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Sample records for green algae evidence

  1. Blue-green algae

    MedlinePlus

    “Blue-green algae” describes a large and diverse group of simple, plant-like organisms found in salt water and some large fresh water lakes. Blue-green algae products are used for many conditions, but so ...

  2. Evidence for land plant cell wall biosynthetic mechanisms in charophyte green algae

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Maria D.; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter; Johansen, Ida E.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Doblin, Monika S.; Bacic, Antony; Willats, William G. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The charophyte green algae (CGA) are thought to be the closest living relatives to the land plants, and ancestral CGA were unique in giving rise to the land plant lineage. The cell wall has been suggested to be a defining structure that enabled the green algal ancestor to colonize land. These cell walls provide support and protection, are a source of signalling molecules, and provide developmental cues for cell differentiation and elongation. The cell wall of land plants is a highly complex fibre composite, characterized by cellulose cross-linked by non-cellulosic polysaccharides, such as xyloglucan, embedded in a matrix of pectic polysaccharides. How the land plant cell wall evolved is currently unknown: early-divergent chlorophyte and prasinophyte algae genomes contain a low number of glycosyl transferases (GTs), while land plants contain hundreds. The number of GTs in CGA is currently unknown, as no genomes are available, so this study sought to give insight into the evolution of the biosynthetic machinery of CGA through an analysis of available transcriptomes. Methods Available CGA transcriptomes were mined for cell wall biosynthesis GTs and compared with GTs characterized in land plants. In addition, gene cloning was employed in two cases to answer important evolutionary questions. Key Results Genetic evidence was obtained indicating that many of the most important core cell wall polysaccharides have their evolutionary origins in the CGA, including cellulose, mannan, xyloglucan, xylan and pectin, as well as arabino-galactan protein. Moreover, two putative cellulose synthase-like D family genes (CSLDs) from the CGA species Coleochaete orbicularis and a fragment of a putative CSLA/K-like sequence from a CGA Spirogyra species were cloned, providing the first evidence that all the cellulose synthase/-like genes present in early-divergent land plants were already present in CGA. Conclusions The results provide new insights into the evolution of

  3. Evidence for equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis in a marine green alga Monostroma angicava

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Tatsuya; Horinouchi, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hironobu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In cell divisions, relative size of daughter cells should play fundamental roles in gametogenesis and embryogenesis. Differences in gamete size between the two mating types underlie sexual selection. Size of daughter cells is a key factor to regulate cell divisions during cleavage. In cleavage, the form of cell divisions (equal/unequal in size) determines the developmental fate of each blastomere. However, strict validation of the form of cell divisions is rarely demonstrated. We cannot distinguish between equal and unequal cell divisions by analysing only the mean size of daughter cells, because their means can be the same. In contrast, the dispersion of daughter cell size depends on the forms of cell divisions. Based on this, we show that gametogenesis in the marine green alga, Monostroma angicava, exhibits equal size cell divisions. The variance and the mean of gamete size (volume) of each mating type measured agree closely with the prediction from synchronized equal size cell divisions. Gamete size actually takes only discrete values here. This is a key theoretical assumption made to explain the diversified evolution of isogamy and anisogamy in marine green algae. Our results suggest that germ cells adopt equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis. PMID:26333414

  4. Evidence for equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis in a marine green alga Monostroma angicava.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Tatsuya; Horinouchi, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hironobu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In cell divisions, relative size of daughter cells should play fundamental roles in gametogenesis and embryogenesis. Differences in gamete size between the two mating types underlie sexual selection. Size of daughter cells is a key factor to regulate cell divisions during cleavage. In cleavage, the form of cell divisions (equal/unequal in size) determines the developmental fate of each blastomere. However, strict validation of the form of cell divisions is rarely demonstrated. We cannot distinguish between equal and unequal cell divisions by analysing only the mean size of daughter cells, because their means can be the same. In contrast, the dispersion of daughter cell size depends on the forms of cell divisions. Based on this, we show that gametogenesis in the marine green alga, Monostroma angicava, exhibits equal size cell divisions. The variance and the mean of gamete size (volume) of each mating type measured agree closely with the prediction from synchronized equal size cell divisions. Gamete size actually takes only discrete values here. This is a key theoretical assumption made to explain the diversified evolution of isogamy and anisogamy in marine green algae. Our results suggest that germ cells adopt equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis.

  5. PPR proteins of green algae.

    PubMed

    Tourasse, Nicolas J; Choquet, Yves; Vallon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Using the repeat finding algorithm FT-Rep, we have identified 154 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins in nine fully sequenced genomes from green algae (with a total of 1201 repeats) and grouped them in 47 orthologous groups. All data are available in a database, PPRdb, accessible online at http://giavap-genomes.ibpc.fr/ppr. Based on phylogenetic trees generated from the repeats, we propose evolutionary scenarios for PPR proteins. Two PPRs are clearly conserved in the entire green lineage: MRL1 is a stabilization factor for the rbcL mRNA, while HCF152 binds in plants to the psbH-petB intergenic region. MCA1 (the stabilization factor for petA) and PPR7 (a short PPR also acting on chloroplast mRNAs) are conserved across the entire Chlorophyta. The other PPRs are clade-specific, with evidence for gene losses, duplications, and horizontal transfer. In some PPR proteins, an additional domain found at the C terminus provides clues as to possible functions. PPR19 and PPR26 possess a methyltransferase_4 domain suggesting involvement in RNA guanosine methylation. PPR18 contains a C-terminal CBS domain, similar to the CBSPPR1 protein found in nucleoids. PPR16, PPR29, PPR37, and PPR38 harbor a SmR (MutS-related) domain similar to that found in land plants pTAC2, GUN1, and SVR7. The PPR-cyclins PPR3, PPR4, and PPR6, in addition, contain a cyclin domain C-terminal to their SmR domain. PPR31 is an unusual PPR-cyclin containing at its N terminus an OctotricoPeptide Repeat (OPR) and a RAP domain. We consider the possibility that PPR proteins with a SmR domain can introduce single-stranded nicks in the plastid chromosome.

  6. PPR proteins of green algae

    PubMed Central

    Tourasse, Nicolas J; Choquet, Yves; Vallon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Using the repeat finding algorithm FT-Rep, we have identified 154 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins in nine fully sequenced genomes from green algae (with a total of 1201 repeats) and grouped them in 47 orthologous groups. All data are available in a database, PPRdb, accessible online at http://giavap-genomes.ibpc.fr/ppr. Based on phylogenetic trees generated from the repeats, we propose evolutionary scenarios for PPR proteins. Two PPRs are clearly conserved in the entire green lineage: MRL1 is a stabilization factor for the rbcL mRNA, while HCF152 binds in plants to the psbH-petB intergenic region. MCA1 (the stabilization factor for petA) and PPR7 (a short PPR also acting on chloroplast mRNAs) are conserved across the entire Chlorophyta. The other PPRs are clade-specific, with evidence for gene losses, duplications, and horizontal transfer. In some PPR proteins, an additional domain found at the C terminus provides clues as to possible functions. PPR19 and PPR26 possess a methyltransferase_4 domain suggesting involvement in RNA guanosine methylation. PPR18 contains a C-terminal CBS domain, similar to the CBSPPR1 protein found in nucleoids. PPR16, PPR29, PPR37, and PPR38 harbor a SmR (MutS-related) domain similar to that found in land plants pTAC2, GUN1, and SVR7. The PPR-cyclins PPR3, PPR4, and PPR6, in addition, contain a cyclin domain C-terminal to their SmR domain. PPR31 is an unusual PPR-cyclin containing at its N terminus an OctotricoPeptide Repeat (OPR) and a RAP domain. We consider the possibility that PPR proteins with a SmR domain can introduce single-stranded nicks in the plastid chromosome. PMID:24021981

  7. Phycobilisomes in Blue-Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Ruth B.; Bowen, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen species of freshwater blue-green algae, including unicellular, filamentous, and colonial forms, were subjected to a variety of fixatives, fixation conditions, and stains for comparison of the preservation of phycobilisomes. Absorption spectra of the corresponding in vivo and released photosynthetic pigments, in 10 of the species that were maintained in culture, demonstrated the presence of phycocyanin in all 10 species and phycoerythrin in only 2 of them. Spectroscope and electron microscope evidence was obtained for localization of phycobiliproteins in phycobilisomes of Nostoc muscorum. Phycobilisomes were observed in all species examined in situ, strenghening the hypothesis that phycobilisomes are common to all phycobiliprotein-containing photosynthetic blue-green algae. Images PMID:4204443

  8. Experimental evidence that evolutionary relatedness does not affect the ecological mechanisms of coexistence in freshwater green algae.

    PubMed

    Narwani, Anita; Alexandrou, Markos A; Oakley, Todd H; Carroll, Ian T; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2013-11-01

    The coexistence of competing species depends on the balance between their fitness differences, which determine their competitive inequalities, and their niche differences, which stabilise their competitive interactions. Darwin proposed that evolution causes species' niches to diverge, but the influence of evolution on relative fitness differences, and the importance of both niche and fitness differences in determining coexistence have not yet been studied together. We tested whether the phylogenetic distances between species of green freshwater algae determined their abilities to coexist in a microcosm experiment. We found that niche differences were more important in explaining coexistence than relative fitness differences, and that phylogenetic distance had no effect on either coexistence or on the sizes of niche and fitness differences. These results were corroborated by an analysis of the frequency of the co-occurrence of 325 pairwise combinations of algal taxa in > 1100 lakes across North America. Phylogenetic distance may not explain the coexistence of freshwater green algae.

  9. Ecological niche partitioning in the picoplanktonic green alga Micromonas pusilla: evidence from environmental surveys using phylogenetic probes.

    PubMed

    Foulon, Elodie; Not, Fabrice; Jalabert, Fabienne; Cariou, Thierry; Massana, Ramon; Simon, Nathalie

    2008-09-01

    Very few studies have analysed the niches of pelagic protist in details. This is because for most protists, both an accurate species definition and methods for routine detection and quantification of cells are lacking. The morphospecies Micromonas pusilla, a marine unicellular green alga, is the most ubiquitous and cosmopolitan picoeukaryote described to date. This species comprises several independent genetic lineages or clades, which are not currently distinguishable based on comparison of their morphology or biogeographical distribution. Molecular probes were used to detect and quantify the genetic clades of M. pusilla in samples from temperate, polar and tropical environments in order to assess potential ecological niche partitioning. The three clades were detected in all biogeographical regions studied and were commonly found in sympatry. Cell abundances recorded for clades A and B were high, especially at coastal stations. Clade C, when detected, was always at low abundances and is suggested to be a low-light clade. Shifts in the contribution of clades to total M. pusilla abundance were observed along environmental gradients, both at local and basin-wide scales. This suggests that the phylogenetic clades occupy specific niches and confirms the existence of cryptic species within the morphospecies M. pusilla. Parameters which can precisely explain the distribution of these cryptic species remain to be elucidated.

  10. Peroxisomal targeting signals in green algae.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Akiko; Sato, Nagisa; Hayashi, Yasuko

    2009-03-01

    Peroxisomal enzymatic proteins contain targeting signals (PTS) to enable their import into peroxisomes. These targeting signals have been identified as PTS1 and PTS2 in mammalian, yeast, and higher plant cells; however, no PTS2-like amino acid sequences have been observed in enzymes from the genome database of Cyanidiochyzon merolae (Bangiophyceae), a primitive red algae. In studies on the evolution of PTS, it is important to know when their sequences came to be the peroxisomal targeting signals for all living organisms. To this end, we identified a number of genes in the genome database of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which contains amino acid sequences similar to those found in plant PTS. In order to determine whether these sequences function as PTS in green algae, we expressed modified green fluorescent proteins (GFP) fused to these putative PTS peptides under the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. To confirm whether granular structures containing GFP-PTS fusion proteins accumulated in the peroxisomes of Closterium ehrenbergii, we observed these cells after the peroxisomes were stained with 3, 3'-diaminobenzidine. Our results confirm that the GFP-PTS fusion proteins indeed accumulated in the peroxisomes of these green algae. These findings suggest that the peroxisomal transport system for PTS1 and PTS2 is conserved in green algal cells and that our fusion proteins can be used to visualize peroxisomes in live cells.

  11. Photooxidative Death in Blue-Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Abeliovich, A.; Shilo, M.

    1972-01-01

    When incubated in the light under 100% oxygen, wild-type blue-green algae (Anacystis nidulans, Synechococcus cedrorum) die out rapidly at temperatures of 4 to 15 C, and at 35 C (or at 26 C in the case of S. cedrorum) in the absence of CO2. Photosynthesis is impaired in these cells long before they die. Blocking of photosystem II at high temperatures in the presence of CO2 sensitizes the algae to photooxidative death. Photooxidative death and bleaching of photosynthetic pigments are separable phenomena. Photooxidative conditions were demonstrated in Israeli fish ponds using A. nidulans as the test organism during dense summer blooms, when dissolved CO2 is low, and in winter, when water temperatures generally drop below 15 C. This finding suggests that photooxidative death may be responsible for the sudden decomposition of blue-green blooms in summer, and may be a factor in the absence of blue-green blooms in winter. PMID:4626540

  12. A "green" phosphoribulokinase in complex algae with red plastids: evidence for a single secondary endosymbiosis leading to haptophytes, cryptophytes, heterokonts, and dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jörn; Teich, René; Brinkmann, Henner; Cerff, Rüdiger

    2006-02-01

    Phosphoribulokinase (PRK) is an essential enzyme of photosynthetic eukaryotes which is active in the plastid-located Calvin cycle and regenerates the substrate for ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Rhodophytes and chlorophytes (red and green algae) recruited their nuclear-encoded PRK from the cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids. The plastids of these organisms can be traced back to a single primary endosymbiosis, whereas, for example, haptophytes, dinoflagellates, and euglenophytes obtained their "complex" plastids through secondary endosymbioses, comprising the engulfment of a unicellular red or green alga by a eukaryotic host cell. We have cloned eight new PRK sequences from complex algae as well as a rhodophyte in order to investigate their evolutionary origin. All available PRK sequences were used for phylogenetic analyses and the significance of alternative topologies was estimated by the approximately unbiased test. Our analyses led to several astonishing findings. First, the close relationship of PRK genes of haptophytes, heterokontophytes, cryptophytes, and dinophytes (complex red lineage) supports a monophyletic origin of their sequences and hence their plastids. Second, based on PRK genes the complex red lineage forms a highly supported assemblage together with chlorophytes and land plants, to the exclusion of the rhodophytes. This green affinity is in striking contrast to the expected red algal origin and our analyses suggest that the PRK gene was acquired once via lateral transfer from a green alga. Third, surprisingly the complex green lineages leading to Bigelowiella and Euglena probably also obtained their PRK genes via lateral gene transfers from a red alga and a complex alga with red plastids, respectively.

  13. Higher plant origins and the phylogeny of green algae.

    PubMed

    Devereux, R; Loeblich, A R; Fox, G E

    1990-07-01

    5S rRNA sequences from six additional green algae lend strong molecular support for the major outlines of higher plant and green algae phylogeny that have been proposed under varying naming conventions by several authors. In particular, the molecular evidence now available unequivocally supports the existence of at least two well-separated divisions of the Chlorobionta: the Chlorophyta and the Streptophyta (i.e., charophytes) (according to the nomenclature of Bremer). The chlamydomonad 5S rRNAs are, however, sufficiently distinct from both clusters that it may ultimately prove preferable to establish a third taxon for them. In support of these conclusions 5S rRNA sequence data now exist for members of four diverse classes of chlorophytes. These sequences all exhibit considerably more phylogenetic affinity to one another than any of them show toward members of the other cluster, the Streptophyta, or the two Chlamydomonas strains. Among the Charophyceae, new 5S rRNA sequences are provided herein for three genera, Spirogyra, Klebsormidium, and Coleochaete. All of these sequences and the previously published Nitella sequence show greater resemblance among themselves and to the higher plants than they do to any of the other green algae examined to date. These results demonstrate that an appropriately named taxon that includes these green algae and the higher plants is strongly justified. The 5S rRNA data lack the resolution needed, however, to unequivocally determine which of several subdivisions of the charophytes is the sister group of the land plants. The evolutionary diversity of Chlamydomonas relative to the other green algae was recognized in earlier 5S rRNA studies but was unanticipated by ultrastructural work.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. The problems of Prochloron. [evolution of green algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Prokaryotic green algae (prochlorophytes), which contain chlorophylls a and b but no bilin pigments, may be phylogenetically related to ancestral chloroplasts if symbiogenesis occurred. They may be otherwise related to eukaryotic chlorophytes. They could have evolved from cyanophytes by loss of phycobilin and gain of chlorophyll b synthesis. These possibilities are briefly discussed. Relevant evidence from biochemical studies in many collaborative laboratories is now becoming available for the resolution of such questions.

  15. Chloroplast Phylogenomic Inference of Green Algae Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linhua; Fang, Ling; Zhang, Zhenhua; Chang, Xin; Penny, David; Zhong, Bojian

    2016-01-01

    The green algal phylum Chlorophyta has six diverse classes, but the phylogenetic relationship of the classes within Chlorophyta remains uncertain. In order to better understand the ancient Chlorophyta evolution, we have applied a site pattern sorting method to study compositional heterogeneity and the model fit in the green algal chloroplast genomic data. We show that the fastest-evolving sites are significantly correlated with among-site compositional heterogeneity, and these sites have a much poorer fit to the evolutionary model. Our phylogenomic analyses suggest that the class Chlorophyceae is a monophyletic group, and the classes Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Prasinophyceae are non-monophyletic groups. Our proposed phylogenetic tree of Chlorophyta will offer new insights to investigate ancient green algae evolution, and our analytical framework will provide a useful approach for evaluating and mitigating the potential errors of phylogenomic inferences. PMID:26846729

  16. Nitrogen starvation-induced accumulation of triacylglycerol in the green algae: evidence for a role for ROC40, a transcription factor involved in circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Elton C; Koh, Jin; Zhu, Ning; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Chen, Sixue; Matsuo, Takuya; Johnson, Jodie V; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2016-03-01

    Microalgal triacylglycerol (TAG), a promising source of biofuel, is induced upon nitrogen starvation (-N), but the proteins and genes involved in this process are poorly known. We performed isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics to identify Chlorella proteins with modulated expression under short-term -N. Out of 1736 soluble proteins and 2187 membrane-associated proteins identified, 288 and 56, respectively, were differentially expressed under -N. Gene expression analysis on select genes confirmed the same direction of mRNA modulation for most proteins. The MYB-related transcription factor ROC40 was the most induced protein, with a 9.6-fold increase upon -N. In a previously generated Chlamydomonas mutant, gravimetric measurements of crude total lipids revealed that roc40 was impaired in its ability to increase the accumulation of TAG upon -N, and this phenotype was complemented when wild-type Roc40 was expressed. Results from radiotracer experiments were consistent with the roc40 mutant being comparable to the wild type in recycling membrane lipids to TAG but being impaired in additional de novo synthesis of TAG during -N stress. In this study we provide evidence to support the hypothesis that transcription factor ROC40 has a role in -N-induced lipid accumulation, and uncover multiple previously unknown proteins modulated by short-term -N in green algae. PMID:26920093

  17. Antibody Production in Plants and Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Kushnir, Natasha; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2016-04-29

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a wide range of modern applications, including research, diagnostic, therapeutic, and industrial uses. Market demand for mAbs is high and continues to grow. Although mammalian systems, which currently dominate the biomanufacturing industry, produce effective and safe recombinant mAbs, they have a limited manufacturing capacity and high costs. Bacteria, yeast, and insect cell systems are highly scalable and cost effective but vary in their ability to produce appropriate posttranslationally modified mAbs. Plants and green algae are emerging as promising production platforms because of their time and cost efficiencies, scalability, lack of mammalian pathogens, and eukaryotic posttranslational protein modification machinery. So far, plant- and algae-derived mAbs have been produced predominantly as candidate therapeutics for infectious diseases and cancer. These candidates have been extensively evaluated in animal models, and some have shown efficacy in clinical trials. Here, we review ongoing efforts to advance the production of mAbs in plants and algae. PMID:26905655

  18. Antibody Production in Plants and Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Kushnir, Natasha; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2016-04-29

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a wide range of modern applications, including research, diagnostic, therapeutic, and industrial uses. Market demand for mAbs is high and continues to grow. Although mammalian systems, which currently dominate the biomanufacturing industry, produce effective and safe recombinant mAbs, they have a limited manufacturing capacity and high costs. Bacteria, yeast, and insect cell systems are highly scalable and cost effective but vary in their ability to produce appropriate posttranslationally modified mAbs. Plants and green algae are emerging as promising production platforms because of their time and cost efficiencies, scalability, lack of mammalian pathogens, and eukaryotic posttranslational protein modification machinery. So far, plant- and algae-derived mAbs have been produced predominantly as candidate therapeutics for infectious diseases and cancer. These candidates have been extensively evaluated in animal models, and some have shown efficacy in clinical trials. Here, we review ongoing efforts to advance the production of mAbs in plants and algae.

  19. POT1 proteins in green algae and land plants: DNA-binding properties and evidence of co-evolution with telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shakirov, Eugene V.; Song, Xiangyu; Joseph, Jessica A.; Shippen, Dorothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Telomeric DNA terminates with a single-stranded 3′ G-overhang that in vertebrates and fission yeast is bound by POT1 (Protection Of Telomeres). However, no in vitro telomeric DNA binding is associated with Arabidopsis POT1 paralogs. To further investigate POT1–DNA interaction in plants, we cloned POT1 genes from 11 plant species representing major branches of plant kingdom. Telomeric DNA binding was associated with POT1 proteins from the green alga Ostreococcus lucimarinus and two flowering plants, maize and Asparagus. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that several residues critical for telomeric DNA recognition in vertebrates are functionally conserved in plant POT1 proteins. However, the plant proteins varied in their minimal DNA-binding sites and nucleotide recognition properties. Green alga POT1 exhibited a strong preference for the canonical plant telomere repeat sequence TTTAGGG with no detectable binding to hexanucleotide telomere repeat TTAGGG found in vertebrates and some plants, including Asparagus. In contrast, POT1 proteins from maize and Asparagus bound TTAGGG repeats with only slightly reduced affinity relative to the TTTAGGG sequence. We conclude that the nucleic acid binding site in plant POT1 proteins is evolving rapidly, and that the recent acquisition of TTAGGG telomere repeats in Asparagus appears to have co-evolved with changes in POT1 DNA sequence recognition. PMID:19783822

  20. Growth of the nuclear envelope in the vegetative phase of the green alga Acetabularia. Evidence for assembly from membrane components synthesized in the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The primary nucleus of the green alga Acetabularia grows about 25,000- fold in volume while it is separated from the endoplasmic reticulum and the whole cytoplasm by a special paranuclear cisterna of a vacuolar labyrinthum system which shows only very few (two to six per square micrometer) and small (ca. 40-120 nm in diamter) fenestrations. The nuclear envelope does not bear polyribosomes, nor do they occur in the entire zone intermediate between the nuclear envelope and the paranuclear cisterna. It is suggested that this special form of nuclear envelope growth takes place by assembly from cytoplasmically synthesized proteins that are translocated across the paranuclear cisterna in a nonmembrane-structured form. PMID:1158977

  1. Growth of the nuclear envelope in the vegetative phase of the green alga Acetabularia. Evidence for assembly from membrane components synthesized in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Franke, W W; Spring, H; Scheer, U; Zerban, H

    1975-09-01

    The primary nucleus of the green alga Acetabularia grows about 25,000-fold in volume while it is separated from the endoplasmic reticulum and the whole cytoplasm by a special paranuclear cisterna of a vacuolar labyrinthum system which shows only very few (two to six per square micrometer) and small (ca. 40-120 nm in diamter) fenestrations. The nuclear envelope does not bear polyribosomes, nor do they occur in the entire zone intermediate between the nuclear envelope and the paranuclear cisterna. It is suggested that this special form of nuclear envelope growth takes place by assembly from cytoplasmically synthesized proteins that are translocated across the paranuclear cisterna in a nonmembrane-structured form.

  2. Phosphorus-limited growth of a green alga and a blue-green alga

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, D.S.; Brown, E.J.

    1981-12-01

    The phosphorus-limited growth kinetics of the chlorophyte Scenedesmus quadricauda and the cyanophyte Synechococcus Nageli were studied by using batch and continuous culturing techniques. The steady-state phosphate transport capability and the phosphorus storage capacity is higher in S. Nageli than in S. quadricauda. Synechococcus Nageli can also deplete phosphate to much lower levels than can S. quadricauda. These results, along with their morphological characteristics, were used to construct partial physiological profiles for each organism. The profiles indicate that this unicellular cyanophyte (cyanobacterium) is better suited for growth in phosphorus-limited oligotrophic niches than is this chlorophyte (green alga). (Refs. 44).

  3. The chloroplast genome of the green alga Schizomeris leibleinii (Chlorophyceae) provides evidence for bidirectional DNA replication from a single origin in the chaetophorales.

    PubMed

    Brouard, Jean-Simon; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude; Turmel, Monique

    2011-01-01

    In the Chlorophyceae, the chloroplast genome is extraordinarily fluid in architecture and displays unique features relative to other groups of green algae. For the Chaetophorales, 1 of the 5 major lineages of the Chlorophyceae, it has been shown that the distinctive architecture of the 223,902-bp genome of Stigeoclonium helveticum is consistent with bidirectional DNA replication from a single origin. Here, we report the 182,759-bp chloroplast genome sequence of Schizomeris leibleinii, a member of the earliest diverging lineage of the Chaetophorales. Like its Stigeoclonium homolog, the Schizomeris genome lacks a large inverted repeat encoding the rRNA operon and displays a striking bias in coding regions that is associated with a bias in base composition along each strand. Our results support the notion that these two chaetophoralean genomes replicate bidirectionally from a putative origin located in the vicinity of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Their shared structural characteristics were most probably inherited from the common ancestor of all chaetophoralean algae. Short dispersed repeats account for most of the 41-kb size variation between the Schizomeris and Stigeoclonium genomes, and there is no indication that homologous recombination between these repeated elements led to the observed gene rearrangements. A comparison of the extent of variation sustained by the Stigeoclonium and Schizomeris chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) with that observed for the cpDNAs of the chlamydomonadalean Chlamydomonas and Volvox suggests that gene rearrangements as well as changes in the abundance of intergenic and intron sequences occurred at a slower pace in the Chaetophorales than in the Chlamydomonadales. PMID:21546564

  4. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal obbjects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charopyhte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorbance spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900 nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance in the wave band of 400-550 nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did not change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400 – 500 nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation. PMID:27442511

  5. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2016-09-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal objects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charophyte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorption spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance between 400-550nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this high absorbance was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did hardly change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400-500nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation. PMID:27442511

  6. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2016-09-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal objects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charophyte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorption spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance between 400-550nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this high absorbance was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did hardly change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400-500nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation.

  7. Evaluation of filamentous green algae as feedstocks for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yonggang; Cui, Binjie; Wang, Hui; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-11-01

    Compared with unicellular microalgae, filamentous algae have high resistance to grazer-predation and low-cost recovery in large-scale production. Green algae, as the most diverse group of algae, included numerous filamentous genera and species. In this study, records of filamentous genera and species in green algae were firstly censused and classified. Then, seven filamentous strains subordinated in different genera were cultivated in bubbled-column to investigate their growth rate and energy molecular (lipid and starch) capacity. Four strains including Stigeoclonium sp., Oedogonium nodulosum, Hormidium sp. and Zygnema extenue were screened out due to their robust growth. And they all could accumulate triacylglycerols and starch in their biomass, but with different capacity. After nitrogen starvation, Hormidium sp. and Oedogonium nodulosum respectively exhibited high capacity of lipid (45.38% in dry weight) and starch (46.19% in dry weight) accumulation, which could be of high potential as feedstocks for biodiesel and bioethanol production. PMID:27598569

  8. Evaluation of filamentous green algae as feedstocks for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yonggang; Cui, Binjie; Wang, Hui; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-11-01

    Compared with unicellular microalgae, filamentous algae have high resistance to grazer-predation and low-cost recovery in large-scale production. Green algae, as the most diverse group of algae, included numerous filamentous genera and species. In this study, records of filamentous genera and species in green algae were firstly censused and classified. Then, seven filamentous strains subordinated in different genera were cultivated in bubbled-column to investigate their growth rate and energy molecular (lipid and starch) capacity. Four strains including Stigeoclonium sp., Oedogonium nodulosum, Hormidium sp. and Zygnema extenue were screened out due to their robust growth. And they all could accumulate triacylglycerols and starch in their biomass, but with different capacity. After nitrogen starvation, Hormidium sp. and Oedogonium nodulosum respectively exhibited high capacity of lipid (45.38% in dry weight) and starch (46.19% in dry weight) accumulation, which could be of high potential as feedstocks for biodiesel and bioethanol production.

  9. Photosynthetic recovery following desiccation of desert green algae (Chlorophyta) and their aquatic relatives.

    PubMed

    Gray, Dennis W; Lewis, Louise A; Cardon, Zoe G

    2007-10-01

    Recent molecular data suggest that desert green algae have evolved from freshwater ancestors at least 14 times in three major classes (Chlorophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Charophyceae), offering a unique opportunity to study the adaptation of photosynthetic organisms to life on land in a comparative phylogenetic framework. We examined the photorecovery of phylogenetically matched desert and aquatic algae after desiccation in darkness and under illumination. Desert algae survived desiccation for at least 4 weeks when dried in darkness, and recovered high levels of photosynthetic quantum yield within 1 h of rehydration in darkness. However, when 4 weeks of desiccation was accompanied by illumination, three of six desert taxa lost their ability to recover quantum yield during rehydration in the dark. Aquatic algae, in contrast, recovered very little during dark rehydration following even just 24 h of desiccation. Re-illuminating rehydrated algae produced a nearly complete recovery of quantum yield in all desert and two of five aquatic taxa. These contrasts provide physiological evidence that desert green algae possess mechanisms for photosynthetic recovery after desiccation distinct from those in aquatic relatives, corroborating molecular evidence that they are not happenstance, short-term visitors from aquatic environments. Photosensitivity during desiccation among desert algae further suggests that they may reside in protected microsites within crusts, and species specificity of photosensitivity suggests that disturbances physically disrupting crusts could lead to shifts or losses of taxonomic diversity within these habitats.

  10. Photobiological hydrogen production in green algae and photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1986-01-01

    We have shown that, under appropriate physiological conditions, certain freshwater and marine green algae are capable of splitting water to molecular hydrogen and oxygen in a sustained steady-state reaction. In these algae, the gaseous-fuel-producing reaction can be driven by light throughout the visible portion of the solar emission spectrum, including the long wavelength (red) 700-nm region. No external energy sources are required.

  11. Induction of CO2 and Bicarbonate Transport in the Green Alga Chlorella ellipsoidea (II. Evidence for Induction in Response to External CO2 Concentration).

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Y.; Colman, B.

    1995-01-01

    The critical species and concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) required for the induction of DIC transport during adaptation to low CO2 were determined for the green alga Chlorella ellipsoidea. The concentration of dissolved CO2 needed for the induction of both CO2 and HCO3- transport was independent of pH during adaptation, whereas the total DIC concentration required increased at alkaline pH. At pH 7.5, the minimum equilibrium DIC concentration at which high CO2 characteristics were maintained, i.e. transport was repressed, was 2100 [mu]M, whereas the maximum equilibrium DIC concentration below which DIC transport was fully induced (DICIND) was 500 [mu]M. Intracellular DIC concentration during adaptation to DICIND decreased temporarily after 2 h to 60% of the maximum level but recovered after 3 h of adaptation. After 3 h of adaptation to DICIND, cells exhibited maximum O2 evolution rate at DICIND. When cells partially adapted to DICIND were returned to high CO2, there was an immediate halt to the induction of transport and a gradual decrease in transport capacity over 23 h. The capacity for the induction of transport was unaffected by the absence of light. These results indicate that changes in the internal DIC pool during adaptation to low CO2 do not trigger the induction of DIC transport and that the induction is not light dependent. Induction of DIC transport in C. ellipsoidea appears to occur in response to the continuous exposure of cells to a critical CO2 concentration in the external medium. PMID:12228471

  12. MicroRNAs in a multicellular green alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingrui; Wu, Yang; Qi, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key components in the eukaryotic gene regulatory network. We and others have previously identified many miRNAs in a unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. To investigate whether miRNA-mediated gene regulation is a general mechanism in green algae and how miRNAs have been evolved in the green algal lineage, we examined small RNAs in Volvox carteri, a multicellular species in the same family with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We identified 174 miRNAs in Volvox, with many of them being highly enriched in gonidia or somatic cells. The targets of the miRNAs were predicted and many of them were subjected to miRNA-mediated cleavage in vivo, suggesting that miRNAs play regulatory roles in the biology of green algae. Our catalog of miRNAs and their targets provides a resource for further studies on the evolution, biological functions, and genomic properties of miRNAs in green algae. PMID:24369344

  13. Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa

    SciTech Connect

    Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

    2012-12-03

    The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on green fuels which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PI's have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

  14. Electrophysiology of turgor regulation in marine siphonous green algae.

    PubMed

    Bisson, M A; Beilby, M J; Shepherd, V A

    2006-05-01

    We review electrophysiological measures of turgor regulation in some siphonous green algae, primarily the giant-celled marine algae, Valonia and Ventricaria, with particular comparison to the well studied charophyte algae Chara and Lamprothamnium. The siphonous green algae have a less negative plasma membrane potential, and are unlikely to have a proton-based chemiosmotic transport system, dominated by active electrogenic K(+) uptake. We also make note of the unusual cellular structure of the siphonous green algae. Hypertonic stress, due to increased external osmotic pressure, is accompanied by positive-going potential difference (PD), increase in conductance, and slow turgor regulation. The relationship between these is not yet resolved, but may involve changes in K(+ )conductance (G (K)) or active K(+) transport at both membranes. Hypotonic turgor regulation, in response to decreased external osmotic pressure, is approximately 3 times faster than hypertonic turgor regulation. It is accompanied by a negative-going PD, although conductance also increases. The conductance increase and the magnitude of the PD change are strongly correlated with the magnitude of hypotonic stress.

  15. Photosynthetic H2 metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular green algae).

    PubMed

    Melis, Anastasios

    2007-10-01

    Unicellular green algae have the ability to operate in two distinctly different environments (aerobic and anaerobic), and to photosynthetically generate molecular hydrogen (H2). A recently developed metabolic protocol in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii permitted separation of photosynthetic O2-evolution and carbon accumulation from anaerobic consumption of cellular metabolites and concomitant photosynthetic H2-evolution. The H2 evolution process was induced upon sulfate nutrient deprivation of the cells, which reversibly inhibits photosystem-II and O2-evolution in their chloroplast. In the absence of O2, and in order to generate ATP, green algae resorted to anaerobic photosynthetic metabolism, evolved H2 in the light and consumed endogenous substrate. This study summarizes recent advances on green algal hydrogen metabolism and discusses avenues of research for the further development of this method. Included is the mechanism of a substantial tenfold starch accumulation in the cells, observed promptly upon S-deprivation, and the regulated starch and protein catabolism during the subsequent H2-evolution. Also discussed is the function of a chloroplast envelope-localized sulfate permease, and the photosynthesis-respiration relationship in green algae as potential tools by which to stabilize and enhance H2 metabolism. In addition to potential practical applications of H2, approaches discussed in this work are beginning to address the biochemistry of anaerobic H2 photoproduction, its genes, proteins, regulation, and communication with other metabolic pathways in microalgae. Photosynthetic H2 production by green algae may hold the promise of generating a renewable fuel from nature's most plentiful resources, sunlight and water. The process potentially concerns global warming and the question of energy supply and demand. PMID:17721788

  16. [Immunostimulating activity of the lipopolysaccharides of blue-green algae].

    PubMed

    Besednova, N N; Smolina, T P; Mikheĭskaia, L V; Ovodova, R G

    1979-12-01

    The whole cells of blue-gree algae and lipopolysaccharides isolated from these cells were shown to stimulate the production of macro-(mainly) and microglobulin antibodies in rabbits. The macro- and microphage indices in rabbits increased significantly after the injection of LPS isolated from blue-green algae 24--48 hours before infecting the animals with a virulent Y. pseudotuberculosis strain. Besides, the inhibiting action of this strain on the migration of phagocytes to the site of infection was abolished immediately after the injection. The use of the indirect hemagglutination test allowed to prove the absence of close antigenic interrelations between blue-green algae and the following organisms: Spirulina platensis, Microcystis aeruginosa, Phormidium africanum and P. uncinatum. PMID:117655

  17. Fatty acid amides from freshwater green alga Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, V M; Shkrob, I; Rozentsvet, O A

    2000-08-01

    Freshwater green algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum growing in the Ural Mountains were examined for their fatty acid amides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Eight fatty acid amides were identified by GC-MS. (Z)-9-octadecenamide was found to be the major component (2.26%).

  18. [Phycobiliproteins of blue-green, red and cryptophytic algae].

    PubMed

    Stadnichuk, I N; Gusev, M V

    1979-04-01

    The present-day concepts on phycobiliproteins, the protein pigments of blue-green, red and cryptophyte algae are reviewed. The functions, distribution, localization, physico-chemical, spectral and immunochemical properties of phycobiliproteins are described. The properties of the polypeptide protein subunits and the composition and chemical structure of chromophores as well as their binding to the apoprotein molecules are discussed.

  19. Fatty acid amides from freshwater green alga Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, V M; Shkrob, I; Rozentsvet, O A

    2000-08-01

    Freshwater green algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum growing in the Ural Mountains were examined for their fatty acid amides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Eight fatty acid amides were identified by GC-MS. (Z)-9-octadecenamide was found to be the major component (2.26%). PMID:11014298

  20. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Phagomixotrophic Green Alga Cymbomonas tetramitiformis

    PubMed Central

    Paasch, Amber E.; Graham, Linda E.; Kim, Eunsoo

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Cymbomonas tetramitiformis strain PLY262, which is a prasinophycean green alga that retains a phagomixotrophic mode of nutrition. The genome is 84,524 bp in length, with a G+C content of 37%, and contains 3 rRNAs, 26 tRNAs, and 76 protein-coding genes. PMID:27313295

  1. Oleosin of subcellular lipid droplets evolved in green algae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L; Huang, Anthony H C

    2013-04-01

    In primitive and higher plants, intracellular storage lipid droplets (LDs) of triacylglycerols are stabilized with a surface layer of phospholipids and oleosin. In chlorophytes (green algae), a protein termed major lipid-droplet protein (MLDP) rather than oleosin on LDs was recently reported. We explored whether MLDP was present directly on algal LDs and whether algae had oleosin genes and oleosins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MLDP in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was associated with endoplasmic reticulum subdomains adjacent to but not directly on LDs. In C. reinhardtii, low levels of a transcript encoding an oleosin-like protein (oleolike) in zygotes-tetrads and a transcript encoding oleosin in vegetative cells transferred to an acetate-enriched medium were found in transcriptomes and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The C. reinhardtii LD fraction contained minimal proteins with no detectable oleolike or oleosin. Several charophytes (advanced green algae) possessed low levels of transcripts encoding oleosin but not oleolike. In the charophyte Spirogyra grevilleana, levels of oleosin transcripts increased greatly in cells undergoing conjugation for zygote formation, and the LD fraction from these cells contained minimal proteins, two of which were oleosins identified via proteomics. Because the minimal oleolike and oleosins in algae were difficult to detect, we tested their subcellular locations in Physcomitrella patens transformed with the respective algal genes tagged with a Green Fluorescent Protein gene and localized the algal proteins on P. patens LDs. Overall, oleosin genes having weak and cell/development-specific expression were present in green algae. We present a hypothesis for the evolution of oleosins from algae to plants. PMID:23391579

  2. Oleosin of subcellular lipid droplets evolved in green algae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L; Huang, Anthony H C

    2013-04-01

    In primitive and higher plants, intracellular storage lipid droplets (LDs) of triacylglycerols are stabilized with a surface layer of phospholipids and oleosin. In chlorophytes (green algae), a protein termed major lipid-droplet protein (MLDP) rather than oleosin on LDs was recently reported. We explored whether MLDP was present directly on algal LDs and whether algae had oleosin genes and oleosins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MLDP in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was associated with endoplasmic reticulum subdomains adjacent to but not directly on LDs. In C. reinhardtii, low levels of a transcript encoding an oleosin-like protein (oleolike) in zygotes-tetrads and a transcript encoding oleosin in vegetative cells transferred to an acetate-enriched medium were found in transcriptomes and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The C. reinhardtii LD fraction contained minimal proteins with no detectable oleolike or oleosin. Several charophytes (advanced green algae) possessed low levels of transcripts encoding oleosin but not oleolike. In the charophyte Spirogyra grevilleana, levels of oleosin transcripts increased greatly in cells undergoing conjugation for zygote formation, and the LD fraction from these cells contained minimal proteins, two of which were oleosins identified via proteomics. Because the minimal oleolike and oleosins in algae were difficult to detect, we tested their subcellular locations in Physcomitrella patens transformed with the respective algal genes tagged with a Green Fluorescent Protein gene and localized the algal proteins on P. patens LDs. Overall, oleosin genes having weak and cell/development-specific expression were present in green algae. We present a hypothesis for the evolution of oleosins from algae to plants.

  3. Fitness Effects of Spontaneous Mutations in Picoeukaryotic Marine Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Krasovec, Marc; Eyre-Walker, Adam; Grimsley, Nigel; Salmeron, Christophe; Pecqueur, David; Piganeau, Gwenael; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Estimates of the fitness effects of spontaneous mutations are important for understanding the adaptive potential of species. Here, we present the results of mutation accumulation experiments over 265-512 sequential generations in four species of marine unicellular green algae, Ostreococcus tauri RCC4221, Ostreococcus mediterraneus RCC2590, Micromonas pusilla RCC299, and Bathycoccus prasinos RCC1105. Cell division rates, taken as a proxy for fitness, systematically decline over the course of the experiment in O. tauri, but not in the three other species where the MA experiments were carried out over a smaller number of generations. However, evidence of mutation accumulation in 24 MA lines arises when they are exposed to stressful conditions, such as changes in osmolarity or exposure to herbicides. The selection coefficients, estimated from the number of cell divisions/day, varies significantly between the different environmental conditions tested in MA lines, providing evidence for advantageous and deleterious effects of spontaneous mutations. This suggests a common environmental dependence of the fitness effects of mutations and allows the minimum mutation/genome/generation rates to be inferred at 0.0037 in these species. PMID:27175016

  4. Fitness Effects of Spontaneous Mutations in Picoeukaryotic Marine Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Krasovec, Marc; Eyre-Walker, Adam; Grimsley, Nigel; Salmeron, Christophe; Pecqueur, David; Piganeau, Gwenael; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Estimates of the fitness effects of spontaneous mutations are important for understanding the adaptive potential of species. Here, we present the results of mutation accumulation experiments over 265–512 sequential generations in four species of marine unicellular green algae, Ostreococcus tauri RCC4221, Ostreococcus mediterraneus RCC2590, Micromonas pusilla RCC299, and Bathycoccus prasinos RCC1105. Cell division rates, taken as a proxy for fitness, systematically decline over the course of the experiment in O. tauri, but not in the three other species where the MA experiments were carried out over a smaller number of generations. However, evidence of mutation accumulation in 24 MA lines arises when they are exposed to stressful conditions, such as changes in osmolarity or exposure to herbicides. The selection coefficients, estimated from the number of cell divisions/day, varies significantly between the different environmental conditions tested in MA lines, providing evidence for advantageous and deleterious effects of spontaneous mutations. This suggests a common environmental dependence of the fitness effects of mutations and allows the minimum mutation/genome/generation rates to be inferred at 0.0037 in these species. PMID:27175016

  5. Hydrogenases in green algae: do they save the algae's life and solve our energy problems?

    PubMed

    Happe, Thomas; Hemschemeier, Anja; Winkler, Martin; Kaminski, Annette

    2002-06-01

    Green algae are the only known eukaryotes with both oxygenic photosynthesis and a hydrogen metabolism. Recent physiological and genetic discoveries indicate a close connection between these metabolic pathways. The anaerobically inducible hydA genes of algae encode a special type of highly active [Fe]-hydrogenase. Electrons from reducing equivalents generated during fermentation enter the photosynthetic electron transport chain via the plastoquinone pool. They are transferred to the hydrogenase by photosystem I and ferredoxin. Thus, the [Fe]-hydrogenase is an electron 'valve' that enables the algae to survive under anaerobic conditions. During sulfur deprivation, illuminated algal cultures evolve large quantities of hydrogen gas, and this promises to be an alternative future energy source. PMID:12049920

  6. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms. PMID:26594068

  7. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimeters), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured, and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  8. Subunit structure of the phycobiliproteins of blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Glazer, A N; Cohen-Bazire, G

    1971-07-01

    The phycobiliproteins of the blue-green algae Synechococcus sp. and Aphanocapsu sp. were characterized with respect to homogeneity, isoelectric point, and subunit composition. Each of the biliproteins consisted of two different noncovalently associated subunits, with molecular weights of about 20,000 and 16,000 for phycocyanin, 17,500 and 15,500 for allophycocyanin, and 22,000 and 20,000 for phycoerythrin. Covalently bound chromophore was associated with each subunit.

  9. Multicellularity in green algae: upsizing in a walled complex.

    PubMed

    Domozych, David S; Domozych, Catherine E

    2014-01-01

    Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous, and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM), most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In "ulvophytes," uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell's signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the ECM. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity. PMID:25477895

  10. Multicellularity in green algae: upsizing in a walled complex

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.; Domozych, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous, and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM), most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In “ulvophytes,” uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell’s signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the ECM. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity. PMID:25477895

  11. Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host

    PubMed Central

    Kerney, Ryan; Kim, Eunsoo; Hangarter, Roger P.; Heiss, Aaron A.; Bishop, Cory D.; Hall, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The association between embryos of the spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) and green algae (“Oophila amblystomatis” Lamber ex Printz) has been considered an ectosymbiotic mutualism. We show here, however, that this symbiosis is more intimate than previously reported. A combination of imaging and algal 18S rDNA amplification reveals algal invasion of embryonic salamander tissues and cells during development. Algal cells are detectable from embryonic and larval Stages 26–44 through chlorophyll autofluorescence and algal 18S rDNA amplification. Algal cell ultrastructure indicates both degradation and putative encystment during the process of tissue and cellular invasion. Fewer algal cells were detected in later-stage larvae through FISH, suggesting that the decline in autofluorescent cells is primarily due to algal cell death within the host. However, early embryonic egg capsules also contained encysted algal cells on the inner capsule wall, and algal 18S rDNA was amplified from adult reproductive tracts, consistent with oviductal transmission of algae from one salamander generation to the next. The invasion of algae into salamander host tissues and cells represents a unique association between a vertebrate and a eukaryotic alga, with implications for research into cell–cell recognition, possible exchange of metabolites or DNA, and potential congruence between host and symbiont population structures. PMID:21464324

  12. The effects of graphene oxide on green algae Raphidocelis subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, P F M; Nakabayashi, D; Zucolotto, V

    2015-09-01

    Graphene represents a new class of nanomaterials that has attracted great interest due to its unique electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. Once disposed in the environment, graphene can interact with biological systems and is expected to exhibit toxicological effects. The ecotoxicity of graphene and its derivatives, viz.: graphene oxide (GO) depends on their physicochemical properties, including purity, diameter, length, surface charge, functionalization and aggregation state. In this study we evaluated the effects of graphene oxide (GO) on green algae Raphidocelis subcapitata. The algae were exposed to different concentrations of GO pre-equilibrated for 24h with oligotrophic freshwater medium (20ml) during incubation in a growth chamber under controlled conditions: 120μEm(-2)s(-1) illumination; 12:12h light dark cycle and constant temperature of 22±2°C. Algal growth was monitored daily for 96h by direct cell counting. Reactive oxygen species level (ROS), membrane damage (cell viability) and autofluorescence (chl-a fluorescence) were evaluated using fluorescent staining and further analyzed by flow cytometry. The toxic effects from GO, as observed in algal density and autofluorescence, started at concentrations from 20 and 10μgmL(-1), respectively. Such toxicity is probably the result of ROS generation and membrane damage (cell viability). The shading effect caused by GO agglomeration in culture medium may also contribute to reduce algal density. The results reported here provide knowledge regarding the GO toxicity on green algae, contributing to a better understanding of its environmental behavior and impacts. PMID:26204245

  13. The effects of graphene oxide on green algae Raphidocelis subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, P F M; Nakabayashi, D; Zucolotto, V

    2015-09-01

    Graphene represents a new class of nanomaterials that has attracted great interest due to its unique electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. Once disposed in the environment, graphene can interact with biological systems and is expected to exhibit toxicological effects. The ecotoxicity of graphene and its derivatives, viz.: graphene oxide (GO) depends on their physicochemical properties, including purity, diameter, length, surface charge, functionalization and aggregation state. In this study we evaluated the effects of graphene oxide (GO) on green algae Raphidocelis subcapitata. The algae were exposed to different concentrations of GO pre-equilibrated for 24h with oligotrophic freshwater medium (20ml) during incubation in a growth chamber under controlled conditions: 120μEm(-2)s(-1) illumination; 12:12h light dark cycle and constant temperature of 22±2°C. Algal growth was monitored daily for 96h by direct cell counting. Reactive oxygen species level (ROS), membrane damage (cell viability) and autofluorescence (chl-a fluorescence) were evaluated using fluorescent staining and further analyzed by flow cytometry. The toxic effects from GO, as observed in algal density and autofluorescence, started at concentrations from 20 and 10μgmL(-1), respectively. Such toxicity is probably the result of ROS generation and membrane damage (cell viability). The shading effect caused by GO agglomeration in culture medium may also contribute to reduce algal density. The results reported here provide knowledge regarding the GO toxicity on green algae, contributing to a better understanding of its environmental behavior and impacts.

  14. Towards tradable permits for filamentous green algae pollution.

    PubMed

    de Lange, W J; Botha, A M; Oberholster, P J

    2016-09-01

    Water pollution permit systems are challenging to design and implement. Operational systems that has maintained functionality remains few and far between, particularly in developing countries. We present current progress towards developing such a system for nutrient enrichment based water pollution, mainly from commercial agriculture. We applied a production function approach to first estimate the monetary value of the impact of the pollution, which is then used as reference point for establishing a reserve price for pollution permits. The subsequent market making process is explained according to five steps including permit design, terms, conditions and transactional protocol, the monitoring system, piloting and implementation. The monetary value of the impact of pollution was estimated at R1887 per hectare per year, which not only provide a "management budget" for filamentous green algae mitigation strategies in the study area, but also enabled the calculation of a reserve price for filamentous green algae pollution permits, which was estimated between R2.25 and R111 per gram filamentous algae and R8.99 per gram at the preferred state.

  15. Genetic transformation of the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Juliane; Shao, Ning; Lu, Yinghong; Bock, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the single-celled green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has become an invaluable model organism in plant biology and an attractive production host in biotechnology. The genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas is relatively simple and efficient, but achieving high expression levels of foreign genes has remained challenging. Here, we provide working protocols for algal cultivation and transformation as well as for selection and analysis of transgenic algal clones. We focus on two commonly used transformation methods for Chlamydomonas: glass bead-assisted transformation and particle gun-mediated (biolistic) transformation. In addition, we describe available tools for promoting efficient transgene expression and highlight important considerations for designing transformation vectors.

  16. Interaction of organic solvents with the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, G.W.; Smith, T.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Solvents are often a component of bioassay systems when water-insoluble toxicants are being tested. These solvents must also be considered as xenobiotics and therefore, as potential toxicants in the bioassay. However, the effects of solvents on the organisms being tested and their possible interaction with the test compound are often overlooked by researchers. The purpose of the present study was to compare the inhibitory effects of six solvents commonly used in pesticide bioassays towards growth of the common green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and to examine the occurrence of solvent-pesticide interactions with this organism.

  17. Substitution rate calibration of small subunit ribosomal RNA identifies chlorarachniophyte endosymbionts as remnants of green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Rensing, S A; Maier, U G; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are amoeboid algae with chlorophyll a and b containing plastids that are surrounded by four membranes instead of two as in plants and green algae. These extra membranes form important support for the hypothesis that chlorarachniophytes have acquired their plastids by the ingestion of another eukaryotic plastid-containing alga. Chlorarachniophytes also contain a small nucleus-like structure called the nucleomorph situated between the two inner and the two outer membranes surrounding the plastid. This nucleomorph is a remnant of the endosymbiont's nucleus and encodes, among other molecules, small subunit ribosomal RNA. Previous phylogenetic analyses on the basis of this molecule provided unexpected and contradictory evidence for the origin of the chlorarachniophyte endosymbiont. We developed a new method for measuring the substitution rates of the individual nucleotides of small subunit ribosomal RNA. From the resulting substitution rate distribution, we derived an equation that gives a more realistic relationship between sequence dissimilarity and evolutionary distance than equations previously available. Phylogenetic trees constructed on the basis of evolutionary distances computed by this new method clearly situate the chlorarachniophyte nucleomorphs among the green algae. Moreover, this relationship is confirmed by transversion analysis of the Chlorarachnion plastid small subunit ribosomal RNA. PMID:8755544

  18. The Effects of Ultraviolet Irradiation on a Coccoid Blue-Green Alga: Survival, Photosynthesis, and Photoreactivation 1

    PubMed Central

    Van Baalen, Chase

    1968-01-01

    The effects of UV irradiation (254 mμ) on a coccoid blue-green alga Agmenellum quadruplicatum, Strain PR-6, have been examined in terms of the survival curve and measurement of short time photosynthetic rates. From study of survival evidence has been found for a strong photoreactivation centered near 430 mμ. Measurements of photosynthetic rate suggest that there is a correlation between decay of photosynthesis and survival after UV exposure. The UV induced decay in photosynthetic activity is reversed by the identical photoreactivation conditions that increase the survival level. The photosynthetic data are interpreted as demonstrating a photoreactivation of photosynthesis in blue-green algae. PMID:16656955

  19. Gain and loss of elongation factor genes in green algae

    PubMed Central

    Cocquyt, Ellen; Verbruggen, Heroen; Leliaert, Frederik; Zechman, Frederick W; Sabbe, Koen; De Clerck, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Background Two key genes of the translational apparatus, elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) and elongation factor-like (EFL) have an almost mutually exclusive distribution in eukaryotes. In the green plant lineage, the Chlorophyta encode EFL except Acetabularia where EF-1α is found, and the Streptophyta possess EF-1α except Mesostigma, which has EFL. These results raise questions about evolutionary patterns of gain and loss of EF-1α and EFL. A previous study launched the hypothesis that EF-1α was the primitive state and that EFL was gained once in the ancestor of the green plants, followed by differential loss of EF-1α or EFL in the principal clades of the Viridiplantae. In order to gain more insight in the distribution of EF-1α and EFL in green plants and test this hypothesis we screened the presence of the genes in a large sample of green algae and analyzed their gain-loss dynamics in a maximum likelihood framework using continuous-time Markov models. Results Within the Chlorophyta, EF-1α is shown to be present in three ulvophycean orders (i.e., Dasycladales, Bryopsidales, Siphonocladales) and the genus Ignatius. Models describing gene gain-loss dynamics revealed that the presence of EF-1α, EFL or both genes along the backbone of the green plant phylogeny is highly uncertain due to sensitivity to branch lengths and lack of prior knowledge about ancestral states or rates of gene gain and loss. Model refinements based on insights gained from the EF-1α phylogeny reduce uncertainty but still imply several equally likely possibilities: a primitive EF-1α state with multiple independent EFL gains or coexistence of both genes in the ancestor of the Viridiplantae or Chlorophyta followed by differential loss of one or the other gene in the various lineages. Conclusion EF-1α is much more common among green algae than previously thought. The mutually exclusive distribution of EF-1α and EFL is confirmed in a large sample of green plants. Hypotheses about the gain

  20. Solar-driven hydrogen production in green algae.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Tamburic, Bojan; Zemichael, Fessehaye; Hellgardt, Klaus; Nixon, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The twin problems of energy security and global warming make hydrogen an attractive alternative to traditional fossil fuels with its combustion resulting only in the release of water vapor. Biological hydrogen production represents a renewable source of the gas and can be performed by a diverse range of microorganisms from strict anaerobic bacteria to eukaryotic green algae. Compared to conventional methods for generating H(2), biological systems can operate at ambient temperatures and pressures without the need for rare metals and could potentially be coupled to a variety of biotechnological processes ranging from desalination and waste water treatment to pharmaceutical production. Photobiological hydrogen production by microalgae is particularly attractive as the main inputs for the process (water and solar energy) are plentiful. This chapter focuses on recent developments in solar-driven H(2) production in green algae with emphasis on the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We review the current methods used to achieve sustained H(2) evolution and discuss possible approaches to improve H(2) yields, including the optimization of culturing conditions, reducing light-harvesting antennae and targeting auxiliary electron transport and fermentative pathways that compete with the hydrogenase for reductant. Finally, industrial scale-up is discussed in the context of photobioreactor design and the future prospects of the field are considered within the broader context of a biorefinery concept.

  1. Photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    An overview of photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable chemical feed stock and energy carrier is presented. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of photosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance--including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transport and (3) the minimum number of light reactions that are required to split water to elemental hydrogen and oxygen. Each of these research topics is being actively addressed by the photobiological hydrogen research community.

  2. Photosynthetic Hydrogen and Oxygen Production by Green Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1999-08-22

    Photosynthesis research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable fuel and chemical feed stock. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are: (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of hotosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance-including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transpor;t and (3) constructing real-world bioreactors, including the generation of hydrogen and oxygen against workable back pressures of the photoproduced gases.

  3. Solar-driven hydrogen production in green algae.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Tamburic, Bojan; Zemichael, Fessehaye; Hellgardt, Klaus; Nixon, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The twin problems of energy security and global warming make hydrogen an attractive alternative to traditional fossil fuels with its combustion resulting only in the release of water vapor. Biological hydrogen production represents a renewable source of the gas and can be performed by a diverse range of microorganisms from strict anaerobic bacteria to eukaryotic green algae. Compared to conventional methods for generating H(2), biological systems can operate at ambient temperatures and pressures without the need for rare metals and could potentially be coupled to a variety of biotechnological processes ranging from desalination and waste water treatment to pharmaceutical production. Photobiological hydrogen production by microalgae is particularly attractive as the main inputs for the process (water and solar energy) are plentiful. This chapter focuses on recent developments in solar-driven H(2) production in green algae with emphasis on the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We review the current methods used to achieve sustained H(2) evolution and discuss possible approaches to improve H(2) yields, including the optimization of culturing conditions, reducing light-harvesting antennae and targeting auxiliary electron transport and fermentative pathways that compete with the hydrogenase for reductant. Finally, industrial scale-up is discussed in the context of photobioreactor design and the future prospects of the field are considered within the broader context of a biorefinery concept. PMID:21807246

  4. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae.

    PubMed

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Several species of unicellular green algae, such as the model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, can operate under either aerobic photosynthesis or anaerobic metabolism conditions. A particularly interesting metabolic condition is that of "anaerobic oxygenic photosynthesis", whereby photosynthetically generated oxygen is consumed by the cell's own respiration, causing anaerobiosis in the culture in the light, and induction of the cellular "hydrogen metabolism" process. The latter entails an alternative photosynthetic electron transport pathway, through the oxygen-sensitive FeFe-hydrogenase, leading to the light-dependent generation of molecular hydrogen in the chloroplast. The FeFe-hydrogenase is coupled to the reducing site of photosystem-I via ferredoxin and is employed as an electron-pressure valve, through which electrons are dissipated, thus permitting a sustained electron transport in the thylakoid membrane of photosynthesis. This hydrogen gas generating process in the cells offers testimony to the unique photosynthetic metabolism that can be found in many species of green microalgae. Moreover, it has attracted interest by the biotechnology and bioenergy sectors, as it promises utilization of green microalgae and the process of photosynthesis in renewable energy production. This article provides an overview of the principles of photobiological hydrogen production in microalgae and addresses in detail the process of induction and analysis of the hydrogen metabolism in the cells. Furthermore, methods are discussed by which the interaction of photosynthesis, respiration, cellular metabolism, and H(2) production in Chlamydomonas can be monitored and regulated. PMID:19291418

  5. Molecular characterization of epiphytic bacterial communities on charophycean green algae

    PubMed

    Fisher; Wilcox; Graham

    1998-11-01

    Epiphytic bacterial communities within the sheath material of three filamentous green algae, Desmidium grevillii, Hyalotheca dissiliens, and Spondylosium pulchrum (class Charophyceae, order Zygnematales), collected from a Sphagnum bog were characterized by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA. A total of 20 partial sequences and nine different sequence types were obtained, and one sequence type was recovered from the bacterial communities on all three algae. By phylogenetic analysis, the cloned sequences were placed into several major lineages of the Bacteria domain: the Flexibacter/Cytophaga/Bacteroides phylum and the alpha, beta, and gamma subdivisions of the phylum Proteobacteria. Analysis at the subphylum level revealed that the majority of our sequences were not closely affiliated with those of known, cultured taxa, although the estimated evolutionary distances between our sequences and their nearest neighbors were always less than 0.1 (i.e., greater than 90% similar). This result suggests that the majority of sequences obtained in this study represent as yet phenotypically undescribed bacterial species and that the range of bacterial-algal interactions that occur in nature has not yet been fully described.

  6. Amidic and acetonic cryoprotectants improve cryopreservation of volvocine green algae.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, A; Nishii, I

    2012-01-01

    A number of volvocalean green algae species were subjected to a two-step cryopreservation protocol with various cryoprotectants. Potential cryoprotectants were methanol (DMSO), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N-dimethylacetamide, N-methylformamide, and hydroxyacetone (HA). We confirmed prior reports that MeOH was effective for cryopreserving Chlamydomonas, but did not work well for larger volvocaleans such as Volvox. In contrast, DMF and HA were effective for both unicellular and multicellular representatives. When we used a cold-inducible transposon to probe Southern blots of Volvox DNA samples taken before and after storage for one month in LN, we could detect no differences, indicating that the genome had remained relatively stable and that the transposon had not been induced by the cryopreservation procedure. We believe these methods will facilitate long-term storage of several volvocine algal species, including Volvox strains harboring transposon-induced mutations of developmental interest. PMID:22825787

  7. Enhanced genetic tools for engineering multigene traits into green algae.

    PubMed

    Rasala, Beth A; Chao, Syh-Shiuan; Pier, Matthew; Barrera, Daniel J; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic microalgae have the potential to impact many diverse biotechnological industries including energy, human and animal nutrition, pharmaceuticals, health and beauty, and specialty chemicals. However, major obstacles to sophisticated genetic and metabolic engineering in algae have been the lack of well-characterized transformation vectors to direct engineered gene products to specific subcellular locations, and the inability to robustly express multiple nuclear-encoded transgenes within a single cell. Here we validate a set of genetic tools that enable protein targeting to distinct subcellular locations, and present two complementary methods for multigene engineering in the eukaryotic green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The tools described here will enable advanced metabolic and genetic engineering to promote microalgae biotechnology and product commercialization. PMID:24710110

  8. A lack of parasitic reduction in the obligate parasitic green alga Helicosporidium.

    PubMed

    Pombert, Jean-François; Blouin, Nicolas Achille; Lane, Chris; Boucias, Drion; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of an obligate parasitic lifestyle is often associated with genomic reduction, in particular with the loss of functions associated with increasing host-dependence. This is evident in many parasites, but perhaps the most extreme transitions are from free-living autotrophic algae to obligate parasites. The best-known examples of this are the apicomplexans such as Plasmodium, which evolved from algae with red secondary plastids. However, an analogous transition also took place independently in the Helicosporidia, where an obligate parasite of animals with an intracellular infection mechanism evolved from algae with green primary plastids. We characterised the nuclear genome of Helicosporidium to compare its transition to parasitism with that of apicomplexans. The Helicosporidium genome is small and compact, even by comparison with the relatively small genomes of the closely related green algae Chlorella and Coccomyxa, but at the functional level we find almost no evidence for reduction. Nearly all ancestral metabolic functions are retained, with the single major exception of photosynthesis, and even here reduction is not complete. The great majority of genes for light-harvesting complexes, photosystems, and pigment biosynthesis have been lost, but those for other photosynthesis-related functions, such as Calvin cycle, are retained. Rather than loss of whole function categories, the predominant reductive force in the Helicosporidium genome is a contraction of gene family complexity, but even here most losses affect families associated with genome maintenance and expression, not functions associated with host-dependence. Other gene families appear to have expanded in response to parasitism, in particular chitinases, including those predicted to digest the chitinous barriers of the insect host or remodel the cell wall of Helicosporidium. Overall, the Helicosporidium genome presents a fascinating picture of the early stages of a transition from free

  9. A Lack of Parasitic Reduction in the Obligate Parasitic Green Alga Helicosporidium

    PubMed Central

    Pombert, Jean-François; Blouin, Nicolas Achille; Lane, Chris; Boucias, Drion; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of an obligate parasitic lifestyle is often associated with genomic reduction, in particular with the loss of functions associated with increasing host-dependence. This is evident in many parasites, but perhaps the most extreme transitions are from free-living autotrophic algae to obligate parasites. The best-known examples of this are the apicomplexans such as Plasmodium, which evolved from algae with red secondary plastids. However, an analogous transition also took place independently in the Helicosporidia, where an obligate parasite of animals with an intracellular infection mechanism evolved from algae with green primary plastids. We characterised the nuclear genome of Helicosporidium to compare its transition to parasitism with that of apicomplexans. The Helicosporidium genome is small and compact, even by comparison with the relatively small genomes of the closely related green algae Chlorella and Coccomyxa, but at the functional level we find almost no evidence for reduction. Nearly all ancestral metabolic functions are retained, with the single major exception of photosynthesis, and even here reduction is not complete. The great majority of genes for light-harvesting complexes, photosystems, and pigment biosynthesis have been lost, but those for other photosynthesis-related functions, such as Calvin cycle, are retained. Rather than loss of whole function categories, the predominant reductive force in the Helicosporidium genome is a contraction of gene family complexity, but even here most losses affect families associated with genome maintenance and expression, not functions associated with host-dependence. Other gene families appear to have expanded in response to parasitism, in particular chitinases, including those predicted to digest the chitinous barriers of the insect host or remodel the cell wall of Helicosporidium. Overall, the Helicosporidium genome presents a fascinating picture of the early stages of a transition from free

  10. Green Algae and the Origins of Multicellularity in the Plant Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Umen, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The green lineage of chlorophyte algae and streptophytes form a large and diverse clade with multiple independent transitions to produce multicellular and/or macroscopically complex organization. In this review, I focus on two of the best-studied multicellular groups of green algae: charophytes and volvocines. Charophyte algae are the closest relatives of land plants and encompass the transition from unicellularity to simple multicellularity. Many of the innovations present in land plants have their roots in the cell and developmental biology of charophyte algae. Volvocine algae evolved an independent route to multicellularity that is captured by a graded series of increasing cell-type specialization and developmental complexity. The study of volvocine algae has provided unprecedented insights into the innovations required to achieve multicellularity. PMID:25324214

  11. Green algae and the origins of multicellularity in the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Umen, James G

    2014-10-16

    The green lineage of chlorophyte algae and streptophytes form a large and diverse clade with multiple independent transitions to produce multicellular and/or macroscopically complex organization. In this review, I focus on two of the best-studied multicellular groups of green algae: charophytes and volvocines. Charophyte algae are the closest relatives of land plants and encompass the transition from unicellularity to simple multicellularity. Many of the innovations present in land plants have their roots in the cell and developmental biology of charophyte algae. Volvocine algae evolved an independent route to multicellularity that is captured by a graded series of increasing cell-type specialization and developmental complexity. The study of volvocine algae has provided unprecedented insights into the innovations required to achieve multicellularity.

  12. Aluminum bioavailability to the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa in acidified synthetic soft water

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, L.; Campbell, P.G.C. )

    1994-04-01

    A unicellular green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, was exposed to inorganic Al under controlled experimental conditions to determine whether the biological response elicited by the dissolved metal could be predicted from the free-metal ion concentration, [Al[sup 3+

  13. Homogentisate phytyltransferase from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Valdivieso, Gregorio; Cardeñosa, Rosa; Pineda, Manuel; Aguilar, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    Homogentisate phytyltransferase (HPT) (EC 2.5.1.-) catalyzes the first committed step of tocopherol biosynthesis in all photosynthetic organisms. This paper presents the molecular characterization and expression analysis of HPT1 gene, and a study on the accumulation of tocopherols under different environmental conditions in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The Chlamydomonas HPT1 protein conserves all the prenylphosphate- and divalent cation-binding sites that are found in polyprenyltransferases and all the amino acids that are essential for its catalytic activity. Its hydrophobicity profile confirms that HPT is a membrane-bound protein. Chlamydomonas genomic DNA analysis suggests that HPT is encoded by a single gene, HPT1, whose promoter region contains multiple motifs related to regulation by jasmonate, abscisic acid, low temperature and light, and an ATCTA motif presents in genes involved in tocopherol biosynthesis and some photosynthesis-related genes. Expression analysis revealed that HPT1 is strongly regulated by dark and low-temperature. Under the same treatments, α-tocopherol increased in cultures exposed to darkness or heat, whereas γ-tocopherol did it in low temperature. The regulatory expression pattern of HPT1 and the changes of tocopherol abundance support the idea that different tocopherols play specific functions, and suggest a role for γ-tocopherol in the adaptation to growth under low-temperature.

  14. Combined toxicity of pesticide mixtures on green algae and photobacteria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Shen; Wang, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Xiang-Wei; Li, Wei-Ying

    2013-09-01

    Different organisms have diverse responses to the same chemicals or mixtures. In this paper, we selected the green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) and photobacteria Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 (V. qinghaiensis) as target organisms and determined the toxicities of six pesticides, including three herbicides (simetryn, bromacil and hexazinone), two fungicides (dodine and metalaxyl) and one insecticide (propoxur), and their mixtures by using the microplate toxicity analysis. The toxicities of three herbicides to C. pyrenoidosa are much higher than those to V. qinghaiensis, and the toxicities of metalaxyl and propoxur to V. qinghaiensis are higher than those to C. pyrenoidosa, while the toxicity of dodine to C. pyrenoidosa is similar to those to V. qinghaiensis. Using the concentration addition as an additive reference model, the binary pesticide mixtures exhibited different toxicity interactions, i.e., displayed antagonism to C. pyrenoidosa but synergism to V. qinghaiensis. However, the toxicities of the multi-component mixtures of more than two components are additive and can be predicted by the concentration addition model.

  15. Toxicity Assessment of Expired Pesticides to Green Algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    PubMed Central

    Satyavani, G.; Chandrasehar, G.; Varma, K. Krishna; Goparaju, A.; Ayyappan, S.; Reddy, P. Neelakanta; Murthy, P. Balakrishna

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of expired pesticides on the yield and growth rate of green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, a study was conducted as per the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guideline number 201. Fifteen expired pesticide formulations, most commonly used in Indian agriculture, were tested in comparison with their unexpired counterparts. The expired pesticide formulations studied belonged to various class and functional groups: organophosphate, pyrethroid-based insecticides; azole-based fungicides; acetamide, propionate, acetic acid-based herbicides; fungicides mixtures containing two actives—azole and dithiocarbamate. The toxicity endpoints of yield (EyC50: 0–72 h) and growth rate (ErC50: 0–72 h) of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata for each pesticide formulation (both expired and unexpired pesticides) were determined statistically using TOXSTAT 3.5 version software. The results pointed out that some expired pesticide formulations exhibited higher toxicity to tested algal species, as compared to the corresponding unexpired pesticides. These data thus stress the need for greater care to dispose expired pesticides to water bodies, to avoid the effects on aquatic ecospecies tested. PMID:23762633

  16. Production of carbonate sediments by a unicellular green alga

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Robbins, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the ability of the unicellular green alga Natmochloris atoimis to precipitate CaCO3, quantifies mineral precipitation rates, estimates sediment production in a N. atomiis bloom, and discusses the implications of microbial calcification for carbonate sediment deposition. A series of N. atomus cultures, isolated from Lake Reeve, Australia, were incubated at various pH and calcium concentrations to determine environmental parameters for calcification. Rates of calcification were calculated from initial and postincubation alkalinity, pH, and calcium measurements. Replicate experiments and controls consisting of non-calcifying cultures, uninoculated media, and dead cell cultures were performed using environmental culture parameters determined in series cultures. Average calcification rates from replicate experiments were used to predict daily sediment production rates in a small bloom of N. atomus. N. atomus precipitates 0.138 g/L of calcite in approximately 4 h when incubated at pH 8.5, 14.24 mM calcium concentration, 33 ??C, 100 ??E/m2/s light intensity, and a cell population density of 107 cells/mL. Assuming continuous precipitation, this corresponds to a maximum estimated sediment production rate of 1.6 ?? 106 kg of CaCO3, per 12 h day in a single bloom of 3.2 ?? 109 L. Our results suggest that microbial calcification contributes significantly to the carbonate sediment budget.

  17. Phylogenetic and molecular analysis of hydrogen-producing green algae

    PubMed Central

    Timmins, Matthew; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Darling, Aaron; Zhang, Eugene; Hankamer, Ben; Marx, Ute C.; Schenk, Peer M.

    2009-01-01

    A select set of microalgae are reported to be able to catalyse photobiological H2 production from water. Based on the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a method was developed for the screening of naturally occurring H2-producing microalgae. By purging algal cultures with N2 in the dark and subsequent illumination, it is possible to rapidly induce photobiological H2 evolution. Using NMR spectroscopy for metabolic profiling in C. reinhardtii, acetate, formate, and ethanol were found to be key compounds contributing to metabolic variance during the assay. This procedure can be used to test algal species existing as axenic or mixed cultures for their ability to produce H2. Using this system, five algal isolates capable of H2 production were identified in various aquatic systems. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using ribosomal sequence data of green unicellular algae to determine if there were taxonomic patterns of H2 production. H2-producing algal species were seen to be dispersed amongst most clades, indicating an H2-producing capacity preceded evolution of the phylum Chlorophyta. PMID:19342428

  18. The charophycean green algae provide insights into the early origins of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Pettolino, Filomena A; Bacic, Antony; Ralph, John; Lu, Fachuang; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Fei, Zhangzhun; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2011-10-01

    Numerous evolutionary innovations were required to enable freshwater green algae to colonize terrestrial habitats and thereby initiate the evolution of land plants (embryophytes). These adaptations probably included changes in cell-wall composition and architecture that were to become essential for embryophyte development and radiation. However, it is not known to what extent the polymers that are characteristic of embryophyte cell walls, including pectins, hemicelluloses, glycoproteins and lignin, evolved in response to the demands of the terrestrial environment or whether they pre-existed in their algal ancestors. Here we show that members of the advanced charophycean green algae (CGA), including the Charales, Coleochaetales and Zygnematales, but not basal CGA (Klebsormidiales and Chlorokybales), have cell walls that are comparable in several respects to the primary walls of embryophytes. Moreover, we provide both chemical and immunocytochemical evidence that selected Coleochaete species have cell walls that contain small amounts of lignin or lignin-like polymers derived from radical coupling of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. Thus, the ability to synthesize many of the components that characterize extant embryophyte walls evolved during divergence within CGA. Our study provides new insight into the evolutionary window during which the structurally complex walls of embryophytes originated, and the significance of the advanced CGA during these events. PMID:21707800

  19. The charophycean green algae provide insights into the early origins of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Pettolino, Filomena A; Bacic, Antony; Ralph, John; Lu, Fachuang; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Fei, Zhangzhun; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2011-10-01

    Numerous evolutionary innovations were required to enable freshwater green algae to colonize terrestrial habitats and thereby initiate the evolution of land plants (embryophytes). These adaptations probably included changes in cell-wall composition and architecture that were to become essential for embryophyte development and radiation. However, it is not known to what extent the polymers that are characteristic of embryophyte cell walls, including pectins, hemicelluloses, glycoproteins and lignin, evolved in response to the demands of the terrestrial environment or whether they pre-existed in their algal ancestors. Here we show that members of the advanced charophycean green algae (CGA), including the Charales, Coleochaetales and Zygnematales, but not basal CGA (Klebsormidiales and Chlorokybales), have cell walls that are comparable in several respects to the primary walls of embryophytes. Moreover, we provide both chemical and immunocytochemical evidence that selected Coleochaete species have cell walls that contain small amounts of lignin or lignin-like polymers derived from radical coupling of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. Thus, the ability to synthesize many of the components that characterize extant embryophyte walls evolved during divergence within CGA. Our study provides new insight into the evolutionary window during which the structurally complex walls of embryophytes originated, and the significance of the advanced CGA during these events.

  20. Sterols in red and green algae: quantification, phylogeny, and relevance for the interpretation of geologic steranes.

    PubMed

    Kodner, R B; Pearson, A; Summons, R E; Knoll, A H

    2008-08-01

    Steroids, a class of triterpenoid lipids with high preservation potential, are widely distributed in sedimentary rocks. All eukaryotes have a physiological requirement for these molecules, making steroids important biomarkers for aiding our understanding of eukaryote molecular evolution and geologic history. C(26)-C(30) sterols are the molecules most commonly incorporated or synthesized by eukaryotes, and correspond to C(26)-C(30) steranes ubiquitously and abundantly preserved in petroleums and sedimentary bitumens. Because these sterols occur in evolutionarily diverse taxa, it can be difficult to associate any particular compound with a single group of organisms. Nevertheless, geochemists have still been able to draw parallels between the empirical patterns in geologic sterane abundances and the age of petroleum source rocks. Paleobiologists have also used sterane data, in particular the patterns in C(29) and C(28) steranes, to support fossil evidence of an early radiation of green algae in latest Proterozoic and Paleozoic and the succession of the major modern phytoplankton groups in the Mesozoic. Although C(29) sterols are found in many eukaryotes, organisms that produce them in proportional abundances comparable to those preserved in Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks are limited. Based on a large, phylogenetically based survey of sterol profiles from the kingdom Plantae, we conclude that modern ulvophyte and early diverging prasinophyte green algae produce high abundances of C(29) relative to C(27) and C(28) sterols most consistent with the sterane profiles observed in Paleozoic rocks. Our analysis also suggests that ancestral stem groups among the Plantae, including the glaucocystophytes and early divergent red algae are also plausible candidates.

  1. How the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii keeps time.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Thomas; Prager, Katja; Dathe, Hannes; Kelm, Juliane; Kiessling, Peter; Mittag, Maria

    2010-08-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has two flagella and a primitive visual system, the eyespot apparatus, which allows the cell to phototax. About 40 years ago, it was shown that the circadian clock controls its phototactic movement. Since then, several circadian rhythms such as chemotaxis, cell division, UV sensitivity, adherence to glass, or starch metabolism have been characterized. The availability of its entire genome sequence along with homology studies and the analysis of several sub-proteomes render C. reinhardtii as an excellent eukaryotic model organism to study its circadian clock at different levels of organization. Previous studies point to several potential photoreceptors that may be involved in forwarding light information to entrain its clock. However, experimental data are still missing toward this end. In the past years, several components have been functionally characterized that are likely to be part of the oscillatory machinery of C. reinhardtii since alterations in their expression levels or insertional mutagenesis of the genes resulted in defects in phase, period, or amplitude of at least two independent measured rhythms. These include several RHYTHM OF CHLOROPLAST (ROC) proteins, a CONSTANS protein (CrCO) that is involved in parallel in photoperiodic control, as well as the two subunits of the circadian RNA-binding protein CHLAMY1. The latter is also tightly connected to circadian output processes. Several candidates including a significant number of ROCs, CrCO, and CASEIN KINASE1 whose alterations of expression affect the circadian clock have in parallel severe effects on the release of daughter cells, flagellar formation, and/or movement, indicating that these processes are interconnected in C. reinhardtii. The challenging task for the future will be to get insights into the clock network and to find out how the clock-related factors are functionally connected. In this respect, system biology approaches will certainly

  2. Hidden genetic diversity in the green alga Spirogyra (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The unbranched filamentous green alga Spirogyra (Streptophyta, Zygnemataceae) is easily recognizable based on its vegetative morphology, which shows one to several spiral chloroplasts. This simple structure falsely points to a low genetic diversity: Spirogyra is commonly excluded from phylogenetic analyses because the genus is known as a long-branch taxon caused by a high evolutionary rate. Results We focused on this genetic diversity and sequenced 130 Spirogyra small subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) strands of different origin. The resulting SSU rDNA sequences were used for phylogenetic analyses using complex evolutionary models (posterior probability, maximum likelihood, neighbor joining, and maximum parsimony methods). The sequences were between 1672 and 1779 nucleotides long. Sequence comparisons revealed 53 individual clones, but our results still support monophyly of the genus. Our data set did not contain a single slow-evolving taxon that would have been placed on a shorter branch compared to the remaining sequences. Out of 130 accessions analyzed, 72 showed a secondary loss of the 1506 group I intron, which formed a long-branched group within the genus. The phylogenetic relationship to the genus Spirotaenia was not resolved satisfactorily. The genetic distance within the genus Spirogyra exceeded the distances measured within any other genus of the remaining Zygnemataceae included in this study. Conclusion Overall, we define eight distinct clades of Spirogyra, one of them including the genus Sirogonium. A large number of non-homoplasious synapomorphies (NHS; 114 NHS in total) was found for Spirogyra (41 NHS) and for each clade (totaling 73 NHS). This emphasizes the high genetic diversity of this genus and the distance to the remaining Zygnematophyceae. PMID:22655677

  3. The influence of nitrogen on heterocyst production in blue-green algae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogawa, Roann E.; Carr, John F.

    1969-01-01

    A series of experiments on heterocyst production in Anabaena variabilis provides some strong indirect evidence for the role of heterocysts in nitrogen fixation. Of the algae tested (Anabaena variabilis, A. inaequalis, A. cylindrica, A. flos-aquae, Tolypothrix distorta, Gloeotrichia echinulata, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Oscillatoria sp., and Microcystis aeruginosa), only those with heterocysts grew in a nitrate-free medium. Growth in the nitrate-free medium was accompanied by an increase in heterocysts. Heterocyst formation in A. variabilis was evident 24 hr after transfer from a nitrate-containing to a nitrate-free medium. The number of heterocysts was altered by changes in the nitrogen source. Numbers were lowest when NH4-N was used as a nitrogen source and highest when nitrogen (N2-N) was derived from the atmosphere. Heterocyst numbers could also be regulated by controlling the concentration of NO3-N in the medium. Heterocyst production depended on the absence of combined nitrogen and the presence of phosphate. Data are presented on the occurrence of blue-green algae (with heterocysts) in Lake Erie and the environmental conditions apparently necessary for them to become dominant.

  4. Development of Singlet Oxygen Luminescence Kinetics during the Photodynamic Inactivation of Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Bornhütter, Tobias; Pohl, Judith; Fischer, Christian; Saltsman, Irena; Mahammed, Atif; Gross, Zeev; Röder, Beate

    2016-04-13

    Recent studies show the feasibility of photodynamic inactivation of green algae as a vital step towards an effective photodynamic suppression of biofilms by using functionalized surfaces. The investigation of the intrinsic mechanisms of photodynamic inactivation in green algae represents the next step in order to determine optimization parameters. The observation of singlet oxygen luminescence kinetics proved to be a very effective approach towards understanding mechanisms on a cellular level. In this study, the first two-dimensional measurement of singlet oxygen kinetics in phototrophic microorganisms on surfaces during photodynamic inactivation is presented. We established a system of reproducible algae samples on surfaces, incubated with two different cationic, antimicrobial potent photosensitizers. Fluorescence microscopy images indicate that one photosensitizer localizes inside the green algae while the other accumulates along the outer algae cell wall. A newly developed setup allows for the measurement of singlet oxygen luminescence on the green algae sample surfaces over several days. The kinetics of the singlet oxygen luminescence of both photosensitizers show different developments and a distinct change over time, corresponding with the differences in their localization as well as their photosensitization potential. While the complexity of the signal reveals a challenge for the future, this study incontrovertibly marks a crucial, inevitable step in the investigation of photodynamic inactivation of biofilms: it shows the feasibility of using the singlet oxygen luminescence kinetics to investigate photodynamic effects on surfaces and thus opens a field for numerous investigations.

  5. Isoprenoid biosynthesis authenticates the classification of the green alga Mesostigma viride as an ancient streptophyte.

    PubMed

    Grauvogel, Carina; Petersen, Jörn

    2007-07-01

    Land plants harbor two essential and completely different metabolic pathways for isoprenoid synthesis. The cytosolic mevalonate pathway (MVA) is shared with heterotrophic eukaryotes, whereas the plastidial 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway has a cyanobacterial origin and was recruited after primary endosymbiosis. Terrestrial plants and green algae have a common evolutionary ancestry, but biochemical as well as genome analyses indicate that the cytosolic MVA pathway is generally absent from Chlorophyta. We investigated the distribution of genes for both pathways in the green alga Mesostigma viride, a key species at the basis of streptophycean (charophycean green algae, land plant) evolution. Ten of altogether twelve generally weakly expressed genes for isoprenoid biosynthesis, including three for the cytosolic MVA pathway, were amplified using a reverse transcription PCR approach with individually designed degenerate primers. Two full length cDNA clones for the first enzyme of the MVA pathway (HMGS) were additionally established from the charophycean green alga Chara vulgaris by library screening. The presence of the MVA pathway in these advanced green algae indicates a universal distribution among Streptophyta, and our phylogenetic HMGS analyses substantiate the recent classification of Mesostigma basal to charophytes and land plants. We identified each of the five cytosolic MVA genes/cDNAs in the genome of the rhodophyte Galdieria sulphuraria and, furthermore, amplified four of them from the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa. Our data indicate that the MVA pathway is a characteristic trait of Plantae in general and propose that it was specifically lost in a common ancestor of Chlorophyta.

  6. Tracing floating green algae blooms in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea using Lagrangian transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Gyu; Son, Young Baek; Choi, Byoung-Ju; Kim, Yong Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Lagrangian particle tracking experiments were conducted to understand the pathway of the floating green algae patches observed in the Yellow Sea (YS) and East China Sea (ECS) in summer 2011. The numerical simulation results indicated that dominant southerly winds during June and July 2011 were related to offshore movement of the floating green algae, especially their eastward extension in the YS/ECS. An infrequent and unusual event occurred in June 2011: a severe Tropical Strom MEARI, caused the green algae to detach from the coast and initiated movement to the east. After the typhoon event, sea surface temperature recovered rapidly enough to grow the floating green algae, and wind and local current controlled the movement of the massive floating algae patches (coastal accumulation or offshore advection in the area). Analysis of the floating green algae movement using satellite images during passage of Typhoon MAON in July 2011 revealed that the floating green algae patches were significantly controlled by both ocean currents and enhanced winds. These findings suggest that the floating green algae bloom off Qingdao, China and in the middle of the YS and ECS in the summer of 2011 occurred due to the combined effects of recent rapid expansion of seaweed aquaculture, strong winds, and the wind patterns in blooming regions. Our combined approach, using satellite data and numerical simulations, provides a robust estimate for tracing and monitoring changes in green algae blooms on a regional scale.

  7. Genotoxic effects of commercial formulations of Chlorpyrifos and Tebuconazole on green algae.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ricardo Santiago; Di Marzio, Walter Darío; Sáenz, María Elena

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) was used for the study of the genotoxic effects of insecticide Chlorpyrifos and fungicide Tebuconazole (commercial formulations) on two freshwater green algae species, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nannocloris oculata, after 24 h of exposure. The percentage of DNA in tail of migrating nucleoids was taken as an endpoint of DNA impairment. Cell viability was measured by fluorometric detection of chlorophyll "a" in vivo and the determination of cell auto-fluorescence. Only the higher concentration of Chlorpyrifos tested resulted to affect significantly the cell viability of P. subcapitata, whereas cells of N. oculata were not affected. Tebuconazole assayed concentrations (3 and 6 mg/l) did not affect cell viability of both species. The results of comet assay on P. subcapitata showed that Chlorpyrifos concentration evaluated (0.8 mg/l) exerted a genotoxic effects; while for the other specie a concentration of 10 mg/l was needed. Tebuconazole was genotoxic at 3 and 6 mg/l for both species. The comet assay evidenced damage at the level of DNA simple strains molecule at pesticide concentrations were cytotoxicity was not evident, demonstrating that algae are models to take into account in ecological risk assessments for aquatic environments. PMID:25230876

  8. Effects of artificial sweeteners on metal bioconcentration and toxicity on a green algae Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongwei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Fan, Yunfei; Zhang, Pengfei; Sun, Hongwen; Gan, Zhiwei; Zhu, Hongkai; Yao, Yiming

    2016-05-01

    The ecotoxicity of heavy metals depends much on their speciation, which is influenced by other co-existing substances having chelating capacity. In the present study, the toxic effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on a green algae Scenedesmus obliquus were examined in the presence of two artificial sweeteners (ASs), acesulfame (ACE) and sucralose (SUC) by comparing the cell specific growth rate μ and pulse-amplitude-modulated (PAM) parameters (maximal photosystem II photochemical efficiency Fv/Fm, actual photochemical efficiency Yield, and non-photochemical quenching NPQ) of the algae over a 96-h period. Simultaneously, the bioconcentration of the metals by the algal cells in the presence of the ASs was measured. The presence of ACE enhanced the growth of S. obliquus and promoted the bioconcentration of Cd(2+) in S. obliquus, while the impacts of SUC were not significant. Meanwhile, EC50 values of Cd(2+) on the growth of S. obliquus increased from 0.42 mg/L to 0.54 mg/L and 0.48 mg/L with the addition of 1.0 mg/L ACE and SUC, respectively. As for Cu(2+), EC50 values increased from 0.13 mg/L to 0.17 mg/L and 0.15 mg/L with the addition of 1.0 mg/L ACE and SUC, respectively. In summary, the two ASs reduced the toxicity of the metals on the algae, with ACE showing greater effect than SUC. Although not as sensitive as the cell specific growth rate, PAM parameters could disclose the mechanisms involved in metal toxicity at subcellular levels. This study provides the first evidence for the possible impact of ASs on the ecotoxicity of heavy metals. PMID:26915590

  9. Effects of artificial sweeteners on metal bioconcentration and toxicity on a green algae Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongwei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Fan, Yunfei; Zhang, Pengfei; Sun, Hongwen; Gan, Zhiwei; Zhu, Hongkai; Yao, Yiming

    2016-05-01

    The ecotoxicity of heavy metals depends much on their speciation, which is influenced by other co-existing substances having chelating capacity. In the present study, the toxic effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on a green algae Scenedesmus obliquus were examined in the presence of two artificial sweeteners (ASs), acesulfame (ACE) and sucralose (SUC) by comparing the cell specific growth rate μ and pulse-amplitude-modulated (PAM) parameters (maximal photosystem II photochemical efficiency Fv/Fm, actual photochemical efficiency Yield, and non-photochemical quenching NPQ) of the algae over a 96-h period. Simultaneously, the bioconcentration of the metals by the algal cells in the presence of the ASs was measured. The presence of ACE enhanced the growth of S. obliquus and promoted the bioconcentration of Cd(2+) in S. obliquus, while the impacts of SUC were not significant. Meanwhile, EC50 values of Cd(2+) on the growth of S. obliquus increased from 0.42 mg/L to 0.54 mg/L and 0.48 mg/L with the addition of 1.0 mg/L ACE and SUC, respectively. As for Cu(2+), EC50 values increased from 0.13 mg/L to 0.17 mg/L and 0.15 mg/L with the addition of 1.0 mg/L ACE and SUC, respectively. In summary, the two ASs reduced the toxicity of the metals on the algae, with ACE showing greater effect than SUC. Although not as sensitive as the cell specific growth rate, PAM parameters could disclose the mechanisms involved in metal toxicity at subcellular levels. This study provides the first evidence for the possible impact of ASs on the ecotoxicity of heavy metals.

  10. Acclimation of green algae to sulfur deficiency: underlying mechanisms and application for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Antal, Taras K; Krendeleva, Tatyana E; Rubin, Andrew B

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is definitely one of the most acceptable fuels in the future. Some photosynthetic microorganisms, such as green algae and cyanobacteria, can produce hydrogen gas from water by using solar energy. In green algae, hydrogen evolution is coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport in thylakoid membranes via reaction catalyzed by the specific enzyme, (FeFe)-hydrogenase. However, this enzyme is highly sensitive to oxygen and can be quickly inhibited when water splitting is active. A problem of incompatibility between the water splitting and hydrogenase reaction can be overcome by depletion of algal cells of sulfur which is essential element for life. In this review the mechanisms underlying sustained hydrogen photoproduction in sulfur deprived C. reinhardtii and the recent achievements in studying of this process are discussed. The attention is focused on the biophysical and physiological aspects of photosynthetic response to sulfur deficiency in green algae. PMID:20878321

  11. Isolation and cultivation of endosymbiotic algae from green hydra and phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kovacević, Goran; Franjević, Damjan; Jelencić, Biserka; Kalafatić, Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Symbiotic associations are of wide significance in evolution and biodiversity. The green hydra is a typical example of endosymbiosis. In its gastrodermal myoepithelial cells it harbors the individuals of a unicellular green algae. Endosymbiotic algae from green hydra have been successfully isolated and permanently maintained in a stable clean lab culture for the first time. We reconstructed the phylogeny of isolated endosymbiotic algae using the 18S rRNA gene to clarify its current status and to validate the traditional inclusion of these endosymbiotic algae within the Chlorella genus. Molecular analyses established that different genera and species of unicellular green algae could be present as symbionts in green hydra, depending on the natural habitat of a particular strain of green hydra.

  12. Green algae in alpine biological soil crust communities: acclimation strategies against ultraviolet radiation and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Ulf; Holzinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are major components of biological soil crusts in alpine habitats. Together with cyanobacteria, fungi and lichens, green algae form a pioneer community important for the organisms that will succeed them. In their high altitudinal habitat these algae are exposed to harsh and strongly fluctuating environmental conditions, mainly intense irradiation, including ultraviolet radiation, and lack of water leading to desiccation. Therefore, green algae surviving in these environments must have evolved with either avoidance or protective strategies, as well as repair mechanisms for damage. In this review we have highlighted these mechanisms, which include photoprotection, photochemical quenching, and high osmotic values to avoid water loss, and in some groups flexibility of secondary cell walls to maintain turgor pressure even in water-limited situations. These highly specialized green algae will serve as good model organisms to study desiccation tolerance or photoprotective mechanisms, due to their natural capacity to withstand unfavorable conditions. We point out the urgent need for modern phylogenetic approaches in characterizing these organisms, and molecular methods for analyzing the metabolic changes involved in their adaptive strategies.

  13. Pectin metabolism and assembly in the cell wall of the charophyte green alga Penium margaritaceum.

    PubMed

    Domozych, David S; Sørensen, Iben; Popper, Zoë A; Ochs, Julie; Andreas, Amanda; Fangel, Jonatan U; Pielach, Anna; Sacks, Carly; Brechka, Hannah; Ruisi-Besares, Pia; Willats, William G T; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-05-01

    The pectin polymer homogalacturonan (HG) is a major component of land plant cell walls and is especially abundant in the middle lamella. Current models suggest that HG is deposited into the wall as a highly methylesterified polymer, demethylesterified by pectin methylesterase enzymes and cross-linked by calcium ions to form a gel. However, this idea is based largely on indirect evidence and in vitro studies. We took advantage of the wall architecture of the unicellular alga Penium margaritaceum, which forms an elaborate calcium cross-linked HG-rich lattice on its cell surface, to test this model and other aspects of pectin dynamics. Studies of live cells and microscopic imaging of wall domains confirmed that the degree of methylesterification and sufficient levels of calcium are critical for lattice formation in vivo. Pectinase treatments of live cells and immunological studies suggested the presence of another class of pectin polymer, rhamnogalacturonan I, and indicated its colocalization and structural association with HG. Carbohydrate microarray analysis of the walls of P. margaritaceum, Physcomitrella patens, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) further suggested the conservation of pectin organization and interpolymer associations in the walls of green plants. The individual constituent HG polymers also have a similar size and branched structure to those of embryophytes. The HG-rich lattice of P. margaritaceum, a member of the charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants, was shown to be important for cell adhesion. Therefore, the calcium-HG gel at the cell surface may represent an early evolutionary innovation that paved the way for an adhesive middle lamella in multicellular land plants. PMID:24652345

  14. Pectin metabolism and assembly in the cell wall of the charophyte green alga Penium margaritaceum.

    PubMed

    Domozych, David S; Sørensen, Iben; Popper, Zoë A; Ochs, Julie; Andreas, Amanda; Fangel, Jonatan U; Pielach, Anna; Sacks, Carly; Brechka, Hannah; Ruisi-Besares, Pia; Willats, William G T; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-05-01

    The pectin polymer homogalacturonan (HG) is a major component of land plant cell walls and is especially abundant in the middle lamella. Current models suggest that HG is deposited into the wall as a highly methylesterified polymer, demethylesterified by pectin methylesterase enzymes and cross-linked by calcium ions to form a gel. However, this idea is based largely on indirect evidence and in vitro studies. We took advantage of the wall architecture of the unicellular alga Penium margaritaceum, which forms an elaborate calcium cross-linked HG-rich lattice on its cell surface, to test this model and other aspects of pectin dynamics. Studies of live cells and microscopic imaging of wall domains confirmed that the degree of methylesterification and sufficient levels of calcium are critical for lattice formation in vivo. Pectinase treatments of live cells and immunological studies suggested the presence of another class of pectin polymer, rhamnogalacturonan I, and indicated its colocalization and structural association with HG. Carbohydrate microarray analysis of the walls of P. margaritaceum, Physcomitrella patens, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) further suggested the conservation of pectin organization and interpolymer associations in the walls of green plants. The individual constituent HG polymers also have a similar size and branched structure to those of embryophytes. The HG-rich lattice of P. margaritaceum, a member of the charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants, was shown to be important for cell adhesion. Therefore, the calcium-HG gel at the cell surface may represent an early evolutionary innovation that paved the way for an adhesive middle lamella in multicellular land plants.

  15. Uptake and Retention of Cs137 by a Blue-Green Alga in Continuous Flow and Batch Culture Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, J.R.

    2003-02-18

    Since routine monitoring data show that blue-green algae concentrate radioactivity from water by factors as great as 10,000, this study was initiated to investigate the uptake and retention patterns of specific radionuclides by the dominant genera of blue-green algae in the reactor effluents. Plectonema purpureum was selected for this study.

  16. The rapid quantitation of the filamentous blue-green alga plectonema boryanum by the luciferase assay for ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, V. N.

    1974-01-01

    Plectonema boryanum is a filamentous blue green alga. Blue green algae have a procaryotic cellular organization similar to bacteria, but are usually obligate photoautotrophs, obtaining their carbon and energy from photosynthetic mechanism similar to higher plants. This research deals with a comparison of three methods of quantitating filamentous populations: microscopic cell counts, the luciferase assay for ATP and optical density measurements.

  17. Modeling the Role of Zebra Mussels in the Proliferation of Blue-green Algae in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under model assumptions from Saginaw Bay 1991, selective rejection of blue-green algae by zebra mussels appears to be a necessary factor in the enhancement of blue-green algae production in the presence of zebra mussels. Enhancement also appears to depend on the increased sedime...

  18. Resurrection kinetics of photosynthesis in desiccation-tolerant terrestrial green algae (Chlorophyta) on tree bark.

    PubMed

    Lüttge, U; Büdel, B

    2010-05-01

    The rough bark of orchard trees (Malus) around Darmstadt is predominantly covered in red to purple-brown layers (biofilms) of epiphytic terrestrial alga of Trentepohlia umbrina. The smooth bark of forest trees (Fagus sylvatica L. and Acer sp.) in the same area is covered by bright green biofilms composed of the green algae Desmococcus, Apatococcus and Trebouxia, with a few cells of Coccomyxa and 'Chlorella' trebouxioides between them. These algae are desiccation tolerant. After samples of bark with the biofilms were kept in dry air in darkness for various periods of time, potential quantum yield of PSII, F(v)/F(m), recovered during rehydration upon rewetting. The kinetics and degree of recovery depended on the length of time that the algae were kept in dry air in the desiccated state. Recovery was better for green biofilm samples, i.e. quite good even after 80 days of desiccation (F(v)/F(m) = ca. 50% of initial value), than the red samples, where recovery was only adequate up to ca. 30-40 days of desiccation (F(v)/F(m) = ca. 20-55% of initial value). It is concluded that the different bark types constitute different ecophysiological niches that can be occupied by the algae and that can be distinguished by their capacity to recover from desiccation after different times in the dry state.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in plants and green algae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixin; Guo, Cheng; Sutharzan, Sreeskandarajan; Li, Pei; Echt, Craig S; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) extensively exist in the genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Based on the sequenced genomes and gene annotations of 31 plant and algal species in Phytozome version 8.0 (http://www.phytozome.net/), we examined TRs in a genome-wide scale, characterized their distributions and motif features, and explored their putative biological functions. Among the 31 species, no significant correlation was detected between the TR density and genome size. Interestingly, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (42,059 bp/Mbp) and castor bean Ricinus communis (55,454 bp/Mbp) showed much higher TR densities than all other species (13,209 bp/Mbp on average). In the 29 land plants, including 22 dicots, 5 monocots, and 2 bryophytes, 5'-UTR and upstream intergenic 200-nt (UI200) regions had the first and second highest TR densities, whereas in the two green algae (C. reinhardtii and Volvox carteri) the first and second highest densities were found in intron and coding sequence (CDS) regions, respectively. In CDS regions, trinucleotide and hexanucleotide motifs were those most frequently represented in all species. In intron regions, especially in the two green algae, significantly more TRs were detected near the intron-exon junctions. Within intergenic regions in dicots and monocots, more TRs were found near both the 5' and 3' ends of genes. GO annotation in two green algae revealed that the genes with TRs in introns are significantly involved in transcriptional and translational processing. As the first systematic examination of TRs in plant and green algal genomes, our study showed that TRs displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation in plants and green algae. PMID:24192840

  20. Desiccation stress and tolerance in green algae: consequences for ultrastructure, physiological and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Karsten, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Although most green algae typically occur in aquatic ecosystems, many species also live partly or permanently under aeroterrestrial conditions, where the cells are exposed to the atmosphere and hence regularly experience dehydration. The ability of algal cells to survive in an air-dried state is termed desiccation tolerance. The mechanisms involved in desiccation tolerance of green algae are still poorly understood, and hence the aim of this review is to summarize recent findings on the effects of desiccation and osmotic water loss. Starting from structural changes, physiological, and biochemical consequences of desiccation will be addressed in different green-algal lineages. The available data clearly indicate a range of strategies, which are rather different in streptophycean and non-streptophycean green algae. While members of the Trebouxiophyceae exhibit effective water loss-prevention mechanisms based on the biosynthesis and accumulation of particular organic osmolytes such as polyols, these compounds are so far not reported in representatives of the Streptophyta. In members of the Streptophyta such as Klebsormidium, the most striking observation is the appearance of cross-walls in desiccated samples, which are strongly undulating, suggesting a high degree of mechanical flexibility. This aids in maintaining structural integrity in the dried state and allows the cell to maintain turgor pressure for a prolonged period of time during the dehydration process. Physiological strategies in aeroterrestrial green algae generally include a rapid reduction of photosynthesis during desiccation, but also a rather quick recovery after rewetting, whereas aquatic species are sensitive to drying. The underlying mechanisms such as the affected molecular components of the photosynthetic machinery are poorly understood in green algae. Therefore, modern approaches based on transcriptomics, proteomics, and/or metabolomics are urgently needed to better understand the molecular

  1. Desiccation stress and tolerance in green algae: consequences for ultrastructure, physiological and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Karsten, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Although most green algae typically occur in aquatic ecosystems, many species also live partly or permanently under aeroterrestrial conditions, where the cells are exposed to the atmosphere and hence regularly experience dehydration. The ability of algal cells to survive in an air-dried state is termed desiccation tolerance. The mechanisms involved in desiccation tolerance of green algae are still poorly understood, and hence the aim of this review is to summarize recent findings on the effects of desiccation and osmotic water loss. Starting from structural changes, physiological, and biochemical consequences of desiccation will be addressed in different green-algal lineages. The available data clearly indicate a range of strategies, which are rather different in streptophycean and non-streptophycean green algae. While members of the Trebouxiophyceae exhibit effective water loss-prevention mechanisms based on the biosynthesis and accumulation of particular organic osmolytes such as polyols, these compounds are so far not reported in representatives of the Streptophyta. In members of the Streptophyta such as Klebsormidium, the most striking observation is the appearance of cross-walls in desiccated samples, which are strongly undulating, suggesting a high degree of mechanical flexibility. This aids in maintaining structural integrity in the dried state and allows the cell to maintain turgor pressure for a prolonged period of time during the dehydration process. Physiological strategies in aeroterrestrial green algae generally include a rapid reduction of photosynthesis during desiccation, but also a rather quick recovery after rewetting, whereas aquatic species are sensitive to drying. The underlying mechanisms such as the affected molecular components of the photosynthetic machinery are poorly understood in green algae. Therefore, modern approaches based on transcriptomics, proteomics, and/or metabolomics are urgently needed to better understand the molecular

  2. Harvesting green algae from eutrophic reservoir by electroflocculation and post-use for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Valero, Enrique; Álvarez, Xana; Cancela, Ángeles; Sánchez, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Each year there are more frequent blooms of green algae and cyanobacteria, representing a serious environmental problem of eutrophication. Electroflocculation (EF) was studied to harvest the algae which are present in reservoirs, as well as different factors which may influence on the effectiveness of the process: the voltage applied to the culture medium, run times, electrodes separation and natural sedimentation. Finally, the viability of its use to obtain biodiesel was studied by direct transesterification. The EF process carried out at 10V for 1min, with an electrode separation of 5.5cm and a height of 4cm in culture vessel, obtained a recovery efficiency greater than 95%, and octadecenoic and palmitic acids were obtained as the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). EF is an effective method to harvest green algae during the blooms, obtaining the greatest amount of biomass for subsequent use as a source of biodiesel.

  3. Evaluation of sample extraction methods for proteomics analysis of green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-05-01

    Many protein extraction methods have been developed for plant proteome analysis but information is limited on the optimal protein extraction method from algae species. This study evaluated four protein extraction methods, i.e. direct lysis buffer method, TCA-acetone method, phenol method, and phenol/TCA-acetone method, using green algae Chlorella vulgaris for proteome analysis. The data presented showed that phenol/TCA-acetone method was superior to the other three tested methods with regards to shotgun proteomics. Proteins identified using shotgun proteomics were validated using sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) technique. Additionally, SWATH provides protein quantitation information from different methods and protein abundance using different protein extraction methods was evaluated. These results highlight the importance of green algae protein extraction method for subsequent MS analysis and identification.

  4. Sulfated phenolic acids from Dasycladales siphonous green algae.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Caroline; Welling, Matthew; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-09-01

    Sulfated aromatic acids play a central role as mediators of chemical interactions and physiological processes in marine algae and seagrass. Among others, Dasycladus vermicularis (Scopoli) Krasser 1898 uses a sulfated hydroxylated coumarin derivative as storage metabolite for a protein cross linker that can be activated upon mechanical disruption of the alga. We introduce a comprehensive monitoring technique for sulfated metabolites based on fragmentation patterns in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and applied it to Dasycladales. This allowed the identification of two new aromatic sulfate esters 4-(sulfooxy)phenylacetic acid and 4-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid. The two metabolites were synthesized to prove the mass spectrometry-based structure elucidation in co-injections. We show that both metabolites are transformed to the corresponding desulfated phenols by sulfatases of bacteria. In biofouling experiments with Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens the desulfated forms were more active than the sulfated ones. Sulfatation might thus represent a measure of detoxification that enables the algae to store inactive forms of metabolites that are activated by settling organisms and then act as defense. PMID:26188914

  5. Final technical report [Molecular genetic analysis of biophotolytic hydrogen production in green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Mets, Laurens

    2000-12-31

    The principal objective of this project was to identify genes necessary for biophotolytic hydrogen production in green algae, using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an experimental organism. The main strategy was to isolate mutants that are selectively deficient in hydrogen production and to genetically map, physically isolate, and ultimately sequence the affected genes.

  6. Some properties and amino acid sequence of plastocyanin from a green alga, Ulva arasakii.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, F; Fukazawa, T; Mishina, Y; Sugimura, Y

    1989-08-01

    Plastocyanin was purified from a multicellular, marine green alga, Ulva arasakii, by conventional methods to homogeneity. The oxidized plastocyanin showed absorption maxima at 252, 276.8, 460, 595.3, and 775 nm, and shoulders at 259, 265, 269, and 282.5 nm; the ratio A276.8/A595.3 was 1.5. The midpoint redox potential was determined to be 0.356 V at pH 7.0 with a ferri- and ferrocyanide system. The molecular weight was estimated to be 10,200 and 11,000 by SDS-PAGE and by gel filtration, respectively. U. arasakii also has a small amount of cytochrome c6, like Enteromorpha prolifera. The amino acid sequence of U. arasakii plastocyanin was determined by Edman degradation and by carboxypeptidase digestion of the plastocyanin, six tryptic peptides, and five staphylococcal protease peptides. The plastocyanin contained 98 amino acid residues, giving a molecular weight of 10,236 including one copper atom. The complete sequence is as follows: AQIVKLGGDDGALAFVPSKISVAAGEAIEFVNNAGFPHNIVFDEDAVPAGVDADAISYDDYLNSKGETV VRKLSTPGVY G VYCEPHAGAGMKMTITVQ. The sequence of U. arasakii plastocyanin is closet to that of the E. prolifera protein (85% homology). A phylogenetic tree of five algal and two higher plant plastocyanins was constructed by comparing the amino acid differences. The branching order is considered to be as follows: a blue-green alga, unicellular green algae, multicellular green algae, and higher plants. PMID:2509442

  7. Effects of p-Cresol on photosynthetic and respiration rates of a filamentous green alga (spirogyra)

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, J.; Kilham, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of spilled phenols and cresols from coal gasification plants on the green alga SPIROYRA was investigated in experimental streams built by the US EPA near Monticello, Minnesota. P-Cresol at low concentrations inhibited photosynthesis and increased algal respiration rates. (JMT)

  8. Utilizing the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for microbial electricity generation: a living solar cell.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam; Schröder, Uwe; Scholz, Fritz

    2005-10-01

    By employing living cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we demonstrate the possibility of direct electricity generation from microbial photosynthetic activity. The presented concept is based on an in situ oxidative depletion of hydrogen, photosynthetically produced by C. reinhardtii under sulfur-deprived conditions, by polymer-coated electrocatalytic electrodes. PMID:15696280

  9. The influence of extracellular compounds produced by selected Baltic cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates on growth of green algae Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żak, Adam; Kosakowska, Alicja

    2015-12-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by bacteria, fungi, algae and plants could affect the growth and development of biological and agricultural systems. This natural process that occurs worldwide is known as allelopathy. The main goal of this work was to investigate the influence of metabolites obtained from phytoplankton monocultures on the growth of green algae Chlorella vulgaris. We selected 6 species occurring in the Baltic Sea from 3 different taxonomic groups: cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; Planktothrix agardhii), diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana; Chaetoceros wighamii) and dinoflagellates (Alexandrium ostenfeldii; Prorocentrum minimum). In this study we have demonstrated that some of selected organisms caused allelopathic effects against microalgae. Both the negative and positive effects of collected cell-free filtrates on C. vulgaris growth, chlorophyll a concentration and fluorescence parameters (OJIP, QY, NPQ) have been observed. No evidence has been found for the impact on morphology and viability of C. vulgaris cells.

  10. Combined effect of oil, oil products and dispersants on the blue-green algae Synechocystis aquatilis and Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Gapochka, L.D.; Brodskii, L.I.; Kravchenko, M.E.; Fedorov, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    The study of the combined effect of oil, oil products and dispersants on the growth of the blue-green algae Synechocystis aquatilis and Anabaena variabilis has shown that out of 12 studied oil-dispersant pairs 6 revealed a positive relationship, which provides evidence for a decrease in oil and oil products toxic effect in the presence of a dispersant. The positive interaction between oil and oil products was found. The negative oil and oil products effect on all studied indices of A. variabilis culture increases with time.

  11. Grazing on green algae by the periwinkle Littorina littorea in the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsen, U.; Reise, K.

    1994-06-01

    On sedimentary tidal flats in the Wadden Sea near the Island of Sylt, the periwinkle Littorina littorea occurred preferentially on clusters and beds of mussels and on shell beds (100 to 350 m-2), achieved moderate densities on green algal patches or mats (20 to 50 m-2), and remained rare on bare sediments (<5 m-2). Green algae covering>10% of sediment surface appeared in summer on approximately one third of the tidal zone, mainly in the upper and sheltered parts and almost never on mussel and shell beds. In feeding experiments, L. littorea ingested more of the dominant alge, Enteromorpha, than of Ulva, irrespective of whether or not algae were fresh or decaying. The tough thalli of Chaetomorpha were hardly consumed. Snails feeding on Enteromorpha produced fecal pellets from which new growth of Enteromorpha started. In the absence of periwinkles, Enteromorpha developed on mussels and the attached fucoids. Experimentally increased snail densities on sediments prevented green algal development, but the snails were unable to graze down established algal mats. It is concluded that natural densities of L. littorea hardly affect the ephemeral mass development of green algae on sediments. However, where the snails occur at high densities, i.e. on mussel beds, green algal development may be prevented.

  12. Algae.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Algae frequently get a bad press. Pond slime is a problem in garden pools, algal blooms can produce toxins that incapacitate or kill animals and humans and even the term seaweed is pejorative - a weed being a plant growing in what humans consider to be the wrong place. Positive aspects of algae are generally less newsworthy - they are the basis of marine food webs, supporting fisheries and charismatic marine megafauna from albatrosses to whales, as well as consuming carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. Here we consider what algae are, their diversity in terms of evolutionary origin, size, shape and life cycles, and their role in the natural environment and in human affairs.

  13. A novel ether-linked phytol-containing digalactosylglycerolipid in the marine green alga, Ulva pertusa

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Nagamatsu, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Matsunaga, Naoyuki; Okino, Nozomu; Yamaguchi, Kuniko; Ito, Makoto

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Alkaline-resistant galactolipid, AEGL, was found in marine algae. • The sugar moiety of AEGL is identical to that of digalactosyldiacylglycerol. • AEGL is the first identified glycolipid that possesses an ether-linked phytol. • AEGL is ubiquitously distributed in green, red and brown marine algae. - Abstract: Galactosylglycerolipids (GGLs) and chlorophyll are characteristic components of chloroplast in photosynthetic organisms. Although chlorophyll is anchored to the thylakoid membrane by phytol (tetramethylhexadecenol), this isoprenoid alcohol has never been found as a constituent of GGLs. We here described a novel GGL, in which phytol was linked to the glycerol backbone via an ether linkage. This unique GGL was identified as an Alkaline-resistant and Endogalactosylceramidase (EGALC)-sensitive GlycoLipid (AEGL) in the marine green alga, Ulva pertusa. EGALC is an enzyme that is specific to the R-Galα/β1-6Galβ1-structure of galactolipids. The structure of U. pertusa AEGL was determined following its purification to 1-O-phytyl-3-O-Galα1-6Galβ1-sn-glycerol by mass spectrometric and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. AEGLs were ubiquitously distributed in not only green, but also red and brown marine algae; however, they were rarely detected in terrestrial plants, eukaryotic phytoplankton, or cyanobacteria.

  14. Mixotrophy in the terrestrial green alga Apatococcus lobatus (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Gustavs, Lydia; Schumann, Rhena; Karsten, Ulf; Lorenz, Maike

    2016-04-01

    The green microalga Apatococcus lobatus is widely distributed in terrestrial habitats throughout many climatic zones. It dominates green biofilms on natural and artificial substrata in temperate latitudes and is regarded as a key genus of obligate terrestrial consortia. Until now, its isolation, cultivation and application as a terrestrial model organism has been hampered by slow growth rates and low growth capacities. A mixotrophic culturing approach clearly enhanced the accumulation of biomass, thereby permitting the future application of A. lobatus in different types of bio-assays necessary for material and biofilm research. The ability of A. lobatus to grow mixotrophically is assumed as a competitive advantage in terrestrial habitats.

  15. Identification of cypermethrin induced protein changes in green algae by iTRAQ quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-04-29

    Cypermethrin (CYP) is one of the most widely used pesticides in large scale for agricultural and domestic purpose and the residue often seriously affects aquatic system. Environmental pollutant-induced protein changes in organisms could be detected by proteomics, leading to discovery of potential biomarkers and understanding of mode of action. While proteomics investigations of CYP stress in some animal models have been well studied, few reports about the effects of exposure to CYP on algae proteome were published. To determine CYP effect in algae, the impact of various dosages (0.001μg/L, 0.01μg/L and 1μg/L) of CYP on green algae Chlorella vulgaris for 24h and 96h was investigated by using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics technique. A total of 162 and 198 proteins were significantly altered after CYP exposure for 24h and 96h, respectively. Overview of iTRAQ results indicated that the influence of CYP on algae protein might be dosage-dependent. Functional analysis of differentially expressed proteins showed that CYP could induce protein alterations related to photosynthesis, stress responses and carbohydrate metabolism. This study provides a comprehensive view of complex mode of action of algae under CYP stress and highlights several potential biomarkers for further investigation of pesticide-exposed plant and algae. PMID:26961939

  16. Identification of cypermethrin induced protein changes in green algae by iTRAQ quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-04-29

    Cypermethrin (CYP) is one of the most widely used pesticides in large scale for agricultural and domestic purpose and the residue often seriously affects aquatic system. Environmental pollutant-induced protein changes in organisms could be detected by proteomics, leading to discovery of potential biomarkers and understanding of mode of action. While proteomics investigations of CYP stress in some animal models have been well studied, few reports about the effects of exposure to CYP on algae proteome were published. To determine CYP effect in algae, the impact of various dosages (0.001μg/L, 0.01μg/L and 1μg/L) of CYP on green algae Chlorella vulgaris for 24h and 96h was investigated by using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics technique. A total of 162 and 198 proteins were significantly altered after CYP exposure for 24h and 96h, respectively. Overview of iTRAQ results indicated that the influence of CYP on algae protein might be dosage-dependent. Functional analysis of differentially expressed proteins showed that CYP could induce protein alterations related to photosynthesis, stress responses and carbohydrate metabolism. This study provides a comprehensive view of complex mode of action of algae under CYP stress and highlights several potential biomarkers for further investigation of pesticide-exposed plant and algae.

  17. Relationship between water solubility of chlorobenzenes and their effects on a freshwater green alga

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.T.S.; Chau, Y.K.; Rhamey, J.S.; Docker, M.

    1984-01-01

    The effective concentrations of benzene and 12 chlorobenzenes that reduced 50% of the primary productivity (EC/sub 50/) of a freshwater green alga, Ankistrodesmus falcatus, were determined. Benzene was the least toxic chemical and the toxicity increased as the degree of chlorine substitution in the aromatic ring increased. No EC/sub 50/ value could be obtained for HCB. A quantitative relationship was found to exist between water solubility, lipophilicity and the EC/sub 50/. A good correlation was also observed between the EC/sub 50/ for this alga and other toxicity data for various aquatic biota.

  18. Water Collective Dynamics in Whole Photosynthetic Green Algae as Affected by Protein Single Mutation.

    PubMed

    Russo, Daniela; Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya D; Haertlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; De Francesco, Alessio; Campi, Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    In the context of the importance of water molecules for protein function/dynamics relationship, the role of water collective dynamics in Chlamydomonas green algae carrying both native and mutated photosynthetic proteins has been investigated by neutron Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. Results show that single point genetic mutation may notably affect collective density fluctuations in hydrating water providing important insight on the transmission of information possibly correlated to biological functionality. In particular, we highlight that the damping factor of the excitations is larger in the native compared to the mutant algae as a signature of a different plasticity and structure of the hydrogen bond network. PMID:27300078

  19. MACROALGAL VOLUME: A SURROGATE FOR BIOMASS IN SOME GREEN ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two green algal morphotypes, filamentous species (e.g., Chaetomorpha spp.) and flattened or tubular (e.g.,Ulva spp. and Enteromorpha spp.) were collected from 63 sites within the Yaquina Bay estuary (Newport, OR) and used to compare an in situ volumetric biomass estimator to the...

  20. The effect of low temperature on Antarctic endolithic green algae.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M A; Huang G-H; Morris, G J; Friedmann, E I

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that undercooling to about -5 degrees C occurs in colonized Beacon sandstones of the Ross Desert, Antarctica. High-frequency temperature oscillations between 5 degrees C and -5 degrees C or -10 degrees C (which occur in nature on the rock surface) did not damage Hemichloris antarctica. In a cryomicroscope, H. antarctica appeared to be undamaged after slow or rapid cooling to -50 degrees C. 14CO2 incorporation after freezing to -20 degrees C was unaffected in H. antarctica or in Trebouxia sp. but slightly depressed in Stichococcus sp. (isolated from a less extreme Antarctic habitat). These results suggest that the freezing regime in the Antarctic desert is not injurious to endolithic algae. It is likely that the freezing-point depression inside the rock makes available liquid water for metabolic activity at subzero temperatures. Freezing may occur more frequently on the rock surface and contribute to the abiotic nature of the surface.

  1. The effect of low temperature on Antarctic endolithic green algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, M. A.; Morris, G. J.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that undercooling to about -5 degrees C occurs in colonized Beacon sandstones of the Ross Desert, Antarctica. High-frequency temperature oscillations between 5 degrees C and -5 degrees C or -10 degrees C (which occur in nature on the rock surface) did not damage Hemichloris antarctica. In a cryomicroscope, H. antarctica appeared to be undamaged after slow or rapid cooling to -50 degrees C. 14CO2 incorporation after freezing to -20 degrees C was unaffected in H. antarctica or in Trebouxia sp. but slightly depressed in Stichococcus sp. (isolated from a less extreme Antarctic habitat). These results suggest that the freezing regime in the Antarctic desert is not injurious to endolithic algae. It is likely that the freezing-point depression inside the rock makes available liquid water for metabolic activity at subzero temperatures. Freezing may occur more frequently on the rock surface and contribute to the abiotic nature of the surface.

  2. [Evolutional relationships of endemic green algae Draparnaldioides simplex from Lake Baikal with nonbaicalian taxa of family Chaetoforaceae (Chlorophyta)].

    PubMed

    Mincheva, E V; Peretolchina, T E; Izhboldina, L A; Kravtsova, L S; Shcherbakov, D Iu

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships between the endemic baicalian green algae Draparnaldioides simplex C. meyer et Skabitsch, 1976 and holarctic taxa of green algae were studied using the fragment of 18S rDNA and internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2 of nuclear DNA. We showed that the baicalian genus Draparnaldioides is a separate taxon. The genetic difference between Draparnaldioides and nonbaicalian taxa of the sister groups of the green algae are small enough to indicate relative youth of the genus Draparnaldioides and its recent radiation from a common ancestor with Draparnaldia and Chaetophora.

  3. The complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of Nephroselmis olivacea and Pedinomonas minor. Two radically different evolutionary patterns within green algae.

    PubMed

    Turmel, M; Lemieux, C; Burger, G; Lang, B F; Otis, C; Plante, I; Gray, M W

    1999-09-01

    Green plants appear to comprise two sister lineages, Chlorophyta (classes Chlorophyceae, Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, and Prasinophyceae) and Streptophyta (Charophyceae and Embryophyta, or land plants). To gain insight into the nature of the ancestral green plant mitochondrial genome, we have sequenced the mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of Nephroselmis olivacea and Pedinomonas minor. These two green algae are presumptive members of the Prasinophyceae. This class is thought to include descendants of the earliest diverging green algae. We find that Nephroselmis and Pedinomonas mtDNAs differ markedly in size, gene content, and gene organization. Of the green algal mtDNAs sequenced so far, that of Nephroselmis (45,223 bp) is the most ancestral (minimally diverged) and occupies the phylogenetically most basal position within the Chlorophyta. Its repertoire of 69 genes closely resembles that in the mtDNA of Prototheca wickerhamii, a later diverging trebouxiophycean green alga. Three of the Nephroselmis genes (nad10, rpl14, and rnpB) have not been identified in previously sequenced mtDNAs of green algae and land plants. In contrast, the 25,137-bp Pedinomonas mtDNA contains only 22 genes and retains few recognizably ancestral features. In several respects, including gene content and rate of sequence divergence, Pedinomonas mtDNA resembles the reduced mtDNAs of chlamydomonad algae, with which it is robustly affiliated in phylogenetic analyses. Our results confirm the existence of two radically different patterns of mitochondrial genome evolution within the green algae.

  4. The complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of Nephroselmis olivacea and Pedinomonas minor. Two radically different evolutionary patterns within green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Turmel, M; Lemieux, C; Burger, G; Lang, B F; Otis, C; Plante, I; Gray, M W

    1999-01-01

    Green plants appear to comprise two sister lineages, Chlorophyta (classes Chlorophyceae, Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, and Prasinophyceae) and Streptophyta (Charophyceae and Embryophyta, or land plants). To gain insight into the nature of the ancestral green plant mitochondrial genome, we have sequenced the mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of Nephroselmis olivacea and Pedinomonas minor. These two green algae are presumptive members of the Prasinophyceae. This class is thought to include descendants of the earliest diverging green algae. We find that Nephroselmis and Pedinomonas mtDNAs differ markedly in size, gene content, and gene organization. Of the green algal mtDNAs sequenced so far, that of Nephroselmis (45,223 bp) is the most ancestral (minimally diverged) and occupies the phylogenetically most basal position within the Chlorophyta. Its repertoire of 69 genes closely resembles that in the mtDNA of Prototheca wickerhamii, a later diverging trebouxiophycean green alga. Three of the Nephroselmis genes (nad10, rpl14, and rnpB) have not been identified in previously sequenced mtDNAs of green algae and land plants. In contrast, the 25,137-bp Pedinomonas mtDNA contains only 22 genes and retains few recognizably ancestral features. In several respects, including gene content and rate of sequence divergence, Pedinomonas mtDNA resembles the reduced mtDNAs of chlamydomonad algae, with which it is robustly affiliated in phylogenetic analyses. Our results confirm the existence of two radically different patterns of mitochondrial genome evolution within the green algae. PMID:10488238

  5. Mixotrophy in the terrestrial green alga Apatococcus lobatus (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Gustavs, Lydia; Schumann, Rhena; Karsten, Ulf; Lorenz, Maike

    2016-04-01

    The green microalga Apatococcus lobatus is widely distributed in terrestrial habitats throughout many climatic zones. It dominates green biofilms on natural and artificial substrata in temperate latitudes and is regarded as a key genus of obligate terrestrial consortia. Until now, its isolation, cultivation and application as a terrestrial model organism has been hampered by slow growth rates and low growth capacities. A mixotrophic culturing approach clearly enhanced the accumulation of biomass, thereby permitting the future application of A. lobatus in different types of bio-assays necessary for material and biofilm research. The ability of A. lobatus to grow mixotrophically is assumed as a competitive advantage in terrestrial habitats. PMID:27037595

  6. Structure of PSI, PSII and antennae complexes from yellow-green alga Xanthonema debile.

    PubMed

    Gardian, Zdenko; Tichý, Josef; Vácha, František

    2011-05-01

    Photosynthetic carbon fixation by Chromophytes is one of the significant components of a carbon cycle on the Earth. Their photosynthetic apparatus is different in pigment composition from that of green plants and algae. In this work we report structural maps of photosystem I, photosystem II and light harvesting antenna complexes isolated from a soil chromophytic alga Xanthonema debile (class Xanthophyceae). Electron microscopy of negatively stained preparations followed by single particle analysis revealed that the overall structure of Xanthophytes' PSI and PSII complexes is similar to that known from higher plants or algae. Averaged top-view projections of Xanthophytes' light harvesting antenna complexes (XLH) showed two groups of particles. Smaller ones that correspond to a trimeric form of XLH, bigger particles resemble higher oligomeric form of XLH. PMID:21455629

  7. Genome-wide characterization of genetic variation in the unicellular, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyosik; Ehrenreich, Ian M

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for studying cilia, photosynthesis, and other core features of eukaryotes, and is also an emerging source of biofuels. Despite its importance to basic and applied biological research, the level and pattern of genetic variation in this haploid green alga has yet to be characterized on a genome-wide scale. To improve understanding of C. reinhardtii's genetic variability, we generated low coverage whole genome resequencing data for nearly all of the available isolates of this species, which were sampled from a number of sites in North America over the past ∼70 years. Based on the analysis of more than 62,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, we identified two groups of isolates that represent geographical subpopulations of the species. We also found that measurements of genetic diversity were highly variable throughout the genome, in part due to technical factors. We studied the level and pattern of linkage disequilibrium (LD), and observed one chromosome that exhibits elevated LD. Furthermore, we detected widespread evidence of recombination across the genome, which implies that outcrossing occurs in natural populations of this species. In summary, our study provides multiple insights into the sequence diversity of C. reinhardtii that will be useful to future studies of natural genetic variation in this organism.

  8. Class XIII myosins from the green alga Acetabularia: driving force in organelle transport and tip growth?

    PubMed

    Vugrek, Oliver; Sawitzky, Heiko; Menzel, Diedrik

    2003-01-01

    The green alga Acetabularia cliftonii (Dasycladales) contains at least two myosin genes, which already have been assigned class XIII of the myosin superfamily (Cope et al., 1996, Structure 4: 969-987). Here we report a complete analysis of their gene structure and their corresponding transcripts Aclmyo1 and Aclmyo2. Despite promising Northern blot data no evidence for alternative splicing could be found. Dissecting the primary structure at complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) level we found a myosin typical organization in head, neck and variable tail region. Most striking is the extremely short tail region of Aclmyo1 with only 18 residues and the maximum number of 7 IQ motifs in Aclmyo2. Probing Acetabularia protein extracts with an antibody raised to a synthetic peptide derived from the amino terminal region in Alcmyo1 showed cross-reactivity to a polypeptide with a molecular mass of approximately 100 kD. This corresponds to the predicted molecular weight of Aclmyo1, which is 106 kD as deduced from the amino acid sequence. Additionally, the same cross-reactive protein is capable of binding F-actin as indicated by a co-sedimentation assay. Confocal laser scanning microscopy with raised antibody revealed co-localization with organelles, the budding region of lateral whorls and the cell apex suggesting involvement of putative Acetabularia myosin in organelle transport and tip growth.

  9. Comparison of ESTs from juvenile and adult phases of the giant unicellular green alga Acetabularia acetabulum

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Isabelle M; Wilkinson, Mark D; Hernandez, J Marcela; Schwarz-Sommer, Zsuzsanna; Grotewold, Erich; Mandoli, Dina F

    2004-01-01

    Background Acetabularia acetabulum is a giant unicellular green alga whose size and complex life cycle make it an attractive model for understanding morphogenesis and subcellular compartmentalization. The life cycle of this marine unicell is composed of several developmental phases. Juvenile and adult phases are temporally sequential but physiologically and morphologically distinct. To identify genes specific to juvenile and adult phases, we created two subtracted cDNA libraries, one adult-specific and one juvenile-specific, and analyzed 941 randomly chosen ESTs from them. Results Clustering analysis suggests virtually no overlap between the two libraries. Preliminary expression data also suggests that we were successful at isolating transcripts differentially expressed between the two developmental phases and that many transcripts are specific to one phase or the other. Comparison of our EST sequences against publicly available sequence databases indicates that ESTs from the adult and the juvenile libraries partition into different functional classes. Three conserved sequence elements were common to several of the ESTs and were also found within the genomic sequence of the carbonic anhydrase1 gene from A. acetabulum. To date, these conserved elements are specific to A. acetabulum. Conclusions Our data provide strong evidence that adult and juvenile phases in A. acetabulum vary significantly in gene expression. We discuss their possible roles in cell growth and morphogenesis as well as in phase change. We also discuss the potential role of the conserved elements found within the EST sequences in post-transcriptional regulation, particularly mRNA localization and/or stability. PMID:15070428

  10. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the red alga Porphyra purpurea. Cyanobacterial introns and shared ancestry of red and green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Burger, G; Saint-Louis, D; Gray, M W; Lang, B F

    1999-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Porphyra purpurea, a circular-mapping genome of 36,753 bp, has been completely sequenced. A total of 57 densely packed genes has been identified, including the basic set typically found in animals and fungi, as well as seven genes characteristic of protist and plant mtDNAs and specifying ribosomal proteins and subunits of succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase. The mitochondrial large subunit rRNA gene contains two group II introns that are extraordinarily similar to those found in the cyanobacterium Calothrix sp, suggesting a recent lateral intron transfer between a bacterial and a mitochondrial genome. Notable features of P. purpurea mtDNA include the presence of two 291-bp inverted repeats that likely mediate homologous recombination, resulting in genome rearrangement, and of numerous sequence polymorphisms in the coding and intergenic regions. Comparative analysis of red algal mitochondrial genomes from five different, evolutionarily distant orders reveals that rhodophyte mtDNAs are unusually uniform in size and gene order. Finally, phylogenetic analyses provide strong evidence that red algae share a common ancestry with green algae and plants. PMID:10488235

  11. Algae.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Algae frequently get a bad press. Pond slime is a problem in garden pools, algal blooms can produce toxins that incapacitate or kill animals and humans and even the term seaweed is pejorative - a weed being a plant growing in what humans consider to be the wrong place. Positive aspects of algae are generally less newsworthy - they are the basis of marine food webs, supporting fisheries and charismatic marine megafauna from albatrosses to whales, as well as consuming carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. Here we consider what algae are, their diversity in terms of evolutionary origin, size, shape and life cycles, and their role in the natural environment and in human affairs. PMID:25004359

  12. Laccase-like enzyme activities from chlorophycean green algae with potential for bioconversion of phenolic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Beuchel, Carl; Liers, Christiane; Reisser, Werner; Harms, Hauke; Schlosser, Dietmar

    2015-06-01

    In order to explore the abundance and potential environmental functions of green algal laccases, we screened various algae for extracellular laccase-like activities, characterized basic features of these activities in selected species and exemplarily studied the transformation of environmental pollutants and complex natural compounds by the laccase of Tetracystis aeria. Oxidation of the classical laccase substrate ABTS was found to be widespread in chlorophycean algae. The oxidation activity detected in members of the 'Scenedesmus' clade was caused by an unknown thermostable low-molecular-mass compound. In contrast, species of the Moewusinia, including Chlamydomonas moewusii and T. aeria, excreted putative 'true' laccases. Phenolic substrates were oxidized by these enzymes optimally at neutral to alkaline pH. The Tetracystis laccase efficiently transformed bisphenol A, 17α-ethinylestradiol, nonylphenol and triclosan in the presence of ABTS as redox mediator, while anthracene, veratrylalcohol and adlerol were not attacked. Lignosulfonate and humic acid underwent slight (de)polymerization reactions in the presence of the laccase and mediator(s), probably involving the oxidation of phenolic constituents. Possible natural functions of the enzymes, such as the synthesis of complex polymers or detoxification processes, may assist the survival of the algae in adverse environments. In contaminated surface waters, laccase-producing green algae might contribute to the environmental breakdown of phenolic pollutants.

  13. Strong tolerance of blue-green alga Microcystis flos-aquae to very high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, F.; Nishihira, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Saigusa, M.; Matsushima, Y.; Yamazaki, D.; Ito, E.

    2015-09-01

    It was shown in our previous reports that a few spores of moss Venturiella could tolerate the very high pressure of 20 GPa for 30 min and germinated a protonema to the length of 30 μm. However, these spores did not grow any further, and disappeared at around 30 days of incubation after seeded. On the other hand, colonies of blue-green alga Microcystis flos-aquae came to appear about 76 days after the moss spores were seeded. Many of these colonies appeared at the places where the moss spores had disappeared. These colonies were formed by the algae that had adhered to the spore cases of the moss and survived after exposure to the very high pressure of 20 GPa. Though the appearance of the colonies of high pressure exposed algae was delayed by about 50 days compared with that of the control group which was not exposed to high pressure, there seems no difference in their shape and color from those of the control group. The pressure tolerance of blue-green alga is found to be enormously strong, and it can survive after exposure to the high pressure which corresponds to the depth of about 550-600 km from the surface of the Earth, just above the lower mantle.

  14. The adsorption potential and recovery of thallium using green micro-algae from eutrophic water sources.

    PubMed

    Birungi, Z S; Chirwa, E M N

    2015-12-15

    Thallium (Tl) is a highly volatile and toxic heavy metal regarded to cause pollution even at very low concentrations of several parts per million. Despite the extremely high risk of Tl in the environment, limited information on removal/recovery exists. The study focussed on the use of green algae to determine the sorption potential and recovery of Tl. From the study, removal efficiency was achieved at 100% for lower concentrations of ≥150 mg/L of Tl. At higher concentrations in a range of 250-500 mg/L, the performance of algae was still higher with sorption capacity (qmax) between 830 and 1000 mg/g. Generally, Chlorella vulgaris was the best adsorbent with a high qmax and lower affinity of 1000 mg/g and 1.11 L/g, respectively. When compared to other studies on Tl adsorption, the tested algae showed a better qmax than most adsorbents. The kinetic studies showed better correlation co-efficient of ≤0.99 for Pseudo-second order model than the first order model. Recovery was achieved highest for C. vulgaris using nitric acid at 93.3%. The strongest functional groups responsible for Tl binding on the algal cell wall were carboxyl and phenols. Green algae from freshwater bodies showed significant potential for Tl removal/recovery from industrial wastewater.

  15. Laccase-like enzyme activities from chlorophycean green algae with potential for bioconversion of phenolic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Beuchel, Carl; Liers, Christiane; Reisser, Werner; Harms, Hauke; Schlosser, Dietmar

    2015-06-01

    In order to explore the abundance and potential environmental functions of green algal laccases, we screened various algae for extracellular laccase-like activities, characterized basic features of these activities in selected species and exemplarily studied the transformation of environmental pollutants and complex natural compounds by the laccase of Tetracystis aeria. Oxidation of the classical laccase substrate ABTS was found to be widespread in chlorophycean algae. The oxidation activity detected in members of the 'Scenedesmus' clade was caused by an unknown thermostable low-molecular-mass compound. In contrast, species of the Moewusinia, including Chlamydomonas moewusii and T. aeria, excreted putative 'true' laccases. Phenolic substrates were oxidized by these enzymes optimally at neutral to alkaline pH. The Tetracystis laccase efficiently transformed bisphenol A, 17α-ethinylestradiol, nonylphenol and triclosan in the presence of ABTS as redox mediator, while anthracene, veratrylalcohol and adlerol were not attacked. Lignosulfonate and humic acid underwent slight (de)polymerization reactions in the presence of the laccase and mediator(s), probably involving the oxidation of phenolic constituents. Possible natural functions of the enzymes, such as the synthesis of complex polymers or detoxification processes, may assist the survival of the algae in adverse environments. In contaminated surface waters, laccase-producing green algae might contribute to the environmental breakdown of phenolic pollutants. PMID:25926529

  16. When the lights go out: the evolutionary fate of free-living colorless green algae.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Martinez, Francisco; Nedelcu, Aurora M; Smith, David R; Adrian, Reyes-Prieto

    2015-05-01

    The endosymbiotic origin of plastids was a launching point for eukaryotic evolution. The autotrophic abilities bestowed by plastids are responsible for much of the eukaryotic diversity we observe today. But despite its many advantages, photosynthesis has been lost numerous times and in disparate lineages throughout eukaryote evolution. For example, among green algae, several groups have lost photosynthesis independently and in response to different selective pressures; these include the parasitic/pathogenic trebouxiophyte genera Helicosporidium and Prototheca, and the free-living chlamydomonadalean genera Polytomella and Polytoma. Here, we examine the published data on colorless green algae and argue that investigations into the different evolutionary routes leading to their current nonphotosynthetic lifestyles provide exceptional opportunities to understand the ecological and genomic factors involved in the loss of photosynthesis. PMID:26042246

  17. Growth of Legionella pneumophila in association with blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria)

    SciTech Connect

    Tison, D.L.; Pope, D.H.; Cherry, W.B.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1980-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila (Legionnaires disease bacterium) of serogroup 1 was isolated from an algal-bacterial mat community growing at 45/sup 0/C in a man-made thermal effluent. This isolate was grown in mineral salts medium at 45/sup 0/C in association with the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Fischerella sp. over a pH range of 6.9 to 7.6. L. pneumophila was apparently using algal extracellular products as its carbon and energy sources. These observations indicate that the temperature, pH, and nutritional requirements of L. pneumophila are not as stringent as those previously observed when cultured on complex media. This association between L. pneumophila and certain blue-green algae suggests an explanation for the apparent widespread distribution of the bacterium in nature.

  18. Ulvan, a Sulfated Polysaccharide from Green Algae, Activates Plant Immunity through the Jasmonic Acid Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaulneau, Valérie; Lafitte, Claude; Jacquet, Christophe; Fournier, Sylvie; Salamagne, Sylvie; Briand, Xavier; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The industrial use of elicitors as alternative tools for disease control needs the identification of abundant sources of them. We report on an elicitor obtained from the green algae Ulva spp. A fraction containing most exclusively the sulfated polysaccharide known as ulvan-induced expression of a GUS gene placed under the control of a lipoxygenase gene promoter. Gene expression profiling was performed upon ulvan treatments on Medicago truncatula and compared to phytohormone effects. Ulvan induced a gene expression signature similar to that observed upon methyl jasmonate treatment (MeJA). Involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in ulvan response was confirmed by detecting induction of protease inhibitory activity and by hormonal profiling of JA, salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Ulvan activity on the hormonal pathway was further consolidated by using Arabidopsis hormonal mutants. Altogether, our results demonstrate that green algae are a potential reservoir of ulvan elicitor which acts through the JA pathway. PMID:20445752

  19. Purification, properties and complete amino acid sequence of the ferredoxin from a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, J M; Jacquot, J P; de Lamotte-Guéry, F; Beauvallet, C; Dutka, S; Gadal, P; Decottignies, P

    1988-03-01

    The ferredoxin was purified from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protein showed typical absorption and circular dichroism spectra of a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin. When compared with spinach ferredoxin, the C. reinhardtii protein was less effective in the catalysis of NADP+ photoreduction, but its activity was higher in the light activation of C. reinhardtii malate dehydrogenase (NADP). The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and of peptides obtained by trypsin and chymotrypsin digestions and by CNBr cleavage. The protein consists of 94 residues, with Tyr at both NH2 and COOH termini. The positions of the four cysteines binding the two iron atoms are similar to those found in other [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. The primary structure of C. reinhardtii ferredoxin showed a great homology (about 80%) with ferredoxins from two other green algae.

  20. A green algae mixture of Scenedesmus and Schroederiella attenuates obesity-linked metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Senthil Arun; Magnusson, Marie; Ward, Leigh C; Paul, Nicholas A; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-04-14

    This study investigated the responses to a green algae mixture of Scenedesmus dimorphus and Schroederiella apiculata (SC) containing protein (46.1% of dry algae), insoluble fibre (19.6% of dry algae), minerals (3.7% of dry algae) and omega-3 fatty acids (2.8% of dry algae) as a dietary intervention in a high carbohydrate, high fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome model in four groups of male Wistar rats. Two groups were fed with a corn starch diet containing 68% carbohydrates as polysaccharides, while the other two groups were fed a diet high in simple carbohydrates (fructose and sucrose in food, 25% fructose in drinking water, total 68%) and fats (saturated and trans fats from beef tallow, total 24%). High carbohydrate, high fat-fed rats showed visceral obesity with hypertension, insulin resistance, cardiovascular remodelling, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. SC supplementation (5% of food) lowered total body and abdominal fat mass, increased lean mass, and attenuated hypertension, impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of inflammatory cells into heart and liver, fibrosis, increased cardiac stiffness, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the high carbohydrate, high fat diet-fed rats. This study suggests that the insoluble fibre or protein in SC helps reverse diet-induced metabolic syndrome.

  1. A Green Algae Mixture of Scenedesmus and Schroederiella Attenuates Obesity-Linked Metabolic Syndrome in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil Arun; Magnusson, Marie; Ward, Leigh C.; Paul, Nicholas A.; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the responses to a green algae mixture of Scenedesmus dimorphus and Schroederiella apiculata (SC) containing protein (46.1% of dry algae), insoluble fibre (19.6% of dry algae), minerals (3.7% of dry algae) and omega-3 fatty acids (2.8% of dry algae) as a dietary intervention in a high carbohydrate, high fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome model in four groups of male Wistar rats. Two groups were fed with a corn starch diet containing 68% carbohydrates as polysaccharides, while the other two groups were fed a diet high in simple carbohydrates (fructose and sucrose in food, 25% fructose in drinking water, total 68%) and fats (saturated and trans fats from beef tallow, total 24%). High carbohydrate, high fat-fed rats showed visceral obesity with hypertension, insulin resistance, cardiovascular remodelling, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. SC supplementation (5% of food) lowered total body and abdominal fat mass, increased lean mass, and attenuated hypertension, impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of inflammatory cells into heart and liver, fibrosis, increased cardiac stiffness, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the high carbohydrate, high fat diet-fed rats. This study suggests that the insoluble fibre or protein in SC helps reverse diet-induced metabolic syndrome. PMID:25875119

  2. Viruses of eukaryotic green algae. Progress report, August 1, 1982-July 1, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Van Etten, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The virus, PBCV-1, which infects the eukaryotic, green alga, Chlorella-NC64A has been characterized and we have begun to look at detailed events associated with its growth cycle. In addition, we have recently discovered other dsDNA viruses from natural sources which replicate in Chlorella NC64A. These viruses can be distinguished from PBCV-1 and from each other by plaque morphology, DNA restriction patterns, and by their resistance to certain restriction endonucleases.

  3. Production of Recombinant Proteins in the Chloroplast of the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Zapata, Daniel; Macedo-Osorio, Karla Soledad; Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Badillo-Corona, Jesus Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be used for the production of valuable recombinant proteins. Here, we describe chloroplast transformation of C. reinhardtii followed by protein detection. Genes of interest integrate stably by homologous recombination into the chloroplast genome following introduction by particle bombardment. Genes are inherited and expressed in lines recovered after selection in the presence of an antibiotic. Recombinant proteins can be detected by conventional techniques like immunoblotting and purified from liquid cultures.

  4. Viruses of eukaryotic green algae. Final technical report, June 1, 1989--February 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Van Etten, J.L.

    1992-12-31

    We have isolated and partially characterized many large, polyhedral, DNA containing, plaque forming viruses which infect certain unicellular, eukaryotic, chlorella-like green algae. These viruses have several unique features, including the fact that they code for DNA site-specific endonucleases and DNA methyltransferases. The primary objectives of this study were to identify, clone, and characterize some of the virus-encoded DNA methyltransferases and DNA restriction endonucleases in order to understand their biological function.

  5. Production of Recombinant Proteins in the Chloroplast of the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Zapata, Daniel; Macedo-Osorio, Karla Soledad; Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Badillo-Corona, Jesus Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be used for the production of valuable recombinant proteins. Here, we describe chloroplast transformation of C. reinhardtii followed by protein detection. Genes of interest integrate stably by homologous recombination into the chloroplast genome following introduction by particle bombardment. Genes are inherited and expressed in lines recovered after selection in the presence of an antibiotic. Recombinant proteins can be detected by conventional techniques like immunoblotting and purified from liquid cultures. PMID:26614282

  6. The xanthophyll cycle and NPQ in diverse desert and aquatic green algae.

    PubMed

    Lunch, Claire K; Lafountain, Amy M; Thomas, Suzanne; Frank, Harry A; Lewis, Louise A; Cardon, Zoe G

    2013-07-01

    It has long been suspected that photoprotective mechanisms in green algae are similar to those in seed plants. However, exceptions have recently surfaced among aquatic and marine green algae in several taxonomic classes. Green algae are highly diverse genetically, falling into 13 named classes, and they are diverse ecologically, with many lineages including members from freshwater, marine, and terrestrial habitats. Genetically similar species living in dramatically different environments are potentially a rich source of information about variations in photoprotective function. Using aquatic and desert-derived species from three classes of green algae, we examined the induction of photoprotection under high light, exploring the relationship between nonphotochemical quenching and the xanthophyll cycle. In liquid culture, behavior of aquatic Entransia fimbriata (Klebsormidiophyceae) generally matched patterns observed in seed plants. Nonphotochemical quenching was lowest after overnight dark adaptation, increased with light intensity, and the extent of nonphotochemical quenching correlated with the extent of deepoxidation of xanthophyll cycle pigments. In contrast, overnight dark adaptation did not minimize nonphotochemical quenching in the other species studied: desert Klebsormidium sp. (Klebsormidiophyceae), desert and aquatic Cylindrocystis sp. (Zygnematophyceae), and desert Stichococcus sp. (Trebouxiophyceae). Instead, exposure to low light reduced nonphotochemical quenching below dark-adapted levels. De-epoxidation of xanthophyll cycle pigments paralleled light-induced changes in nonphotochemical quenching for species within Klebsormidiophyceae and Trebouxiophyceae, but not Zygnematophyceae. Inhibition of violaxanthin-zeaxanthin conversion by dithiothreitol reduced high-light-associated nonphotochemical quenching in all species (Zygnematophyceae the least), indicating that zeaxanthin can contribute to photoprotection as in seed plants but to different extents

  7. Cryptic sex in the smallest eukaryotic marine green alga.

    PubMed

    Grimsley, Nigel; Péquin, Bérangère; Bachy, Charles; Moreau, Hervé; Piganeau, Gwenaël

    2010-01-01

    Ostreococcus spp. are common worldwide oceanic picoeukaryotic pelagic algae. The complete genomes of three strains from different ecological niches revealed them to represent biologically distinct species despite their identical cellular morphologies (cryptic species). Their tiny genomes (13 Mb), with approximately 20 chromosomes, are colinear and densely packed with coding sequences, but no sexual life cycle has been described. Seventeen new strains of one of these species, Ostreococcus tauri, were isolated from 98 seawater samplings from the NW Mediterranean by filtering, culturing, cloning, and plating for single colonies and identification by sequencing their ribosomal 18S gene. In order to find the genetic markers for detection of polymorphisms and sexual recombination, we used an in silico approach to screen available genomic data. Intergenic regions of DNA likely to evolve neutrally were analyzed following polymerase chain reaction amplification of sequences using flanking primers from adjacent conserved coding sequences that were present as syntenic pairs in two different species of Ostreococcus. Analyses of such DNA regions from eight marker loci on two chromosomes from each strain revealed that the isolated O. tauri clones were haploid and that the overall level of polymorphism was approximately 0.01. Four different genetic tests for recombination showed that sexual exchanges must be inferred to account for the between-locus and between-chromosome marker combinations observed. However, our data suggest that sexual encounters are infrequent because we estimate the frequency of meioses/mitoses among the sampled strains to be 10(-6). Ostreococcus tauri and related species encode and express core genes for mitosis and meiosis, but their mechanisms of cell division and recombination, nevertheless, remain enigmatic because a classical eukaryotic spindle with 40 canonical microtubules would be much too large for the available approximately 0.9-microm(3) cellular

  8. Multiple regulatory mechanisms in the chloroplast of green algae: relation to hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Antal, Taras K; Krendeleva, Tatyana E; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2015-09-01

    A complex regulatory network in the chloroplast of green algae provides an efficient tool for maintenance of energy and redox balance in the cell under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In this review, we discuss the structural and functional organizations of electron transport pathways in the chloroplast, and regulation of photosynthesis in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The focus is on the regulatory mechanisms induced in response to nutrient deficiency stress and anoxia and especially on the role of a hydrogenase-mediated reaction in adaptation to highly reducing conditions and ATP deficiency in the cell. PMID:25986411

  9. Cell-cycle regulation in green algae dividing by multiple fission.

    PubMed

    Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém

    2014-06-01

    Green algae dividing by multiple fission comprise unrelated genera but are connected by one common feature: under optimal growth conditions, they can divide into more than two daughter cells. The number of daughter cells, also known as the division number, is relatively stable for most species and usually ranges from 4 to 16. The number of daughter cells is dictated by growth rate and is modulated by light and temperature. Green algae dividing by multiple fission can thus be used to study coordination of growth and progression of the cell cycle. Algal cultures can be synchronized naturally by alternating light/dark periods so that growth occurs in the light and DNA replication(s) and nuclear and cellular division(s) occur in the dark; synchrony in such cultures is almost 100% and can be maintained indefinitely. Moreover, the pattern of cell-cycle progression can be easily altered by differing growth conditions, allowing for detailed studies of coordination between individual cell-cycle events. Since the 1950s, green algae dividing by multiple fission have been studied as a unique model for cell-cycle regulation. Future sequencing of algal genomes will provide additional, high precision tools for physiological, taxonomic, structural, and molecular studies in these organisms.

  10. Heterotrimeric G proteins in green algae: an early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophyaceaen green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions. PMID:24614119

  11. Unique regulation of the Calvin cycle in the ultrasmall green alga Ostreococcus.

    PubMed

    Robbens, Steven; Petersen, Jörn; Brinkmann, Henner; Rouzé, Pierre; Van de Peer, Yves

    2007-05-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapAB) and CP12 are two major players in controlling the inactivation of the Calvin cycle in land plants at night. GapB originated from a GapA gene duplication and differs from GapA by the presence of a specific C-terminal extension that was recruited from CP12. While GapA and CP12 are assumed to be generally present in the Plantae (glaucophytes, red and green algae, and plants), up to now GapB was exclusively found in Streptophyta, including the enigmatic green alga Mesostigma viride. However, here we show that two closely related prasinophycean green algae, Ostreococcus tauri and Ostreococcus lucimarinus, also possess a GapB gene, while CP12 is missing. This remarkable finding either antedates the GapA/B gene duplication or indicates a lateral recruitment. Moreover, Ostreococcus is the first case where the crucial CP12 function may be completely replaced by GapB-mediated GapA/B aggregation.

  12. Heterotrimeric G proteins in green algae: an early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophyaceaen green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions.

  13. The prospect function of terrestrial nitrogen-fixing blue-green algae on the fixation of desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yusuo; Lei, Jiaqiang

    2003-07-01

    The Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae, which are possessed of both photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, are the leading organisms in the adverse circumstances. With their typical cell structures and physiological abilities, they are strongly resistant to drought, infertility etc. The growth of Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae can rich the soils in nitrogen and organic compounds, which are benefit to other microbes and plants. Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae are widely distributed in Gurbantunggut Desert. It was estimated that about 40% of the surface of the desert are covered by the "Black Crust". "Black Crust" is mainly occupied by Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae. It is Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae that construct the mechanical crust with a little other algae and fungi through biological, chemical and physical actions. So Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae play an important part in desert fixation. It was analyzed that there are three species of the blue-greens in the "Black Crust": Microcoleus vaginatus(Vauch)Gom.,Scytonema ocellatum Lynbye and Schizothrix mella Gardner. We had isolated Microcoleus vaginatus(Vauch)Gom. and Scytonema ocellatum Lynbye. Some tests had been made to prove the feasibility of the desert fixation of the Blue-greens. Under experiment conditions, the blue-greens grown on the surface of sand, covered the sand quickly after the inoculation, and formed a mechanical fixed surface layer (7 days for Microcoleus vaginatus, 15-21 days for Scytonema ocellatum).

  14. Effects of alginate oligosaccharide mixtures on the growth and fatty acid composition of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Yokose, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Toru; Kim, Daekyung; Jiang, Zedong; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    Alginate is a natural acidic linear polysaccharide that is produced by brown seaweeds. It is currently used in a broad range of commercial enterprises, such as the food and medical products industries. Recent evidence has demonstrated that alginate oligosaccharides may function as growth promoting agents for certain plant cells, including those of some green algae. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green alga that is used as a model organism in fundamental molecular biology studies; it is also a producer of biohydrogen. In the present study, we examined effects of two types of alginate oligosaccharide mixtures (AOMs), which were prepared by either enzymatic degradation (ED) or acid hydrolysis (AH), on the growth of C. reinhardtii. Growth was significantly promoted by AOM (ED) in a concentration-dependent manner. The maximum effect was observed on day 4 of treatment. The fatty acid composition of C. reinhardtii was also influenced by AOM (ED); the levels of C16:0, C18:2 cis and C18:3 n-3 increased in treated cells. AOM (AH) and the other saccharides that we tested did not affect the growth of C. reinhardtii. The effects that we identified could promote efficient biomass production by reducing culture times and by changing cellular fatty acid levels.

  15. Evidence for methane production by the marine algae Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, Katharina; Klintzsch, Thomas; Langer, Gerald; Nehrke, Gernot; Bunge, Michael; Schnell, Sylvia; Keppler, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas that affects radiation balance and consequently the earth's climate, still has uncertainties in its sinks and sources. The world's oceans are considered to be a source of CH4 to the atmosphere, although the biogeochemical processes involved in its formation are not fully understood. Several recent studies provided strong evidence of CH4 production in oxic marine and freshwaters, but its source is still a topic of debate. Studies of CH4 dynamics in surface waters of oceans and large lakes have concluded that pelagic CH4 supersaturation cannot be sustained either by lateral inputs from littoral or benthic inputs alone. However, regional and temporal oversaturation of surface waters occurs frequently. This comprises the observation of a CH4 oversaturating state within the surface mixed layer, sometimes also termed the "oceanic methane paradox". In this study we considered marine algae as a possible direct source of CH4. Therefore, the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi was grown under controlled laboratory conditions and supplemented with two 13C-labeled carbon substrates, namely bicarbonate and a position-specific 13C-labeled methionine (R-S-13CH3). The CH4 production was 0.7 µg particular organic carbon (POC) g-1 d-1, or 30 ng g-1 POC h-1. After supplementation of the cultures with the 13C-labeled substrate, the isotope label was observed in headspace CH4. Moreover, the absence of methanogenic archaea within the algal culture and the oxic conditions during CH4 formation suggest that the widespread marine algae Emiliania huxleyi might contribute to the observed spatially and temporally restricted CH4 oversaturation in ocean surface waters.

  16. Acute toxicity of live and decomposing green alga Ulva ( Enteromorpha) prolifera to abalone Haliotis discus hannai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2011-05-01

    From 2007 to 2009, large-scale blooms of green algae (the so-called "green tides") occurred every summer in the Yellow Sea, China. In June 2008, huge amounts of floating green algae accumulated along the coast of Qingdao and led to mass mortality of cultured abalone and sea cucumber. However, the mechanism for the mass mortality of cultured animals remains undetermined. This study examined the toxic effects of Ulva ( Enteromorpha) prolifera, the causative species of green tides in the Yellow Sea during the last three years. The acute toxicity of fresh culture medium and decomposing algal effluent of U. prolifera to the cultured abalone Haliotis discus hannai were tested. It was found that both fresh culture medium and decomposing algal effluent had toxic effects to abalone, and decomposing algal effluent was more toxic than fresh culture medium. The acute toxicity of decomposing algal effluent could be attributed to the ammonia and sulfide presented in the effluent, as well as the hypoxia caused by the decomposition process.

  17. Development of a UV laser-induced fluorescence lidar for monitoring blue-green algae in Lake Suwa.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasunori; Takano, Kengo; Kobayashi, Fumitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Park, Ho-Dong

    2014-10-20

    We developed a UV (355 nm) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) lidar for monitoring the real-time status of blue-green algae. Since the fluorescence spectrum of blue-green algae excited by 355 nm showed the specific fluorescence at 650 nm, the lidar was designed to be able to detect the 650 nm fluorescence as a surveillance method for the algae. The usefulness was confirmed by observation at Lake Suwa over four years (2005-2008). The detection limit of the LIF lidar was 16.65 mg/L for the blue-green algae, which is the range of concentrations in the safe level set by the World Health Organization.

  18. A cryptic intracellular green alga in Ginkgo biloba: ribosomal DNA markers reveal worldwide distribution.

    PubMed

    Trémouillaux-Guiller, Jocelyne; Huss, Volker A R

    2007-07-01

    Intracellular symbioses involving eukaryotic microalgae and a variety of heterotrophic protists and invertebrates are widespread, but are unknown in higher plants. Recently, we reported the isolation and molecular identification of a Coccomyxa-like green alga from in vitro cell cultures of Ginkgo biloba L. This alga resides intracellularly in an immature "precursor" form with a nonfunctional chloroplast, implying that algal photosynthetic activity has no role in this endosymbiosis. In necrotizing Ginkgo cells, precursors evolved into mature algae, proliferated, and were liberated into the culture medium after host cell bursting. In the present paper we demonstrate by molecular methods a worldwide distribution of the alga in planta. Endosymbiont-specific sequences of ribosomal DNA could be traced in Ginkgo tissues of each specimen examined from different geographic locations in Europe, North America, and Asia. The Ginkgo/Coccomyca association represents a new kind of intracellular, vertically inherited symbiosis. Storage bodies, probably of lipid nature, present in the cytoplasm of each partner suggest a possible involvement of the endosymbiont in metabolic pathways of its host.

  19. The effect of natural organic matter on bioaccumulation and toxicity of chlorobenzenes to green algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Lin, Daohui; Wu, Fengchang

    2016-07-01

    The effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on toxicity and bioavailability of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) to aquatic organisms has been investigated with conflicting results and undefined mechanisms, and few studies have been conducted on volatile HOCs. In this study, six volatile chlorobenzenes (CBs) with 1-6 chlorine substitutions were investigated for their bioaccumulation in an acute toxicity to a green alga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) in the presence/absence of Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM). The fluorescence quenching efficiency of SRNOM increased as the number of chlorine substitutions of CBs increased. SRNOM increased the cell-surface hydrophobicity of algae and decreased the release rates of algae-accumulated CBs, thus increasing the concentration factor (CF) and accumulation of the CBs in the algae. SRNOM increased the toxicity of monochlorobenzene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene, decreased the toxicity of pentachlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene, and had no significant effect on the toxicity of 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene and 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene. Relationships between the 96 h CF/IC50 (i.e., the CB concentration leading to a 50% algal growth reduction compared with the control) and physicochemical properties of CBs with/without SRNOM were established, providing reasonable explanations for the experimental results. These findings will help with the accurate assessment of ecological risks of organic pollutants in the presence of NOM.

  20. Identification of phytochelatins in the cadmium-stressed conjugating green alga Micrasterias denticulata.

    PubMed

    Volland, Stefanie; Schaumlöffel, Dirk; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Krauss, Gerd-Joachim; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    Aquatic environments like peat bogs are affected by anthropogenic metal input into the environment. These ecosystems are inhabited by unicellular green algae of the class Zygnematophyceae. In this study the desmid Micrasterias denticulata was stressed with 600 nM Cd, 10 μM Cr and 300 nM Cu for 3 weeks. GSH levels were measured with HPLC and did not differ between the different treatments or the control. According to the metallo-thiolomics concept, mass spectrometry was used as a method for unambiguous thiol peptide identification. PC2, PC3 and PC4 were clearly identified in the Cd stressed sample with UPLC-MS by their MS spectrum and molecular masses. PC2 and PC3 were determined to be the main thiol compounds, while PC4 was only abundant in traces in Micrasterias. In addition, the identity of PC2 and PC3 was confirmed by MS/MS. No PCs were detected in the Cu stressed algae sample. However, in the Cr stressed sample traces of PC2 were indicated by a peak in UPLC-MS at the retention time of the PC2 standard, but the intensity was too low to acquire reliable MS and MS/MS spectra. In this study PCs have been detected for the first time in a green alga of the division Streptophyta, a close relative to higher plants. PMID:23266414

  1. Effect of endocrine disrupters on photosystem II energy fluxes of green algae and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Perron, Marie-Claude; Juneau, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Among the numerous toxics found in the aquatic environment, endocrine disrupters can interfere with the normal functioning of the endocrine system of several organisms, leading to important consequences. Even if algae and cyanobacteria are non-target organisms without endocrine system, our goals were to verify if endocrine disrupters can affect photosynthetic activity and how energy flows through photosystem II (PSII) were altered. To reach these objectives, we exposed, for 15 min, two green algae (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain CC125, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata strain CPCC37) and a toxic and a non-toxic strain of Microcystis aeruginosa (CPCC299 and CPCC632 respectively) to 4-octylphenol, 4-nonylphenol and β-estradiol at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 5 μg/mL. We have shown for the first time that endocrine disrupters may have drastic effects on PSII energy fluxes. Furthermore, we showed that various species have different sensitivity to endocrine disrupters. P. subcapitata was tolerant to each endocrine disrupter tested, while flows of energy through PSII were affected similarly, but at different extent, for the other species. Cyanobacterial PSII energy fluxes were more affected than green algae, suggesting that the prokaryotic characteristics of these organisms are responsible of their high sensitivity.

  2. Identification of phytochelatins in the cadmium-stressed conjugating green alga Micrasterias denticulata.

    PubMed

    Volland, Stefanie; Schaumlöffel, Dirk; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Krauss, Gerd-Joachim; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    Aquatic environments like peat bogs are affected by anthropogenic metal input into the environment. These ecosystems are inhabited by unicellular green algae of the class Zygnematophyceae. In this study the desmid Micrasterias denticulata was stressed with 600 nM Cd, 10 μM Cr and 300 nM Cu for 3 weeks. GSH levels were measured with HPLC and did not differ between the different treatments or the control. According to the metallo-thiolomics concept, mass spectrometry was used as a method for unambiguous thiol peptide identification. PC2, PC3 and PC4 were clearly identified in the Cd stressed sample with UPLC-MS by their MS spectrum and molecular masses. PC2 and PC3 were determined to be the main thiol compounds, while PC4 was only abundant in traces in Micrasterias. In addition, the identity of PC2 and PC3 was confirmed by MS/MS. No PCs were detected in the Cu stressed algae sample. However, in the Cr stressed sample traces of PC2 were indicated by a peak in UPLC-MS at the retention time of the PC2 standard, but the intensity was too low to acquire reliable MS and MS/MS spectra. In this study PCs have been detected for the first time in a green alga of the division Streptophyta, a close relative to higher plants.

  3. Genomic analysis of organismal complexity in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri

    SciTech Connect

    Prochnik, Simon E.; Umen, James; Nedelcu, Aurora; Hallmann, Armin; Miller, Stephen M.; Nishii, Ichiro; Ferris, Patrick; Kuo, Alan; Mitros, Therese; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Hellsten, Uffe; Chapman, Jarrod; Simakov, Oleg; Rensing, Stefan A.; Terry, Astrid; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Jurka, Jerzy; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Schmitt, Rudiger; Kirk, David; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2010-07-01

    Analysis of the Volvox carteri genome reveals that this green alga's increased organismal complexity and multicellularity are associated with modifications in protein families shared with its unicellular ancestor, and not with large-scale innovations in protein coding capacity. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and its morphologically diverse close relatives (the volvocine algae) are uniquely suited for investigating the evolution of multicellularity and development. We sequenced the 138 Mb genome of V. carteri and compared its {approx}14,500 predicted proteins to those of its unicellular relative, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Despite fundamental differences in organismal complexity and life history, the two species have similar protein-coding potentials, and few species-specific protein-coding gene predictions. Interestingly, volvocine algal-specific proteins are enriched in Volvox, including those associated with an expanded and highly compartmentalized extracellular matrix. Our analysis shows that increases in organismal complexity can be associated with modifications of lineage-specific proteins rather than large-scale invention of protein-coding capacity.

  4. Evaluation of antigenotoxic effects of carotenoids from green algae Chlorococcum humicola using human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bhagavathy, S; Sumathi, P

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify the available phytochemicals and carotenoids in the selected green algae and evaluate the potential genotoxic/antigenotoxic effect using lymphocytes. Methods Organic solvent extracts of Chlorococcum humicola (C. humicola) were used for the phytochemical analysis. The available carotenoids were assessed by HPLC, and LC-MS analysis. The genotoxicity was induced by the benzo(a)pyrene in the lymphocyte culture, the genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of algal carotenoids with and without genotoxic inducer were evaluated by chromosomal aberration (CA), sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus assay (MN). Results The results of the analysis showed that the algae were rich in carotenoids and fatty acids. In the total carotenoids lutein, β-carotene and α-carotene were found to be present in higher concentration. The frequency of CA and SCE increased by benzo(a)pyrene were significantly decreased by the carotenoids (P<0.05 for CA, P<0.001 for SCE). The MN frequencies of the cells were significantly decreased by the treatment with carotenoids when compared with the positive controls (P<0.05). Conclusions The findings of the present study demonstrate that, the green algae C. humicola is a rich source of bioactive compounds especially carotenoids which effectively fight against environmental genotoxic agents, the carotenoids itself is not a genotoxic substance and should be further considered for its beneficial effects. PMID:23569879

  5. Flagellar apparatus absolute orientations and the phylogeny of the green algae.

    PubMed

    O'Kelly, C J; Floyd, G L

    The absolute orientation of the flagellar apparatus in green algal motile cells is a feature of considerable value in studies of green algal systematics and phylogeny. The absolute orientation patterns found in those algae for which this feature is known or can be deduced are reviewed. Counterclockwise absolute orientation occurs in all classes except the Chlorophyceae and is considered primitive, while the clockwise absolute orientation present in most members of the Chlorophyceae is the result of progressive clockwise rotation of components during evolution. Extant intermediates documenting this rotation include Hafniomonas vegetative cells, which show counterclockwise absolute orientation, and Chaetopeltis quadriflagellate zoospores, in which the flagellar apparatus is strictly cruciate except for a slight clockwise offset of the microtubular rootlets. The V-shaped arrangement of the basal bodies in the flagellar apparatus, as well as the presence of proximal sheaths and of two layers of scales on the cell body, further identifies the Chaetopeltis zoospore as a primitive cell type within the Chlorophyceae . Trends towards the exsertion of basal bodies from a flagellar pit, either apically or laterally, the elimination of quadriflagellate cells, and, in the Chlorophyceae , an increasing amount of basal body offset, indicate advancement within the classes. Absolute orientation is conserved during flagellar apparatus replication and development. Events after flagellar apparatus division in the algae studied may be subdivided into component assembly, which is universal and preserves phylogenetically-useful features, and component reorientation, which occurs in relatively few green algae and adapts the flagellar apparatus to specialized functions. From these flagellar apparatus orientation studies, a major reevaluation of evolution within the Chlorophyceae is proposed, with weakly- thalloid algae possessing desmoschisis (e.g. Chaetopeltis ) considered primitive, and

  6. Colony organization in the green alga Botryococcus braunii is specified by a complex extracellular matrix

    DOE PAGES

    Weiss, Taylor L.; Roth, Robyn; Goodson, Carrie; Vithda, Stanislav; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Rusch, Jannette; Holzenburg, Andreas; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Goodenough, Ursula

    2012-08-31

    Botryococcus braunii is a colonial green alga whose cells associate via a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) and produce prodigious amounts of liquid hydrocarbons that can be readily converted into conventional combustion engine fuels. We used quickfreeze deep-etch electron microscopy and biochemical/histochemical analysis to elucidate many new features of B. braunii cell/colony organization and composition. Intracellular lipid bodies associate with the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but show no evidence of being secreted. The ER displays striking fenestrations and forms a continuous subcortical system in direct contact with the cell membrane. The ECM has three distinct components. (i) Each cell ismore » surrounded by a fibrous β-1, 4- and/or β-1, 3-glucan-containing cell wall. (ii) The intracolonial ECM space is filled with a cross-linked hydrocarbon network permeated with liquid hydrocarbons. (iii) Colonies are enclosed in a retaining wall festooned with a fibrillar sheath dominated by arabinose-galactose polysaccharides, which sequesters ECM liquid hydrocarbons. Each cell apex associates with the retaining wall and contributes to its synthesis. Retaining-wall domains also form "drapes" between cells, with some folding in on themselves and penetrating the hydrocarbon interior of a mother colony, partitioning it into daughter colonies. In addition, we propose that retaining-wall components are synthesized in the apical Golgi apparatus, delivered to apical ER fenestrations, and assembled on the surfaces of apical cell walls, where a proteinaceous granular layer apparently participates in fibril morphogenesis. We further propose that hydrocarbons are produced by the nonapical ER, directly delivered to the contiguous cell membrane, and pass across the nonapical cell wall into the hydrocarbon-based ECM.« less

  7. Ecotoxicity of silica nanoparticles to the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata: importance of surface area.

    PubMed

    Van Hoecke, Karen; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C; Van der Meeren, Paul; Lucas, Stéphane; Janssen, Colin R

    2008-09-01

    To date, (eco)toxicological information on industrial nanoparticles is very limited. In the present study, the hypothesis that the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) is related to their surface area and not to their mass was tested using a freshwater green algal species. Particle diameter and morphology were assessed using light scattering and electron microscopy techniques. To assess the toxicity of silica (SiO2) nanoparticles, the growth inhibition of the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata when exposed to stable silica suspensions was monitored. Commercial LUDOX suspensions of nanoparticles with 12.5 and 27.0 nm diameter were found to be toxic, with 72-h 20% effect concentrations for growth rate (E(r)C20) values +/- standard deviation (n = 5) of 20.0 +/- 5.0 and 28.8 +/- 3.2 mg/L, respectively. The toxicity was attributable to the solid nanospheres, because no aggregation was observed and dissolution of the nanoparticles was negligible. When expressing the concentration as a surface area, the difference in toxicity was not significant. In the latter case, 72-h E(r)C20 values +/- standard deviation (n = 5) were 4.7 +/- 1.2 and 3.9 +/- 0.4 m2/L. Silica bulk material was found to be nontoxic up to 1 g/L. In an additional experiment with 100 mg/L of 12.5 and 27.0 nm SiO2 NPs, the interaction between the nanoparticles and algal cells was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Although the particles clearly adhered to the outer cell surface, no evidence was found for particle uptake. PMID:19086319

  8. Growth of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under red and blue lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Sara S.; Cuello, Joel L.; Myhre, Graham; Pau, Stanley

    2011-03-01

    Red and blue lasers, holding promise as an electric light source for photosynthetic systems on account of being true monochromatic, high-power, and having high electrical-conversion efficiency, were employed in growing a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The laser treatments tested included: 655-nm Red; 680-nm Red; 655-nm Red+474-nm Blue and 680-nm Red+474-nm Blue. A white cold cathode lamp with spectral output similar to that of white fluorescent lamp served as control. C. reinhardtii successfully grew and divided under the 655 and 680-nm red lasers as well as under the white-light control. Supplementing either red with blue laser, however, resulted in increased algae cell count that significantly exceeded those under both red lasers and the white-light control on average by 241%.

  9. Genomic analysis of organismal complexity in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Prochnik, Simon E; Umen, James; Nedelcu, Aurora M; Hallmann, Armin; Miller, Stephen M; Nishii, Ichiro; Ferris, Patrick; Kuo, Alan; Mitros, Therese; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Hellsten, Uffe; Chapman, Jarrod; Simakov, Oleg; Rensing, Stefan A; Terry, Astrid; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Jurka, Jerzy; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grigoriev, Igor V; Schmitt, Rüdiger; Kirk, David; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2010-07-01

    The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and its morphologically diverse close relatives (the volvocine algae) are well suited for the investigation of the evolution of multicellularity and development. We sequenced the 138-mega-base pair genome of V. carteri and compared its approximately 14,500 predicted proteins to those of its unicellular relative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Despite fundamental differences in organismal complexity and life history, the two species have similar protein-coding potentials and few species-specific protein-coding gene predictions. Volvox is enriched in volvocine-algal-specific proteins, including those associated with an expanded and highly compartmentalized extracellular matrix. Our analysis shows that increases in organismal complexity can be associated with modifications of lineage-specific proteins rather than large-scale invention of protein-coding capacity. PMID:20616280

  10. Organelle genome complexity scales positively with organism size in volvocine green algae.

    PubMed

    Smith, David Roy; Hamaji, Takashi; Olson, Bradley J S C; Durand, Pierre M; Ferris, Patrick; Michod, Richard E; Featherston, Jonathan; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Keeling, Patrick J

    2013-04-01

    It has been argued that for certain lineages, noncoding DNA expansion is a consequence of the increased random genetic drift associated with long-term escalations in organism size. But a lack of data has prevented the investigation of this hypothesis in most plastid-bearing protists. Here, using newly sequenced mitochondrial and plastid genomes, we explore the relationship between organelle DNA noncoding content and organism size within volvocine green algae. By looking at unicellular, colonial, and differentiated multicellular algae, we show that organelle DNA complexity scales positively with species size and cell number across the volvocine lineage. Moreover, silent-site genetic diversity data suggest that the volvocine species with the largest cell numbers and most bloated organelle genomes have the smallest effective population sizes. Together, these findings support the view that nonadaptive processes, like random genetic drift, promote the expansion of noncoding regions in organelle genomes.

  11. DNA barcoding of a new record of epi-endophytic green algae Ulvella leptochaete (Ulvellaceae, Chlorophyta) in India.

    PubMed

    Bast, Felix; Bhushan, Satej; John, Aijaz Ahmad

    2014-09-01

    Epi-endophytic green algae comprise one of the most diverse and phylogenetically primitive groups of green algae and are considered to be ubiquitous in the world's oceans; however, no reports of these algae exist from India. Here we report the serendipitous discovery of Ulvella growing on intertidal green algae Cladophora glomerata and benthic red algae Laurencia obtusa collected from India. DNA barcodes at nuclear ribosomal DNA Internal Transcriber Spacer (nrDNA ITS) 1 and 2 regions for Indian isolates from the west and east coasts have been generated for the first time. Based on morphology and DNA barcoding, isolates were identified as Ulvella leptochaete. Phylogenetic reconstruction of concatenated dataset using Maximum Likelihood method differentiated Indian isolates from other accessions of this alga available in Genbank, albeit with low bootstrap support. Monophyly of Ulvella leptochaete was obvious in both of our phylogenetic analyses. With this first report of epi-endophytic algae from Indian territorial waters, the dire need to catalogue its cryptic diversity is highlighted and avenues of future research are discussed.

  12. Common Ancestry Is a Poor Predictor of Competitive Traits in Freshwater Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Narwani, Anita; Alexandrou, Markos A; Herrin, James; Vouaux, Alaina; Zhou, Charles; Oakley, Todd H; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton species traits have been used to successfully predict the outcome of competition, but these traits are notoriously laborious to measure. If these traits display a phylogenetic signal, phylogenetic distance (PD) can be used as a proxy for trait variation. We provide the first investigation of the degree of phylogenetic signal in traits related to competition in freshwater green phytoplankton. We measured 17 traits related to competition and tested whether they displayed a phylogenetic signal across a molecular phylogeny of 59 species of green algae. We also assessed the fit of five models of trait evolution to trait variation across the phylogeny. There was no significant phylogenetic signal for 13 out of 17 ecological traits. For 7 traits, a non-phylogenetic model provided the best fit. For another 7 traits, a phylogenetic model was selected, but parameter values indicated that trait variation evolved recently, diminishing the importance of common ancestry. This study suggests that traits related to competition in freshwater green algae are not generally well-predicted by patterns of common ancestry. We discuss the mechanisms by which the link between phylogenetic distance and phenotypic differentiation may be broken. PMID:26348482

  13. Photosynthetic biomanufacturing in green algae; production of recombinant proteins for industrial, nutritional, and medical uses.

    PubMed

    Rasala, Beth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant proteins are widely used for industrial, nutritional, and medical applications. Green microalgae have attracted considerable attention recently as a biomanufacturing platform for the production of recombinant proteins for a number of reasons. These photosynthetic eukaryotic microorganisms are safe, scalable, easy to genetically modify through transformation, mutagenesis, or breeding, and inexpensive to grow. Many microalgae species are genetically transformable, but the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the most widely used host for recombinant protein expression. An extensive suite of molecular genetic tools has been developed for C. reinhardtii over the last 25 years, including a fully sequenced genome, well-established methods for transformation, mutagenesis and breeding, and transformation vectors for high levels of recombinant protein accumulation and secretion. Here, we review recent successes in the development of C. reinhardtii as a biomanufacturing host for recombinant proteins, including antibodies and immunotoxins, hormones, industrial enzymes, an orally-active colostral protein for gastrointestinal health, and subunit vaccines. In addition, we review the biomanufacturing potential of other green algae from the genera Dunaliella and Chlorella.

  14. Common Ancestry Is a Poor Predictor of Competitive Traits in Freshwater Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Narwani, Anita; Alexandrou, Markos A.; Herrin, James; Vouaux, Alaina; Zhou, Charles; Oakley, Todd H.; Cardinale, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton species traits have been used to successfully predict the outcome of competition, but these traits are notoriously laborious to measure. If these traits display a phylogenetic signal, phylogenetic distance (PD) can be used as a proxy for trait variation. We provide the first investigation of the degree of phylogenetic signal in traits related to competition in freshwater green phytoplankton. We measured 17 traits related to competition and tested whether they displayed a phylogenetic signal across a molecular phylogeny of 59 species of green algae. We also assessed the fit of five models of trait evolution to trait variation across the phylogeny. There was no significant phylogenetic signal for 13 out of 17 ecological traits. For 7 traits, a non-phylogenetic model provided the best fit. For another 7 traits, a phylogenetic model was selected, but parameter values indicated that trait variation evolved recently, diminishing the importance of common ancestry. This study suggests that traits related to competition in freshwater green algae are not generally well-predicted by patterns of common ancestry. We discuss the mechanisms by which the link between phylogenetic distance and phenotypic differentiation may be broken. PMID:26348482

  15. The identification of putative RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain associated proteins in red and green algae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunlin; Hager, Paul W; Stiller, John W

    2014-01-01

    A tandemly repeated C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II is functionally essential and strongly conserved in many organisms, including animal, yeast and plant models. Although present in simple, ancestral red algae, CTD tandem repeats have undergone extensive modifications and degeneration during the evolutionary transition to developmentally complex rhodophytes. In contrast, CTD repeats are conserved in both green algae and their more complex land plant relatives. Understanding the mechanistic differences that underlie these variant patterns of CTD evolution requires knowledge of CTD-associated proteins in these 2 lineages. To provide an initial baseline comparison, we bound potential phospho-CTD associated proteins (PCAPs) to artificially synthesized and phosphorylated CTD repeats from the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae and green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our results indicate that red and green algae share a number of PCAPs, including kinases and proteins involved in mRNA export. There also are important taxon-specific differences, including mRNA splicing-related PCAPs recovered from Chlamydomonas but not Cyanidioschyzon, consistent with the relative intron densities in green and red algae. Our results also offer the first experimental indication that different proteins bind 2 distinct types of repeats in Cyanidioschyzon, suggesting a division of function between the proximal and distal CTD, similar to patterns identified in more developmentally complex model organisms.

  16. Recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate in green, blue-green, and diatom algae after exposure to atrazine.

    PubMed

    Brain, Richard A; Arnie, Joshua R; Porch, John R; Hosmer, Alan J

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated the recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate in green (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), blue-green (Anabaena flos-aquae), and diatom (Navicula pelliculosa) algae after pulsed exposure to atrazine. Subsequent to a grow-up period of 24 to 72 h to establish requisite cell density for adequate signal strength to measure photosystem II (PSII) quantum yield, algae were exposed to a pulse of atrazine for 48 h followed by a 48-h recovery period in control media. Photosynthesis was measured at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h of the exposure and recovery phases using pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry; growth rate and cell density were also concomitantly measured at these time points. Exposure to atrazine resulted in immediate, but temporary, inhibition of photosynthesis and growth; however, these effects were transient and fully reversible in the tested species of algae. For all three algal species, no statistically significant reductions (p ≤ 0.05) in growth rate or PSII quantum yield were detected at any of the treatment concentrations 48 h after atrazine was removed from the test system. Effects at test levels up to the highest tested exposure levels were consequently determined to be algistatic (reversible). Both biochemically and physiologically, recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate occur immediately, reaching control levels within hours following exposure. Therefore, pulsed exposure profiles of atrazine typically measured in Midwestern U.S. streams are unlikely to result in biologically meaningful changes in primary production given that the effects of atrazine are temporary and fully reversible in species representative of native populations.

  17. Abiotic Stress Tolerance of Charophyte Green Algae: New Challenges for Omics Techniques.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Pichrtová, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Charophyte green algae are a paraphyletic group of freshwater and terrestrial green algae, comprising the classes of Chlorokybophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae, Klebsormidiophyceae, Zygnematophyceae, Mesostigmatophyceae, and Charo- phyceae. Zygnematophyceae (Conjugating green algae) are considered to be closest algal relatives to land plants (Embryophyta). Therefore, they are ideal model organisms for studying stress tolerance mechanisms connected with transition to land, one of the most important events in plant evolution and the Earth's history. In Zygnematophyceae, but also in Coleochaetophyceae, Chlorokybophyceae, and Klebsormidiophyceae terrestrial members are found which are frequently exposed to naturally occurring abiotic stress scenarios like desiccation, freezing and high photosynthetic active (PAR) as well as ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Here, we summarize current knowledge about various stress tolerance mechanisms including insight provided by pioneer transcriptomic and proteomic studies. While formation of dormant spores is a typical strategy of freshwater classes, true terrestrial groups are stress tolerant in vegetative state. Aggregation of cells, flexible cell walls, mucilage production and accumulation of osmotically active compounds are the most common desiccation tolerance strategies. In addition, high photophysiological plasticity and accumulation of UV-screening compounds are important protective mechanisms in conditions with high irradiation. Now a shift from classical chemical analysis to next-generation genome sequencing, gene reconstruction and annotation, genome-scale molecular analysis using omics technologies followed by computer-assisted analysis will give new insights in a systems biology approach. For example, changes in transcriptome and role of phytohormone signaling in Klebsormidium during desiccation were recently described. Application of these modern approaches will deeply enhance our understanding of stress reactions in an

  18. Abiotic Stress Tolerance of Charophyte Green Algae: New Challenges for Omics Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Pichrtová, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Charophyte green algae are a paraphyletic group of freshwater and terrestrial green algae, comprising the classes of Chlorokybophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae, Klebsormidiophyceae, Zygnematophyceae, Mesostigmatophyceae, and Charo- phyceae. Zygnematophyceae (Conjugating green algae) are considered to be closest algal relatives to land plants (Embryophyta). Therefore, they are ideal model organisms for studying stress tolerance mechanisms connected with transition to land, one of the most important events in plant evolution and the Earth’s history. In Zygnematophyceae, but also in Coleochaetophyceae, Chlorokybophyceae, and Klebsormidiophyceae terrestrial members are found which are frequently exposed to naturally occurring abiotic stress scenarios like desiccation, freezing and high photosynthetic active (PAR) as well as ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Here, we summarize current knowledge about various stress tolerance mechanisms including insight provided by pioneer transcriptomic and proteomic studies. While formation of dormant spores is a typical strategy of freshwater classes, true terrestrial groups are stress tolerant in vegetative state. Aggregation of cells, flexible cell walls, mucilage production and accumulation of osmotically active compounds are the most common desiccation tolerance strategies. In addition, high photophysiological plasticity and accumulation of UV-screening compounds are important protective mechanisms in conditions with high irradiation. Now a shift from classical chemical analysis to next-generation genome sequencing, gene reconstruction and annotation, genome-scale molecular analysis using omics technologies followed by computer-assisted analysis will give new insights in a systems biology approach. For example, changes in transcriptome and role of phytohormone signaling in Klebsormidium during desiccation were recently described. Application of these modern approaches will deeply enhance our understanding of stress reactions in an

  19. Abiotic Stress Tolerance of Charophyte Green Algae: New Challenges for Omics Techniques.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Pichrtová, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Charophyte green algae are a paraphyletic group of freshwater and terrestrial green algae, comprising the classes of Chlorokybophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae, Klebsormidiophyceae, Zygnematophyceae, Mesostigmatophyceae, and Charo- phyceae. Zygnematophyceae (Conjugating green algae) are considered to be closest algal relatives to land plants (Embryophyta). Therefore, they are ideal model organisms for studying stress tolerance mechanisms connected with transition to land, one of the most important events in plant evolution and the Earth's history. In Zygnematophyceae, but also in Coleochaetophyceae, Chlorokybophyceae, and Klebsormidiophyceae terrestrial members are found which are frequently exposed to naturally occurring abiotic stress scenarios like desiccation, freezing and high photosynthetic active (PAR) as well as ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Here, we summarize current knowledge about various stress tolerance mechanisms including insight provided by pioneer transcriptomic and proteomic studies. While formation of dormant spores is a typical strategy of freshwater classes, true terrestrial groups are stress tolerant in vegetative state. Aggregation of cells, flexible cell walls, mucilage production and accumulation of osmotically active compounds are the most common desiccation tolerance strategies. In addition, high photophysiological plasticity and accumulation of UV-screening compounds are important protective mechanisms in conditions with high irradiation. Now a shift from classical chemical analysis to next-generation genome sequencing, gene reconstruction and annotation, genome-scale molecular analysis using omics technologies followed by computer-assisted analysis will give new insights in a systems biology approach. For example, changes in transcriptome and role of phytohormone signaling in Klebsormidium during desiccation were recently described. Application of these modern approaches will deeply enhance our understanding of stress reactions in an

  20. Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ikawa, Miyoshi; Mosley, S.P.; Barbero, L.J. )

    1992-10-01

    The growth of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa was inhibited by terpene alcohols and the terpene aldehyde citral. The strongest activity was shown by citral. Nerol, geraniol, and citronellol also showed pronounced activity. Strong inhibition was linked to acyclic terpenes containing a primary alcohol or aldehyde function. Inhibition appeared to be taking place through the vapor phase rather than by diffusion through the agar medium from the terpene-treated paper disks used in the system. Inhibition through agar diffusion was shown by certain aged samples of terpene hydrocarbons but not by recently purchased samples.

  1. Viruses of eukaryotic green algae. Progress report, August 1, 1984-March 1, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Van Etten, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    PBCV-1 is a large dsDNA-containing, plaque forming virus that replicates in a unicellular, eukaryotic Chlorella-like green alga strain NC64A. We have discovered that PBCV-1 infection results in the appearance of a restriction and modification system in the host. Furthermore, we have isolated and partially characterized 30 additional large, dsDNA-containing viruses which replicate in the same host. Some, if not all, of these viruses probably induce the synthesis of modification and restriction systems which are different from that induced by PBCV-1. 16 refs.

  2. Cloning and sequencing of the ferredoxin gene of blue-green alga Anabaena siamensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shou-Dong; Song, Li-Rong; Liu, Yong-Ding; Zhao, Jin-Dong

    1998-03-01

    The structure gene for ferredoxin, petFI, from Anabaena siamensis has been amplified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and cloned into cloning vector pGEM-3zf(+). The nucleotide sequence of petFI has been determined with silver staining sequencing method. There is 96.8% homology between coding region of petFI from A. siamensis and that of petFI from A. sp. 7120. Amino acid sequences of seven strains of blue-green algae are compared.

  3. Molecular identification of green algae from the rafts based infrastructure of Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Li, Hongye; Li, Yan; Wang, Zongling; Liu, Jiesheng; Yang, Weidong

    2012-10-01

    To provide more information on the origin of the Ulva prolifera bloom in Qingdao sea area in China from 2007 to 2011, the diversity of green algae growing on the rafts of Porphyra yezoensis on the coast in Jiangsu Province was investigated based on ITS, rbcL and 5S sequences. Eighty-four of green algal samples from various sites and cruises in 2010 and 2011 were collected. According to ITS and rbcL sequences, samples from the rafts of P. yezoensis fell into four clades: Ulva linza-procera-prolifera (LPP) complex, Ulva flexuosa, Blidingia sp. and Urospora spp. However, based on the 5S rDNA, a more resolved DNA marker, only one of the 84 samples belonged to U. prolifera. Combined with the previous reports, it is likely that U. prolifera bloom in Qingdao sea area might consist of more than one origin, and Porphyra cultivation rafts might be one of the causes. PMID:22858010

  4. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genome data representing nine green algae in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Louise A; Lewis, Paul O

    2016-06-01

    The chloroplast genomes of green algae are highly variable in their architecture. In this article we summarize gene content across newly obtained and published chloroplast genomes in Chlorophyceae, including new data from nine of species in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). We present genome architecture information, including genome synteny analysis across two groups of species. Also, we provide a phylogenetic tree obtained from analysis of gene order data for species in Chlorophyceae with fully sequenced chloroplast genomes. Further analyses and interpretation of the data can be found in "Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution" (Fučíková et al., In review) [1]. PMID:27054159

  5. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genome data representing nine green algae in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Louise A.; Lewis, Paul O.

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast genomes of green algae are highly variable in their architecture. In this article we summarize gene content across newly obtained and published chloroplast genomes in Chlorophyceae, including new data from nine of species in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). We present genome architecture information, including genome synteny analysis across two groups of species. Also, we provide a phylogenetic tree obtained from analysis of gene order data for species in Chlorophyceae with fully sequenced chloroplast genomes. Further analyses and interpretation of the data can be found in “Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution” (Fučíková et al., In review) [1]. PMID:27054159

  6. Molecular identification of green algae from the rafts based infrastructure of Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Li, Hongye; Li, Yan; Wang, Zongling; Liu, Jiesheng; Yang, Weidong

    2012-10-01

    To provide more information on the origin of the Ulva prolifera bloom in Qingdao sea area in China from 2007 to 2011, the diversity of green algae growing on the rafts of Porphyra yezoensis on the coast in Jiangsu Province was investigated based on ITS, rbcL and 5S sequences. Eighty-four of green algal samples from various sites and cruises in 2010 and 2011 were collected. According to ITS and rbcL sequences, samples from the rafts of P. yezoensis fell into four clades: Ulva linza-procera-prolifera (LPP) complex, Ulva flexuosa, Blidingia sp. and Urospora spp. However, based on the 5S rDNA, a more resolved DNA marker, only one of the 84 samples belonged to U. prolifera. Combined with the previous reports, it is likely that U. prolifera bloom in Qingdao sea area might consist of more than one origin, and Porphyra cultivation rafts might be one of the causes.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation of ionizing-radiation tolerance of a Chlorophyceae green micro-alga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhi, E.; Rivasseau, C.; Gromova, M.; Compagnon, E.; Marzloff, V.; Ollivier, J.; Boisson, A. M.; Bligny, R.; Natali, F.; Russo, D.; Couté, A.

    2008-03-01

    Micro-organisms living in extreme environments are captivating in the peculiar survival processes they have developed. Deinococcus radiodurans is probably the most famous radio-resistant bacteria. Similarly, a specific ecosystem has grown in a research reactor storage pool, and has selected organisms which may sustain radiative stress. An original green micro-alga which was never studied for its high tolerance to radiations has been isolated. It is the only autotrophic eukaryote that develops in this pool, although contamination possibilities coming from outside are not unusual. Studying what could explain this irradiation tolerance is consequently very interesting. An integrative study of the effects of irradiation on the micro-algae physiology, metabolism, internal dynamics, and genomics was initiated. In the work presented here, micro-algae were stressed with irradiation doses up to 20 kGy (2 Mrad), and studied by means of nuclear magnetic resonance, looking for modifications in the metabolism, and on the IN13 neutron backscattering instrument at the ILL, looking for both dynamics and structural macromolecular changes in the cells.

  8. Nitrogen Fixation by Thermophilic Blue-Green Algae (Cyanobacteria): Temperature Characteristics and Potential Use in Biophotolysis

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Hallenbeck, Patrick C.; Benemann, John R.

    1979-01-01

    Thermophilic, nitrogen-fixing, blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) were investigated for use in biophotolysis. Three strains of Mastigocladus laminosus were tested and were found to be equally effective in biophotolysis as judged by nitrogenase activity. The alga, M. laminosus NZ-86-m, which was chosen for further study, grew well in the temperature range from 35 to 50°C, with optimum growth at 45°C, at which temperature acetylene reduction activity was also greatest. The maximum tolerable temperature was 55°C. Acetylene reduction activity was saturated at a light intensity of 1 × 104 ergs cm−2 s−1. Atmospheric oxygen tension was found to be slightly inhibitory to acetylene reduction of both slowly growing and exponentially growing cultures. Nonsterile continuous cultures, which were conducted to test problems of culture maintenance, could be operated for 2 months without any significant decrease in nitrogenase activity or contamination by other algae. Nitrogen-starved cultures of M. laminosus NZ-86-m produced hydrogen at comparable rates to Anabaena cylindrica. The conversion efficiency of light to hydrogen energy at maximum rates of hydrogen production was 2.7%. PMID:16345353

  9. (Carbon and hydrogen metabolism of green algae in light and dark)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this project was the elucidation of anaerobic metabolism in ecuaryotic green algae, chlamydomonas reinhardii. Chlamydomonas is a versatile organism that can grow under disparate conditions such as fresh water lakes and sewage ponds. The cell an photoassimilate CO{sub 2} aerobically and anaerobically, the latter after adaptation'' to a hydrogen metabolism. It can recall the knallgas or oxyhydrogen reaction and utilize hydrogen the simplest of all reducing agents for the dark assimilation of CO{sub 2} by the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle. The dark reduction with hydrogen lies on the border line between autotrophic and heterotrophic carbon assimilation. Both autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are known in which molecular hydrogen can replace either inorganic or organic hydrogen donors. Here the dark reduction of CO{sub 2} acquires a particular importance since it occurs in the same cell that carries on photoreduction and photosynthesis. We will demonstrate here that the alga chloroplast possesses a respiratory capacity. It seems likely that Chlamydomonas may have retained the chloroplastic respiratory pathway because of the selective advantage provided to the algae under a wide range of environmental conditions that the cells experience in nature. The ability to cycle electrons and poise the reduction level of the photosynthetic apparatus under aerobic and microaerobic conditions could allow more efficient CO{sub 2} fixation and enhanced growth under unfavorable conditions or survival under more severe conditions.

  10. Determination of Volatile Compounds in Four Commercial Samples of Japanese Green Algae Using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Fujita, Akira; Mase, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera), Tokushima (Ulva prolifera), and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza). Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera) and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera). Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum). Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA) enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings. PMID:24592162

  11. Influence of PbS nanoparticle polymer coating on their aggregation behavior and toxicity to the green algae Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Hajar; Moradshahi, Ali; Jahromi, Hamed Dehdashti; Sheikhi, Mohammad Hosein

    2014-09-01

    The potential hazards of nanoparticles (NPs) to the environment and to living organisms need to be considered for a safe development of nanotechnology. In the present study, the potential toxic effects of uncoated and gum Arabic-coated lead sulfide nanoparticles (GA-coated PbS NPs) on the growth, lipid peroxidation, reducing capacity and total carotenoid content of the hypersaline unicellular green algae Dunaliella salina were investigated. Coatings of PbS NPs with GA, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, reduced the toxicity of PbS NPs. Uncoated PbS NP toxicity to D. salina was attributed to higher algal cell-NP agglomerate formation, higher lipid peroxidation, lower content of total reducing substances and lower total carotenoid content. Low levels of Pb(2+) in the growth culture media indicate that PbS NP dissolution does not occur in the culture. Also, the addition of 100 μM Pb(2+) to the culture media had no significant (P>0.05) effect on algal growth. The shading of light (shading effect) by PbS NPs, when simulated using activated charcoal, did not contribute to the overall toxic effect of PbS NPs which was evident by insignificant (P>0.05) reduction in the growth and antioxidant capacity of the algae. When PbS NP aggregation in culture media (without algal cells) was followed for 60 min, uncoated form aggregated rapidly reaching aggregate sizes with hydrodynamic diameter of over 2500 nm within 60 min. Effective particle-particle interaction was reduced in the GA-coated NPs. Aggregates of about 440 nm hydrodynamic diameter were formed within 35 min. Afterwards the aggregate size remained constant. It is concluded that PbS NPs have a negative effect on aquatic algae and their transformation by GA capping affects NPs aggregation properties and toxicity.

  12. Influence of PbS nanoparticle polymer coating on their aggregation behavior and toxicity to the green algae Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Hajar; Moradshahi, Ali; Jahromi, Hamed Dehdashti; Sheikhi, Mohammad Hosein

    2014-09-01

    The potential hazards of nanoparticles (NPs) to the environment and to living organisms need to be considered for a safe development of nanotechnology. In the present study, the potential toxic effects of uncoated and gum Arabic-coated lead sulfide nanoparticles (GA-coated PbS NPs) on the growth, lipid peroxidation, reducing capacity and total carotenoid content of the hypersaline unicellular green algae Dunaliella salina were investigated. Coatings of PbS NPs with GA, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, reduced the toxicity of PbS NPs. Uncoated PbS NP toxicity to D. salina was attributed to higher algal cell-NP agglomerate formation, higher lipid peroxidation, lower content of total reducing substances and lower total carotenoid content. Low levels of Pb(2+) in the growth culture media indicate that PbS NP dissolution does not occur in the culture. Also, the addition of 100 μM Pb(2+) to the culture media had no significant (P>0.05) effect on algal growth. The shading of light (shading effect) by PbS NPs, when simulated using activated charcoal, did not contribute to the overall toxic effect of PbS NPs which was evident by insignificant (P>0.05) reduction in the growth and antioxidant capacity of the algae. When PbS NP aggregation in culture media (without algal cells) was followed for 60 min, uncoated form aggregated rapidly reaching aggregate sizes with hydrodynamic diameter of over 2500 nm within 60 min. Effective particle-particle interaction was reduced in the GA-coated NPs. Aggregates of about 440 nm hydrodynamic diameter were formed within 35 min. Afterwards the aggregate size remained constant. It is concluded that PbS NPs have a negative effect on aquatic algae and their transformation by GA capping affects NPs aggregation properties and toxicity. PMID:24907922

  13. Transcriptional analysis of cell growth and morphogenesis in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias (Streptophyta), with emphasis on the role of expansin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptophyte green algae share several characteristics of cell growth and cell wall formation with their relatives, the embryophytic land plants. The multilobed cell wall of Micrasterias denticulata that rebuilds symmetrically after cell division and consists of pectin and cellulose, makes this unicellular streptophyte alga an interesting model system to study the molecular controls on cell shape and cell wall formation in green plants. Results Genome-wide transcript expression profiling of synchronously growing cells identified 107 genes of which the expression correlated with the growth phase. Four transcripts showed high similarity to expansins that had not been examined previously in green algae. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that these genes are most closely related to the plant EXPANSIN A family, although their domain organization is very divergent. A GFP-tagged version of the expansin-resembling protein MdEXP2 localized to the cell wall and in Golgi-derived vesicles. Overexpression phenotypes ranged from lobe elongation to loss of growth polarity and planarity. These results indicate that MdEXP2 can alter the cell wall structure and, thus, might have a function related to that of land plant expansins during cell morphogenesis. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential of M. denticulata as a unicellular model system, in which cell growth mechanisms have been discovered similar to those in land plants. Additionally, evidence is provided that the evolutionary origins of many cell wall components and regulatory genes in embryophytes precede the colonization of land. PMID:21943227

  14. Physiological and biochemical responses of the freshwater green algae Closterium ehrenbergii to the common disinfectant chlorine.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Ramaraj; Ebenezer, Vinitha; Guo, Ruoyu; Ki, Jang-Seu

    2016-11-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) is widely used as a disinfectant in water treatment plants and for cleaning swimming pools; it is finally discharged into aquatic environments, possibly causing damage to the non-target organisms in the receiving water bodies. Present study evaluated the effects of the biocide Cl2 to the green alga Closterium ehrenbergii (C. ehrenbergii). Growth rate, chlorophyll a levels, carotenoids, chlorophyll autofluorescence, and antioxidant enzymes were monitored up to 72-h after Cl2 exposure. C. ehrenbergii showed dose-dependent decrease in growth rate and cell division after exposure to Cl2. By using cell counts, the median effective concentration (EC50)-72-h was calculated to be 0.071mgL(-1). Cl2 significantly decreased the pigment levels and chlorophyll autofluorescence intensity, indicating that the photosystem was damaged in C. ehrenbergii. In addition, it increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells. This stressor significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione, and affected the physiology of the cells. These results indicate that Cl2 induces oxidative stress in the cellular metabolic process and leads to physiological and biochemical damages in the green algae. Cl2 discharged in industrial effluents and from water treatment plants may cause harmful effects to the C. ehrenbergii a common freshwater microalgae and other non-target organisms.

  15. Phagotrophy by the picoeukaryotic green alga Micromonas: implications for Arctic Oceans.

    PubMed

    McKie-Krisberg, Zaid M; Sanders, Robert W

    2014-10-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPE) are recognized as major primary producers and contributors to phytoplankton biomass in oceanic and coastal environments. Molecular surveys indicate a large phylogenetic diversity in the picoeukaryotes, with members of the Prymnesiophyceae and Chrysophyseae tending to be more common in open ocean waters and Prasinophyceae dominating coastal and Arctic waters. In addition to their role as primary producers, PPE have been identified in several studies as mixotrophic and major predators of prokaryotes. Mixotrophy, the combination of photosynthesis and phagotrophy in a single organism, is well established for most photosynthetic lineages. However, green algae, including prasinophytes, were widely considered as a purely photosynthetic group. The prasinophyte Micromonas is perhaps the most common picoeukaryote in coastal and Arctic waters and is one of the relatively few cultured representatives of the picoeukaryotes available for physiological investigations. In this study, we demonstrate phagotrophy by a strain of Micromonas (CCMP2099) isolated from Arctic waters and show that environmental factors (light and nutrient concentration) affect ingestion rates in this mixotroph. In addition, we show size-selective feeding with a preference for smaller particles, and determine P vs I (photosynthesis vs irradiance) responses in different nutrient conditions. If other strains have mixotrophic abilities similar to Micromonas CCMP2099, the widespread distribution and frequently high abundances of Micromonas suggest that these green algae may have significant impact on prokaryote populations in several oceanic regimes. PMID:24553471

  16. Physiological and biochemical responses of the freshwater green algae Closterium ehrenbergii to the common disinfectant chlorine.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Ramaraj; Ebenezer, Vinitha; Guo, Ruoyu; Ki, Jang-Seu

    2016-11-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) is widely used as a disinfectant in water treatment plants and for cleaning swimming pools; it is finally discharged into aquatic environments, possibly causing damage to the non-target organisms in the receiving water bodies. Present study evaluated the effects of the biocide Cl2 to the green alga Closterium ehrenbergii (C. ehrenbergii). Growth rate, chlorophyll a levels, carotenoids, chlorophyll autofluorescence, and antioxidant enzymes were monitored up to 72-h after Cl2 exposure. C. ehrenbergii showed dose-dependent decrease in growth rate and cell division after exposure to Cl2. By using cell counts, the median effective concentration (EC50)-72-h was calculated to be 0.071mgL(-1). Cl2 significantly decreased the pigment levels and chlorophyll autofluorescence intensity, indicating that the photosystem was damaged in C. ehrenbergii. In addition, it increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells. This stressor significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione, and affected the physiology of the cells. These results indicate that Cl2 induces oxidative stress in the cellular metabolic process and leads to physiological and biochemical damages in the green algae. Cl2 discharged in industrial effluents and from water treatment plants may cause harmful effects to the C. ehrenbergii a common freshwater microalgae and other non-target organisms. PMID:27552343

  17. The system of contractile vacuoles in the green alga Mesostigma viride (Streptophyta).

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Karin; Becker, Burkhard

    2009-08-01

    The contractile vacuole (CV) is an osmoregulatory organelle which is found in many protists. We have investigated the structure and function of the CV in the green alga Mesostigma viride by light (video) and serial section electron microscopy. Mesostigma is the only known flagellate streptophyte (charophycean green algae and land plants) and therefore of great importance for our understanding of the evolution of streptophytes. The entire CV system of Mesostigma has been reconstructed 3-dimensionally for three cells. Based on light microscopy cells contain an average of 8 CVs. The maximal diameter of a CV in Mesostigma was 1.5 microm and the expulsion interval 24.1s in 10 mosM medium. Video microscopy revealed the system of CVs to be very dynamic with individual CVs connecting temporarily or fusing completely with each other. Electron microscopy confirmed these observations and showed coated vesicles to be predominantly associated with large CVs. No expulsion pore was observed by electron microscopy. Instead we encountered close contact zones of approximately 150 nm diameter, which we propose to be the site of water expulsion. A model for the function of CVs in Mesostigma is presented.

  18. ANALYSIS OF EXPRESSED SEQUENCE TAGS FROM THE GREEN ALGA DUNALIELLA SALINA (CHLOROPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui; Cao, Yu; Xu, Hui; Lv, Linfeng; Qiao, Dairong; Cao, Yi

    2011-12-01

    The unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina (Dunal) Teodor. is a novel model photosynthetic eukaryote for studying photosystems, high salinity acclimation, and carotenoid accumulation. In spite of such significance, there have been limited studies on the Dunaliella genome transcriptome and proteome. To further investigate D. salina, a cDNA library was constructed and sequenced. Here, we present the analysis of the 2,282 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) generated together with 3,990 ESTs from dbEST. A total of 4,148 unique sequences (UniSeqs) were identified, of which 56.1% had sequence similarity with Uniprot entries, suggesting that a large number of unique genes may be harbored by Dunaliella. Additionally, protein family domains were identified to further characterize these sequences. Then, we also compared EST sequences with different complete eukaryotic genomes from several animals, plants, and fungi. We observed notable differences between D. salina and other organisms. This EST collection and its annotation provided a significant resource for basic and applied research on D. salina and laid the foundation for a systematic analysis of the transcriptome basis of green algae development and diversification.

  19. A new microscopic method to analyse desiccation-induced volume changes in aeroterrestrial green algae.

    PubMed

    Lajos, K; Mayr, S; Buchner, O; Blaas, K; Holzinger, A

    2016-08-01

    Aeroterrestrial green algae are exposed to desiccation in their natural habitat, but their actual volume changes have not been investigated. Here, we measure the relative volume reduction (RVRED ) in Klebsormidium crenulatum and Zygnema sp. under different preset relative air humidities (RH). A new chamber allows monitoring RH during light microscopic observation of the desiccation process. The RHs were set in the range of ∼4 % to ∼95% in 10 steps. RVRED caused by the desiccation process was determined after full acclimation to the respective RHs. In K. crenulatum, RVRED (mean ± SE) was 46.4 ± 1.9%, in Zygnema sp. RVRED was only 34.3 ± 2.4% at the highest RH (∼95%) tested. This indicates a more pronounced water loss at higher RHs in K. crenulatum versus Zygnema sp. By contrast, at the lowest RH (∼4%) tested, RVRED ranged from 75.9 ± 2.7% in K. crenulatum to 83.9 ± 2.2% in Zygnema sp. The final volume reduction is therefore more drastic in Zygnema sp. These data contribute to our understanding of the desiccation process in streptophytic green algae, which are considered the closest ancestors of land plants. PMID:27075881

  20. A new microscopic method to analyse desiccation‐induced volume changes in aeroterrestrial green algae

    PubMed Central

    LAJOS, K.; MAYR, S.; BUCHNER, O.; BLAAS, K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aeroterrestrial green algae are exposed to desiccation in their natural habitat, but their actual volume changes have not been investigated. Here, we measure the relative volume reduction (RVRED) in Klebsormidium crenulatum and Zygnema sp. under different preset relative air humidities (RH). A new chamber allows monitoring RH during light microscopic observation of the desiccation process. The RHs were set in the range of ∼4 % to ∼95% in 10 steps. RVRED caused by the desiccation process was determined after full acclimation to the respective RHs. In K. crenulatum, RVRED (mean ± SE) was 46.4 ± 1.9%, in Zygnema sp. RVRED was only 34.3 ± 2.4% at the highest RH (∼95%) tested. This indicates a more pronounced water loss at higher RHs in K. crenulatum versus Zygnema sp. By contrast, at the lowest RH (∼4%) tested, RVRED ranged from 75.9 ± 2.7% in K. crenulatum to 83.9 ± 2.2% in Zygnema sp. The final volume reduction is therefore more drastic in Zygnema sp. These data contribute to our understanding of the desiccation process in streptophytic green algae, which are considered the closest ancestors of land plants. PMID:27075881

  1. Toxicity and bioaccumulation kinetics of arsenate in two freshwater green algae under different phosphate regimes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning-Xin; Li, Yan; Deng, Xi-Hai; Miao, Ai-Jun; Ji, Rong; Yang, Liu-Yan

    2013-05-01

    In the present study, the toxicity and bioaccumulation kinetics of arsenate in two green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Scenedesmus obliquus under phosphate-enriched (+P) and limited (-P) conditions were investigated. P-limitation was found to aggravate arsenate toxicity and S. obliquus was more tolerant than C. reinhardtii. Such phosphate-condition-dependent or algal-species-specific toxicity difference was narrowed when the relative inhibition of cell growth was plotted against intracellular arsenate content instead of its extracellular concentration. The discrepance was further reduced when the intracellular ratio of arsenic to phosphorus was applied. It suggests that both arsenate bioaccumulation and intracellular phosphorus played an important role in arsenate toxicity. On the other hand, arsenate uptake was induced by P-limitation and its variation with ambient arsenate concentration could be well fitted to the Michaelis-Menten model. Arsenate transporters of S. obliquus were found to have a higher affinity but lower capacity than those of C. reinhardtii, which explains its better regulation of arsenate accumulation than the latter species in the toxicity experiment. Further, arsenate depuration was facilitated and more was transformed to arsenite in C. reinhardtii or under -P condition. Intracellular proportion of arsenite was also increased after the algae were transferred from the long-term uptake media to a relatively clean solution in the efflux experiment. Both phenomena imply that algae especially the sensitive species could make physiological adjustments to alleviate the adverse effects of arsenate. Overall, our findings will facilitate the application of algae in arsenate remediation. PMID:23497978

  2. Characterization of arsenate transformation and identification of arsenate reductase in a green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xixiang; Wang, Lihong; Duan, Guilan; Sun, Guoxin

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a pervasive and ubiquitous environmental toxin that has created catastrophic human health problems world-wide. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga, which exists ubiquitously in freshwater aquatic systems. Arsenic metabolism processes of this alga through arsenate reduction and sequent store and efflux were investigated. When supplied with 10 micromol/L arsenate, arsenic speciation analysis showed that arsenite concentration increased from 5.7 to 15.7 mg/kg dry weight during a 7-day period, accounting for 18%-24% of the total As in alga. When treated with different levels of arsenate (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 micromol/L) for 7 days, the arsenite concentration increased with increasing external arsenate concentrations, the proportion of arsenite was up to 23%-28% of the total As in alga. In efflux experiments, both arsenate and arsenite could be found in the efflux solutions. Additionally, the efflux of arsenate was more than that of arsenite. Furthermore, two arsenate reductase genes of C. reinhardtii (CrACR2s) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli strain WC3110 (deltaarsC) for the first time. The abilities of both CrACR2s genes to complement the arsenate-sensitive strain were examined. CrACR2.1 restored arsenate resistance at 0.8 mmol/L. However, CrACR2.2 showed much less ability to complement. The gene products were demonstrated to reduce arsenate to arsenite in vivo. In agreement with the complementation results, CrACR2.1 showed higher reduction ability than CrACR2.2, when treated with 0.4 mmol/L arsenate for 16 hr incubation.

  3. Iron colloids reduce the bioavailability of phosphorus to the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Nawara, Sophie; Van Moorleghem, Christoff; Smolders, Erik

    2014-08-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a limiting nutrient in many aquatic systems. The bioavailability of P in natural waters strongly depends on its speciation. In this study, structural properties of iron colloids were determined and related to their effect on P sorption and P bioavailability. The freshwater green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata was exposed to media spiked with radiolabelled (33)PO4, and the uptake of (33)P was monitored for 1 h. The media contained various concentrations of synthetic iron colloids with a size between 10 kDa and 0.45 μm. The iron colloids were stabilised by natural organic matter. EXAFS spectroscopy showed that these colloids predominantly consisted of ferrihydrite with small amounts of organically complexed Fe. In colloid-free treatments, the P uptake flux by the algae obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the presence of iron colloids at 9 or 90 μM Fe, corresponding to molar P:Fe ratios between 0.02 and 0.17, the truly dissolved P (<10 kDa) was between 4 and 60% of the total dissolved P (<0.45 μm). These colloids reduced the P uptake flux by R. subcapitata compared to colloid-free treatments at the same total dissolved P concentration. However, the P uptake flux from colloid containing solutions equalled that from colloid-free ones when expressed as truly dissolved P. This demonstrates that colloidal P did not contribute to the P uptake flux. It is concluded that, on the short term, phosphate adsorbed to ferrihydrite colloids is not available to the green alga R. subcapitata.

  4. Estrogenic activity in extracts and exudates of cyanobacteria and green algae.

    PubMed

    Sychrová, E; Štěpánková, T; Nováková, K; Bláha, L; Giesy, J P; Hilscherová, K

    2012-02-01

    Here is presented some of the first information on interactions of compounds produced by cyanobacteria and green algae with estrogen receptor signaling. Estrogenic potency of aqueous extracts and exudates (culture spent media with extracellular products) of seven species of cyanobacteria (10 different laboratory strains) and two algal species were assessed by use of in vitro trans-activation assays. Compounds produced by cyanobacteria and algae, and in particular those excreted from the cells, were estrogenic. Most exudates were estrogenic with potencies expressed at 50% of the maximum response under control of the estrogen receptor ranging from 0.2 to 7.2 ng 17β-estradiol (E(2)) equivalents (EEQ)/L. The greatest estrogenic potency was observed for exudates of Microcystis aerigunosa, a common species that forms water blooms. Aqueous extracts of both green algae, but only one species of cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon gracile) elicited significant estrogenicity with EEQ ranging from 15 to 280 ng 17β-estradiol (E(2))/g dry weight. Scenedesmus quadricauda exudates and extracts of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae were antagonistic to the ER when coexposed to E(2). The EEQ potency was not correlated with concentrations of cyanotoxins, such as microcystin and cylindrospermopsin, which suggests that the EEQ was comprised of other compounds. The study demonstrates some differences between the estrogenic potency of aqueous extracts prepared from the same species, but of different origin, while the effects of exudates were comparable within species. The observed estrogenic potencies are important namely in relation to the possible mass expansion of cyanobacteria and release of the active compounds into surrounding water. PMID:22208753

  5. Antioxidant system responses in two co-occurring green-tide algae under stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Zhao, Xinyu; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-01-01

    Green tides have occurred every year from 2007 to 2014 in the Yellow Sea. Ulva prolifera (Müller) J. Agardh has been identified as the bloom-forming alga, co-occurring with U. intestinalis. We observed distinct strategies for both algal species during green tides. U. prolifera exhibited a high abundance initially and then decreased dramatically, while U. intestinalis persisted throughout. The antioxidant system responses of these two macroalgae were compared in the late phase of a green tide (in-situ) and after laboratory acclimation. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system responses differed significantly between the two. Malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide contents increased significantly in-situ in U. prolifera, but not in U. intestinalis. In U. prolifera, we observed a significant decrease in total antioxidant ability (T-AOC), antioxidant enzymes (SOD and Apx), and non-enzyme antioxidants (GSH and AsA) in-situ. U. intestinalis showed the same pattern of T-AOC and SOD, but its Gpx, Apx, and GSH responses did not differ significantly. The results suggest that U. prolifera was more susceptible than U. intestinalis to the harsh environmental changes during the late phase of a Yellow Sea green tide. The boom and bust strategy exhibited by U. prolifera and the persistence of U. intestinalis can be explained by differences in enzyme activity and antioxidant systems.

  6. Rapid Mass Movement of Chloroplasts during Segment Formation of the Calcifying Siphonalean Green Alga, Halimeda macroloba

    PubMed Central

    Larkum, Anthony W. D.; Salih, Anya; Kühl, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background The calcifying siphonalean green alga, Halimeda macroloba is abundant on coral reefs and is important in the production of calcium carbonate sediments. The process by which new green segments are formed over-night is revealed here for the first time. Methodology/Principal Findings Growth of new segments was visualised by epifluorescence and confocal microscopy and by pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorimetry. Apical colourless proto-segments were initiated on day 1, and formed a loose network of non-calcified, non-septate filaments, containing no chloroplasts. Rapid greening was initiated at dusk by i) the mass movement of chloroplasts into these filaments from the parent segment and ii) the growth of new filaments containing chloroplasts. Greening was usually complete in 3–5 h and certainly before dawn on day 2 when the first signs of calcification were apparent. Mass chloroplast movement took place at a rate of ∼0.65 µm/s. Photosynthetic yield and rate remained low for a period of 1 to several hours, indicating that the chloroplasts were made de novo. Use of the inhibitors colchicine and cytochalasin d indicated that the movement process is dependent on both microtubules and microfilaments. Significance This unusual process involves the mass movement of chloroplasts at a high rate into new segments during the night and rapid calcification on the following day and may be an adaptation to minimise the impact of herbivorous activity. PMID:21750703

  7. Larvicidal algae.

    PubMed

    Marten, Gerald G

    2007-01-01

    Although most algae are nutritious food for mosquito larvae, some species kill the larvae when ingested in large quantities. Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) that kill larvae do so by virtue of toxicity. While blue-green algae toxins may offer possibilities for delivery as larvicides, the toxicity of live blue-green algae does not seem consistent enough for live algae to be useful for mosquito control. Certain species of green algae in the order Chlorococcales kill larvae primarily because they are indigestible. Where these algae are abundant in nature, larvae consume them to the exclusion of other food and then starve. Under the right circumstances, it is possible to introduce indigestible algae into a breeding habitat so they become abundant enough to render it unsuitable for mosquito production. The algae can persist for years, even if the habitat dries periodically. The main limitation of indigestible algae lies in the fact that, under certain conditions, they may not replace all the nutritious algae in the habitat. More research on techniques to ensure complete replacement will be necessary before indigestible algae can go into operational use for mosquito control.

  8. Pectin Metabolism and Assembly in the Cell Wall of the Charophyte Green Alga Penium margaritaceum1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.; Sørensen, Iben; Popper, Zoë A.; Ochs, Julie; Andreas, Amanda; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Pielach, Anna; Sacks, Carly; Brechka, Hannah; Ruisi-Besares, Pia; Willats, William G.T.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.

    2014-01-01

    The pectin polymer homogalacturonan (HG) is a major component of land plant cell walls and is especially abundant in the middle lamella. Current models suggest that HG is deposited into the wall as a highly methylesterified polymer, demethylesterified by pectin methylesterase enzymes and cross-linked by calcium ions to form a gel. However, this idea is based largely on indirect evidence and in vitro studies. We took advantage of the wall architecture of the unicellular alga Penium margaritaceum, which forms an elaborate calcium cross-linked HG-rich lattice on its cell surface, to test this model and other aspects of pectin dynamics. Studies of live cells and microscopic imaging of wall domains confirmed that the degree of methylesterification and sufficient levels of calcium are critical for lattice formation in vivo. Pectinase treatments of live cells and immunological studies suggested the presence of another class of pectin polymer, rhamnogalacturonan I, and indicated its colocalization and structural association with HG. Carbohydrate microarray analysis of the walls of P. margaritaceum, Physcomitrella patens, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) further suggested the conservation of pectin organization and interpolymer associations in the walls of green plants. The individual constituent HG polymers also have a similar size and branched structure to those of embryophytes. The HG-rich lattice of P. margaritaceum, a member of the charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants, was shown to be important for cell adhesion. Therefore, the calcium-HG gel at the cell surface may represent an early evolutionary innovation that paved the way for an adhesive middle lamella in multicellular land plants. PMID:24652345

  9. Rickettsial endosymbiont in the "early-diverging" streptophyte green alga Mesostigma viride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ashley; Narechania, Apurva; Kim, Eunsoo

    2016-04-01

    A bacterial endosymbiont was unexpectedly found in the "axenic" culture strain of the streptophyte green alga Mesostigma viride (NIES-995). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the symbiont belongs to the order Rickettsiales, specifically to the recently designated clade "Candidatus Megaira," which is closely related to the well-known Rickettsia clade. Rickettsiales bacteria of the "Ca. Megaira" clade are found in a taxonomically diverse array of eukaryotic hosts, including chlorophycean green algae, several ciliate species, and invertebrates such as Hydra. Transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence in situ hybridi-zation, and SYBR Green I staining experiments revealed that the endosymbiont of M. viride NIES-995 is rod shaped, typically occurs in clusters, and is surrounded by a halo-like structure, presumably formed by secretory substances from the bacterium. Two additional M. viride strains (NIES-296 and NIES-475), but not SAG50-1, were found to house the rickettsial endosymbiont. Analyses of strain NIES-995 transcriptome data indicated the presence of at least 91 transcriptionally active genes of symbiont origins. These include genes for surface proteins (e.g., rOmpB) that are known to play key roles in bacterial attachment onto host eukaryotes in related Rickettsia species. The assembled M. viride transcriptome includes transcripts that code for a suite of predicted algal-derived proteins, such as Ku70, WASH, SCAR, and CDC42, which may be important in the formation of the algal-rickettsial association.

  10. Rickettsial endosymbiont in the "early-diverging" streptophyte green alga Mesostigma viride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ashley; Narechania, Apurva; Kim, Eunsoo

    2016-04-01

    A bacterial endosymbiont was unexpectedly found in the "axenic" culture strain of the streptophyte green alga Mesostigma viride (NIES-995). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the symbiont belongs to the order Rickettsiales, specifically to the recently designated clade "Candidatus Megaira," which is closely related to the well-known Rickettsia clade. Rickettsiales bacteria of the "Ca. Megaira" clade are found in a taxonomically diverse array of eukaryotic hosts, including chlorophycean green algae, several ciliate species, and invertebrates such as Hydra. Transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence in situ hybridi-zation, and SYBR Green I staining experiments revealed that the endosymbiont of M. viride NIES-995 is rod shaped, typically occurs in clusters, and is surrounded by a halo-like structure, presumably formed by secretory substances from the bacterium. Two additional M. viride strains (NIES-296 and NIES-475), but not SAG50-1, were found to house the rickettsial endosymbiont. Analyses of strain NIES-995 transcriptome data indicated the presence of at least 91 transcriptionally active genes of symbiont origins. These include genes for surface proteins (e.g., rOmpB) that are known to play key roles in bacterial attachment onto host eukaryotes in related Rickettsia species. The assembled M. viride transcriptome includes transcripts that code for a suite of predicted algal-derived proteins, such as Ku70, WASH, SCAR, and CDC42, which may be important in the formation of the algal-rickettsial association. PMID:27037587

  11. Growth and Metabolism of the Green Alga, Chlorella Pyrenoidosa, in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, W. Ronald

    2003-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on living organisms during space flight has been a topic of interest for some time, and a substantial body of knowledge on the subject has accumulated. Despite this, comparatively little information is available regarding the influence of microgravity on algae, even though it has been suggested for long duration flight or occupancy in space that plant growth systems, including both higher plants and algae, are likely to be necessary for bioregenerative life support systems. High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating-Wall Vessel or HARV bioreactors developed at Johnson Space Center provide a laboratory-based approach to investigating the effects of microgravity on cellular reactions. In this study, the HARV bioreactor was used to examine the influence of simulated microgravity on the growth and metabolism of the green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa. After the first 2 days of culture, cell numbers increased more slowly in simulated microgravity than in the HARV gravity control; after 7 days, growth in simulated microgravity was just over half (58%) that of the gravity control and at 14 days it was less than half (42%). Chlorophyll and protein were also followed as indices of cell competence and function; as with growth, after 2-3 days, protein and chlorophyll levels were reduced in modeled microgravity compared to gravity controls. Photosynthesis is a sensitive biochemical index of the fitness of photosynthetic organisms; thus, CO2-dependent O2 evolution was tested as a measure of photosynthetic capacity of cells grown in simulated microgravity. When data were expressed with respect to cell number, modeled microgravity appeared to have little effect on CO2 fixation. Thus, even though the overall growth rate was lower for cells cultured in microgravity, the photosynthetic capacity of the cells appears to be unaffected. Cells grown in simulated microgravity formed loose clumps or aggregates within about 2 days of culture, with aggregation increasing over time

  12. Light-driven Uptake of Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide, and Bicarbonate by the Green Alga Scenedesmus12

    PubMed Central

    Radmer, Richard; Ollinger, Otto

    1980-01-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques were used to study several aspects of the competition between O2 and species of inorganic carbon for photosynthetically generated reducing power in the green alga, Scenedesmus. In contrast to wild type, no appreciable light-driven O2 uptake was observed in a mutant lacking photosystem I. It is concluded that the carbon cycle-independent reduction of O2 occurs at the expense of photosystem I-generated reducing equivalents. The commonly observed differences between CO2-grown and air-grown Scenedesmus with respect to CO2 uptake and glycolate formation cannot be ascribed to differences in their capacity for light-driven O2 uptake. There were no intrinsic differences found in O2 uptake capacity between the two physiological types under conditions in which CO2 was saturating or CO2 uptake was inhibited. It was only under CO2-limited conditions that pronounced differences between the two physiological types were observed. This fact suggests that differences in O2 metabolism and sensitivity between the two types really reflect differences in their capacity to assimilate inorganic carbon; in this respect they are analogous to C3 and C4 plants. The hypothesis that air-grown Scenedesmus can assimilate HCO3− by directly monitoring the time course of dissolved CO2, O2 uptake, and O2 evolution in illuminated algal suspensions at alkaline pH was tested. Inasmuch as the measuring technique employed was fast compared to the nonenzymic equilibration of the inorganic carbon species, it was possible to determine the degree to which the CO2 concentration deviated from equilibrium (with the other inorganic carbon species) during the course of illumination. The observed kinetics in air-grown and CO2-grown algae in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase, and a comparison of these kinetics with theoretical (computer-generated) time courses, support the idea that air-adapted algae are able to assimilate HCO3− actively at a high rate. The data

  13. The mTERF protein MOC1 terminates mitochondrial DNA transcription in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wobbe, Lutz; Nixon, Peter J

    2013-07-01

    The molecular function of mTERFs (mitochondrial transcription termination factors) has so far only been described for metazoan members of the protein family and in animals they control mitochondrial replication, transcription and translation. Cells of photosynthetic eukaryotes harbour chloroplasts and mitochondria, which are in an intense cross-talk that is vital for photosynthesis. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga widely used as a model organism for photosynthesis research and green biotechnology. Among the six nuclear C. reinhardtii mTERF genes is mTERF-like gene of Chlamydomonas (MOC1), whose inactivation alters mitorespiration and interestingly also light-acclimation processes in the chloroplast that favour the enhanced production of biohydrogen. We show here from in vitro studies that MOC1 binds specifically to a sequence within the mitochondrial rRNA-coding module S3, and that a knockout of MOC1 in the mutant stm6 increases read-through transcription at this site, indicating that MOC1 acts as a transcription terminator in vivo. Whereas the level of certain antisense RNA species is higher in stm6, the amount of unprocessed mitochondrial sense transcripts is strongly reduced, demonstrating that a loss of MOC1 causes perturbed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) expression. Overall, we provide evidence for the existence of mitochondrial antisense RNAs in C. reinhardtii and show that mTERF-mediated transcription termination is an evolutionary-conserved mechanism occurring in phototrophic protists and metazoans.

  14. Aniline blue and Calcofluor white staining of callose and cellulose in the streptophyte green algae Zygnema and Klebsormidium

    PubMed Central

    Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Plant including green algal cells are surrounded by a cell wall, which is a diverse composite of complex polysaccharides and crucial for their function and survival. Here we describe two simple protocols to visualize callose (β-1→3-glucan) and cellulose (β-1→4-glucan) and related polysaccharides in the cell walls of streptophyte green algae by using standard dyes and epifluorescence microscopy. PMID:27785458

  15. Proliferation of group II introns in the chloroplast genome of the green alga Oedocladium carolinianum (Chlorophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Otis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background The chloroplast genome sustained extensive changes in architecture during the evolution of the Chlorophyceae, a morphologically and ecologically diverse class of green algae belonging to the Chlorophyta; however, the forces driving these changes are poorly understood. The five orders recognized in the Chlorophyceae form two major clades: the CS clade consisting of the Chlamydomonadales and Sphaeropleales, and the OCC clade consisting of the Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales, and Chaetopeltidales. In the OCC clade, considerable variations in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) structure, size, gene order, and intron content have been observed. The large inverted repeat (IR), an ancestral feature characteristic of most green plants, is present in Oedogonium cardiacum (Oedogoniales) but is lacking in the examined members of the Chaetophorales and Chaetopeltidales. Remarkably, the Oedogonium 35.5-kb IR houses genes that were putatively acquired through horizontal DNA transfer. To better understand the dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution in the Oedogoniales, we analyzed the cpDNA of a second representative of this order, Oedocladium carolinianum. Methods The Oedocladium cpDNA was sequenced and annotated. The evolutionary distances separating Oedocladium and Oedogonium cpDNAs and two other pairs of chlorophycean cpDNAs were estimated using a 61-gene data set. Phylogenetic analysis of an alignment of group IIA introns from members of the OCC clade was performed. Secondary structures and insertion sites of oedogonialean group IIA introns were analyzed. Results The 204,438-bp Oedocladium genome is 7.9 kb larger than the Oedogonium genome, but its repertoire of conserved genes is remarkably similar and gene order differs by only one reversal. Although the 23.7-kb IR is missing the putative foreign genes found in Oedogonium, it contains sequences coding for a putative phage or bacterial DNA primase and a hypothetical protein. Intergenic sequences are 1.5-fold longer and

  16. The vegetative arctic freshwater green alga Zygnema is insensitive to experimental UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Roleda, Michael Y; Lütz, Cornelius

    2009-12-01

    The physiological performance and ultrastructural integrity of the vegetative freshwater green alga Zygnema sp., growing under ambient polar day solar radiation and after exposure to experimentally low radiation, but with high UVR:PAR ratio were investigated. In the laboratory, algae were exposed to low photosynthetic active radiation (PAR=P, 400-700 nm, 20 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), PAR + UV-A = PA (320-400 nm, 4.00 W m(-2) = UV-A) and PAR + UV-A + UV-B = PAB (280-320 nm, 0.42 W m(-2) = UV-B) for 24 h at 7 degrees C. Photosynthetic performance and ultrastructure of ambient solar radiation-exposed (field control) and experimentally treated Zygnema samples were assessed using chlorophyll fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). No significant treatment effect was observed in the photosynthesis-irradiance curve parameters. Exclusion of the UV-B spectrum in the laboratory treatment caused significantly lower effective photosynthetic quantum yield compared to samples exposed to the whole radiation spectrum. TEM revealed no obvious differences in the ultrastructure of field control and laboratory P-, PA- and PAB-exposed samples. Substantial amounts of lipid bodies, visualized by Sudan IV staining, were observed in all samples. Chloroplasts contained numerous plastoglobules. Organelles like mitochondria, Golgi bodies and the nucleus remained unaffected by the radiation exposures. Zygnema is well adapted to ambient solar radiation, enabling the alga to cope with experimental UV exposure and it is expected to persist in a scenario with enhanced UV radiation caused by stratospheric ozone depletion.

  17. Cultivation of green algae Chlorella sp. in different wastewaters from municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Min, Min; Li, Yecong; Chen, Paul; Chen, Yifeng; Liu, Yuhuan; Wang, Yingkuan; Ruan, Roger

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth of green algae Chlorella sp. on wastewaters sampled from four different points of the treatment process flow of a local municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) and how well the algal growth removed nitrogen, phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and metal ions from the wastewaters. The four wastewaters were wastewater before primary settling (#1 wastewater), wastewater after primary settling (#2 wastewater), wastewater after activated sludge tank (#3 wastewater), and centrate (#4 wastewater), which is the wastewater generated in sludge centrifuge. The average specific growth rates in the exponential period were 0.412, 0.429, 0.343, and 0.948 day(-1) for wastewaters #1, #2, #3, and #4, respectively. The removal rates of NH4-N were 82.4%, 74.7%, and 78.3% for wastewaters #1, #2, and #4, respectively. For #3 wastewater, 62.5% of NO3-N, the major inorganic nitrogen form, was removed with 6.3-fold of NO2-N generated. From wastewaters #1, #2, and #4, 83.2%, 90.6%, and 85.6% phosphorus and 50.9%, 56.5%, and 83.0% COD were removed, respectively. Only 4.7% was removed in #3 wastewater and the COD in #3 wastewater increased slightly after algal growth, probably due to the excretion of small photosynthetic organic molecules by algae. Metal ions, especially Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Mn in centrate, were found to be removed very efficiently. The results of this study suggest that growing algae in nutrient-rich centrate offers a new option of applying algal process in MWTP to manage the nutrient load for the aeration tank to which the centrate is returned, serving the dual roles of nutrient reduction and valuable biofuel feedstock production.

  18. Ocean acidification alters the calcareous microstructure of the green macro-alga Halimeda opuntia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wizemann, André; Meyer, Friedrich W.; Hofmann, Laurie C.; Wild, Christian; Westphal, Hildegard

    2015-09-01

    Decreases in seawater pH and carbonate saturation state ( Ω) following the continuous increase in atmospheric CO2 represent a process termed ocean acidification, which is predicted to become a main threat to marine calcifiers in the near future. Segmented, tropical, marine green macro-algae of the genus Halimeda form a calcareous skeleton that involves biotically initiated and induced calcification processes influenced by cell physiology. As Halimeda is an important habitat provider and major carbonate sediment producer in tropical shallow areas, alterations of these processes due to ocean acidification may cause changes in the skeletal microstructure that have major consequences for the alga and its environment, but related knowledge is scarce. This study used scanning electron microscopy to examine changes of the CaCO3 segment microstructure of Halimeda opuntia specimens that had been exposed to artificially elevated seawater pCO2 of ~650 µatm for 45 d. In spite of elevated seawater pCO2, the calcification of needles, located at the former utricle walls, was not reduced as frequent initiation of new needle-shaped crystals was observed. Abundance of the needles was ~22 % µm-2 higher and needle crystal dimensions ~14 % longer. However, those needles were ~42 % thinner compared with the control treatment. Moreover, lifetime cementation of the segments decreased under elevated seawater pCO2 due to a loss in micro-anhedral carbonate as indicated by significantly thinner calcified rims of central utricles (35-173 % compared with the control treatment). Decreased micro-anhedral carbonate suggests that seawater within the inter-utricular space becomes CaCO3 undersaturated ( Ω < 1) during nighttime under conditions of elevated seawater pCO2, thereby favoring CaCO3 dissolution over micro-anhedral carbonate accretion. Less-cemented segments of H. opuntia may impair the environmental success of the alga, its carbonate sediment contribution, and the temporal storage of

  19. Extraction of Nutraceuticals from Spirulina (Blue-Green Alga): A Bioorganic Chemistry Practice Using Thin-layer Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera Bravo de Laguna, Irma; Toledo Marante, Francisco J.; Luna-Freire, Kristerson R.; Mioso, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina is a blue-green alga (cyanobacteria) with high nutritive value. This work provides an innovative and original approach to the consideration of a bioorganic chemistry practice, using Spirulina for the separation of phytochemicals with nutraceutical characteristics via thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The aim is to bring together…

  20. Overview on Biological Activities and Molecular Characteristics of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Marine Green Algae in Recent Years

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingchong; Wang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hao; Liu, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Among the three main divisions of marine macroalgae (Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta), marine green algae are valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds and remain largely unexploited in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed to isolate novel sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) from marine green algae because of their numerous health beneficial effects. Green seaweeds are known to synthesize large quantities of SPs and are well established sources of these particularly interesting molecules such as ulvans from Ulva and Enteromorpha, sulfated rhamnans from Monostroma, sulfated arabinogalactans from Codium, sulfated galacotans from Caulerpa, and some special sulfated mannans from different species. These SPs exhibit many beneficial biological activities such as anticoagulant, antiviral, antioxidative, antitumor, immunomodulating, antihyperlipidemic and antihepatotoxic activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential for further development as healthy food and medical products. The present review focuses on SPs derived from marine green algae and presents an overview of the recent progress of determinations of their structural types and biological activities, especially their potential health benefits. PMID:25257786

  1. Extraction of nutraceuticals from Spirulina (blue-green alga): A bioorganic chemistry practice using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Herrera Bravo de Laguna, Irma; Toledo Marante, Francisco J; Luna-Freire, Kristerson R; Mioso, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina is a blue-green alga (cyanobacteria) with high nutritive value. This work provides an innovative and original approach to the consideration of a bioorganic chemistry practice, using Spirulina for the separation of phytochemicals with nutraceutical characteristics via thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The aim is to bring together current research, theory, and practice, and always in accordance with pedagogical ideas.

  2. Composition and structure of the 80S ribosome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: 80S ribosomes are conserved in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Manuell, Andrea L; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Haynes, Paul A; Milligan, Ronald A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2005-08-12

    We have conducted a proteomic analysis of the 80S cytosolic ribosome from the eukaryotic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and accompany this with a cryo-electron microscopy structure of the ribosome. Proteins homologous to all but one rat 40S subunit protein, including a homolog of RACK1, and all but three rat 60S subunit proteins were identified as components of the C. reinhardtii ribosome. Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) evidence and annotation of the completed C. reinhardtii genome identified genes for each of the four proteins not identified by proteomic analysis, showing that algae potentially have a complete set of orthologs to mammalian 80S ribosomal proteins. Presented at 25A, the algal 80S ribosome is very similar in structure to the yeast 80S ribosome, with only minor distinguishable differences. These data show that, although separated by billions of years of evolution, cytosolic ribosomes from photosynthetic organisms are highly conserved with their yeast and animal counterparts.

  3. The Unicellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an Experimental System to Study Chloroplast RNA Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickelsen, J.; Kück, U.

    Chloroplasts are typical organelles of photoautotrophic eukaryotic cells which drive a variety of functions, including photosynthesis. For many years the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as an experimental organism for studying photosynthetic processes. The recent development of molecular tools for this organism together with efficient methods of genetic analysis and the availability of many photosynthesis mutants has now made this alga a powerful model system for the analysis of chloroplast biogenesis. For example, techniques have been developed to transfer recombinant DNA into both the nuclear and the chloroplast genome. This allows both complementation tests and analyses of gene functions in vivo. Moreover, site-specific DNA recombinations in the chloroplast allow targeted gene disruption experiments which enable a "reverse genetics" to be performed. The potential of the algal system for the study of chloroplast biogenesis is illustrated in this review by the description of regulatory systems of gene expression involved in organelle biogenesis. One example concerns the regulation of trans-splicing of chloroplast mRNAs, a process which is controlled by both multiple nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded factors. The second example involves the stabilization of chloroplast mRNAs. The available data lead us predict distinct RNA elements, which interact with trans-acting factors to protect the RNA against nucleolytic attacks.

  4. Fatty acid profiles of four filamentous green algae under varying culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzhuo; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Although benthic filamentous algae are interesting targets for wastewater treatment and biotechnology, relatively little is known about their biochemical composition and variation in response to growth conditions. Fatty acid composition of four benthic filamentous green algae was determined in different culture conditions. Although the response was partly species-dependent, increasing culture age, nitrogen deprivation and dark exposure of stationary phase greatly increased both total fatty acid content (TFA) from 12-35 to 40-173mgg(-1) dry weight (DW) and the relative proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from 21-58% to 55-87% of TFA, with dark exposure having the greatest effect. However, the main variation in fatty acid composition was between species, with Uronema being rich in C16:0 (2.3% of DW), Klebsormidium in C18:2ω6 (5.4% of DW) and Stigeoclonium in C18:3ω3 (11.1% of DW). This indicates the potential of the latter two species as potential sources of these PUFAs.

  5. Inhibition of target of rapamycin signaling by rapamycin in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Crespo, José L; Díaz-Troya, Sandra; Florencio, Francisco J

    2005-12-01

    The macrolide rapamycin specifically binds the 12-kD FK506-binding protein (FKBP12), and this complex potently inhibits the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase. The identification of TOR in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) revealed that TOR is conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, research on TOR signaling in plants has been hampered by the natural resistance of plants to rapamycin. Here, we report TOR inactivation by rapamycin treatment in a photosynthetic organism. We identified and characterized TOR and FKBP12 homologs in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Whereas growth of wild-type Chlamydomonas cells is sensitive to rapamycin, cells lacking FKBP12 are fully resistant to the drug, indicating that this protein mediates rapamycin action to inhibit cell growth. Unlike its plant homolog, Chlamydomonas FKBP12 exhibits high affinity to rapamycin in vivo, which was increased by mutation of conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket. Furthermore, pull-down assays demonstrated that TOR binds FKBP12 in the presence of rapamycin. Finally, rapamycin treatment resulted in a pronounced increase of vacuole size that resembled autophagic-like processes. Thus, our findings suggest that Chlamydomonas cell growth is positively controlled by a conserved TOR kinase and establish this unicellular alga as a useful model system for studying TOR signaling in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  6. Effect of Nanohexaconazole on Nitrogen Fixing Blue Green Algae and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gopal, Madhuban; Pabbi, Sunil; Paul, Sangeeta; Alam, Md Imteyaz; Yadav, Saurabh; Nair, Kishore Kumar; Chauhan, Neetu; Srivastava, Chitra; Gogoi, Robin; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Goswami, Arunava

    2016-01-01

    Nanohexaconazole is a highly efficient fungicide against Rhizoctonia solani. Nanoparticles are alleged to adversely affect the non-target organisms. In order to evaluate such concern, the present study was carried out to investigate the effect of nanohexaconazole and its commercial formulation on sensitive nitrogen fixing blue green algae (BGA) and bacteria. Various activities of algae and bacteria namely growth, N-fixation, N-assimilation, Indole acetic acid (IAA) production and phosphate solubilization were differently affected in the presence of hexaconazole. Although, there was stimulatory to slightly inhibitory effect on the growth measurable parameters of the organisms studied at the recommended dose of nanohexaconazole, but its higher dose was inhibitory to all these microorganisms. On the other hand, the recommended as well as higher dose of commercial hexaconazole showed much severe inhibition of growth and metabolic activity of these organisms as compared to the nano preparation. The uses of nanohexazconazole instead of hexaconazole as a fungicide will not only help to control various fungal pathogens but also sustain the growth and activity of these beneficial microorganisms for sustaining soil fertility and productivity. PMID:27398501

  7. Acute toxicity of butachlor and atrazine to freshwater green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and cladoceran Daphnia carinata.

    PubMed

    He, Hongzhi; Yu, Jing; Chen, Guikui; Li, Wenyang; He, Jinbo; Li, Huashou

    2012-06-01

    Both single and joint toxicity of atrazine and butachlor to freshwater green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and cladoceran Daphnia carinata isolated from South China were investigated in the present study. The 96 h-EC(50) values of atrazine and butachlor to S. obliquus were 0.0147 and 2.31 mg L(-1), while the 48 h-LC(50) values to D. carinata were 60.6 and 3.40 mg L(-1), respectively. These results suggest that atrazine could be highly toxic to S. obliquus and slightly toxic to D. carinata, while butachlor exhibits moderate toxicity to both organisms. The additive indexes of atrazine and butachlor mixtures were -2.68 (-3.02 to -2.32) to S. obliquus and 0.054 (-0.025 to 0.238) to D. carinata, respectively. Therefore, the joint action of two herbicides was significant antagonism to S. obliquus, while significant synergism was not shown to D. carinata. Moreover, significant linear correlation between the natural logarithm of herbicide concentrations and growth rates of alga S. obliquus was observed. Taken together, it is the first study reporting the toxicity endpoints for mixture of atrazine and butachlor against S. obliquus and D. carinata isolated from south China. The present results would be helpful to provide data to assess the ecological risk of both herbicides to aquatic organisms.

  8. Strong induction of phytochelatin synthesis by zinc in marine green alga, Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    PubMed

    Hirata, K; Tsujimoto, Y; Namba, T; Ohta, T; Hirayanagi, N; Miyasaka, H; Zenk, M H; Miyamoto, K

    2001-01-01

    Synthesis of phytochelatins (PCs), heavy-metal-sequestering peptides, in the marine green alga, Dunaliella tertiolecta, was evaluated under various conditions of exposure to heavy metals. To investigate the effect of heavy metals on both PC synthesis and their upstream biosynthetic reactions, an ion-pair-HPLC system was developed in this study, by which PCs and their biosynthetic intermediates, cysteine (Cys), gamma-glutamylcysteine (gammaEC) and glutathione (GSH), could be determined simultaneously with high sensitivity. When the cells were exposed to Zn2+, the level of PCs was maximal at 200 microM and significantly higher than that obtained after exposure to 400 microM Cd2+, which is the strongest inducer of PC synthesis in higher plants in vivo and in vitro as well as in microalgae. The predominant PC subtype was PC4, followed by PC3 and PC5, whereas PC2, which is generally abundant in higher plants, has the lowest level among PC2 to PC5. These results suggest that the characteristics of PC synthase in D. tertiolecta including the requirement of heavy metals for its catalysis and substrate specificity towards GSH and PC(n) are considerably different from those in higher plants and other algae. While PC synthesis proceeded in the heavy-metal-treated cells, the level of GSH did not appreciably change. To maintain the same size of the GSH pool, GSH must be newly synthesized to balance the amount consumed for PC synthesis. PMID:16233052

  9. Biosorption of lead from aqueous solutions by green algae Spirogyra species: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K; Rastogi, A

    2008-03-21

    Biosorption is the effective method for the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewaters. Results are presented showing the sorption of Pb(II) from solutions by biomass of commonly available, filamentous green algae Spirogyra sp. Batch experiments were conducted to determine the biosorption properties of the biomass and it was observed that the maximum adsorption capacity of Pb(II) ion was around 140mgmetal/g of biomass at pH 5.0 in 100min with 200mg/L of initial concentration. Temperature change in the range 20-40 degrees C affected the adsorption capacity and the nature of the reaction was found to be endothermic in nature. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium is well described by Langmuir isotherm. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameters of the process, viz., free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change. Various properties of the algae, as adsorbent, explored in the characterization part were chemical composition of the adsorbent, thermal analysis by TGA, surface area calculation by BET method, surface morphology with scanning electron microscope images and surface functionality by FTIR. FTIR analysis of algal biomass revealed the presence of amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. The results indicated that the biomass of Spirogyra sp. is an efficient biosorbent for the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solutions.

  10. Toxic effects of organic solvents on the growth of blue-green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, G.W.

    1987-06-01

    Relatively few reports have been published on the comparative toxicity of solvents towards test organisms, and these deal primarily with fish and aquatic invertebrates. Information for microbial systems are more limited with some data available for algae and slightly more for fungi. Aside from direct toxic effects of their own, solvents can interact synergistically and antagonistically with the toxicant in solution. This problem has been well documented with pesticides, and a procedure has been developed to identify and eliminate these effects from bioassays. The first step in choosing a solvent for use in microbial bioassays should be a detailed screening to identify solvents with inherently low toxicity to the test organism, followed by an interaction study to choose the best concentration to use. The purpose of the present study was to compare the inhibitory effects of six solvents commonly used in pesticide bioassays towards five species of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), in order to identify solvents with low toxicity for use in bioassays.

  11. Purification and some properties of a trehalase from a green alga, Lobosphaera sp.

    PubMed

    Nakano, H; Moriwaki, M; Washino, T; Kino, T; Yoshizumi, H; Kitahata, S

    1994-08-01

    An unicellular green alga identified as Lobosphaera sp. by morphological observations was selected as a source of trehalase. The alga grew well heterotrophically and produced intracellular trehalase using Polypepton, yeast extract, and glycerol as nutrients. The enzyme was highly purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, column chromatography on DEAE-Toyopearl, Sepharose CL-4B, and SP-Toyopearl. The molecular mass was estimated to be 400 kDa by gel filtration. SDS-PAGE indicated that the enzyme consisted of two subunits with a molecular mass range of 180-220 kDa and it contained carbohydrates. The enzyme was most active at pH 5.5 and at 65 degrees C and stable between pH 4-9 and below 65 degrees C. Fe3+ inactivated the enzyme. Sucrose was a competitive inhibitor with a Ki of 7.5 mM. The enzyme specifically hydrolyzed trehalase with a Km of 0.6 mM.

  12. Alternative photosynthetic electron transport pathways during anaerobiosis in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Happe, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis uses light as energy source to generate an oxidant powerful enough to oxidize water into oxygen, electrons and protons. Upon linear electron transport, electrons extracted from water are used to reduce NADP(+) to NADPH. The oxygen molecule has been integrated into the cellular metabolism, both as the most efficient electron acceptor during respiratory electron transport and as oxidant and/or "substrate" in a number of biosynthetic pathways. Though photosynthesis of higher plants, algae and cyanobacteria produces oxygen, there are conditions under which this type of photosynthesis operates under hypoxic or anaerobic conditions. In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this condition is induced by sulfur deficiency, and it results in the production of molecular hydrogen. Research on this biotechnologically relevant phenomenon has contributed largely to new insights into additional pathways of photosynthetic electron transport, which extend the former concept of linear electron flow by far. This review summarizes the recent knowledge about various electron sources and sinks of oxygenic photosynthesis besides water and NADP(+) in the context of their contribution to hydrogen photoproduction by C. reinhardtii. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Electron Transport in Chloroplasts. PMID:21376011

  13. Effect of aluminum and zinc on enzyme activities in the green Alga Selenastrum capricorutum

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, F.X.; Chen, Y.

    1995-11-01

    Acid rain produced by atmospheric pollution may decrease the pH value of water and increase the availability and potential toxicity of metals in water which have detrimental effects on aquatic organism, including algae, the important component of the primary production, and, thus, the entire aquatic food chain. Recent reviews of the effects of acid rain on freshwater ecosystems have emphasized research interest in soluble trivalent aluminum, although Al is rated low among trace metals in biological importance. On the other hand, zinc is an important trace element for the growth of phytoplankton and the cofactor of some enzymes. The growth response and tolerance of different species of algae to Al and Zn have been reported by Whitton who showed that algal growth would be stimulated by lower levels of the metals and totally inhibited by higher levels. These is little information, however, on the effect of Al on biochemical processes in aquatic organisms. This study investigates the influence of aluminum and zinc on several physioclogical processes in S. capricournutum, a common species of green algal in lake water. Algal growth (dry weight), ATP levels and the activities of several enzymes in the algal cells were measured after the treatment with various concentrations of Al and Zn in culture medium. Special attention is given to the relation between the enzymatic response and algal growth. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Lineage-specific fragmentation and nuclear relocation of the mitochondrial cox2 gene in chlorophycean green algae (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Salinas, Elizabeth; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Li, Zhongkui; Fucíková, Karolina; Brand, Jerry J; Lewis, Louise A; González-Halphen, Diego

    2012-07-01

    In most eukaryotes the subunit 2 of cytochrome c oxidase (COX2) is encoded in intact mitochondrial genes. Some green algae, however, exhibit split cox2 genes (cox2a and cox2b) encoding two polypeptides (COX2A and COX2B) that form a heterodimeric COX2 subunit. Here, we analyzed the distribution of intact and split cox2 gene sequences in 39 phylogenetically diverse green algae in phylum Chlorophyta obtained from databases (28 sequences from 22 taxa) and from new cox2 data generated in this work (23 sequences from 18 taxa). Our results support previous observations based on a smaller number of taxa, indicating that algae in classes Prasinophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Trebouxiophyceae contain orthodox, intact mitochondrial cox2 genes. In contrast, all of the algae in Chlorophyceae that we examined exhibited split cox2 genes, and could be separated into two groups: one that has a mitochondrion-localized cox2a gene and a nucleus-localized cox2b gene ("Scenedesmus-like"), and another that has both cox2a and cox2b genes in the nucleus ("Chlamydomonas-like"). The location of the split cox2a and cox2b genes was inferred using five different criteria: differences in amino acid sequences, codon usage (mitochondrial vs. nuclear), codon preference (third position frequencies), presence of nucleotide sequences encoding mitochondrial targeting sequences and presence of spliceosomal introns. Distinct green algae could be grouped according to the form of cox2 gene they contain: intact or fragmented, mitochondrion- or nucleus-localized, and intron-containing or intron-less. We present a model describing the events that led to mitochondrial cox2 gene fragmentation and the independent and sequential migration of cox2a and cox2b genes to the nucleus in chlorophycean green algae. We also suggest that the distribution of the different forms of the cox2 gene provides important insights into the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of Chlorophyceae.

  15. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses.

  16. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses.

  17. Multi-Level Light Capture Control in Plants and Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Wobbe, Lutz; Bassi, Roberto; Kruse, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Life on Earth relies on photosynthesis, and the ongoing depletion of fossil carbon fuels has renewed interest in phototrophic light-energy conversion processes as a blueprint for the conversion of atmospheric CO2 into various organic compounds. Light-harvesting systems have evolved in plants and green algae, which are adapted to the light intensity and spectral composition encountered in their habitats. These organisms are constantly challenged by a fluctuating light supply and other environmental cues affecting photosynthetic performance. Excess light can be especially harmful, but plants and microalgae are equipped with different acclimation mechanisms to control the processing of sunlight absorbed at both photosystems. We summarize the current knowledge and discuss the potential for optimization of phototrophic light-energy conversion. PMID:26545578

  18. Uptake of Inorganic Carbon by Isolated Chloroplasts of the Unicellular Green Alga Chlorella ellipsoidea1

    PubMed Central

    Rotatore, Caterina; Colman, Brian

    1990-01-01

    Chloroplasts, isolated from protoplasts of the green alga, Chlorella ellipsoidea, were estimated to be 99% intact by the ferricyanide-reduction assay, and gave CO2 and PGA-dependent rates of O2 evolution of 64.5 to 150 micromoles per milligram of chlorophyll per hour, that is 30 to 70% of the photosynthetic activity of the parent cells. Intact chloroplasts showed no carbonic anhydrase activity, but it was detected in preparations of ruptured organelles. Rates of photosynthesis, measured in a closed system at pH 7.5, were twice the calculated rate of CO2 supply from the uncatalyzed dehydration of HCO3− indicating a direct uptake of bicarbonate by the intact chloroplasts. Mass spectrometric measurements of CO2 depletion from the medium on the illumination of chloroplasts indicate the lack of an active CO2 transport across the chloroplast envelope. PMID:16667662

  19. Predictive modeling studies for the ecotoxicity of ionic liquids towards the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus.

    PubMed

    Das, Rudra Narayan; Roy, Kunal

    2014-06-01

    Hazardous potential of ionic liquids is becoming an issue of high concern with increasing application of these compounds in various industrial processes. Predictive toxicological modeling on ionic liquids provides a rational assessment strategy and aids in developing suitable guidance for designing novel analogues. The present study attempts to explore the chemical features of ionic liquids responsible for their ecotoxicity towards the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus by developing mathematical models using extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices along with other categories of chemical descriptors. The entire study has been conducted with reference to the OECD guidelines for QSAR model development using predictive classification and regression modeling strategies. The best models from both the analyses showed that ecotoxicity of ionic liquids can be decreased by reducing chain length of cationic substituents and increasing hydrogen bond donor feature in cations, and replacing bulky unsaturated anions with simple saturated moiety having less lipophilic heteroatoms.

  20. Spirulan from blue-green algae inhibits fibrin and blood clots: its potent antithrombotic effects.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Kim, Seung; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2015-05-01

    We investigated in vitro and in vivo fibrinolytic and antithrombotic activity of spirulan and analyzed its partial biochemical properties. Spirulan, a sulfated polysaccharide from the blue-green alga Arthrospira platensis, exhibits antithrombotic potency. Spirulan showed a strong fibrin zymogram lysis band corresponding to its molecular mass. It specifically cleaved Aα and Bβ, the major chains of fibrinogen. Spirulan directly decreased the activity of thrombin and factor X activated (FXa), procoagulant proteins. In vitro assays using human fibrin and mouse blood clots showed fibrinolytic and hemolytic activities of spirulan. Spirulan (2 mg/kg) showed antithrombotic effects in the ferric chloride (FeCl3 )-induced carotid arterial thrombus model and collagen and epinephrine-induced pulmonary thromboembolism mouse model. These results may be attributable to the prevention of thrombus formation and partial lysis of thrombus. Therefore, we suggest that spirulan may be a potential antithrombotic agent for thrombosis-related diseases. PMID:25651404

  1. Total lipid production of the green alga Nannochloropsis sp. QII under different nitrogen regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, Yu.; Hubbard, J.S.; Holzer, G.; Tornabene, T.G.

    1987-06-01

    The green alga Nannochloropsis sp. QII was cultivated in media with sufficient and growth-limiting levels of nitrogen (nitrate). Nitrogen deficiency promoted lipid synthesis yielding cells with lipids comprising 55% of the biomass. The major lipids were triacylglycerols (79%), polar lipids (9%) and hydrocarbons (2.5%). The polar lipids consisted of a broad range of phospholipids, glycolipids and sulfolipids. Other lipids identified were pigments, free fatty acids, saponifiable and unsaponifiable sterol derivatives, various glycerides, a family of alkyl-1, 4-dioxane derivatives and a series of alkyl- and hydroxy-alkyl-dimethyl-acetals. Experiments in which /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was provided at different times in the growth cycle demonstrated that enhanced lipid biosynthesis at low nitrogen levels resulted principally from de novo CO/sub 2/ fixation.

  2. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24614164

  3. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:25764429

  4. Assessment of blue-green algae in substantially reducing nitrogen fertilizer requirements for biomass fuel crops

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Molten, P.M.; Metting, B.

    1981-07-01

    Laboratory, mass culture, and field studies are being undertaken in order to assess the potential of using blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) as nitrogen biofertilizers on irrigated ground. Of seven candidate strains, two were chosen for application to replicated field plots sown to field corn and the basis of laboratory-scale soil tray experiments and ease of semi-continuous 8000 l culture. Chosen were Anabaena BM-165, isolated from a local soil and Tolypothrix tenuis, imported from India. Using the acetylene reduction method, Anabaena is estimated from laboratory soil experiments to be able to fix from 30 to 62 kg N/ha/y, and has been mass cultured to a density of 1527 mg dry wt/l. T. tenuis is estimated from laboratory experiments to be able to fix from 27 to 65 kg N/ha/y, and has been mass cultured to a density of 1630 mg dry wt/l.

  5. Multi-Level Light Capture Control in Plants and Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Wobbe, Lutz; Bassi, Roberto; Kruse, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Life on Earth relies on photosynthesis, and the ongoing depletion of fossil carbon fuels has renewed interest in phototrophic light-energy conversion processes as a blueprint for the conversion of atmospheric CO2 into various organic compounds. Light-harvesting systems have evolved in plants and green algae, which are adapted to the light intensity and spectral composition encountered in their habitats. These organisms are constantly challenged by a fluctuating light supply and other environmental cues affecting photosynthetic performance. Excess light can be especially harmful, but plants and microalgae are equipped with different acclimation mechanisms to control the processing of sunlight absorbed at both photosystems. We summarize the current knowledge and discuss the potential for optimization of phototrophic light-energy conversion.

  6. Blue green alga mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its antibacterial efficacy against Gram positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Suganya, K S Uma; Govindaraju, K; Kumar, V Ganesh; Dhas, T Stalin; Karthick, V; Singaravelu, G; Elanchezhiyan, M

    2015-02-01

    Biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) play an important role in design and development of nanomedicine. Synthesis of AuNPs from biogenic materials is environmentally benign and possesses high bacterial inhibition and bactericidal properties. In the present study, blue green alga Spirulina platensis protein mediated synthesis of AuNPs and its antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria is discussed. AuNPs were characterized using Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, High Resolution-Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Stable, well defined AuNPs of smaller and uniform shape with an average size of ~ 5 nm were obtained. The antibacterial efficacy of protein functionalized AuNPs were tested against Gram positive organisms Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25492207

  7. Synchronization of Green Algae by Light and Dark Regimes for Cell Cycle and Cell Division Studies.

    PubMed

    Hlavová, Monika; Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    A synchronous population of cells is one of the prerequisites for studying cell cycle processes such as DNA replication, nuclear and cellular division. Green algae dividing by multiple fission represent a unique single cell system enabling the preparation of highly synchronous cultures by application of a light-dark regime similar to what they experience in nature. This chapter provides detailed protocols for synchronization of different algal species by alternating light-dark cycles; all critical points are discussed extensively. Moreover, detailed information on basic analysis of cell cycle progression in such cultures is presented, including analyses of nuclear, cellular, and chloroplast divisions. Modifications of basic protocols that enable changes in cell cycle progression are also suggested so that nuclear or chloroplast divisions can be followed separately.

  8. The non-photosynthetic, pathogenic green alga Helicosporidium sp. has retained a modified, functional plastid genome.

    PubMed

    Tartar, Aurélien; Boucias, Drion G

    2004-04-01

    A fragment of the Helicosporidium sp. (Chlorophyta: Trebouxiophyceae) plastid genome has been sequenced. The genome architecture was compared to that of both a non-photosynthetic relative (Prototheca wickerhamii) and a photosynthetic relative (Chlorella vulgaris). Comparative genomic analysis indicated that Helicosporidium and Prototheca are closely related genera. The analyses also revealed that the Helicosporidium sp. plastid genome has been rearranged. In particular, two ribosomal protein-encoding genes (rpl19 and rps23) appeared to have been transposed, or lost from the Helicosporidium sp. plastid genome. RT-PCR reactions demonstrated that the retained plastid genes were transcribed, suggesting that, despite rearrangement(s), the Helicosporidium sp. plastid genome has remained functional. The modified plastid genome architecture is a novel apomorphy that indicates that the Helicosporidia are highly derived green algae, more so than Prototheca spp. As such, they represent a promising model to study organellar genome reorganizations in parasitic protists.

  9. Viruses of eukaryotic green algae; Progress report, June 20, 1990--July 1, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Van Etten, J.L.

    1991-12-31

    Many large polyhedral, dsDNA containing (ca. 330 kb), plaque forming viruses which infect a unicellular, eukaryotic, chlorella-like green alga have been isolated and characterized. The plaque assay, the ability to synchronously infect the host, the short life cycle, and the ability of the viruses to undergo homologous recombination make them excellent model systems for studying many plant cell functions in the manner that bacterial and animal viruses have been used to study bacterial and animal cell functions. These viruses have several unique features including: (1) coding for DNA methyltransferase and site-specific (restriction) endonucleases and (2) unlike other viruses, these viruses appear to code for the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of their glycoproteins.

  10. Evidence of ancient genome reduction in red algae (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huan; Price, Dana C; Yang, Eun Chan; Yoon, Hwan Su; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2015-08-01

    Red algae (Rhodophyta) comprise a monophyletic eukaryotic lineage of ~6,500 species with a fossil record that extends back 1.2 billion years. A surprising aspect of red algal evolution is that sequenced genomes encode a relatively limited gene inventory (~5-10 thousand genes) when compared with other free-living algae or to other eukaryotes. This suggests that the common ancestor of red algae may have undergone extensive genome reduction, which can result from lineage specialization to a symbiotic or parasitic lifestyle or adaptation to an extreme or oligotrophic environment. We gathered genome and transcriptome data from a total of 14 red algal genera that represent the major branches of this phylum to study genome evolution in Rhodophyta. Analysis of orthologous gene gains and losses identifies two putative major phases of genome reduction: (i) in the stem lineage leading to all red algae resulting in the loss of major functions such as flagellae and basal bodies, the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis pathway, and the autophagy regulation pathway; and (ii) in the common ancestor of the extremophilic Cyanidiophytina. Red algal genomes are also characterized by the recruitment of hundreds of bacterial genes through horizontal gene transfer that have taken on multiple functions in shared pathways and have replaced eukaryotic gene homologs. Our results suggest that Rhodophyta may trace their origin to a gene depauperate ancestor. Unlike plants, it appears that a limited gene inventory is sufficient to support the diversification of a major eukaryote lineage that possesses sophisticated multicellular reproductive structures and an elaborate triphasic sexual cycle. PMID:26986787

  11. Novel shuttle markers for nuclear transformation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Vallon, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii today is a premier model organism for the study of green algae and plants. Yet the efficient engineering of its nuclear genome requires development of new antibiotic resistance markers. We have recoded, based on codon usage in the nuclear genome, the AadA marker that has been used previously for chloroplast transformation. The recoded AadA gene, placed under the control of the HSP70A-RBCS2 hybrid promoter and preceded by the RbcS2 chloroplast-targeting peptide, can be integrated into the nuclear genome by electroporation, conferring resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. Transformation efficiency is markedly increased when vector sequences are completely eliminated from the transforming DNA. Antibiotic resistance is stable for several months in the absence of selection pressure. Shuttle markers allowing selection in both Chlamydomonas and Escherichia coli would also be a useful asset. By placing an artificial bacterial promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequence in frame within the AadA coding sequence, we generated such a shuttle marker. To our surprise, we found that the classical AphVIII construct already functions as a shuttle marker. Finally, we developed a method to introduce the AadA and AphVIII markers into the vector part of the bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) of the Chlamydomonas genomic DNA library. Our aim was to facilitate complementation studies whenever the test gene cannot be selected for directly. After transformation of a petC mutant with a modified BAC carrying the AphVIII marker along with the PETC gene in the insert, almost half of the paromomycin-resistant transformants obtained showed restoration of phototrophy, indicating successful integration of the unselected test gene. With AadA, cotransformation was also observed, but with a lower efficiency.

  12. Novel shuttle markers for nuclear transformation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Vallon, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii today is a premier model organism for the study of green algae and plants. Yet the efficient engineering of its nuclear genome requires development of new antibiotic resistance markers. We have recoded, based on codon usage in the nuclear genome, the AadA marker that has been used previously for chloroplast transformation. The recoded AadA gene, placed under the control of the HSP70A-RBCS2 hybrid promoter and preceded by the RbcS2 chloroplast-targeting peptide, can be integrated into the nuclear genome by electroporation, conferring resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. Transformation efficiency is markedly increased when vector sequences are completely eliminated from the transforming DNA. Antibiotic resistance is stable for several months in the absence of selection pressure. Shuttle markers allowing selection in both Chlamydomonas and Escherichia coli would also be a useful asset. By placing an artificial bacterial promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequence in frame within the AadA coding sequence, we generated such a shuttle marker. To our surprise, we found that the classical AphVIII construct already functions as a shuttle marker. Finally, we developed a method to introduce the AadA and AphVIII markers into the vector part of the bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) of the Chlamydomonas genomic DNA library. Our aim was to facilitate complementation studies whenever the test gene cannot be selected for directly. After transformation of a petC mutant with a modified BAC carrying the AphVIII marker along with the PETC gene in the insert, almost half of the paromomycin-resistant transformants obtained showed restoration of phototrophy, indicating successful integration of the unselected test gene. With AadA, cotransformation was also observed, but with a lower efficiency. PMID:22002656

  13. A multidisciplinary study of iron transport and storage in the marine green alga Tetraselmis suecica.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Andrej; Böttger, Lars H; Matzanke, Berthold F; Carrano, Carl J

    2012-11-01

    The iron uptake and storage systems of terrestrial/higher plants are now reasonably well understood with two basic strategies being distinguished: strategy I involves the induction of a Fe(III)-chelate reductase (ferrireductase) along with Fe(II) or Fe(III) transporter proteins while strategy II plants have evolved sophisticated systems based on high-affinity, iron specific, binding compounds called phytosiderophores. In contrast, there is little knowledge about the corresponding systems in marine, plant-like lineages. Herein we report a study of the iron uptake and storage mechanisms in the green alga Tetraselmis suecica. Short term radio-iron uptake studies indicate that iron is taken up by Tetraselmis in a time and concentration dependent manner consistent with an active transport process. Based on inhibitor and other studies it appears that a reductive-oxidative pathway such as that found in yeast and the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is likely. Upon long term exposure to (57)Fe we have been able, using a combination of Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopies, to identify three metabolites. The first exhibits Mössbauer parameters typical of a [Fe(4)S(4)](2+) cluster and which accounts for approximately 10% of the total intracellular iron pool. The second displays a spectrum typical of a [Fe(II)O(6)] system accounting for approximately 2% of the total pool. The largest component (ca. 85+%) consists of polymeric iron-oxo mineral species with parameters between that of the crystalline ferrihydrite core of animal ferritins and the amorphous hydrated ferric phosphate of bacterial and plant ferritins.

  14. Transformation of the Green Alga Haematococcus pluvialis with a Phytoene Desaturase for Accelerated Astaxanthin Biosynthesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrenner, Jens; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a high-value carotenoid which is used as a pigmentation source in fish aquaculture. Additionally, a beneficial role of astaxanthin as a food supplement for humans has been suggested. The unicellular alga Haematococcus pluvialis is a suitable biological source for astaxanthin production. In the context of the strong biotechnological relevance of H. pluvialis, we developed a genetic transformation protocol for metabolic engineering of this green alga. First, the gene coding for the carotenoid biosynthesis enzyme phytoene desaturase was isolated from H. pluvialis and modified by site-directed mutagenesis, changing the leucine codon at position 504 to an arginine codon. In an in vitro assay, the modified phytoene desaturase was still active in conversion of phytoene to ζ-carotene and exhibited 43-fold-higher resistance to the bleaching herbicide norflurazon. Upon biolistic transformation using the modified phytoene desaturase gene as a reporter and selection with norflurazon, integration into the nuclear genome of H. pluvialis and phytoene desaturase gene and protein expression were demonstrated by Southern, Northern, and Western blotting, respectively, in 11 transformants. Some of the transformants had a higher carotenoid content in the green state, which correlated with increased nonphotochemical quenching. This measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence can be used as a screening procedure for stable transformants. Stress induction of astaxanthin biosynthesis by high light showed that there was accelerated accumulation of astaxanthin in one of the transformants compared to the accumulation in the wild type. Our results strongly indicate that the modified phytoene desaturase gene is a useful tool for genetic engineering of carotenoid biosynthesis in H. pluvialis. PMID:17012596

  15. High-Throughput Genetics Strategies for Identifying New Components of Lipid Metabolism in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal lipid metabolism is of broad interest because microalgae accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs) that can be used for biodiesel production (Durrett et al Plant J 54(4):593-607, 2008; Hu et al Plant J 54(4):621-639, 2008). Additionally, green algae are close relatives of land plants and serve as models to understand conserved lipid metabolism pathways in the green lineage. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas hereafter) is a powerful model organism for understanding algal lipid metabolism. Various methods have been used to screen Chlamydomonas mutants for lipid amount or composition, and for identification of the mutated loci in mutants of interest. In this chapter, we summarize the advantages and caveats for each of these methods with a focus on screens for mutants with perturbed TAG content. We also discuss technical opportunities and new tools that are becoming available for screens of mutants altered in TAG content or perturbed in other processes in Chlamydomonas.

  16. High-Throughput Genetics Strategies for Identifying New Components of Lipid Metabolism in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal lipid metabolism is of broad interest because microalgae accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs) that can be used for biodiesel production (Durrett et al Plant J 54(4):593-607, 2008; Hu et al Plant J 54(4):621-639, 2008). Additionally, green algae are close relatives of land plants and serve as models to understand conserved lipid metabolism pathways in the green lineage. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas hereafter) is a powerful model organism for understanding algal lipid metabolism. Various methods have been used to screen Chlamydomonas mutants for lipid amount or composition, and for identification of the mutated loci in mutants of interest. In this chapter, we summarize the advantages and caveats for each of these methods with a focus on screens for mutants with perturbed TAG content. We also discuss technical opportunities and new tools that are becoming available for screens of mutants altered in TAG content or perturbed in other processes in Chlamydomonas. PMID:27023238

  17. [Effect of blue-green alga (Cyanobacteria) and their exometabolites on formation of resting forms and variability of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Solokhina, L V; Pushkareva, V I; Litvin, V Iu

    2001-01-01

    Research, carried out with the use of bacteriological methods and polymerase chain reaction, revealed that the transformation of Y. pseudotuberculosis, associated with blue-green algae Anabaena variabilis, into resting (noncultivable) forms took shorter time than in soil extract containing no algae. The exometabolites of "old" cultures of these algae sharply accelerated the formation of resting Y. pseudotuberculosis forms. The influence of the algae and the products of their metabolism was manifested far more intensively at 22 degrees C than at 4 degrees C. After passage through infusoria resting Y. pseudotuberculosis forms, preserved in the mucous covering of cyanobacteria, partially reverted into vegetative forms, capable of growing on solid culture media. The revertants essentially differed from the initial vegetative forms by having lower enzymatic activity, agglutinability and cytopathogenicity, as well as by the loss of plasmid p45. The probable role of blue-green algae, widely spread in soils and water reservoirs, in the processes of reversible transformation of Y. pseudotuberculosis vegetative and resting forms, closely connected with seasonal changes of temperature conditions. PMID:11550552

  18. Distinctive Architecture of the Chloroplast Genome in the Chlorodendrophycean Green Algae Scherffelia dubia and Tetraselmis sp. CCMP 881

    PubMed Central

    Turmel, Monique; de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Chlorodendrophyceae is a small class of green algae belonging to the core Chlorophyta, an assemblage that also comprises the Pedinophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae. Here we describe for the first time the chloroplast genomes of chlorodendrophycean algae (Scherffelia dubia, 137,161 bp; Tetraselmis sp. CCMP 881, 100,264 bp). Characterized by a very small single-copy (SSC) region devoid of any gene and an unusually large inverted repeat (IR), the quadripartite structures of the Scherffelia and Tetraselmis genomes are unique among all core chlorophytes examined thus far. The lack of genes in the SSC region is offset by the rich and atypical gene complement of the IR, which includes genes from the SSC and large single-copy regions of prasinophyte and streptophyte chloroplast genomes having retained an ancestral quadripartite structure. Remarkably, seven of the atypical IR-encoded genes have also been observed in the IRs of pedinophycean and trebouxiophycean chloroplast genomes, suggesting that they were already present in the IR of the common ancestor of all core chlorophytes. Considering that the relationships among the main lineages of the core Chlorophyta are still unresolved, we evaluated the impact of including the Chlorodendrophyceae in chloroplast phylogenomic analyses. The trees we inferred using data sets of 79 and 108 genes from 71 chlorophytes indicate that the Chlorodendrophyceae is a deep-diverging lineage of the core Chlorophyta, although the placement of this class relative to the Pedinophyceae remains ambiguous. Interestingly, some of our phylogenomic trees together with our comparative analysis of gene order data support the monophyly of the Trebouxiophyceae, thus offering further evidence that the previously observed affiliation between the Chlorellales and Pedinophyceae is the result of systematic errors in phylogenetic reconstruction. PMID:26849226

  19. Anaerobic and Aerobic Hydrogen Gas Formation by the Blue-Green Alga Anabaena cylindrica

    PubMed Central

    Daday, Arlene; Platz, Rosalea A.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made of certain factors involved in the formation of hydrogen gas, both in an anaerobic environment (argon) and in air, by the blue-green alga Anabaena cylindrica. The alga had not been previously adapted under hydrogen gas and hence the hydrogen evolution occurred entirely within the nitrogen-fixing heterocyst cells; organisms grown in a fixed nitrogen source, and which were therefore devoid of heterocysts, did not produce hydrogen under these conditions. Use of the inhibitor dichlorophenyl-dimethyl urea showed that hydrogen formation was directly dependent on photosystem I and only indirectly dependent on photosystem II, consistent with heterocysts being the site of hydrogen formation. The uncouplers carbonyl cyanide chlorophenyl hydrazone and dinitrophenol almost completely inhibited hydrogen formation, indicating that the process occurs almost entirely via the adenosine 5′-triphosphate-dependent nitrogenase. Salicylaldoxime also inhibited hydrogen formation, again illustrating the necessity of photophosphorylation. Whereas hydrogen formation could usually only be observed in anaerobic, dinitrogen-free environments, incubation in the presence of the dinitrogen-fixing inhibitor carbon monoxide plus the hydrogenase inhibitor acetylene resulted in significant formation of hydrogen even in air. Hydrogen formation was studied in batch cultures as a function of age of the cultures and also as a function of culture concentration, in both cases the cultures being harvested in logarithmic growth. Hydrogen evolution (and acetylene-reducing activity) exhibited a distinct maximum with respect to the age of the cultures. Finally, the levels of the protective enzyme, superoxide dismutase, were measured in heterocyst and vegetative cell fractions of the organism; the level was twice as high in heterocyst cells (2.3 units/mg of protein) as in vegetative cells (1.1 units/mg of protein). A simple procedure for isolating heterocyst cells is described. PMID

  20. Small G proteins of two green algae are localized to exocytic compartments and to flagella.

    PubMed

    Huber, H; Beyser, K; Fabry, S

    1996-05-01

    The Ypt/Rab proteins are small GTPases, which belong to the Ras superfamily and have been shown to be involved in endo- and exocytosis in mammalian cells and yeast. Using affinity-purified antibodies specific for four Ypt proteins, namely Ypt1p, Ypt4p, Ypt5p and Ypt6p, of the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri (YptVp) and its close unicellular relative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (YptCp), we examined the abundance of the corresponding antigens during the asexual life cycle of Volvox, and their intracellular localization. The YptV proteins were found in all stages throughout the asexual life cycle and are tightly associated with intracellular membranes. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed that YptV4p, YptV5p and YptV6p are present in perinuclear regions of the cell, indicating an association with the Golgi region. Golgi localization of YptV4p and YptV6p in Volvox was confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy. In contrast, we found Ypt1p associated with the contractile vacuole in both V. carteri and C. reinhardtii. Furthermore, the YptV proteins were also detected along the entire length of the flagella of somatic Volvox cells. This flagellar location was substantiated by western blot analysis of extracts prepared from isolated flagella of both algae. While localization to exocytic compartments is in agreement with the established Ypt/Rab function in intracellular vesicle transport of eukaryotic cells, presence in the algal flagellum is the first hint of a possible role for small G proteins also in motility organelles.

  1. Screening and isolation of the algicidal compounds from marine green alga Ulva intestinalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xue; Jin, Haoliang; Zhang, Lin; Hu, Wei; Li, Yahe; Xu, Nianjun

    2016-07-01

    Twenty species of seaweed were collected from the coast of Zhejiang, China, extracted with ethanol, and screened for algicidal activity against red tide microalgae Heterosigma akashiwo and Prorocentrum micans. Inhibitory effects of fresh and dried tißsues of green alga Ulva intestinalis were assessed and the main algicidal compounds were isolated, purified, and identified. Five seaweed species, U. intestinalis, U. fasciata, Grateloupia romosissima, Chondria crassicaulis, and Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, were investigated for their algicidal activities. Fresh tissues of 8.0 and 16.0 mg/mL of U. intestinalis dissolved in media significantly inhibited growth of H. akashiwo and P. micans, respectively. Dried tissue and ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extracts of U. intestinalis at greater than 1.2 and 0.04 mg/mL, respectively, were fatal to H. akashiwo, while its water and EtOAc extracts in excess of 0.96 and 0.32 mg/mL, respectively, were lethal to P. micans. Three algicidal compounds in the EtOAc extracts were identified as 15-ethoxy-(6z,9z,12z)-hexadecatrienoic acid (I), (6E,9E,12E)-(2-acetoxy- β-D-glucose)-octadecatrienoic acid ester (II) and hexadecanoic acid (III). Of these, compound II displayed the most potent algicidal activity with IC50 values of 4.9 and 14.1 µg/mL for H. akashiwo and P. micans, respectively. Compound I showed moderate algicidal activity with IC50 values of 13.4 and 24.7 µg/mL for H. akashiwo and P. micans, respectively. These findings suggested that certain macroalgae or products therefrom could be used as effective biological control agents against red tide algae.

  2. Uranium accumulation and toxicity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is modulated by pH.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Michel; Sabatier, Sébastien; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Fortin, Claude

    2014-06-01

    The effects of pH on metal uptake and toxicity in aquatic organisms are currently poorly understood and remain an evolving topic in studies about the biotic ligand model (BLM). In the present study, the authors investigated how pH may influence long-term (4 d) uranium (U) accumulation and chronic toxicity in batch cultures of the freshwater green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The toxicity expressed as a function of the free uranyl ion was much greater at pH 7 (effective concentration, 50% [EC50] = 1.8 × 10(-9)  M UO2 (2+) ) than at pH 5 (EC50 = 1.2 × 10(-7)  M UO2 (2+) ). The net accumulation rate of U in algal cells was much higher at pH 7 than at pH 5 for the same free [UO2 (2+) ], but the cells exposed at pH 5 were also more sensitive to intracellular U than the cells at pH 7 with EC50s of 4.0 × 10(-15) and 7.1 × 10(-13)  mol of internalized U cell(-1) , respectively. The higher cellular sensitivity to U at pH 5 than at pH 7 could be explained partly by the increase in cytosolic U binding to algal soluble proteins or enzymes at pH 5 as observed by subcellular fractionation. To predict U accumulation and toxicity in algae accurately, the important modulating effects of pH on U accumulation and U cellular sensitivity should be considered in the BLM. PMID:24596137

  3. Effect of scenedesmus acuminatus green algae extracts on the development of Candida lipolytic yeast in gas condensate-containing media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilmes, B. I.; Kasymova, G. A.; Runov, V. I.; Karavayeva, N. N.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given of a comparative study of the growth and development as well as the characteristics of the biomass of the C. Lipolytica yeast according to the content of raw protein, protein, lipids, vitamins in the B group, and residual hydrocarbons during growth in media with de-aromatized gas-condensate FNZ as the carbon source with aqueous and alcohol extracts of S. acuminatus as the biostimulants. It is shown that the decoction and aqueous extract of green algae has the most intensive stimulating effect on the yeast growth. When a decoction of algae is added to the medium, the content of residual hydrocarbons in the biomass of C. lipolytica yeast is reduced by 4%; the quantity of protein, lipids, thamine and inositol with replacement of the yeast autolysate by the decoction of algae is altered little.

  4. Acute toxicities of pharmaceuticals toward green algae. mode of action, biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system and quantile regression models.

    PubMed

    Villain, Jonathan; Minguez, Laetitia; Halm-Lemeille, Marie-Pierre; Durrieu, Gilles; Bureau, Ronan

    2016-02-01

    The acute toxicities of 36 pharmaceuticals towards green algae were estimated from a set of quantile regression models representing the first global quantitative structure-activity relationships. The selection of these pharmaceuticals was based on their predicted environmental concentrations. An agreement between the estimated values and the observed acute toxicity values was found for several families of pharmaceuticals, in particular, for antidepressants. A recent classification (BDDCS) of drugs based on ADME properties (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion) was clearly correlated with the acute ecotoxicities towards algae. Over-estimation of toxicity from our QSAR models was observed for classes 2, 3 and 4 whereas our model results were in agreement for the class 1 pharmaceuticals. Clarithromycin, a class 3 antibiotic characterized by weak metabolism and high solubility, was the most toxic to algae (molecular stability and presence in surface water).

  5. Acute toxicities of pharmaceuticals toward green algae. mode of action, biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system and quantile regression models.

    PubMed

    Villain, Jonathan; Minguez, Laetitia; Halm-Lemeille, Marie-Pierre; Durrieu, Gilles; Bureau, Ronan

    2016-02-01

    The acute toxicities of 36 pharmaceuticals towards green algae were estimated from a set of quantile regression models representing the first global quantitative structure-activity relationships. The selection of these pharmaceuticals was based on their predicted environmental concentrations. An agreement between the estimated values and the observed acute toxicity values was found for several families of pharmaceuticals, in particular, for antidepressants. A recent classification (BDDCS) of drugs based on ADME properties (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion) was clearly correlated with the acute ecotoxicities towards algae. Over-estimation of toxicity from our QSAR models was observed for classes 2, 3 and 4 whereas our model results were in agreement for the class 1 pharmaceuticals. Clarithromycin, a class 3 antibiotic characterized by weak metabolism and high solubility, was the most toxic to algae (molecular stability and presence in surface water). PMID:26590695

  6. A freshwater green alga under cadmium stress: ameliorating calcium effects on ultrastructure and photosynthesis in the unicellular model Micrasterias.

    PubMed

    Andosch, Ancuela; Affenzeller, Matthias J; Lütz, Cornelius; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-10-15

    Cadmium is a highly toxic heavy metal pollutant arising mainly from increasing industrial disposal of electronic components. Due to its high solubility it easily enters soil and aquatic environments. Via its similarity to calcium it may interfere with different kinds of Ca dependent metabolic or developmental processes in biological systems. In the present study we investigate primary cell physiological, morphological and ultrastructural responses of Cd on the unicellular freshwater green alga Micrasterias which has served as a cell biological model system since many years and has proved to be highly sensitive to any kind of abiotic stress. Our results provide evidence that the severe Cd effects in Micrasterias such as unidirectional disintegration of dictyosomes, occurrence of autophagy, decline in photosystem II activity and oxygen production as well as marked structural damage of the chloroplast are based on a disturbance of Ca homeostasis probably by displacement of Ca by Cd. This is indicated by the fact that physiological and structural cadmium effects could be prevented in Micrasterias by pre-treatment with Ca. Additionally, thapsigargin an inhibitor of animal and plant Ca(2+)-ATPase mimicked the adverse Cd induced morphological and functional effects on dictyosomes. Recovery experiments indicated rapid repair mechanisms after Cd stress.

  7. Glycosyltransferase family 43 is also found in early eukaryotes and has three subfamilies in Charophycean green algae.

    PubMed

    Taujale, Rahil; Yin, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    The glycosyltransferase family 43 (GT43) has been suggested to be involved in the synthesis of xylans in plant cell walls and proteoglycans in animals. Very recently GT43 family was also found in Charophycean green algae (CGA), the closest relatives of extant land plants. Here we present evidence that non-plant and non-animal early eukaryotes such as fungi, Haptophyceae, Choanoflagellida, Ichthyosporea and Haptophyceae also have GT43-like genes, which are phylogenetically close to animal GT43 genes. By mining RNA sequencing data (RNA-Seq) of selected plants, we showed that CGA have evolved three major groups of GT43 genes, one orthologous to IRX14 (IRREGULAR XYLEM14), one orthologous to IRX9/IRX9L and the third one ancestral to all land plant GT43 genes. We confirmed that land plant GT43 has two major clades A and B, while in angiosperms, clade A further evolved into three subclades and the expression and motif pattern of A3 (containing IRX9) are fairly different from the other two clades likely due to rapid evolution. Our in-depth sequence analysis contributed to our overall understanding of the early evolution of GT43 family and could serve as an example for the study of other plant cell wall-related enzyme families. PMID:26023931

  8. Glycosyltransferase family 43 is also found in early eukaryotes and has three subfamilies in Charophycean green algae.

    PubMed

    Taujale, Rahil; Yin, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    The glycosyltransferase family 43 (GT43) has been suggested to be involved in the synthesis of xylans in plant cell walls and proteoglycans in animals. Very recently GT43 family was also found in Charophycean green algae (CGA), the closest relatives of extant land plants. Here we present evidence that non-plant and non-animal early eukaryotes such as fungi, Haptophyceae, Choanoflagellida, Ichthyosporea and Haptophyceae also have GT43-like genes, which are phylogenetically close to animal GT43 genes. By mining RNA sequencing data (RNA-Seq) of selected plants, we showed that CGA have evolved three major groups of GT43 genes, one orthologous to IRX14 (IRREGULAR XYLEM14), one orthologous to IRX9/IRX9L and the third one ancestral to all land plant GT43 genes. We confirmed that land plant GT43 has two major clades A and B, while in angiosperms, clade A further evolved into three subclades and the expression and motif pattern of A3 (containing IRX9) are fairly different from the other two clades likely due to rapid evolution. Our in-depth sequence analysis contributed to our overall understanding of the early evolution of GT43 family and could serve as an example for the study of other plant cell wall-related enzyme families.

  9. Glycosyltransferase Family 43 Is Also Found in Early Eukaryotes and Has Three Subfamilies in Charophycean Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Taujale, Rahil; Yin, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    The glycosyltransferase family 43 (GT43) has been suggested to be involved in the synthesis of xylans in plant cell walls and proteoglycans in animals. Very recently GT43 family was also found in Charophycean green algae (CGA), the closest relatives of extant land plants. Here we present evidence that non-plant and non-animal early eukaryotes such as fungi, Haptophyceae, Choanoflagellida, Ichthyosporea and Haptophyceae also have GT43-like genes, which are phylogenetically close to animal GT43 genes. By mining RNA sequencing data (RNA-Seq) of selected plants, we showed that CGA have evolved three major groups of GT43 genes, one orthologous to IRX14 (IRREGULAR XYLEM14), one orthologous to IRX9/IRX9L and the third one ancestral to all land plant GT43 genes. We confirmed that land plant GT43 has two major clades A and B, while in angiosperms, clade A further evolved into three subclades and the expression and motif pattern of A3 (containing IRX9) are fairly different from the other two clades likely due to rapid evolution. Our in-depth sequence analysis contributed to our overall understanding of the early evolution of GT43 family and could serve as an example for the study of other plant cell wall-related enzyme families. PMID:26023931

  10. 3-D analysis of dictyosomes and multivesicular bodies in the green alga Micrasterias denticulata by FIB/SEM tomography.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Gerhard; Schäfer, Tillman; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    In the present study we employ FIB/SEM tomography for analyzing 3-D architecture of dictyosomes and formation of multivesicular bodies (MVB) in high pressure frozen and cryo-substituted interphase cells of the green algal model system Micrasterias denticulata. The ability of FIB/SEM of milling very thin 'slices' (5-10 nm), viewing the block face and of capturing cytoplasmic volumes of several hundred μm(3) provides new insight into the close spatial connection of the ER-Golgi machinery in an algal cell particularly in z-direction, complementary to informations obtained by TEM serial sectioning or electron tomography. Our FIB/SEM series and 3-D reconstructions show that interphase dictyosomes of Micrasterias are not only closely associated to an ER system at their cis-side which is common in various plant cells, but are surrounded by a huge "trans-ER" sheath leading to an almost complete enwrapping of dictyosomes by the ER. This is particularly interesting as the presence of a trans-dictyosomal ER system is well known from mammalian secretory cells but not from cells of higher plants to which the alga Micrasterias is closely related. In contrast to findings in plant storage tissue indicating that MVBs originate from the trans-Golgi network or its derivatives our investigations show that MVBs in Micrasterias are in direct spatial contact with both, trans-Golgi cisternae and the trans-ER sheath which provides evidence that both endomembrane compartments are involved in their formation.

  11. Complex phylogenetic distribution of a non-canonical genetic code in green algae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A non-canonical nuclear genetic code, in which TAG and TAA have been reassigned from stop codons to glutamine, has evolved independently in several eukaryotic lineages, including the ulvophycean green algal orders Dasycladales and Cladophorales. To study the phylogenetic distribution of the standard and non-canonical genetic codes, we generated sequence data of a representative set of ulvophycean green algae and used a robust green algal phylogeny to evaluate different evolutionary scenarios that may account for the origin of the non-canonical code. Results This study demonstrates that the Dasycladales and Cladophorales share this alternative genetic code with the related order Trentepohliales and the genus Blastophysa, but not with the Bryopsidales, which is sister to the Dasycladales. This complex phylogenetic distribution whereby all but one representative of a single natural lineage possesses an identical deviant genetic code is unique. Conclusions We compare different evolutionary scenarios for the complex phylogenetic distribution of this non-canonical genetic code. A single transition to the non-canonical code followed by a reversal to the canonical code in the Bryopsidales is highly improbable due to the profound genetic changes that coincide with codon reassignment. Multiple independent gains of the non-canonical code, as hypothesized for ciliates, are also unlikely because the same deviant code has evolved in all lineages. Instead we favor a stepwise acquisition model, congruent with the ambiguous intermediate model, whereby the non-canonical code observed in these green algal orders has a single origin. We suggest that the final steps from an ambiguous intermediate situation to a non-canonical code have been completed in the Trentepohliales, Dasycladales, Cladophorales and Blastophysa but not in the Bryopsidales. We hypothesize that in the latter lineage an initial stage characterized by translational ambiguity was not followed by final

  12. Influence of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) produced by two different green unicellular algae on membrane filtration in an algae-based biofuel production process.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takaki; Yamamura, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Jyunpei; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, two strains of green algae named S1 and S2, categorized as the same species of Pseudo-coccomyxa ellipsoidea but showing 99% homology, were cultivated under the same conditions and filtrated with a microfiltration membrane. On the basis of the results of the extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) characteristics of these two green algae and the degree of fouling, the influence of these characteristics on the performance of membrane filtration was investigated. There was no difference in the specific growth rate between the S1 and S2 strains; however, large differences were seen in the amount and quality of EPS between S1 and S2. When the S1 and S2 strains were filtered with a membrane, the trend in the increase in transmembrane pressure (TMP) was quite different. The filtration of the S1 strain showed a rapid increase in TMP, whereas the TMP of the filtration of the S2 strain did not increase at all during the operation. This clearly demonstrated that the characteristics of each strain affect the development of membrane fouling. On the basis of the detailed characterization of solved-EPS (s-EPS) and bound-EPS (b-EPS), it was clarified that s-EPS mainly contributed to irreversible fouling for both operations and the biopolymer-like organic matter contained in b-EPS mainly contributed to reversible fouling. PMID:24804668

  13. Influence of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) produced by two different green unicellular algae on membrane filtration in an algae-based biofuel production process.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takaki; Yamamura, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Jyunpei; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, two strains of green algae named S1 and S2, categorized as the same species of Pseudo-coccomyxa ellipsoidea but showing 99% homology, were cultivated under the same conditions and filtrated with a microfiltration membrane. On the basis of the results of the extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) characteristics of these two green algae and the degree of fouling, the influence of these characteristics on the performance of membrane filtration was investigated. There was no difference in the specific growth rate between the S1 and S2 strains; however, large differences were seen in the amount and quality of EPS between S1 and S2. When the S1 and S2 strains were filtered with a membrane, the trend in the increase in transmembrane pressure (TMP) was quite different. The filtration of the S1 strain showed a rapid increase in TMP, whereas the TMP of the filtration of the S2 strain did not increase at all during the operation. This clearly demonstrated that the characteristics of each strain affect the development of membrane fouling. On the basis of the detailed characterization of solved-EPS (s-EPS) and bound-EPS (b-EPS), it was clarified that s-EPS mainly contributed to irreversible fouling for both operations and the biopolymer-like organic matter contained in b-EPS mainly contributed to reversible fouling.

  14. Metabolic regulation of triacylglycerol accumulation in the green algae: identification of potential targets for engineering to improve oil yield.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Elton C; Wilkie, Ann C; Kirst, Matias; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2016-08-01

    The great need for more sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels has increased our research interests in algal biofuels. Microalgal cells, characterized by high photosynthetic efficiency and rapid cell division, are an excellent source of neutral lipids as potential fuel stocks. Various stress factors, especially nutrient-starvation conditions, induce an increased formation of lipid bodies filled with triacylglycerol in these cells. Here we review our knowledge base on glycerolipid synthesis in the green algae with an emphasis on recent studies on carbon flux, redistribution of lipids under nutrient-limiting conditions and its regulation. We discuss the contributions and limitations of classical and novel approaches used to elucidate the algal triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathway and its regulatory network in green algae. Also discussed are gaps in knowledge and suggestions for much needed research both on the biology of triacylglycerol accumulation and possible avenues to engineer improved algal strains. PMID:26801206

  15. Culture observation and molecular phylogenetic analysis on the blooming green alga Chaetomorpha valida (Cladophorales, Chlorophyta) from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yunyan; Tang, Xiaorong; Zhan, Zifeng; Teng, Linhong; Ding, Lanping; Huang, Bingxin

    2013-05-01

    The marine green alga Chaetomorpha valida fouls aquaculture ponds along the coastal cities of Dalian and Rongcheng, China. Unialgal cultures were observed under a microscope to determine the developmental morphological characters of C. valida. Results reveal that gametophytic filaments often produce lateral branches under laboratory culture conditions, suggesting an atypical heteromorphic life cycle of C. valida between unbranched sporophytes and branched gametophytes, which differs from typical isomorphic alternation of Chaetomorpha species. The shape of the basal attachment cell, an important taxonomic character within the genus, was found variable depending on environmental conditions. The 18S rDNA and 28S rDNA regions were used to explore the phylogenetic affinity of the taxa. Inferred trees from 18S rDNA sequences revealed a close relationship between C. valida and Chaetomorpha moniligera. These results would enrich information in general biology and morphological plasticity of C. valida and provided a basis for future identification of green tide forming algae.

  16. Metabolic regulation of triacylglycerol accumulation in the green algae: identification of potential targets for engineering to improve oil yield.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Elton C; Wilkie, Ann C; Kirst, Matias; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2016-08-01

    The great need for more sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels has increased our research interests in algal biofuels. Microalgal cells, characterized by high photosynthetic efficiency and rapid cell division, are an excellent source of neutral lipids as potential fuel stocks. Various stress factors, especially nutrient-starvation conditions, induce an increased formation of lipid bodies filled with triacylglycerol in these cells. Here we review our knowledge base on glycerolipid synthesis in the green algae with an emphasis on recent studies on carbon flux, redistribution of lipids under nutrient-limiting conditions and its regulation. We discuss the contributions and limitations of classical and novel approaches used to elucidate the algal triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathway and its regulatory network in green algae. Also discussed are gaps in knowledge and suggestions for much needed research both on the biology of triacylglycerol accumulation and possible avenues to engineer improved algal strains.

  17. Nucleotide diversity of the colorless green alga Polytomella parva (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta): high for the mitochondrial telomeres, surprisingly low everywhere else.

    PubMed

    Smith, David Roy; Lee, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Silent-site nucleotide diversity data (π(silent)) can provide insights into the forces driving genome evolution. Here we present π(silent) statistics for the mitochondrial and nuclear DNAs of Polytomella parva, a nonphotosynthetic green alga with a highly reduced, linear fragmented mitochondrial genome. We show that this species harbors very little genetic diversity, with the exception of the mitochondrial telomeres, which have an excess of polymorphic sites. These data are compared with previously published π(silent) values from the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of the model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri, which are close relatives of P. parva, and are used to understand the modes and tempos of genome evolution within green algae. PMID:21762422

  18. Response of the green alga Oophila sp., a salamander endosymbiont, to a PSII-inhibitor under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Leilan; Brain, Richard; Rodriguez-Gil, Jose Luis; Hosmer, Alan; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2014-08-01

    In a rare example of autotroph-vertebrate endosymbiosis, eggs of the yellow-spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) are colonized by a green alga (Oophila sp.) that significantly enhances salamander development. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for impacts to the salamander embryo when growth of the algae is impaired by exposure to herbicides. To further investigate this relationship, the authors characterized the response of the symbiotic algae (Oophila sp.) alone to the photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor atrazine under controlled laboratory conditions. After extraction of the alga from A. maculatum eggs and optimization of culturing conditions, 4 toxicity assays (96 h each) were conducted. Recovery of the algal population was also assessed after a further 96 h in untreated media. Average median effective concentration (EC50) values of 123 µg L(-1) (PSII yield), 169 µg L(-1) (optical density), and 299 µg L(-1) (growth rate) were obtained after the 96-h exposure. Full recovery of exposed algal populations after 96 h in untreated media was observed for all endpoints, except for optical density at the greatest concentration tested (300 µg L(-1) ). Our results show that, under laboratory conditions, Oophila sp. is generally less sensitive to atrazine than standard test species. Although conditions of growth in standard toxicity tests are not identical to those in the natural environment, these results provide an understanding of the tolerance of this alga to PSII inhibitors as compared with other species.

  19. Response of the green alga Oophila sp., a salamander endosymbiont, to a PSII-inhibitor under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Leilan; Brain, Richard; Rodriguez-Gil, Jose Luis; Hosmer, Alan; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2014-08-01

    In a rare example of autotroph-vertebrate endosymbiosis, eggs of the yellow-spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) are colonized by a green alga (Oophila sp.) that significantly enhances salamander development. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for impacts to the salamander embryo when growth of the algae is impaired by exposure to herbicides. To further investigate this relationship, the authors characterized the response of the symbiotic algae (Oophila sp.) alone to the photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor atrazine under controlled laboratory conditions. After extraction of the alga from A. maculatum eggs and optimization of culturing conditions, 4 toxicity assays (96 h each) were conducted. Recovery of the algal population was also assessed after a further 96 h in untreated media. Average median effective concentration (EC50) values of 123 µg L(-1) (PSII yield), 169 µg L(-1) (optical density), and 299 µg L(-1) (growth rate) were obtained after the 96-h exposure. Full recovery of exposed algal populations after 96 h in untreated media was observed for all endpoints, except for optical density at the greatest concentration tested (300 µg L(-1) ). Our results show that, under laboratory conditions, Oophila sp. is generally less sensitive to atrazine than standard test species. Although conditions of growth in standard toxicity tests are not identical to those in the natural environment, these results provide an understanding of the tolerance of this alga to PSII inhibitors as compared with other species. PMID:24782078

  20. Phytochrome levels in the green alga Mesotaenium caldariorum are light regulated.

    PubMed

    Morand, L Z; Kidd, D G; Lagarias, J C

    1993-01-01

    Experiments undertaken in this investigation examine the influence of light on the levels of phytochrome in the green alga Mesotaenium caldariorum and also provide partial protein sequence of the algal phytochrome. Immunochemical and spectrophotometric measurements reveal that phytochrome levels increase nearly 4-fold upon transfer of light-grown algal cells to total darkness during a 6- to 8-d adaptation period. Within 24 h after return to continuous illumination, the level of phytochrome in dark-adapted cells has decreased to that found in light-grown cells. Red or far-red light experiments show that both effects of light, phytochrome accumulation during dark adaptation and light-dependent decrease of phytochrome, do not depend on the form of the phytochrome photoreceptor (i.e. far-red absorbing or red absorbing) present in the algal cell. The light-dependent reduction of phytochrome in dark-adapted cells is inhibited by the photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea, suggesting that this light effect is mediated by photosynthesis. Microsequence analyses of internal peptides indicate that algal phytochrome purified from dark-adapted cells shares the greatest sequence identity with phytochrome from the fern Selaginella (74%). Compared with higher plant photoreceptors, Mesotaenium phytochrome appears to be more closely related to phyB gene products (i.e. 62 and 63% average sequence identity) than to phyA gene products (i.e. 50 and 53% average sequence identity). Because light regulation and the structure of Mesotaenium phytochrome do not conform with either type I (light-labile) or type II (light-stable) phytochromes from higher plants, these results support the hypothesis that the lower green plant photoreceptors represent a distinct class of phytochrome. PMID:8278502

  1. Isolation of a novel oil globule protein from the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Peled, Ehud; Leu, Stefan; Zarka, Aliza; Weiss, Meira; Pick, Uri; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Boussiba, Sammy

    2011-09-01

    Cytoplasmic oil globules of Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae) were isolated and analyzed for pigments, lipids and proteins. Astaxanthin appeared to be the only pigment deposited in the globules. Triacyglycerols were the main lipids (more than 90% of total fatty acids) in both the cell-free extract and in the oil globules. Lipid profile analysis of the oil globules showed that relative to the cell-free extract, they were enriched with extraplastidial lipids. A fatty acids profile revealed that the major fatty acids in the isolated globules were oleic acid (18:1) and linoleic acid (18:2). Protein extracts from the globules revealed seven enriched protein bands, all of which were possible globule-associated proteins. A major 33-kDa globule protein was partially sequenced by MS/MS analysis, and degenerate DNA primers were prepared and utilized to clone its encoding gene from cDNA extracted from cells grown in a nitrogen depleted medium under high light. The sequence of this 275-amino acid protein, termed the Haematococcus Oil Globule Protein (HOGP), revealed partial homology with a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii oil globule protein and with undefined proteins from other green algae. The HOGP transcript was barely detectable in vegetative cells, but its level increased by more than 100 fold within 12 h of exposure to nitrogen depletion/high light conditions, which induced oil accumulation. HOGP is the first oil-globule-associated protein to be identified in H. pluvialis, and it is a member of a novel gene family that may be unique to green microalgae. PMID:21732215

  2. Molecular Identification of Rickettsial Endosymbionts in the Non-Phagotrophic Volvocalean Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Kawafune, Kaoru; Hongoh, Yuichi; Hamaji, Takashi; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Background The order Rickettsiales comprises Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria (also called rickettsias) that are mainly associated with arthropod hosts. This group is medically important because it contains human-pathogenic species that cause dangerous diseases. Until now, there has been no report of non-phagotrophic photosynthetic eukaryotes, such as green plants, harboring rickettsias. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the bacterial endosymbionts of two freshwater volvocalean green algae: unicellular Carteria cerasiformis and colonial Pleodorina japonica. Epifluorescence microscopy using 4′-6-deamidino-2-phenylindole staining revealed the presence of endosymbionts in all C. cerasiformis NIES-425 cells, and demonstrated a positive correlation between host cell size and the number of endosymbionts. Strains both containing and lacking endosymbionts of C. cerasiformis (NIES-425 and NIES-424) showed a >10-fold increase in cell number and typical sigmoid growth curves over 192 h. A phylogenetic analysis of 16 S ribosomal (r)RNA gene sequences from the endosymbionts of C. cerasiformis and P. japonica demonstrated that they formed a robust clade (hydra group) with endosymbionts of various non-arthropod hosts within the family Rickettsiaceae. There were significantly fewer differences in the 16 S rRNA sequences of the rickettsiacean endosymbionts between C. cerasiformis and P. japonica than in the chloroplast 16 S rRNA or 18 S rRNA of the host volvocalean cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated the existence of the rickettsiacean endosymbionts in the cytoplasm of two volvocalean species. Conclusions/Significance The rickettsiacean endosymbionts are likely not harmful to their volvocalean hosts and may have been recently transmitted from other non-arthropod organisms. Because rickettsias are the closest relatives of mitochondria, incipient stages of mitochondrial endosymbiosis may be deduced using both strains with and without C

  3. Extraction of nutraceuticals from Spirulina (blue-green alga): A bioorganic chemistry practice using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Herrera Bravo de Laguna, Irma; Toledo Marante, Francisco J; Luna-Freire, Kristerson R; Mioso, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina is a blue-green alga (cyanobacteria) with high nutritive value. This work provides an innovative and original approach to the consideration of a bioorganic chemistry practice, using Spirulina for the separation of phytochemicals with nutraceutical characteristics via thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The aim is to bring together current research, theory, and practice, and always in accordance with pedagogical ideas. PMID:26331489

  4. Palindromic Genes in the Linear Mitochondrial Genome of the Nonphotosynthetic Green Alga Polytomella magna

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy; Hua, Jimeng; Archibald, John M.; Lee, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Organelle DNA is no stranger to palindromic repeats. But never has a mitochondrial or plastid genome been described in which every coding region is part of a distinct palindromic unit. While sequencing the mitochondrial DNA of the nonphotosynthetic green alga Polytomella magna, we uncovered precisely this type of genic arrangement. The P. magna mitochondrial genome is linear and made up entirely of palindromes, each containing 1–7 unique coding regions. Consequently, every gene in the genome is duplicated and in an inverted orientation relative to its partner. And when these palindromic genes are folded into putative stem-loops, their predicted translational start sites are often positioned in the apex of the loop. Gel electrophoresis results support the linear, 28-kb monomeric conformation of the P. magna mitochondrial genome. Analyses of other Polytomella taxa suggest that palindromic mitochondrial genes were present in the ancestor of the Polytomella lineage and lost or retained to various degrees in extant species. The possible origins and consequences of this bizarre genomic architecture are discussed. PMID:23940100

  5. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-01-01

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolution beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ∼90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context. PMID:25675478

  6. Comparison of the Photosynthetic Yield of Cyanobacteria and Green Algae: Different Methods Give Different Answers

    PubMed Central

    Schuurmans, R. Milou; van Alphen, Pascal; Schuurmans, J. Merijn; Matthijs, Hans C. P.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.

    2015-01-01

    The societal importance of renewable carbon-based commodities and energy carriers has elicited a particular interest for high performance phototrophic microorganisms. Selection of optimal strains is often based on direct comparison under laboratory conditions of maximal growth rate or additional valued features such as lipid content. Instead of reporting growth rate in culture, estimation of photosynthetic efficiency (quantum yield of PSII) by pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorimetry is an often applied alternative method. Here we compared the quantum yield of PSII and the photonic yield on biomass for the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana 211-8K and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Our data demonstrate that the PAM technique inherently underestimates the photosynthetic efficiency of cyanobacteria by rendering a high F0 and a low FM, specifically after the commonly practiced dark pre-incubation before a yield measurement. Yet when comparing the calculated biomass yield on light in continuous culture experiments, we obtained nearly equal values for both species. Using mutants of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we analyzed the factors that compromise its PAM-based quantum yield measurements. We will discuss the role of dark respiratory activity, fluorescence emission from the phycobilisomes, and the Mehler-like reaction. Based on the above observations we recommend that PAM measurements in cyanobacteria are interpreted only qualitatively. PMID:26394153

  7. Respiratory-deficient mutants of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas: a review.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Thalia; Larosa, Véronique; Cardol, Pierre; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Remacle, Claire

    2014-05-01

    Genetic manipulation of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is straightforward. Nuclear genes can be interrupted by insertional mutagenesis or targeted by RNA interference whereas random or site-directed mutagenesis allows the introduction of mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This, combined with a screen that easily allows discriminating respiratory-deficient mutants, makes Chlamydomonas a model system of choice to study mitochondria biology in photosynthetic organisms. Since the first description of Chlamydomonas respiratory-deficient mutants in 1977 by random mutagenesis, many other mutants affected in mitochondrial components have been characterized. These respiratory-deficient mutants increased our knowledge on function and assembly of the respiratory enzyme complexes. More recently some of these mutants allowed the study of mitochondrial gene expression processes poorly understood in Chlamydomonas. In this review, we update the data concerning the respiratory components with a special focus on the assembly factors identified on other organisms. In addition, we make an inventory of different mitochondrial respiratory mutants that are inactivated either on mitochondrial or nuclear genes.

  8. 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone is the dominant naphthoquinone of PSI in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Shin-ichiro; Kosugi, Makiko; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Sugimura, Takashi; Takahashi, Yuichiro

    2012-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes contain two types of quinones, benzoquinone (plastoquinone) and naphthoquinone, which are involved in photosynthetic electron transfer. Unlike the benzoquinone, the chemical species of naphthoquinone present (phylloquinone, menaquinone-4 and 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone) varies depending on the oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used as a model organism to study the function of the naphthoquinone bound to PSI. However, the level of phylloquinone and the presence of other naphthoquinones in this organism remain unknown. In the present study, we found that 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone is the predominant naphthoquinone in cell and thylakoid extracts based on the retention time during reverse phase HPLC, absorption and mass spectrometry measurements. It was shown that 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone is enriched 2.5-fold in the PSI complex as compared with thylakoid membranes but that it is absent from PSI-deficient mutant cells. We also found a small amount of phylloquinone in the cells and in the PSI complex and estimated that accumulated 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone and phylloquinone account for approximately 90 and 10%, respectively, of the total naphthoquinone content. The ratio of these two naphthoquinones remained nearly constant in the cells and in the PSI complexes from logarithmic and stationary cell growth stages. We conclude that both 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone and phylloquinone stably co-exist as major and minor naphthoquinones in Chlamydomonas PSI.

  9. Relief of arsenate toxicity by Cd-stimulated phytochelatin synthesis in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Isao; Fujiwara, Shoko; Saegusa, Hirotaka; Inouhe, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Hiroko; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2006-01-01

    In most photosynthetic organisms, inorganic arsenic taken up into the cells inhibits photosynthesis and cellular growth. In a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, 0.5 mM arsenate inhibited photosynthesis almost completely within 30 min. However, in cells acclimated with a sublethal concentration (0.05 to 0.1 mM) of Cd, the inhibition of photosynthesis at 30 min after the addition of arsenate was relieved by more than 50%. The concentrations of arsenic incorporated into the cells were not significantly different between the Cd-acclimated and the non-acclimated cells. The Cd-acclimated cells accumulated Cd and synthesized phytochelatin (PC) peptides, which are known to play an important role in detoxification of heavy metals in plants. By the addition of an inhibitor of glutathione (an intermediate in the PC biosynthetic pathway) biosynthesis, buthionine sulfoximine, cells lost not only Cd tolerance but also arsenate tolerance. These results suggest that glutathione and/or PCs synthesized in Cd-acclimated cells are involved in mechanisms of arsenate tolerance.

  10. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolution beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ~90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.

  11. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolutionmore » beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ~90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.« less

  12. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    DOE PAGES

    Cornish, Adam J.; Green, Robin; Gärtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L.

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobicmore » conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.« less

  13. Bioenergetic Strategy for the Biodegradation of p-Cresol by the Unicellular Green Alga Scenedesmus obliquus

    PubMed Central

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Assimakopoulos, Konstantinos; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2012-01-01

    Cultures from the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus obliquus biodegrade the toxic p-cresol (4-methylphenol) and use it as alternative carbon/energy source. The biodegradation procedure of p-cresol seems to be a two-step process. HPLC analyses indicate that the split of the methyl group (first step) that is possibly converted to methanol (increased methanol concentration in the growth medium), leading, according to our previous work, to changes in the molecular structure and function of the photosynthetic apparatus and therefore to microalgal biomass increase. The second step is the fission of the intermediately produced phenol. A higher p-cresol concentration results in a higher p-cresol biodegradation rate and a lower total p-cresol biodegradability. The first biodegradation step seems to be the most decisive for the effectiveness of the process, because methanol offers energy for the further biodegradation reactions. The absence of LHCII from the Scenedesmus mutant wt-lhc stopped the methanol effect and significantly reduced the p-cresol biodegradation (only 9%). The present contribution deals with an energy distribution between microalgal growth and p-cresol biodegradation, activated by p-cresol concentration. The simultaneous biomass increase with the detoxification of a toxic phenolic compound (p-cresol) could be a significant biotechnological aspect for further applications. PMID:23251641

  14. Active hydrocarbon biosynthesis and accumulation in a green alga, Botryococcus braunii (race A).

    PubMed

    Hirose, Mana; Mukaida, Fukiko; Okada, Sigeru; Noguchi, Tetsuko

    2013-08-01

    Among oleaginous microalgae, the colonial green alga Botryococcus braunii accumulates especially large quantities of hydrocarbons. This accumulation may be achieved more by storage of lipids in the extracellular space rather than in the cytoplasm, as is the case for all other examined oleaginous microalgae. The stage of hydrocarbon synthesis during the cell cycle was determined by autoradiography. The cell cycle of B. braunii race A was synchronized by aminouracil treatment, and cells were taken at various stages in the cell cycle and cultured in a medium containing [(14)C]acetate. Incorporation of (14)C into hydrocarbons was detected. The highest labeling occurred just after septum formation, when it was about 2.6 times the rate during interphase. Fluorescent and electron microscopy revealed that new lipid accumulation on the cell surface occurred during at least two different growth stages and sites of cells. Lipid bodies in the cytoplasm were not prominent in interphase cells. These lipid bodies then increased in number, size, and inclusions, reaching maximum values just before the first lipid accumulation on the cell surface at the cell apex. Most of them disappeared from the cytoplasm concomitant with the second new accumulation at the basolateral region, where extracellular lipids continuously accumulated. The rough endoplasmic reticulum near the plasma membrane is prominent in B. braunii, and the endoplasmic reticulum was often in contact with both a chloroplast and lipid bodies in cells with increasing numbers of lipid bodies. We discuss the transport pathway of precursors of extracellular hydrocarbons in race A.

  15. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-10-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H(+)-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation. PMID:26272553

  16. Integration of carbon assimilation modes with photosynthetic light capture in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Berger, Hanna; Blifernez-Klassen, Olga; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Wobbe, Lutz; Kruse, Olaf

    2014-10-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of using organic and inorganic carbon sources simultaneously, which requires the adjustment of photosynthetic activity to the prevailing mode of carbon assimilation. We obtained novel insights into the regulation of light-harvesting at photosystem II (PSII) following altered carbon source availability. In C. reinhardtii, synthesis of PSII-associated light-harvesting proteins (LHCBMs) is controlled by the cytosolic RNA-binding protein NAB1, which represses translation of particular LHCBM isoform transcripts. This mechanism is fine-tuned via regulation of the nuclear NAB1 promoter, which is activated when linear photosynthetic electron flow is restricted by CO(2)-limitation in a photoheterotrophic context. In the wild-type, accumulation of NAB1 reduces the functional PSII antenna size, thus preventing a harmful overexcited state of PSII, as observed in a NAB1-less mutant. We further demonstrate that translation control as a newly identified long-term response to prolonged CO(2)-limitation replaces LHCII state transitions as a fast response to PSII over-excitation. Intriguingly, activation of the long-term response is perturbed in state transition mutant stt7, suggesting a regulatory link between the long- and short-term response. We depict a regulatory circuit operating on distinct timescales and in different cellular compartments to fine-tune light-harvesting in photoheterotrophic eukaryotes.

  17. Oxygen-dependent proton efflux in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). [Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.; Stuerzl, E.; Boeger, P.

    1984-05-01

    The oxygen-dependent proton efflux (in the dark) of intact cells of Anabaena variabilis and four other cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) was investigated. In contrast to bacteria and isolated mitochondria, an H/sup +//e ratio (= protons translocated per electron transported) of only 0.23 to 0.35 and a P/e ratio of 0.8 to 1.5 were observed, indicative of respiratory electron transport being localized essentially on the thylakoids, not on the cytoplasmic membrane. Oxygen-induced acidification of the medium was sensitive to cyanide and the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Inhibitors such as 2,6-dinitrophenol and vanadate exhibited a significant decrease in the H/sup +//e ratio. After the oxygen pulse, electron transport started immediately, but proton efflux lagged 40 to 60 s behind, a period also needed before maximum ATP pool levels were attained. The authors suggest that proton efflux in A. variabilis is due to a proton-translocating ATP hydrolase (ATP-consuming ATPase) rather than to respiratory electron transport located on the cytoplasmic membrane.

  18. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Adam J; Green, Robin; Gärtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobic conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes. PMID:25927230

  19. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Adam J; Green, Robin; Gärtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobic conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.

  20. Monophyly of primary photosynthetic eukaryotes: green plants, red algae, and glaucophytes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Brinkmann, Henner; Burey, Suzanne C; Roure, Béatrice; Burger, Gertraud; Löffelhardt, Wolfgang; Bohnert, Hans J; Philippe, Hervé; Lang, B Franz

    2005-07-26

    Between 1 and 1.5 billion years ago, eukaryotic organisms acquired the ability to convert light into chemical energy through endosymbiosis with a Cyanobacterium (e.g.,). This event gave rise to "primary" plastids, which are present in green plants, red algae, and glaucophytes ("Plantae" sensu Cavalier-Smith). The widely accepted view that primary plastids arose only once implies two predictions: (1) all plastids form a monophyletic group, as do (2) primary photosynthetic eukaryotes. Nonetheless, unequivocal support for both predictions is lacking (e.g.,). In this report, we present two phylogenomic analyses, with 50 genes from 16 plastid and 15 cyanobacterial genomes and with 143 nuclear genes from 34 eukaryotic species, respectively. The nuclear dataset includes new sequences from glaucophytes, the less-studied group of primary photosynthetic eukaryotes. We find significant support for both predictions. Taken together, our analyses provide the first strong support for a single endosymbiotic event that gave rise to primary photosynthetic eukaryotes, the Plantae. Because our dataset does not cover the entire eukaryotic diversity (but only four of six major groups in), further testing of the monophyly of Plantae should include representatives from eukaryotic lineages for which currently insufficient sequence information is available.

  1. Occurrence of Only One Form of Glutamine Synthetase in the Green Alga Monoraphidium braunii.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Fernandez, J. M.; Lopez-Ruiz, A.; Toribio, F.; Roldan, J. M.; Diez, J.

    1994-01-01

    Anion-exchange chromatography of crude extracts from the green alga Monoraphidium braunii yielded two glutamine synthetase (GS) activities. The ratio of activities was markedly different when crude extracts were subjected to various processing conditions but was not influenced by environmental factors of cell cultures. However, high performance liquid chromatography anion-exchange chromatograms showed only one GS if the crude extracts were processed immediately after cell disruption. Moreover, standard chromatography of crude extracts obtained in the absence of dithioerythritol, a reductant generally used in disruption buffers, yielded a single activity peak. Enzyme samples from the two activities obtained in the presence of dithioerythritol were purified for physicochemical characterization and antibody production. Both enzyme samples exhibited similar reactions to different inactivating agents and were undistinguishable by size-exclusion chromatography and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Additionally, the two GS preparations showed absolute antigenic identity as demonstrated by immunodiffusion and immunoblotting experiments. Immunocytochemistry of M. braunii cryosections evidenced a chloroplast-specific distribution of the enzyme, which rules out the existence of a cytoplasmic counterpart. All these results support the proposal that M. braunii possesses only one form of GS. PMID:12232093

  2. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Adam J.; Green, Robin; Gärtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobic conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes. PMID:25927230

  3. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, Adam J.; Green, Robin; Gärtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L.

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobic conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.

  4. A novel alphaproteobacterial ectosymbiont promotes the growth of the hydrocarbon-rich green alga Botryococcus braunii

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Yuuhiko; Okazaki, Yusuke; Yoshida, Masaki; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Kai, Atsushi; Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-ichiro; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Makoto M.

    2015-01-01

    Botryococcus braunii is a colony-forming green alga that accumulates large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons within the colony. The utilization of B. braunii for biofuel production is however hindered by its low biomass productivity. Here we describe a novel bacterial ectosymbiont (BOTRYCO-2) that confers higher biomass productivity to B. braunii. 16S rDNA analysis indicated that the sequence of BOTRYCO-2 shows low similarity (<90%) to cultured bacterial species and located BOTRYCO-2 within a phylogenetic lineage consisting of uncultured alphaproteobacterial clones. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies and transmission electric microscopy indicated that BOTRYCO-2 is closely associated with B. braunii colonies. Interestingly, FISH analysis of a water bloom sample also found BOTRYCO-2 bacteria in close association with cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa colonies, suggesting that BOTRYCO-2 relatives have high affinity to phytoplankton colonies. A PCR survey of algal bloom samples revealed that the BOTRYCO-2 lineage is commonly found in Microcystis associated blooms. Growth experiments indicated that B. braunii Ba10 can grow faster and has a higher biomass (1.8-fold) and hydrocarbon (1.5-fold) yield in the presence of BOTRYCO-2. Additionally, BOTRYCO-2 conferred a higher biomass yield to BOT-22, one of the fastest growing strains of B. braunii. We propose the species name ‘Candidatus Phycosocius bacilliformis’ for BOTRYCO-2. PMID:26130609

  5. Ammonia removal from anaerobic digestion effluent of livestock waste using green alga Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongmin; Jin, Hai-Feng; Lim, Byung-Ran; Park, Ki-Young; Lee, Kisay

    2010-11-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus was investigated for its ability to remove nitrogen from anaerobic digestion effluent possessing high ammonium content and alkalinity in addition to its growth characteristics. Nitrate and ammonium were indistinguishable as a nitrogen source when the ammonium concentration was at normal cultivation levels. Ammonium up to 100ppm NH(4)-N did not inhibit cell growth, but did decrease final cell density by up to 70% at a concentration of 200-500ppm NH(4)-N. Inorganic carbon of alkalinity in the form of bicarbonate was consumed rapidly, in turn causing the attenuation of cell growth. Therefore, maintaining a certain level of inorganic carbon is necessary in order to prolong ammonia removal. A moderate degree of aeration was beneficial to ammonia removal, not only due to the stripping of ammonium to ammonia gas but also due to the stripping of oxygen, which is an inhibitor of regular photosynthesis. Magnesium is easily consumed compared to other metallic components and therefore requires periodic supplementation. Maintaining appropriate levels of alkalinity, Mg, aeration along with optimal an initial NH(4)(+)/cell ratio were all necessary for long-term semi-continuous ammonium removal and cell growth. PMID:20663665

  6. Lipopolysaccharide containing L-acofriose in the filamentous blue-green alga Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Weckesser, J; Katz, A; Drews, G; Mayer, H; Fromme, I

    1974-11-01

    For the first time, an O-antigenic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been isolated from a filamentous blue-green alga (Anabaena variabilis). It was extractable with phenol-water, resulting in extraction of the bulk of the LPS into the phenol phase. The polysaccharide moiety of this LPS consists of l-rhamnose, its 3-O-methyl ether l-acofriose, d-mannose, d-glucose, and d-galactose. l-Glycero-d-mannoheptose and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, the two characteristic sugar components of enteric LPS, and phosphate groups are absent from the A. variabilis O antigen. The only amino sugar present is d-glucosamine. Three hydroxy fatty acids were identified, namely, beta-hydroxymyristic, beta-hydroxypalmitic and beta-hydroxystearic acids, in addition to palmitic and unidentified fatty acid. The LPS of A. variabilis is localized in the outermost cell wall layer and behaves like a bacterial O antigen in serological tests. The passive hemagglutination yielded high titers with isolated LPS (pretreated by heat or by alkali) and rabbit antisera prepared against living or heat-killed cells. The position of the precipitation arcs after immunoelectrophoresis of the O antigen indicates the lack of charged groups. The water phase of the phenol-water extract contains, in high yield, a glucose polymer. It is serologically inactive as shown by the passive hemagglutination test and by agar-gel precipitation.

  7. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-10-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H(+)-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation.

  8. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C.; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H+-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation. PMID:26272553

  9. Dynamics and pharmacological perturbations of the endoplasmic reticulum in the unicellular green alga Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    Menzel, D

    1994-06-01

    The giant unicellular green alga Acetabularia was labeled with the lipophilic fluorochrome DiOC6 (3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine) and examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy to study the distribution of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and its dynamic changes after the application of inhibitors. In control cells, a two-dimensional polygonal network of ER sheets and tubulus is suspended between parallel, longitudinally oriented bands. These bands coincide with the main physical tracks of organelle transport. All treatments that inhibited organelle motility caused a transformation of the polygonal network into confluent large patches of lamellar ER sheets. The shape of the lamellar sheets and residual activities of the ER were dependent on the inhibitors used. The largest ER lamellae were obtained after cytochalasin D (CD) treatment which effectively stopped cytoplasmic streaming. CD also caused the formation of a network of fine tubules overlapping with the lamellar sheets. Okadaic acid, a specific inhibitor of serine/threonine-protein phosphatases, also caused inhibition of organelle movement and enlargement of lamellar areas. Tension in the cytoplasm appeared to be reduced, as judged from the convexly curved lamellar rims and wavy connecting ER tubules. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide, a sulfhydryl group blocking reagent, rapidly stopped streaming and halted all activities of the ER in a rigor-like state. These effects are interpreted in the context of actin-based motility phenomena prevalent in Acetabularia, and regulatory principles are discussed that might underlie ER dynamics.

  10. Genome of the halotolerant green alga Picochlorum sp. reveals strategies for thriving under fluctuating environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Foflonker, Fatima; Price, Dana C; Qiu, Huan; Palenik, Brian; Wang, Shuyi; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2015-02-01

    An expected outcome of climate change is intensification of the global water cycle, which magnifies surface water fluxes, and consequently alters salinity patterns. It is therefore important to understand the adaptations and limits of microalgae to survive changing salinities. To this end, we sequenced the 13.5 Mbp genome of the halotolerant green alga Picochlorum SENEW3 (SE3) that was isolated from a brackish water pond subject to large seasonal salinity fluctuations. Picochlorum SE3 encodes 7367 genes, making it one of the smallest and most gene dense eukaryotic genomes known. Comparison with the pico-prasinophyte Ostreococcus tauri, a species with a limited range of salt tolerance, reveals the enrichment of transporters putatively involved in the salt stress response in Picochlorum SE3. Analysis of cultures and the protein complement highlight the metabolic flexibility of Picochlorum SE3 that encodes genes involved in urea metabolism, acetate assimilation and fermentation, acetoin production and glucose uptake, many of which form functional gene clusters. Twenty-four cases of horizontal gene transfer from bacterial sources were found in Picochlorum SE3 with these genes involved in stress adaptation including osmolyte production and growth promotion. Our results identify Picochlorum SE3 as a model for understanding microalgal adaptation to stressful, fluctuating environments.

  11. Phototoxicity of benzo(a)pyrene in the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, T.E.; Radike, M.J.; Warshawsky, D.

    1984-10-01

    The effects of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the growth of the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum in three light regimens were examined. In gold fluorescent light, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) at 12 mg/liter (48 ..mu..mole/liter), benz(a)anthracene (BaA) at 40 mg/liter (175 ..mu..mole/liter), anthracene (A) at 40 mg/liter (224 ..mu..mole/liter), and 13 metabolites of BaP each at 40 ..mu..g/liter had no effect on algal growth. In cool-white fluorescent light, 30% inhibition of algal growth occurred with 0.1 ..mu..mole/liter BaP, 8.0 ..mu..mole/liter BaA, and 40 ..mu..mole/liter A. BaP at 0.16 mg/liter (0.64 ..mu..mole/liter) totally inhibited growth. BaP concentrations an order of magnitude lower inhibited algal growth in fluorescent blacklight. In cool-white light, 5 of 13 metabolites of BaP (each 40 ..mu..g/liter) inhibited algal growth; 3,6-quinone; 6-hydroxy; 9-hydroxy; 3-hydroxy; and 1,6-quinone. Based on these results, PAHs and metabolites of BaP are selectively phototoxic to S. capricornutum due to the incident light intensity below 550 nm.

  12. Photosynthetic regeneration of ATP using a strain of thermophilic blue-green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, Y.; Kanayama, K.; Ochiai, H.

    1982-02-01

    Photosynthetic ATP accumulation was shown in the presence of exogenous ADP plus ortho-phosphate on illumination to the intact cells of a strain of thermophilic blue-green algae isolated from Matsue hot springs, Mastigocladus sp. Kinetic studies of various effectors on the ATP accumulation proved that the ATP synthesis depends mainly on the cyclic photophosphorylation system around photosystem I (PS-I) in the algal cells. The temperature and pH optima for the accumulation were found at 45 degrees C and pH 7.5. Maximum yield was obtained with light intensity higher than 15 mW/squared cm. Borate ion exerted pronounced enhancement on the ATP synthesis. With a continuous reactor at a flow rate of 1 ml/hour at 45 degrees C and pH 7.5, efficient photoconversion of ADP (2mM, at substrate reservoir) to ATP (1mM, at product outlet) has been maintained for a period of 2.5 days, though the efficiency has decreased in a further 2-day period to the level of 0.5 mM ATP/9.5 h of residence time. (Refs. 24).

  13. Toxic cell concentrations of three polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in the green alga, Selenastrum capricornutum

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, P. |; Halling-Soerensen, B.; Nyholm, N.; Sijm, D.T.H.M.

    1998-09-01

    Algal growth inhibition tests were performed with the unicellular green alga Selenastrum capricornutum and three {sup 14}C-labeled polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. Toxicity was related to external aqueous concentrations and additionally to internal algal bound PCB concentrations. Estimates of the concentrations at 50% effectiveness (EC50s) for the three PCB congeners ranged within a factor of 17 when based on measured aqueous concentrations. When based on internal toxicant concentrations the corresponding range was 6.7 to 14.3 mmol/kg wet weight. Thus, changing the basis from external to internal concentrations reduced the range by almost one order of magnitude. Additional toxic cell concentrations of five monoaromatic compounds and S. capricornutum were calculated from literature data to be in the same order of magnitude as the experimental toxic cell concentrations for the PCBs, whereas EC50 values for all substances ranged by more than four orders of magnitude. The experimental and calculated data indicate that observed differences in the estimated EC50 values were mainly due to differences in bioconcentration behavior rather than to different intrinsic toxicities. These findings are in agreement with the concept of baseline toxicity, meaning that a number of hydrophobic organics exerts their acute toxicity by one relatively nonspecific mode of action.

  14. Comparison of the Photosynthetic Yield of Cyanobacteria and Green Algae: Different Methods Give Different Answers.

    PubMed

    Schuurmans, R Milou; van Alphen, Pascal; Schuurmans, J Merijn; Matthijs, Hans C P; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2015-01-01

    The societal importance of renewable carbon-based commodities and energy carriers has elicited a particular interest for high performance phototrophic microorganisms. Selection of optimal strains is often based on direct comparison under laboratory conditions of maximal growth rate or additional valued features such as lipid content. Instead of reporting growth rate in culture, estimation of photosynthetic efficiency (quantum yield of PSII) by pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorimetry is an often applied alternative method. Here we compared the quantum yield of PSII and the photonic yield on biomass for the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana 211-8K and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Our data demonstrate that the PAM technique inherently underestimates the photosynthetic efficiency of cyanobacteria by rendering a high F0 and a low FM, specifically after the commonly practiced dark pre-incubation before a yield measurement. Yet when comparing the calculated biomass yield on light in continuous culture experiments, we obtained nearly equal values for both species. Using mutants of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we analyzed the factors that compromise its PAM-based quantum yield measurements. We will discuss the role of dark respiratory activity, fluorescence emission from the phycobilisomes, and the Mehler-like reaction. Based on the above observations we recommend that PAM measurements in cyanobacteria are interpreted only qualitatively. PMID:26394153

  15. Heterotrimeric G-proteins in green algae. An early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophycean green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions.

  16. Heterotrimeric G-proteins in green algae. An early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophycean green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions. PMID:25764428

  17. Arabitol provided by lichenous fungi enhances ability to dissipate excess light energy in a symbiotic green alga under desiccation.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Makiko; Miyake, Hirohisa; Yamakawa, Hisanori; Shibata, Yutaka; Miyazawa, Atsuo; Sugimura, Takashi; Satoh, Kazuhiko; Itoh, Shigeru; Kashino, Yasuhiro

    2013-08-01

    Lichens are drought-resistant symbiotic organisms of mycobiont fungi and photobiont green algae or cyanobacteria, and have an efficient mechanism to dissipate excess captured light energy into heat in a picosecond time range to avoid photoinhibition. This mechanism can be assessed as drought-induced non-photochemical quenching (d-NPQ) using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. A green alga Trebouxia sp., which lives within a lichen Ramalina yasudae, is one of the most common green algal photobionts. This alga showed very efficient d-NPQ under desiccation within the lichen thallus, whereas it lost d-NPQ ability when isolated from R. yasudae, indicating the importance of the interaction with the mycobiont for d-NPQ ability. We analyzed the water extracts from lichen thalli that enhanced d-NPQ in Trebouxia. Of several sugar compounds identified in the water extracts by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectrometry (MS) and gas chromatography (GC) analyses, only d-arabitol recovered d-NPQ in isolated Trebouxia to a level similar to that detected for R. yasudae thallus. Other sugar compounds did not help the expression of d-NPQ at the same concentrations. Thus, arabitol is essential for the expression of d-NPQ to dissipate excess captured light energy into heat, protecting the photobiont from photoinhibition. The relationship between mycobionts and photobionts is, therefore, not commensalism, but mutualism with each other, as shown by d-NPQ expression.

  18. The effect of bloom of filamentous green algae on the reproduction of yellowfin sculpin Cottocomephorus grewingkii (Dybowski, 1874) (Cottoidae) during ecological crisis in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Khanaev, I V; Dzyuba, E V; Kravtsova, L S; Grachev, M A

    2016-03-01

    In shallow water areas of open Lake Baikal, filamentous green alga of the genus Spirogyra grows abundantly. Together with alga of the genus Ulothrix, it forms algal mats. According to our observations from 2010 to 2013, the spawning habitat conditions for the yellowfin sculpin Cottocomephorus grewingkii (Dybowski, 1874) (Cottidae) proved to be significantly disturbed in the littoral zone of Listvennichnyi Bay (southern Baikal), which, in turn, reduced the number of egg layings. With a 100% projective cover of the floor and a high density of green filamentous algae, the shallow-water stony substrate becomes completely inaccessible for spawning of the August population. PMID:27193877

  19. The effect of bloom of filamentous green algae on the reproduction of yellowfin sculpin Cottocomephorus grewingkii (Dybowski, 1874) (Cottoidae) during ecological crisis in Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Khanaev, I V; Dzyuba, E V; Kravtsova, L S; Grachev, M A

    2016-03-01

    In shallow water areas of open Lake Baikal, filamentous green alga of the genus Spirogyra grows abundantly. Together with alga of the genus Ulothrix, it forms algal mats. According to our observations from 2010 to 2013, the spawning habitat conditions for the yellowfin sculpin Cottocomephorus grewingkii (Dybowski, 1874) (Cottidae) proved to be significantly disturbed in the littoral zone of Listvennichnyi Bay (southern Baikal), which, in turn, reduced the number of egg layings. With a 100% projective cover of the floor and a high density of green filamentous algae, the shallow-water stony substrate becomes completely inaccessible for spawning of the August population.

  20. Cancer prevention by green tea: evidence from epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jian-Min

    2013-12-01

    In contrast to the consistent results of an inhibitory effect of green tea extracts and tea polyphenols on the development and growth of carcinogen-induced tumors in experimental animal models, results from human studies are mixed. Both observational and intervention studies have provided evidence in support of a protective role of green tea intake in the development of oral-digestive tract cancer or an inhibitory role of oral supplementation of green tea extract on a precancerous lesion of oral cavity. Evidence in support of green tea intake against the development of liver cancer risk is limited and inconsistent. An inverse association between green tea intake and lung cancer risk has been observed among never smokers but not among smokers. Although observational studies do not support a beneficial role of tea intake against the development of prostate cancer, several phase 2 clinical trials have shown an inhibitory effect of green tea extract against the progression of prostate premalignant lesions to malignant tumors. Prospective epidemiologic studies so far have not provided evidence for a protective effect of green tea consumption on breast cancer development. Current data neither confirm nor refute a definitive cancer-preventive role of green tea intake. Large randomized intervention trials on the efficacy of green tea polyphenols or extracts are required before a recommendation for green tea consumption for cancer prevention should be made.

  1. Increased temperature mitigates the effects of ocean acidification in calcified green algae ( Halimeda spp.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Justin E.; Fisch, Jay; Langdon, Chris; Paul, Valerie J.

    2016-03-01

    The singular and interactive effects of ocean acidification and temperature on the physiology of calcified green algae ( Halimeda incrassata, H. opuntia, and H. simulans) were investigated in a fully factorial, 4-week mesocosm experiment. Individual aquaria replicated treatment combinations of two pH levels (7.6 and 8.0) and two temperatures (28 and 31 °C). Rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification were measured for all species both prior to and after treatment exposure. Pre-treatment measurements revealed that H. incrassata displayed higher biomass-normalized rates of photosynthesis and calcification (by 55 and 81 %, respectively) relative to H. simulans and H. opuntia. Furthermore, prior to treatment exposure, photosynthesis was positively correlated to calcification, suggesting that the latter process may be controlled by photosynthetic activity in this group. After treatment exposure, net photosynthesis was unaltered by pH, yet significantly increased with elevated temperature by 58, 38, and 37 % for H. incrassata, H. simulans, and H. opuntia, respectively. Both pH and temperature influenced calcification, but in opposing directions. On average, calcification declined by 41 % in response to pH reduction, but increased by 49 % in response to elevated temperature. Within each pH treatment, elevated temperature increased calcification by 23 % (at pH 8.0) and 74 % (at pH 7.6). Interactions between pH, temperature, and/or species were not observed. This work demonstrates that, in contrast to prior studies, increased temperature may serve to enhance the metabolic performance (photosynthesis and calcification) of some marine calcifiers, despite elevated carbon dioxide concentrations. Thus, in certain cases, ocean warming may mitigate the negative effects of acidification.

  2. A rapid, modular and marker-free chloroplast expression system for the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Bertalan, Ivo; Munder, Matthias C; Weiß, Caroline; Kopf, Judith; Fischer, Dirk; Johanningmeier, Udo

    2015-02-10

    In search of alternative expression platforms heterologous protein production in microalgae has gained increasing importance in the last years. Particularly, the chloroplast of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been adopted to successfully express foreign proteins like vaccines and antibodies. However, when compared with other expression systems, the development of the algal chloroplast to a powerful production platform for recombinant proteins is still in its early stages. In an effort to further improve methods for a reliable and rapid generation of transplastomic Chlamydomonas strains we constructed the key plasmid pMM2 containing the psbA gene and a multiple cloning site for foreign gene insertion. The psbA gene allows a marker-free selection procedure using as a recipient the Fud7 strain of Chlamydomonas, which grows on media containing acetate as a carbon source, but is unable to grow photoautotrophically due to the lack of an intact psbA gene. Biolistic transformation of Fud7 with vectors containing this gene restores photoautotrophic growth and thus permits selection in the light on media without carbon sources and antibiotics. The multiple cloning site with a BsaI recognition sequence allows type IIs restriction enzyme-based modular cloning which rapidly generates new gene constructs without sequences, which could influence the expression and characteristics of the foreign protein. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a codon optimized version of the gene for the bacterial protein MPT64 has been integrated into the plastome. Several strains with different promoter/UTR combinations show a stable expression of the HA tagged MPT64 protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplasts.

  3. Toxicity assessment of manufactured nanomaterials using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Xuezhi; Chen, Yongsheng; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2008-10-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, there is an increasing risk of human and environmental exposure to nanotechnology-based materials and products. As water resources are particularly vulnerable to direct and indirect contamination of nonomaterials (NMs), the potential toxicity and environmental implication of NMs to aquatic organisms must be evaluated. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used NMs, titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and quantum dots (QDs), using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhartii as a model system. The response of the organism to NMs was assessed at physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic levels. Growth kinetics showed that growth inhibition occurred during the first two to three days of cultivation in the presence of TiO(2) or QDs. Measurements of lipid peroxidation measurement indicated that oxidative stress of the cells occurred as early as 6 h after exposure to TiO(2) or QDs. The transcriptional expression profiling of four stress response genes (sod1, gpx, cat, and ptox2) revealed that transient up-regulation of these genes occurred in cultures containing as low as 1.0 mg L(-1) of TiO(2) or 0.1 mg L(-1) of QDs, and the maximum transcripts of cat, sod1, gpx, and ptox2 occurred at 1.5, 3, 3, and 6 h, respectively, and were proportional to the initial concentration of the NMs. As the cultures continued, recovery in growth was observed and the extent of recovery, as indicated by the final cell concentration, was dosage-dependent. QDs were found to be more toxic to Chlamydomonas cells than TiO(2) under our experimental conditions.

  4. Functional Rearrangement of the Light-Harvesting Antenna upon State Transitions in a Green Alga

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarczyk, Lucyna M.; Snellenburg, Joris J.; Ihalainen, Janne A.; van Grondelle, Rienk; van Stokkum, Ivo H.M.; Dekker, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    State transitions in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii serve to balance excitation energy transfer to photosystem I (PSI) and to photosystem II (PSII) and possibly play a role as a photoprotective mechanism. Thus, light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) can switch between the photosystems consequently transferring more excitation energy to PSII (state 1) or to PSI (state 2) or can end up in LHCII-only domains. In this study, low-temperature (77 K) steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measured on intact cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii shows that independently of the state excitation energy transfer from LHCII to PSI or to PSII occurs on two main timescales of <15 ps and ∼100 ps. Moreover, in state 1 almost all LHCIIs are functionally connected to PSII, whereas the transition from state 1 to a state 2 chemically locked by 0.1 M sodium fluoride leads to an almost complete functional release of LHCIIs from PSII. About 2/3 of the released LHCIIs transfer energy to PSI and ∼1/3 of the released LHCIIs form a component designated X-685 peaking at 685 nm that decays with time constants of 0.28 and 5.8 ns and does not transfer energy to PSI or to PSII. A less complete state 2 was obtained in cells incubated under anaerobic conditions without chemical locking. In this state about half of all LHCIIs remained functionally connected to PSII, whereas the remaining half became functionally connected to PSI or formed X-685 in similar amounts as with chemical locking. We demonstrate that X-685 originates from LHCII domains not connected to a photosystem and that its presence introduces a change in the interpretation of 77 K steady-state fluorescence emission measured upon state transitions in Chalamydomonas reinhardtii. PMID:25606675

  5. Toxicity assessment of manufactured nanomaterials using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Xuezhi; Chen, Yongsheng; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2008-10-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, there is an increasing risk of human and environmental exposure to nanotechnology-based materials and products. As water resources are particularly vulnerable to direct and indirect contamination of nonomaterials (NMs), the potential toxicity and environmental implication of NMs to aquatic organisms must be evaluated. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used NMs, titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and quantum dots (QDs), using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhartii as a model system. The response of the organism to NMs was assessed at physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic levels. Growth kinetics showed that growth inhibition occurred during the first two to three days of cultivation in the presence of TiO(2) or QDs. Measurements of lipid peroxidation measurement indicated that oxidative stress of the cells occurred as early as 6 h after exposure to TiO(2) or QDs. The transcriptional expression profiling of four stress response genes (sod1, gpx, cat, and ptox2) revealed that transient up-regulation of these genes occurred in cultures containing as low as 1.0 mg L(-1) of TiO(2) or 0.1 mg L(-1) of QDs, and the maximum transcripts of cat, sod1, gpx, and ptox2 occurred at 1.5, 3, 3, and 6 h, respectively, and were proportional to the initial concentration of the NMs. As the cultures continued, recovery in growth was observed and the extent of recovery, as indicated by the final cell concentration, was dosage-dependent. QDs were found to be more toxic to Chlamydomonas cells than TiO(2) under our experimental conditions. PMID:18768203

  6. A new paradigm for producing astaxanthin from the unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Baobei; Hu, Qiang; Sommerfeld, Milton; Li, Yuanguang; Han, Danxiang

    2016-10-01

    The unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis has been exploited as a cell factory to produce the high-value antioxidant astaxanthin for over two decades, due to its superior ability to synthesize astaxanthin under adverse culture conditions. However, slow vegetative growth under favorable culture conditions and cell deterioration or death under stress conditions (e.g., high light, nitrogen starvation) has limited the astaxanthin production. In this study, a new paradigm that integrated heterotrophic cultivation, acclimation of heterotrophically grown cells to specific light/nutrient regimes, followed by induction of astaxanthin accumulation under photoautotrophic conditions was developed. First, the environmental conditions such as pH, carbon source, nitrogen regime, and light intensity, were optimized to induce astaxanthin accumulation in the dark-grown cells. Although moderate astaxanthin content (e.g., 1% of dry weight) and astaxanthin productivity (2.5 mg L(-1)  day(-1) ) were obtained under the optimized conditions, a considerable number of cells died off when subjected to stress for astaxanthin induction. To minimize the susceptibility of dark-grown cells to light stress, the algal cells were acclimated, prior to light induction of astaxanthin biosynthesis, under moderate illumination in the presence of nitrogen. Introduction of this strategy significantly reduced the cell mortality rate under high-light and resulted in increased cellular astaxanthin content and astaxanthin productivity. The productivity of astaxanthin was further improved to 10.5 mg L(-1)  day(-1) by implementation of such a strategy in a bubbling column photobioreactor. Biochemical and physiological analyses suggested that rebuilding of photosynthetic apparatus including D1 protein and PsbO, and recovery of PSII activities, are essential for acclimation of dark-grown cells under photo-induction conditions. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2088-2099. © 2016 The Authors

  7. Phragmoplast of the green alga Spirogyra is functionally distinct from the higher plant phragmoplast.

    PubMed

    Sawitzky, H; Grolig, F

    1995-09-01

    Cytokinesis in the green alga Spirogyra (Zygnemataceae) is characterized by centripetal growth of a septum, which impinges on a persistent, centrifugally expanding telophase spindle, leading to a phragmoplast-like structure of potential phylogenetic significance (Fowke, L. C., and J. D. Pickett-Heaps. 1969. J. Phycol. 5:273-281). Combining fluorescent tagging of the cytoskeleton in situ and video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy of live cells, the process of cytokinesis was investigated with emphasis on cytoskeletal reorganization and concomitant redistribution of organelles. Based on a sequence of cytoskeletal arrangements and the effects of cytoskeletal inhibitors thereon, cytokinetic progression could be divided into three functional stages with respect to the contribution of microfilaments (MFs) and microtubules (MTs): (1) Initiation: in early prophase, a cross wall initial was formed independently of MFs and MTs at the presumptive site of wall growth. (2) Septum ingrowth: numerous organelles accumulated at the cross wall initial concomitant with reorganization of the extensive peripheral interphase MF array into a distinct circumferential MF array. This array guided the ingrowing septum until it contacted the expanding interzonal MT array. (3) Cross wall closure: MFs at the growing edge of the septum coaligned with and extended along the interzonal MTs toward the daughter nuclei. Thus, actin-based transportation of small organelles during this third stage occurred, in part, along a scaffold previously deployed in space by MTs. Displacement of the nuclei-associated interzonal MT array by centrifugation and depolymerization of the phragmoplast-like structure showed that the success of cytokinesis at the third stage depends on the interaction of both MF and MT cytoskeletons. Important features of the phragmoplast-like structure in Spirogyra were different from the higher plant phragmoplast: in particular, MFs were responsible for the

  8. Blue-Green Algae Inhibit the Development of Atherosclerotic Lesions in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chai Siah; Kim, Bohkyung; Pham, Tho X; Yang, Yue; Wegner, Casey J; Park, Young-Ki; Balunas, Marcy; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia and inflammation contribute to the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Our objective was to determine antiatherogenic effect of edible blue-green algae (BGA) species, that is, Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (NO) and Spirulina platensis (SP), in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice, a well-established mouse model of atherosclerosis. Male ApoE(-/-) mice were fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol (HF/HC, 15% fat and 0.2% cholesterol by wt) control diet or a HF/HC diet supplemented with 5% (w/w) of NO or SP powder for 12 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured, and livers were analyzed for histology and gene expression. Morphometric analysis for lesions and immunohistochemical analysis for CD68 were conducted in the aorta and the aortic root. NO supplementation significantly decreased plasma TC and TG, and liver TC, compared to control and SP groups. In the livers of NO-fed mice, less lipid droplets were present with a concomitant decrease in fatty acid synthase protein levels than the other groups. There was a significant increase in hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein levels in SP-supplemented mice than in control and NO groups. Quantification of aortic lesions by en face analysis demonstrated that both NO and SP decreased aortic lesion development to a similar degree compared with control. While lesions in the aortic root were not significantly different between groups, the CD68-stained area in the aortic root was significantly lowered in BGA-fed mice than controls. In conclusion, both NO and SP supplementation decreased the development of atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting that they may be used as a natural product for atheroprotection. PMID:26566121

  9. Construction of a growth model in the green alga Tetraselmis subcordiformis using a response surface approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Niu, Jingyan; Liu, Jiahui; Yang, Hongshuai; Liu, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    The green alga Tetraselmis subcordiformis has been widely used as a quality live food for aquaculture species, and also has been studied as a model organism for the photo-biological production of hydrogen. We attempted to quantify the relationship between T. subcordiformis specific growth rate (SGR) and three important environmental factors (temperature, salinity, and pH) using the central composite design and response surface method under laboratory conditions. The results showed that the linear effects of temperature and salinity were significant (P< 0.05), and they were equally important in impacting T. subcordiformis specific growth; the linear effect of pH was not significant (P>0.05); the interactive effect of temperature and pH was significant (P<0.05), whereas the temperature × salinity and salinity × pH interactions were not significant (P>0.05); all of the quadratic effects of the three factors were significant (P<0.05). A model equation for specific growth rate with the three factors was established, with the unadjusted and predictive R 2 as high as 0.990 and 0.921, respectively, suggesting that the model was a very good fit and that it could be used to predict SGR. Through optimizing the reliable model, an optimal 3-factor combination of 25 °C/35 of salinity/pH 7.9 was obtained, at which the maximum specific growth rate (0.65) was recorded, with a desirability value of 93.8%. These experimental results could serve as guidelines for increasing T. subcordiformis production efficiency.

  10. Ornithinimicrobium algicola sp. nov., a marine actinobacterium isolated from the green alga of the genus Ulva.

    PubMed

    Ramaprasad, E V V; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, non-spore-forming actinobacterium, strain JC311T, isolated from marine green alga of the genus Ulva was studied to examine its taxonomic position. On the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity studies, strain JC311T was shown represent a member of the genus Ornithinimicrobium and to be closely related to Ornithinimicrobium pekingense LW6T (98.6 %), Ornithinimicrobium kibberense K22-20T (98.3 %) and Ornithinimicrobium humiphilum HKI 0124T (98.1 %). However, strain JC311T showed less than 22 % DNA reassociation value (based on DNA-DNA hybridization) with O. pekingense JCM14001T, O. kibberense JCM12763T and O. humiphilum KCTC19901T. The predominant menaquinone of strain JC311T was MK-8(H4). The peptidoglycan contained l-ornithine as the diagnostic diamino acid. The polar lipid profile consisted of the lipids diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, glycophospholipid, aminophospholipid, phospholipid and two unidentified lipids. The major fatty acids iso-C16 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 1ω9c and iso-C17 : 0 were consistent with the fatty acid patterns reported for members of the genus Ornithinimicrobium. The distinct genomic, morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic differences from the previously described taxa support the classification of JC311T as a representative of a novel species of the genus Ornithinimicrobium, for which we propose the name Ornithinimicrobium algicola sp. nov., with the type strain JC311T ( = KCTC 39559 T =  LMG 28808T).

  11. A rapid, modular and marker-free chloroplast expression system for the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Bertalan, Ivo; Munder, Matthias C; Weiß, Caroline; Kopf, Judith; Fischer, Dirk; Johanningmeier, Udo

    2015-02-10

    In search of alternative expression platforms heterologous protein production in microalgae has gained increasing importance in the last years. Particularly, the chloroplast of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been adopted to successfully express foreign proteins like vaccines and antibodies. However, when compared with other expression systems, the development of the algal chloroplast to a powerful production platform for recombinant proteins is still in its early stages. In an effort to further improve methods for a reliable and rapid generation of transplastomic Chlamydomonas strains we constructed the key plasmid pMM2 containing the psbA gene and a multiple cloning site for foreign gene insertion. The psbA gene allows a marker-free selection procedure using as a recipient the Fud7 strain of Chlamydomonas, which grows on media containing acetate as a carbon source, but is unable to grow photoautotrophically due to the lack of an intact psbA gene. Biolistic transformation of Fud7 with vectors containing this gene restores photoautotrophic growth and thus permits selection in the light on media without carbon sources and antibiotics. The multiple cloning site with a BsaI recognition sequence allows type IIs restriction enzyme-based modular cloning which rapidly generates new gene constructs without sequences, which could influence the expression and characteristics of the foreign protein. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a codon optimized version of the gene for the bacterial protein MPT64 has been integrated into the plastome. Several strains with different promoter/UTR combinations show a stable expression of the HA tagged MPT64 protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplasts. PMID:25554634

  12. In Vitro Reconstitution of Light-harvesting Complexes of Plants and Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Natali, Alberto; Roy, Laura M.; Croce, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    In plants and green algae, light is captured by the light-harvesting complexes (LHCs), a family of integral membrane proteins that coordinate chlorophylls and carotenoids. In vivo, these proteins are folded with pigments to form complexes which are inserted in the thylakoid membrane of the chloroplast. The high similarity in the chemical and physical properties of the members of the family, together with the fact that they can easily lose pigments during isolation, makes their purification in a native state challenging. An alternative approach to obtain homogeneous preparations of LHCs was developed by Plumley and Schmidt in 19871, who showed that it was possible to reconstitute these complexes in vitro starting from purified pigments and unfolded apoproteins, resulting in complexes with properties very similar to that of native complexes. This opened the way to the use of bacterial expressed recombinant proteins for in vitro reconstitution. The reconstitution method is powerful for various reasons: (1) pure preparations of individual complexes can be obtained, (2) pigment composition can be controlled to assess their contribution to structure and function, (3) recombinant proteins can be mutated to study the functional role of the individual residues (e.g., pigment binding sites) or protein domain (e.g., protein-protein interaction, folding). This method has been optimized in several laboratories and applied to most of the light-harvesting complexes. The protocol described here details the method of reconstituting light-harvesting complexes in vitro currently used in our laboratory,and examples describing applications of the method are provided. PMID:25350712

  13. A new paradigm for producing astaxanthin from the unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Baobei; Hu, Qiang; Sommerfeld, Milton

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis has been exploited as a cell factory to produce the high‐value antioxidant astaxanthin for over two decades, due to its superior ability to synthesize astaxanthin under adverse culture conditions. However, slow vegetative growth under favorable culture conditions and cell deterioration or death under stress conditions (e.g., high light, nitrogen starvation) has limited the astaxanthin production. In this study, a new paradigm that integrated heterotrophic cultivation, acclimation of heterotrophically grown cells to specific light/nutrient regimes, followed by induction of astaxanthin accumulation under photoautotrophic conditions was developed. First, the environmental conditions such as pH, carbon source, nitrogen regime, and light intensity, were optimized to induce astaxanthin accumulation in the dark‐grown cells. Although moderate astaxanthin content (e.g., 1% of dry weight) and astaxanthin productivity (2.5 mg L−1 day−1) were obtained under the optimized conditions, a considerable number of cells died off when subjected to stress for astaxanthin induction. To minimize the susceptibility of dark‐grown cells to light stress, the algal cells were acclimated, prior to light induction of astaxanthin biosynthesis, under moderate illumination in the presence of nitrogen. Introduction of this strategy significantly reduced the cell mortality rate under high‐light and resulted in increased cellular astaxanthin content and astaxanthin productivity. The productivity of astaxanthin was further improved to 10.5 mg L−1 day−1 by implementation of such a strategy in a bubbling column photobioreactor. Biochemical and physiological analyses suggested that rebuilding of photosynthetic apparatus including D1 protein and PsbO, and recovery of PSII activities, are essential for acclimation of dark‐grown cells under photo‐induction conditions. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2088–2099.

  14. Biosorption of copper, cobalt and nickel by marine green alga Ulva reticulata in a packed column.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Jegan, J; Palanivelu, K; Velan, M

    2005-07-01

    Biosorption of copper, cobalt and nickel by marine green alga Ulva reticulata were investigated in a packed bed up-flow column. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of important design parameters such as bed height and flow rate. At a bed height of 25 cm, the metal-uptake capacity of U. reticulata for copper, cobalt and nickel was found to be 56.3+/-0.24, 46.1+/-0.07 and 46.5+/-0.08 mgg(-1), respectively. The Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) model was used to analyze the experimental data. The computed sorption capacity per unit bed volume (N0) was 2580, 2245 and 1911 mgl(-1) for copper, cobalt and nickel, respectively. The rate constant (K(a)) was recorded as 0.063, 0.081 and 0.275 lmg(-1)h(-1) for copper, cobalt and nickel, respectively. In flow rate experiments, the results confirmed that the metal uptake capacity and the metal removal efficiency of U. reticulata decreased with increasing flow rate. The Thomas model was used to fit the column biosorption data at different flow rates and model constants were evaluated. The column regeneration studies were carried out for three sorption-desorption cycles. The elutant used for the regeneration of the biosorbent was 0.1 M CaCl2 at pH 3 adjusted using HCl. For all the metal ions, a decreased breakthrough time and an increased exhaustion time were observed as the regeneration cycles progressed, which also resulted in a broadened mass transfer zone. The pH variations during both sorption and desorption process have been reported. PMID:15924962

  15. Assessing the combined effects from two kinds of cephalosporins on green alga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) based on response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruixin; Xie, Weishu; Chen, Jianqiu

    2015-04-01

    The present work evaluated the combined effects of cefradine and ceftazidime on the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa using response surface methodologies (RSM). After a 48 h-exposure, the population growth rate (PGR), the chlorophyll-a content and the SOD content of the alga increased with increased concentrations of two antibiotics. However, the three responses did not continue to demonstrate significant increases once antibiotic concentrations exceed a moderate level. Three two order polynomial regression equations were obtained to describe well the relationship between the responses of the alga and the two antibiotics' concentration (R(2) = 0.9997, 0.9292 and 0.9039, respectively). Three 3 D-surface graphs and their contour plots showed directly the changing trends of the alga under the combined effects of two antibiotics. This study for the first time employed the RSM in ecotoxicology, which indicated that the RSM should be placed under a feasible and a potential application prospect in toxicity assessment.

  16. Effects of lead on growth, photosynthetic characteristics and production of reactive oxygen species of two freshwater green algae.

    PubMed

    Dao, Ly H T; Beardall, John

    2016-03-01

    In the natural environment, heavy metal contamination can occur as long-term pollution of sites or as pulses of pollutants from wastewater disposal. In this study two freshwater green algae, Chlorella sp. FleB1 and Scenedesmus YaA6, were isolated from lead-polluted water samples and the effects of 24 h vs 4 and 8 d exposure of cultures to lead on growth, photosynthetic physiology and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of these algae were investigated. In Chlorella sp. FleB1, there was agreement between lead impacts on chlorophyll content, photosynthesis and growth in most case. However, in Scenedesmus acutus YaA6 growth was inhibited at lower lead concentrations (0.03-0.87 × 10(-9) M), under which ROS, measured by 2',7' dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate fluorescence, were 4.5 fold higher than in controls but photosynthesis was not affected, implying that ROS had played a role in the growth inhibition that did not involve direct effects on photosynthesis. Effects of short-term (5 h, 24 h) vs long-term (4 d and 8 d) exposure to lead were also compared between the two algae. The results contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of lead toxicity to algae.

  17. Assessing the combined effects from two kinds of cephalosporins on green alga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) based on response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruixin; Xie, Weishu; Chen, Jianqiu

    2015-04-01

    The present work evaluated the combined effects of cefradine and ceftazidime on the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa using response surface methodologies (RSM). After a 48 h-exposure, the population growth rate (PGR), the chlorophyll-a content and the SOD content of the alga increased with increased concentrations of two antibiotics. However, the three responses did not continue to demonstrate significant increases once antibiotic concentrations exceed a moderate level. Three two order polynomial regression equations were obtained to describe well the relationship between the responses of the alga and the two antibiotics' concentration (R(2) = 0.9997, 0.9292 and 0.9039, respectively). Three 3 D-surface graphs and their contour plots showed directly the changing trends of the alga under the combined effects of two antibiotics. This study for the first time employed the RSM in ecotoxicology, which indicated that the RSM should be placed under a feasible and a potential application prospect in toxicity assessment. PMID:25684417

  18. Enhanced acetyl-CoA production is associated with increased triglyceride accumulation in the green alga Chlorella desiccata.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Omri; Brandis, Alexander; Rogachev, Ilana; Pick, Uri

    2015-07-01

    Triglycerides (TAGs) from microalgae can be utilized as food supplements and for biodiesel production, but little is known about the regulation of their biosynthesis. This work aimed to test the relationship between acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) levels and TAG biosynthesis in green algae under nitrogen deprivation. A novel, highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique enabled us to determine the levels of Ac-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and unacetylated (free) CoA in green microalgae. A comparative study of three algal species that differ in TAG accumulation levels shows that during N starvation, Ac-CoA levels rapidly rise, preceding TAG accumulation in all tested species. The levels of Ac-CoA in the high TAG accumulator Chlorella desiccata exceed the levels in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Similarly, malonyl-CoA and free CoA levels also increase, but to lower extents. Calculated cellular concentrations of Ac-CoA are far lower than reported K mAc-CoA values of plastidic Ac-CoA carboxylase (ptACCase) in plants. Transcript level analysis of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH), the major chloroplastic Ac-CoA producer, revealed rapid induction in parallel with Ac-CoA accumulation in C. desiccata, but not in D. tertiolecta or C. reinhardtii. It is proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG levels in green algae critically depends on their ability to divert carbon flow towards Ac-CoA. This requires elevation of the chloroplastic CoA pool level and enhancement of Ac-CoA biosynthesis. These conclusions may have important implications for future genetic manipulation to enhance TAG biosynthesis in green algae.

  19. Colony organization in the green alga Botryococcus braunii is specified by a complex extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Taylor L.; Roth, Robyn; Goodson, Carrie; Vithda, Stanislav; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Rusch, Jannette; Holzenburg, Andreas; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Goodenough, Ursula

    2012-08-31

    Botryococcus braunii is a colonial green alga whose cells associate via a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) and produce prodigious amounts of liquid hydrocarbons that can be readily converted into conventional combustion engine fuels. We used quickfreeze deep-etch electron microscopy and biochemical/histochemical analysis to elucidate many new features of B. braunii cell/colony organization and composition. Intracellular lipid bodies associate with the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but show no evidence of being secreted. The ER displays striking fenestrations and forms a continuous subcortical system in direct contact with the cell membrane. The ECM has three distinct components. (i) Each cell is surrounded by a fibrous β-1, 4- and/or β-1, 3-glucan-containing cell wall. (ii) The intracolonial ECM space is filled with a cross-linked hydrocarbon network permeated with liquid hydrocarbons. (iii) Colonies are enclosed in a retaining wall festooned with a fibrillar sheath dominated by arabinose-galactose polysaccharides, which sequesters ECM liquid hydrocarbons. Each cell apex associates with the retaining wall and contributes to its synthesis. Retaining-wall domains also form "drapes" between cells, with some folding in on themselves and penetrating the hydrocarbon interior of a mother colony, partitioning it into daughter colonies. In addition, we propose that retaining-wall components are synthesized in the apical Golgi apparatus, delivered to apical ER fenestrations, and assembled on the surfaces of apical cell walls, where a proteinaceous granular layer apparently participates in fibril morphogenesis. We further propose that hydrocarbons are produced by the nonapical ER, directly delivered to the contiguous cell membrane, and pass across the nonapical cell wall into the hydrocarbon-based ECM.

  20. 3-D analysis of dictyosomes and multivesicular bodies in the green alga Micrasterias denticulata by FIB/SEM tomography.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Gerhard; Schäfer, Tillman; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    In the present study we employ FIB/SEM tomography for analyzing 3-D architecture of dictyosomes and formation of multivesicular bodies (MVB) in high pressure frozen and cryo-substituted interphase cells of the green algal model system Micrasterias denticulata. The ability of FIB/SEM of milling very thin 'slices' (5-10 nm), viewing the block face and of capturing cytoplasmic volumes of several hundred μm(3) provides new insight into the close spatial connection of the ER-Golgi machinery in an algal cell particularly in z-direction, complementary to informations obtained by TEM serial sectioning or electron tomography. Our FIB/SEM series and 3-D reconstructions show that interphase dictyosomes of Micrasterias are not only closely associated to an ER system at their cis-side which is common in various plant cells, but are surrounded by a huge "trans-ER" sheath leading to an almost complete enwrapping of dictyosomes by the ER. This is particularly interesting as the presence of a trans-dictyosomal ER system is well known from mammalian secretory cells but not from cells of higher plants to which the alga Micrasterias is closely related. In contrast to findings in plant storage tissue indicating that MVBs originate from the trans-Golgi network or its derivatives our investigations show that MVBs in Micrasterias are in direct spatial contact with both, trans-Golgi cisternae and the trans-ER sheath which provides evidence that both endomembrane compartments are involved in their formation. PMID:24135121

  1. Photosynthetic activity and protein overexpression found in Cr(III)-tolerant cells of the green algae Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M; Bartolomé, C M; Sánchez-Fortún, S

    2014-08-01

    Chromium is an important constituent in effluents obtained from chromium plating industries. Due to the highly toxic nature of Cr(VI), attention has been shifted to less hazardous Cr(III) electroplating processes. This study evaluated aquatic toxicity of Cr(III)-containing laboratory samples representative of effluents from chromium electroplating industries, on the photosynthetic activity exhibited by both Cr(III)-sensitive (Dc1M(wt)) and tolerant (Dc1M(Cr(III)R30)) Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides strains. Additionally, selected de novo-determined peptide sequences, obtained from Dc1M(Cr(III)R30), have been analyzed to evidence the possible Cr(III) toxic mechanism involved in the resistance of these cells to high Cr(III) levels in aquatic environments. Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) strain exhibited a gross photosynthetic balance of about five times lower than that exhibited by Dc1M(wt) strain, demonstrating that Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) has a photosynthetic yield significantly lower than Dc1M(wt). SDS-PAGE of Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) samples showed the presence of at least two protein bands (23.05 and 153.46 KDa, respectively) absent in wild-type strain samples. Although it has achieved a low coincidence between the lower molecular weight band and a GTPase identified from genome of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, none of de novo peptide sequences obtained showed a significant MS-BLAST score, so that further studies will be required. PMID:24556547

  2. Comparative Chloroplast Genome Analyses of Streptophyte Green Algae Uncover Major Structural Alterations in the Klebsormidiophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Claude; Otis, Christian; Turmel, Monique

    2016-01-01

    The Streptophyta comprises all land plants and six main lineages of freshwater green algae: Mesostigmatophyceae, Chlorokybophyceae, Klebsormidiophyceae, Charophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. Previous comparisons of the chloroplast genome from nine streptophyte algae (including four zygnematophyceans) revealed that, although land plant chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) inherited most of their highly conserved structural features from green algal ancestors, considerable cpDNA changes took place during the evolution of the Zygnematophyceae, the sister group of land plants. To gain deeper insights into the evolutionary dynamics of the chloroplast genome in streptophyte algae, we sequenced the cpDNAs of nine additional taxa: two klebsormidiophyceans (Entransia fimbriata and Klebsormidium sp. SAG 51.86), one coleocheatophycean (Coleochaete scutata) and six zygnematophyceans (Cylindrocystis brebissonii, Netrium digitus, Roya obtusa, Spirogyra maxima, Cosmarium botrytis and Closterium baillyanum). Our comparative analyses of these genomes with their streptophyte algal counterparts indicate that the large inverted repeat (IR) encoding the rDNA operon experienced loss or expansion/contraction in all three sampled classes and that genes were extensively shuffled in both the Klebsormidiophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. The klebsormidiophycean genomes boast greatly expanded IRs, with the Entransia 60,590-bp IR being the largest known among green algae. The 206,025-bp Entransia cpDNA, which is one of the largest genome among streptophytes, encodes 118 standard genes, i.e., four additional genes compared to its Klebsormidium flaccidum homolog. We inferred that seven of the 21 group II introns usually found in land plants were already present in the common ancestor of the Klebsormidiophyceae and its sister lineages. At 107,236 bp and with 117 standard genes, the Coleochaete IR-less genome is both the smallest and most compact among the streptophyte algal cpDNAs analyzed thus

  3. Comparative Chloroplast Genome Analyses of Streptophyte Green Algae Uncover Major Structural Alterations in the Klebsormidiophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Claude; Otis, Christian; Turmel, Monique

    2016-01-01

    The Streptophyta comprises all land plants and six main lineages of freshwater green algae: Mesostigmatophyceae, Chlorokybophyceae, Klebsormidiophyceae, Charophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. Previous comparisons of the chloroplast genome from nine streptophyte algae (including four zygnematophyceans) revealed that, although land plant chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) inherited most of their highly conserved structural features from green algal ancestors, considerable cpDNA changes took place during the evolution of the Zygnematophyceae, the sister group of land plants. To gain deeper insights into the evolutionary dynamics of the chloroplast genome in streptophyte algae, we sequenced the cpDNAs of nine additional taxa: two klebsormidiophyceans (Entransia fimbriata and Klebsormidium sp. SAG 51.86), one coleocheatophycean (Coleochaete scutata) and six zygnematophyceans (Cylindrocystis brebissonii, Netrium digitus, Roya obtusa, Spirogyra maxima, Cosmarium botrytis and Closterium baillyanum). Our comparative analyses of these genomes with their streptophyte algal counterparts indicate that the large inverted repeat (IR) encoding the rDNA operon experienced loss or expansion/contraction in all three sampled classes and that genes were extensively shuffled in both the Klebsormidiophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. The klebsormidiophycean genomes boast greatly expanded IRs, with the Entransia 60,590-bp IR being the largest known among green algae. The 206,025-bp Entransia cpDNA, which is one of the largest genome among streptophytes, encodes 118 standard genes, i.e., four additional genes compared to its Klebsormidium flaccidum homolog. We inferred that seven of the 21 group II introns usually found in land plants were already present in the common ancestor of the Klebsormidiophyceae and its sister lineages. At 107,236 bp and with 117 standard genes, the Coleochaete IR-less genome is both the smallest and most compact among the streptophyte algal cpDNAs analyzed thus

  4. Comparative Chloroplast Genome Analyses of Streptophyte Green Algae Uncover Major Structural Alterations in the Klebsormidiophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Claude; Otis, Christian; Turmel, Monique

    2016-01-01

    The Streptophyta comprises all land plants and six main lineages of freshwater green algae: Mesostigmatophyceae, Chlorokybophyceae, Klebsormidiophyceae, Charophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. Previous comparisons of the chloroplast genome from nine streptophyte algae (including four zygnematophyceans) revealed that, although land plant chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) inherited most of their highly conserved structural features from green algal ancestors, considerable cpDNA changes took place during the evolution of the Zygnematophyceae, the sister group of land plants. To gain deeper insights into the evolutionary dynamics of the chloroplast genome in streptophyte algae, we sequenced the cpDNAs of nine additional taxa: two klebsormidiophyceans (Entransia fimbriata and Klebsormidium sp. SAG 51.86), one coleocheatophycean (Coleochaete scutata) and six zygnematophyceans (Cylindrocystis brebissonii, Netrium digitus, Roya obtusa, Spirogyra maxima, Cosmarium botrytis and Closterium baillyanum). Our comparative analyses of these genomes with their streptophyte algal counterparts indicate that the large inverted repeat (IR) encoding the rDNA operon experienced loss or expansion/contraction in all three sampled classes and that genes were extensively shuffled in both the Klebsormidiophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. The klebsormidiophycean genomes boast greatly expanded IRs, with the Entransia 60,590-bp IR being the largest known among green algae. The 206,025-bp Entransia cpDNA, which is one of the largest genome among streptophytes, encodes 118 standard genes, i.e., four additional genes compared to its Klebsormidium flaccidum homolog. We inferred that seven of the 21 group II introns usually found in land plants were already present in the common ancestor of the Klebsormidiophyceae and its sister lineages. At 107,236 bp and with 117 standard genes, the Coleochaete IR-less genome is both the smallest and most compact among the streptophyte algal cpDNAs analyzed thus

  5. Evolutionary relatedness does not predict competition and co-occurrence in natural or experimental communities of green algae.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, Markos A; Cardinale, Bradley J; Hall, John D; Delwiche, Charles F; Fritschie, Keith; Narwani, Anita; Venail, Patrick A; Bentlage, Bastian; Pankey, M Sabrina; Oakley, Todd H

    2015-01-22

    The competition-relatedness hypothesis (CRH) predicts that the strength of competition is the strongest among closely related species and decreases as species become less related. This hypothesis is based on the assumption that common ancestry causes close relatives to share biological traits that lead to greater ecological similarity. Although intuitively appealing, the extent to which phylogeny can predict competition and co-occurrence among species has only recently been rigorously tested, with mixed results. When studies have failed to support the CRH, critics have pointed out at least three limitations: (i) the use of data poor phylogenies that provide inaccurate estimates of species relatedness, (ii) the use of inappropriate statistical models that fail to detect relationships between relatedness and species interactions amidst nonlinearities and heteroskedastic variances, and (iii) overly simplified laboratory conditions that fail to allow eco-evolutionary relationships to emerge. Here, we address these limitations and find they do not explain why evolutionary relatedness fails to predict the strength of species interactions or probabilities of coexistence among freshwater green algae. First, we construct a new data-rich, transcriptome-based phylogeny of common freshwater green algae that are commonly cultured and used for laboratory experiments. Using this new phylogeny, we re-analyse ecological data from three previously published laboratory experiments. After accounting for the possibility of nonlinearities and heterogeneity of variances across levels of relatedness, we find no relationship between phylogenetic distance and ecological traits. In addition, we show that communities of North American green algae are randomly composed with respect to their evolutionary relationships in 99% of 1077 lakes spanning the continental United States. Together, these analyses result in one of the most comprehensive case studies of how evolutionary history influences

  6. Evolutionary relatedness does not predict competition and co-occurrence in natural or experimental communities of green algae

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrou, Markos A.; Cardinale, Bradley J.; Hall, John D.; Delwiche, Charles F.; Fritschie, Keith; Narwani, Anita; Venail, Patrick A.; Bentlage, Bastian; Pankey, M. Sabrina; Oakley, Todd H.

    2015-01-01

    The competition-relatedness hypothesis (CRH) predicts that the strength of competition is the strongest among closely related species and decreases as species become less related. This hypothesis is based on the assumption that common ancestry causes close relatives to share biological traits that lead to greater ecological similarity. Although intuitively appealing, the extent to which phylogeny can predict competition and co-occurrence among species has only recently been rigorously tested, with mixed results. When studies have failed to support the CRH, critics have pointed out at least three limitations: (i) the use of data poor phylogenies that provide inaccurate estimates of species relatedness, (ii) the use of inappropriate statistical models that fail to detect relationships between relatedness and species interactions amidst nonlinearities and heteroskedastic variances, and (iii) overly simplified laboratory conditions that fail to allow eco-evolutionary relationships to emerge. Here, we address these limitations and find they do not explain why evolutionary relatedness fails to predict the strength of species interactions or probabilities of coexistence among freshwater green algae. First, we construct a new data-rich, transcriptome-based phylogeny of common freshwater green algae that are commonly cultured and used for laboratory experiments. Using this new phylogeny, we re-analyse ecological data from three previously published laboratory experiments. After accounting for the possibility of nonlinearities and heterogeneity of variances across levels of relatedness, we find no relationship between phylogenetic distance and ecological traits. In addition, we show that communities of North American green algae are randomly composed with respect to their evolutionary relationships in 99% of 1077 lakes spanning the continental United States. Together, these analyses result in one of the most comprehensive case studies of how evolutionary history influences

  7. Blue-green algae (Arthrospira platensis) as an ingredient in pasta: free radical scavenging activity, sensory and cooking characteristics evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zouari, Nacim; Abid, Mouna; Fakhfakh, Nahed; Ayadi, M A; Zorgui, Lazhar; Ayadi, Moez; Attia, Hamadi

    2011-12-01

    The effects of semolina enrichment with blue-green algae (Arthrospira platensis) at three different levels (1, 2 and 3 g/100 g of semolina) on the colour, cooking properties, firmness, free radical scavenging activity and sensory characteristics of pasta are reported. Microalgae addition resulted in higher swelling index and lower cooking loss than the control sample. A significant increase in pasta firmness was evidenced with an increase of added microalgae due to structural reinforcement. In addition to colouring, the use of A. platensis (2 g/100 g of semolina) can enhance the sensory quality and nutraceutical potential as evaluated by free radical scavenging activity of pasta. PMID:21568819

  8. Interactive effects of copper oxide nanoparticles and light to green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Cheloni, Giulia; Marti, Elodie; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores the effect of light with different spectral composition on the stability of CuO-nanoparticle (CuO-NP) dispersions and their effects to green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results showed that simulated natural light (SNL) and light with enhanced UVB radiation (UVR*) do not affect the dissolution of CuO-NPs as compared to light irradiation conditions typically used in laboratory incubator (INC). Comparable values of ζ-potential and hydrodynamic size during 24h were found under all studied conditions. Concentrations of CuO-NPs below 1mgL(-1) do not attenuate the light penetration in the algal suspensions in comparison with NP-free system. Exposure to a combination of 8μgL(-1) or 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs and INC or SNL has no significant effect on the algal growth inhibition, algal fluorescence and membrane integrity under short-term exposure. However, an enhancement of the percentage of cells experiencing oxidative stress was observed upon exposure to 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs and SNL for 4 and 8h. Combination of UVR* and 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs resulted in synergistic effects for all biological endpoints. Despite the photocatalytic properties of CuO-NPs no significant increase in abiotic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under simulated solar radiation was observed suggesting that the synergistic effect observed might be correlated to other factors than CuO-NP-mediated ROS photoproduction. Tests performed with CuSO4 confirmed the important role of dissolution as toxicity driving force for lower CuO-NP concentration. However, they failed to clarify the contribution of dissolved Cu on the combined effects at 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs. The results point out the necessity of taking into account the possible interactions between ENPs and changing light conditions when evaluating the potential effects of ENPs to phytoplankton in natural waters.

  9. Interactive effects of copper oxide nanoparticles and light to green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Cheloni, Giulia; Marti, Elodie; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores the effect of light with different spectral composition on the stability of CuO-nanoparticle (CuO-NP) dispersions and their effects to green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results showed that simulated natural light (SNL) and light with enhanced UVB radiation (UVR*) do not affect the dissolution of CuO-NPs as compared to light irradiation conditions typically used in laboratory incubator (INC). Comparable values of ζ-potential and hydrodynamic size during 24h were found under all studied conditions. Concentrations of CuO-NPs below 1mgL(-1) do not attenuate the light penetration in the algal suspensions in comparison with NP-free system. Exposure to a combination of 8μgL(-1) or 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs and INC or SNL has no significant effect on the algal growth inhibition, algal fluorescence and membrane integrity under short-term exposure. However, an enhancement of the percentage of cells experiencing oxidative stress was observed upon exposure to 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs and SNL for 4 and 8h. Combination of UVR* and 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs resulted in synergistic effects for all biological endpoints. Despite the photocatalytic properties of CuO-NPs no significant increase in abiotic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under simulated solar radiation was observed suggesting that the synergistic effect observed might be correlated to other factors than CuO-NP-mediated ROS photoproduction. Tests performed with CuSO4 confirmed the important role of dissolution as toxicity driving force for lower CuO-NP concentration. However, they failed to clarify the contribution of dissolved Cu on the combined effects at 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs. The results point out the necessity of taking into account the possible interactions between ENPs and changing light conditions when evaluating the potential effects of ENPs to phytoplankton in natural waters. PMID:26655656

  10. Light-harvesting complex Lhcb9 confers a green alga-type photosystem I supercomplex to the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Masakazu; Yokono, Makio; Kono, Masaru; Noguchi, Ko; Akimoto, Seiji; Nakano, Akihiko

    2015-01-19

    Light-harvesting complex (LHC) proteins in chloroplast thylakoid membranes not only transfer absorbed light energy to the two photosystems but also regulate the rate of energy transfer to avoid photodamage. Here we demonstrate that Lhcb9, a recently discovered LHC protein in the moss Physcomitrella patens, functions to connect LHC proteins with photosystem I (PSI), resulting in the formation of two different types of PSI supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes. We observed that the Lhcb9-containing PSI supercomplex is disassembled in response to excess light conditions. On the basis of our phylogenetic analysis, it appears that P. patens acquired Lhcb9 by horizontal gene transfer from the earlier green algal lineage, leading to the presence of both green alga-type and vascular plant-type PSI supercomplexes, which would have been crucial for conquering the dynamic environmental interface between aquatic and terrestrial conditions it faced during evolution.

  11. Sequestration of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and Acrylate from the Green Alga Ulva Spp. by the Sea Hare Aplysia juliana.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Michiya; Koyama, Mao; Hayashihara, Nobuko; Hiei, Kaori; Uchida, Hajime; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Many animals sequester secondary metabolites from their food. In this study, we hypothesized that the sea hare Aplysia juliana sequesters secondary metabolites from green algae. To test this, we performed NMR-based metabolomic analysis on methanol extracts of Ulva spp. and A. juliana. Another sea hare, Bursatella leachii, which mainly feeds on another type of alga, was added to this analysis as an outgroup. Two body parts of the sea hares, skin and digestive glands, were used in the analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) on the NMR data of these samples detected biomarkers common to Ulva spp. and A. juliana. This result indicates sequestration of secondary metabolites by the herbivore from the plants. The biomarker metabolites were identified as dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and acrylate, which were concentrated in skin of A. juliana and were released from the skin of live animals when physically stressed. Thus, our NMR-based metabolomic study revealed sequestration of algae-derived secondary metabolites in skin of A. Juliana, and in the discharge of the metabolites under conditions that mimic attack by predators. PMID:27179528

  12. Comparative Genomics of a Bacterivorous Green Alga Reveals Evolutionary Causalities and Consequences of Phago-Mixotrophic Mode of Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Burns, John A; Paasch, Amber; Narechania, Apurva; Kim, Eunsoo

    2015-11-01

    Cymbomonas tetramitiformis-a marine prasinophyte-is one of only a few green algae that still retain an ancestral particulate-feeding mechanism while harvesting energy through photosynthesis. The genome of the alga is estimated to be 850 Mb-1.2 Gb in size-the bulk of which is filled with repetitive sequences-and is annotated with 37,366 protein-coding gene models. A number of unusual metabolic pathways (for the Chloroplastida) are predicted for C. tetramitiformis, including pathways for Lipid-A and peptidoglycan metabolism. Comparative analyses of the predicted peptides of C. tetramitiformis to sets of other eukaryotes revealed that nonphagocytes are depleted in a number of genes, a proportion of which have known function in feeding. In addition, our analysis suggests that obligatory phagotrophy is associated with the loss of genes that function in biosynthesis of small molecules (e.g., amino acids). Further, C. tetramitiformis and at least one other phago-mixotrophic alga are thus unique, compared with obligatory heterotrophs and nonphagocytes, in that both feeding and small molecule synthesis-related genes are retained in their genomes. These results suggest that early, ancestral host eukaryotes that gave rise to phototrophs had the capacity to assimilate building block molecules from inorganic substances (i.e., prototrophy). The loss of biosynthesis genes, thus, may at least partially explain the apparent lack of instances of permanent incorporation of photosynthetic endosymbionts in later-divergent, auxotrophic eukaryotic lineages, such as metazoans and ciliates. PMID:26224703

  13. Refactoring the Six-Gene Photosystem II Core in the Chloroplast of the Green Algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gimpel, Javier A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Scranton, Melissa A; Li, Daphne; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2016-07-15

    Oxygenic photosynthesis provides the energy to produce all food and most of the fuel on this planet. Photosystem II (PSII) is an essential and rate-limiting component of this process. Understanding and modifying PSII function could provide an opportunity for optimizing photosynthetic biomass production, particularly under specific environmental conditions. PSII is a complex multisubunit enzyme with strong interdependence among its components. In this work, we have deleted the six core genes of PSII in the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and refactored them in a single DNA construct. Complementation of the knockout strain with the core PSII synthetic module from three different green algae resulted in reconstitution of photosynthetic activity to 85, 55, and 53% of that of the wild-type, demonstrating that the PSII core can be exchanged between algae species and retain function. The strains, synthetic cassettes, and refactoring strategy developed for this study demonstrate the potential of synthetic biology approaches for tailoring oxygenic photosynthesis and provide a powerful tool for unraveling PSII structure-function relationships.

  14. Klebsormidium flaccidum, a charophycean green alga, exhibits cold acclimation that is closely associated with compatible solute accumulation and ultrastructural changes.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Manabu; Matsui, Kenji; Uemura, Matsuo

    2008-06-01

    To elucidate the fundamental mechanisms and subsequent evolutionary aspects of plant cold acclimation, we examined the effect of cold acclimation on freezing tolerance in Klebsormidium flaccidum, a green alga belonging to Charophyceae, a sister group of land plants. Freezing tolerance of K. flaccidum was significantly enhanced by cold treatment: survival increased from 15% at -10 degrees C when grown at 18 degrees C to 55 and 85% after exposure at 2 degrees C for 2 and 7 d, respectively. Accompanying the development of freezing tolerance, soluble sugars (glucose and sucrose), a putative glycoside and amino acids, including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), accumulated to high levels in the alga, suggesting that these solutes play a crucial role in the cold acclimation of K. flaccidum. Interestingly, the application of abscisic acid (ABA) did not change the freezing tolerance of the alga. We also observed changes in cell structure, including increased numbers and sizes of starch grains in chloroplasts, chloroplast enlargement, vacuole size reduction and cytoplasmic volume increase. These results suggest that K. flaccidum responds well to cold treatment and develops freezing tolerance in a process comparable to that of land plants.

  15. Alpha-amylase Inhibition and Antioxidant Activity of Marine Green Algae and its Possible Role in Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, P. S.; Suthindhiran, K.; Jayasri, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In the continuing search for safe and efficient antidiabetic drug, marine algae become important source which provide several compounds of immense therapeutic potential. Alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and antioxidant compounds are known to manage diabetes and have received much attention recently. In the present study, four green algae (Chaetomorpha aerea, Enteromorpha intestinalis, Chlorodesmis, and Cladophora rupestris) were chosen to evaluate alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitory, and antioxidant activity in vitro. Materials and Methods: The phytochemical constituents of all the extracts were qualitatively determined. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by inhibitory potential of extracts against alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase by spectrophotometric assays. Antioxidant activity was determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and nitric oxide scavenging assay. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was carried out to determine the major compound responsible for its antidiabetic action. Results: Among the various extracts screened, chloroform extract of C. aerea (IC50 − 408.9 μg/ml) and methanol extract of Chlorodesmis (IC50 − 147.6 μg/ml) showed effective inhibition against alpha-amylase. The extracts were also evaluated for alpha-glucosidase inhibition, and no observed activity was found. Methanol extract of C. rupestris showed notable free radical scavenging activity (IC50 – 666.3 μg/ml), followed by H2O2 (34%) and nitric oxide (49%). Further, chemical profiling by GC-MS revealed the presence of major bioactive compounds. Phenol, 2,4-bis (1,1-dimethylethyl) and z, z-6,28-heptatriactontadien-2-one were predominantly found in the methanol extract of C. rupestris and chloroform extract of C. aerea. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that the selected algae exhibit notable alpha-amylase inhibition and antioxidant activity. Therefore, characterization of active compounds and its in vivo

  16. The complete chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Nephroselmis olivacea: insights into the architecture of ancestral chloroplast genomes.

    PubMed

    Turmel, M; Otis, C; Lemieux, C

    1999-08-31

    Green plants seem to form two sister lineages: Chlorophyta, comprising the green algal classes Prasinophyceae, Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, and Chlorophyceae, and Streptophyta, comprising the Charophyceae and land plants. We have determined the complete chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequence (200,799 bp) of Nephroselmis olivacea, a member of the class (Prasinophyceae) thought to include descendants of the earliest-diverging green algae. The 127 genes identified in this genome represent the largest gene repertoire among the green algal and land plant cpDNAs completely sequenced to date. Of the Nephroselmis genes, 2 (ycf81 and ftsI, a gene involved in peptidoglycan synthesis) have not been identified in any previously investigated cpDNA; 5 genes [ftsW, rnE, ycf62, rnpB, and trnS(cga)] have been found only in cpDNAs of nongreen algae; and 10 others (ndh genes) have been described only in land plant cpDNAs. Nephroselmis and land plant cpDNAs share the same quadripartite structure-which is characterized by the presence of a large rRNA-encoding inverted repeat and two unequal single-copy regions-and very similar sets of genes in corresponding genomic regions. Given that our phylogenetic analyses place Nephroselmis within the Chlorophyta, these structural characteristics were most likely present in the cpDNA of the common ancestor of chlorophytes and streptophytes. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genomes indicate that the typical quadripartite architecture and gene-partitioning pattern of land plant cpDNAs are ancient features that may have been derived from the genome of the cyanobacterial progenitor of chloroplasts. Our phylogenetic data also offer insight into the chlorophyte ancestor of euglenophyte chloroplasts.

  17. The GC-Rich Mitochondrial and Plastid Genomes of the Green Alga Coccomyxa Give Insight into the Evolution of Organelle DNA Nucleotide Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David Roy; Burki, Fabien; Yamada, Takashi; Grimwood, Jane; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Van Etten, James L.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2011-05-13

    Most of the available mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences are biased towards adenine and thymine (AT) over guanine and cytosine (GC). Examples of GC-rich organelle DNAs are limited to a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green algae. Here, to gain insight in the evolution of organelle nucleotide landscape, we present the GC-rich mitochondrial and plastid DNAs from the trebouxiophyte green alga Coccomyxa sp. C-169. We compare these sequences with other GC-rich organelle DNAs and argue that the forces biasing them towards G and C are nonadaptive and linked to the metabolic and/or life history features of this species. The Coccomyxa organelle genomes are also used for phylogenetic analyses, which highlight the complexities in trying to resolve the interrelationships among the core chlorophyte green algae, but ultimately favour a sister relationship between the Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae, with the Trebouxiophyceae branching at the base of the chlorophyte crown.

  18. Green tea and bone health: Evidence from laboratory studies.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Yeh, James K; Cao, Jay J; Chyu, Ming-Chien; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem in the elderly. Epidemiological evidence has shown an association between tea consumption and the prevention of bone loss in the elderly population. Ingestion of green tea and green tea bioactive compounds may be beneficial in mitigating bone loss of this population and decreasing their risk of osteoporotic fractures. This review describes the effect of green tea with its bioactive components on bone health with an emphasis on the following: (i) the etiology of osteoporosis, (ii) evidence of osteo-protective impacts of green tea on bone mass and microarchitecture in various bone loss models in which induced by aging, sex hormone deficiency, and chronic inflammation, (iii) discussion of impacts of green tea on bone mass in two obesity models, (iv) observation of short-term green tea supplementation given to postmenopausal women with low bone mass, (v) possible mechanisms for the osteo-protective effects of green tea bioactive compounds, and (vi) a summary and future research direction of green tea and bone health.

  19. Ribosomal protein L10 is encoded in the mitochondrial genome of many land plants and green algae

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genomes of plants generally encode 30-40 identified protein-coding genes and a large number of lineage-specific ORFs. The lack of wide conservation for most ORFs suggests they are unlikely to be functional. However, an ORF, termed orf-bryo1, was recently found to be conserved among bryophytes suggesting that it might indeed encode a functional mitochondrial protein. Results From a broad survey of land plants, we have found that the orf-bryo1 gene is also conserved in the mitochondria of vascular plants and charophycean green algae. This gene is actively transcribed and RNA edited in many flowering plants. Comparative sequence analysis and distribution of editing suggests that it encodes ribosomal protein L10 of the large subunit of the ribosome. In several lineages, such as crucifers and grasses, where the rpl10 gene has been lost from the mitochondrion, we suggest that a copy of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast-derived rpl10 gene may serve as a functional replacement. Conclusion Despite the fact that there are now over 20 mitochondrial genome sequences for land plants and green algae, this gene has remained unidentified and largely undetected until now because of the unlikely coincidence that most of the earlier sequences were from the few lineages that lack the intact gene. These results illustrate the power of comparative sequencing to identify novel genomic features. PMID:19917118

  20. Ca(2+)-regulated cyclic electron flow supplies ATP for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Hu, Jinlu; Qiao, Yaqin; Chen, Weixian; Rong, Junfeng; Zhang, Yunming; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that both the linear photosynthetic electron transportation rate and the respiration rate dropped significantly during N starvation-induced neutral lipid accumulation in an oil-producing microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana, and proposed a possible role for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in ATP supply. In this study, we further exploited this hypothesis in both Chlorella sorokiniana C3 and the model green alga Chlamydomonas. We found that both the rate of CEF around photosystem I and the activity of thylakoid membrane-located ATP synthetase increased significantly during N starvation to drive ATP production. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Chlamydomonas mutant pgrl1, which is deficient in PGRL1-mediated CEF, accumulated less neutral lipids and had reduced rates of CEF under N starvation. Further analysis revealed that Ca(2+) signaling regulates N starvation-induced neutral lipid biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas by increasing calmodulin activity and boosting the expression of the calcium sensor protein that regulates Pgrl1-mediated CEF. Thus, Ca(2+)-regulated CEF supplies ATP for N starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga. The increased CEF may re-equilibrate the ATP/NADPH balance and recycle excess light energy in photosystems to prevent photooxidative damage, suggesting Ca(2+)-regulated CEF also played a key role in protecting and sustaining photosystems. PMID:26450399

  1. Metabolite profiling and integrative modeling reveal metabolic constraints for carbon partitioning under nitrogen starvation in the green algae Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Recht, Lee; Töpfer, Nadine; Batushansky, Albert; Sikron, Noga; Gibon, Yves; Fait, Aaron; Nikoloski, Zoran; Boussiba, Sammy; Zarka, Aliza

    2014-10-31

    The green alga Hematococcus pluvialis accumulates large amounts of the antioxidant astaxanthin under inductive stress conditions, such as nitrogen starvation. The response to nitrogen starvation and high light leads to the accumulation of carbohydrates and fatty acids as well as increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Although the behavior of individual pathways has been well investigated, little is known about the systemic effects of the stress response mechanism. Here we present time-resolved metabolite, enzyme activity, and physiological data that capture the metabolic response of H. pluvialis under nitrogen starvation and high light. The data were integrated into a putative genome-scale model of the green alga to in silico test hypotheses of underlying carbon partitioning. The model-based hypothesis testing reinforces the involvement of starch degradation to support fatty acid synthesis in the later stages of the stress response. In addition, our findings support a possible mechanism for the involvement of the increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in carbon repartitioning. Finally, the in vitro experiments and the in silico modeling presented here emphasize the predictive power of large scale integrative approaches to pinpoint metabolic adjustment to changing environments.

  2. Polyclonal antibodies to light-harvesting CHL-protein of PSII (LHC II) in marine green algae Bryopsis corticulans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaonan; Zhou, Baicheng; Tseng, C. K.

    1992-06-01

    Polyc·lonal antibodies raised against LHC II isolated from SDS-solubilized Bryopsis corticulans thylakiod membranes by SDS-PAGE, were characterised by double immunodiffusion, Rocket immunoelectrophoresis and antigen-antibody crossed immunoelectro-phoresis assays showed the antibodies had strong cross-reaction with all B. corticulans LHC II components (even with those which were incubated in boiling water) and showed immunological cross-reactivity with LHC II polypeptides of spinach and the marine green alga Codium fragile. The results suggested that LHC II of different species had similar antigenic determinants and also conservation of amino acid sequences of the polypeptides during evolution, and that the antibodies could cross react with apoproteins of D2 proteins (which contain P680) from B. corticulans, spinach and C. fragile, but not with apoproteins of P700 Chl-proteins. Our results indicated some similarities in primary structure between LHC II of different species, and between LHC II and D2 proteins of marine green algae and spinach. Our finding that D2 and P700 Chl-proteins are not immunologically related suggested that P700 Chl-proteins and D2 proteins pass through independent evolutionary pathways.

  3. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga-Competition or Allelopathy?

    PubMed

    B-Béres, Viktória; Vasas, Gábor; Dobronoki, Dalma; Gonda, Sándor; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Bácsi, István

    2015-11-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon) ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were tested by treatments with crude extracts containing total cell debris, and with cell debris free crude extracts, modelling the collapse of a cyanobacterial water bloom. The growth inhibition of Chlorococcum sp. increased with the increasing ratio of the cyanobacterium in mixed cultures (inhibition ranged from 26% to 87% compared to control). Interestingly, inhibition of the cyanobacterium growth also occurred in mixed cultures, and it was more pronounced than it was expected. The inhibitory effects of cyanobacterial crude extracts on Chlorococcum cultures were concentration-dependent. The presence of C. ovalisporum in mixed cultures did not cause significant differences in nutrient content compared to Chlorococcum control culture, so the growth inhibition of the green alga could be linked to the presence of CYN and/or other bioactive compounds. PMID:26528991

  4. Different fates of the chloroplast tufA gene following its transfer to the nucleus in green algae.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, S L; Manhart, J R; Palmer, J D

    1990-07-01

    Previous work suggested that the tufA gene, encoding protein synthesis elongation factor Tu, was transferred from the chloroplast to the nucleus within the green algal lineage giving rise to land plants. In this report we investigate the timing and mode of transfer by examining chloroplast and nuclear DNA from the three major classes of green algae, with emphasis on the class Charophyceae, the proposed sister group to land plants. Filter hybridizations reveal a chloroplast tufA gene in all Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae and in some but not all Charophyceae. One charophycean alga, Coleochaete orbicularis, is shown to contain an intact but highly divergent chloroplast tufA gene, whose product is predicted to be non-functional in protein synthesis. We propose that a copy of the tufA gene was functionally transferred from the chloroplast to the nucleus early in the evolution of the Charophyceae, with chloroplast copies of varying function being retained in some but not all of the subsequently diverging lineages. This proposal is supported by the demonstration of multiple tufA-like sequences in Coleochaete nuclear DNA and in nuclear DNA from all other Charophyceae examined.

  5. Ca2+-regulated cyclic electron flow supplies ATP for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Hu, Jinlu; Qiao, Yaqin; Chen, Weixian; Rong, Junfeng; Zhang, Yunming; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that both the linear photosynthetic electron transportation rate and the respiration rate dropped significantly during N starvation-induced neutral lipid accumulation in an oil-producing microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana, and proposed a possible role for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in ATP supply. In this study, we further exploited this hypothesis in both Chlorella sorokiniana C3 and the model green alga Chlamydomonas. We found that both the rate of CEF around photosystem I and the activity of thylakoid membrane-located ATP synthetase increased significantly during N starvation to drive ATP production. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Chlamydomonas mutant pgrl1, which is deficient in PGRL1-mediated CEF, accumulated less neutral lipids and had reduced rates of CEF under N starvation. Further analysis revealed that Ca2+ signaling regulates N starvation-induced neutral lipid biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas by increasing calmodulin activity and boosting the expression of the calcium sensor protein that regulates Pgrl1-mediated CEF. Thus, Ca2+-regulated CEF supplies ATP for N starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga. The increased CEF may re-equilibrate the ATP/NADPH balance and recycle excess light energy in photosystems to prevent photooxidative damage, suggesting Ca2+-regulated CEF also played a key role in protecting and sustaining photosystems. PMID:26450399

  6. Metabolite Profiling and Integrative Modeling Reveal Metabolic Constraints for Carbon Partitioning under Nitrogen Starvation in the Green Algae Haematococcus pluvialis*

    PubMed Central

    Recht, Lee; Töpfer, Nadine; Batushansky, Albert; Sikron, Noga; Gibon, Yves; Fait, Aaron; Nikoloski, Zoran; Boussiba, Sammy; Zarka, Aliza

    2014-01-01

    The green alga Hematococcus pluvialis accumulates large amounts of the antioxidant astaxanthin under inductive stress conditions, such as nitrogen starvation. The response to nitrogen starvation and high light leads to the accumulation of carbohydrates and fatty acids as well as increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Although the behavior of individual pathways has been well investigated, little is known about the systemic effects of the stress response mechanism. Here we present time-resolved metabolite, enzyme activity, and physiological data that capture the metabolic response of H. pluvialis under nitrogen starvation and high light. The data were integrated into a putative genome-scale model of the green alga to in silico test hypotheses of underlying carbon partitioning. The model-based hypothesis testing reinforces the involvement of starch degradation to support fatty acid synthesis in the later stages of the stress response. In addition, our findings support a possible mechanism for the involvement of the increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in carbon repartitioning. Finally, the in vitro experiments and the in silico modeling presented here emphasize the predictive power of large scale integrative approaches to pinpoint metabolic adjustment to changing environments. PMID:25183014

  7. Metabolite profiling and integrative modeling reveal metabolic constraints for carbon partitioning under nitrogen starvation in the green algae Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Recht, Lee; Töpfer, Nadine; Batushansky, Albert; Sikron, Noga; Gibon, Yves; Fait, Aaron; Nikoloski, Zoran; Boussiba, Sammy; Zarka, Aliza

    2014-10-31

    The green alga Hematococcus pluvialis accumulates large amounts of the antioxidant astaxanthin under inductive stress conditions, such as nitrogen starvation. The response to nitrogen starvation and high light leads to the accumulation of carbohydrates and fatty acids as well as increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Although the behavior of individual pathways has been well investigated, little is known about the systemic effects of the stress response mechanism. Here we present time-resolved metabolite, enzyme activity, and physiological data that capture the metabolic response of H. pluvialis under nitrogen starvation and high light. The data were integrated into a putative genome-scale model of the green alga to in silico test hypotheses of underlying carbon partitioning. The model-based hypothesis testing reinforces the involvement of starch degradation to support fatty acid synthesis in the later stages of the stress response. In addition, our findings support a possible mechanism for the involvement of the increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in carbon repartitioning. Finally, the in vitro experiments and the in silico modeling presented here emphasize the predictive power of large scale integrative approaches to pinpoint metabolic adjustment to changing environments. PMID:25183014

  8. Localization and Quantification of Callose in the Streptophyte Green Algae Zygnema and Klebsormidium: Correlation with Desiccation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater green algae started to colonize terrestrial habitats about 460 million years ago, giving rise to the evolution of land plants. Today, several streptophyte green algae occur in aero-terrestrial habitats with unpredictable fluctuations in water availability, serving as ideal models for investigating desiccation tolerance. We tested the hypothesis that callose, a β-d-1,3-glucan, is incorporated specifically in strained areas of the cell wall due to cellular water loss, implicating a contribution to desiccation tolerance. In the early diverging genus Klebsormidium, callose was drastically increased already after 30 min of desiccation stress. Localization studies demonstrated an increase in callose in the undulating cross cell walls during cellular water loss, allowing a regulated shrinkage and expansion after rehydration. This correlates with a high desiccation tolerance demonstrated by a full recovery of the photosynthetic yield visualized at the subcellular level by Imaging-PAM. Furthermore, abundant callose in terminal cell walls might facilitate cell detachment to release dispersal units. In contrast, in the late diverging Zygnema, the callose content did not change upon desiccation for up to 3.5 h and was primarily localized in the corners between individual cells and at terminal cells. While these callose deposits still imply reduction of mechanical damage, the photosynthetic yield did not recover fully in the investigated young cultures of Zygnema upon rehydration. The abundance and specific localization of callose correlates with the higher desiccation tolerance in Klebsormidium when compared with Zygnema. PMID:26412780

  9. Treatment with NaHSO3 greatly enhances photobiological H2 production in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weimin; Chen, Ming; Wang, Lianjun; Wei, Lanzhen; Wang, Quanxi

    2011-09-01

    Treatment with NaHSO3 induces a 10-fold increase in H2 photoproduction in the filamentous N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. However, it is unclear whether this treatment also increases H2 photoproduction in green alga. In this study, treatment with 13 mM NaHSO3 resulted in about a 200-fold increase in H2 production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and this increase was most probably the result of reduced O2 content and enhanced hydrogenase activity. Compared to the conventional strategy of sulfur deprivation, NaHSO3 treatment results in a higher maximum rate of H2 photoproduction, greater efficiency of conversion of light energy into H2, shorter half-time to produce the maximum accumulated H2 levels, and reduced costs because no centrifugation is involved. We therefore conclude that NaHSO3 treatment is an efficient, rapid, and economic strategy for improving photobiological H2 production in the green alga C. reinhardtii. PMID:21489780

  10. Antiviral activity of acidic polysaccharides from Coccomyxa gloeobotrydiformi, a green alga, against an in vitro human influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takayuki; Kido, Nobuo; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Yokochi, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    The extracts prepared from green algae are reported to possess a variety of biological activities including antioxidant, antitumor and antiviral activities. The acidic polysaccharide fraction from a green alga Coccomyxa gloeobotrydiformi (CmAPS) was isolated and the antiviral action on an in vitro infection of influenza A virus was examined. CmAPS inhibited the growth and yield of all influenza A virus strains tested, such as A/H1N1, A/H2N2, A/H3N2 and A/H1N1 pandemic strains. The 50% inhibitory concentration of CmAPS on the infection of human influenza A virus strains ranged from 26 to 70 µg/mL and the antiviral activity of CmAPS against influenza A/USSR90/77 (H1N1) was the strongest. The antiviral activity of CmAPS was not due to the cytotoxicity against host cells. The antiviral activity of CmAPS required its presence in the inoculation of virus onto MDCK cells. Pretreatment and post-treatment with CmAPS was ineffective for the antiviral activity. CmAPS inhibited influenza A virus-induced erythrocyte hemagglutination and hemolysis. Taken together, CmAPS was suggested to exhibit the anti-influenza virus activity through preventing the interaction of virus and host cells. The detailed antiviral activity of CmAPS is discussed.

  11. [Experimental assessment of combined effect of nitrates and acute gamma-irradiation on green algae Scenedesmus quadricauda growth].

    PubMed

    Triapitsyna, G A; Tarasova, S P; Atamaniuk, N I; Osipov, D I; Priakhin, E A

    2012-01-01

    The combined effect of acute gamma-irradiation at doses of 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 Gy and nitrates in concentrations of 0.04 g/dm3 (that corresponds to maximum permissible concentrations for fishery waters), 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 g/dm3 (that is close to NO3(-) level in water of a reservoir R-17 used as radioactive waste storage of the "Mayak" Production Association) and 5.0 g/dm3 (that is close to NO3(-) level in the water of radioactive waste storage reservoir R-9) on the unicellular green algae Scenedesmus quadricauda growth has been studied in laboratory conditions. It was shown that the joint effects of nitrates and y-radiation had an antagonistic character. Thus, it may be concluded that chemical pollution is the factor limiting the development of green algae in reservoir R-17; probably, both factors, chemical and radiating, are essential to the algocenosis degradation in reservoir R-9. PMID:22891554

  12. The effects of sub-lethal UV-C irradiation on growth and cell integrity of cyanobacteria and green algae.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Zhang, Xihui; Au, Doris W T; Mao, Xianzhong; Yuan, Kan

    2010-01-01

    The effects of UV-C irradiation on algal growth and cell integrity were investigated to develop a potential method for preventing cyanobacterial blooms. The toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and three common freshwater green algae Chlorella ellipsoidea, Chlorella vulgaris, and Scenedesmus quadricanda were exposed to UV-C irradiation at 0-200mJcm(-2) and subsequently incubated for 9-15 d under normal culture conditions. Cell density and cell integrity were assessed using flow cytometry. The results suggested that UV-C irradiation at 20-200mJcm(-2) can suppress M. aeruginosa growth for 3-13 d in a dose-dependent manner. UV-C irradiation at 20 and 50mJcm(-2) is sub-lethal to M. aeruginosa cells as over 80% of the exposed cells remained intact. However, UV-C irradiation at 100 and 200mJcm(-2) induced severe cell disintegration in more than 70% of the irradiated cells. Neither significant suppression nor disintegration effects on green algae were observed for UV-C irradiation at 20-200mJcm(-2) in this study. Taken together, the sensitivity of M. aeruginosa to UV-C irradiation was significantly higher than that of the non-toxic C. ellipsoidea, C. vulgaris, and S. quadricauda, suggesting the potential application of sub-lethal UV-C irradiation for M. aeruginosa bloom control with a predictable low ecological risk. PMID:20005556

  13. [Experimental assessment of combined effect of nitrates and acute gamma-irradiation on green algae Scenedesmus quadricauda growth].

    PubMed

    Triapitsyna, G A; Tarasova, S P; Atamaniuk, N I; Osipov, D I; Priakhin, E A

    2012-01-01

    The combined effect of acute gamma-irradiation at doses of 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 Gy and nitrates in concentrations of 0.04 g/dm3 (that corresponds to maximum permissible concentrations for fishery waters), 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 g/dm3 (that is close to NO3(-) level in water of a reservoir R-17 used as radioactive waste storage of the "Mayak" Production Association) and 5.0 g/dm3 (that is close to NO3(-) level in the water of radioactive waste storage reservoir R-9) on the unicellular green algae Scenedesmus quadricauda growth has been studied in laboratory conditions. It was shown that the joint effects of nitrates and y-radiation had an antagonistic character. Thus, it may be concluded that chemical pollution is the factor limiting the development of green algae in reservoir R-17; probably, both factors, chemical and radiating, are essential to the algocenosis degradation in reservoir R-9.

  14. The characterization of C-phycocyanin from an extremely halo-tolerant blue-green alga, Coccochloris elabens.

    PubMed

    Kao, O H; Berns, D S; Town, W R

    1973-01-01

    C-Phycocyanin was isolated and purified from a uni-algal culture of an extremely halo-tolerant blue-green alga, Coccochloris elabens. This alga can be grown under laboratory conditions in 25% (w/v) NaCl. Purified halophile phycocyanin was characterized by amino acid analysis and the measurement of sedimentation velocity, fluorescence polarization and immunodiffusion as a function of protein concentration, pH and ionic strength. The results were compared with those of studies of phycocyanin isolated from Plectonema calothricoides and from several other sources. The states of aggregation previously characterized as being present in other C-phycocyanins, monomer, trimer and hexamer, were present in halophile phycocyanin and were characterized as antigenically related to all C-phycocyanins tested. The equilibrium between 3S monomer and 11S hexamer at low concentrations in halophile phycocyanin was quantitatively similar to that for other phycocyanins. The effect of pH and ionic strength on the 6S (trimer) and 11S (hexamer) aggregation of halophile phycocyanin was markedly salt-dependent and the relative amount of each aggregate in the presence of 2m-NaCl was like that of C-phycocyanin from mesophiles, in the absence of additional salt. In antigenic relationship and aggregation properties, the phycocyanin from C. elabens appeared to be most closely related to that isolated from the thermophilic blue-green alga, Synechococcus lividus. Amino acid content of the halophile phycocyanin indicated the presence of a significantly larger number of acidic residues than that found in mesophiles. Explanations of the properties of the halophile protein require consideration of a strong contribution of hydrophobic forces and utilize both charge-shielding and salting-out effects. PMID:4198583

  15. New “missing link” genus of the colonial volvocine green algae gives insights into the evolution of oogamy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The evolution of oogamy from isogamy, an important biological event, can be summarized as follows: morphologically similar gametes (isogametes) differentiated into small “male” and large “female” motile gametes during anisogamy, from which immotile female gametes (eggs) evolved. The volvocine green algae represent a model lineage to study this type of sex evolution and show two types of gametic unions: conjugation between isogametes outside the parental colonies (external fertilization during isogamy) and fertilization between small motile gametes (sperm) and large gametes (eggs) inside the female colony (internal fertilization during anisogamy and oogamy). Although recent cultural studies on volvocine algae revealed morphological diversity and molecular genetic data of sexual reproduction, an intermediate type of union between these two gametic unions has not been identified. Results We identified a novel colonial volvocine genus, Colemanosphaera, which produces bundles of spindle-shaped male gametes through successive divisions of colonial cells. Obligately anisogamous conjugation between male and female motile gametes occurred outside the female colony (external fertilization during anisogamy). This new genus contains 16- or 32-celled spheroidal colonies similar to those of the volvocine genera Yamagishiella and Eudorina. However, Colemanosphaera can be clearly distinguished from these two genera based on its sister phylogenetic position to the enigmatic flattened colonial volvocine Platydorina and external fertilization during anisogamy. Two species of Colemanosphaera were found in a Japanese lake; these species are also distributed in European freshwaters based on a published sequence of an Austrian strain and the original description of Pandorina charkowiensis from Ukraine. Conclusions Based on phylogeny and morphological data, this novel genus exhibits a missing link between Platydorina and the typical spheroidal colonial volvocine members

  16. The mitochondrial genome of Chara vulgaris: insights into the mitochondrial DNA architecture of the last common ancestor of green algae and land plants.

    PubMed

    Turmel, Monique; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2003-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has undergone radical changes during the evolution of green plants, yet little is known about the dynamics of mtDNA evolution in this phylum. Land plant mtDNAs differ from the few green algal mtDNAs that have been analyzed to date by their expanded size, long spacers, and diversity of introns. We have determined the mtDNA sequence of Chara vulgaris (Charophyceae), a green alga belonging to the charophycean order (Charales) that is thought to be the most closely related alga to land plants. This 67,737-bp mtDNA sequence, displaying 68 conserved genes and 27 introns, was compared with those of three angiosperms, the bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha, the charophycean alga Chaetosphaeridium globosum (Coleochaetales), and the green alga Mesostigma viride. Despite important differences in size and intron composition, Chara mtDNA strikingly resembles Marchantia mtDNA; for instance, all except 9 of 68 conserved genes lie within blocks of colinear sequences. Overall, our genome comparisons and phylogenetic analyses provide unequivocal support for a sister-group relationship between the Charales and the land plants. Only four introns in land plant mtDNAs appear to have been inherited vertically from a charalean algar ancestor. We infer that the common ancestor of green algae and land plants harbored a tightly packed, gene-rich, and relatively intron-poor mitochondrial genome. The group II introns in this ancestral genome appear to have spread to new mtDNA sites during the evolution of bryophytes and charalean green algae, accounting for part of the intron diversity found in Chara and land plant mitochondria.

  17. Bacterial diversity in surface water of the Yellow Sea during and after a green alga tide in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cong; Li, Fuchao; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Zhaopu; Qin, Song

    2011-11-01

    From May to August 2008, a large "green tide", consisting of the alga Ulva ( Enteromorpha) prolifera, occurred in the Yellow Sea, China, affecting the local marine ecosystem and human activities. We investigated the influence of the green tide on the microbial community in the surface seawater, at four sites from July to August 2008, using bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. We sequenced 228 clones of unique patterns identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques. The results show that 228 sequenced clones fell into six bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, and Planctomycetes. Alphaproteobacteria (33%), Gammaproteobacteria (25%), Bacteroidetes (23%) and Cyanobacteria (9%) dominated the assemblage. Comparison between samples collected in July (during the tide) and those collected in August (after the tide) showed that, in the microbial community, diversities of Alphaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria increased after the tide, while those of Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased. These results indicate that the green tide influenced the growth of some bacteria, and provide information for further studies on the interactions and relationships between U. prolifera and the bacterial community. This study suggests that microbial community analysis is a good approach to monitoring green tides.

  18. Isolation of clonal cultures of endosymbiotic green algae from their ciliate hosts.

    PubMed

    Achilles-Day, Undine E M; Day, John G

    2013-03-01

    Using Paramecium bursaria as a model organism improved protocols have been developed to isolate clonal endosymbiotic algae. This involved micromanipulation of individual protists, rupturing to release endosymbionts followed by enrichment on complex media and a series of plating steps, under low light (PAR ~10μmol photons m(-2)s(-1)).

  19. Transcriptomics of Desiccation Tolerance in the Streptophyte Green Alga Klebsormidium Reveal a Land Plant-Like Defense Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Kaplan, Franziska; Blaas, Kathrin; Zechmann, Bernd; Komsic-Buchmann, Karin; Becker, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    functions such as cell division, DNA replication, cofactor biosynthesis, and amino acid biosynthesis were down-regulated. Significance This is the first study investigating the desiccation transcriptome of a streptophyte green alga. Our results indicate that the cellular response is similar to embryophytes, suggesting that embryophytes inherited a basic cellular desiccation tolerance from their streptophyte predecessors. PMID:25340847

  20. Determination of growth rate depression of some green algae by atrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Hersh, C.M.; Crumpton, W.G.

    1987-12-01

    A common contaminant of surface waters of agricultural regions is the triazine herbicide, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isoproplyamino-s-triazine). Atrazine effectively inhibits growth and photosynthesis of most plants, including freshwater algae. Both depression of growth rate and reduced yield have been used as parameters in studies of the effects of atrazine on algal growth. Considerable variation exists among algal toxicity methods despite attempts at standardization. Experimental endpoints range from percent inhibitions to EC50s. Algae from two different Iowa springs were the subjects of a study of naturally occurring atrazine tolerance. The authors report here the results of two aspects of that study: development of a quick method of assessing toxin effects on algal growth, and investigation of a ecologically meaningful endpoint for toxin-growth experiments.

  1. An omics based assessment of cadmium toxicity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Jamers, An; Blust, Ronny; De Coen, Wim; Griffin, Julian L; Jones, Oliver A H

    2013-01-15

    The effects of cadmium were assessed in the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Algae were exposed to concentrations of 0, 8.1 or 114.8 μM of cadmium and growth rates, gene transcription and metabolite profiles were examined after 48 and 72 h of exposure. In algae exposed to 8.1 μM Cd, several genes were differentially transcribed after 48 h but no adverse growth related effects were detected. A transient effect on both gene transcription patterns and metabolite profiles could be discerned after 48 h of exposure but the majority of these changes disappeared after 72 h. In contrast, all effects were more pronounced at the 114.8 μM cadmium exposure. Here growth was clearly reduced and transcription of a large number of genes involved in oxidative stress defense mechanisms was differentially increased. Metabolites involved in the glutathione synthesis pathway (an important antioxidant defense) were also affected but the effects of cadmium were found to be more pronounced at the transcript level than in the metabolome, suggesting that the former exhibits greater sensitivity toward cadmium exposure. PMID:23063003

  2. Anti-cancer effects of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis, a natural source of bilirubin-like tetrapyrrolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Koníčková, Renata; Vaňková, Kateřina; Vaníková, Jana; Váňová, Kateřina; Muchová, Lucie; Subhanová, Iva; Zadinová, Marie; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Dvořák, Aleš; Kolář, Michal; Strnad, Hynek; Rimpelová, Silvie; Ruml, Tomáš; J Wong, Ronald; Vítek, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Spirulina platensis is a blue-green alga used as a dietary supplement because of its hypocholesterolemic properties. Among other bioactive substances, it is also rich in tetrapyrrolic compounds closely related to bilirubin molecule, a potent antioxidant and anti-proliferative agent. The aim of our study was to evaluate possible anticancer effects of S. platensis and S. platensis-derived tetrapyrroles using an experimental model of pancreatic cancer. The anti-proliferative effects of S. platensis and its tetrapyrrolic components [phycocyanobilin (PCB) and chlorophyllin, a surrogate molecule for chlorophyll A] were tested on several human pancreatic cancer cell lines and xenotransplanted nude mice. The effects of experimental therapeutics on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and glutathione redox status were also evaluated. Compared to untreated cells, experimental therapeutics significantly decreased proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro in a dose-dependent manner (from 0.16 g•L-1 [S. platensis], 60 μM [PCB], and 125 μM [chlorophyllin], p<0.05). The anti-proliferative effects of S. platensis were also shown in vivo, where inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth was evidenced since the third day of treatment (p < 0.05). All tested compounds decreased generation of mitochondrial ROS and glutathione redox status (p = 0.0006; 0.016; and 0.006 for S. platensis, PCB, and chlorophyllin, respectively). In conclusion, S. platensis and its tetrapyrrolic components substantially decreased the proliferation of experimental pancreatic cancer. These data support a chemopreventive role of this edible alga. Furthermore, it seems that dietary supplementation with this alga might enhance systemic pool of tetrapyrroles, known to be higher in subjects with Gilbert syndrome. PMID:24552870

  3. Promotive effect of se on the growth and antioxidation of a blue-green alga Spirulina maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Gang, Zhou; Zhi-Li, Liu

    1998-12-01

    Cultures of a blue-green alga Spirulina maxima (Setch. et Gard.) Geitler with various concentrations of Se in Zarrouk's medium showed that not higher than 40 mg/L Se could promote its growth. The present experiments showed that S. maxima grown under normal conditions, has an oxidant stress defence system for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) removal, which is the Halliwell-Asada pathway. When 4 to 20 mg/L Se was added to the algal medium, this pathway was replaced by a so-called Sestressed pathway containing GSH peroxidase (GSH-POD). As a result of the occurrence of both higher activity of GSH-POD and lower levels of hydroxyl radical (OH·), the Se-stressed pathway scavenged H2O2 so effectively that the growth of S. maxima was promoted by 4 to 20 mg/L Se. While GSH-POD activity of the alga disappeared at 40 mg/L Se, the recovery of ascorbate peroxidase was observed. The lower levels of ascorbic acid and GSH made the Halliwell-Asada pathway for scavenging H2O2 less effective, while the highest activity of catalase might be responsible in part for the H2O2 removal, causing the level of OH· in S. maxima grown at 40 mg/L Se to be much higher than the OH· level in this alga grown at 4 to 20 mg/L Se, but lower than that in the control. The OH· level changes caused the growth of S. maxima cultured at 40 mg/L Se to increase slightly to close to that of the control.

  4. Taxonomic revision and species delimitation of coccoid green algae currently assigned to the genus Dictyochloropsis (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Škaloud, Pavel; Friedl, Thomas; Hallmann, Christine; Beck, Andreas; Dal Grande, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Coccoid green algae traditionally classified in Dictyochloropsis have a complex, reticulate chloroplast, when mature, without a pyrenoid. They occupy remarkably diverse ecological niches as free-living organisms or in association with lichen-forming fungi and were recently shown to form two distinct lineages within Trebouxiophyceae. We used a polyphasic approach to revise the taxonomy of the genus. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rRNA gene, and detailed morphological investigation using comparative conventional light and confocal microscopy, we have assigned these lineages to two genera, Dictyochloropsis and Symbiochloris gen. nov. We have reconsidered the diagnostic generic features as follows: Dictyochloropsis comprises only free-living algae with a reticulate chloroplast, forming lobes in a parallel arrangement at some ontogenetic stages, and which reproduce only by means of autospores. This agrees with Geitler's original diagnosis of Dictyochloropsis, but not with the later emendation by Tschermak-Woess. Consequently, the species of Dictyochloropsis sensu Tschermak-Woess are assigned to Symbiochloris, with new combinations proposed. Symbiochloris encompasses free-living and/or lichenized algae with lobed chloroplasts and that reproduce by forming zoospores characterized by two subapical isokont flagella that emerge symmetrically near the flattened apex. In addition, using coalescent-based approaches, morphological characters and secondary structure of ITS transcripts, we inferred species boundaries and taxonomic relationships within the newly proposed genera. Two species of Dictyochloropsis and nine species of Symbiochloris are delimited, including the newly described species D. asterochloroides, S. handae, S. tropica, and S. tschermakiae. Our results further support the non-monophyly of autosporine taxa within Trebouxiophyceae.

  5. Characterization of the heterotrimeric G-protein complex and its regulator from the green alga Chara braunii expands the evolutionary breadth of plant G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Pandey, Sona

    2013-12-01

    The lack of heterotrimeric G-protein homologs in the sequenced genomes of green algae has led to the hypothesis that, in plants, this signaling mechanism coevolved with the embryophytic life cycle and the acquisition of terrestrial habitat. Given the large evolutionary gap that exists between the chlorophyte green algae and most basal land plants, the bryophytes, we evaluated the presence of this signaling complex in a charophyte green alga, Chara braunii, proposed to be the closest living relative of land plants. The C. braunii genome encodes for the entire G-protein complex, the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, and the REGULATOR OF G-PROTEIN SIGNALING (RGS) protein. The biochemical properties of these proteins and their cross-species functionality show that they are functional homologs of canonical G-proteins. The subunit-specific interactions between CbGα and CbGβ, CbGβ and CbGγ, and CbGα and CbRGS are also conserved, establishing the existence of functional G-protein complex-based signaling mechanisms in green algae.

  6. Characterization of the heterotrimeric G-protein complex and its regulator from the green alga Chara braunii expands the evolutionary breadth of plant G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Pandey, Sona

    2013-12-01

    The lack of heterotrimeric G-protein homologs in the sequenced genomes of green algae has led to the hypothesis that, in plants, this signaling mechanism coevolved with the embryophytic life cycle and the acquisition of terrestrial habitat. Given the large evolutionary gap that exists between the chlorophyte green algae and most basal land plants, the bryophytes, we evaluated the presence of this signaling complex in a charophyte green alga, Chara braunii, proposed to be the closest living relative of land plants. The C. braunii genome encodes for the entire G-protein complex, the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, and the REGULATOR OF G-PROTEIN SIGNALING (RGS) protein. The biochemical properties of these proteins and their cross-species functionality show that they are functional homologs of canonical G-proteins. The subunit-specific interactions between CbGα and CbGβ, CbGβ and CbGγ, and CbGα and CbRGS are also conserved, establishing the existence of functional G-protein complex-based signaling mechanisms in green algae. PMID:24179134

  7. Comparative effects of the blue green algae Nodularia spumigena and a lysed extract on detoxification and antioxidant enzymes in the green lipped mussel (Perna viridis).

    PubMed

    Davies, Warren R; Siu, William H L; Jack, Ralph W; Wu, Rudolf S S; Lam, Paul K S; Nugegoda, Dayanthi

    2005-01-01

    Nodularia spumigena periodically proliferates to cause toxic algal blooms with some aquatic animals enduring and consuming high densities of the blue green algae or toxic lysis. N. spumigena contains toxic compounds such as nodularin and lipopolysaccharides. This current work investigates physiological effects of exposure from bloom conditions of N. spumigena cells and a post-bloom lysis. Biochemical and antioxidative biomarkers were comparatively studied over an acute 3-day exposure. In general, a post-bloom N. spumigena lysis caused opposite physiological responses to bloom densities of N. spumigena. Specifically, increases in glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and decreases in glutathione S-transferase (GST) were observed from the N. spumigena lysis. In contrast, N. spumigena cell densities decreased GSH and increased GST and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in mussels. Findings also suggest that at different stages of a toxic bloom, exposure may result in toxic stress to specific organs in the mussel. PMID:16291202

  8. The sporulation of the green alga Ulva prolifera is controlled by changes in photosynthetic electron transport chain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Lin, Apeng; Gu, Wenhui; Huan, Li; Gao, Shan; Wang, Guangce

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation and spore release are essential phases of the life cycle in algae and land plants. Ulva prolifera, which is an ideal organism for studying sporulation and spore release, was used as the experimental material in the present study. The determination of photosynthetic parameters, combined with microscopic observation, treatment with photosynthetic inhibitors, limitation of carbon acquisition, and protein mass spectrometry, was employed in this experiment. Cycle electron transport (CEF) was found enhanced at the onset of sporangia formation. The inhibition effect of dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB) towards sporulation was always strong during the sporulation process whereas the inhibition effect of 3-(3′,4′-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) was continuously declined accompanied with the progress of sporulation. The changes of photosynthesis resulted from the limitation of CO2 acquisition could stimulate sporulation onset. Quantitative protein analysis showed that enzymes involved in carbon fixation, including RUBISCO and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase, declined during sporogenesis, while proteins involved in sporulation, including tubulin and centrin, increased. These results suggest that enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF) and oxidation of the plastoquinone pool are essential for sporangia formation onset, and changes in photosynthetic electron transport chain have significant impacts on sporulation of the green algae. PMID:27102955

  9. DISINTEGRATION OF THE CELLS OF SIPHONOUS GREEN ALGA CODIUM EDULE (BRYOPSIDALES, CHLOROPHYTA) UNDER MILD HEAT STRESS(1).

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzan-Chain; Hsu, Ban-Dar

    2009-04-01

    The siphonous green alga Codium edule P. C. Silva (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta) has the highest covering ratio among the macroalgae on the coral reef of Nanwan Bay in southern Taiwan, but its population in the subtidal region drastically decreases from July to September each year. The objective of this study was to determine whether the high temperature of summer could be the basis for this population decrease. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements revealed that when the algae were incubated at 35°C (a temperature that can be reached in southern Taiwan during the summer), their photosynthetic activities were almost completely inhibited after about 8 h. The circadian rhythm of photosynthesis was disrupted at a temperature as low as 32°C. TEM studies showed that 4 h incubation at 35°C induced a decrease in turgidity accompanied by vacuole shrinkage and plasmolysis. The marked disintegrative changes, including damage to organelles, such as chloroplasts and nuclei, occurred after about 8 h, at which time central vacuoles collapsed and the cell interior was then filled with numerous small vesicles. Our results suggested that the rise in seawater temperature during the summer could be one of the major causes of the massive death of C. edule in the field. PMID:27033813

  10. Toxicity of Cu (II) to the green alga Chlorella vulgaris: a perspective of photosynthesis and oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Song, Shufang; Wen, Yuezhong; Zou, Yuqin; Liu, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    The toxic effects of Cu (II) on the freshwater green algae Chlorella vulgaris and its chloroplast were investigated by detecting the responses of photosynthesis and oxidant stress. The results showed that Cu (II) arrested the growth of C. vulgaris and presented in a concentration- and time-dependent trend and the SRichards 2 model fitted the inhibition curve best. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including qP, Y (II), ETR, F v /F m , and F v /F 0, were stimulated at low concentration of Cu (II) but declined at high concentration, indicating the photosystem II (PSII) of C. vulgaris was destroyed by Cu (II). The chloroplasts were extracted, and the Hill reaction activity (HRA) of chloroplast was significantly decreased with the increasing Cu (II) concentration under both illuminating and dark condition, and faster decline speed was observed under dark condition. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were also significantly decreased at high concentration Cu (II), companied with a large number of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All these results indicated a severe oxidative stress on algal cells occurred as well as the effect on photosynthesis, thus inhibiting the growth of algae, which providing sights to evaluate the phytotoxicity of Cu (II). PMID:27255311

  11. Toxicity of Cu (II) to the green alga Chlorella vulgaris: a perspective of photosynthesis and oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Song, Shufang; Wen, Yuezhong; Zou, Yuqin; Liu, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    The toxic effects of Cu (II) on the freshwater green algae Chlorella vulgaris and its chloroplast were investigated by detecting the responses of photosynthesis and oxidant stress. The results showed that Cu (II) arrested the growth of C. vulgaris and presented in a concentration- and time-dependent trend and the SRichards 2 model fitted the inhibition curve best. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including qP, Y (II), ETR, F v /F m , and F v /F 0, were stimulated at low concentration of Cu (II) but declined at high concentration, indicating the photosystem II (PSII) of C. vulgaris was destroyed by Cu (II). The chloroplasts were extracted, and the Hill reaction activity (HRA) of chloroplast was significantly decreased with the increasing Cu (II) concentration under both illuminating and dark condition, and faster decline speed was observed under dark condition. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were also significantly decreased at high concentration Cu (II), companied with a large number of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All these results indicated a severe oxidative stress on algal cells occurred as well as the effect on photosynthesis, thus inhibiting the growth of algae, which providing sights to evaluate the phytotoxicity of Cu (II).

  12. Hydrogen peroxide photoproduction by immobilized cells of the blue-green alga Anabaena variabilis: A way to solar energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, I.; La Rosa, F.F. de )

    1992-07-01

    A photosystem for hydrogen peroxide photoproduction formed by immobilized cells of the blue-green alga, Anabaena variabilis and the redox mediator methyl viologen is described. Hydrogen peroxide is produced in a redox catalyst cycle in which methyl viologen is reduced by electrons from water obtained by the photosynthetic apparatus of the algae using solar energy, and reoxidized by the introduction of oxygen into the solution. Hydrogen peroxide is produced during methyl viologen re-oxidation in two steps by means of the formation of superoxide. Experimental conditions for maximum photoproduction (catalyst charge, chlorophyll, and agar final concentration for cell immobilization) have been investigated using a continuous photosystem with immobilized A. variabilis as photocatalyst. Under the determined optimum conditions, the photosystem with immobilized A. variabilis is photocatalyst. Under the determined optimum conditions, the photosystem produces hydrogen peroxide at a rate of 100 {mu}moles/mg Chl{center dot}h, maintaining the production for several hours, and with an energy conversion efficiency of about 2%. Taking into account the use of hydrogen peroxide as fuel, this photosystem can be a useful tool in the storage of solar energy.

  13. An experimental test of the symbiosis specificity between the ciliate Paramecium bursaria and strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Summerer, Monika; Sonntag, Bettina; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2007-08-01

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria living in mutualistic relationship with the unicellular green alga Chlorella is known to be easily infected by various potential symbionts/parasites such as bacteria, yeasts and other algae. Permanent symbiosis, however, seems to be restricted to Chlorella taxa. To test the specificity of this association, we designed infection experiments with two aposymbiotic P. bursaria strains and Chlorella symbionts isolated from four Paramecium strains, seven other ciliate hosts and two Hydra strains, as well as three free-living Chlorella species. Paramecium bursaria established stable symbioses with all tested Chlorella symbionts of ciliates, but never with symbiotic Chlorella of Hydra viridissima or with free-living Chlorella. Furthermore, we tested the infection specificity of P. bursaria with a 1:1:1 mixture of three compatible Chlorella strains, including the native symbiont, and then identified the strain of the newly established symbiosis by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region 1 of the 18S rRNA gene. The results indicated that P. bursaria established symbiosis with its native symbiont. We conclude that despite clear preferences for their native Chlorella, the host-symbiont relationship in P. bursaria is flexible.

  14. Selenium Accumulation in Unicellular Green Alga Chlorella vulgaris and Its Effects on Antioxidant Enzymes and Content of Photosynthetic Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xian; Zhong, Yu; Huang, Zhi; Yang, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate selenite effects in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris as a primary producer and the relationship with intracellular bioaccumulation. The effects of selenite were evaluated by measuring the effect of different selenite concentrations on algal growth during a 144 h exposure period. It was found that lower Se concentrations (≤75 mg L−1) positively promoted C. vulgaris growth and acted as antioxidant by inhibiting lipid peroxidation (LPO) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidative effect was associated with an increase in guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthetic pigments. Meanwhile, significant increase in the cell growth rate and organic Se content was also detected in the algae. In contrast, these changes were opposite in C. vulgaris exposed to Se higher than 100 mg L−1. The antioxidation and toxicity appeared to be correlated to Se bioaccumulation, which suggests the appropriate concentration of Se in the media accumulation of C. vulgaris should be 75 mg L−1. Taken together, C. vulgaris possesses tolerance to Se, and Se-Chlorella could be developed as antioxidative food for aquaculture and human health. PMID:25375113

  15. Characterization and heterologous expression of a new matrix attachment region binding protein from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyun; Hou, Guiqin; Wang, Yafeng; Xue, Lexun

    2010-12-01

    Although interactions between the nuclear matrix and special regions of chromosomal DNA called matrix attachment regions (MARs) are implicated in various nuclear functions, the understanding of the regulatory mechanism of MARs is still poor. A few MAR-binding proteins (MARBP) have been isolated from some plants and animals, but not from the unicellular algae. Here, we identify a novel MAR-binding protein, namely DMBP-1, from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina. The cDNA of DMBP-1 is 2322-bp long and contains a 1626 bp of an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 542 amino acids (59 kDa). The DMBP-1 expressed in Escherichia coli specifically binds A/T-rich MAR DNA. The DMBP-1 fused to green fluorescent protein appears only inside the nuclei of Chinese hamster ovarian cells transfected with the pEGFP-MBP, indicating that the protein is located in the nuclei. The findings mentioned above may contribute to better understanding of the nuclear matrix-MAR interactions.

  16. The sporulation of the green alga Ulva prolifera is controlled by changes in photosynthetic electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Lin, Apeng; Gu, Wenhui; Huan, Li; Gao, Shan; Wang, Guangce

    2016-01-01

    Sporulation and spore release are essential phases of the life cycle in algae and land plants. Ulva prolifera, which is an ideal organism for studying sporulation and spore release, was used as the experimental material in the present study. The determination of photosynthetic parameters, combined with microscopic observation, treatment with photosynthetic inhibitors, limitation of carbon acquisition, and protein mass spectrometry, was employed in this experiment. Cycle electron transport (CEF) was found enhanced at the onset of sporangia formation. The inhibition effect of dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB) towards sporulation was always strong during the sporulation process whereas the inhibition effect of 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) was continuously declined accompanied with the progress of sporulation. The changes of photosynthesis resulted from the limitation of CO2 acquisition could stimulate sporulation onset. Quantitative protein analysis showed that enzymes involved in carbon fixation, including RUBISCO and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase, declined during sporogenesis, while proteins involved in sporulation, including tubulin and centrin, increased. These results suggest that enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF) and oxidation of the plastoquinone pool are essential for sporangia formation onset, and changes in photosynthetic electron transport chain have significant impacts on sporulation of the green algae. PMID:27102955

  17. The influence of salinity on the toxicity of selected sulfonamides and trimethoprim towards the green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Borecka, Marta; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Haliński, Łukasz P; Pazdro, Ksenia; Stepnowski, Piotr; Stolte, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the investigation of the influence of salinity variations on the toxicity of sulfapyridine, sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and trimethoprim towards the green algae Chlorella vulgaris after exposure times of 48 and 72 h. In freshwater the EC50 values ranged from 0.98 to 123.22 mg L(-1) depending on the compound. The obtained results revealed that sulfamethoxazole and sulfapyridine were the most toxic, while trimethoprim was the least toxic pharmaceutical to the selected organism. Deviations between the nominal and real test concentrations were determined via instrumental analysis to support the interpretation of ecotoxicological data. The toxicity effects were also tested in saline water (3, 6 and 9 PSU). The tendency that the toxicity of selected pharmaceuticals decreases with increasing salinity was observed. Higher salinity implies an elevated concentration of inorganic monovalent cations that are capable of binding with countercharges available on algal surfaces (hydroxyl functional groups). Hence it can reduce the permeability of pharmaceuticals through the algal cell walls, which could be the probable reason for the observed effect. Moreover, for the classification of the mode of toxic action, the toxic ratio concept was applied, which indicated that the effects of the investigated drugs towards algae are caused by the specific mode of toxic action. PMID:26835894

  18. New lipid-producing, cold-tolerant yellow-green alga isolated from the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David R; Mengistu, Sinafik; Ranum, Paul; Celio, Gail; Mashek, Mara; Mashek, Douglas; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    A new strain of yellow-green algae (Xanthophyceae, Heterokonta), tentatively named Heterococcus sp. DN1 (UTEX accession number UTEX ZZ885), was discovered among snow fields in the Rocky Mountains. Axenic cultures of H. sp. DN1 were isolated and their cellular morphology, growth, and composition of lipids were characterized. H. sp. DN1 was found to grow at temperatures approaching freezing to accumulate large intracellular stores of lipids. H. sp. DN1 produces the highest quantity of lipids when grown undisturbed with high light in low temperatures. Of particular interest was the accumulation of eicosapentaenoic acid, known to be important for human nutrition, and palmitoleic acid, known to improve biodiesel feedstock properties. PMID:23754623

  19. Deciphering the relationship among phosphate dynamics, electron-dense body and lipid accumulation in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shuhei; Yoshihara, Mai; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Aiko; Konomi, Mami; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element for life on earth and is also important for modern agriculture, which is dependent on inorganic fertilizers from phosphate rock. Polyphosphate is a biological polymer of phosphate residues, which is accumulated in organisms during the biological wastewater treatment process to enhance biological phosphorus removal. Here, we investigated the relationship between polyphosphate accumulation and electron-dense bodies in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Under sulfur-depleted conditions, in which some symporter genes were upregulated, while others were downregulated, total phosphate accumulation increased in the early stage of culture compared to that under sulfur-replete conditions. The P signal was detected only in dense bodies by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed marked ultrastructural variations in dense bodies with and without polyphosphate. Our findings suggest that the dense body is a site of polyphosphate accumulation, and P. kessleri has potential as a phosphate-accumulating organism.

  20. Fresh water blue green algae from three agro-climatic zones of Uttar Pradesh, India: distribution pattern with seasonal variation.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, S; Misra, P K; Rai, U N; Tripathi, R D; Suseela, M R; Sinha, S; Baghel, V S; Pal, Amit; Dwivedi, C P

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with 45 species of 21 genera of fresh water blue green algae (BGA) from three different agro-climatic zones of Uttar Pradesh. Samples were collected from different habitats varying in physico-chemical properties. Out of 45 species, 13 species belonged to order Chroococcales, 31 to order Nostocales, while only 1 species belonged to order Stigonimatales i.e. Fischerella mucicola. The physico-chemical parameters like pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity, nitrate, nitrite and rainfall play an important role in the periodicity of BGA. A positive correlation was found between dissolved oxygen (DO) of different ponds and species diversity, except in the case of western region of Uttar Pradesh (Farukhabad and Mahoba districts) where a positive correlation was found in electrical conductivity and total dissolved solids.

  1. New lipid-producing, cold-tolerant yellow-green alga isolated from the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David R; Mengistu, Sinafik; Ranum, Paul; Celio, Gail; Mashek, Mara; Mashek, Douglas; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    A new strain of yellow-green algae (Xanthophyceae, Heterokonta), tentatively named Heterococcus sp. DN1 (UTEX accession number UTEX ZZ885), was discovered among snow fields in the Rocky Mountains. Axenic cultures of H. sp. DN1 were isolated and their cellular morphology, growth, and composition of lipids were characterized. H. sp. DN1 was found to grow at temperatures approaching freezing to accumulate large intracellular stores of lipids. H. sp. DN1 produces the highest quantity of lipids when grown undisturbed with high light in low temperatures. Of particular interest was the accumulation of eicosapentaenoic acid, known to be important for human nutrition, and palmitoleic acid, known to improve biodiesel feedstock properties.

  2. Differential larval settlement responses of Porites astreoides and Acropora palmata in the presence of the green alga Halimeda opuntia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, K.; Sneed, J. M.; Paul, V. J.

    2016-06-01

    Settlement is critical to maintaining coral cover on reefs, yet interspecific responses of coral planulae to common benthic macroalgae are not well characterized. Larval survival and settlement of two Caribbean reef-building corals, the broadcast-spawner Acropora palmata and the planulae-brooder Porites astreoides, were quantified following exposure to plastic algae controls and the green macroalga Halimeda opuntia. Survival and settlement rates were not significantly affected by the presence of H. opuntia in either species. However, ~10 % of P. astreoides larvae settled on the surface of the macroalga, whereas larvae of A. palmata did not. It is unlikely that corals that settle on macroalgae will survive post-settlement; therefore, H. opuntia may reduce the number of P. astreoides and other non-discriminatory larvae that survive to adulthood. Our results suggest that the presence of macroalgae on impacted reefs can have unexpected repercussions for coral recruitment and highlight discrepancies in settlement specificity between corals with distinct life history strategies.

  3. Toxicity of volcanic-ash leachate to a blue-green alga. Results of a preliminary bioassay experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Feder, G.L.; Stiles, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the possible effects of volcanic ash from the May 18,1980, eruption of Mt. St. Helens, Washington, on aquatic ecosystems, we conducted a bioassay experiment with a blue-green alga, Anabaena flos-aquae. Results showed that leachate (obtained by leaching 151 g of ash with 130 mL of simulated freshwater) was lethal to Anabaena flos-aquae cultures when diluted as much as 1:100 with culture medium. Cultures exposed to a 1:500 dilution grew, but a toxic effect was indicated by abnormalities in the Anabaena filaments. This study indicates that ash from the Mt. St. Helens volcano could have an effect on aquatic ecosystems in the areas of significant ashfall. Further study is needed to determine the toxic chemical constituents in the ash and also its possible effects on other aquatic organisms.

  4. Deciphering the relationship among phosphate dynamics, electron-dense body and lipid accumulation in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Shuhei; Yoshihara, Mai; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Aiko; Konomi, Mami; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element for life on earth and is also important for modern agriculture, which is dependent on inorganic fertilizers from phosphate rock. Polyphosphate is a biological polymer of phosphate residues, which is accumulated in organisms during the biological wastewater treatment process to enhance biological phosphorus removal. Here, we investigated the relationship between polyphosphate accumulation and electron-dense bodies in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Under sulfur-depleted conditions, in which some symporter genes were upregulated, while others were downregulated, total phosphate accumulation increased in the early stage of culture compared to that under sulfur-replete conditions. The P signal was detected only in dense bodies by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed marked ultrastructural variations in dense bodies with and without polyphosphate. Our findings suggest that the dense body is a site of polyphosphate accumulation, and P. kessleri has potential as a phosphate-accumulating organism. PMID:27180903

  5. Deciphering the relationship among phosphate dynamics, electron-dense body and lipid accumulation in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shuhei; Yoshihara, Mai; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Aiko; Konomi, Mami; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element for life on earth and is also important for modern agriculture, which is dependent on inorganic fertilizers from phosphate rock. Polyphosphate is a biological polymer of phosphate residues, which is accumulated in organisms during the biological wastewater treatment process to enhance biological phosphorus removal. Here, we investigated the relationship between polyphosphate accumulation and electron-dense bodies in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Under sulfur-depleted conditions, in which some symporter genes were upregulated, while others were downregulated, total phosphate accumulation increased in the early stage of culture compared to that under sulfur-replete conditions. The P signal was detected only in dense bodies by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed marked ultrastructural variations in dense bodies with and without polyphosphate. Our findings suggest that the dense body is a site of polyphosphate accumulation, and P. kessleri has potential as a phosphate-accumulating organism. PMID:27180903

  6. Chaperonin cofactors, Cpn10 and Cpn20, of green algae and plants function as hetero-oligomeric ring complexes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chin C; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2012-06-01

    The chloroplast chaperonin system of plants and green algae is a curiosity as both the chaperonin cage and its lid are encoded by multiple genes, in contrast to the single genes encoding the two components of the bacterial and mitochondrial systems. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr), three genes encode chaperonin cofactors, with cpn10 encoding a single ∼10-kDa domain and cpn20 and cpn23 encoding tandem cpn10 domains. Here, we characterized the functional interaction of these proteins with the Escherichia coli chaperonin, GroEL, which normally cooperates with GroES, a heptamer of ∼10-kDa subunits. The C. reinhardtii cofactor proteins alone were all unable to assist GroEL-mediated refolding of bacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase but gained this ability when CrCpn20 and/or CrCpn23 was combined with CrCpn10. Native mass spectrometry indicated the formation of hetero-oligomeric species, consisting of seven ∼10-kDa domains. The cofactor "heptamers" interacted with GroEL and encapsulated substrate protein in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Different hetero-oligomer arrangements, generated by constructing cofactor concatamers, indicated a preferential heptamer configuration for the functional CrCpn10-CrCpn23 complex. Formation of heptamer Cpn10/Cpn20 hetero-oligomers was also observed with the Arabidopsis thaliana (At) cofactors, which functioned with the chloroplast chaperonin, AtCpn60α(7)β(7). It appears that hetero-oligomer formation occurs more generally for chloroplast chaperonin cofactors, perhaps adapting the chaperonin system for the folding of specific client proteins.

  7. The complete plastid genome sequence of the parasitic green alga Helicosporidium sp. is highly reduced and structured

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Audrey P; Keeling, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Background Loss of photosynthesis has occurred independently in several plant and algal lineages, and represents a major metabolic shift with potential consequences for the content and structure of plastid genomes. To investigate such changes, we sequenced the complete plastid genome of the parasitic, non-photosynthetic green alga, Helicosporidium. Results The Helicosporidium plastid genome is among the smallest known (37.5 kb), and like other plastids from non-photosynthetic organisms it lacks all genes for proteins that function in photosynthesis. Its reduced size results from more than just loss of genes, however; it has little non-coding DNA, with only one intron and tiny intergenic spaces, and no inverted repeat (no duplicated genes at all). It encodes precisely the minimal complement of tRNAs needed to translate the universal genetic code, and has eliminated all redundant isoacceptors. The Helicosporidium plastid genome is also highly structured, with each half of the circular genome containing nearly all genes on one strand. Helicosporidium is known to be related to trebouxiophyte green algae, but the genome is structured and compacted in a manner more reminiscent of the non-photosynthetic plastids of apicomplexan parasites. Conclusion Helicosporidium contributes significantly to our understanding of the evolution of plastid DNA because it illustrates the highly ordered reduction that occurred following the loss of a major metabolic function. The convergence of plastid genome structure in Helicosporidium and the Apicomplexa raises the interesting possibility that there are common forces that shape plastid genomes, subsequent to the loss of photosynthesis in an organism. PMID:16630350

  8. Enantioselective ecotoxicity of the herbicide dichlorprop and complexes formed with chitosan in two fresh water green algae.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yuezhong; Chen, Hui; Yuan, Yuli; Xu, Dongmei; Kang, Xiaodong

    2011-04-01

    To reduce the leaching potential, to prevent groundwater contamination and to maintain the efficacy of a pesticide, natural polysaccharides have received increasing attention due to their biocompatibility and useful biological reactivity for controlled release formulations (CRFs) of pesticides. In this paper, the toxicities of the chiral herbicide dichlorprop (DCPP) and its complexes with chitosan molecules (DCPP-CS) and chitosan nanoparticles (DCPP-NP) to two different green algae were determined and compared. The inhibition rates of DCPP, DCPP-CS and DCPP-NP were determined at 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144, 168 h, and the results show that (S)-DCPP was more toxic to Chlorella vulgaris than (R)-DCPP, while the (R)-DCPP was more toxic to Scenedesmus obliquus than (S)-DCPP. The study also found that the chiral selectivity of DCPP to Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus could be changed when DCPP was complexed with chitosan molecules (CS) or chitosan nanoparticles (NP). For Chlorella vulgaris, the order of inhibition was (R)-DCPP-CS > (S)-DCPP-CS and (R)-DCPP-NP > (S)-DCPP-NP; for Scenedesmus obliquus, the order was (S)-DCPP-CS > (R)-DCPP-CS and (S)-DCPP-NP > (R)-DCPP-NP. This phenomenon suggests that the enantioselective behaviors of chiral compounds might shift when interactions with other chiral receptors coexist in different biological environments. Additionally, chitosan molecules and chitosan nanoparticles also showed different toxicities, which could be ascribed to the difference in the physicochemical properties between CS and NP or the differences in the cell walls of the two fresh water green algae.

  9. Identifying Aspects of the Post-Transcriptional Program Governing the Proteome of the Green Alga Micromonas pusilla

    PubMed Central

    Waltman, Peter H.; Guo, Jian; Reistetter, Emily Nahas; Purvine, Samuel; Ansong, Charles K.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Wong, Chee-Hong; Wei, Chia-Lin; Smith, Richard D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2016-01-01

    Micromonas is a unicellular motile alga within the Prasinophyceae, a green algal group that is related to land plants. This picoeukaryote (<2 μm diameter) is widespread in the marine environment but is not well understood at the cellular level. Here, we examine shifts in mRNA and protein expression over the course of the day-night cycle using triplicated mid-exponential, nutrient replete cultures of Micromonas pusilla CCMP1545. Samples were collected at key transition points during the diel cycle for evaluation using high-throughput LC-MS proteomics. In conjunction, matched mRNA samples from the same time points were sequenced using pair-ended directional Illumina RNA-Seq to investigate the dynamics and relationship between the mRNA and protein expression programs of M. pusilla. Similar to a prior study of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, we found significant divergence in the mRNA and proteomics expression dynamics in response to the light:dark cycle. Additionally, expressional responses of genes and the proteins they encoded could also be variable within the same metabolic pathway, such as we observed in the oxygenic photosynthesis pathway. A regression framework was used to predict protein levels from both mRNA expression and gene-specific sequence-based features. Several features in the genome sequence were found to influence protein abundance including codon usage as well as 3’ UTR length and structure. Collectively, our studies provide insights into the regulation of the proteome over a diel cycle as well as the relationships between transcriptional and translational programs in the widespread marine green alga Micromonas. PMID:27434306

  10. Identifying Aspects of the Post-Transcriptional Program Governing the Proteome of the Green Alga Micromonas pusilla.

    PubMed

    Waltman, Peter H; Guo, Jian; Reistetter, Emily Nahas; Purvine, Samuel; Ansong, Charles K; van Baren, Marijke J; Wong, Chee-Hong; Wei, Chia-Lin; Smith, Richard D; Callister, Stephen J; Stuart, Joshua M; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2016-01-01

    Micromonas is a unicellular motile alga within the Prasinophyceae, a green algal group that is related to land plants. This picoeukaryote (<2 μm diameter) is widespread in the marine environment but is not well understood at the cellular level. Here, we examine shifts in mRNA and protein expression over the course of the day-night cycle using triplicated mid-exponential, nutrient replete cultures of Micromonas pusilla CCMP1545. Samples were collected at key transition points during the diel cycle for evaluation using high-throughput LC-MS proteomics. In conjunction, matched mRNA samples from the same time points were sequenced using pair-ended directional Illumina RNA-Seq to investigate the dynamics and relationship between the mRNA and protein expression programs of M. pusilla. Similar to a prior study of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, we found significant divergence in the mRNA and proteomics expression dynamics in response to the light:dark cycle. Additionally, expressional responses of genes and the proteins they encoded could also be variable within the same metabolic pathway, such as we observed in the oxygenic photosynthesis pathway. A regression framework was used to predict protein levels from both mRNA expression and gene-specific sequence-based features. Several features in the genome sequence were found to influence protein abundance including codon usage as well as 3' UTR length and structure. Collectively, our studies provide insights into the regulation of the proteome over a diel cycle as well as the relationships between transcriptional and translational programs in the widespread marine green alga Micromonas. PMID:27434306

  11. Interactive effect of brassinosteroids and cytokinins on growth, chlorophyll, monosaccharide and protein content in the green alga Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Bajguz, Andrzej; Piotrowska-Niczyporuk, Alicja

    2014-07-01

    Interaction between brassinosteroids (BRs) (brassinolide, BL; 24-epibrassinolide, 24-epiBL; 28-homobrassinolide, 28-homoBL; castasterone, CS; 24-epicastasterone, 24-epiCS; 28-homocastasterone, 28-homoCS) and adenine- (trans-zeatin, tZ; kinetin, Kin) as well as phenylurea-type (1,3-diphenylurea, DPU) cytokinins (CKs) in the regulation of cell number, phytohormone level and the content of chlorophyll, monosaccharide and protein in unicellular green alga Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae) were examined. Chlorella vulgaris exhibited sensitivity to CKs in the following order of their stimulating properties: 10 nM tZ > 100 nM Kin >1 μM DPU. Exogenously applied BRs possessed the highest biological activity in algal cells at concentration of 10 nM. Among the BRs, BL was characterized by the highest activity, while 28-homoCS - by the lowest. The considerable increase in the level of all endogenous BRs by 27-46% was observed in C. vulgaris culture treated with exogenous 10 nM tZ. It can be speculated that CKs may stimulate BR activity in C. vulgaris by inducing the accumulation of endogenous BRs. CKs interacted synergistically with BRs increasing the number of cells and endogenous accumulation of proteins, chlorophylls and monosaccharides in C. vulgaris. The highest stimulation of algal growth and the contents of analyzed biochemical parameters were observed for BL applied in combination with tZ, whereas the lowest in the culture treated with both 28-homoCS and DPU. However, regardless of the applied mixture of BRs with CKs, the considerable increase in cell number and the metabolite accumulation was found above the level obtained in cultures treated with any single phytohormone in unicellular green alga C. vulgaris.

  12. Comparative analysis of astaxanthin and its esters in the mutant E1 of Haematococcus pluvialis and other green algae by HPLC with a C30 column.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Xiang, WenZhou; Tang, QuanMing; Sun, Ni; Chen, Feng; Yuan, JianPing

    2008-12-01

    A gradient reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using a C30 column was developed for the simultaneous determination of astaxanthin, astaxanthin monoesters and astaxanthin diesters in the green algae Chlorococcum sp., Chlorella zofingiensis, Haematococcus pluvialis and the mutant E1, which was obtained from the mutagenesis of H. pluvialis by exposure to UV-irradiation and ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) with subsequent screening using nicotine. The results showed that the contents of total astaxanthins including free astaxanthin and astaxanthin esters ranged from 1.4 to 30.9 mg/g dry biomass in these green algae. The lower total astaxanthin levels (< 2 mg/g dry biomass) were detected in the green algae Chlorococcum sp. and C. zofingiensis. The higher total astaxanthin levels (>16 mg/g dry biomass) were found in the green alga H. pluvialis and its mutant E1. It is notable that the mutant E1 is found to have considerably higher amounts of total astaxanthin (30.9 mg/g) as compared to the wild strain of H. pluvialis (16.1 mg/g). This indicates that UV-irradiation and EMS compound mutagenesis with subsequent screening using nicotine is an effective method for breeding of a high-producing astaxanthin strain of H. pluvialis. In addition, the green alga C. zofingiensis had a remarkably higher percentage of astaxanthin diesters (76.3% of total astaxanthins) and a remarkably lower percentage of astaxanthin monoesters (18.0% of total astaxanthins) in comparison with H. pluvialis (35.5% for diesters and 60.9% for monoesters), the mutant E1 (49.1% and 48.1%) and Chlorococcum sp. (18.0% and 58.6%).

  13. Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amos, W. A.

    2004-01-01

    This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NREL's photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The previous study had looked mainly at incident light intensities, batch cycles and light adsorption without directly attempting to model the saturation effects seen in algal cultures. This study takes a more detailed look at the effects that cell density, light adsorption and light saturation have on algal hydrogen production. Performance estimates based on actual solar data are also included in this study. Based on this analysis, the estimated future selling price of hydrogen produced from algae ranges $0.57/kg to $13.53/kg.

  14. Characterisation Of Polysacharides And Lipids From Selected Green Algae Species By FTIR-ATR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, Alica; Blinová, Lenka; Gerulová, Kristína

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used in this study to identify and determine spectral features of Chromochloris zofingiensis (Dönz) Fucíková et L.A. Lewis (SAG 211-14, Gottingen, Germany), Acutodesmus obliguus (Turpin) Hegewald (SAG 276-1, Gottingen, Germany) and Chlorella sorokiniana (K. Brandt) Pröschold et Darienko (SAG 211-40c, Gottingen, Germany). Polysaccharides and lipids from these three algae species were determined using Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) with ATR accessory with diamante crystal in spectral range from 400 - 4000 cm-1 and resolution 4.

  15. Multiple facets of anoxic metabolism and hydrogen production in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Arthur R; Catalanotti, Claudia; Yang, Wenqiang; Dubini, Alexandra; Magneschi, Leonardo; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Posewitz, Matthew C; Seibert, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Many microbes in the soil environment experience micro-oxic or anoxic conditions for much of the late afternoon and night, which inhibit or prevent respiratory metabolism. To sustain the production of energy and maintain vital cellular processes during the night, organisms have developed numerous pathways for fermentative metabolism. This review discusses fermentation pathways identified for the soil-dwelling model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, its ability to produce molecular hydrogen under anoxic conditions through the activity of hydrogenases, and the molecular flexibility associated with fermentative metabolism that has only recently been revealed through the analysis of specific mutant strains. PMID:21563367

  16. The origin of red algae and the evolution of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Moreira, D; Le Guyader, H; Philippe, H

    2000-05-01

    Chloroplast structure and genome analyses support the hypothesis that three groups of organisms originated from the primary photosynthetic endosymbiosis between a cyanobacterium and a eukaryotic host: green plants (green algae + land plants), red algae and glaucophytes (for example, Cyanophora). Although phylogenies based on several mitochondrial genes support a specific green plants/red algae relationship, the phylogenetic analysis of nucleus-encoded genes yields inconclusive, sometimes contradictory results. To address this problem, we have analysed an alternative nuclear marker, elongation factor 2, and included new red algae and protist sequences. Here we provide significant support for a sisterhood of green plants and red algae. This sisterhood is also significantly supported by a multi-gene analysis of a fusion of 13 nuclear markers (5,171 amino acids). In addition, the analysis of an alternative fusion of 6 nuclear markers (1,938 amino acids) indicates that glaucophytes may be the closest relatives to the green plants/red algae group. Thus, our study provides evidence from nuclear markers for a single primary endosymbiosis at the origin of these groups, and supports a kingdom Plantae comprising green plants, red algae and glaucophytes.

  17. Generic concept in Chlorella-related coccoid green algae (Chlorophyta, Trebouxiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Luo, W; Pröschold, T; Bock, C; Krienitz, L

    2010-05-01

    Using a combined set of sequences of SSU and ITS regions of nuclear-encoded ribosomal DNA, the concept of the experimental algal genus Chlorella was evaluated. Conventionally in the genus Chlorella, only coccoid, solitary algae with spherical morphology that do not possess any mucilaginous envelope were included. All Chlorella species reproduce asexually by autospores. However, phylogenetic analyses showed that within the clade of 'true'Chlorella species (Chlorella vulgaris, C. lobophora, and C. sorokiniana), taxa with a mucilaginous envelope and colonial lifeform have also evolved. These algae, formerly designated as Dictyosphaerium, are considered as members of the genus Chlorella. In close relationship to Chlorella, five different genera were supported by the phylogenetic analyses: Micractinium (spherical cells, colonial, with bristles), Didymogenes (ellipsoidal cells, two-celled coenobia, with or without two spines per cell), Actinastrum (ellipsoidal cells within star-shaped coenobia), Meyerella (spherical cells, solitary, without pyrenoids), and Hegewaldia (spherical cells, colonial, with or without bristles, oogamous propagation). Based on the secondary structures of SSU and ITS rDNA sequences, molecular signatures are provided for each genus of the Chlorella clade.

  18. Nuclear DNA Content Estimates in Multicellular Green, Red and Brown Algae: Phylogenetic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    KAPRAUN, DONALD F.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Multicellular eukaryotic algae are phylogenetically disparate. Nuclear DNA content estimates have been published for fewer than 1 % of the described species of Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta. The present investigation aims to summarize the state of our knowledge and to add substantially to our database of C-values for theses algae. • Methods The DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and RBC (chicken erythrocyte) standard were used to estimate 2C values with static microspectrophotometry. • Key Results 2C DNA contents for 85 species of Chlorophyta range from 0·2–6·1 pg, excluding the highly polyploidy Charales and Desmidiales with DNA contents of up to 39·2 and 20·7 pg, respectively. 2C DNA contents for 111 species of Rhodophyta range from 0·1–2·8 pg, and for 44 species of Phaeophyta range from 0·2–1·8 pg. • Conclusions New availability of consensus higher-level molecular phylogenies provides a framework for viewing C-value data in a phylogenetic context. Both DNA content ranges and mean values are greater in taxa considered to be basal. It is proposed that the basal, ancestral genome in each algal group was quite small. Both mechanistic and ecological processes are discussed that could have produced the observed C-value ranges. PMID:15596456

  19. Quantile regression model for a diverse set of chemicals: application to acute toxicity for green algae.

    PubMed

    Villain, Jonathan; Lozano, Sylvain; Halm-Lemeille, Marie-Pierre; Durrieu, Gilles; Bureau, Ronan

    2014-12-01

    The potential of quantile regression (QR) and quantile support vector machine regression (QSVMR) was analyzed for the definitions of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models associated with a diverse set of chemicals toward a particular endpoint. This study focused on a specific sensitive endpoint (acute toxicity to algae) for which even a narcosis QSAR model is not actually clear. An initial dataset including more than 401 ecotoxicological data for one species of algae (Selenastrum capricornutum) was defined. This set corresponds to a large sample of chemicals ranging from classical organic chemicals to pesticides. From this original data set, the selection of the different subsets was made in terms of the notion of toxic ratio (TR), a parameter based on the ratio between predicted and experimental values. The robustness of QR and QSVMR to outliers was clearly observed, thus demonstrating that this approach represents a major interest for QSAR associated with a diverse set of chemicals. We focused particularly on descriptors related to molecular surface properties.

  20. Two Class I Aldolases in the Green Alga Chara foetida (Charophyceae) 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobshagen, Sigrid; Schnarrenberger, Claus

    1988-01-01

    Aldolase activity of Chara foetida (Braun) could be separated into a minor (peak I) and a major peak (peak II) by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Affinity chromatography on P-cellulose resulted in highly purified aldolase preparations with specific activities of 3.2 and 4.8 units per milligram protein and molecular subunit masses of 37 and 35 kilodalton, as shown by SDS-PAGE, for the aldolase of peak I and peak II, respectively. Both aldolases belong to class I aldolase since the activity is not inhibited by 1 millimolar EDTA. The Km (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate) values were 0.64 and 13.4 micromolar, respectively. The aldolase of peak I showed a 6.7 times stronger crossreaction with a specific antiserum against the cytosol aldolase of spinach than with an antiserum against the chloroplast aldolase of spinach. On the other hand the aldolase of peak II showed a 5.1 times stronger cross-reaction with the α-plastidaldolase antiserum than with the α-cytosol-aldolase antiserum. For algae this is the first separation of two class I aldolases. They are similar to the cytosol and chloroplast aldolases in higher plants, but different from a reported class I (Me2+ independent) and class II (Me2+ dependent) aldolase in other algae. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16666130

  1. Two Class I Aldolases in the Green Alga Chara foetida (Charophyceae).

    PubMed

    Jacobshagen, S; Schnarrenberger, C

    1988-05-01

    Aldolase activity of Chara foetida (Braun) could be separated into a minor (peak I) and a major peak (peak II) by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Affinity chromatography on P-cellulose resulted in highly purified aldolase preparations with specific activities of 3.2 and 4.8 units per milligram protein and molecular subunit masses of 37 and 35 kilodalton, as shown by SDS-PAGE, for the aldolase of peak I and peak II, respectively. Both aldolases belong to class I aldolase since the activity is not inhibited by 1 millimolar EDTA. The K(m) (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate) values were 0.64 and 13.4 micromolar, respectively. The aldolase of peak I showed a 6.7 times stronger crossreaction with a specific antiserum against the cytosol aldolase of spinach than with an antiserum against the chloroplast aldolase of spinach. On the other hand the aldolase of peak II showed a 5.1 times stronger cross-reaction with the alpha-plastidaldolase antiserum than with the alpha-cytosol-aldolase antiserum. For algae this is the first separation of two class I aldolases. They are similar to the cytosol and chloroplast aldolases in higher plants, but different from a reported class I (Me(2+) independent) and class II (Me(2+) dependent) aldolase in other algae.

  2. Evolution of photoprotection mechanisms upon land colonization: evidence of PSBS-dependent NPQ in late Streptophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Gerotto, Caterina; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2013-12-01

    Light is the energy source for photosynthetic organisms but, if absorbed in excess, it can drive to the formation of reactive oxygen species and photoinhibition. One major mechanism to avoid oxidative damage in plants and algae is the dissipation of excess excitation energy as heat, called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Eukaryotic algae and plants, however, rely on two different proteins for NPQ activation, the former mainly depending on LHCSR (Lhc-like protein Stress Related; previously called Li818, Light Induced protein 818), whereas in the latter the major role is played by a distinct protein, PSBS (photosystem II subunit S). In the moss Physcomitrella patens, which diverged from vascular plants early after land colonization, both these proteins were found to be present and active in inducing NPQ, suggesting that during plants evolution both mechanisms co-existed. In order to investigate in more detail NPQ adaptation toward land colonization, we analyzed Streptophyte algae, the latest organisms to diverge from the land plants ancestors. Among them we found evidence of a PSBS-dependent NPQ in species belonging to Charales, Coleochaetales and Zygnematales, the latest groups to diverge from land plants ancestors. On the contrary earlier diverging algae, as Mesostigmatales and Klebsormidiales, likely rely on LHCSR for their NPQ activation. Presented evidence thus suggests that PSBS-dependent NPQ, although possibly present in some Chlorophyta, was stably acquired in the Cambrian period about 500 million years ago, before late Streptophyte algae diverged from plants ancestors.

  3. Food production and gas exchange system using blue-green alga (Spirulina) for CELSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Hatayama, Shigeki

    In order to reduce the cultivation area required for the growth of higher plants in space adoption of algae, which have a higher photosynthetic ability, seems very suitable for obtaining oxygen and food as a useful source of high quality protein. The preliminary cultivation experiment for determining optimum cultivation conditions and for obtaining the critical design parameters of the cultivator itself has been conducted. Spirulina was cultivated in the 6-liter medium containing a sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and a cultivation temperature controlled using a thermostat. Generated oxygen gas was separated using a polypropyrene porous hollow fiber membrane module. Through this experiment, oxygen gas (at a concentration of more than 46%) at a rate of 100 ~ 150 ml per minute could be obtained.

  4. Direct and indirect toxic effects of cotton-derived cellulose nanofibres on filamentous green algae.

    PubMed

    Munk, Michele; Brandão, Humberto M; Nowak, Sophie; Mouton, Ludovic; Gern, Juliana C; Guimaraes, Alessandro S; Yéprémian, Claude; Couté, Alain; Raposo, Nádia R B; Marconcini, José M; Brayner, Roberta

    2015-12-01

    Recently, cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) have attracted considerable attention as natural, abundant polymers with excellent mechanical properties and biodegradability. CNFs provide a new materials platform for the sustainable production of high-performance nano-enable products for various applications. Given the increasing rates of CNF production, the potential for their release to the environment and the subsequent impact on ecosystem is becoming an increasing concern that needs to be addressed. Here, we used the Klebsormidium flaccidum as a bioindicator organism of terrestrial and freshwater habitats pollution using a battery of biomarkers. Our results show that cotton CNFs inhibit the proliferation of algae and induce morphological changes in them. The two main toxicity mechanisms induced by cotton CNFs are: (i) a direct contact of CNFs with the cell wall and cellular membrane and (ii) an indirect effect through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  5. Food production and gas exchange system using blue-green alga (spirulina) for CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Hatayama, Shigeki

    1987-01-01

    In order to reduce the cultivation area required for the growth of higher plants in space adoption of algae, which have a higher photosynthetic ability, seems very suitable for obtaining oxygen and food as a useful source of high quality protein. The preliminary cultivation experiment for determining optimum cultivation conditions and for obtaining the critical design parameters of the cultivator itself was conducted. Spirulina was cultivated in the 6 liter medium containing a sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and a cultivation temperature controlled using a thermostat. Generated oxygen gas was separated using a polypropyrene porous hollow fiber membrane module. Through this experiment, oxygen gas (at a concentration of more than 46 percent) at a rate of 100 to approx. 150 ml per minute could be obtained.

  6. Biosorption of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by green algae Spirogyra species.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K; Shrivastava, A K; Jain, N

    2001-12-01

    Biosorption of heavy metals is an effective technology for the treatment of industrial wastewaters. Results are presented showing the sorption of Cr(VI) from solutions by biomass of filamentous algae Spirogyra species. Batch experiments were conducted to determine the adsorption properties of the biomass and it was observed that the adsorption capacity of the biomass strongly depends on equilibrium pH. Equilibrium isotherms were also obtained and maximum removal of Cr(VI) was around 14.7 x 10(3) mg metal, kg of dry weight biomass at a pH of 2.0 in 120 min with 5 mg/l of initial concentration. The results indicated that the biomass of Spirogyra species is suitable for the development of efficient biosorbent for the removal and recovery of Cr(VI) from wastewater.

  7. Sensitivity of a green alga to atrazine is not enhanced by previous acute exposure.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Leilan; Brain, Richard; Prosser, Ryan; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to atrazine in small lotic systems can be episodic, with short-term pulses (peaks) followed by lower, decreasing concentrations. Algae and macrophytes recover rapidly from pulsed exposure to atrazine, but reported observations of population response to subsequent exposures are minimal and inconclusive. Consequently, the sensitivity of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata to atrazine following a pulsed exposure was assessed. Exposure concentrations reflected amplifications of those observed in streams from highly vulnerable watersheds in regions of intense use. Initial pulsed atrazine exposure at 0, 150 or 300 μg/L for 24-h was followed by 72-h exposure to 0, 5, 10, 25, or 50 μg/L. Measured responses were cell density, growth rate, chlorophyll-a, and maximum quantum yield of photosystem II. Algal recovery was rapid and prior pulsed exposure to atrazine did not significantly affect subsequent sensitivity (EC10s, EC25s) for any endpoint, indicating no changes in tolerance at the population level for this species.

  8. A green light for engineered algae: redirecting metabolism to fuel a biotechnology revolution.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Julian N; Oyler, George A; Wilkinson, Loy; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    Microalgae have the potential to revolutionize biotechnology in a number of areas including nutrition, aquaculture, pharmaceuticals, and biofuels. Although algae have been commercially cultivated for over 50 years, metabolic engineering now seems necessary in order to achieve their full processing capabilities. Recently, the development of a number of transgenic algal strains boasting recombinant protein expression, engineered photosynthesis, and enhanced metabolism encourage the prospects of designer microalgae. Given the vast contributions that these solar-powered, carbon dioxide-sequestering organisms can provide to current global markets and the environment, an intensified focus on microalgal biotechnology is warranted. Ongoing advances in cultivation techniques coupled with genetic manipulation of crucial metabolic networks will further promote microalgae as an attractive platform for the production of numerous high-value compounds.

  9. Hydrogen production from salt water by Marine blue green algae and solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, A.; Rosner, D.; Kumazawa, S.; Barciela, S.; Phlips, E.

    1985-01-01

    Two marine bluegreen algae, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7 and Synechococcus sp Miami 041511 have been selected as the result of over 10 years continuous and intensive effort of isolation, growth examination, and the screening of hydrogen photoproduction capability in this laboratory. Both strains photoproduced hydrogen for several days at high rates and a quantity of hydrogen was accumulated in a closed vessel. Overall hydrogen donor substance of the hydrogen photoproduction was found to be salt water. Using strain Miami BG 7, a two step method of hydrogen photoproduction from salt water was successfully developed and this was recycled several times over a one month period using both free cells and immobilized cells in both indoor and outdoor under natural sunlight. According to these experiments, a prototype floating hydrogen production system was designed for further development of the biosolar hydrogen production system.

  10. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) inhibition of the dissolved inorganic carbon concentrating process in unicellular green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution, for measuring K{sub 0.5}(CO{sub 2} + HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K{sub i}(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO{sub 2} uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar NaHCO{sub 3}), and the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation with 100 micromolar ({sup 14}C)HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O{sub 2} evolution and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO{sub 3}. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO{sub 2} accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  11. Salicylhydroxamic Acid (SHAM) Inhibition of the Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Concentrating Process in Unicellular Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Goyal, A; Tolbert, N E

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O(2) evolution, for measuring K(0.5)(CO(2) + HCO(3) (-)) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO(3) (-) to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K(1)(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO(2) uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O(2) evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar Na-HCO(3)), and the rate of (14)CO(2) fixation with 100 micromolar [(14)C] HCO(3) (-). Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O(2) evolution and (14)CO(2)-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO(3). Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO(2) accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  12. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the first ARA6 homologue, a RAB5 GTPase, from green algae.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Geretschlaeger, Anja; Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Hammerl, Peter; Tenhaken, Raimund; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2013-12-01

    RAB5 GTPases are important regulators of endosomal membrane traffic in yeast, plants, and animals. A specific subgroup of this family, the ARA6 group, has been described in land plants including bryophytes, lycophytes, and flowering plants. Here, we report on the isolation of an ARA6 homologue in a green alga. CaARA6 (CaRABF1) from Chara australis, a member of the Characeae that is a close relative of land plants, encodes a polypeptide of 237 aa with a calculated molecular mass of 25.4 kDa, which is highly similar to ARA6 members from Arabidopsis thaliana and other land plants and has GTPase activity. When expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells, fluorescently tagged CaARA6 labelled organelles with diameters between 0.2 and 1.2 µm, which co-localized with fluorescently tagged AtARA6 known to be present on multivesicular endosomes. Mutations in the membrane-anchoring and GTP-binding sites altered the localization of CaARA6 comparable to that of A. thaliana ARA6 (RABF1). In characean internodal cells, confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy with antibodies against AtARA6 and CaARA6 revealed ARA6 epitopes not only at multivesicular endosomes but also at the plasma membrane, including convoluted domains (charasomes), and at the trans-Golgi network. Our findings demonstrate that ARA6-like proteins have a more ancient origin than previously thought. They indicate further that ARA6-like proteins could have different functions in spite of the high similarity between characean algae and flowering plants.

  13. Effects of temperature on the astaxanthin productivity and light harvesting characteristics of the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Luca; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-03-01

    The green alga Haematococcus pluvialis, which accumulates astaxanthin at an optimal temperature of 20°C, was cultivated under temperatures of 20°C, 23.5°C, 27°C, and 30.5°C, in order to assess the effects on algal metabolism during the growth phase. The culture growth rate declined with above-optimal increases in temperature, and the final maximum cell concentration at 30.5°C reached only 35% of that attained at 20°C. On the contrary, the biomass productivity was increased under all the high-temperature conditions, probably reflecting the metabolism switch from cell duplication to energy accumulation that is typically observed in algal cultures subjected to environmental stress. Moreover, an increase in the light-harvesting capability of the alga was observed by means of the total pigment balance and the photosynthesis-intensity (PI) curve measured under the different cultivation conditions. Cultures kept at higher temperatures were able to better harvest and utilize the impinging light due to photo-acclimation. Finally, the differences in the astaxanthin metabolism were elucidated by subjecting the cultures to nitrogen starvation at 20°C and 27°C. In the culture at 27°C, a 1.4-fold increase in the astaxanthin productivity was observed when compared to that at 20°C, and the latter required almost two-fold more energy for the astaxanthin production compared with the 27°C culture. PMID:25441445

  14. QSAR analysis and specific endpoints for classifying the physiological modes of action of biocides in synchronous green algae.

    PubMed

    Neuwoehner, Judith; Junghans, Marion; Koller, Mirjam; Escher, Beate I

    2008-10-20

    We propose the use of additional physiological endpoints in the 24h growth inhibition test with synchronous cultures of Scenedesmus vacuolatus for the classification of physiological modes of toxic action of chemicals in green algae. The classification scheme is illustrated on the example of one baseline toxicant (3-nitroaniline) and five biocides (irgarol, diuron, Sea-Nine, tributyltin (TBT) and norflurazon). The well-established endpoint of inhibition of reproduction is used for an analysis of the degree of specificity of toxicity by comparing the experimental data with predictions from a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for baseline toxicity (narcosis). For those compounds with a toxic ratio greater than 10, i.e. a 10 times higher effect in reproduction than predicted by baseline toxicity, additionally the physiological endpoints inhibition of photosynthesis, cell division and cell volume growth were experimentally assessed. Depending on the relative sensitivity of the different endpoints the chemicals were classified into five different classes of modes of toxic action using a flow chart that was developed in the present study. The advantage of the novel classification scheme is the simplicity of the experimental approach. For the determination of the inhibition of reproduction, the cell size and numbers are quantified with a particle analyzer. This information can be used to derive also the physiological endpoints of cell volume growth and inhibition of cell division. The only additional measurement is the inhibition of the photosynthesis efficiency, which can be easily performed using the non-invasive saturation pulse method and pulse-modulated chlorophyll fluorometry with the Tox-Y-PAM instrument. This mechanistic approach offers a great future potential in ecotoxicology for the physiological mode of action classification of chemicals in algae, which should be a crucial step considered in the risk assessment of chemicals.

  15. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the first ARA6 homologue, a RAB5 GTPase, from green algae.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Geretschlaeger, Anja; Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Hammerl, Peter; Tenhaken, Raimund; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2013-12-01

    RAB5 GTPases are important regulators of endosomal membrane traffic in yeast, plants, and animals. A specific subgroup of this family, the ARA6 group, has been described in land plants including bryophytes, lycophytes, and flowering plants. Here, we report on the isolation of an ARA6 homologue in a green alga. CaARA6 (CaRABF1) from Chara australis, a member of the Characeae that is a close relative of land plants, encodes a polypeptide of 237 aa with a calculated molecular mass of 25.4 kDa, which is highly similar to ARA6 members from Arabidopsis thaliana and other land plants and has GTPase activity. When expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells, fluorescently tagged CaARA6 labelled organelles with diameters between 0.2 and 1.2 µm, which co-localized with fluorescently tagged AtARA6 known to be present on multivesicular endosomes. Mutations in the membrane-anchoring and GTP-binding sites altered the localization of CaARA6 comparable to that of A. thaliana ARA6 (RABF1). In characean internodal cells, confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy with antibodies against AtARA6 and CaARA6 revealed ARA6 epitopes not only at multivesicular endosomes but also at the plasma membrane, including convoluted domains (charasomes), and at the trans-Golgi network. Our findings demonstrate that ARA6-like proteins have a more ancient origin than previously thought. They indicate further that ARA6-like proteins could have different functions in spite of the high similarity between characean algae and flowering plants. PMID:24127512

  16. QSAR analysis and specific endpoints for classifying the physiological modes of action of biocides in synchronous green algae.

    PubMed

    Neuwoehner, Judith; Junghans, Marion; Koller, Mirjam; Escher, Beate I

    2008-10-20

    We propose the use of additional physiological endpoints in the 24h growth inhibition test with synchronous cultures of Scenedesmus vacuolatus for the classification of physiological modes of toxic action of chemicals in green algae. The classification scheme is illustrated on the example of one baseline toxicant (3-nitroaniline) and five biocides (irgarol, diuron, Sea-Nine, tributyltin (TBT) and norflurazon). The well-established endpoint of inhibition of reproduction is used for an analysis of the degree of specificity of toxicity by comparing the experimental data with predictions from a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for baseline toxicity (narcosis). For those compounds with a toxic ratio greater than 10, i.e. a 10 times higher effect in reproduction than predicted by baseline toxicity, additionally the physiological endpoints inhibition of photosynthesis, cell division and cell volume growth were experimentally assessed. Depending on the relative sensitivity of the different endpoints the chemicals were classified into five different classes of modes of toxic action using a flow chart that was developed in the present study. The advantage of the novel classification scheme is the simplicity of the experimental approach. For the determination of the inhibition of reproduction, the cell size and numbers are quantified with a particle analyzer. This information can be used to derive also the physiological endpoints of cell volume growth and inhibition of cell division. The only additional measurement is the inhibition of the photosynthesis efficiency, which can be easily performed using the non-invasive saturation pulse method and pulse-modulated chlorophyll fluorometry with the Tox-Y-PAM instrument. This mechanistic approach offers a great future potential in ecotoxicology for the physiological mode of action classification of chemicals in algae, which should be a crucial step considered in the risk assessment of chemicals. PMID:18789546

  17. Green energy from marine algae: biogas production and composition from the anaerobic digestion of Irish seaweed species.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, C H; Bartlett, J

    2013-01-01

    Marine algae have emerged as an alternative feedstock for the production of a number of renewable fuels, including biogas. In addition to energy potential, other characteristics make them attractive as an energy source, including their ability to absorb carbon dioxide (CO2), higher productivity rates than land-based crops and the lack of water use or land competition. For Ireland, biofuels from marine algae can play an important role by reducing imports of fossil fuels as well as providing the necessary energy in rural communities. In this study, five potential seaweed species common in Irish waters, Saccorhiza polyschides, Ulva sp., Laminaria digitata, Fucus serratus and Saccharina latissima, were co-digested individually with bovine slurry. Batch reactors of 120ml and 1000ml were set up and incubated at 35 degrees C to investigate their suitability for production of biogas. Digesters fed with S. latissima produced the maximum methane yield (335 ml g volatile solids(-1) (g(VS)(-1) followed by S. polyschides with 255 ml g(VS)(-1). L. digitata produced 246ml g(VS)(-1) and the lowest yields were from the green seaweed Ulva sp. 191ml g(VS)(-1). The methane and CO2 percentages ranged between 50-72% and 10-45%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the seaweed species investigated are good feedstocks candidates for the production of biogas and methane as a source of energy. Their use on a large-scale process will require further investigation to increase yields and reduce production costs.

  18. Stable transformation and reverse genetic analysis of Penium margaritaceum: a platform for studies of charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Fei, Zhangjun; Andreas, Amanda; Willats, William G T; Domozych, David S; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-02-01

    The charophyte green algae (CGA, Streptophyta, Viridiplantae) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the immediate ancestors of land plants but, paradoxically, are less well-studied than the other major plant lineages. This is particularly true in the context of functional genomic studies, where the lack of an efficient protocol for their stable genetic transformation has been a major obstacle. Observations of extant CGA species suggest the existence of some of the evolutionary adaptations that had to occur for land colonization; however, to date, there has been no robust experimental platform to address this genetically. We present a protocol for high-throughput Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Penium margaritaceum, a unicellular CGA species. The versatility of Penium as a model for studying various aspects of plant cell biology and development was illustrated through non-invasive visualization of protein localization and dynamics in living cells. In addition, the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) for reverse genetic studies was demonstrated by targeting genes associated with cell wall modification (pectin methylesterase) and biosynthesis (cellulose synthase). This provided evidence supporting current models of cell wall assembly and inter-polymer interactions that were based on studies of land plants, but in this case using direct observation in vivo. This new functional genomics platform has broad potential applications, including studies of plant organismal biology and the evolutionary innovations required for transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitats. PMID:24308430

  19. Stable transformation and reverse genetic analysis of Penium margaritaceum: a platform for studies of charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Fei, Zhangjun; Andreas, Amanda; Willats, William G T; Domozych, David S; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-02-01

    The charophyte green algae (CGA, Streptophyta, Viridiplantae) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the immediate ancestors of land plants but, paradoxically, are less well-studied than the other major plant lineages. This is particularly true in the context of functional genomic studies, where the lack of an efficient protocol for their stable genetic transformation has been a major obstacle. Observations of extant CGA species suggest the existence of some of the evolutionary adaptations that had to occur for land colonization; however, to date, there has been no robust experimental platform to address this genetically. We present a protocol for high-throughput Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Penium margaritaceum, a unicellular CGA species. The versatility of Penium as a model for studying various aspects of plant cell biology and development was illustrated through non-invasive visualization of protein localization and dynamics in living cells. In addition, the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) for reverse genetic studies was demonstrated by targeting genes associated with cell wall modification (pectin methylesterase) and biosynthesis (cellulose synthase). This provided evidence supporting current models of cell wall assembly and inter-polymer interactions that were based on studies of land plants, but in this case using direct observation in vivo. This new functional genomics platform has broad potential applications, including studies of plant organismal biology and the evolutionary innovations required for transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitats.

  20. In vitro and in vivo safety assessment of edible blue-green algae, Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing and Spirulina plantensis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Park, Youngki; Cassada, David A.; Snow, Daniel D.; Rogers, Douglas G.; Lee, Jiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Blue-green algae (BGA) have been consumed as food and herbal medicine for centuries. However, safety for their consumption has not been well investigated. This study was undertaken to evaluate in vitro and in vivo toxicity of cultivated Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (NO) and Spirulina platensis (SP). Neither NO nor SP contained detectable levels of microcystin (MC)-LA, MC-RR, MC-LW and MC-LR by LC/MS/MS. Cell viability remained ~70-80% when HepG2 cells were incubated with 0-500 μg/ml of hexane, chloroform, methanol and water-extractable fractions of NO and SP. Four-week-old male and female C57BL/6J mice were fed an AIN-93G/M diet supplemented with 0, 2.5% or 5% of NO and SP (wt/wt) for 6 months. For both genders, BGA-rich diets did not induce noticeable abnormality in weight gain and plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations except a significant increase in plasma ALT levels by 2.5% NO supplementation in male mice at 6 month. Histopathological analysis of livers, however, indicated that BGA did not cause significant liver damage compared with controls. In conclusion, our results suggest that NO and SP are free of MC and the long-term dietary supplementation of up to 5% of the BGA may be consumed without evident toxic side-effects. PMID:21473896

  1. Flash kinetics and light intensity dependence of oxygen evolution in the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Ley, A C; Babcock, G T; Sauer, K

    1975-05-15

    Patterns of oxygen evolution in flashing light for the glue-green alga Anacystis nidulans are compared with those for broken spinach chloroplasts and whole cells of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The oscillations of oxygen yield with flash number that occur in both Anacystis and Chlorella, display a greater degree of damping than do those of isolated spinach chloroplasts. The increase in damping results from a two- to threefold increase in the fraction (alpha) of reaction centers "missed" by a flash. The increase in alpha cannot be explained by non-saturing flash intensities or by the dark reduction of the oxidized intermediates formed by the flash. Anaerobic conditions markedly increase alpha in Anacystis and Chlorella but have no effect on alpha in broken spinach chloroplasts. The results signify that the mechanism of charge separation and water oxidation involved in all three orgainsms is the same, but that the pool of secondary electron acceptors between Photosystem II and Photosystem I is more reduced in the dark, in the algal cells, than in the isolated spinach chloroplasts. Oxygen evolution in flashing light for Anacystis and Chlorella show light saturation curves for the oxygen yield of the third flash (Y3) that differ markedly from those of the steady-state flashes(YS). In experiments in which all flashes are uniformly attenuated, Y3 requires nearly twice as much light as YS to reach half-saturation. Under these conditions Y3 has a sigmoidal dependence on intensity, while that of YS is hyperbolic. These differences depend on the number of flashes attenuated. When any one of the first three flashes is attenuated, the variation of Y3 with intensity resembles that of YS. When two of the first three flashes are attenuated, Y3 is intermediate in shape between the two extremes. A quantitative interpretation of these results based on the model of Kok et al. (Kik, B., Forbush, B.and McGloin, M. (1970) Photochem. Photobiol. 14, 307-321) fits the experimental

  2. The liverwort Pellia endiviifolia shares microtranscriptomic traits that are common to green algae and land plants

    PubMed Central

    Alaba, Sylwia; Piszczalka, Pawel; Pietrykowska, Halina; Pacak, Andrzej M; Sierocka, Izabela; Nuc, Przemyslaw W; Singh, Kashmir; Plewka, Patrycja; Sulkowska, Aleksandra; Jarmolowski, Artur; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2015-01-01

    Liverworts are the most basal group of extant land plants. Nonetheless, the molecular biology of liverworts is poorly understood. Gene expression has been studied in only one species, Marchantia polymorpha. In particular, no microRNA (miRNA) sequences from liverworts have been reported. Here, Illumina-based next-generation sequencing was employed to identify small RNAs, and analyze the transcriptome and the degradome of Pellia endiviifolia. Three hundred and eleven conserved miRNA plant families were identified, and 42 new liverwort-specific miRNAs were discovered. The RNA degradome analysis revealed that target mRNAs of only three miRNAs (miR160, miR166, and miR408) have been conserved between liverworts and other land plants. New targets were identified for the remaining conserved miRNAs. Moreover, the analysis of the degradome permitted the identification of targets for 13 novel liverwort-specific miRNAs. Interestingly, three of the liverwort microRNAs show high similarity to previously reported miRNAs from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This is the first observation of miRNAs that exist both in a representative alga and in the liverwort P. endiviifolia but are not present in land plants. The results of the analysis of the P. endivifolia microtranscriptome support the conclusions of previous studies that placed liverworts at the root of the land plant evolutionary tree of life. PMID:25530158

  3. A simple, low-cost method for chloroplast transformation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Economou, Chloe; Wannathong, Thanyanan; Szaub, Joanna; Purton, Saul

    2014-01-01

    The availability of routine techniques for the genetic manipulation of the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has allowed a plethora of reverse-genetic studies of chloroplast biology using this alga as a model organism. These studies range from fundamental investigations of chloroplast gene function and regulation to sophisticated metabolic engineering programs and to the development of the algal chloroplast as a platform for producing high-value recombinant proteins. The established method for delivering transforming DNA into the Chlamydomonas chloroplast involves microparticle bombardment, with the selection of transformant lines most commonly involving the use of antibiotic resistance markers. In this chapter we describe a simpler and cheaper delivery method in which cell/DNA suspensions are agitated with glass beads: a method that is more commonly used for nuclear transformation of Chlamydomonas. Furthermore, we highlight the use of an expression vector (pASapI) that employs an endogenous gene as a selectable marker, thereby avoiding the contentious issue of antibiotic resistance determinants in transgenic lines.

  4. Green alga Ulva pertusa--a new source of bioactive compounds with antialgal activity.

    PubMed

    Ying-ying, Sun; Hui, Wang; Gan-lin, Guo; Yin-fang, Pu; Bin-lun, Yan; Chang-hai, Wang

    2015-07-01

    We tested the effects of solvent fractions (FA, FB, FC, and FD), which partitioned by liquid-liquid extraction from the methanol extract of Ulva pertusa, on the growth of red tide microalgae (Karenia mikimitoi, Skeletonema costatum, Alexandrium tamarense, Heterosigma akashiwo, Prorocentrum donghaiense), and FA, FB, and FC exhibited significantly antialgal activity. The chemical constituent analysis showed the existence of bioactive compounds such as phenols and alkaloids. Further, four solvent fractions were applied to silica gel column and repeated preparative TLC to produce 13 samples and their purity qualified as thin-layer chromatographic grade. Among these purified samples, FA111, FB411, FC411, FD111, and FD211 exhibited stronger antialgal activity. Furthermore, their functional groups were analyzed by colorimetric methods and UV spectra data. FD111 and FD211 were temptatively identified as alkaloids; the others were initially identified as phenolic acids. This is a preliminary study and the structure identification of these purified samples requires further investigation. While concentration of these purified samples in this algae was very small, they showed excellent effects against red tide microalgae. PMID:25724801

  5. The liverwort Pellia endiviifolia shares microtranscriptomic traits that are common to green algae and land plants.

    PubMed

    Alaba, Sylwia; Piszczalka, Pawel; Pietrykowska, Halina; Pacak, Andrzej M; Sierocka, Izabela; Nuc, Przemyslaw W; Singh, Kashmir; Plewka, Patrycja; Sulkowska, Aleksandra; Jarmolowski, Artur; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2015-04-01

    Liverworts are the most basal group of extant land plants. Nonetheless, the molecular biology of liverworts is poorly understood. Gene expression has been studied in only one species, Marchantia polymorpha. In particular, no microRNA (miRNA) sequences from liverworts have been reported. Here, Illumina-based next-generation sequencing was employed to identify small RNAs, and analyze the transcriptome and the degradome of Pellia endiviifolia. Three hundred and eleven conserved miRNA plant families were identified, and 42 new liverwort-specific miRNAs were discovered. The RNA degradome analysis revealed that target mRNAs of only three miRNAs (miR160, miR166, and miR408) have been conserved between liverworts and other land plants. New targets were identified for the remaining conserved miRNAs. Moreover, the analysis of the degradome permitted the identification of targets for 13 novel liverwort-specific miRNAs. Interestingly, three of the liverwort microRNAs show high similarity to previously reported miRNAs from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This is the first observation of miRNAs that exist both in a representative alga and in the liverwort P. endiviifolia but are not present in land plants. The results of the analysis of the P. endivifolia microtranscriptome support the conclusions of previous studies that placed liverworts at the root of the land plant evolutionary tree of life. PMID:25530158

  6. A simple, low-cost method for chloroplast transformation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Economou, Chloe; Wannathong, Thanyanan; Szaub, Joanna; Purton, Saul

    2014-01-01

    The availability of routine techniques for the genetic manipulation of the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has allowed a plethora of reverse-genetic studies of chloroplast biology using this alga as a model organism. These studies range from fundamental investigations of chloroplast gene function and regulation to sophisticated metabolic engineering programs and to the development of the algal chloroplast as a platform for producing high-value recombinant proteins. The established method for delivering transforming DNA into the Chlamydomonas chloroplast involves microparticle bombardment, with the selection of transformant lines most commonly involving the use of antibiotic resistance markers. In this chapter we describe a simpler and cheaper delivery method in which cell/DNA suspensions are agitated with glass beads: a method that is more commonly used for nuclear transformation of Chlamydomonas. Furthermore, we highlight the use of an expression vector (pASapI) that employs an endogenous gene as a selectable marker, thereby avoiding the contentious issue of antibiotic resistance determinants in transgenic lines. PMID:24599870

  7. The liverwort Pellia endiviifolia shares microtranscriptomic traits that are common to green algae and land plants.

    PubMed

    Alaba, Sylwia; Piszczalka, Pawel; Pietrykowska, Halina; Pacak, Andrzej M; Sierocka, Izabela; Nuc, Przemyslaw W; Singh, Kashmir; Plewka, Patrycja; Sulkowska, Aleksandra; Jarmolowski, Artur; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2015-04-01

    Liverworts are the most basal group of extant land plants. Nonetheless, the molecular biology of liverworts is poorly understood. Gene expression has been studied in only one species, Marchantia polymorpha. In particular, no microRNA (miRNA) sequences from liverworts have been reported. Here, Illumina-based next-generation sequencing was employed to identify small RNAs, and analyze the transcriptome and the degradome of Pellia endiviifolia. Three hundred and eleven conserved miRNA plant families were identified, and 42 new liverwort-specific miRNAs were discovered. The RNA degradome analysis revealed that target mRNAs of only three miRNAs (miR160, miR166, and miR408) have been conserved between liverworts and other land plants. New targets were identified for the remaining conserved miRNAs. Moreover, the analysis of the degradome permitted the identification of targets for 13 novel liverwort-specific miRNAs. Interestingly, three of the liverwort microRNAs show high similarity to previously reported miRNAs from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This is the first observation of miRNAs that exist both in a representative alga and in the liverwort P. endiviifolia but are not present in land plants. The results of the analysis of the P. endivifolia microtranscriptome support the conclusions of previous studies that placed liverworts at the root of the land plant evolutionary tree of life.

  8. Marine green algae Codium iyengarii as a good bio-sorbent for elimination of reactive black 5 from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Azmat, Rafia

    2014-09-01

    The green seaweeds Codium iyengarii (C. iyengarii) was used to prepare as an adsorbent surface for the deletion of Reactive Black 5 (RB 5) from aqueous solution via adsorption. The batch technique was adopted under the optimal condition of amount of adsorbent, agitation time, concentration of dye, and at neutral and low pH. The depletion in concentration of the dye was monitored by Schimadzo 180 AUV/Visible spectrophotometer. It was initially monolayer adsorption, which showed multilayered formation later on with the passage of time at low and neutral pH. The Results displayed that adsorptive ability of C. iyengarii was 1.95-3.82mg/g with an elevation in primary application of dye contents (50ppm-70 ppm). The elimination data were well stable into the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm equations. The Langmuir (R2=0.9848) and Freundlich (R2=0.9441) constants for biosorption of RB 5 on green algae were determined. The coefficient relation values suggested that the Langmuir isotherm was well fitted. It explained the interaction of surface molecules, which helps in well organization of dye molecules in a monolayer formation initially on algal biomass. The pseudo first and second order rate equations were applied to link the investigational statistics and found that the second order rate expression was found to be more suitable for both the models. The absorption spectrum of RB 5 before and after adsorption with respect to time was monitored which clearly indicate that C. iyengarii was much effective surface at very low quantity. PMID:25176238

  9. On the selective adsorption of cations in the cell wall of the green alga Valonia utricularis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesseler, H.

    1980-06-01

    The selective adsorption of the cations Na+, K+, Mg++ and Ca++ by the cell wall of the Mediterranean alga Valonia utricularis (Siphonocladales, Chlorophyceae) from sea water of 40 %. S was investigated by extraction of cell-wall preparations, eluted before in 1.1 mol methanol (adjusted to pH 8) with 0.1 n formic acid in a Soxhlet apparatus. Na+ and K+ were determined by flame photometry, Mg++ and Ca++ by complexometric titration with EDTA. From calculation of the dry weight:fresh weight ratios and the chloride determinations in the eluates, the Donnan free-space fraction of the total cell-wall volume was calculated to about 35 %, and the analytical results of the cation concentrations in the extracts expressed as μVal cm-3 DFS. This calculation is based on the assumption that the acidic groups of the noncellulosic matrix material, carrying negative charges by dissociation at the reaction of sea water (ph about 8) are responsible for the adsorption of cations by exhibition of a Donnan effect. The results obtained show clearly that besides the divalent cations Mg++ and Ca++, which according to the physico-chemical laws of the Donnan distribution must be relatively accumulated to the second power of the monovalent ones, potassium is also enriched by selective adsorption, and the K+:Na+ ratio increased significantly compared with that in sea water. This seems to indicate that the strength of attraction between the cations and the negative sites is dependent on the radii of the ions and the state of hydration and/or polarisation of the ions and binding sites.

  10. RNA silencing of hydrogenase(-like) genes and investigation of their physiological roles in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Godman, James E; Molnár, Attila; Baulcombe, David C; Balk, Janneke

    2010-11-01

    The genome of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii encodes two [FeFe]-hydrogenases, HydA1 and HydA2, and the hydrogenase-like protein HYD3. The unique combination of these proteins in one eukaryotic cell allows for direct comparison of their in vivo functions, which have not been established for HydA2 and HYD3. Using an artificial microRNA silencing method developed recently, the expression of HydA1, HydA2 and HYD3 was specifically down-regulated. Silencing of HydA1 resulted in 4-fold lower hydrogenase protein and activity under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, silencing of HydA2 or HYD3 did not affect hydrogen production. Cell lines with strongly (>90%) decreased HYD3 transcript levels grew more slowly than wild-type. The activity of aldehyde oxidase, a cytosolic Fe-S enzyme, was decreased in HYD3-knockdown lines, whereas Fe-S dependent activities in the chloroplast and mitochondria were unaffected. In addition, the HYD3-knockdown lines grew poorly on hypoxanthine, indicating impaired function of xanthine dehydrogenase, another cytosolic Fe-S enzyme. The expression levels of selected genes in response to hypoxia were unaltered upon HYD3 silencing. Together, our results clearly distinguish the cellular roles of HydA1 and HYD3, and indicate that HYD3, like its yeast and human homologues, has an evolutionary conserved role in the biogenesis or maintenance of cytosolic Fe-S proteins.

  11. Adaptability of free-floating green tide algae in the Yellow Sea to variable temperature and light intensity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianjun; Zhang, Jianheng; Huo, Yuanzi; Zhou, Lingjie; Wu, Qing; Chen, Liping; Yu, Kefeng; He, Peimin

    2015-12-30

    In this study, the influence of temperature and light intensity on the growth of seedlings and adults of four species of green tide algae (Ulvaprolifera, Ulvacompressa, Ulva flexuosa and Ulvalinza) from the Yellow Sea was evaluated. The results indicated that the specific growth rate (SGR) of seedlings was much higher than that of adults for the four species. The adaptability of U. prolifera is much wider: Adult daily SGRs were the highest among the four species at 15-20 °C with 10-600 μmol · m(-2) · s(-1) and 25-30 °C with 200-600 μmol · m(-2) · s(-1). SGRs were 1.5-3.5 times greater than the other three species at 15-25 °C with 200-600 μmol · m(-2) · s(-1). These results indicate that U. prolifera has better tolerance to high temperature and light intensity than the other three species, which may in part explain why only U. prolifera undergoes large-scale outbreaks and floats to the Qingdao coast while the other three species decline and disappear at the early stage of blooming.

  12. Comparative study of aluminum and copper transport and toxicity in an acid-tolerant freshwater green alga

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, B.R.; Popescu, N.A.; Wood, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    A comparative study of the transport and toxicity of one nonessential metal (aluminum), and one essential metal (copper), has been performed with the acid-tolerant green alga Chlorella saccarophila. This organism was isolated from a naturally acidified lake and grows well in laboratory cultures at pH 3.0. Our results show that the fast-exchange ions Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, and Na/sup +/ offer some protection against both Al/sup 3 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ toxicity whereas K/sup +/ protects against Al/sup 3 +/ toxicity but enhances Cu/sup 2 +/ toxicity. Plasma emission spectroscopy shows that complexation of Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ to cell surfaces is important in preventing toxic cytoplasmic levels of these metals, both in culture media and in acid mine water. The aqueous ion chemistry for toxic metal uptake is simplified considerably in acidic conditions, where competing hydrolysis and precipitation reactions are eliminated. Therefore, simple competitive experiments can be performed quantitatively. 12 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  13. Toxicant Induced Changes on Delayed Fluorescence Decay Kinetics of Cyanobacteria and Green Algae: A Rapid and Sensitive Biotest

    PubMed Central

    Leunert, Franziska; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Gerhardt, Volkmar; Eckert, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Algal tests have developed into routine tools for testing toxicity of pollutants in aquatic environments. Meanwhile, in addition to algal growth rates, an increasing number of fluorescence based methods are used for rapid and sensitive toxicity measures. The present study stresses the suitability of delayed fluorescence (DF) as a promising parameter for biotests. DF is based on the recombination fluorescence at the reaction centre of photosystem II, which is emitted only by photosynthetically active cells. We analyzed the effects of three chemicals (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 3,5 Dichlorophenol (3,5 DCP) and copper) on the shape of the DF decay kinetics for potential use in phytoplankton toxicity tests. The short incubation tests were done with four phytoplankton species, with special emphasis on the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. All species exhibited a high sensitivity to DCMU, but cyanobacteria were more affected by copper and less by 3,5 DCP than the tested green algae. Analyses of changes in the DF decay curve in response to the added chemicals indicated the feasibility of the DF decay approach as a rapid and sensitive testing tool. PMID:23646185

  14. The green alga Zygogonium ericetorum (Zygnematophyceae, Charophyta) shows high iron and aluminium tolerance: protection mechanisms and photosynthetic performance.

    PubMed

    Herburger, Klaus; Remias, Daniel; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Streptophyte green algae, ancestors of Embryophytes, occur frequently in terrestrial habitats being exposed to high light intensities, water scarcity and potentially toxic metal cations under acidic conditions. The filamentous Zygogonium ericetorum synthesizes a purple vacuolar ferrous pigment, which is lost after aplanospore formation. However, it is unknown whether this cellular reorganization also removes excessive iron from the protoplast and how Z. ericetorum copes with high concentrations of aluminium. Here we show that aplanospore formation shifts iron into the extracellular space of the algal filament. Upon germination of aplanospores, aluminium is bound in the parental cell wall. Both processes reduce iron and aluminium in unpigmented filaments. Comparison of the photosynthetic oxygen production in response to light and temperature gradients in two different Z. ericetorum strains from an Austrian alpine and a Scottish highland habitat revealed lower values in the latter strain. In contrast, the Scottish strain showed a higher optimum quantum yield of PSII during desiccation stress followed by rehydration. Furthermore, pigmented filaments of both strains exhibited a higher light and temperature dependent oxygen production when compared to the unpigmented phenotype. Our results demonstrate a high metal tolerance of Z. ericetorum, which is crucial for surviving in acidic terrestrial habitats. PMID:27178434

  15. Effect-directed analysis of contaminated sediments with partition-based dosing using green algae cell multiplication inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bandow, Nicole; Altenburger, Rolf; Streck, Georg; Brack, Werner

    2009-10-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) has been frequently and successfully used to identify key toxicants in sediment extracts. However, by disregarding bioavailability this approach may lead to a biased prioritisation of fractions and toxicants with respect to hazards and risks. To overcome this problem the present EDA of sediment components from the Bílina river (Most Czech Republic), that inhibit growth of the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus, applies a novel partition-based dosing technique to prioritize and identify major toxic fractions and compounds in comparison to conventional solvent dosing. The novel dosing technique is based on partitioning from loaded silicone rods to the aqueous phase similar to partition processes that determine exposure in native sediment-water systems. In the present study the application of partition-based dosing had a big influence suggesting polar compounds such as triclosan as key toxicants while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions did not exhibit significant effects. In contrast, conventional dosing prioritized mainly PAHs in agreement with previous studies. For both approaches individual toxicants could be confirmed quantitatively based on the index of confirmation quality (ICQ), which compares the effect of fractions and artificial mixtures of identified and quantified toxicants over the full range of effect levels. PMID:19848144

  16. Influence of the CO2 absorbent monoethanolamine on growth and carbon fixation by the green alga Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wookjin; Kim, Garam; Lee, Kisay

    2012-09-01

    The influence of monoethanolamine (MEA) as a CO(2) absorbent on photoautotrophic culture of CO(2)-fixing microalgae was investigated. When 300 ppm MEA (4.92 mM) was added to blank culture medium, the dissolved inorganic carbon and the molar absorption ratio increased to 51.0mg/L and 0.34 mol CO2 = mol MEA, respectively, which was an almost 6-fold increase in CO(2) solubility. When free MEA up to 300 mg/L was added to a green alga Scenedesmus sp. culture that was supplied 5% (v/v) CO(2) at 0.1 vvm, both cell growth rate and final cell density were enhanced compared to when no MEA was added. The cell growth rate reached 288.6 mg/L/d, which was equivalent to 539.6 mg-CO(2)/L/d as a CO(2)-fixation rate and enhancement of about 63.0% compared to not adding MEA. Chlorophyll-a content and nitrate consumption rate increased correspondingly. MEA doses higher than 400mg/L inhibited cell growth, probably due to toxicity of the carbamate intermediate.

  17. Identification and characterization of a new strain of the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina (Teod.) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Polle, Jurgen E W; Struwe, Lena; Jin, Eonseon

    2008-05-01

    The unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina is a halotolerant eukaryotic organism. Its halophytic properties provide an important advantage for open pond mass cultivation, since D. salina can be grown selectively. D. salina was originally described by E. C. Teodoresco in 1905. Since that time, numerous isolates of D. salina have been identified from hypersaline environments on different continents. The new Dunaliella strain used for this study was isolated from the salt farm area of the west coastal side of South Korea. Cells of the new strain were approximately oval- or pear-shaped (approximately 16-24 microm long and 10-15 microm wide), and contained one pyrenoid, cytoplasmatic granules, and no visible eyespot. Although levels of beta-carotene per cell were relatively low in cells grown at salinities between 0.5 to 2.5 M NaCl, cells grown at 4.5 M NaCl contained about a ten-fold increase in cellular levels of beta-carotene, which demonstrated that cells of the new Korean strain of Dunaliella can overaccumulate beta- carotene in response to salt stress. Analysis of the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of the new Korean isolate showed that it is in the same clade as D. salina. Consequently, based on comparative cell morphology, biochemistry, and molecular phylogeny, the new Dunaliella isolate from South Korea was classified as D. salina KCTC10654BP. PMID:18633277

  18. The green alga Zygogonium ericetorum (Zygnematophyceae, Charophyta) shows high iron and aluminium tolerance: protection mechanisms and photosynthetic performance

    PubMed Central

    Herburger, Klaus; Remias, Daniel; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Streptophyte green algae, ancestors of Embryophytes, occur frequently in terrestrial habitats being exposed to high light intensities, water scarcity and potentially toxic metal cations under acidic conditions. The filamentous Zygogonium ericetorum synthesizes a purple vacuolar ferrous pigment, which is lost after aplanospore formation. However, it is unknown whether this cellular reorganization also removes excessive iron from the protoplast and how Z. ericetorum copes with high concentrations of aluminium. Here we show that aplanospore formation shifts iron into the extracellular space of the algal filament. Upon germination of aplanospores, aluminium is bound in the parental cell wall. Both processes reduce iron and aluminium in unpigmented filaments. Comparison of the photosynthetic oxygen production in response to light and temperature gradients in two different Z. ericetorum strains from an Austrian alpine and a Scottish highland habitat revealed lower values in the latter strain. In contrast, the Scottish strain showed a higher optimum quantum yield of PSII during desiccation stress followed by rehydration. Furthermore, pigmented filaments of both strains exhibited a higher light and temperature dependent oxygen production when compared to the unpigmented phenotype. Our results demonstrate a high metal tolerance of Z. ericetorum, which is crucial for surviving in acidic terrestrial habitats. PMID:27178434

  19. The effect of lead on the growth, content of primary metabolites, and antioxidant response of green alga Acutodesmus obliquus (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Piotrowska-Niczyporuk, Alicja; Bajguz, Andrzej; Talarek, Marta; Bralska, Monika; Zambrzycka, Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    Green unicellular alga Acutodesmus obliquus (Turpin) Hegewald et Hanagata (SAG strain no. 276-6) (Chlorophyceae) was used for determination of phytotoxicity of lead (Pb) at the range of concentrations 0.01-500 μM during 7 days of culture. The accumulation of Pb in algal cells was found to be increased in a concentration- and duration-dependent manner. The highest Pb uptake value was obtained in response to 500 μM Pb on the seventh day of cultivation. The decrease in the number and the size of cells and the contents of selected primary metabolites (photosynthetic pigments, monosaccharides, and proteins) in A. obliquus cells were observed under Pb stress. Heavy metal stimulated also formation of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) and oxidative damage as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, the deleterious effects of Pb resulting from the cellular oxidative state can be alleviated by enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbate, glutathione) antioxidant systems. These results suggest that A. obliquus is a promising bioindicator of heavy metal toxicity in aquatic environment, and it has been identified as good scavenger of Pb from aqueous solution. PMID:26233754

  20. The green alga Zygogonium ericetorum (Zygnematophyceae, Charophyta) shows high iron and aluminium tolerance: protection mechanisms and photosynthetic performance.

    PubMed

    Herburger, Klaus; Remias, Daniel; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Streptophyte green algae, ancestors of Embryophytes, occur frequently in terrestrial habitats being exposed to high light intensities, water scarcity and potentially toxic metal cations under acidic conditions. The filamentous Zygogonium ericetorum synthesizes a purple vacuolar ferrous pigment, which is lost after aplanospore formation. However, it is unknown whether this cellular reorganization also removes excessive iron from the protoplast and how Z. ericetorum copes with high concentrations of aluminium. Here we show that aplanospore formation shifts iron into the extracellular space of the algal filament. Upon germination of aplanospores, aluminium is bound in the parental cell wall. Both processes reduce iron and aluminium in unpigmented filaments. Comparison of the photosynthetic oxygen production in response to light and temperature gradients in two different Z. ericetorum strains from an Austrian alpine and a Scottish highland habitat revealed lower values in the latter strain. In contrast, the Scottish strain showed a higher optimum quantum yield of PSII during desiccation stress followed by rehydration. Furthermore, pigmented filaments of both strains exhibited a higher light and temperature dependent oxygen production when compared to the unpigmented phenotype. Our results demonstrate a high metal tolerance of Z. ericetorum, which is crucial for surviving in acidic terrestrial habitats.

  1. Elevated water temperature reduces the acute toxicity of the widely used herbicide diuron to a green alga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Tasmin, Rumana; Shimasaki, Yohei; Tsuyama, Michito; Qiu, Xuchun; Khalil, Fatma; Okino, Nozomu; Yamada, Naotaka; Fukuda, Shinji; Kang, Ik-Joon; Oshima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    In the actual environment, temperatures fluctuate drastically through season or global warming and are thought to affects risk of pollutants for aquatic biota; however, there is no report about the effect of water temperature on toxicity of widely used herbicide diuron to fresh water microalgae. The present research investigated inhibitory effect of diuron on growth and photosynthetic activity of a green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata at five different temperatures (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 °C) for 144 h of exposure. As a result, effective diuron concentrations at which a 50% decrease in algal growth occurred was increased with increasing water temperature ranging from 9.2 to 20.1 μg L(-1) for 72 h and 9.4-28.5 μg L(-1) for 144 h. The photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (F v/F m ratio) was significantly reduced at all temperatures by diuron exposure at 32 μg L(-1) after 72 h. Inhibition rates was significantly increased with decreased water temperature (P < 0.01). Intracellular H2O2 levels as an indicator of oxidative stress were also decreased with increasing temperature in both control and diuron treatment groups and were about 2.5 times higher in diuron treatment groups than that of controls (P < 0.01). Our results suggest water temperatures may affect the toxicokinetics of diuron in freshwater and should therefore be considered in environmental risk assessment. PMID:23872901

  2. Computer simulation of energy migration in the C-phycocyanin of the blue-green algae Agmenellum Quadruplicatum

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, Andrey A.; Borisov, Alexander Yu.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods for simulation of energy migration in the C-phycocyanin fragments of PBS were developed. Both methods are based on the statistical analysis of an excitation behavior in modeling complexes with a limited number (up to hundreds) of chromophores using the Monte-Carlo approach and calculation of migration rates for the system of linear balance equations. Energy migration rates were calculated in the case of C-phycocyanin of the blue-green algae Agmenellum quadruplicatum. The main channels of energy migration were determined in a monomer, trimer, hexamer, and in the rods consisting of 2-4 hexamers. The influence of the “screw” angle between two adjoining trimers of hexamer on the rates of energy migration and on its efficiencies in 1-4 hexamers was also estimated. The analysis was made for the average (random) and real orientation of chromophores in the C-phycocyanin. For both cases the optimal angle values were determined and the one for real C-phycocyanin structure was found to be very close (Δø ≤ 5°) to the optimal angle calculated. PMID:19431892

  3. Electrochemical Potential Gradients of H+, K+, Ca2+, and Cl- across the Tonoplast of the Green Alga Eremosphaera Viridis.

    PubMed Central

    Bethmann, B.; Thaler, M.; Simonis, W.; Schonknecht, G.

    1995-01-01

    Using ion-selective microelectrodes, we measured the activity of H+, K+, Ca2+, and Cl- and the electrical potential both in the vacuole and in the cytoplasm of the unicellular green alga Eremosphaera viridis to obtain comparable values of the named parameters from the same object under identical conditions. The cytosol had a pH of 7.3, and activities of the other ions were 130 mM K+, 160 nM Ca2+, and 2.2 mM Cl-. We observed only small and transient light-dependent changes of the cytosolic Ca2+ activity. The vacuolar K+ activity did not differ significantly from the cytosolic one. The Ca2+ activity inside the vacuole was approximately 200 [mu]M, the pH was 5.0, and the Cl- activity was 6.2 mM. The concentrations of K+, Ca2+, and Cl- in cell extracts were measured by induction-coupled plasma spectroscopy and anion chromatography. This confirmed the vacuolar activities for K+ and Cl- obtained with ion-selective microelectrodes and indicated that approximately 60% of the vacuolar Ca2+ was buffered. The tonoplast potential was vanishingly low ([less than or equal to][plus or minus]2 mV). There was no detectable electrochemical potential gradient for K+ across the tonoplast, but there was, however, an obvious electrochemical potential gradient for Cl- (-26 mV), indicating an active accumulation of Cl- inside the vacuole. PMID:12228672

  4. De novo transcriptomic analysis of hydrogen production in the green alga Chlamydomonas moewusii through RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microalgae can make a significant contribution towards meeting global renewable energy needs in both carbon-based and hydrogen (H2) biofuel. The development of energy-related products from algae could be accelerated with improvements in systems biology tools, and recent advances in sequencing technology provide a platform for enhanced transcriptomic analyses. However, these techniques are still heavily reliant upon available genomic sequence data. Chlamydomonas moewusii is a unicellular green alga capable of evolving molecular H2 under both dark and light anaerobic conditions, and has high hydrogenase activity that can be rapidly induced. However, to date, there is no systematic investigation of transcriptomic profiling during induction of H2 photoproduction in this organism. Results In this work, RNA-Seq was applied to investigate transcriptomic profiles during the dark anaerobic induction of H2 photoproduction. 156 million reads generated from 7 samples were then used for de novo assembly after data trimming. BlastX results against NCBI database and Blast2GO results were used to interpret the functions of the assembled 34,136 contigs, which were then used as the reference contigs for RNA-Seq analysis. Our results indicated that more contigs were differentially expressed during the period of early and higher H2 photoproduction, and fewer contigs were differentially expressed when H2-photoproduction rates decreased. In addition, C. moewusii and C. reinhardtii share core functional pathways, and transcripts for H2 photoproduction and anaerobic metabolite production were identified in both organisms. C. moewusii also possesses similar metabolic flexibility as C. reinhardtii, and the difference between C. moewusii and C. reinhardtii on hydrogenase expression and anaerobic fermentative pathways involved in redox balancing may explain their different profiles of hydrogenase activity and secreted anaerobic metabolites. Conclusions Herein, we have described a

  5. The Evolutionary Relationships between Endosymbiotic Green Algae of Paramecium bursaria Syngens Originating from Different Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria (Ehrenberg 1831), a freshwater ciliate, typically harbors hundreds of green algal symbionts inside the cell. The aim of present study was the molecular identification of newly analyzed P. bursaria symbionts. The second aspect of the present survey was testing a hypothesis whether endosymbionts prefer the specified syngen of the host, and the specified geographical distribution. Ten strains of endosymbionts isolated from strains of P. bursaria originating from different geographical locations were studied. We analyzed for the first time, both the fragment of plastid genome containing 3'rpl36-5' infA genes and a fragment of a nuclear gene encoding large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rDNA). The analysis of the LSU rDNA sequences showed the existence of 3 haplotypes and the haplotype diversity of 0.733, and 8 haplotypes for the 3'rpl36-5' infA gene fragment and haplotype diversity of 0.956. The endosymbionts isolated from P. bursaria strains were identified as Chlorella vulgaris, Ch. variabilis and Micractinium conductrix. There was no correlation between the syngen of P. bursaria and the species of endosymbiont.

  6. Enzymatic hydrolysis and production of bioethanol from common macrophytic green alga Ulva fasciata Delile.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Nitin; Gupta, Vishal; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-12-01

    The green seaweed Ulva which proliferates fast and occurs abundantly worldwide was used as a feedstock for production of ethanol following enzymatic hydrolysis. Among the different cellulases investigated for efficient saccharification, cellulase 22119 showed the highest conversion efficiency of biomass into reducing sugars than Viscozyme L, Cellulase 22086 and 22128. Pre-heat treatment of biomass in aqueous medium at 120°C for 1h followed by incubation in 2% (v/v) enzyme for 36 h at 45°C gave a maximum yield of sugar 206.82±14.96 mg/g. The fermentation of hydrolysate gave ethanol yield of 0.45 g/g reducing sugar accounting for 88.2% conversion efficiency. These values are substantially higher than those of reported so far for both agarophytes and carrageenophytes. It was also confirmed that enzyme can be used twice without compromising on the saccharification efficiency. The findings of this study reveal that Ulva can be a potential feedstock for bioethanol production. PMID:24157682

  7. The Evolutionary Relationships between Endosymbiotic Green Algae of Paramecium bursaria Syngens Originating from Different Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria (Ehrenberg 1831), a freshwater ciliate, typically harbors hundreds of green algal symbionts inside the cell. The aim of present study was the molecular identification of newly analyzed P. bursaria symbionts. The second aspect of the present survey was testing a hypothesis whether endosymbionts prefer the specified syngen of the host, and the specified geographical distribution. Ten strains of endosymbionts isolated from strains of P. bursaria originating from different geographical locations were studied. We analyzed for the first time, both the fragment of plastid genome containing 3'rpl36-5' infA genes and a fragment of a nuclear gene encoding large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rDNA). The analysis of the LSU rDNA sequences showed the existence of 3 haplotypes and the haplotype diversity of 0.733, and 8 haplotypes for the 3'rpl36-5' infA gene fragment and haplotype diversity of 0.956. The endosymbionts isolated from P. bursaria strains were identified as Chlorella vulgaris, Ch. variabilis and Micractinium conductrix. There was no correlation between the syngen of P. bursaria and the species of endosymbiont. PMID:27172712

  8. Enzymatic hydrolysis and production of bioethanol from common macrophytic green alga Ulva fasciata Delile.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Nitin; Gupta, Vishal; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-12-01

    The green seaweed Ulva which proliferates fast and occurs abundantly worldwide was used as a feedstock for production of ethanol following enzymatic hydrolysis. Among the different cellulases investigated for efficient saccharification, cellulase 22119 showed the highest conversion efficiency of biomass into reducing sugars than Viscozyme L, Cellulase 22086 and 22128. Pre-heat treatment of biomass in aqueous medium at 120°C for 1h followed by incubation in 2% (v/v) enzyme for 36 h at 45°C gave a maximum yield of sugar 206.82±14.96 mg/g. The fermentation of hydrolysate gave ethanol yield of 0.45 g/g reducing sugar accounting for 88.2% conversion efficiency. These values are substantially higher than those of reported so far for both agarophytes and carrageenophytes. It was also confirmed that enzyme can be used twice without compromising on the saccharification efficiency. The findings of this study reveal that Ulva can be a potential feedstock for bioethanol production.

  9. Towards elucidation of the toxic mechanism of copper on the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongguang; Zhu, Yanli; Hu, Zhangli; Lei, Anping; Wang, Jiangxin

    2016-09-01

    Toxic effects of copper on aquatic organisms in polluted water bodies have garnered particular attention in recent years. Microalgae play an important role in aquatic ecosystems, and they are sensitive to heavy metal pollution. Thus, it is important to clarify the mechanism of copper toxicity first for ecotoxicology studies. In this study, the physiological, biochemical and gene expression characteristics of a model green microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, with 0, 50, 150 and 250 μM copper treatments were investigated. The response of C. reinhardtii to copper stress was significantly shown at a dose dependent manner. Inhibition of cell growth and variation of total chlorophyll content were observed with copper treatments. The maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII, actual photochemical efficiency of PSII and photochemical quenching value decreased in the 250 μM copper treatment with minimum values equal to 28, 24 and 60 % of the control values respectively. The content of lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde with copper treatments increased with a maximum value sevenfold higher than the control value. Inhibition of cell growth and photosynthesis was ascribed to peroxidation of membrane lipids. The glutathione content and activities of antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were induced by copper. Interestingly, the expression of antioxidant genes and the photosynthetic gene decreased in most copper treatments. In conclusion, oxidative stress caused by production of excess reactive oxidative species might be the major mechanism of copper toxicity on C. reinhardtii. PMID:27395008

  10. An original adaptation of photosynthesis in the marine green alga Ostreococcus

    PubMed Central

    Cardol, Pierre; Bailleul, Benjamin; Rappaport, Fabrice; Derelle, Evelyne; Béal, Daniel; Breyton, Cécile; Bailey, Shaun; Wollman, Francis André; Grossman, Arthur; Moreau, Hervé; Finazzi, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Adaptation of photosynthesis in marine environment has been examined in two strains of the green, picoeukaryote Ostreococcus: OTH95, a surface/high-light strain, and RCC809, a deep-sea/low-light strain. Differences between the two strains include changes in the light-harvesting capacity, which is lower in OTH95, and in the photoprotection capacity, which is enhanced in OTH95. Furthermore, RCC809 has a reduced maximum rate of O2 evolution, which is limited by its decreased photosystem I (PSI) level, a possible adaptation to Fe limitation in the open oceans. This decrease is, however, accompanied by a substantial rerouting of the electron flow to establish an H2O-to-H2O cycle, involving PSII and a potential plastid plastoquinol terminal oxidase. This pathway bypasses electron transfer through the cytochrome b6f complex and allows the pumping of “extra” protons into the thylakoid lumen. By promoting the generation of a large ΔpH, it facilitates ATP synthesis and nonphotochemical quenching when RCC809 cells are exposed to excess excitation energy. We propose that the diversion of electrons to oxygen downstream of PSII, but before PSI, reflects a common and compulsory strategy in marine phytoplankton to bypass the constraints imposed by light and/or nutrient limitation and allow successful colonization of the open-ocean marine environment. PMID:18511560

  11. An original adaptation of photosynthesis in the marine green alga Ostreococcus.

    PubMed

    Cardol, Pierre; Bailleul, Benjamin; Rappaport, Fabrice; Derelle, Evelyne; Béal, Daniel; Breyton, Cécile; Bailey, Shaun; Wollman, Francis André; Grossman, Arthur; Moreau, Hervé; Finazzi, Giovanni

    2008-06-01

    Adaptation of photosynthesis in marine environment has been examined in two strains of the green, picoeukaryote Ostreococcus: OTH95, a surface/high-light strain, and RCC809, a deep-sea/low-light strain. Differences between the two strains include changes in the light-harvesting capacity, which is lower in OTH95, and in the photoprotection capacity, which is enhanced in OTH95. Furthermore, RCC809 has a reduced maximum rate of O(2) evolution, which is limited by its decreased photosystem I (PSI) level, a possible adaptation to Fe limitation in the open oceans. This decrease is, however, accompanied by a substantial rerouting of the electron flow to establish an H(2)O-to-H(2)O cycle, involving PSII and a potential plastid plastoquinol terminal oxidase. This pathway bypasses electron transfer through the cytochrome b(6)f complex and allows the pumping of "extra" protons into the thylakoid lumen. By promoting the generation of a large DeltapH, it facilitates ATP synthesis and nonphotochemical quenching when RCC809 cells are exposed to excess excitation energy. We propose that the diversion of electrons to oxygen downstream of PSII, but before PSI, reflects a common and compulsory strategy in marine phytoplankton to bypass the constraints imposed by light and/or nutrient limitation and allow successful colonization of the open-ocean marine environment. PMID:18511560

  12. Photorecovery of gamma irradiated cultures of blue-green alga, Anacystis nidulans.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asato, Y.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence is given for photorecovery of Anacystis nidulans after exposures to Co 60 gamma radiation. After irradiation the levels of viable cells were higher in cultures kept in white light than in cultures kept dark for 24 hr. The post-irradiation survival rate increase after 30-min exposures to visible light is demonstrated in cultures irradiated with 35 krad. An increase in survival rates was not observed after exposures to ?red' light.

  13. UNUSUAL PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS CONTRIBUTE TO ECOPHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE IN THE PURPLE-COLORED GREEN ALGA ZYGOGONIUM ERICETORUM (ZYGNEMATOPHYCEAE, STREPTOPHYTA) FROM A HIGH-ALPINE HABITAT

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, Siegfried; Remias, Daniel; Karsten, Ulf; Holzinger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous green alga Zygogonium ericetorum (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta) was collected in a high-alpine rivulet in Tyrol, Austria. Two different morphotypes of this alga were found: a purple morph with a visible purple vacuolar content and a green morph lacking this coloration. These morphotypes were compared with respect to their secondary metabolites, ultrastructure, and ecophysiological properties. Colorimetric tests with aqueous extracts of the purple morph indicated the presence of soluble compounds such as phenolics and hydrolyzable tannins. High-performance liquid chromatography-screening showed that Z. ericetorum contained several large phenolic peaks with absorption maxima at ∼280 nm and sometimes with minor maxima at ∼380 nm. Such compounds are uncommon for freshwater green microalgae, and could contribute to protect the organism against increased UV and visible (VIS) irradiation. The purple Z. ericetorum contained larger amounts (per dry weight) of the putative phenolic substances than the green morph; exposure to irradiation may be a key factor for accumulation of these phenolic compounds. Transmission electron microscopy of the purple morph showed massive vacuolization with homogenous medium electron-dense content in the cell periphery, which possibly contains the secondary compounds. In contrast, the green morph had smaller, electron-translucent vacuoles. The ecophysiological data on photosynthesis and desiccation tolerance indicated that increasing photon fluence densities led to much higher relative electron transport rates (rETR) in the purple than in the green morph. These data suggest that the secondary metabolites in the purple morph are important for light acclimation in high-alpine habitats. However, the green morph recovered better after 4 d of rehydration following desiccation stress. PMID:25810559

  14. Unusual phenolic compounds contribute to ecophysiological performance in the purple-colored green alga zygogonium ericetorum (zygnematophyceae, streptophyta) from a high-alpine habitat.

    PubMed

    Aigner, Siegfried; Remias, Daniel; Karsten, Ulf; Holzinger, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    The filamentous green alga Zygogonium ericetorum (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta) was collected in a high-alpine rivulet in Tyrol, Austria. Two different morphotypes of this alga were found: a purple morph with a visible purple vacuolar content and a green morph lacking this coloration. These morphotypes were compared with respect to their secondary metabolites, ultrastructure, and ecophysiological properties. Colorimetric tests with aqueous extracts of the purple morph indicated the presence of soluble compounds such as phenolics and hydrolyzable tannins. High-performance liquid chromatography-screening showed that Z. ericetorum contained several large phenolic peaks with absorption maxima at ∼280 nm and sometimes with minor maxima at ∼380 nm. Such compounds are uncommon for freshwater green microalgae, and could contribute to protect the organism against increased UV and visible (VIS) irradiation. The purple Z. ericetorum contained larger amounts (per dry weight) of the putative phenolic substances than the green morph; exposure to irradiation may be a key factor for accumulation of these phenolic compounds. Transmission electron microscopy of the purple morph showed massive vacuolization with homogenous medium electron-dense content in the cell periphery, which possibly contains the secondary compounds. In contrast, the green morph had smaller, electron-translucent vacuoles. The ecophysiological data on photosynthesis and desiccation tolerance indicated that increasing photon fluence densities led to much higher relative electron transport rates (rETR) in the purple than in the green morph. These data suggest that the secondary metabolites in the purple morph are important for light acclimation in high-alpine habitats. However, the green morph recovered better after 4 d of rehydration following desiccation stress.

  15. Multiple stressor effects of high light irradiance and photosynthetic herbicides on growth and survival of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Beat B; Rüfenacht, Karin; Dannenhauer, Kerstin; Wiesendanger, Manuela; Eggen, Rik I L

    2010-10-01

    Exposure of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard to a combination of environmental stress by high light irradiance and chemical stress by each of the three herbicides paraquat, atrazine, and norflurazon resulted in diverse multiple stressor effects on growth and survival of the cells. Under low light conditions, growth analyzed by cell numbers was generally more sensitive to herbicide treatment than optical density-based growth rates or colony-forming unit endpoints, which both also analyzed the viability of the cells. However, growth analyzed by optical density and colony-forming units in herbicide-treated cultures was affected much more strongly by high light irradiance, as shown by reduced 50% effective concentrations, indicating extensive multiple stressor effects of the combined treatment on the viability of the cells. None of the currently used concepts for mixture toxicity (concentration addition, independent action, or effect summation) could accurately describe the effects measured by the two stressors in combination. Both synergistic and antagonistic interactions seem to occur depending on the light conditions and the parameter analyzed. The strong stimulation of toxicity by the combined stresses can be explained by the similar mode of toxic action of the treatments, all increasing the production of reactive oxygen species. Antagonistic effects, conversely, are probably attributable to the various protection mechanisms of photosynthetic organisms to increased light irradiance, which help the cells acclimate to specific light conditions and defend against the deleterious effects of excess light. These protection mechanisms can affect growth and viability under increased light conditions and also might influence the toxicity of the photosynthetic herbicides.

  16. Addressing Unknown Constants and Metabolic Network Behaviors Through Petascale Computing: Understanding H2 Production in Green Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Alber, D.; Graf, P.; Seibert, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Genomics Revolution has resulted in a massive and growing quantity of whole-genome DNA sequences, which encode the metabolic catalysts necessary for life. However, gene annotations can rarely be complete, and measurement of the kinetic constants associated with the encoded enzymes can not possibly keep pace, necessitating the use of careful modeling to explore plausible network behaviors. Key challenges are (1) quantitatively formulating kinetic laws governing each transformation in a fixed model network; (2) characterizing the stable solution (if any) of the associated ordinary differential equations (ODEs); (3) fitting the latter to metabolomics data as it becomes available; and, (4) optimizing a model output against the possible space of kinetic parameters, with respect to properties such as robustness of network response, or maximum consumption/production. This SciDAC-2 project addresses this large-scale uncertainty in the genome-scale metabolic network of the water-splitting, H{sub 2}-producing green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Each metabolic transformation is formulated as an irreversible steady-state process, such that the vast literature on known enzyme mechanisms may be incorporated directly. To start, glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and basic fermentation pathways have been encoded in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) with careful annotation and consistency with the KEGG database, yielding a model with 3 compartments, 95 species, 38 reactions, and 109 kinetic constants. To study and optimize such models with a view toward larger models, we have developed a system which takes as input an SBML model, and automatically produces C code that when compiled and executed optimizes the model's kinetic parameters according to test criteria. We describe the system and present numerical results. Further development, including overlaying of a parallel multistart algorithm, will allow optimization of thousands of parameters on high

  17. Structural Studies of β-Carbonic Anhydrase from the Green Alga Coccomyxa: Inhibitor Complexes with Anions and Acetazolamide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shenghua; Hainzl, Tobias; Grundström, Christin; Forsman, Cecilia; Samuelsson, Göran; Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The β-class carbonic anhydrases (β-CAs) are widely distributed among lower eukaryotes, prokaryotes, archaea, and plants. Like all CAs, the β-enzymes catalyze an important physiological reaction, namely the interconversion between carbon dioxide and bicarbonate. In plants the enzyme plays an important role in carbon fixation and metabolism. To further explore the structure-function relationship of β-CA, we have determined the crystal structures of the photoautotroph unicellular green alga Coccomyxa β-CA in complex with five different inhibitors: acetazolamide, thiocyanate, azide, iodide, and phosphate ions. The tetrameric Coccomyxa β-CA structure is similar to other β-CAs but it has a 15 amino acid extension in the C-terminal end, which stabilizes the tetramer by strengthening the interface. Four of the five inhibitors bind in a manner similar to what is found in complexes with α-type CAs. Iodide ions, however, make contact to the zinc ion via a zinc-bound water molecule or hydroxide ion — a type of binding mode not previously observed in any CA. Binding of inhibitors to Coccomyxa β-CA is mediated by side-chain movements of the conserved residue Tyr-88, extending the width of the active site cavity with 1.5-1.8 Å. Structural analysis and comparisons with other α- and β-class members suggest a catalytic mechanism in which the movements of Tyr-88 are important for the CO2-HCO3- interconversion, whereas a structurally conserved water molecule that bridges residues Tyr-88 and Gln-38, seems important for proton transfer, linking water molecules from the zinc-bound water to His-92 and buffer molecules. PMID:22162771

  18. Acclimation of Photosynthetic Light Reactions during Induction of Inorganic Carbon Accumulation in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii12

    PubMed Central

    Palmqvist, Kristin; Sundblad, Lars-Göran; Wingsle, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Göran

    1990-01-01

    Cells of the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were grown in high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations (supplied with 50 milliliters per liter CO2[g]) and transferred to low DIC concentrations (supplied with ≤ 100 microliters per liter CO2[g]). Immediately after transfer from high to low DIC the emission of photosystem II related chlorophyll a fluorescence was substantially quenched. It is hypothesized that the suddenly induced inorganic carbon limitation of photosynthesis resulted in a phosphorylation of LHCII, leading to the subsequent state 1 to state 2 transition. After 2 hours of low-DIC acclimation, 77 K fluorescence measurements revealed an increase in the fluorescence emitted from photosystem I, due to direct excitation, suggesting a change in photosystem II/photosystem I stoichiometry or an increased light harvesting capacity of photosystem I. After 5 to 6 hours of acclimation a considerable increase in spillover from photosystem II to photosystem I was observed. These adjustments of the photosynthetic light reactions reached steady-state after about 12 hours of low DIC treatment. The quencher of fluorescence could be removed by 5 minutes of dark treatment followed by 5 minutes of weak light treatment, of any of four different light qualities. It is hypothesized that this restoration of fluorescence was due to a state 2 to state 1 transition in low-DIC acclimated cells. A decreased ratio of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin was also observed in 12 hour low DIC treated cells, compared with high DIC grown cells. This ratio was not coupled to the level of fluorescence quenching. The role of different processes during the induction of a DIC accumulating mechanism is discussed. PMID:16667710

  19. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from the green alga, Dunaliella salina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    A calcium-dependent protein kinase was partially purified and characterized from the green alga Dunaliella salina. The enzyme was activated at free Ca2+ concentrations above 10(-7) molar. and half-maximal activation was at about 3 x 10(-7) molar. The optimum pH for its Ca(2+)-dependent activity was 7.5. The addition of various phospholipids and diolein had no effects on enzyme activity and did not alter the sensitivity of the enzyme toward Ca2+. The enzyme was inhibited by calmodulin antagonists, N-(6-aminohexyl)-1-naphthalene sulfonamide and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide in a dose-dependent manner while the protein kinase C inhibitor, sphingosine, had little effect on enzyme activity up to 800 micromolar. Immunoassay showed some calmodulin was present in the kinase preparations. However, it is unlikely the kinase was calmodulin regulated, since it still showed stimulation by Ca2+ in gel assays after being electrophoretically separated from calmodulin by two different methods. This gel method of detection of the enzyme indicated that a protein band with an apparent molecular weight of 40,000 showed protein kinase activity at each one of the several steps in the purification procedure. Gel assay analysis also showed that after native gel isoelectric focusing the partially purified kinase preparations had two bands with calcium-dependent activity, at isoelectric points 6.7 and 7.1. By molecular weight, by isoelectric point, and by a comparative immunoassay, the Dunaliella kinase appears to differ from at least some of the calcium-dependent, but calmodulin and phospholipid independent kinases described from higher plants.

  20. Role of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone in enhancing photobiological hydrogen production by marine green alga Platymonas subcordiformis.

    PubMed

    Ran, Chunqiu; Yu, Xingju; Jin, Meifang; Zhang, Wei

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated that a significant volume of H(2) gas could be photobiologically produced by a marine green alga Platymonas subcordiformis when an uncoupler of photophosphorylation, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), was added after 32 h of anaerobic dark incubation, whereas a negligible volume of H(2) gas was produced without CCCP. The role of CCCP in enhancing photobiological H(2) production was delineated. CCCP as an ADRY agent (agent accelerating the deactivation reactions of water-splitting enzyme system Y) rapidly inhibited the photosystem II (PSII) activity of P. subcordiformis cells, resulting in a markedly decline in the coupled oxygen evolution. The mitochondrial oxidative respiration was only slightly inactivated by CCCP, which depleted O(2) in the light. As a result, anaerobiosis during the stage of photobiological H(2) evolution was established, preventing severe O(2) inactivation of the reversible hydrogenase in P. subcordiformis. The uncoupling effect of CCCP accelerates electron transfer from water due to a disruption of the proton motive force and release of DeltapH across the thylakoid membrane and thus enhances the accessibility of electron and H(+) to hydrogenase. The electrons for hydrogen photoevolution are mainly from the photolysis of water (90%). Upon the addition of CCCP, Chl a/b ratio increased, which implies a decrease in the light-harvesting PSII antennae or an increase in PSII/PSI ratio, possibly resulting in higher efficiency of utilization of light energy. The enhancement of H(2) evolution by the addition of CCCP is mostly due to the combination of the above three mechanisms. However, the disruption of the proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane may prevent a sustained photobiological H(2) evolution due to a shortfall of ATP generation essential for the maintenance and repair functions of the cells.

  1. Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for an ethanol production process based on blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dexin; Hu, Zushou; Choi, Dong Gu; Thomas, Valerie M; Realff, Matthew J; Chance, Ronald R

    2010-11-15

    Ethanol can be produced via an intracellular photosynthetic process in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), excreted through the cell walls, collected from closed photobioreactors as a dilute ethanol-in-water solution, and purified to fuel grade ethanol. This sequence forms the basis for a biofuel production process that is currently being examined for its commercial potential. In this paper, we calculate the life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for three different system scenarios for this proposed ethanol production process, using process simulations and thermodynamic calculations. The energy required for ethanol separation increases rapidly for low initial concentrations of ethanol, and, unlike other biofuel systems, there is little waste biomass available to provide process heat and electricity to offset those energy requirements. The ethanol purification process is a major consumer of energy and a significant contributor to the carbon footprint. With a lead scenario based on a natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power system to provide process electricity and extra heat and conservative assumptions around the ethanol separation process, the net life cycle energy consumption, excluding photosynthesis, ranges from 0.55 MJ/MJ(EtOH) down to 0.20 MJ/ MJ(EtOH), and the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions range from 29.8 g CO₂e/MJ(EtOH) down to 12.3 g CO₂e/MJ(EtOH) for initial ethanol concentrations from 0.5 wt % to 5 wt %. In comparison to gasoline, these predicted values represent 67% and 87% reductions in the carbon footprint for this ethanol fuel on a energy equivalent basis. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions can be further reduced via employment of higher efficiency heat exchangers in ethanol purification and/ or with use of solar thermal for some of the process heat. PMID:20968295

  2. Arsenic availability, toxicity and direct role of GSH and phytochelatins in As detoxification in the green alga Stichococcus bacillaris.

    PubMed

    Pawlik-Skowrońska, B; Pirszel, J; Kalinowska, R; Skowroński, T

    2004-12-10

    Accumulation and toxicity of inorganic arsenic forms As(III) and As(V) to the green microalga Stichococcus bacillaris depended on environmental variables. pH of exposure and to a lesser extent elevated concentrations of humic acid, chloride and orthophosphate ions affected arsenic accumulation and its toxicity. As(V) was more toxic than As(III), especially at the near neutral pH 6.8. Intracellular As(V) uptake by algal cells was greater at pH 6.8 than at 8.2. In response to As(III) and As(V) the alga produced phytochelatins (PC(2-3)), but at As(V) exposure, their levels in cells were higher than with As(III), suggesting higher As(V) than As(III) availability and uptake. Arsenic in algal cells occurred in various complexes with non-protein SH groups. Some of these complexes dissociated under acidic conditions, but others were able to dissociate only at an alkaline pH. The former consisted of SH groups of phytochelatins. Those dissociating at an alkaline pH involved SH groups from both glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PC) or their derivatives. In the predominant acid-stable mixed As-SH complex, the ratio of SH (PC(2)) to SH (GSH) was 2:1, which suggests that one molecule of PC(2) (containing two SH groups) together with one molecule of GSH were involved in intracellular complexation of each As atom. This is the first demonstration of GSH involvement in arsenic complexation, in vivo. The intracellular concentration of As was greater than that of non-protein SH groups which suggests that not all the arsenic in algal cells was complexed and detoxified by thiol groups. PMID:15550277

  3. Multiple stressor effects of high light irradiance and photosynthetic herbicides on growth and survival of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Beat B; Rüfenacht, Karin; Dannenhauer, Kerstin; Wiesendanger, Manuela; Eggen, Rik I L

    2010-10-01

    Exposure of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard to a combination of environmental stress by high light irradiance and chemical stress by each of the three herbicides paraquat, atrazine, and norflurazon resulted in diverse multiple stressor effects on growth and survival of the cells. Under low light conditions, growth analyzed by cell numbers was generally more sensitive to herbicide treatment than optical density-based growth rates or colony-forming unit endpoints, which both also analyzed the viability of the cells. However, growth analyzed by optical density and colony-forming units in herbicide-treated cultures was affected much more strongly by high light irradiance, as shown by reduced 50% effective concentrations, indicating extensive multiple stressor effects of the combined treatment on the viability of the cells. None of the currently used concepts for mixture toxicity (concentration addition, independent action, or effect summation) could accurately describe the effects measured by the two stressors in combination. Both synergistic and antagonistic interactions seem to occur depending on the light conditions and the parameter analyzed. The strong stimulation of toxicity by the combined stresses can be explained by the similar mode of toxic action of the treatments, all increasing the production of reactive oxygen species. Antagonistic effects, conversely, are probably attributable to the various protection mechanisms of photosynthetic organisms to increased light irradiance, which help the cells acclimate to specific light conditions and defend against the deleterious effects of excess light. These protection mechanisms can affect growth and viability under increased light conditions and also might influence the toxicity of the photosynthetic herbicides. PMID:20872684

  4. Excitation dynamics and structural implication of the stress-related complex LHCSR3 from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Nicoletta; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir; Roy, Laura M; van Grondelle, Rienk; Croce, Roberta

    2016-09-01

    LHCSR3 is a member of the Light-Harvesting Complexes (LHC) family, which is mainly composed of pigment-protein complexes responsible for collecting photons during the first steps of photosynthesis. Unlike related LHCs, LHCSR3 is expressed in stress conditions and has been shown to be essential for the fast component of photoprotection, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In plants, which do not possess LHCSR homologs, NPQ is triggered by the PSBS protein. Both PSBS and LHCSR3 possess the ability to sense pH changes but, unlike PSBS, LHCSR3 binds multiple pigments. In this work we have analyzed the properties of the pigments bound to LHCSR3 and their excited state dynamics. The data show efficient excitation energy transfer between pigments with rates similar to those observed for the other LHCs. Application of an exciton model based on a template of LHCII, the most abundant LHC, satisfactorily explains the collected steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic data, indicating that LHCSR3 has a LHC-like molecular architecture, although it probably binds less pigments. The model suggests that most of the chlorophylls have similar energy and interactions as in LHCII. The most striking difference is the localization of the lowest energy state, which is not on the Chlorophyll a (Chl a) 610-611-612 triplet as in all the LHCB antennas, but on Chl a613, which is located close to the lumen and to the pH-sensing region of the protein. PMID:27150505

  5. Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for an ethanol production process based on blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dexin; Hu, Zushou; Choi, Dong Gu; Thomas, Valerie M; Realff, Matthew J; Chance, Ronald R

    2010-11-15

    Ethanol can be produced via an intracellular photosynthetic process in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), excreted through the cell walls, collected from closed photobioreactors as a dilute ethanol-in-water solution, and purified to fuel grade ethanol. This sequence forms the basis for a biofuel production process that is currently being examined for its commercial potential. In this paper, we calculate the life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for three different system scenarios for this proposed ethanol production process, using process simulations and thermodynamic calculations. The energy required for ethanol separation increases rapidly for low initial concentrations of ethanol, and, unlike other biofuel systems, there is little waste biomass available to provide process heat and electricity to offset those energy requirements. The ethanol purification process is a major consumer of energy and a significant contributor to the carbon footprint. With a lead scenario based on a natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power system to provide process electricity and extra heat and conservative assumptions around the ethanol separation process, the net life cycle energy consumption, excluding photosynthesis, ranges from 0.55 MJ/MJ(EtOH) down to 0.20 MJ/ MJ(EtOH), and the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions range from 29.8 g CO₂e/MJ(EtOH) down to 12.3 g CO₂e/MJ(EtOH) for initial ethanol concentrations from 0.5 wt % to 5 wt %. In comparison to gasoline, these predicted values represent 67% and 87% reductions in the carbon footprint for this ethanol fuel on a energy equivalent basis. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions can be further reduced via employment of higher efficiency heat exchangers in ethanol purification and/ or with use of solar thermal for some of the process heat.

  6. Role of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone in enhancing photobiological hydrogen production by marine green alga Platymonas subcordiformis.

    PubMed

    Ran, Chunqiu; Yu, Xingju; Jin, Meifang; Zhang, Wei

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated that a significant volume of H(2) gas could be photobiologically produced by a marine green alga Platymonas subcordiformis when an uncoupler of photophosphorylation, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), was added after 32 h of anaerobic dark incubation, whereas a negligible volume of H(2) gas was produced without CCCP. The role of CCCP in enhancing photobiological H(2) production was delineated. CCCP as an ADRY agent (agent accelerating the deactivation reactions of water-splitting enzyme system Y) rapidly inhibited the photosystem II (PSII) activity of P. subcordiformis cells, resulting in a markedly decline in the coupled oxygen evolution. The mitochondrial oxidative respiration was only slightly inactivated by CCCP, which depleted O(2) in the light. As a result, anaerobiosis during the stage of photobiological H(2) evolution was established, preventing severe O(2) inactivation of the reversible hydrogenase in P. subcordiformis. The uncoupling effect of CCCP accelerates electron transfer from water due to a disruption of the proton motive force and release of DeltapH across the thylakoid membrane and thus enhances the accessibility of electron and H(+) to hydrogenase. The electrons for hydrogen photoevolution are mainly from the photolysis of water (90%). Upon the addition of CCCP, Chl a/b ratio increased, which implies a decrease in the light-harvesting PSII antennae or an increase in PSII/PSI ratio, possibly resulting in higher efficiency of utilization of light energy. The enhancement of H(2) evolution by the addition of CCCP is mostly due to the combination of the above three mechanisms. However, the disruption of the proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane may prevent a sustained photobiological H(2) evolution due to a shortfall of ATP generation essential for the maintenance and repair functions of the cells. PMID:16599559

  7. Arsenic availability, toxicity and direct role of GSH and phytochelatins in As detoxification in the green alga Stichococcus bacillaris.

    PubMed

    Pawlik-Skowrońska, B; Pirszel, J; Kalinowska, R; Skowroński, T

    2004-12-10

    Accumulation and toxicity of inorganic arsenic forms As(III) and As(V) to the green microalga Stichococcus bacillaris depended on environmental variables. pH of exposure and to a lesser extent elevated concentrations of humic acid, chloride and orthophosphate ions affected arsenic accumulation and its toxicity. As(V) was more toxic than As(III), especially at the near neutral pH 6.8. Intracellular As(V) uptake by algal cells was greater at pH 6.8 than at 8.2. In response to As(III) and As(V) the alga produced phytochelatins (PC(2-3)), but at As(V) exposure, their levels in cells were higher than with As(III), suggesting higher As(V) than As(III) availability and uptake. Arsenic in algal cells occurred in various complexes with non-protein SH groups. Some of these complexes dissociated under acidic conditions, but others were able to dissociate only at an alkaline pH. The former consisted of SH groups of phytochelatins. Those dissociating at an alkaline pH involved SH groups from both glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PC) or their derivatives. In the predominant acid-stable mixed As-SH complex, the ratio of SH (PC(2)) to SH (GSH) was 2:1, which suggests that one molecule of PC(2) (containing two SH groups) together with one molecule of GSH were involved in intracellular complexation of each As atom. This is the first demonstration of GSH involvement in arsenic complexation, in vivo. The intracellular concentration of As was greater than that of non-protein SH groups which suggests that not all the arsenic in algal cells was complexed and detoxified by thiol groups.

  8. Addressing unknown constants and metabolic network behaviors through petascale computing: understanding H2 production in green algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christopher; Alber, David; Graf, Peter; Kim, Kwiseon; Seibert, Michael

    2007-07-01

    The Genomics Revolution has resulted in a massive and growing quantity of whole-genome DNA sequences, which encode the metabolic catalysts necessary for life. However, gene annotations can rarely be complete, and measurement of the kinetic constants associated with the encoded enzymes can not possibly keep pace, necessitating the use of careful modeling to explore plausible network behaviors. Key challenges are (1) quantitatively formulating kinetic laws governing each transformation in a fixed model network; (2) characterizing the stable solution (if any) of the associated ordinary differential equations (ODEs); (3) fitting the latter to metabolomics data as it becomes available; and, (4) optimizing a model output against the possible space of kinetic parameters, with respect to properties such as robustness of network response, or maximum consumption/production. This SciDAC-2 project addresses this large-scale uncertainty in the genome-scale metabolic network of the water-splitting, H2-producing green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Each metabolic transformation is formulated as an irreversible steady-state process, such that the vast literature on known enzyme mechanisms may be incorporated directly. To start, glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and basic fermentation pathways have been encoded in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) with careful annotation and consistency with the KEGG database, yielding a model with 3 compartments, 95 species, 38 reactions, and 109 kinetic constants. To study and optimize such models with a view toward larger models, we have developed a system which takes as input an SBML model, and automatically produces C code that when compiled and executed optimizes the model's kinetic parameters according to test criteria. We describe the system and present numerical results. Further development, including overlaying of a parallel multistart algorithm, will allow optimization of thousands of parameters on high-performance systems

  9. JENUFA GEN. NOV.: A NEW GENUS OF COCCOID GREEN ALGAE (CHLOROPHYCEAE, INCERTAE SEDIS) PREVIOUSLY RECORDED BY ENVIRONMENTAL SEQUENCING(1).

    PubMed

    Němcová, Yvonne; Eliáš, Marek; Škaloud, Pavel; Hodač, Ladislav; Neustupa, Jiří

    2011-08-01

    The diversity of eukaryotic microorganisms is far from fully described, as indicated by the vast number of unassigned genotypes retrieved by environmental sequencing or metagenomics. We isolated several strains of unicellular green algae from algal biofilms growing on tree bark in a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest and determined them to be relatives of an unidentified lineage of environmental 18S rDNA sequences, thus uncovering its cellular identity. Light, confocal, and electron microscope observations and sequencing the 18S rRNA gene revealed that the strains represent two different species within an apparently new genus, described here as Jenufa gen. nov. Both species formed minute coccoid cells with an irregular globular outline, a smooth cell wall, and a single parietal chloroplast without a pyrenoid. The two species, described herein as J. perforata and J. minuta, differed in chloroplast morphology and cell wall structure. Phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA gene sequences showed a firm relationship between the two species and placed the Jenufa lineage in an unresolved position within the CS clade (Chlamydomonadales + Sphaeropleales) of the class Chlorophyceae, although possible affinities to the genus Golenkinia were suggested both by maximum-likelihood (ML) and Bayesian methods. Furthermore, two almost identical environmental 18S rDNA sequences from an endolithic microbial community occurring in dolomite rock in the central Alps turned out to be specifically related to, yet apparently distinct from, the sequence of J. minuta, indicating the existence of an undescribed Jenufa species occurring in the temperate zone. PMID:27020027

  10. Natural dissolved organic matter mobilizes Cd but does not affect the Cd uptake by the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (Korschikov) in resin buffered solutions.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Liesbeth; Versieren, Liske; Smolders, Erik

    2014-09-01

    Natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) can have contrasting effects on metal bioaccumulation in algae because of complexation reactions that reduce free metal ion concentrations and because of DOM adsorption to algal surfaces which promote metal adsorption. This study was set up to reveal the role of different natural DOM samples on cadmium (Cd) uptake by the green algae