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Sample records for green coffee extract

  1. Decaffeinated Green Coffee Bean Extract Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su Jin; Choi, Sena; Park, Taesun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether decaffeinated green coffee bean extract prevents obesity and improves insulin resistance and elucidated its mechanism of action. Male C57BL/6N mice (N = 48) were divided into six dietary groups: chow diet, HFD, HFD-supplemented with 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.9% decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, and 0.15% 5-caffeoylquinic acid. Based on the reduction in HFD-induced body weight gain and increments in plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin levels, the minimum effective dose of green coffee bean extract appears to be 0.3%. Green coffee bean extract resulted in downregulation of genes involved in WNT10b- and galanin-mediated adipogenesis and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory pathway and stimulation of GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane in white adipose tissue. Taken together, decaffeinated green coffee bean extract appeared to reverse HFD-induced fat accumulation and insulin resistance by downregulating the genes involved in adipogenesis and inflammation in visceral adipose tissue. PMID:24817902

  2. NMR Confirmation and HPLC Quantification of Javamide-I and Javamide-II in Green Coffee Extract Products Available in the Market.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae B

    2017-01-01

    Javamide-I/javamide-II are phenolic amides found in coffee. Recent reports suggested that they may contain several biological activities related to human health. Therefore, there is emergent interest about their quantities in coffee-related products. Green coffee extract is a powder extract made of unroasted green coffee beans, available as a dietary supplement. However, there is little information about the amounts of javamide-I/javamide-II in green coffee extract products in the market. Therefore, in this paper, javamide-I/javamide-II were extracted from green coffee extract products and their identifications were confirmed by NMR. After that, the amounts of javamide-I/javamide-II were individually quantified from seven different green coffee extract samples using the HPLC method coupled to an electrochemical detector. The HPLC method provided accurate and reliable measurement of javamide-I/javamide-II with excellent peak resolution and low detection limit. In all seven green coffee extract samples, javamide-II was found to be between 0.28 and 2.96 mg/g, but javamide-I was detected in only five samples in the concentration levels of 0.15-0.52 mg/g, suggesting that green coffee extract products contain different amounts of javamide-I/javamide-II. In summary, javamide-I/javamide-II can be found in green coffee extract products sold in the market, but their amounts are likely to be comparatively different in between green coffee extract brands.

  3. Pharmacological characterisation of extracts of coffee dusts.

    PubMed Central

    Zuskin, E; Duncan, P G; Douglas, J S

    1983-01-01

    The contractile or relaxant activities or both of aqueous extracts of green and roasted coffees were assayed on isolated guinea pig tracheal spirals. Contractile and relaxant activities were compared with histamine and theophylline, respectively. Green coffee extracts induced concentration dependent contraction, but the maximal tension never exceeded 76.3% +/- 5.2 of a maximal histamine contraction (0.69 +/- 0.07 g/mm2 v 0.52 +/- 0.05 g/mm2; p (0.01). One gram of green coffee dust had a biological activity equivalent to 1.23 +/- 0.1 mg of histamine. The pD2 value of histamine was -5.17 +/- 0.05. The potency of green coffee was unaffected by mepyramine maleate (1 micrograms/ml, final bath concentration) while that of histamine was reduced 500 fold. Tissues contracted with histamine were not significantly relaxed by green coffee extracts. By contrast, roasted coffee extracts induced concentration dependent relaxation of uncontracted and histamine contracted tissues. Tissues contracted with green coffee extracts were also completely relaxed by roasted coffee extracts. The pD2 value of theophylline was -4.10 +/- 0.03. The relaxant activity of 1 g of roasted coffee was equivalent to 1.95 +/- 0.16 mg of theophylline. The potency of these extracts was significantly reduced after propranolol (1 micrograms/ml; dose ratio 1.56). Our results show that coffee dust extracts have considerable biological activity which changes from a contractile to a relaxant action as a consequence of processing. The greater incidence of adverse reactions to green coffee dust(s) in coffee workers may be related to the contractile activity present in green coffee dust. PMID:6830717

  4. New fluorescence spectroscopic method for the simultaneous determination of alkaloids in aqueous extract of green coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Yisak, Hagos; Redi-Abshiro, Mesfin; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2018-05-11

    There is no fluorescence spectroscopic method for the determination of trigonelline and theobromine in green coffee beans. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop a new fluorescence spectroscopic method to determine the alkaloids simultaneously in the aqueous extract of green coffee beans. The calibration curves were linear in the range 2-6, 1-6, 1-5 mg/L for caffeine, theobromine and trigonelline, respectively, with R 2  ≥ 0.9987. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 2, 6 and 7 µg/L and 40, 20 and 20 µg/L for caffeine, theobromine and trigonelline, respectively. Caffeine and trigonelline exhibited well separated fluorescence excitation spectra and therefore the two alkaloids were selectively quantified in the aqueous extract of green coffee. While theobromine showed overlapping fluorescence excitation spectra with caffeine and hence theobromine could not be determined in the aqueous extract of green coffee beans. The amount of caffeine and trigonelline in the three samples of green coffee beans were found to be 0.95-1.10 and 1.00-1.10% (w/w), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSD ≤ 4%) of the method for the three compounds of interest were of very good. The accuracy of the developed analytical method was evaluated by spiking standard caffeine and trigonelline to green coffee beans and the average recoveries were 99 ± 2% for both the alkaloids. A fast, sensitive and reliable fluorescence method for the simultaneous determination of caffeine and trigonelline in the aqueous extract of green coffee beans was developed and validated. The developed method reflected an effective performance to the direct determination of the two alkaloids in the aqueous extract of green coffee beans.

  5. Microwave-assisted extraction of green coffee oil and quantification of diterpenes by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Tsukui, A; Santos Júnior, H M; Oigman, S S; de Souza, R O M A; Bizzo, H R; Rezende, C M

    2014-12-01

    The microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of 13 different green coffee beans (Coffea arabica L.) was compared to Soxhlet extraction for oil obtention. The full factorial design applied to the microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), related to time and temperature parameters, allowed to develop a powerful fast and smooth methodology (10 min at 45°C) compared to a 4h Soxhlet extraction. The quantification of cafestol and kahweol diterpenes present in the coffee oil was monitored by HPLC/UV and showed satisfactory linearity (R(2)=0.9979), precision (CV 3.7%), recovery (<93%), limit of detection (0.0130 mg/mL), and limit of quantification (0.0406 mg/mL). The space-time yield calculated on the diterpenes content for sample AT1 (Arabica green coffee) showed a six times higher value compared to the traditional Soxhlet method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Green Coffee Bean Extract on Streptococcus mutans Count: A Randomised Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Mamta; Roshni, Roshni; Reddy, Pallavi; Mehra, Neha; Jain, Vallari; Rana, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Mouth rinses have been popularly used as a supplementary oral hygiene aid. A lot of commercially available mouth rinses possess few adverse effects, which has necessitated the search for alternative and herbal mouth rinses. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the effect of rinsing with green coffee bean extract in comparison with chlorhexidine mouthwash and sterile water on salivary Streptococcus mutans count. Materials and Methods A randomized parallel controlled clinical trial was planned and 45 subjects aged between 18-22 years were selected. The subjects were divided into three groups (n=15 in each group): Group A: Study group: 2% Green coffee bean extract, Group B: Positive control: 0.2% Chlorhexidine (CHX), Group C: Negative control: Sterile water. Group A subjects rinsed mouth with 5 ml of 2% Green coffee bean extract for one minute. Group B subjects rinsed mouth with 5 ml 0.2% CHX mouthwash for one minute. Group C subjects rinsed mouth with 5 ml of Sterile water for one minute twice daily for two weeks. Baseline samples (Pre rinse) were collected on day 1 and post rinsing saliva samples were collected after 14 days. The samples were cultured using Mitis Salivarius Agar enriched with Bacitracin and colonies were counted using a hand held digital colony counter. The statistical analysis was done using paired t-test, One-way variance ANOVA and Post-Hoc tests. Results The Green coffee bean extract group showed a statistical significant reduction in Streptococcus mutans colony count before and after intervention which was comparable with CHX group. Conclusion Green coffee bean extract as a mouthwash can be explored as a safe and effective alternative to CHX mouthwash. PMID:28658911

  7. NMR-driven identification of anti-amyloidogenic compounds in green and roasted coffee extracts.

    PubMed

    Ciaramelli, Carlotta; Palmioli, Alessandro; De Luigi, Ada; Colombo, Laura; Sala, Gessica; Riva, Chiara; Zoia, Chiara Paola; Salmona, Mario; Airoldi, Cristina

    2018-06-30

    To identify food and beverages that provide the regular intake of natural compounds capable of interfering with toxic amyloidogenic aggregates, we developed an experimental protocol that combines NMR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, in vitro biochemical and cell assays to detect anti-Aβ molecules in natural edible matrices. We applied this approach to investigate the potential anti-amyloidogenic properties of coffee and its molecular constituents. Our data showed that green and roasted coffee extracts and their main components, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid and melanoidins, can hinder Aβ on-pathway aggregation and toxicity in a human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. Coffee extracts and melanoidins also counteract hydrogen peroxide- and rotenone-induced cytotoxicity and modulate some autophagic pathways in the same cell line. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulation of coffee aroma via the fermentation of green coffee beans with Rhizopus oligosporus: I. Green coffee.

    PubMed

    Lee, Liang Wei; Cheong, Mun Wai; Curran, Philip; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan

    2016-11-15

    Modulation of coffee aroma via the biotransformation/fermentation of different coffee matrices during post-harvest remains sparingly explored despite some studies showing their positive impacts on coffee aroma. Therefore, this is an unprecedented study aimed at modulating coffee aroma via the fermentation of green coffee beans with a food-grade fungus Rhizopus oligosporus. The objective of part I of this two-part study was to characterize the volatile and non-volatile profiles of green coffee beans after fermentation. Proteolysis during fermentation resulted in 1.5-fold increase in the concentrations of proline and aspartic acid which exhibited high Maillard reactivity. Extensive degradation of ferulic and caffeic acids led to 2-fold increase in the total concentrations of volatile phenolic derivatives. 36% of the total volatiles detected in fermented green coffee beans were generated during fermentation. Hence, the work presented demonstrated that R. oligosporus fermentation of green coffee beans could induce modification of the aroma precursors of green coffees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Green Coffee

    MedlinePlus

    ... of coffee beans reduces amounts of the chemical chlorogenic acid. Therefore, green coffee beans have a higher level of chlorogenic acid compared to regular, roasted coffee beans. Chlorogenic acid ...

  10. Green coffee seed residue: A sustainable source of antioxidant compounds.

    PubMed

    Castro, A C C M; Oda, F B; Almeida-Cincotto, M G J; Davanço, M G; Chiari-Andréo, B G; Cicarelli, R M B; Peccinini, R G; Zocolo, G J; Ribeiro, P R V; Corrêa, M A; Isaac, V L B; Santos, A G

    2018-04-25

    Oil extraction from green coffee seeds generates residual mass that is discarded by agribusiness and has not been previously studied. Bioactive secondary metabolites in coffee include antioxidant phenolic compounds, such as chlorogenic acids. Coffee seeds also contain caffeine, a pharmaceutically important methylxanthine. Here, we report the chemical profile, antioxidant activity, and cytotoxicity of hydroethanolic extracts of green Coffea arabica L. seed residue. The extracts of the green seeds and the residue have similar chemical profiles, containing the phenolic compounds chlorogenic acid and caffeine. Five monoacyl and three diacyl esters of trans-cinnamic acids and quinic acid were identified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-quadruple time of flight mass spectrometry. The residue extract showed antioxidant potential in DPPH, ABTS, and pyranine assays and low cytotoxicity. Thus, coffee oil residue has great potential for use as a raw material in dietary supplements, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, or as a source of bioactive compounds. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Effect of green coffee extract on rheological, physico-sensory and antioxidant properties of bread.

    PubMed

    Mukkundur Vasudevaiah, A; Chaturvedi, A; Kulathooran, R; Dasappa, I

    2017-06-01

    Green coffee extract, GCE ( Coffee canephora ) was used at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0% levels for making bioactive rich bread. The processed GCE from the green coffee beans had 21.42% gallic acid equivalents (GAE) total polyphenols (TPP), 37.28% chlorogenic acid (CGA) and 92.73% radical scavenging activity (RSA), at 100 ppm concentration of GCE and caffeine content (1.75%). Rheological, physico-sensory and antioxidant properties of GCE incorporated breads were analysed and compared with control bread. The results revealed not much significant change in the rheological characteristics of dough up to 1.5% level; an increase in bread volume; greenness of bread crumb and mostly unchanged textural characteristics of the bread with increased addition of GCE from 0 to 2.0%. Sensory evaluation showed that maximum level of incorporation of GCE without adverse effect on the overall quality of bread (especially taste) was at 1.5% level. The contents of TPP, RSA and CGA increased by 12, 6 and 42 times when compared to control bread and had the highest amount of 4-5 caffeoylquinic acid.

  12. Effect of post-exercise caffeine and green coffee bean extract consumption on blood glucose and insulin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Beam, Jason R; Gibson, Ann L; Kerksick, Chad M; Conn, Carole A; White, Ailish C; Mermier, Christine M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ingesting caffeine and green coffee bean extract on blood glucose and insulin concentrations during a post-exercise oral glucose tolerance test. Ten male cyclists (age: 26 ± 5 y; height: 179.9 ± 5.4 cm; weight: 77.6 ± 13.3 kg; body mass index: 24 ± 4.3 kg/m(2); VO2 peak: 55.9 ± 8.4 mL·kg·min(-1)) participated in this study. In a randomized order, each participant completed three 30-min bouts of cycling at 60% of peak power output. Immediately after exercise, each participant consumed 75 g of dextrose with either 5 mg/kg body weight of caffeine, 10 mg/kg of green coffee bean extract (5 mg/kg chlorogenic acid), or placebo. Venous blood samples were collected immediately before and after exercise during completion of the oral glucose tolerance test. No significant time × treatment effects for blood glucose and insulin were found. Two-h glucose and insulin area under the curve values, respectively, for the caffeine (658 ± 74 mmol/L and 30,005 ± 13,304 pmol/L), green coffee bean extract (637 ± 100 mmol/L and 31,965 ± 23,586 pmol/L), and placebo (661 ± 77 mmol/L and 27,020 ± 12,339 pmol/L) trials were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Caffeine and green coffee bean extract did not significantly alter postexercise blood glucose and insulin concentrations when compared with a placebo. More human research is needed to determine the impact of these combined nutritional treatments and exercise on changes in blood glucose and insulin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biotransformation of caffeoyl quinic acids from green coffee extracts by Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533.

    PubMed

    Bel-Rhlid, Rachid; Thapa, Dinesh; Kraehenbuehl, Karin; Hansen, Carl Erik; Fischer, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    The potential of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 to metabolize chlorogenic acids from green coffee extract was investigated. Two enzymes, an esterase and a hydroxycinnamate decarboxylase (HCD), were involved in this biotransformation. The complete hydrolysis of 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA) into caffeic acid (CA) by L. johnsonii esterase occurred during the first 16 h of reaction time. No dihydrocaffeic acid was identified in the reaction mixture. The decarboxylation of CA into 4-vinylcatechol (4-VC) started only when the maximum concentration of CA was reached (10 μmol/ml). CA was completely transformed into 4-VC after 48 h of incubation. No 4-vinylphenol or other derivatives could be identified in the reaction media. In this study we demonstrate the capability of L. johnsonii to transform chlorogenic acids from green coffee extract into 4-VC in two steps one pot reaction. Thus, the enzymatic potential of certain lactobacilli might be explored to generate flavor compounds from plant polyphenols.

  14. Role of catechins in the antioxidant capacity of an active film containing green tea, green coffee, and grapefruit extracts.

    PubMed

    Colon, M; Nerin, C

    2012-10-03

    The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method was used to characterize the antioxidant capacity of natural extracts of green tea, green coffee, and grapefruit. These natural extracts were incorporated into a plastic film layer, which was subsequently subjected to a free radical gas stream in order to determine the antioxidant capacity directly in the active film. The green tea extract (GTE) afforded the strongest antioxidant activity. To identify the active compounds in the extract, concentration of the diverse catechins in samples were determined by HPLC-UV analysis. The results showed that the content of catechins in the GTE is around 77% (w/w), the major components being (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-epicatechin gallate, and (-)-epicatechin. A variation in the concentration profile of catechins was detected during the oxidation process. The chromatographic study demonstrated that (-)-gallocatechin, (-)- epigallocatechin, (+)-catechin, and (-)-catechin gallate exhibited the most radical scavenging.

  15. GREEN SYNTHESIS OF SILVER AND PALLADIUM NANOPARTICLES AT ROOM TEMPERATURE USING COFFEE AND TEA EXTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An extremely simple green approach that generates bulk quantities of nanocrystals of noble metals such as silver (Ag) and palladium (Pd) using coffee and tea extract at room temperature is described. The single-pot method uses no surfactant, capping agent, and/or template. The ob...

  16. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease.

  17. Climatic factors directly impact the volatile organic compound fingerprint in green Arabica coffee bean as well as coffee beverage quality.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, B; Boulanger, R; Dussert, S; Ribeyre, F; Berthiot, L; Descroix, F; Joët, T

    2012-12-15

    Coffee grown at high elevations fetches a better price than that grown in lowland regions. This study was aimed at determining whether climatic conditions during bean development affected sensory perception of the coffee beverage and combinations of volatile compounds in green coffee. Green coffee samples from 16 plots representative of the broad range of climatic variations in Réunion Island were compared by sensory analysis. Volatiles were extracted by solid phase micro-extraction and the volatile compounds were analysed by GC-MS. The results revealed that, among the climatic factors, the mean air temperature during seed development greatly influenced the sensory profile. Positive quality attributes such as acidity, fruity character and flavour quality were correlated and typical of coffees produced at cool climates. Two volatile compounds (ethanal and acetone) were identified as indicators of these cool temperatures. Among detected volatiles, most of the alcohols, aldehydes, hydrocarbons and ketones appeared to be positively linked to elevated temperatures and high solar radiation, while the sensory profiles displayed major defects (i.e. green, earthy flavour). Two alcohols (butan-1,3-diol and butan-2,3-diol) were closely correlated with a reduction in aromatic quality, acidity and an increase in earthy and green flavours. We assumed that high temperatures induce accumulation of these compounds in green coffee, and would be detected as off-flavours, even after roasting. Climate change, which generally involves a substantial increase in average temperatures in mountainous tropical regions, could be expected to have a negative impact on coffee quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease. PMID:26097349

  19. Positive and negative aspects of green coffee consumption - antioxidant activity versus mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Jeszka-Skowron, Magdalena; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Stępień, Łukasz; Stanisz, Ewa

    2017-09-01

    The quality of coffee depends not only on the contents of healthy compounds but also on its contamination with microorganisms that can produce mycotoxins during development, harvesting, preparation, transport and storage. The antioxidant activity of green coffee brews measured in this study by ABTS, DPPH and Folin-Ciocalteu assays showed that coffee extracts from Robusta beans possessed higher activity in all assays than extracts from Arabica beans. The occurrence of ochratoxin A and aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2) in green coffee beans was studied using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Apart from mycotoxins, the content of ergosterol as a marker indicating fungal occurrence was also determined. Among aflatoxins, aflatoxin B1 was the dominant mycotoxin in coffee bean samples, with the highest level at 17.45 ng g -1 . Ochratoxin A was detected in four samples at levels ranging from 1.27 to 4.34 ng g -1 , and fungi potentially producing this toxin, namely Aspergillus oryzae, Alternaria sp., Aspergillus foetidus, Aspergillus tamarii and Penicillium citrinum, were isolated. Steaming and decaffeination of coffee beans increased antioxidant activities of brews in comparison with those prepared from unprocessed beans. Although toxins can be quantified in green coffee beans and novel fungi were isolated, their concentrations are acceptable according to legal limits. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Method validation for the determination of ochratoxin A in green and soluble coffee by immunoaffinity column cleanup and liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Diaz, G J; Ariza, D; Perilla, N S

    2004-06-01

    A method was validated for the determination of ochratoxin A (OTA) in soluble and green coffee. Performance parameters evaluated included selectivity, accuracy, intermediate precision, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantitation, and ruggedness. The method was found to be selective for OTA in both matrices tested. Recovery rates from soluble coffee samples ranged from 73.5 to 91.2%, and from green coffee samples from 68.7 to 84.5%. The intermediate precision (RSDr) was between 9.1 and 9.4% for soluble coffee and between 14.3 and 15.5% for green coffee analysis. The linearity of the standard calibration curve (r(2)) was <0.999 for OTA levels of 1.0-20.0 μg/kg in coffee samples. The limit of detection was determined to be 0.01 ng of OTA on column, while the limit of quantitation was found to be 0.03 ng on column. The limit of quantitation is equivalent to 0.6 μg/kg in soluble coffee samples and 0.3 μg/kg in green coffee samples. The results of the ruggedness trial showed two factors are critical for soluble coffee analysis: the extraction method, and the flow rate of the mobile phase. For green coffee analysis two critical factors detected were the extraction method and the storage temperature of the immunoaffinity column.Five samples of soluble coffee and 42 of green coffee were analysed using the validated method. All soluble coffee samples contained OTA at levels that ranged from 8.4 to 13.9 μg/kg. Six of the 42 green coffee samples analysed (14.3%) contained OTA at levels ranging from 0.9 to 19.4 μg/kg. The validated method can be used to monitor OTA levels in Colombian coffee for export or for local consumption.

  1. Comparison of antioxidant activity between green and roasted coffee beans using molecular methods

    PubMed Central

    PRIFTIS, ALEXANDROS; STAGOS, DIMITRIOS; KONSTANTINOPOULOS, KONSTANTINOS; TSITSIMPIKOU, CHRISTINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDES M.; TZATZARAKIS, MANOLIS N.; KOURETAS, DEMETRIOS

    2015-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most popular and widely consumed beverages worldwide due to its pleasant taste and aroma. A number of studies have been performed to elucidate the possible beneficial effects of coffee consumption on human health and have shown that coffee exhibits potent antioxidant activity, which may be attributed mainly to its polyphenolic content. However, there is also evidence to suggest that coffee roasting (the procedure which turns green coffee beans to the dark, roasted ones from which the beverage derives) may alter the polyphenolic profile of the beans (e.g., via the Maillard reaction) and, concomitantly, their antioxidant activity. In the present study, the antioxidant activity of 13 coffee varieties was examined in both green and roasted coffee bean extracts using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azinobis-(3-eth-ylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS•+) radical scavenging assays. In addition, 5 selected varieties were also examined for their protective effects against peroxyl and hydroxyl radical-induced DNA strand cleavage. Finally, C2C12 murine myoblasts were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of the most potent extract in order to examine its effects on the cellular redox status by measuring the glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by flow cytometry. Our results revealed that, in 8 out of the 13 coffee varieties, roasting increased free radical scavenging activity as shown by DPPH and ABTS•+ assays. Moreover, we found that when one coffee variety was roasted for different amounts of time, the increase in the antioxidant activity depended on the roasting time. By contrast, in 5 varieties, roasting reduced the antioxidant activity. Similar differences between the roasted and green beans were also observed in the free radical-induced DNA strand cleavage assay. The observed differences in the antioxidant activity between the different coffee varieties may be attributed to their varying polyphenolic

  2. Use of different extracts of coffee pulp for the production of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Evandro Galvão Tavares; do Carmo, Juliana Ribeiro; Menezes, Aline Galvão Tavares; Alves, José Guilherme Lembi Ferreira; Pimenta, Carlos José; Queiroz, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most important agricultural products in Brazil. More than 50 % of the coffee fruit is not used for the production of commercial green coffee and is therefore discarded, usually ending up in the environment. The goal of this work was to select an efficient process for obtaining coffee pulp extract and to evaluate the use of this extract in bioethanol production. The effects of heat treatment and trituration on the yield and composition of the extract were investigated by measuring the amounts of reducing sugars, starch, pectin, and phenolic compounds. The extraction process was most efficient at room temperature using grinding followed by pressing. Five different fermentation media were tested: sugarcane juice or molasses diluted with water or with coffee pulp extract and a medium with only coffee pulp extract. Batch fermentations were carried out at 30 °C for 24 h, and samples were taken to obtain measurements of the total reducing sugars, cell count, and ethanol concentration. The addition of coffee pulp extract did not influence the fermentation or yeast viability, and it can thus be mixed with sugarcane juice or molasses for the production of bioethanol, with a yield of approximately 70 g/L.

  3. Cellular Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Coffee Extracts with Different Roasting Levels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soohan; Kim, Min Hyung; Park, Jae Hee; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Ko, Kwang Suk

    2017-06-01

    During roasting, major changes occur in the composition and physiological effects of coffee beans. In this study, in vitro antioxidant effects and anti-inflammatory effects of Coffea arabica green coffee extracts were investigated at different roasting levels corresponding to Light, Medium, City, and French roast. Total caffeine did not show huge difference according to roasting level, but total chlorogenic acid contents were higher in light roasted coffee extract than other roasted groups. In addition, light roasted coffee extract had the highest antioxidant activity in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. To determine the in vitro antioxidant property, coffee extracts were used to treat AML-12 cells. Intracellular glutathione (GSH) concentration and mRNA expression levels of genes related to GSH synthesis were negatively related to roasting levels. The anti-inflammatory effects of coffee extracts were investigated in lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. The cellular antioxidant activity of coffee extracts exhibited similar patterns as the AML-12 cells. The expression of mRNA for tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 was decreased in cells treated with the coffee extracts and the expression decreased with increasing roasting levels. These data suggest that coffee has physiological antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and these effects are negatively correlated with roasting levels in the cell models.

  4. The content of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg and Mn and antioxidant activity of green coffee brews.

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Ewelina; Pohl, Pawel; Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna

    2015-09-01

    A simple and fast method of the analysis of green coffee infusions was developed to measure total concentrations of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg and Mn by high resolution-continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The precision of the method was within 1-8%, while the accuracy was within -1% to 2%. The method was used to the analysis of infusions of twelve green coffees of different geographical origin. It was found that Ca and Mg were leached the easiest, i.e., on average 75% and 70%, respectively. As compared to the mug coffee preparation, the rate of the extraction of elements was increased when infusions were prepared using dripper or Turkish coffee preparation methods. Additionally, it was established that the antioxidant activity of green coffee infusions prepared using the mug coffee preparation was high, 75% on average, and positively correlated with the total content of phenolic compounds and the concentration of Ca in the brew. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prediction of specialty coffee cup quality based on near infrared spectra of green coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Tolessa, Kassaye; Rademaker, Michael; De Baets, Bernard; Boeckx, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The growing global demand for specialty coffee increases the need for improved coffee quality assessment methods. Green bean coffee quality analysis is usually carried out by physical (e.g. black beans, immature beans) and cup quality (e.g. acidity, flavour) evaluation. However, these evaluation methods are subjective, costly, time consuming, require sample preparation and may end up in poor grading systems. This calls for the development of a rapid, low-cost, reliable and reproducible analytical method to evaluate coffee quality attributes and eventually chemical compounds of interest (e.g. chlorogenic acid) in coffee beans. The aim of this study was to develop a model able to predict coffee cup quality based on NIR spectra of green coffee beans. NIR spectra of 86 samples of green Arabica beans of varying quality were analysed. Partial least squares (PLS) regression method was used to develop a model correlating spectral data to cupping score data (cup quality). The selected PLS model had a good predictive power for total specialty cup quality and its individual quality attributes (overall cup preference, acidity, body and aftertaste) showing a high correlation coefficient with r-values of 90, 90,78, 72 and 72, respectively, between measured and predicted cupping scores for 20 out of 86 samples. The corresponding root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 1.04, 0.22, 0.27, 0.24 and 0.27 for total specialty cup quality, overall cup preference, acidity, body and aftertaste, respectively. The results obtained suggest that NIR spectra of green coffee beans are a promising tool for fast and accurate prediction of coffee quality and for classifying green coffee beans into different specialty grades. However, the model should be further tested for coffee samples from different regions in Ethiopia and test if one generic or region-specific model should be developed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Green engineering: Green composite material, biodiesel from waste coffee grounds, and polyurethane bio-foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hsiang-Fu

    In this thesis we developed several ways of producing green materials and energy resources. First, we developed a method to fabricate natural fibers composites, with the purpose to develop green textile/woven composites that could potentially serve as an alternative to materials derived from non-renewable sources. Flax and hemp fabrics were chosen because of their lightweight and exceptional mechanical properties. To make these textile/woven composites withstand moist environments, a commercially available marine resin was utilized as a matrix. The tensile, three-point bending, and edgewise compression strengths of these green textile/woven composites were measured using ASTM protocols. Secondly, we developed a chemical procedure to obtain oil from waste coffee grounds; we did leaching and liquid extractions to get liquid oil from the solid coffee. This coffee oil was used to produce bio-diesel that could be used as a substitute for petroleum-based diesel. Finally, polyurethane Bio-foam formation utilized glycerol that is the by-product from the biodiesel synthesis. A chemical synthesis procedure from the literature was used as the reference system: a triol and isocynate are mixed to produce polyurethane foam. Moreover, we use a similar triol, a by-product from bio-diesel synthesis, to reproduce polyurethane foam.

  7. Regenerable immuno-biochip for screening ochratoxin A in green coffee extract using an automated microarray chip reader with chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Sauceda-Friebe, Jimena C; Karsunke, Xaver Y Z; Vazac, Susanna; Biselli, Scarlett; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2011-03-18

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) can contaminate foodstuffs in the ppb to ppm range and once formed, it is difficult to remove. Because of its toxicity and potential risks to human health, the need exists for rapid, efficient detection methods that comply with legal maximum residual limits. In this work we have synthesized an OTA conjugate functionalized with a water-soluble peptide for covalent immobilization on a glass biochip by means of contact spotting. The chip was used for OTA determination with an indirect competitive immunoassay format with flow-through reagent addition and chemiluminescence detection, carried out with the stand-alone automated Munich Chip Reader 3 (MCR 3) platform. A buffer model and real green coffee extracts were used for this purpose. At the present, covalent conjugate immobilization allowed for at least 20 assay-regeneration cycles of the biochip surface. The total analysis time for a single sample, including measurement and surface regeneration, was 12 min and the LOQ of OTA in green coffee extract was 0.3 μg L(-1) which corresponds to 7 μg kg(-1). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell‑specific and roasting‑dependent regulation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway by coffee extracts.

    PubMed

    Priftis, Alexandros; Angeli-Terzidou, Antonia-Eugenia; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2018-06-01

    Coffee is a popular beverage that contains various bioactive compounds. However, its molecular mechanism of action is not fully elucidated. In this context, two previously characterized coffee extracts, a lightly roasted and the corresponding green one, were investigated for their effect on nuclear factor erythroid 2‑related factor 2 (Nrf2) target gene expression in myoblasts and endothelial cells using quantitative PCR. The tested concentrations were non‑cytotoxic and led to improved redox cell status, as was evident by increased reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. In both cell lines, the roasted extract upregulated gene expression more readily than its green counterpart leading to increased NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 and γ‑glutamyl cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, among others. The green extract had a mixed effect on the endothelial cells, while, as regards the myoblasts it caused the downregulation of some Nrf‑target genes. Therefore, a potential dose‑ and roasting‑dependent mechanism is proposed in the current study, accounting for coffee's antioxidant activity.

  9. Chemical partitioning and antioxidant capacity of green coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora) of different geographical origin.

    PubMed

    Babova, Oxana; Occhipinti, Andrea; Maffei, Massimo E

    2016-03-01

    Green coffee beans of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora accessions from different geographical origin (Brazil, Colombia, Ethiopia, Honduras, Kenya, Mexico, Peru, Uganda and Vietnam) were extracted and the extracts analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS for the identification and quantification of chlorogenic acids and caffeine content. Principal component and cluster analyses were used to identify chemical patterns separating the different species and accessions based on their geographical origin. C. canephora showed always a higher caffeine content with respect to C. arabica, whereas the C. arabica accessions from Kenya showed a higher chlorogenic acids and a lower caffeine content. The antioxidant capacity of green coffee extracts was assayed by the reducing power and DPPH assays. The antioxidant capacity correlated with the chlorogenic acids content. The results show that the C. arabica from Kenya possesses the highest chlorogenic acids/caffeine ratio and, among the C. arabica accessions, the highest antioxidant capacity. Therefore, the C. arabica from Kenya is the most suitable green coffee source for nutraceutical applications because of its high antioxidant capacity and low caffeine content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Consumption of green coffee and the risk of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sanlier, Nevin; Atik, Azize; Atik, Ilker

    2018-04-06

    Green coffee contains macro nutrients such as carbohydrates, protein, fat, as well as minor components such as caffeine, trigonelin and chlorogenic acid. Phenolics, chlorogenic acids and brown pigments are sources of natural antixodants. High polypehonic materials found in green coffee and especially chlorogenic acid in it have an important place. It is considered that; green coffee has effects on body mass, blood glucose and lipid levels, blood pressure, prevention from cardiovascular diseases which is based on chlorogenic acid consisting antioxidant activity. However, many topics like toxicological effects, doses, amounts, usage in the body, advantages and disadvantages, etc. of these active molecules need to be examined. For these reasons this article was rewieved to evaluate health effects of green coffee.

  11. Optimization of the isolation and quantitation of kahweol and cafestol in green coffee oil.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Agnes; Beaumesnil, Mathieu; de Oliveira, Alessandra Lopes; Elfakir, Claire; Bostyn, Stephane

    2013-12-15

    Kahweol and cafestol are two diterpenes that exist mainly as esters of fatty acids in green coffee oil. To recover them under their free form they have to be either saponified or trans-esterified. These two compounds are well known to be sensitive to heat, and reagents, therefore experimental conditions used in the transesterification reaction are critical. In this paper, a Doehlert experimental design plan is used to optimize the transesterification conditions using some key variables such as the temperature of the reaction, the reagent base concentration and the duration of the reaction. Therefore, the optimal parameters determined from the Doehlert design are equal to 70 °C, temperature of the reaction; 1.25 mol L(-1) concentration of the reagent base; and 60 min reaction time. The contour plots show that the extracted quantity of kahweol and cafestol can depend greatly from the experimental conditions. After transesterification, the free form of the diterpernes is extracted from the lipid fraction using liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed using GC-FID without prior derivatization. The amount of kahweol and cafestol obtained from green coffee oil obtained by cold mechanical press of Catuai coffee bean is equal to 33.2±2.2 and 24.3±2.4 g kg(-1)oil, respectively. In an attempt to streamline the process, the transesterification reaction is performed in an in-flow chemistry reactor using the optimal conditions obtained with the Doehlert experimental design. The amount of kahweol and cafestol obtained from the same green coffee oil is equal to 43.5 and 30.072 g kg(-1)oil, respectively. Results are slightly higher compared to the ones obtained with the batch procedure. This can be explained by a better mixing of the coffee oil with the reagents and a faster transesterification reaction. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical and sensory quality of Java Arabica green coffee beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunarharum, W. B.; Yuwono, S. S.; Pangestu, N. B. S. W.; Nadhiroh, H.

    2018-03-01

    Demand on high quality coffee for consumption is continually increasing not only in the consuming countries (importers) but also in the producing countries (exporters). Coffee quality could be affected by several factors from farm to cup including the post-harvest processing methods. This research aimed to investigate the influence of different post-harvest processing methods on physical and sensory quality of Java Arabica green coffee beans. The two factors being evaluated were three different post-harvest processing methods to produce green coffee beans (natural/dry, semi-washed and fully-washed processing) under sun drying. Physical quality evaluation was based on The Indonesian National Standard (SNI 01-2907-2008) while sensory quality was evaluated by five expert judges. The result shows that less defects observed in wet processed coffee as compared to the dry processing. The mechanical drying was also proven to yield a higher quality green coffee beans and minimise losses.

  13. The Impact of the Roast Levels of Coffee Extracts on their Potential Anticancer Activities.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Benigno E; Fong, Lisa E; Biju, Denny; Muharram, Alfeah; Davis, Isabel M; Vela, Klarisse O; Rios, Diana; Osorio-Camacena, Elena; Kaur, Baljit; Rojas, Sebastian M; Forester, Sarah C

    2018-04-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world and contains numerous phytochemicals that are beneficial to consumer health. The phytochemical profile of coffee, however, can be affected by the roast level. In this study, we compared the effect of roasting level on the growth inhibitory activity of HT-29 (colon) and SCC-25 (oral) cancer cell lines. The different roasting stages selected for this study were green, cinnamon/blonde, city/medium, full city/medium-dark, and full city plus/dark. Cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of coffee extracts for 72 hr. Cell viability was quantified using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay. It was found that the lighter roast extracts, Cinnamon in particular, reduced cell growth more than darker roast extracts. The Cinnamon extract had the greatest amount of total phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Relative levels of gallic, caffeic, and chlorogenic acid in the extracts were also compared. The Cinnamon coffee extract had the highest levels of gallic and caffeic acids, which have both been widely-regarded as bioactive phytochemicals. In conclusion, the consumption of lighter roasted coffee, may contribute to the prevention of certain types of cancer such as oral and colon. Chemical compounds in coffee may reduce the risk for certain types of cancers. These compounds may be particularly abundant in lighter roasted coffee. Therefore, lighter roasted coffee could contribute to the prevention of cancer through a healthy diet. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Qualitative carbonyl profile in coffee beans through GDME-HPLC-DAD-MS/MS for coffee preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Liliana; Valente, Inês M; Santos, João Rodrigo; Rodrigues, José A

    2018-05-01

    In this work, an analytical methodology for volatile carbonyl compounds characterization in green and roasted coffee beans was developed. The methodology relied on a recent and simple sample preparation technique, gas diffusion microextraction for extraction of the samples' volatiles, followed HPLC-DAD-MS/MS analysis. The experimental conditions in terms of extraction temperature and extraction time were studied. A profile for carbonyl compounds was obtained for both arabica and robusta coffee species (green and roasted samples). Twenty-seven carbonyl compounds were identified and further discussed, in light of reported literature, with different coffee characteristics: coffee ageing, organoleptic impact, presence of defective beans, authenticity, human's health implication, post-harvest coffee processing and roasting. The applied methodology showed to be a powerful analytical tool to be used for coffee characterization as it measures marker compounds of different coffee characteristics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, linear dose, crossover study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a green coffee bean extract in overweight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, Joe A; Burnham, Bryan R; Nagendran, Mysore V

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult weight gain and obesity have become worldwide problems. Issues of cost and potential side effects of prescription weight loss drugs have led overweight and obese adults to try nutraceuticals that may aid weight loss. One promising nutraceutical is green coffee extract, which contains high concentrations of chlorogenic acids that are known to have health benefits and to influence glucose and fat metabolism. A 22-week crossover study was conducted to examine the efficacy and safety of a commercial green coffee extract product GCA™ at reducing weight and body mass in 16 overweight adults. Methods Subjects received high-dose GCA (1050 mg), low-dose GCA (700 mg), or placebo in separate six-week treatment periods followed by two-week washout periods to reduce any influence of preceding treatment. Treatments were counterbalanced between subjects. Primary measurements were body weight, body mass index, and percent body fat. Heart rate and blood pressure were also measured. Results Significant reductions were observed in body weight (−8.04 ± 2.31 kg), body mass index (−2.92 ± 0.85 kg/m2), and percent body fat (−4.44% ± 2.00%), as well as a small decrease in heart rate (−2.56 ± 2.85 beats per minute), but with no significant changes to diet over the course of the study. Importantly, the decreases occurred when subjects were taking GCA. Body mass index for six subjects shifted from preobesity to the normal weight range (<25.00 kg/m2). Conclusion The results are consistent with human and animal studies and a meta-analysis of the efficacy of green coffee extract in weight loss. The results suggest that GCA may be an effective nutraceutical in reducing weight in preobese adults, and may be an inexpensive means of preventing obesity in overweight adults. PMID:22291473

  16. Unsaponifiable matter from oil of green coffee beans: cosmetic properties and safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wagemaker, Tais A L; Campos, Patrícia M B G Maia; Fernandes, Ana Sofia; Rijo, Patrícia; Nicolai, Marisa; Roberto, Amílcar; Rosado, Catarina; Reis, Catarina; Rodrigues, Luis M; Carvalho, Cássia Regina Limonta; Maia, Nilson Borlina; Guerreiro Filho, Oliveiro

    2016-10-01

    Unsaponifiable matter (UM), a fraction of green coffee oil (GCO) contains functional compounds responsible for desirable cosmetic properties such as UV-B absorption. To evaluate oil content and sun protection factor (SPF) variability of the two most important species of coffee and, the toxic and cytotoxic effects, as well as cosmetic properties, including antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of UM obtained from green Coffea arabica seed oil. The safety and potential cosmetic properties of UM extracted from green coffee oil (GCO) were evaluated by the brine shrimp viability and the MTT cytotoxicity assays. The SPF and antioxidant activity were evaluated using in vitro methods. Relevant cytotoxicity was found against keratinocytes for concentrations ≥25 µg/mL and in the brine shrimp assay (LC50 24 µg/mL). Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities (IC50 1448 µg/mL) were low in UM but SPF was 10 times higher than in GCO. UM is a novel potential UV-B absorbent but its use as a cosmetic ingredient should be better considered due to the considerable cytotoxicity shown in the experimental conditions described.

  17. Exhaustive Qualitative LC-DAD-MSn Analysis of Arabica Green Coffee Beans: Cinnamoyl-glycosides and Cinnamoylshikimic Acids as New Polyphenols in Green Coffee.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Gema; Sarriá, Beatriz; Bravo, Laura; Mateos, Raquel

    2016-12-28

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world, due to its unique aroma and stimulant properties. Although its health effects are controversial, moderate intake seems to be beneficial. The present work deals with the characterization and quantification of polyphenols and methylxanthines in four Arabica green coffee beans from different geographical origins. The antioxidant activity was also evaluated. Forty-three polyphenols (cinnamic acid, cinnamoyl-amide, 5 cinammoyl-glycosides, and 36 cinnamate esters) were identified using LC-MS n . Among these, cinnamate esters of six different chemical groups (including two dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid isomers, three caffeoyl-feruloylquinic acid isomers, caffeoyl-sinapoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl-feruloylquinic acid, two caffeoylshikimic acid isomers, and trimethoxycinnamoylshikimic acid) in addition to five isomers of cinnamoyl-glycosides called caffeoyl-2,7-anhydro-3-deoxy-2-octulopyranosic acid (CDOA) are described for the first time in Arabica green coffee beans. Moreover, 38 polyphenols (6-7% w/w) and 2 methylxanthines (1.3% w/w) were quantified by HPLC-DAD. Caffeoylquinic was the most abundant group of compounds (up to 85.5%) followed by dicaffeoylquinic and feruloylquinic acids (up to 8 and 7%, respectively) and the newly identified cinnamoyl-glycosides (CDOA) (up to 2.5%). Caffeine was the main methylxanthine (99.8%), with minimal amounts of theobromine (0.2%). African coffees (from Kenya and Ethiopia) showed higher polyphenolic content than American beans (from Brazil and Colombia), whereas methylxanthine contents varied randomly. Both phenols and methylxanthines contributed to the antioxidant capacity associated with green coffee, with a higher contribution of polyphenols. We conclude that green coffee represents an important source of polyphenols and methylxanthines, with high antioxidant capacity.

  18. Caffeine adsorption of montmorillonite in coffee extracts.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kenichiro; Yotsumoto, Yuko; Yoshida, Aruto

    2017-08-01

    The growth in health-conscious consumers continues to drive the demand for a wide variety of decaffeinated beverages. We previously developed a new technology using montmorillonite (MMT) in selective decaffeination of tea extract. This study evaluated and compared decaffeination of coffee extract using MMT and activated carbon (AC). MMT adsorbed caffeine without significant adsorption of caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs), feruloylquinic acids (FQAs), dicaffeoylquinic acids (di-CQAs), or caffeoylquinic lactones (CQLs). AC adsorbed caffeine, chlorogenic acids (CGAs) and CQLs simultaneously. The results suggested that the adsorption selectivity for caffeine in coffee extract is higher in MMT than AC. The caffeine adsorption isotherms of MMT in coffee extract fitted well to the Langmuir adsorption model. The adsorption properties in coffee extracts from the same species were comparable, regardless of roasting level and locality of growth. Our findings suggest that MMT is a useful adsorbent in the decaffeination of a wide range of coffee extracts.

  19. Exploring the Impacts of Postharvest Processing on the Microbiota and Metabolite Profiles during Green Coffee Bean Production

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyn, Florac; Zhang, Sophia Jiyuan; Pothakos, Vasileios; Torres, Julio; Lambot, Charles; Moroni, Alice V.; Callanan, Michael; Sybesma, Wilbert; Weckx, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The postharvest treatment and processing of fresh coffee cherries can impact the quality of the unroasted green coffee beans. In the present case study, freshly harvested Arabica coffee cherries were processed through two different wet and dry methods to monitor differences in the microbial community structure and in substrate and metabolite profiles. The changes were followed throughout the postharvest processing chain, from harvest to drying, by implementing up-to-date techniques, encompassing multiple-step metagenomic DNA extraction, high-throughput sequencing, and multiphasic metabolite target analysis. During wet processing, a cohort of lactic acid bacteria (i.e., Leuconostoc, Lactococcus, and Lactobacillus) was the most commonly identified microbial group, along with enterobacteria and yeasts (Pichia and Starmerella). Several of the metabolites associated with lactic acid bacterial metabolism (e.g., lactic acid, acetic acid, and mannitol) produced in the mucilage were also found in the endosperm. During dry processing, acetic acid bacteria (i.e., Acetobacter and Gluconobacter) were most abundant, along with Pichia and non-Pichia (Candida, Starmerella, and Saccharomycopsis) yeasts. Accumulation of associated metabolites (e.g., gluconic acid and sugar alcohols) took place in the drying outer layers of the coffee cherries. Consequently, both wet and dry processing methods significantly influenced the microbial community structures and hence the composition of the final green coffee beans. This systematic approach to dissecting the coffee ecosystem contributes to a deeper understanding of coffee processing and might constitute a state-of-the-art framework for the further analysis and subsequent control of this complex biotechnological process. IMPORTANCE Coffee production is a long process, starting with the harvest of coffee cherries and the on-farm drying of their beans. In a later stage, the dried green coffee beans are roasted and ground in order to

  20. Exploring the Impacts of Postharvest Processing on the Microbiota and Metabolite Profiles during Green Coffee Bean Production.

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, Florac; Zhang, Sophia Jiyuan; Pothakos, Vasileios; Torres, Julio; Lambot, Charles; Moroni, Alice V; Callanan, Michael; Sybesma, Wilbert; Weckx, Stefan; De Vuyst, Luc

    2017-01-01

    The postharvest treatment and processing of fresh coffee cherries can impact the quality of the unroasted green coffee beans. In the present case study, freshly harvested Arabica coffee cherries were processed through two different wet and dry methods to monitor differences in the microbial community structure and in substrate and metabolite profiles. The changes were followed throughout the postharvest processing chain, from harvest to drying, by implementing up-to-date techniques, encompassing multiple-step metagenomic DNA extraction, high-throughput sequencing, and multiphasic metabolite target analysis. During wet processing, a cohort of lactic acid bacteria (i.e., Leuconostoc, Lactococcus, and Lactobacillus) was the most commonly identified microbial group, along with enterobacteria and yeasts (Pichia and Starmerella). Several of the metabolites associated with lactic acid bacterial metabolism (e.g., lactic acid, acetic acid, and mannitol) produced in the mucilage were also found in the endosperm. During dry processing, acetic acid bacteria (i.e., Acetobacter and Gluconobacter) were most abundant, along with Pichia and non-Pichia (Candida, Starmerella, and Saccharomycopsis) yeasts. Accumulation of associated metabolites (e.g., gluconic acid and sugar alcohols) took place in the drying outer layers of the coffee cherries. Consequently, both wet and dry processing methods significantly influenced the microbial community structures and hence the composition of the final green coffee beans. This systematic approach to dissecting the coffee ecosystem contributes to a deeper understanding of coffee processing and might constitute a state-of-the-art framework for the further analysis and subsequent control of this complex biotechnological process. Coffee production is a long process, starting with the harvest of coffee cherries and the on-farm drying of their beans. In a later stage, the dried green coffee beans are roasted and ground in order to brew a cup of coffee

  1. [Comparison of green coffee beans volatiles chemical composition of Hainan main area].

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong-Suo; Chu, Zhong; Gu, Feng-Lin; Lu, Min-Quan; Lu, Shao-Fang; Wu, Gui-Ping; Tan, Le-He

    2013-02-01

    Chemical component of Hainan green coffee beans was analyzed with solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the discrepancy between two green coffee beans was differentiated through the spectrum database retrieval and retention index of compound characterization. The experimental results show that: the chemical composition of Wanning coffee beans and Chengmai coffee beans is basically the same. The quantity of analyzed compound in Wanning area coffee is 91, and in Chengmai area coffee is 106, the quantity of the same compound is 66, and the percent of the same component is 75.52%. The same compounds accounted for 89.86% of the total content of Wanning area coffee, and accounted for 85.70% of the total content of Chengmai area coffee.

  2. Supercritical fluid extraction from spent coffee grounds and coffee husks: antioxidant activity and effect of operational variables on extract composition.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Kátia S; Gonçalvez, Ricardo T; Maraschin, Marcelo; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria; Martínez, Julian; Ferreira, Sandra R S

    2012-01-15

    The present study describes the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of spent coffee grounds and coffee husks extracts, obtained by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with CO(2) and with CO(2) and co-solvent. In order to evaluate the high pressure method in terms of process yield, extract composition and antioxidant activity, low pressure methods, such as ultrasound (UE) and soxhlet (SOX) with different organic solvents, were also applied to obtain the extracts. The conditions for the SFE were: temperatures of 313.15K, 323.15K and 333.15K and pressures from 100 bar to 300 bar. The SFE kinetics and the mathematical modeling of the overall extraction curves (OEC) were also investigated. The extracts obtained by LPE (low pressure extraction) with ethanol showed the best results for the global extraction yield (X(0)) when compared to SFE results. The best extraction yield was 15±2% for spent coffee grounds with ethanol and 3.1±04% for coffee husks. The antioxidant potential was evaluated by DPPH method, ABTS method and Folin-Ciocalteau method. The best antioxidant activity was showed by coffee husk extracts obtained by LPE. The quantification and the identification of the extracts were accomplished using HPLC analysis. The main compounds identified were caffeine and chlorogenic acid for the supercritical extracts from coffee husks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Levels of Antioxidant Activity and Fluoride Content in Coffee Infusions of Arabica, Robusta and Green Coffee Beans in According to their Brewing Methods.

    PubMed

    Wolska, J; Janda, Katarzyna; Jakubczyk, K; Szymkowiak, M; Chlubek, D; Gutowska, I

    2017-10-01

    Coffee is a rich source of dietary antioxidants, and this property links with the fact that coffee is one of the world's most popular beverages. Moreover, it is a source of macro- and microelements, including fluoride. The aim of this work was to determine antioxidant activity of coffee beverages and fluoride content depending on different coffee species and conditions of brewing. Three species of coffee, arabica, robusta and green coffee beans obtained from retail stores in Szczecin (Poland) were analyzed. Five different techniques of preparing drink were used: simple infusion, french press, espresso maker, overflow espresso and Turkish coffee. Antioxidant potential of coffee beverages was investigated spectrophotometrically by DPPH method. Fluoride concentrations were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Statistical analysis was performed using Stat Soft Statistica 12.5. Antioxidant activity of infusions was high (71.97-83.21% inhibition of DPPH) depending on coffee species and beverage preparing method. It has been shown that the method of brewing arabica coffee and green coffee significantly affects the antioxidant potential of infusions. The fluoride concentration in the coffee infusions changed depending, both, on the species and conditions of brewing, too (0.013-0.502 mg/L). Methods of brewing didn't make a difference to the antioxidant potential of robusta coffee, which had also the lowest level of fluoride among studied species. Except overflow espresso, the fluoride content was the highest in beverages from green coffee. The highest fluoride content was found in Turkish coffee from green coffee beans.

  4. UHPLC-MS/MS determination of ochratoxin A and fumonisins in coffee using QuEChERS extraction combined with mixed-mode SPE purification.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Ngemela, Archard Ferdinand; Jensen, Lene Bai; de Medeiros, Lívia Soman; Rasmussen, Peter Have

    2015-01-28

    A method was developed for simultaneous determination of the mycotoxins: ochratoxin A (OTA) and fumonisins B2 (FB2), B4 (FB4), and B6 (FB6) in green, roasted, and instant coffee. Extraction was performed by QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) under acidic conditions followed by mixed-mode reversed phase-anion exchange solid phase extraction. OTA and FB2 were detected at levels down to 0.5 and 2 μg/kg by UHPLC-MS/MS and quantitated via isotope dilution using U-(13)C-labeled FB2 and OTA as internal standards. Mixing 20% isopropanol in the acetonitrile of the acidic UHPLC gradient system increased the signal intensity by 50% and decreased the ion-suppression with 50-75% in roasted coffee samples. About half of the roasted coffee samples (n = 57, from 9 countries) contained detectable levels of OTA, however, with only 5 samples above the EU regulatory limit of 5 μg/kg and the highest with 21 μg/kg. None of the 25 instant coffee samples contained OTA above the EU regulatory level of 10 μg/kg. Nonetheless, the toxin could be detected in 56% of the analyzed instant coffee samples. Fumonisins were not detected in any of the roasted or instant coffee samples (n = 82). However, in the green coffee samples (n = 18) almost half of the samples were positive with a maximum value of 164 μg/kg (sum of FB2, FB4, and FB6). This discrepancy between green coffee and processed coffees indicated that the fumonisins decompose during the roasting process, which was confirmed in roasting experiments. Here fumonisins could not be detected after roasting of the green, 164 μg/kg coffee, sample. Under the same conditions, OTA was reduced from 2.4 to 0.5 μg/kg.

  5. Phytochemical Characteristics of Coffee Bean Treated by Coating of Ginseng Extract

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sang Yoon; Hong, Hee-Do; Bae, Hye-Min; Choi, Changsun; Kim, Kyung-Tack

    2011-01-01

    The principal objective of this study was to assess the instrumental and sensory characteristics of ginseng coffee with different ratios of the ingredients: type of coffee bean (Colombia, Brazil, and Indonesia), type of ginseng extract (white ginseng, red ginseng, and America ginseng) and concentration of ginseng extract (3, 6, and 9 w/v %). The sensory optimal condition of white ginseng coffee, red ginseng coffee and America ginseng coffee were as follows: 3% Indonesian coffee bean coated with 3% white ginseng extract, Colombian coffee bean coated with 6% red ginseng extract and Colombian coffee bean coated with 3% American ginseng extract, respectively. In particular, the Colombian coffee bean coated with 6% red ginseng extract had significantly higher scores than other samples in terms of flavor, taste, and overall preference. Additionally, the contents of total ginsenoside and total sugar and total phenolic compounds were also highest in the Colombian coffee bean coated with 6% red ginseng extract. PMID:23717089

  6. The role of dissolved cations in coffee extraction.

    PubMed

    Hendon, Christopher H; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell

    2014-05-28

    The flavorsome compounds in coffee beans exist in the form of aprotic charge neutral species, as well as a collection of acids and conjugate salts. The dissolution and extraction of these organic molecules is a process dependent on the dissolved mineral content of the water. It is known that different rates and compositions of coffee extraction are achieved through the control of the water "impurities", Na(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), which coordinate to nucleophilic motifs in coffee. Using density functional theory, we quantify the thermodynamic binding energies of five familiar coffee-contained acids, caffeine, and a representative flavor component, eugenol. From this, we provide insight into the mechanism and ideal mineral composition of water for extraction of flavorsome compounds in coffee.

  7. Design of a sampling plan to detect ochratoxin A in green coffee.

    PubMed

    Vargas, E A; Whitaker, T B; Dos Santos, E A; Slate, A B; Lima, F B; Franca, R C A

    2006-01-01

    The establishment of maximum limits for ochratoxin A (OTA) in coffee by importing countries requires that coffee-producing countries develop scientifically based sampling plans to assess OTA contents in lots of green coffee before coffee enters the market thus reducing consumer exposure to OTA, minimizing the number of lots rejected, and reducing financial loss for producing countries. A study was carried out to design an official sampling plan to determine OTA in green coffee produced in Brazil. Twenty-five lots of green coffee (type 7 - approximately 160 defects) were sampled according to an experimental protocol where 16 test samples were taken from each lot (total of 16 kg) resulting in a total of 800 OTA analyses. The total, sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variances were 10.75 (CV = 65.6%), 7.80 (CV = 55.8%), 2.84 (CV = 33.7%), and 0.11 (CV = 6.6%), respectively, assuming a regulatory limit of 5 microg kg(-1) OTA and using a 1 kg sample, Romer RAS mill, 25 g sub-samples, and high performance liquid chromatography. The observed OTA distribution among the 16 OTA sample results was compared to several theoretical distributions. The 2 parameter-log normal distribution was selected to model OTA test results for green coffee as it gave the best fit across all 25 lot distributions. Specific computer software was developed using the variance and distribution information to predict the probability of accepting or rejecting coffee lots at specific OTA concentrations. The acceptation probability was used to compute an operating characteristic (OC) curve specific to a sampling plan design. The OC curve was used to predict the rejection of good lots (sellers' or exporters' risk) and the acceptance of bad lots (buyers' or importers' risk).

  8. Coffee and green tea consumption is associated with insulin resistance in Japanese adults.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ngoc Minh; Nanri, Akiko; Kochi, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Keisuke; Tsuruoka, Hiroko; Kurotani, Kayo; Akter, Shamima; Kabe, Isamu; Sato, Masao; Hayabuchi, Hitomi; Mizoue, Tetsuya

    2014-03-01

    Higher coffee and green tea consumption has been suggested to decrease risk of type 2 diabetes, but their roles in insulin resistance (IR) and insulin secretion remain unclear. This study examined the association between habitual consumption of these beverages and markers of glucose metabolism in a Japanese working population. Participants were 1440 Japanese employees (1151 men and 289 women) aged 18-69years. Consumption of coffee and green tea was ascertained via a validated brief diet history questionnaire. Multilevel linear regression was used to estimate means (95% confidence intervals) of fasting insulin, fasting plasma glucose, homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR), homeostatic model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with adjustment for potential confounding variables. Coffee consumption was significantly, inversely associated with HOMA-IR (P for trend=0.03), and the association appeared to be confined to overweight subjects (BMI≥25kg/m(2)) (P for trend=0.01, P for interaction=0.08). Unexpectedly, green tea consumption was positively associated with HOMA-IR (P for trend=0.02), though there was no dose-response relationship among daily consumers of green tea. Neither coffee nor green tea consumption was associated with HOMA-β and HbA1c. Our findings indicate that coffee consumption may be associated with decreased IR, but not with insulin secretion. The positive association between green tea consumption and IR warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Recognition of spectral identifier from green coffee beans of arabica and robusta varieties using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggraeni, Karina; Nasution, Aulia; Suyanto, Hery

    2016-11-01

    Coffee is one of the world's commodity that is cultivated in more than 50 countries. Production of coffee in Indonesia is positioned of fourth rank in the world, after Brazil, Vietnam, and Colombia. There are two varieties of coffee grown in Indonesia, i.e. the arabica and robusta. The chemical compositions between arabica and robusta are different each other. A trained coffee tester can distinguish these differences from its taste, but it is very subjective. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a spectroscopic technique based on the analysis of micro-plasma induced on the surface sample after being shot with a laser pulse. In this study, elemental spectra acquired using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique were analysed to differentate between green coffee beans of arabica and robusta, which are collected from plantations in Malang, Bondowoso, Prigen, and Pasuruan. Results show that optimum conditions for acquiring spectra from green coffee beans using LIBS are at 120 mJ of laser energy and 1,0 μs of delay time. Green coffee beans of arabica and robusta contain some elements such as Ca, W, Sr, Mg, Be, Na, H, N, K, Rb, and O. Discriminant analysis method was then applied to distinguish the green beans of arabica and robusta coffee. Element identifiers of green coffee beans are Ca, W, Mg, Be, Na, and Sr. The abundant element in green coffee beans is Calcium (Ca), and depth-profile testing shows that Ca is homogeneous inside the beans.

  10. Spent coffee grounds as a versatile source of green energy.

    PubMed

    Kondamudi, Narasimharao; Mohapatra, Susanta K; Misra, Mano

    2008-12-24

    The production of energy from renewable and waste materials is an attractive alternative to the conventional agricultural feed stocks such as corn and soybean. This paper describes an approach to extract oil from spent coffee grounds and to further transesterify the processed oil to convert it into biodiesel. This process yields 10-15% oil depending on the coffee species (Arabica or Robusta). The biodiesel derived from the coffee grounds (100% conversion of oil to biodiesel) was found to be stable for more than 1 month under ambient conditions. It is projected that 340 million gallons of biodiesel can be produced from the waste coffee grounds around the world. The coffee grounds after oil extraction are ideal materials for garden fertilizer, feedstock for ethanol, and as fuel pellets.

  11. Influences of Product Temperature on Emotional Responses to, and Sensory Attributes of, Coffee and Green Tea Beverages.

    PubMed

    Pramudya, Ragita C; Seo, Han-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Coffee and green tea are popular beverages consumed at both hot and cold temperatures. When people consume hot beverages concurrently with other activities, they may experience at different temperatures over the period of consumption. However, there has been limited research investigating the effects of product temperatures on emotional responses and sensory attributes of beverages. This study aimed to determine whether emotional responses to, and sensory attributes of, brewed coffee and green tea vary as a function of sample temperature. Using a check-all-that-apply (CATA) method, 157 participants (79 for coffee and 78 for green tea) were asked to evaluate either coffee or green tea samples served at cold (5°C), ambient (25°C), and hot (65°C) temperatures with respect to emotional responses and sensory attributes. The results showed that sample temperature could have significant influences on emotional responses to, and sensory attributes of, coffee and green tea samples. More specifically, 6 and 18 sensory attributes of coffee and green tea samples, respectively, significantly differed with sample temperature. Beverage samples evaluated at 65°C were characterized, regardless of activation/arousal level, by positive emotional responses terms and favorable sensory attributes. While beverages evaluated at 25°C were associated more with negative emotional responses with low activation/arousal, those evaluated at 5°C were more frequently characterized as having negative emotional responses with high activation/arousal. Sensory and emotional drivers of liking for both coffee and green tea differed both with sample temperature and gender. While both emotional responses and sensory attributes were identified as drivers of liking among females, only emotional responses were identified as drivers of liking among males. In conclusion, this study provides empirical evidence that both emotional responses to, and sensory attributes of, coffee and green tea beverages can

  12. Influences of Product Temperature on Emotional Responses to, and Sensory Attributes of, Coffee and Green Tea Beverages

    PubMed Central

    Pramudya, Ragita C.; Seo, Han-Seok

    2018-01-01

    Coffee and green tea are popular beverages consumed at both hot and cold temperatures. When people consume hot beverages concurrently with other activities, they may experience at different temperatures over the period of consumption. However, there has been limited research investigating the effects of product temperatures on emotional responses and sensory attributes of beverages. This study aimed to determine whether emotional responses to, and sensory attributes of, brewed coffee and green tea vary as a function of sample temperature. Using a check-all-that-apply (CATA) method, 157 participants (79 for coffee and 78 for green tea) were asked to evaluate either coffee or green tea samples served at cold (5°C), ambient (25°C), and hot (65°C) temperatures with respect to emotional responses and sensory attributes. The results showed that sample temperature could have significant influences on emotional responses to, and sensory attributes of, coffee and green tea samples. More specifically, 6 and 18 sensory attributes of coffee and green tea samples, respectively, significantly differed with sample temperature. Beverage samples evaluated at 65°C were characterized, regardless of activation/arousal level, by positive emotional responses terms and favorable sensory attributes. While beverages evaluated at 25°C were associated more with negative emotional responses with low activation/arousal, those evaluated at 5°C were more frequently characterized as having negative emotional responses with high activation/arousal. Sensory and emotional drivers of liking for both coffee and green tea differed both with sample temperature and gender. While both emotional responses and sensory attributes were identified as drivers of liking among females, only emotional responses were identified as drivers of liking among males. In conclusion, this study provides empirical evidence that both emotional responses to, and sensory attributes of, coffee and green tea beverages can

  13. Elemental detection of arabica and robusta green bean coffee using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Meilina, Hesti; Hedwig, Rinda; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    The elemental detection of green bean of arabica and robusta coffee from Gayo Highland, Aceh-Indonesia, has been identified by using fundamental Nd-YAG Laser at 10 Torr of surrounding air gas pressure for distinguishing the characteristics of both coffees. As the preliminary study, we have detected the elements of K 766.49 nm, Na 588.9 nm, Ca 393.3 nm, CN band at 388.3 nm, N 337.13 nm and C 247.8 nm of both coffees. It is noticed that the order of elements concentration from highest to lowest are Ca>K>CN> Na>N> C for arabica and K>Ca>CN >Na>C>N for robusta. The emission intensity of K 766.49 nm is almost same for both of coffee. However, the emission intensity of Na 588.9 nm is lower in Arabica coffee. To distinguish the Arabica coffee and Robusta Coffee, we take the ratio intensity of K/C, Na/C, CN/C, and Ca/C. It is found that the ratio intensities of CN/C and Ca/C in arabica bean are significantly different with robusta bean. That ratio intensities can be used as a marker to discriminate kind of coffee. We also noted that the arabica green bean is 1.3 harder than robusta green bean. These findings prove that the technique of laser-induced plasma spectroscopy can be used to make rapid identification of elements in coffee and can potentially be applied to measure the concentration of blended coffee for the purpose of authentication.

  14. Caffeine Extraction from Raw and Roasted Coffee Beans.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Donyau; Lin, Chih-Yang; Hu, Chen-Ti; Lee, Sanboh

    2018-04-01

    Coffee is a stimulant, psychoactive, popular daily beverage, and its caffeine affects human physiological health and behavior. These important issues prompted us to study caffeine extraction from both the raw and roasted coffee beans of 3 types at different temperatures. A hemispheric model is developed to simulate the extraction process of the caffeine from the coffee beans of hemisphere is proposed. The experimental data are in good agreement with the predicted model. The effective diffusivities of caffeine in both the raw and roasted beans increase with temperature in all 3 types. An incubation period, decreasing with increasing temperature, is observed in all samples studied. Caffeine extraction in roasted beans is more rapid than that for the raw beans and the time difference is significant at low temperatures. In both the raw and roasted samples, caffeine diffusion in the raw beans and the incubation behavior are thermally activated processes. Single activation energies are obtained for diffusion within the extraction temperature range for all beans tested with the exception of one type of the coffee beans, Mandheling, which exhibits 2 activation energies in raw samples. The surface energies of the epidermis of the raw beans and roasted beans obtained from the contact angle measurements are used to interpret the difference of incubation periods. This study has a potential application to the decaffeinated coffee industry.Caffeine affects human physiological health and behavior so that caffeine extraction from coffee beans of different types at different temperatures is important for product refining and customers. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  15. Chemical characterisation of non-defective and defective green arabica and robusta coffees by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Juliana C F; Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S; Nunes, Marcella

    2008-11-15

    The coffee roasted in Brazil is considered to be of low quality, due to the presence of defective coffee beans that depreciate the beverage quality. These beans, although being separated from the non-defective ones prior to roasting, are still commercialized in the coffee trading market. Thus, it was the aim of this work to verify the feasibility of employing ESI-MS to identify chemical characteristics that will allow the discrimination of Arabica and Robusta species and also of defective and non-defective coffees. Aqueous extracts of green (raw) defective and non-defective coffee beans were analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and this technique provided characteristic fingerprinting mass spectra that not only allowed for discrimination of species but also between defective and non-defective coffee beans. ESI-MS profiles in the positive mode (ESI(+)-MS) provided separation between defective and non-defective coffees within a given species, whereas ESI-MS profiles in the negative mode (ESI(-)-MS) provided separation between Arabica and Robusta coffees. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antioxidant and genoprotective effects of spent coffee extracts in human cells.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Jimena; Arbillaga, Leire; de Peña, M Paz; Cid, Concepcion

    2013-10-01

    Spent coffee has been shown as a good source of hydrophilic antioxidant compounds. The ability of two spent coffee extracts rich in caffeoylquinic acids, mainly dicaffeoylquinic acids, and caffeine (Arabica filter and Robusta espresso) to protect against oxidation and DNA damage in human cells (HeLa) was evaluated at short (2 h) and long (24 h) exposure times. Cell viability (MTT) was not affected by spent coffee extracts (>80%) up to 1000 μg/mL after 2 h. Both spent coffee extracts significantly reduced the increase of ROS level and DNA strand breaks (29-73% protection by comet assay) induced by H₂O₂. Pretreatment of cells with robusta spent coffee extract also decreased Ro photosensitizer-induced oxidative DNA damage after 24 h exposure. The higher effectiveness of Robusta spent coffee extract, with less caffeoylquinic acids and melanoidins, might be due to other antioxidant compounds, such as caffeine and other Maillard reaction products. This work evidences the potential antioxidant and genoprotective properties of spent coffee in human cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid sucrose monitoring in green coffee samples using multienzymatic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Stredansky, Miroslav; Redivo, Luca; Magdolen, Peter; Stredansky, Adam; Navarini, Luciano

    2018-07-15

    Amperometric biosensor utilizing FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FAD-GDH) for a specific sucrose monitoring in green coffee is described. FAD-GDH was co-immobilized with invertase and mutarotase on a thin-layer gold planar electrode using chitosan. The biosensor showed a wide linearity (from 10 to 1200 μM), low detection limit (8.4 μM), fast response time (50 s), and appeared to be O2 independent. In addition the biosensors exhibited a good operational (3 days) and storage (1 year) stability. Finally, the results achieved from the biosensor measurements of sucrose in 17 samples of green coffee (Coffea arabica, C. canephora and C. liberica) were compared with those obtained by the standard HPLC method. The good correlation among results of real samples, satisfactory analytical performance and simple use of the presented biosensor make it suitable for application in coffee industry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanofiltration for concentration of roasted coffee extract: From bench to pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dat, Lai Quoc; Quyen, Nguyen Thi Ngoc

    2017-09-01

    This paper focused on the application of nanofiltration (NF) for concentration of the roasted coffee extract in instant coffee processing. Three kinds of NF membranes were screened for separation capacity of total dry solid (TDS), polyphenols (PPs) and caffeine in roasted coffee extract and NF99 membrane showed the good performance for the NF of the extract. The crossflow NF with NF99 membrane at pilot scale was investigated for technical assessment of concentration of roasted coffee extract. Maximum theoretical concentration was estimated as 6.06. Recovery yields of TDS, PPs and caffeine were higher than 70% at 4.4 of concentration factor. The content of TDS in accumulative permeate was lower than 2.0 g/L. The fouling of NF was also solved by the suitable cleaning procedure with recovery index being 97.7%. Results of research indicate that it is feasible to apply NF for concentration of the roasted coffee extract in instant coffee production.

  19. Plasma appearance and correlation between coffee and green tea metabolites in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Mathieu; Guy, Philippe; Marmet, Cynthia; Longet, Karin; Fraering, Anne-Lise; Moulin, Julie; Barron, Denis; Dionisi, Fabiola; Cavin, Christophe; Steiling, Heike; Williamson, Gary

    2010-12-01

    Coffee and green tea are two of the most widely consumed hot beverages in the world. Their respective bioavailability has been studied separately, but absorption of their respective bioactive phenolics has not been compared. In a randomised cross-over design, nine healthy subjects drank instant coffee and green tea. Blood samples were collected over 12 h and at 24 h to assess return to baseline. After green tea consumption, (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC) was the major catechin, appearing rapidly in the plasma; (-)-EGC gallate (EGCg) and (-)-epicatechin (EC) were also present, but (-)-EC gallate and C were not detected. Dihydroferulic acid and dihydrocaffeic acid were the major metabolites that appeared after coffee consumption with a long time needed to reach maximum plasma concentration, suggesting metabolism and absorption in the colon. Other phenolic acid equivalents (caffeic acid (CA), ferulic acid (FA) and isoferulic acid (iFA)) were detected earlier, and they peaked at lower concentrations. Summations of the plasma area under the curves (AUC) for the measured metabolites showed 1.7-fold more coffee-derived phenolic acids than green tea-derived catechins (P = 0.0014). Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between coffee metabolites based on AUC. Inter-individual differences were observed, but individuals with a high level of CA also showed a correspondingly high level of FA. However, no such correlation was observed between the tea catechins and coffee phenolic acids. Correlation between AUC and maximum plasma concentration was also significant for CA, FA and iFA and for EGCg. This implies that the mechanisms of absorption for these two classes of compounds are different, and that a high absorber of phenolic acids is not necessarily a high absorber of catechins.

  20. Pulverization of coffee silverskin extract as a source of antioxidant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S.; Kusumocahyo, S. P.; Widiputri, D. I.

    2016-11-01

    Coffee silverskin (CS) is waste from coffee roasting process that has a value as source of antioxidant. In this research, two types of variant coffee Robusta and Arabica CS were extracted for their phenolic content, flavonoid content, and antioxidant activity. The extraction was done at 40°C for 60 minutes using hydroalcoholic solvent. The phenolic, flavonoid content, and antioxidant activity of Robusta CS extract were 816.75 ± 63.24 mg GAE/L and 32.82 ± 2.47 mg QE/L, and 54.80% inhibition respectively, while for Arabica CS extract were 473.51 ± 56.70 mg GAE/L, 18.58 ± 2.47 mg QE/L, and 26.30% inhibition respectively. Thus, the Robusta coffee silverskin extract has higher value of total phenolic content, flavonoid content, and antioxidant activity than Arabica coffee silverskin extract. To produce high antioxidant powder of CS extract, the effect of drying method (freeze drying and spray drying) affecting the phenolic content, flavonoid content, and antioxidant activity was evaluated. The effect of evaporation prior to both drying processes was also evaluated. Evaporation caused up to 23% of total phenolic content degradation. Spray drying resulted in dried CS extract with degradation of total phenolic content up to 17%. On the other hand, freeze drying resulted no major degradation of total phenolic content. However, the coffee silverskin extract can be directly spray dried without evaporation resulting in higher amount of phenolic content in the powder than the one which was evaporated first.

  1. A Prospective Randomized, Double-Blind, Two-Period Crossover Pharmacokinetic Trial Comparing Green Coffee Bean Extract-A Botanically Sourced Caffeine-With a Synthetic USP Control.

    PubMed

    Morton, Kayce; Knight, Katelin; Kalman, Douglas; Hewlings, Susan

    2018-04-16

    Coffee is a primary dietary source of the chlorogenic acids (CGAs) of phenolic compounds. Coffee contains caffeine and other phytonutrients, including CGAs. Caffeine on its own has been well characterized and descried pharmacokinetically in the literature, less so for CGAs. The purpose of this double-blind crossover study was to determine the comparative pharmacokinetics of CGAs with caffeine (natural extract) with synthetic caffeine (US Pharmacopeia [USP] standard). Sixteen healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to take 1 dose of product 1, 60 mg of botanically sourced caffeine from 480 mg of green coffee bean extract, or product 2, 60 mg of synthetic USP caffeine, with 5 days between. Blood analysis was done to determine the levels of CGA compounds, more specifically 3-, 4-, and 5-caffeoylquinic acid (CQA), and serum caffeine. The natural caffeine extract exhibited mean peak concentrations (C max ) of 3-CQA (11.4 ng/mL), 4-CQA (6.84 ng/mL), and 5-CQA (7.20 ng/mL). The mean systemic 4-hour exposure (AUC 0-4 h ) was 3-CQA (27.3 ng·h/mL), 4-CQA (16.1 ng·h/mL), and 5-CQA (15.7 ng·h/mL). The median t max was 3-CQA (1.00 hour), 4-CQA (1.00 hour), and 5-CQA (1.50 hours). The t max of caffeine was 0.75 hours (natural extract) and 0.63 hours (synthetic caffeine). C max and AUC 0-4 h of serum caffeine were statistically equivalent between products. The geometric least-squares mean ratios (GMRs) of C max and AUC 0-4 h of caffeine were 97.77% (natural extract) and 98.33% (synthetic caffeine). It would appear that CGA compounds from the natural caffeine extract are bioavailable, and 3-CGA may be the compound most absorbed. In addition, caffeine sourced from natural extract versus synthetic were statistically similar for pharmacokinetic parameters. There were no adverse events or safety concerns. © 2018 The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Tea, coffee, and cocoa as ultraviolet radiation protectants for the beet armyworm nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    El-Salamouny, S; Ranwala, D; Shapiro, M; Shepard, B M; Farrar, Robert R

    2009-10-01

    The addition of 1% (wt:vol) aqueous extracts of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) (Malvales: Malvaceae), coffee (Coffea arabica L.) (Gentianales: Rubiaceae), and green and black tea (Camellia sinensis L.) (Ericales: Theaceae) provided excellent UV radiation protection for the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), nucleopolyhedrovirus under laboratory conditions. Aqueous extracts of coffee, green tea, and black tea at 0.5% provided 85-100% UV protection, whereas cocoa provided 50% UV protection. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a component of green tea, and caffeine, a component of tea and coffee, also were tested as UV protectants. Both compounds were ineffective when tested alone. When EGCG and caffeine were combined, UV protection increased in a synergistic manner, but <35% of the original virus activity was maintained. This study demonstrated that coffee was comparable to green tea and black tea as a UV protectant. Further studies should be conducted to optimize their use in biopesticide formulations.

  3. Effect of Green Coffee Consumption on Resting Energy Expenditure, Blood Pressure, and Body Temperature in Healthy Women: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Acar-Tek, Nilüfer; Aǧagündüz, Duygu; Ayhan, Büşra

    2018-05-03

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of green coffee consumption on resting energy expenditures (REEs), blood pressure, and body temperature of individuals. The study was conducted with 24 women. The REE values of the individuals were measured with the COSMED Fitmate PRO. After the first REE measurements, individuals were given 1 cup of green coffee that was prepared to contain 6 mg caffeine per kg of lean body mass. After coffee consumption, REE measurements were made at 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes. Blood pressure (mm Hg) and body temperature values (°C) were measured simultaneously with REE measurement. There was a positive correlation between the caffeine amounts given with green coffee and 30-minute (p < 0.05), 60-minute (p = 0.06), and 120-minute (p < 0.05) REE (kcal/d) values. There was also a positive correlation between the total chlorogenic acid taken with green coffee and 30-minute (p < 0.05), 60-minute (p = 0.06), and 120-minute (p < 0.05) REE (kcal/d) values. The intracellular and extracellular fluid amounts liter(l) before and after consumption of green coffee by individuals were 18.7 ± 1.57 versus 18.6 ± 1.44 (p < 0.05) and 11.4 ± 1.01 versus 11.2 ± 0.97 (p < 0.05), respectively. The body temperature (°C) changes observed in the individuals whose usual dietary caffeine intake was less than or equal to the 50th percentile after green coffee consumption were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Similarly, the diastolic blood pressure changes observed in the individuals whose usual dietary caffeine intake was less than or equal to the 50th percentile after green coffee consumption was almost statistically significant (p = 0.06). The results of this study showed that 6 mg caffeine/kg (lean body mass) intake among women changed body temperature and blood pressure values and liquid balance depending on the usual dietary coffee intake. In addition, chlorogenic acid is also correlated with REE values besides green coffee caffeine. Key

  4. Development of new analytical methods for the determination of caffeine content in aqueous solution of green coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Weldegebreal, Blen; Redi-Abshiro, Mesfin; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2017-12-05

    This study was conducted to develop fast and cost effective methods for the determination of caffeine in green coffee beans. In the present work direct determination of caffeine in aqueous solution of green coffee bean was performed using FT-IR-ATR and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Caffeine was also directly determined in dimethylformamide solution using NIR spectroscopy with univariate calibration technique. The percentage of caffeine for the same sample of green coffee beans was determined using the three newly developed methods. The caffeine content of the green coffee beans was found to be 1.52 ± 0.09 (% w/w) using FT-IR-ATR, 1.50 ± 0.14 (% w/w) using NIR and 1.50 ± 0.05 (% w/w) using fluorescence spectroscopy. The means of the three methods were compared by applying one way analysis of variance and at p = 0.05 significance level the means were not significantly different. The percentage of caffeine in the same sample of green coffee bean was also determined by using the literature reported UV/Vis spectrophotometric method for comparison and found to be 1.40 ± 0.02 (% w/w). New simple, rapid and inexpensive methods were developed for direct determination of caffeine content in aqueous solution of green coffee beans using FT-IR-ATR and fluorescence spectrophotometries. NIR spectrophotometry can also be used as alternative choice of caffeine determination using reduced amount of organic solvent (dimethylformamide) and univariate calibration technique. These analytical methods may therefore, be recommended for the rapid, simple, safe and cost effective determination of caffeine in green coffee beans.

  5. Early detection of fungal contamination on green coffee by a MOX sensors based Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sberveglieri, V.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.; Gobbi, E.; Pulvirenti, A.; Fava, P.

    2011-09-01

    Fungal growth can occur on green coffee beans along all the distribution chain, eventually bringing on health hazards to consumers, because of the production of toxic metabolites (mycotoxins) [1]. Besides, the sensorial contamination due to volatiles by-products of fungal metabolism could cause defects on coffee also after roasting. Therefore, it is necessary to devise strategies to detect and quantify fungal infection and toxin production at early stages of the food chain. One of the most promising techniques is the analysis of volatile compounds in the headspace gas surrounding the samples. The aim of this work was to verify the ability of the Electronic Nose (EN EOS835) to early detect the microbial contamination of Arabica green coffee. This EN is equipped with Metal Oxide Semiconductor sensor array. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the static headspace of non-contaminated Arabica green coffee samples was carried out to confirm the EN ability to provide satisfactory indications about the presence of contamination.

  6. Extraction of coffee silverskin to convert waste into a source of antioxidant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangguh, Patrick; Kusumocahyo, Samuel P.

    2017-01-01

    Coffee silverskin (CS) is a thin layer of coffee bean, and is regarded as a waste during coffee roasting process. In this work, coffee silverskin was extracted by three types of method: conventional extraction (CE) with agitation, conventional extraction (CE) without agitation and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). The total phenolic content, the total flavonoid content and the antioxidant activity of the extract were analyzed. It was found that the type of extraction method, the extraction time and the extraction temperature strongly influenced the total phenolic content, the total flavonoid content and the antioxidant activity of the extract. Comparison between conventional extraction (CE) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) were statistically analyzed using 3-way ANOVA test. The optimum extraction time and temperature for each method were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA test. It was found that the optimum condition to obtain a high antioxidant activity of 68.9% was by using CE with agitation with the extraction time and temperature of 60 minutes and 60˚C, respectively.

  7. Flutriafol and pyraclostrobin residues in Brazilian green coffees.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luiz Alberto Bandeira; Pacheco, Henrique Poltronieri; Scherer, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to monitor flutriafol and pyraclostrobin residues in Brazilian green coffees. More than 10,000 samples were analyzed. The pesticides were extracted using the QuEChERS method and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The validated method is fast, with 5 min runs, and efficient, as precision and accuracy showed RSD no greater than 5% and recoveries within the 88-119% range. LOQ for flutriafol and pyraclostrobin were 0.005 mg/kg. The results of the analyzed samples showed that the percentage of nonconformities regarding flutriafol increased throughout the years, with over 1200 samples (11.8%). On the other hand, just 15 samples (0.15%) presented residues above 10 μg/kg for pyraclostrobin. Considering that flutriafol is a toxic and carcinogenic pesticide, as well as the increase in the number of irregularities throughout the years, it becomes important to implement public actions to assure consumer safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid prediction of single green coffee bean moisture and lipid content by hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Caporaso, Nicola; Whitworth, Martin B; Grebby, Stephen; Fisk, Ian D

    2018-06-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (1000-2500 nm) was used for rapid prediction of moisture and total lipid content in intact green coffee beans on a single bean basis. Arabica and Robusta samples from several growing locations were scanned using a "push-broom" system. Hypercubes were segmented to select single beans, and average spectra were measured for each bean. Partial Least Squares regression was used to build quantitative prediction models on single beans (n = 320-350). The models exhibited good performance and acceptable prediction errors of ∼0.28% for moisture and ∼0.89% for lipids. This study represents the first time that HSI-based quantitative prediction models have been developed for coffee, and specifically green coffee beans. In addition, this is the first attempt to build such models using single intact coffee beans. The composition variability between beans was studied, and fat and moisture distribution were visualized within individual coffee beans. This rapid, non-destructive approach could have important applications for research laboratories, breeding programmes, and for rapid screening for industry.

  9. Eco-sustainable systems based on poly(lactic acid), diatomite and coffee grounds extract for food packaging.

    PubMed

    Cacciotti, Ilaria; Mori, Stefano; Cherubini, Valeria; Nanni, Francesca

    2018-06-01

    In the food packaging sector many efforts have been (and are) devoted to the development of new materials in order to reply to an urgent market demand for green and eco-sustainable products. Particularly a lot of attention is currently devoted both to the use of compostable and biobased polymers as innovative and promising alternative to the currently used petrochemical derived polymers, and to the re-use of waste materials coming from agriculture and food industry. In this work, multifunctional eco-sustainable systems, based on poly(lactic acid) (PLA) as biopolymeric matrix, diatomaceous earth as reinforcing filler and spent coffee grounds extract as oxygen scavenger, were produced for the first time, in order to provide a simultaneous improvement of mechanical and gas barrier properties. The influence of the diatomite and the spent coffee grounds extract on the microstructural, mechanical and oxygen barrier properties of the produced films was deeply investigated by means of X-Ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, ATR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), uniaxial tensile tests, O 2 permeabilimetry measurements. An improvement of both mechanical and oxygen barrier properties was recorded for systems characterised by the co-presence of diatomite and coffee grounds extract, suggesting a possible synergic effect of the two additives. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Coffee extracts suppress tryptophan breakdown in mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gostner, Johanna M; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Jenny, Marcel; Klein, Angela; Ueberall, Florian; Schennach, Harald; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Coffee consumption is considered to exert an influence on mood, the immune system, cardiovascular disease, and cancer development, but the mechanisms of action of coffee and its compounds are only partly known and understood. Immunomodulatory effects of filtered extracts of coffee and decaffeinated coffee as well as coffee compounds were investigated in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA). The activation of PBMCs was monitored by the breakdown of tryptophan to kynurenine via enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and the production of the immune activation marker neopterin by GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GCH1). Both of these biochemical pathways are induced during cellular immune activation in response to the Th1-type cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Filtered extracts of coffee and decaffeinated coffee both suppressed tryptophan breakdown and neopterin formation in mitogen-stimulated PBMCs efficiently and in a dose-dependent manner. Of 4 coffee compounds tested individually, only gallic acid and less strong also caffeic acid had a consistent suppressive influence but also affected cell viability, whereas pure caffeine and chlorogenic acid exerted no relevant effect in the PBMC assay. The parallel influence of extracts on tryptophan breakdown and neopterin production shows an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive property of coffee extracts and some of its compounds. When extrapolating the in vitro results to in vivo, IFN-γ-mediated breakdown of tryptophan could be counteracted by the consumption of coffee or decaffeinated coffee. This may increase tryptophan availability for the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) and thereby improve mood and quality of life.

  11. A validated UHPLC method for the determination of caffeoylquinic and di-caffeoylquinic acids in green coffee extracts using an RP-Amide fused-core column.

    PubMed

    Fibigr, Jakub; Majorová, Michaela; Kočová Vlčková, Hana; Solich, Petr; Šatínský, Dalibor

    2018-03-20

    The presented work describes the development and validation of a rapid UHPLC-UV method using a fused core particle column with an RP-Amide stationary phase for the separation and quantitative analysis of caffeoylquinic and di-caffeoylquinic acids in green coffee extracts. Three caffeoylquinic acids (3-caffeoylquinic acid, 4-caffeoylquinic acid, and 5-caffeoylquinic acid) and two di-caffeoylquinic acids (1,3-di-caffeoylquinic acid, and 3,5-di-caffeoylquinic acid) were separated and analyzed in 8 min. That was possible due to the unique selectivity of the RP-Amide stationary phase for the analyzed acids. The retention behavior of all analytes under different compositions of the mobile phase on different columns was evaluated in this study. The optimal chromatographic separation was performed using an Ascentis Express RP-Amide (100 × 2.1 mm) fused-core column with a particle size of 2.7 μm at a temperature of 30 °C. For validation of the newly developed method, acetonitrile was used as mobile phase B and 5% formic acid, filtrated through a 0.22 μm filter, was used as mobile phase A. They were delivered at a flow rate of 0.9 mL min -1 according to the elution gradient program. The detection wavelength was set at 325 nm. A solid-liquid extraction with a solution of methanol and a 5% water solution of formic acid (25 + 75 v/v) using an ultrasonic bath was chosen for the preparation of the available commercial samples of food supplements containing a green coffee extract. Recoveries for all analyzed acids were 98.2-101.0% and the relative standard deviation ranged from 0.3% to 1.4% for intra-day and from 0.3% to 3.0% for inter-day repeatability. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.30-0.53 μg mL -1 . Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity, and the Effect of the Aqueous Extract of Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) Bean Residual Press Cake on the Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Affonso, Regina Celis Lopes; Voytena, Ana Paula Lorenzen; Fanan, Simone; Pitz, Heloísa; Coelho, Daniela Sousa; Horstmann, Ana Luiza; Pereira, Aline; Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Hillmann, Maria Clara; Varela, Lucas Andre Calbusch; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The world coffee consumption has been growing for its appreciated taste and its beneficial effects on health. The residual biomass of coffee, originated in the food industry after oil extraction from coffee beans, called coffee beans residual press cake, has attracted interest as a source of compounds with antioxidant activity. This study investigated the chemical composition of aqueous extracts of coffee beans residual press cake (AE), their antioxidant activity, and the effect of topical application on the skin wound healing, in animal model, of hydrogels containing the AE, chlorogenic acid (CGA), allantoin (positive control), and carbopol (negative control). The treatments' performance was compared by measuring the reduction of the wound area, with superior result ( p < 0.05) for the green coffee AE (78.20%) with respect to roasted coffee AE (53.71%), allantoin (70.83%), and carbopol (23.56%). CGA hydrogels reduced significantly the wound area size on the inflammatory phase, which may be associated with the well known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions of that compound. The topic use of the coffee AE studied improved the skin wound healing and points to an interesting biotechnological application of the coffee bean residual press cake.

  13. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity, and the Effect of the Aqueous Extract of Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) Bean Residual Press Cake on the Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Voytena, Ana Paula Lorenzen; Fanan, Simone; Pitz, Heloísa; Coelho, Daniela Sousa; Horstmann, Ana Luiza; Pereira, Aline; Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Hillmann, Maria Clara; Varela, Lucas Andre Calbusch; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The world coffee consumption has been growing for its appreciated taste and its beneficial effects on health. The residual biomass of coffee, originated in the food industry after oil extraction from coffee beans, called coffee beans residual press cake, has attracted interest as a source of compounds with antioxidant activity. This study investigated the chemical composition of aqueous extracts of coffee beans residual press cake (AE), their antioxidant activity, and the effect of topical application on the skin wound healing, in animal model, of hydrogels containing the AE, chlorogenic acid (CGA), allantoin (positive control), and carbopol (negative control). The treatments' performance was compared by measuring the reduction of the wound area, with superior result (p < 0.05) for the green coffee AE (78.20%) with respect to roasted coffee AE (53.71%), allantoin (70.83%), and carbopol (23.56%). CGA hydrogels reduced significantly the wound area size on the inflammatory phase, which may be associated with the well known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions of that compound. The topic use of the coffee AE studied improved the skin wound healing and points to an interesting biotechnological application of the coffee bean residual press cake. PMID:27965732

  14. Coffee consumption but not green tea consumption is associated with adiponectin levels in Japanese males.

    PubMed

    Imatoh, T; Tanihara, S; Miyazaki, M; Momose, Y; Uryu, Y; Une, H

    2011-06-01

    Coffee is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world. Numerous epidemiological studies have reported a significant inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Therefore, we conducted an epidemiological study to clarify the relationship between coffee consumption and adiponectin levels in Japanese males. We also evaluated whether green tea consumption affected adiponectin levels. We carried out a cross-sectional study. The subjects were 665 male employees in Japan. Coffee consumption was assessed, using a self-administered questionnaire, as the number of times per week and cups per day respondents drank, and subjects were grouped into four levels (non, 1-5 times/week, 1-2 cups/day and ≥3 cups/day). The means of adiponectin levels were positively associated with coffee consumption. A dose-response relationship was found between coffee consumption and circulating adiponectin levels. The relationship remained significant after adjustment for potential confounding factors (P for trend <0.05). However, green tea consumption was not significantly associated with adiponectin levels (P for trend = 0.90). We not only revealed that habitual coffee consumption is associated with higher adiponectin levels in Japanese males but also found a dose-dependent association between coffee consumption and adiponectin levels. Therefore, our study suggested that coffee components might play an important role in the elevation of adiponectin level.

  15. Chlorogenic acids and lactones in regular and water-decaffeinated arabica coffees.

    PubMed

    Farah, Adriana; de Paulis, Tomas; Moreira, Daniel P; Trugo, Luiz C; Martin, Peter R

    2006-01-25

    The market for decaffeinated coffees has been increasingly expanding over the years. Caffeine extraction may result in losses of other compounds such as chlorogenic acids (CGA) and, consequently, their 1,5-gamma-quinolactones (CGL) in roasted coffee. These phenolic compounds are important for flavor formation as well as the health effects of coffee; therefore, losses due to decaffeination need to be investigated. The present study evaluates the impact of decaffeination processing on CGA and CGL levels of green and roasted arabica coffees. Decaffeination produced a 16% average increase in the levels of total CGA in green coffee (dry matter), along with a 237% increase in CGL direct precursors. Different degrees of roasting showed average increments of 5.5-18% in CGL levels of decaffeinated coffee, compared to regular, a change more consistent with observed levels of total CGA than with those of CGL direct precursors in green samples. On the other hand, CGA levels in roasted coffee were 3-9% lower in decaffeinated coffee compared to regular coffee. Although differences in CGA and CGL contents of regular and decaffeinated roasted coffees appear to be relatively small, they may be enough to affect flavor characteristics as well as the biopharmacological properties of the final beverage, suggesting the need for further study.

  16. Effect of Microwave Vacuum Drying on the Drying Characteristics, Color, Microstructure, and Antioxidant Activity of Green Coffee Beans.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjiang; Cheng, Ke; Hu, Rongsuo; Chu, Zhong; Zhao, Jianping; Long, Yuzhou

    2018-05-11

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of microwave vacuum drying (MVD) on the drying characteristics and quality attributes of green coffee beans. We specifically focused on the effective moisture diffusion coefficient ( D eff ), surface temperature, glass transition temperature ( T g ), water state, and microstructure. The kinetics of color changes during drying, total phenolic content (TPC), and antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP, and ABTS) were also characterized. Microwave power during MVD affected the porosity of coffee beans, their color, TPC, and antioxidant activity. The Allometric 1 model was the most suitable for simulating surface temperature rise kinetics. Thermal processing of green coffee beans resulted in increased b* , L* , Δ E , and TPC values, and greater antioxidant capacity. These findings may provide a theoretical reference for the technical improvement, mechanisms of flavor compound formation, and quality control of dried green coffee beans.

  17. A new species of myrmecophilous lady beetle in the genus Diomus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Diomini) from Chiapas, Mexico that feeds on green coffee scale, Coccus viridis (Green) (Hemiptera: Coccidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species of myrmecophilous lady beetle in the genus Diomus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Diomini) is described from a coffee agroecosystem in Chiapas, Mexico. The new species was found preying on the green coffee scale pest, Coccus viridis (Green), tended primarily by Azteca sericeasur Longino an...

  18. Biological activity of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles depends on the applied natural extracts: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Rónavári, Andrea; Kovács, Dávid; Igaz, Nóra; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Boros, Imre Miklós; Kónya, Zoltán; Pfeiffer, Ilona; Kiricsi, Mónika

    2017-01-01

    Due to obvious disadvantages of the classical chemical methods, green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles has attracted tremendous attention in recent years. Numerous environmentally benign synthesis methods have been developed yielding nanoparticles via low-cost, eco-friendly, and simple approaches. In this study, our aim was to determine the suitability of coffee and green tea extracts in green synthesis of silver nanoparticles as well as to compare the performance of the obtained materials in different biological systems. We successfully produced silver nanoparticles (C-AgNP and GT-AgNP) using coffee and green tea extracts; moreover, based on our comprehensive screening, we delineated major differences in the biological activity of C-AgNPs and GT-AgNPs. Our results indicate that although GT-AgNPs exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against all the examined microbial pathogens, these particles were also highly toxic to mammalian cells, which limits their potential applications. On the contrary, C-AgNPs manifested substantial inhibitory action on the tested microbes but were nontoxic to human and mouse cells, indicating an outstanding capacity to discriminate between potential pathogens and mammalian cells. These results clearly show that the various green materials used for stabilization and for reduction of metal ions have a defining role in determining and fine-tuning the biological activity of the obtained nanoparticles.

  19. Biological activity of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles depends on the applied natural extracts: a comprehensive study

    PubMed Central

    Rónavári, Andrea; Kovács, Dávid; Igaz, Nóra; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Boros, Imre Miklós; Kónya, Zoltán; Pfeiffer, Ilona; Kiricsi, Mónika

    2017-01-01

    Due to obvious disadvantages of the classical chemical methods, green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles has attracted tremendous attention in recent years. Numerous environmentally benign synthesis methods have been developed yielding nanoparticles via low-cost, eco-friendly, and simple approaches. In this study, our aim was to determine the suitability of coffee and green tea extracts in green synthesis of silver nanoparticles as well as to compare the performance of the obtained materials in different biological systems. We successfully produced silver nanoparticles (C-AgNP and GT-AgNP) using coffee and green tea extracts; moreover, based on our comprehensive screening, we delineated major differences in the biological activity of C-AgNPs and GT-AgNPs. Our results indicate that although GT-AgNPs exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against all the examined microbial pathogens, these particles were also highly toxic to mammalian cells, which limits their potential applications. On the contrary, C-AgNPs manifested substantial inhibitory action on the tested microbes but were nontoxic to human and mouse cells, indicating an outstanding capacity to discriminate between potential pathogens and mammalian cells. These results clearly show that the various green materials used for stabilization and for reduction of metal ions have a defining role in determining and fine-tuning the biological activity of the obtained nanoparticles. PMID:28184158

  20. A spent coffee grounds based biorefinery for the production of biofuels, biopolymers, antioxidants and biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Karmee, Sanjib Kumar

    2018-02-01

    Spent coffee grounds are composed of lipid, carbohydrates, carbonaceous, and nitrogen containing compounds among others. Using n-hexane and n-hexane/isopropanol mixture highest oil yield was achived during soxhlet extraction of oil from spent coffee grounds. Alternatively, supercritical carbon dioxide can be employed as a green solvent for the extraction of oil. Using advanced chemical and biotechnological methods, spent coffee grounds are converted to various biofuels such as, biodiesel, renewable diesel, bioethanol, bioethers, bio-oil, biochar, and biogas. The in-situ transesterification of spent coffee grounds was carried out in a large scale (4 kg), which led to 80-83% biodiesel yield. In addition, a large number of value added and diversified products viz. polyhydroxyalkanoates, biosorbent, activated carbon, polyol, polyurethane foam, carotenoid, phenolic antioxidants, and green composite are obtained from spent coffee grounds. The principles of circular economy are applied to develop a sustanaible biorefinery based on valorisation of spent coffee grounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regularly consuming a green/roasted coffee blend reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sarriá, Beatriz; Martínez-López, Sara; Sierra-Cinos, José Luis; García-Diz, Luis; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo-Clemente, Laura

    2018-02-01

    Preventive health effects of coffee could have a widespread impact on public health. Green coffee has more phenols than roasted, and thus is healthier, although with less acceptable organoleptic properties. Therefore, the effects of regularly consuming a green/roasted coffee blend (35/65) on the main components of MetS in humans were evaluated. A crossover, randomized, controlled study was performed in 25 normocholesterolaemic and 27 hypercholesterolaemic men and women aged 18-45 years with BMI 18-25 kg/m 2 . Three servings/day of the blend, providing 510.6 mg hydroxycinnamic acids and 121.2 mg caffeine/day, were consumed versus a control drink, during 8 weeks each. Polyphenol and methylxanthine-rich foods were restricted along the study. At the beginning (baseline) and end of the control and coffee interventions, blood samples were collected and glucose, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, leptin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), resistin and visfatin were analysed; waist circumference, %body fat, and blood pressure were measured and dietary records and physical activity questionnaires completed. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively) in both groups as well as %body fat (p = 0.001) which may be related to the lower leptin (p = 0.001), PAI-1 (p < 0.001) and resistin (p = 0.034) levels in the two groups after coffee consumption. Glucose concentration (p = 0.030) and insulin resistance (p = 0.011; HOMA-IR) also decreased, as well as triglyceride levels (p = 0.017), so that the reduction was much greater in the hypercholesterolaemics (group effect, p = 0.027). Regular consumption of the green/roasted coffee blend may be recommended to healthy and hypercholesterolaemic subjects to prevent MetS, as it produces positive effects on blood pressure, glucose and triglyceride levels.

  2. Coffee and green tea consumption in relation to brain tumor risk in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Hidaka, Akihisa; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Narita, Yoshitaka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-12-15

    Few prospective studies have investigated the etiology of brain tumor, especially among Asian populations. Both coffee and green tea are popular beverages, but their relation with brain tumor risk, particularly with glioma, has been inconsistent in epidemiological studies. In this study, we evaluated the association between coffee and greed tea intake and brain tumor risk in a Japanese population. We evaluated a cohort of 106,324 subjects (50,438 men and 55,886 women) in the Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study (JPHC Study). Subjects were followed from 1990 for Cohort I and 1993 for Cohort II until December 31, 2012. One hundred and fifty-seven (70 men and 87 women) newly diagnosed cases of brain tumor were identified during the study period. Hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for the association between coffee or green tea consumption and brain tumor risk were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. We found a significant inverse association between coffee consumption and brain tumor risk in both total subjects (≥3 cups/day; HR = 0.47, 95%CI = 0.22-0.98) and in women (≥3 cups/day; HR = 0.24, 95%CI = 0.06-0.99), although the number of cases in the highest category was small. Furthermore, glioma risk tended to decrease with higher coffee consumption (≥3 cups/day; HR = 0.54, 95%CI = 0.16-1.80). No association was seen between green tea and brain tumor risk. In conclusion, our study suggested that coffee consumption might reduce the risk of brain tumor, including that of glioma, in the Japanese population. © 2016 UICC.

  3. Analysis of amino acids and carbohydrates in green coffee.

    PubMed

    Murkovic, Michael; Derler, Karin

    2006-11-30

    The analysis of carbohydrates and amino acids in green coffee is of the utmost importance since these two classes of compounds act as precursors of the Maillard reaction during which the colour and aroma are formed. During the course of the Maillard reaction potentially harmful substances like acrylamide or 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural accrue as well. The carbohydrates were analysed by anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection and the amino acids by reversed phase chromatography after derivatization with 6-amino-quinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate and fluorescence detection. Both methods had to be optimized to obtain a sufficient resolution of the analytes for identification and quantification. Sucrose is the dominant carbohydrate in green coffee with a concentration of up to 90 mg/g (mean = 73 mg/g) in arabica beans and significantly lower amounts in robusta beans (mean=45 mg/g). Alanine is the amino acid with the highest concentration (mean = 1200 microg/g) followed by asparagine (mean = 680 microg/g) in robusta and 800 microg/g and 360 microg/g in arabica respectively. In general, the concentration of amino acids is higher in robusta than in arabica.

  4. Crude ethanolic extract from spent coffee grounds: Volatile and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Page, Julio C; Arruda, Neusa P; Freitas, Suely P

    2017-11-01

    Espresso capsule consumption and spent coffee ground (SCG) generation have increased, and the present study was undertaken to evaluate the volatile profile (VP), the antioxidant activity (AA) and the sun protection factor (SPF) of the Crude ethanolic extract obtained from the SCG in capsules. The extract yield was superior to the ether yield because a higher unsaponifiable matter (U.M.) amount was recovered by ethanol. The obtained VP (70 compounds) was typical of roasted coffee oil. Furthermore, chemometric analysis using principal components (PCA) discriminated the extracts and grouped the replicates for each sample, which showed the repeatability of the extraction process. The AA ranged from 18.4 to 23.6 (mg extract mg DPPH -1 ) and the SPF from 2.27 to 2.76. The combination of the coffee VP, AA and SPF gave the espresso SCG's crude ethanolicextract, desirable properties that can be used in cosmetic and food industries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of polysaccharides extracted from spent coffee grounds by alkali pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Lina F; Cerqueira, Miguel A; Teixeira, José A; Mussatto, Solange I

    2015-01-01

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG), obtained during the processing of coffee powder with hot water to make soluble coffee, are the main coffee industry residues and retain approximately seventy percent of the polysaccharides present in the roasted coffee beans. The purpose of this study was to extract polysaccharides from SCG by using an alkali pretreatment with sodium hydroxide at 25°C, and determine the chemical composition, as well as the antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of the extracted polysaccharides. Galactose (60.27%mol) was the dominant sugar in the recovered polysaccharides, followed by arabinose (19.93%mol), glucose (15.37%mol) and mannose (4.43%mol). SCG polysaccharides were thermostable, and presented a typical carbohydrate pattern. Additionally, they showed good antioxidant activity through different methods and presented high antimicrobial percent inhibition against Phoma violacea and Cladosporium cladosporioides (41.27% and 54.60%, respectively). These findings allow identifying possible applications for these polysaccharides in the food industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Extractability and structure of spent coffee ground polysaccharides by roasting pre-treatments.

    PubMed

    Simões, Joana; Nunes, Fernando M; Domingues, M Rosário; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2013-08-14

    The coffee residue left after the preparation of the brew (spent coffee grounds - SCG) is very rich in polysaccharides, namely galactomannans and arabinogalactans, which are polymers that can be used as dietary fibre and present immunostimulatory activity. Considering the huge amount of SCG produced all over the world, the reutilisation of this by-product by its application as food ingredients is very promising. However, the yields of extraction of these polysaccharides tend to be very low, namely the galactomannans. Based on the observation that the yield of galactomannans extracted from the ground coffee to the brew increase when the coffee is roasted, in this study, with the aim of increasing the yield of these polysaccharides, the SCG was roasted and then extracted with hot water and alkali solutions. The roasting at 160°C promoted an increment of 15% in the yield of galactomannan extractions and further improvement of the yield of extraction until 56% of all galactomannans was achieved by alkali extractions at 60 and 120°C. In these samples the galactomannans still kept their characteristic structure, including the acetylation and branching, determined by sugar linkage analysis and mass spectrometry. The yield of extraction of arabinogalactans under these conditions was 54%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antioxidant and neuronal cell protective effects of columbia arabica coffee with different roasting conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Hee; Jeong, Hee Rok; Jo, Yu Na; Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Uk; Heo, Ho Jin

    2013-03-01

    In vitro antioxidant activities and neuronal cell protective effects of ethanol extract from roasted coffee beans were investigated. Colombia arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) green beans were roasted to give medium (230°C, 10 min), city (230°C, 12 min) and french (230°C, 15 min) coffee beans. Total phenolics in raw green beans, medium, city and french-roasted beans were 8.81±0.05, 9.77±0.03, 9.92±0.04 and 7.76±0.01 mg of GAE/g, respectively. The content of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, the predominant phenolic, was detected higher in medium-roasted beans than others. In addition, we found that extracts from medium-roasted beans particularly showed the highest in vitro antioxidant activity on ABTS radical scavenging activity and FRAP assays. To determine cell viability using the MTT assay, extracts from medium-roasted beans showed higher protection against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity than others. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage was also inhibited by the extracts due to prevention of lipid peroxidation using the malondialdehyde (MDA) assay from mouse whole brain homogenates. These data suggest that the medium-roasting condition to making tasty coffee from Columbia arabica green beans may be more helpful to human health by providing the most physiological phenolics, including 5-O-caffeoylquinic acids.

  8. Effects of Coffee Extracts with Different Roasting Degrees on Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Systems in Mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sukyoung; Jung, Soohan; Ko, Kwang Suk

    2018-03-16

    Coffee roasting affects the taste, color, and aroma of coffee. The Maillard reaction, a major reaction during the roasting process, produces melanoidin, which affects the overall antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory effects of coffee. In this experiment, coffee roasting was divided into four degrees: Light, Medium, City, and French. To examine the in vivo antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of coffee extracts with different roasting degrees, we used 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice. Mice were pre-treated with coffee extracts for 10 days by oral gavage (300 mg/Kg.B.W). After the last pre-treatment, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 15 mg/Kg.B.W) was injected intraperitoneally for immune stimulation. Histopathological analysis showed that hepatic portal vein invasion and liver necrosis were severe in the LPS-treated group. However, these phenomena were greatly ameliorated when mice were pre-treated with Light- or Medium-roasted coffee extracts. Hepatic glutathione level was increased in the French group but decreased in the LPS-stimulated group. When mice were treated with LPS, mRNA expression level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) was increased, whereas TNF-α expression was significantly reduced in the Light and Medium groups. Treatment with coffee extracts decreased the mRNA expression levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) in mice stimulated by LPS, regardless of coffee roasting degrees. These effects decreased with the increasing coffee roasting degree. Results of luciferase reporter assay revealed that these effects of coffee extracts were transcriptionally regulated by the NF-κB pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that the roasting degree affects the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of coffee extracts.

  9. Application of FTIR Spectroscopy for Assessment of Green Coffee Beans According to Their Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeidat, S. M.; Hammoudeh, A. Y.; Alomary, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    Samples of green coffee beans originating from five different countries were ground and analyzed using FTIR spectra in the region of 600-4000 cm-1. Successful discrimination of each coffee type based on their origin was achieved applying a PCA algorithm on the obtained IR spectra for all samples. PCA loading plots show that the IR bands at 2850, 2920, and 1745 cm-1 corresponding to the symmetric, and antisymmetric vibrations of CH2 and the stretching vibration of C=O bond in ester, respectively, are the most significant peaks in distinguishing the origin of the above coffee samples.

  10. Malachite Green Adsorption by Spent Coffee Grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syamimie Atirah Mat, Siti; Zati Hanani Syed Zuber, Sharifah; Rahim, Siti Kartini Enche Ab; Sohaimi, Khairunissa Syairah Ahmad; Halim, Noor Amirah Abdul; Fauziah Zainudin, Nor; Aida Yusoff, Nor; Munirah Rohaizad, Nor; Hidayah Ishak, Noor; Anuar, Adilah; Sarip, Mohd Sharizan Md

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the ability of spent coffee grounds (SCG) as a low-cost adsorbent to remove malachite green (MG) from aqueous solutions was studied. Batch adsorption tests were carried out to observe the effect of various experimental parameters such as contact time, initial concentration of malachite green and adsorbent dosage on the removal of dye. The results obtained show that the percentage of dye removal will decreased with the increased of initial concentration of dye in the range of 50 mg/L to 250 mg/L. Besides, percentage removal of dye was also found to be increased as the contact time increased until it reached equilibrium condition. The results also showed that the adsorbent dosage in range of 0.2 g to 1.0 g is proportional to the percentage removal of malachite green dye. Study on the kinetic adsorption and isotherm adsorption has also been investigated. The adsorption isotherm data were described by Langmuir isotherm with high-correlation coefficients while the experimental data showed the pseudo-second-order kinetics model was the best model for the adsorption of MG by SCG with the coefficients of correlation R2 > 0.9978.

  11. Antioxidant Effect of Extracts from the Coffee Residue in Raw and Cooked Meat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Ahn, Dong Uk; Eun, Jong Bang; Moon, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    The residue of ground coffee obtained after the brewing process (spent coffee) still contains various functional components with high antioxidant capacity and health benefits, but no attempts have been made to use it as a resource to produce value-added food ingredients. This study evaluates the antioxidant activity of ethanol or hot water extracts from the residues of coffee after brewing. An extraction experiment was carried out using the conventional solid–liquid methods, including ethanol and water as the extraction media at different temperatures and liquid/solid ratios. The antioxidant activity of extracts was tested for total phenolic compound (TPC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) using oil emulsion and raw/cooked meat systems. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of the ethanol extracts with heating (HEE) and without heating (CEE) were higher than that of the hot water extracts (WE). The highest DPPH value of HEE and CEE at 1000 ppm was 91.22% and 90.21%, respectively. In oil emulsion and raw/cooked systems, both the water and ethanol extracts had similar antioxidant effects to the positive control (BHA), but HEE and CEE extracts showed stronger antioxidant activities than WE extract. These results indicated that the ethanol extracts of coffee residue have a strong antioxidant activity and have the potential to be used as a natural antioxidant in meat. PMID:27384587

  12. How the variance of some extraction variables may affect the quality of espresso coffees served in coffee shops.

    PubMed

    Severini, Carla; Derossi, Antonio; Fiore, Anna G; De Pilli, Teresa; Alessandrino, Ofelia; Del Mastro, Arcangela

    2016-07-01

    To improve the quality of espresso coffee, the variables under the control of the barista, such as grinding grade, coffee quantity and pressure applied to the coffee cake, as well as their variance, are of great importance. A nonlinear mixed effect modeling was used to obtain information on the changes in chemical attributes of espresso coffee (EC) as a function of the variability of extraction conditions. During extraction, the changes in volume were well described by a logistic model, whereas the chemical attributes were better fit by a first-order kinetic. The major source of information was contained in the grinding grade, which accounted for 87-96% of the variance of the experimental data. The variability of the grinding produced changes in caffeine content in the range of 80.03 mg and 130.36 mg when using a constant grinding grade of 6.5. The variability in volume and chemical attributes of EC is large. Grinding had the most important effect as the variability in particle size distribution observed for each grinding level had a profound effect on the quality of EC. Standardization of grinding would be of crucial importance for obtaining all espresso coffees with a high quality. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of ochratoxin A contamination in green coffee beans using Fourier transform near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taradolsirithitikul, Panchita; Sirisomboon, Panmanas; Dachoupakan Sirisomboon, Cheewanun

    2017-03-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination is highly prevalent in a variety of agricultural products including the commercially important coffee bean. As such, rapid and accurate detection methods are considered necessary for the identification of OTA in green coffee beans. The goal of this research was to apply Fourier transform near infrared spectroscopy to detect and classify OTA contamination in green coffee beans in both a quantitative and qualitative manner. PLSR models were generated using pretreated spectroscopic data to predict the OTA concentration. The best model displayed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.814, a standard error of prediction (SEP and bias of 1.965 µg kg -1 and 0.358 µg kg -1 , respectively. Additionally, a PLS-DA model was also generated, displaying a classification accuracy of 96.83% for a non-OTA contaminated model and 80.95% for an OTA contaminated model, with an overall classification accuracy of 88.89%. The results demonstrate that the developed model could be used for detecting OTA contamination in green coffee beans in either a quantitative or qualitative manner. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Raw coffee based dietary supplements contain carboxyatractyligenin derivatives inhibiting mitochondrial adenine-nucleotide-translocase.

    PubMed

    Lang, Roman; Fromme, Tobias; Beusch, Anja; Lang, Tatjana; Klingenspor, Martin; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Capsules, powders and tablets containing raw coffee extract are advertised to the consumer as antioxidant rich dietary supplements as part of a healthy diet. We isolated carboxyatractyligenin (4), 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl carboxyatractyligenin (6) and 3'-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-isovaleryl-2β-(2-desoxy-carboxyatractyligenin)-β-d-glucopyranoside (8) from green coffee and found strong inhibitory effects on phosphorylating respiration in isolated mitochondria similar to the effects of the known phytotoxin carboxyatractyloside. LC-MS/MS analysis of commercial green coffee based dietary supplements revealed the occurrence of carboxyatractyligenin, 3'-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-2'-O-isovaleryl-2β-(2-desoxy-carboxyatractyligenin)-β-d-glucopyranoside, and 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl carboxyatractyligenin in concentrations up to 4.0, 5.7, and 41.6μmol/g, respectively. These data might help to gain first insight into potential physiological side-effects of green coffee containing dietary supplement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Coffee and Green Tea Consumption and Subsequent Risk of Malignant Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma in Japan: The Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ugai, Tomotaka; Matsuo, Keitaro; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-08-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of coffee and green tea consumption and the risk of malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma in a large-scale population-based cohort study in Japan. Methods: In this analysis, a total of 95,807 Japanese subjects (45,937 men and 49,870 women; ages 40-69 years at baseline) of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study who completed a questionnaire about their coffee and green tea consumption were followed up until December 31, 2012, for an average of 18 years. HRs and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using a Cox regression model adjusted for potential confounders as a measure of association between the risk of malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma associated with coffee and green tea consumption at baseline. Results: During the follow-up period, a total of 411 malignant lymphoma cases and 138 multiple myeloma cases were identified. Overall, our findings showed no significant association between coffee or green tea consumption and the risk of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma for both sexes. Conclusions: In this study, we observed no significant association between coffee or green tea consumption and the risk of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma. Impact: Our results do not support an association between coffee or green tea consumption and the risk of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1352-6. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Effect of roasting degree on the antioxidant activity of different Arabica coffee quality classes.

    PubMed

    Odžaković, Božana; Džinić, Natalija; Kukrić, Zoran; Grujić, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world, because of its unique sensory properties and physiological properties. Coffee beverages represent a significant source of antioxidants in the consumers' diet and contribute significantly to their daily intake. The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of different roasting degrees on the content of biologically active compounds and antioxidant activity in different quality classes of Arabica coffee. Samples of green Arabica coffee (Rio Minas) of two quality classes from two production batches were used for the research. Roasting was carried out at temperatures of 167, 175 and 171°C. The total phenol content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), flavonol content (FC) and antioxidant activity (DPPH, ABTS) in the coffee extracts was determined. This research shows that TPC was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in green coffee compared to TPC in roasted coffee, and TPC decreases as the roasting temperature increases. TFC and FC were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in green coffee than in roasted coffee. Differences in TPC between the 1st and 2nd classes of Arabica coffee were not significant (P > 0.05), while differences in TFC were significant (P < 0.05) only for green coffee from the second production batch and differences in FC were significant (P < 0.05) for green coffee and for coffee roasted at 175°C. Roasting temperatures have different influences the antioxidant activity (DPPH, ABTS) of coffee and the highest antioxidant activity was determined in coffee roasted at 171°C. An exception was 1st class Arabica coffee roasted at 167°C (ABTS). All samples of 1st class Arabica coffee had higher antioxidant activity (DPPH, ABTS) compared to 2nd class Arabica. This research shows that the bioactive compounds content and antioxidant activity of different quality classes of Arabica coffee are dependent on the degree of roasting. TPC decreases when the roasting temperature increases, while TFC

  17. Non-destructive analysis of sucrose, caffeine and trigonelline on single green coffee beans by hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Caporaso, Nicola; Whitworth, Martin B; Grebby, Stephen; Fisk, Ian D

    2018-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a novel technology for the food sector that enables rapid non-contact analysis of food materials. HSI was applied for the first time to whole green coffee beans, at a single seed level, for quantitative prediction of sucrose, caffeine and trigonelline content. In addition, the intra-bean distribution of coffee constituents was analysed in Arabica and Robusta coffees on a large sample set from 12 countries, using a total of 260 samples. Individual green coffee beans were scanned by reflectance HSI (980-2500nm) and then the concentration of sucrose, caffeine and trigonelline analysed with a reference method (HPLC-MS). Quantitative prediction models were subsequently built using Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression. Large variations in sucrose, caffeine and trigonelline were found between different species and origin, but also within beans from the same batch. It was shown that estimation of sucrose content is possible for screening purposes (R 2 =0.65; prediction error of ~0.7% w/w coffee, with observed range of ~6.5%), while the performance of the PLS model was better for caffeine and trigonelline prediction (R 2 =0.85 and R 2 =0.82, respectively; prediction errors of 0.2 and 0.1%, on a range of 2.3 and 1.1% w/w coffee, respectively). The prediction error is acceptable mainly for laboratory applications, with the potential application to breeding programmes and for screening purposes for the food industry. The spatial distribution of coffee constituents was also successfully visualised for single beans and this enabled mapping of the analytes across the bean structure at single pixel level. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of an instant coffee enriched with chlorogenic acids.

    PubMed

    Corso, Marinês Paula; Vignoli, Josiane Alessandra; Benassi, Marta de Toledo

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to present possible formulations for an instant coffee product enriched with chlorogenic acids for the Brazilian market. Formulations were prepared with different concentrations of freeze dried extracts of green Coffea canephora beans (G) added to freeze dried extracts of roasted Coffea arabica (A) and Coffea canephora (C). Medium (M) and dark (D) roasting degrees instant coffee were produced (AM, AD, CM and CD) to obtain four formulations with green extract addition (AMG, ADG, CMG and CDG). Chlorogenic acids were determined by HPLC, with average contents of 7.2 %. Roasted extracts and formulations were evaluated for 5-CQA and caffeine contents (by HPLC), browned compounds (absorbance 420 nm), and antioxidant activity (ABTS and Folin). Coffee brews of the four formulations were also assessed in a lab-scale test by 42 consumers for acceptance of the color, aroma, flavor and body, overall acceptance and purchase intent, using a 10 cm hybrid scale. The formulations obtained acceptance scores of 6.6 and 7.7 for all attributes, thus they were equally acceptable. Greater purchase intent was observed for ADG, CDG and CMG (6.9) in comparison to AMG (6.1). The formulations had, on average, 2.5 times more 5-CQA than the average obtained from conventional commercial instant coffees. In addition to being more economically viable, the formulations developed with C. canephora (CDG and CMG) showed greater antioxidant potential (32.5 g of Trolox/100 g and 13.8 g of gallic acid equivalent/100 g) due to a balance in the amount of bioactive compounds.

  19. Ochratoxin A on green coffee: influence of harvest and drying processing procedures.

    PubMed

    Paulino De Moraes, Maria Heloisa; Luchese, Rosa Helena

    2003-09-10

    Ochratoxin A is a metabolite produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species that is nephrotoxic and possibly carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate ochratoxin A contamination in green coffee obtained by different harvesting and drying operations and from fruits of different ripening stages in order to identify hazards. The research was directed to coffees from the highland area of Rio de Janeiro state (Brazil), which is traded in the domestic market. Twenty-two out of 54 samples contained ochratoxin A at levels ranging from 0.3 to 160 microg/kg. Ochatoxin A contamination levels between different ripe stage fruits were not significant (P > 0.05). "Varrição" coffee, consisting of fruits that fell from the tree spontaneously and stayed longer on the ground before being harvested, was the most contaminated. Eleven out of 14 samples of varrição coffee were contaminated. Three out of 10 samples from the northwestern region of the state were positive for ochratoxin at levels ranging from 10.1 to 592 microg/kg. The contaminated samples had in common the fact that they were harvested directly from the soil.

  20. A rapid and simple determination of caffeine in teas, coffees and eight beverages.

    PubMed

    Sereshti, Hassan; Samadi, Soheila

    2014-09-01

    Caffeine was extracted and preconcentrated by the simple, fast and green method of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and analysed by gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-NPD). The influence of main parameters affecting the extraction efficiency investigated and optimised. Under the optimal conditions, the method was successfully applied to determination of caffeine in different real samples including five types of tea (green, black, white, oolong teas and tea bag), two kinds of coffee (Nescafe coffee and coffee), and eight beverages (regular Coca Cola, Coca Cola zero, regular Pepsi, Pepsi max, Sprite, 7up, Red Bull and Hype).The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 and 0.05 μg mL(-1), respectively. Linear dynamic range (LDR) was 0.05-500 μg mL(-1) and determination coefficient (R(2)) was 0.9990. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.2% (n=5, C=1 μg mL(-1)). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. GCMS investigation of volatile compounds in green coffee affected by potato taste defect and the Antestia bug.

    PubMed

    Jackels, Susan C; Marshall, Eric E; Omaiye, Angelica G; Gianan, Robert L; Lee, Fabrice T; Jackels, Charles F

    2014-10-22

    Potato taste defect (PTD) is a flavor defect in East African coffee associated with Antestiopsis orbitalis feeding and 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IPMP) in the coffee. To elucidate the manifestation of PTD, surface and interior volatile compounds of PTD and non-PTD green coffees were sampled by headspace solid phase microextraction and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis of the chromatographic data revealed a profile of surface volatiles distinguishing PTD from non-PTD coffees dominated by tridecane, dodecane, and tetradecane. While not detected in surface volatiles, IPMP was found in interior volatiles of PTD coffee. Desiccated antestia bugs were analyzed by GCMS, revealing that the three most prevalent volatiles were tridecane, dodecane, and tetradecane, as was found in the surface profile PTD coffee. Coffee having visible insect damage exhibited both a PTD surface volatile profile and IPMP in interior volatiles, supporting the hypothesis linking antestia bug feeding activity with PTD profile compounds on the surface and IPMP in the interior of the beans.

  2. Utilization of oil extracted from spent coffee grounds for sustainable production of polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Obruca, Stanislav; Petrik, Sinisa; Benesova, Pavla; Svoboda, Zdenek; Eremka, Libor; Marova, Ivana

    2014-07-01

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG), an important waste product of the coffee industry, contain approximately 15 wt% of coffee oil. The aim of this work was to investigate the utilization of oil extracted from SCG as a substrate for the production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) by Cupriavidus necator H16. When compared to other waste/inexpensive oils, the utilization of coffee oil resulted in the highest biomass as well as PHB yields. Since the correlation of PHB yields and the acid value of oil indicated a positive effect of the presence of free fatty acids in oil on PHB production (correlation coefficient R (2) = 0.9058), superior properties of coffee oil can be probably attributed to the high content of free fatty acids which can be simply utilized by the bacteria culture. Employing the fed-batch mode of cultivation, the PHB yields, the PHB content in biomass, the volumetric productivity, and the Y P/S yield coefficient reached 49.4 g/l, 89.1 wt%, 1.33 g/(l h), and 0.82 g per g of oil, respectively. SCG are annually produced worldwide in extensive amounts and are disposed as solid waste. Hence, the utilization of coffee oil extracted from SCG is likely to improve significantly the economic aspects of PHB production. Moreover, since oil extraction decreased the calorific value of SCG by only about 9 % (from 19.61 to 17.86 MJ/kg), residual SCG after oil extraction can be used as fuel to at least partially cover heat and energy demands of fermentation, which should even improve the economic feasibility of the process.

  3. Coffee, its roasted form, and their residues cause birth failure and shorten lifespan in dengue vectors.

    PubMed

    Dieng, Hamady; Ellias, Salbiah Binti; Satho, Tomomitsu; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Abang, Fatimah; Ghani, Idris Abd; Noor, Sabina; Ahmad, Hamdan; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Morales Vargas, Ronald E; Morales, Noppawan P; Hipolito, Cirilo N; Attrapadung, Siriluck; Noweg, Gabriel Tonga

    2017-06-01

    In dengue mosquitoes, successful embryonic development and long lifespan are key determinants for the persistence of both virus and vector. Therefore, targeting the egg stage and vector lifespan would be expected to have greater impacts than larvicides or adulticides, both strategies that have lost effectiveness due to the development of resistance. Therefore, there is now a pressing need to find novel chemical means of vector control. Coffee contains many chemicals, and its waste, which has become a growing environmental concern, is as rich in toxicants as the green coffee beans; these chemicals do not have a history of resistance in insects, but some are lost in the roasting process. We examined whether exposure to coffee during embryonic development could alter larval eclosion and lifespan of dengue vectors. A series of bioassays with different coffee forms and their residues indicated that larval eclosion responses of Aedes albopictus and Ae. aegypti were appreciably lower when embryonic maturation occurred in environments containing coffee, especially roasted coffee crude extract (RCC). In addition, the lifespan of adults derived from eggs that hatched successfully in a coffee milieu was reduced, but this effect was less pronounced with roasted and green coffee extracts (RCU and GCU, respectively). Taken together, these findings suggested that coffee and its residues have embryocidal activities with impacts that are carried over onto the adult lifespan of dengue vectors. These effects may significantly reduce the vectorial capacity of these insects. Reutilizing coffee waste in vector control may also represent a realistic solution to the issues associated with its pollution.

  4. Modulation of brain insulin signaling in Alzheimer's disease: New insight on the protective role of green coffee bean extract.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hoda E; Asker, Mervat E; Younis, Nahla N; Shaheen, Mohamed A; Eissa, Rana G

    2018-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder, involves brain insulin signaling cascades and insulin resistance (IR). Because of limited treatment options, new treatment strategies are mandatory. Green coffee bean extract (GCBE) was reported to attenuate IR and improve brain energy metabolism. We aimed to investigate the possible use of GCBE as a prophylactic strategy to delay the onset of AD or combined with pioglitazone (PIO) as a strategy to retard the progression of AD. Rats received 10% fructose in drinking water for 18 weeks to induce AD. GCBE-prophylactic group received GCBE for 22 weeks started 4 weeks prior to fructose administration. The PIO group treated with PIO for 6 weeks started on week 12 of fructose administration. The GCBE+PIO group received GCBE for 22 weeks started 4 weeks prior to fructose administration and treated with PIO for the last 6 weeks of fructose administration. Pretreatment with GCBE, either alone or combined with PIO, alleviated IR-induced AD changes. GCBE improved cognition, decreased serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate, increased phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) activity and protein kinase B (Akt) gene expression, decreased glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GS3Kβ) gene expression and Tau hyperphosphorylation. GCBE exerted neuroprotective effects against IR-induced AD mediated by alleviating IR and modulating brain insulin signaling cascade.

  5. Rapid approach to identify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Ruge, Winfried; Kuballa, Thomas; Ilse, Maren; Winkelmann, Ole; Diehl, Bernd; Thomas, Freddy; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2015-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to verify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee. Lipophilic extracts of authentic roasted and green coffees showed the presence of established markers for Robusta (16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC)) and for Arabica (kahweol). The integration of the 16-OMC signal (δ 3.165 ppm) was used to estimate the amount of Robusta in coffee blends with an approximate limit of detection of 1-3%. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 77 commercial coffee samples (coffee pods, coffee capsules, and coffee beans). Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectra of lipophilic and aqueous extracts of 20 monovarietal authentic samples. Clusters of the two species were observed. NMR spectroscopy can be used as a rapid prescreening tool to discriminate Arabica and Robusta coffee species before the confirmation applying the official method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Catechol--an oviposition stimulant for cigarette beetle in roasted coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Atsuhiko; Kamada, Yuji; Kosaka, Yuji; Arakida, Naohiro; Hori, Masatoshi

    2014-05-01

    The cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne, is a serious global pest that preys on stored food products. Larvae of the beetle cannot grow on roasted coffee beans or dried black or green tea leaves, although they oviposit on such products. We investigated oviposition by the beetles on MeOH extracts of the above products. The number of eggs laid increased with an increase in dose of each extract, indicating that chemical factors stimulate oviposition by the beetles. This was especially true for \\ coffee bean extracts, which elicited high numbers of eggs even at a low dose (0.1 g bean equivalent/ml) compared to other extracts. Coffee beans were extracted in hexane, chloroform, 1-butanol, MeOH, and 20% MeOH in water. The number of eggs laid was higher on filter papers treated with chloroform, 1-butanol, MeOH, and 20% MeOH in water extracts than on control (solvent alone) papers. The chloroform extract was fractionated by silica-gel column chromatography. Nine compounds were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry from an active fraction. Of these compounds, only a significant ovipositional response to catechol was observed.

  7. Coffee extract inhibits adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocyes by interrupting insulin signaling through the downregulation of IRS1

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Chihiro; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Aoyagi, Ryohei; Ueda, Fumihito; Kimura, Masaki; Kobata, Kenji; Tago, Kenji; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2017-01-01

    Although epidemiological data have indicated that a strong negative association exists between coffee consumption and the prevalence of obesity-associated diseases, the molecular mechanisms by which coffee intake prevents obesity-associated diseases has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we found that coffee intake significantly suppressed high-fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic alternations such as increases in body weight and the accumulation of adipose tissue, and up-regulation of glucose, free fatty acid, total cholesterol and insulin levels in the blood. We also found that coffee extract significantly inhibited adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. In the early phase of adipogenesis, 3T3-L1 cells treated with coffee extract displayed the retardation of cell cycle entry into the G2/M phase called as mitotic clonal expansion (MCE). Coffee extract also inhibited the activation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) by preventing its phosphorylation by ERK. Furthermore, the coffee extract suppressed the adipogenesis-related events such as MCE and C/EBPβ activation through the down-regulation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1). The stability of the IRS1 protein was markedly decreased by the treatment with coffee extract due to proteasomal degradation. These results have revealed an anti-adipogenic function for coffee intake and identified IRS1 as a novel target for coffee extract in adipogenesis. PMID:28282409

  8. Coffee extract inhibits adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocyes by interrupting insulin signaling through the downregulation of IRS1.

    PubMed

    Maki, Chihiro; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Aoyagi, Ryohei; Ueda, Fumihito; Kimura, Masaki; Kobata, Kenji; Tago, Kenji; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2017-01-01

    Although epidemiological data have indicated that a strong negative association exists between coffee consumption and the prevalence of obesity-associated diseases, the molecular mechanisms by which coffee intake prevents obesity-associated diseases has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we found that coffee intake significantly suppressed high-fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic alternations such as increases in body weight and the accumulation of adipose tissue, and up-regulation of glucose, free fatty acid, total cholesterol and insulin levels in the blood. We also found that coffee extract significantly inhibited adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. In the early phase of adipogenesis, 3T3-L1 cells treated with coffee extract displayed the retardation of cell cycle entry into the G2/M phase called as mitotic clonal expansion (MCE). Coffee extract also inhibited the activation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) by preventing its phosphorylation by ERK. Furthermore, the coffee extract suppressed the adipogenesis-related events such as MCE and C/EBPβ activation through the down-regulation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1). The stability of the IRS1 protein was markedly decreased by the treatment with coffee extract due to proteasomal degradation. These results have revealed an anti-adipogenic function for coffee intake and identified IRS1 as a novel target for coffee extract in adipogenesis.

  9. Identification of Two Metallothioneins as Novel Inhalative Coffee Allergens Cof a 2 and Cof a 3

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ulrike; Frenzel, Karsten; Brettschneider, Reinhold; Oldenburg, Marcus; Bittner, Cordula

    2015-01-01

    Background Dust of green coffee beans is known to be a relevant cause for occupational allergic disorders in coffee industry workers. Recently, we described the first coffee allergen (Cof a 1) establishing an allergenic potential of green coffee dust. Objective Our aim was to identify allergenic components of green coffee in order to enhance inhalative coffee allergy diagnosis. Methods A Coffea arabica pJuFo cDNA phage display library was created and screened for IgE binding with sera from allergic coffee workers. Two further coffee allergens were identified by sequence analysis, expressed in E. coli, and evaluated by Western blots. The prevalence of sensitization to recombinant Cof a 1, Cof a 2, and Cof a 3 and to commercially available extract was investigated by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) respectively CAP (capacity test) screening in 18 sera of symptomatic coffee workers. Results In addition to the previously described chitinase Cof a 1, two Coffea arabica cysteine-rich metallothioneins of 9 and 7 kDa were identified and included in the IUIS Allergen Nomenclature as Cof a 2 and Cof a 3. Serum IgE antibodies to at least one of the recombinant allergens were found in 8 out of 18 symptomatic coffee workers (44%). Only 2 of the analysed sera (11%) had reacted previously to the commercial allergy test. Conclusions In addition to the previously described Cof a 1 we have identified two further coffee proteins to be type I coffee allergens (Cof a 2 and Cof a 3) which may have a relevant potential for the specific diagnosis and/or therapy of coffee allergy. PMID:25962169

  10. Insight into the time-resolved extraction of aroma compounds during espresso coffee preparation: online monitoring by PTR-ToF-MS.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, José A; Zimmermann, Ralf; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2014-12-02

    Using proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS), we investigated the extraction dynamic of 95 ion traces in real time (time resolution = 1 s) during espresso coffee preparation. Fifty-two of these ions were tentatively identified. This was achieved by online sampling of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in close vicinity to the coffee flow, at the exit of the extraction hose of the espresso machine (single serve capsules). Ten replicates of six different single serve coffee types were extracted to a final weight between 20-120 g, according to the recommended cup size of the respective coffee capsule (Ristretto, Espresso, and Lungo), and analyzed. The results revealed considerable differences in the extraction kinetics between compounds, which led to a fast evolution of the volatile profiles in the extract flow and consequently to an evolution of the final aroma balance in the cup. Besides exploring the time-resolved extraction dynamics of VOCs, the dynamic data also allowed the coffees types (capsules) to be distinguished from one another. Both hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) showed full separation between the coffees types. The methodology developed provides a fast and simple means of studying the extraction dynamics of VOCs and differentiating between different coffee types.

  11. Roasting has a distinct effect on the antimutagenic activity of coffee varieties.

    PubMed

    Priftis, Alexandros; Mitsiou, Dimitra; Halabalaki, Maria; Ntasi, Georgia; Stagos, Dimitrios; Skaltsounis, Leandros A; Kouretas, Demetrios

    Coffee is a highly consumed beverage throughout the world. Its popularity derives from its organoleptic properties that are a result of the roasting process. Roasting greatly alters a coffee bean's composition and possibly its bioactivity. In the current study, green as well as roasted extracts from both Coffea arabica (Brazil and Decaf) and Coffea canephora (Robusta) species were tested for their antimutagenic activity using the Ames test. In addition, a compositional analysis was conducted to identify the main components, mainly Chlorogenic acid isomers (CGA) and derivatives present in the extracts using UHPLC-ESI(±) and HRMS/MS methods According to the results, all extracts exhibited strong antimutagenic activity against the oxidizing factor tert-Butyl hydroperoxide, a Reactive Oxygen Species-producing compound. Roasting had a distinct effect on the antimutagenic activity of coffee, enhancing it in the Brazil variety and having no effect in the Decaf and Robusta varieties. In addition, all coffee extracts exhibited reducing activity as well as the ability to scavenge (albeit differentially) both the superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, implying that their potential antimutagenic effect can be partially attributed to their free radical scavenging activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Tea, coffee, and cocoa as ultraviolet radiation protectants for beet armyworm nucleopolyhedrovirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The addition of 1% (wt/v) aqueous extracts of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) (Malvales: Malvaceae), coffee (Coffea arabica L.) (Gentianales: Rubiaceae), green, and black tea (Camellia sinensis L.) (Ericales: Theaceae) provided excellent ultraviolet (UV) radiation protection for the beet armyworm, Spodo...

  13. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for spectral characterization of regular coffee beans and luwak coffee bean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nufiqurakhmah, Nufiqurakhmah; Nasution, Aulia; Suyanto, Hery

    2016-11-01

    Luwak (civet) coffee refers to a type of coffee, where the cherries have been priorly digested and then defecated by a civet (Paradoxurus Hermaphroditus), a catlike animals typically habited in Indonesia. Luwak will only selectively select ripe cherries, and digesting them by enzymatic fermentation in its digestive system. The defecated beans is then removed and cleaned from the feces. It is regarded as the world's most expensive coffee, Traditionally the quality of the coffee is subjectively determined by a tester. This research is motivated by the needs to study and develop quantitative parameters in determining the quality of coffee bean, which are more objective to measure the quality of coffee products. LIBS technique was used to identify the elemental contents of coffee beans based on its spectral characteristics in the range 200-900 nm. Samples of green beans from variant of arabica and robusta, either regular and luwak, were collected from 5 plantations in East Java. From the recorded spectra, intensity ratio of nitrogen (N), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O) as essential elements in coffee is applied. In general, values extracted from luwak coffee bean is higher with increases 0.03% - 79.93%. A Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA) also applied to identify marker elements that characterize the regular and luwak beans. Elements of Ca, W, Sr, Mg, and H are the ones used to differentiate the regular and luwak beans from arabica variant, while Ca and W are the ones used to differentiate the regular and luwak beans of robusta variant.

  14. Application of Moringa Oleifera seed extract to treat coffee fermentation wastewater.

    PubMed

    Garde, William K; Buchberger, Steven G; Wendell, David; Kupferle, Margaret J

    2017-05-05

    Wastewater generated from wet processing of coffee cherries degrades stream water quality downstream of processing mills and impacts human health. The widespread popularity of coffee as an export makes this a global problem, although the immediate impact is local. Approximately 40% of all coffee around the world is wet processed, producing wastewater rich in organic nutrients that can be hazardous to aquatic systems. Moringa Oleifera Seed Extract (MOSE) offers promise as a local and affordable "appropriate" coagulation technology for aiding in the treatment of coffee wastewater. Field research was conducted at the Kauai Coffee Company to investigate the application of MOSE to treat coffee fermentation wastewater (CFW). Coagulation tests were conducted at five pH CFW levels (3-7) and MOSE doses (0-4g/L). After settling, TSS, COD, nitrate, nitrite, total nitrogen, and pH of supernatant from each test were measured. MOSE reduced TSS, COD, nitrate, and nitrite in CFW to varying degrees dependent on pH and dose applied. TSS removal ranged from 8% to 54%. Insoluble COD removal ranged from 26% to 100% and total COD removal ranged from 1% to 25%. Nitrate and nitrite reduction ranged from 20% to 100%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Coffee polyphenols extracted from green coffee beans improve skin properties and microcirculatory function.

    PubMed

    Fukagawa, Satoko; Haramizu, Satoshi; Sasaoka, Shun; Yasuda, Yuka; Tsujimura, Hisashi; Murase, Takatoshi

    2017-09-01

    Coffee polyphenols (CPPs), including chlorogenic acid, exert various physiological activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of CPPs on skin properties and microcirculatory function in humans. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 49 female subjects with mildly xerotic skin received either a test beverage containing CPPs (270 mg/100 mL/day) or a placebo beverage for 8 weeks. The ingestion of CPPs significantly lowered the clinical scores for skin dryness, decreased transepidermal water loss, skin surface pH, and increased stratum corneum hydration and the responsiveness of skin blood flow during local warming. Moreover, the amounts of free fatty acids and lactic acid in the stratum corneum significantly increased after the ingestion of CPPs. These results suggest that an 8-week intake of CPPs improve skin permeability barrier function and hydration, with a concomitant improvement in microcirculatory function, leading to efficacy in the alleviation of mildly xerotic skin.

  16. Conceptual study on maillardized dietary fiber in coffee.

    PubMed

    Silván, José Manuel; Morales, Francisco J; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio

    2010-12-08

    There is a methodological and conceptual overlap between coffee melanoidins and dietary fiber. Green Uganda coffee beans were roasted in a range from 8.1 to 21.6% of weight loss to evaluate melanoidins and dietary fiber. Samples were characterized by color, moisture, solubility, water activity, carbohydrates, polyphenols, protein, soluble dietary fiber (SDF), and melanoidins content. Hydroxymethylfurfural and chlorogenic acids were also measured as chemical markers of the extent of roasting. Melanoidins rapidly increased from 5.6 (light roasting) to 29.1 mg/100 mg soluble dry matter (dark roasting). A melanoidins-like structure was already present in green coffee that might overestimate up to 21.0% of the melanoidins content as determined by colorimetric methods. However, its contribution is variable and very likely depends on the method of drying applied to green coffee. SDF content (mg/100 mg soluble dry matter) gradually increased from 39.4 in green coffee to 64.9 at severe roasting conditions due to incorporation of neoformed colored structures and polyphenols. Then, SDF progressively turns to a maillardized structure, which increased from 11.0 to 45.0% according to the roasting conditions. It is concluded that the content of coffee melanoidins includes a substantial part of dietary fiber and also that coffee dietary fiber includes melanoidins. A conceptual discussion on a new definition of coffee melanoidins as a type of maillardized dietary fiber is conducted.

  17. Using elemental profiles and stable isotopes to trace the origin of green coffee beans on the global market.

    PubMed

    Santato, Alessandro; Bertoldi, Daniela; Perini, Matteo; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    A broad elemental profile incorporating 54 elements (Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Er, Tm, Yb, Re, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi and U) in combination with δ(2) H, δ(13) C, δ(15) N and δ(18) O was used to characterise the composition of 62 green arabica (Coffea arabica) and robusta (Coffea canephora) coffee beans grown in South and Central America, Africa and Asia, the four most internationally renowned areas of production. The δ(2) H, Mg, Fe, Co and Ni content made it possible to correctly assign 95% of green coffee beans to the appropriate variety. Canonical discriminant analysis, performed using δ(13) C, δ(15) N, δ(18) O, Li, Mg, P, K, Mn, Co, Cu, Se, Y, Mo, Cd, La and Ce correctly traced the origin of 98% of coffee beans. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Extraction of espresso coffee by using gradient of temperature. Effect on physicochemical and sensorial characteristics of espresso.

    PubMed

    Salamanca, C Alejandra; Fiol, Núria; González, Carlos; Saez, Marc; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Espresso extraction is generally carried out at a fixed temperature within the range 85-95°C. In this work the extraction of the espressos was made in a new generation coffee machine that enables temperature profiling of the brewing water. The effect of using gradient of temperature to brew espressos on physicochemical and sensorial characteristics of the beverage has been investigated. Three different extraction temperature profiles were tested: updrawn gradient (88-93°C), downdrawn gradient (93-88°C) and fixed temperature (90°C). The coffee species investigated were Robusta, Arabica natural and Washed Arabica. Results proved that the use of gradient temperature for brewing espressos allows increasing or decreasing the extraction of some chemical compounds from coffee grounds. Moreover an appropriate gradient of temperature can highlight or hide some sensorial attributes. In conclusion, the possibility of programming gradient of temperature in the coffee machines recently introduced in the market opens new expectations in the field of espresso brewing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of altitude on biochemical composition and quality of green arabica coffee beans can be affected by shade and postharvest processing method.

    PubMed

    Worku, Mohammed; de Meulenaer, Bruno; Duchateau, Luc; Boeckx, Pascal

    2018-03-01

    Although various studies have assessed altitude, shade and postharvest processing effects on biochemical content and quality of coffee beans, data on their interactions are scarce. The individual and interactive effects of these factors on the caffeine, chlorogenic acids (CGA) and sucrose contents as well as physical and sensory qualities of green coffee beans from large plantations in southwestern Ethiopia were evaluated. Caffeine and CGA contents decreased with increasing altitude; they respectively declined 0.12 and 1.23gkg -1 100m -1 . Sucrose content increased with altitude; however, the altitude effect was significant for wet-processed beans (3.02gkg -1 100m -1 ), but not for dry-processed beans (0.36g kg -1 100m -1 ). Similarly, sucrose content increased with altitude with much stronger effect for coffee grown without shade (2.11gkg -1 100m -1 ) compared to coffee grown under shade (0.93gkg -1 100m -1 ). Acidity increased with altitude when coffee was grown under shade (0.22 points 100m -1 ), but no significant altitude effect was observed on coffee grown without shade. Beans grown without shade showed a higher physical quality score for dry (37.2) than for wet processing (29.1). These results generally underline the complex interaction effects between altitude and shade or postharvest processing on biochemical composition and quality of green arabica coffee beans. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Biodiesel Production from Spent Coffee Grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinová, Lenka; Bartošová, Alica; Sirotiak, Maroš

    2017-06-01

    The residue after brewing the spent coffee grounds is an oil-containing waste material having a potential of being used as biodiesel feedstock. Biodiesel production from the waste coffee grounds oil involves collection and transportation of coffee residue, drying, oil extraction, and finally production of biodiesel. Different methods of oil extraction with organic solvents under different conditions show significant differences in the extraction yields. In the manufacturing of biodiesel from coffee oil, the level of reaction completion strongly depends on the quality of the feedstock oil. This paper presents an overview of oil extraction and a method of biodiesel production from spent coffee grounds.

  1. Determination of multiple mycotoxins in dietary supplements containing green coffee bean extracts using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Vaclavik, Lukas; Vaclavikova, Marta; Begley, Timothy H; Krynitsky, Alexander J; Rader, Jeanne I

    2013-05-22

    An ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of 34 mycotoxins in dietary supplements containing green coffee bean (GCB) extracts was developed, evaluated, and used in the analysis of 50 commercial products. A QuEChERS-like procedure was used for isolation of target analytes from the examined matrices. Average recoveries of the analytes were in the range of 75-110%. The precision of the method expressed as relative standard deviation was below 12%. Limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantitation (LOQs) ranged from 1.0 to 50.0 μg/kg and from 2.5 to 100 μg/kg, respectively. Due to matrix effects, the method of standard additions was used to ensure accurate quantitation. Ochratoxin A, ochratoxin B, fumonisin B1 and mycophenolic acid were found in 36%, 32%, 10%, and 16% of tested products, respectively. Mycotoxins occurred in the following concentration ranges: ochratoxin A, <1.0-136.9 μg/kg; ochratoxin B, <1.0-20.2 μg/kg; fumonisin B1, <50.0-415.0 μg/kg; mycophenolic acid, <5.0-395.0 μg/kg. High-resolution mass spectrometry operated in full MS and MS/MS mode was used to confirm the identities of the reported compounds.

  2. Investigation of CO2 precursors in roasted coffee.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuju; Lim, Loong-Tak

    2017-03-15

    Two CO 2 formation pathways (chlorogenic acid (CGA) degradation and Maillard reaction) during coffee roasting were investigated. CGA is shown not a major contributor to CO 2 formation, as heating of this compound under typical roasting conditions did not release a large quantity of CO 2 . However, heating of a CGA moiety, caffeic acid, resulted in high yield of CO 2 (>98%), suggesting that CGA hydrolysis could be the rate limiting step for CO 2 formation from CGA. A large amount of CO 2 was detected from glycine-sucrose model system under coffee roasting conditions, implying the importance of Maillard reactions in CO 2 formation. Further studies on the heating of various components isolated from green coffee beans showed that CO 2 was generated from various green coffee components, including water insoluble proteins and polysaccharides. Around 50% of CO 2 was formed from thermal reactions of lower molecular weight compounds that represent ∼25% by weight in green coffee. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A pilot study of NMR-based sensory prediction of roasted coffee bean extracts.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be considered a kind of "magnetic tongue" for the characterisation and prediction of the tastes of foods, since it provides a wealth of information in a nondestructive and nontargeted manner. In the present study, the chemical substances in roasted coffee bean extracts that could distinguish and predict the different sensations of coffee taste were identified by the combination of NMR-based metabolomics and human sensory test and the application of the multivariate projection method of orthogonal projection to latent structures (OPLS). In addition, the tastes of commercial coffee beans were successfully predicted based on their NMR metabolite profiles using our OPLS model, suggesting that NMR-based metabolomics accompanied with multiple statistical models is convenient, fast and accurate for the sensory evaluation of coffee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of green coffee and yerba mate extracts, their main hydroxycinnamic acids, methylxanthine and metabolites in different human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Amigo-Benavent, M; Wang, S; Mateos, R; Sarriá, B; Bravo, L

    2017-08-01

    This work aimed at studying the effects of green coffee bean (GCBE) and yerba mate (YME) extracts, their main phenolic components (5-caffeoylquinic acid, 5-CQA; 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-DCQA) and metabolites (ferulic acid, FA; caffeic acid, CA; dihydrocaffeic acid, DHCA; and dihydroferulic acid, DHFA) along with caffeine (CAF) on the viability and proliferation of different human cell lines. Extracts (10-1000 μg/mL) and standards (10-1000 μM) were assayed in colon (Caco-2), lung (A549), oesophageal (OE-33), urinary bladder (T24) human carcinoma cells, and a non-cancer cell line (CCD-18Co). YME significantly reduced viability of cancer cells at all assayed concentrations, the higher doses also reducing cell proliferation. GCBE effects on cell viability were more effective at 100 and 1000 μg/mL, showing modest effects on cell proliferation. The highest doses of 5-CQA and 3,5-DCQA reduced cell viability and proliferation in all cell lines, whereas FA, DHCA and DHFA had lower and variable effects. Caffeine had no effect. Dietary-attainable concentrations (0.1, 1 and 10 μg/mL) of YME were tested for cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species generation, showing no cytotoxic effect. Low concentrations of all tested compounds were non-cytotoxic to CCD-18Co cells. YME and to a lower degree GCBE, their phenolic components and metabolites may decrease cancer cell viability and proliferation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of temperature and relative humidity during transportation on green coffee bean moisture content and ochratoxin A production.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Cabrera, Hector A; Menezes, Hilary C; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Canepa, Frederico; Teixeira, Aldir A; Carvalhaes, Nelson; Santi, Domenico; Leme, Plinio T Z; Yotsuyanagi, Katumi; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2007-01-01

    Changes in temperature, relative humidity, and moisture content of green coffee beans were monitored during transportation of coffee from Brazil to Italy. Six containers (three conventional and three prototype) were stowed in three different places (hold, first floor, and deck) on the ship. Each prototype was located next to a conventional container. The moisture content of the coffee in the container located on the first floor was less affected by environmental variations (0.7%) than that in the hold and on the deck. Coffee located in the hold showed the highest variation in moisture content (3%); in addition, the container showed visible condensation. Coffee transported on the deck showed an intermediary variation in moisture (2%), and there was no visible condensation. The variation in coffee moisture content of the prototype containers was similar to that of the conventional ones, especially in the top layers of coffee bags (2 to 3%), while the increase in water activity was 0.70. This suggests that diffusion of moisture occurs very slowly inside the cargo and that there are thus sufficient time and conditions for fungal growth. The regions of the container near the wall and ceiling are susceptible to condensation since they are close to the headspace with its high relative humidity. Ochratoxin A production occurred in coffee located at the top of the container on the deck and in the wet bags from the hold (those found to be wet on opening the containers at the final destination).

  6. Additive interaction of carbon dots extracted from soluble coffee and biogenic silver nanoparticles against bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Patricia F.; Nakazato, Gerson; Durán, Nelson

    2017-06-01

    It is known the presence of carbon dots (CDs) in carbohydrate based foods. CDs extracted from coffee grounds and instant coffee was also published. CDs from soluble coffee revealed an average size of 4.4 nm. CDs were well-dispersed in water, fluorescent and we have characterized by XPS, XRD analysis, fluorescence and by FTIR spectra. The MIC value by serial micro-dilution assays for CDs on S. aureus ATCC 25923 was 250 μg/mL and E. coli ATCC 25922 >1000 ug/mL. For silver nanoparticles biogenically synthesized was 6.7 μg/mL. Following the checkerboard assay with combining ½ MIC values of the MICs of 125 μg/mL of carbon dots and 3.4 μg/mL of silver nanoparticles, following the fractionated inhibitory concentration (FIC) index methodology, on S. aureus gave a fractionated inhibitory concentration (FIC) value of 1.0, meaning additive interaction. In general, the unfunctionalized CDs showed to be inefficient as antibacterial compounds, however the CDs extracted from Coffee powder and together silver nanoparticles appeared interesting as antibacterial association.

  7. Antioxidant and Antiradical Activity of Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Yashin, Alexander; Yashin, Yakov; Wang, Jing Yuan; Nemzer, Boris

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes published information concerning the determination of antioxidant activity (AA) in coffee samples by various methods (ORAC, FRAP, TRAP, TEAC, etc.) in vitro and limited data of antiradical activity of coffee products in vitro and in vivo. Comparison is carried out of the AA of coffee Arabica and coffee Robusta roasted at different temperatures as well as by different roasting methods (microwave, convection, etc.). Data on the antiradical activity of coffee is provided. The antioxidant activity of coffee, tea, cocoa, and red wine is compared. At the end of this review, the total antioxidant content (TAC) of coffee samples from 21 coffee-producing countries as measured by an amperometric method is provided. The TAC of green and roasted coffee beans is also compared. PMID:26784461

  8. Beneficial effects of cocoa, coffee, green tea, and garcinia complex supplement on diet induced obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Chang; Tung, Yu-Tang; Huang, Wen-Ching; Chen, Yi-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Hsu, Mei-Chich

    2016-03-12

    Cocoa, coffee, green tea and garcinia contain large amounts of polyphenols. Polyphenols are well-known phytochemicals and found in plants, and have modulated physiological and molecular pathways that are involved in energy metabolism, adiposity, and obesity. To evaluate the obesity-lowering effect of a combined extract (comprising cocoa, coffee, green tea and garcinia; CCGG) in high-energy diet (HED)-induced obese rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats (8 weeks old) were randomly divided into four groups (n = 12 per group): normal diet with vehicle treatment (Control), and HED to receive vehicle or CCGG by oral gavage at 129, 258, or 517 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks, designated the HED, 0.5X, 1X and 1X groups, respectively. HED induced macrovesicular fat in the liver and the formation of adipose tissues, and significantly increased the levels of serum free fatty acids (FFA), triacylglycerol (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and LDL-C/HDL-C, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and ketone bodies in serum, and hepatic TG and TC levels, and decreased the levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in serum and lipase activity in fat tissues. Treatment with CCGG could significantly decrease the levels of FFA, TG, TC, LDL-C, and LDL-C/HDL-C, AST, ALT, and ketone bodies in serum, and hepatic TG and TC contents, and increase the levels of HDL-C in serum and lipase activity in fat tissues compared to the HED group. Liver histopathology also showed that CCGG could significantly reduce the incidence of liver lesions. These results suggested that CCGG stimulated lipid metabolism in HED-induced obese rats, which is attributable to fat mobilization from adipose tissue.

  9. Rapid determination of benzo(a)pyrene in roasted coffee and coffee brew by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    de Kruijf, N.; Schouten, T.; van der Stegen, G.H.D.

    A rapid and reliable analytical method is presented for the determination of trace amounts of benzo(a)pyrene in roasted coffee, coffee brew, and spent grounds. Roasted coffee and spent grounds were extracted with acetone, followed by saponification and cyclohexane extraction. Coffee brew was extracted three times with cyclohexane, and the combined extracts were purified by chromatography on a silica gel column. The extracts were analyzed by HPLC with a 5-..mu..m Vydac reversed-phase 201 TPB 5 column and fluorescence detection under isocratic conditions. The benzo(a)pyrene levels in 55 roasted coffee samples, commercially available in the Netherlands, ranged from not detectable (<0.1 ..mu..g/kg)more » to 0.5 ..mu..g/kg. Coffee brews were prepared by two different methods from an over-roasted coffee sample with an elevated benzo(a)pyrene level of 2 ..mu..g/kg. These brews yielded benzo(a)pyrene contents of approximately 1 ng/L, indicating benzo(a)pyrene extraction yields of about 1% for both coffee preparation methods.« less

  10. Selective enzymatic hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid lactones in a model system and in a coffee extract. Application to reduction of coffee bitterness.

    PubMed

    Kraehenbuehl, Karin; Page-Zoerkler, Nicole; Mauroux, Olivier; Gartenmann, Karin; Blank, Imre; Bel-Rhlid, Rachid

    2017-03-01

    Chlorogenic acid lactones have been identified as key contributors to coffee bitterness. These compounds are formed during roasting by dehydration and cyclization of their precursors, the chlorogenic acids (CGAs). In the present study, we investigated an approach to decompose these lactones in a selective way without affecting the positive coffee attributes developed during roasting. A model system composed of (3-caffeoylquinic acid lactone (3-CQAL), 4- caffeoyl quinic acid lactone (4-CQAL), and 4-feruloylquinic acid lactone (4-FQAL)) was used for the screening of enzymes before treatment of the coffee extracts. Hog liver esterase (HLE) hydrolyzed chlorogenic acid lactones (CQALs, FQALs) selectively, while chlorogenate esterase hydrolyzed all chlorogenic acids (CQAs, FQAs) and their corresponding lactones (CQALs, FQALs) in a non-selective way. Enzymatically treated coffee samples were evaluated for their bitterness by a trained sensory panel and were found significantly less bitter than the untreated samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Microwave-assisted water extraction of green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Nkhili, Ezzohra; Tomao, Valerie; El Hajji, Hakima; El Boustani, Es-Seddik; Chemat, Farid; Dangles, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Green tea, a popular drink with beneficial health properties, is a rich source of specific flavanols (polyphenols). There is a special interest in the water extraction of green tea polyphenols since the composition of the corresponding extracts is expected to reflect the one of green tea infusions consumed worldwide. To develop a microwave-assisted water extraction (MWE) of green tea polyphenols. MWE of green tea polyphenols has been investigated as an alternative to water extraction under conventional heating (CWE). The experimental conditions were selected after consideration of both temperature and extraction time. The efficiency and selectivity of the process were determined in terms of extraction time, total phenolic content, chemical composition (HPLC-MS analysis) and antioxidant activity of the extracts. By MWE (80 degrees C, 30 min), the flavanol content of the extract reached 97.46 (+/- 0.08) mg of catechin equivalent/g of green tea extract, vs. only 83.06 (+/- 0.08) by CWE (80 degrees C, 45 min). In particular, the concentration of the most bioactive flavanol EGCG was 77.14 (+/- 0.26) mg of catechin equivalent/g of green tea extract obtained by MWE, vs 64.18 (+/- 0.26) mg/g by CWE. MWE appears more efficient than CWE at both 80 and 100 degrees C, particularly for the extraction of flavanols and hydroxycinnamic acids. Although MWE at 100 degrees C typically affords higher yields in total phenols, MWE at 80 degrees C appears more convenient for the extraction of the green tea-specific and chemically sensitive flavanols.

  12. Soymilk enriched with green coffee phenolics - Antioxidant and nutritional properties in the light of phenolics-food matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Sęczyk, Łukasz; Świeca, Michał; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2017-05-15

    This study investigated the effect of soymilk fortification with green coffee extract (GCE) on phenolic contents, antioxidant capacity, relative in vitro digestibility of proteins and starch, and consumer acceptance. Special attention was paid to the effect of phenolics-food matrix interactions on fortification efficiency. Soymilk was enriched with GCE extracts containing 0.025-1mg of phenolics per 1mL-samples M1-M6. Compared to control, an increase in phenolic contents of up to 70% (M6) was observed for potentially bioaccessible fractions (AD). The antiradical activity and reducing power were also about 1.9 and 10.1 times higher, respectively. However, the determined phenolic and antioxidant activities differed from those predicted. Fortification improved the digestibility of nutrients when higher doses of GCE was introduced (M4-M6). The addition of GCE at an adequate dose allowed the production of a beverage with elevated hedonic properties. In conclusion, fortification was a successful in improving the pro-health status of soymilk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence of acrylamide carcinogen in Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea from Saudi Arabian market

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Rizwan; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Naushad, Mu; Alomary, Ahmed Khodran; Alfadul, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alsohaimi, Ibrahim Hotan; Algamdi, Mohammad Saad

    2017-01-01

    The present work describes the outcomes of the assessment on acrylamide contents in a number of thermally treated foods (Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea) obtained from the Saudi Arabian markets. A total of 56 food samples of different brands and origin were studied, the amounts of acrylamide in Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea were obtained in the range of 10 to 682 μg kg−1. In comparison to coffee (152–682 μg kg−1), the Arabic coffee Qahwa (73–108 μg kg−1) and tea (10–97 μg kg−1) contain lower amounts of acrylamide. Among the analyzed samples, the green tea contained low amounts of acrylamide ranged from 10 to 18 μg kg−1, and thus the green tea could be considered as a healthier hot drink. A great variation of acrylamide formation has been observed in these food products. This divergence may be due to the initial concentration of amino acids especially asparagines and reducing sugars in food products, in addition to roasting temperature and time, pH and water activity. The obtained data can also be used in epidemiological investigation to estimate the acrylamide exposure from nutritional survey. PMID:28150749

  14. Occurrence of acrylamide carcinogen in Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea from Saudi Arabian market.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Rizwan; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Naushad, Mu; Alomary, Ahmed Khodran; Alfadul, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alsohaimi, Ibrahim Hotan; Algamdi, Mohammad Saad

    2017-02-02

    The present work describes the outcomes of the assessment on acrylamide contents in a number of thermally treated foods (Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea) obtained from the Saudi Arabian markets. A total of 56 food samples of different brands and origin were studied, the amounts of acrylamide in Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea were obtained in the range of 10 to 682 μg kg -1 . In comparison to coffee (152-682 μg kg -1 ), the Arabic coffee Qahwa (73-108 μg kg -1 ) and tea (10-97 μg kg -1 ) contain lower amounts of acrylamide. Among the analyzed samples, the green tea contained low amounts of acrylamide ranged from 10 to 18 μg kg -1 , and thus the green tea could be considered as a healthier hot drink. A great variation of acrylamide formation has been observed in these food products. This divergence may be due to the initial concentration of amino acids especially asparagines and reducing sugars in food products, in addition to roasting temperature and time, pH and water activity. The obtained data can also be used in epidemiological investigation to estimate the acrylamide exposure from nutritional survey.

  15. Occurrence of acrylamide carcinogen in Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea from Saudi Arabian market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammad Rizwan; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Naushad, Mu; Alomary, Ahmed Khodran; Alfadul, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alsohaimi, Ibrahim Hotan; Algamdi, Mohammad Saad

    2017-02-01

    The present work describes the outcomes of the assessment on acrylamide contents in a number of thermally treated foods (Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea) obtained from the Saudi Arabian markets. A total of 56 food samples of different brands and origin were studied, the amounts of acrylamide in Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea were obtained in the range of 10 to 682 μg kg-1. In comparison to coffee (152-682 μg kg-1), the Arabic coffee Qahwa (73-108 μg kg-1) and tea (10-97 μg kg-1) contain lower amounts of acrylamide. Among the analyzed samples, the green tea contained low amounts of acrylamide ranged from 10 to 18 μg kg-1, and thus the green tea could be considered as a healthier hot drink. A great variation of acrylamide formation has been observed in these food products. This divergence may be due to the initial concentration of amino acids especially asparagines and reducing sugars in food products, in addition to roasting temperature and time, pH and water activity. The obtained data can also be used in epidemiological investigation to estimate the acrylamide exposure from nutritional survey.

  16. Determination of acrylamide in coffee and chocolate by pressurised fluid extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pardo, O; Yusà, V; Coscollà, C; León, N; Pastor, A

    2007-07-01

    A selective and sensitive procedure has been developed and validated for the determination of acrylamide in difficult matrices, such as coffee and chocolate. The proposed method includes pressurised fluid extraction (PFE) with acetonitrile, florisil clean-up purification inside the PFE extraction cell and detection by liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to atmospheric pressure ionisation in positive mode tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS-MS). Comparison of ionisation sources (atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and the combined APCI/APPI) and clean-up procedures were carried out to improve the analytical signal. The main parameters affecting the performance of the different ionisation sources were previously optimised using statistical design of experiments (DOE). PFE parameters were also optimised by DOE. For quantitation, an isotope dilution approach was used. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of the method was 1 microg kg(-1) for coffee and 0.6 microg kg(-1) for chocolate. Recoveries ranged between 81-105% in coffee and 87-102% in chocolate. The accuracy was evaluated using a coffee reference test material FAPAS T3008. Using the optimised method, 20 coffee and 15 chocolate samples collected from Valencian (Spain) supermarkets, were investigated for acrylamide, yielding median levels of 146 microg kg(-1) in coffee and 102 microg kg(-1) in chocolate.

  17. Coffee-Driven Green Activation of Cellulose and Its Use for All-Paper Flexible Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donggue; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Song, Hyun-Kon; Chun, Sang-Jin; Park, Sang-Bum; Choi, Don-Ha; Lee, Sun-Young; Yoo, JongTae; Lee, Sang-Young

    2017-07-12

    Cellulose, which is one of the most-abundant and -renewable natural resources, has been extensively explored as an alternative substance for electrode materials such as activated carbons. Here, we demonstrate a new class of coffee-mediated green activation of cellulose as a new environmentally benign chemical-activation strategy and its potential use for all-paper flexible supercapacitors. A piece of paper towel is soaked in espresso coffee (acting as a natural activating agent) and then pyrolyzed to yield paper-derived activated carbons (denoted as "EK-ACs"). Potassium ions (K + ), a core ingredient of espresso, play a viable role in facilitating pyrolysis kinetics and also in achieving a well-developed microporous structure in the EK-ACs. As a result, the EK-ACs show significant improvement in specific capacitance (131 F g -1 at a scan rate of 1.0 mV s -1 ) over control ACs (64 F g -1 ) obtained from the carbonization of a pristine paper towel. All-paper flexible supercapacitors are fabricated by assembling EK-ACs/carbon nanotube mixture-embedded paper towels (as electrodes), poly(vinyl alcohol)/KOH mixture-impregnated paper towels (as electrolytes), and polydimethylsiloxane-infiltrated paper towels (as packaging substances). The introduction of the EK-ACs (as an electrode material) and the paper towel (as a deformable and compliant substrate) enables the resulting all-paper supercapacitor to provide reliable and sustainable cell performance as well as exceptional mechanical flexibility. Notably, no appreciable loss in the cell capacitance is observed after repeated bending (over 5000 cycles) or multiple folding. The coffee-mediated green activation of cellulose and the resultant all-paper flexible supercapacitors open new material and system opportunities for eco-friendly high-performance flexible power sources.

  18. The Study of Interactions between Active Compounds of Coffee and Willow (Salix sp.) Bark Water Extract

    PubMed Central

    Durak, Agata; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Coffee and willow are known as valuable sources of biologically active phytochemicals such as chlorogenic acid, caffeine, and salicin. The aim of the study was to determine the interactions between the active compounds contained in water extracts from coffee and bark of willow (Salix purpurea and Salix myrsinifolia). Raw materials and their mixtures were characterized by multidirectional antioxidant activities; however, bioactive constituents interacted with each other. Synergism was observed for ability of inhibition of lipid peroxidation and reducing power, whereas compounds able to scavenge ABTS radical cation acted antagonistically. Additionally, phytochemicals from willow bark possessed hydrophilic character and thermostability which justifies their potential use as an ingredient in coffee beverages. Proposed mixtures may be used in the prophylaxis or treatment of some civilization diseases linked with oxidative stress. Most importantly, strong synergism observed for phytochemicals able to prevent lipids against oxidation may suggest protective effect for cell membrane phospholipids. Obtained results indicate that extracts from bark tested Salix genotypes as an ingredient in coffee beverages can provide health promoting benefits to the consumers; however, this issue requires further study. PMID:25013777

  19. Modification of ginseng flavors by bitter compounds found in chocolate and coffee.

    PubMed

    Sook Chung, Hee; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2012-06-01

    Ginseng is not widely accepted by U.S. consumers due to its unfamiliar flavors, despite its numerous health benefits. Previous studies have suggested that the bitter compounds in chocolate and coffee may mask the off-flavors of ginseng. The objectives of this study were to: (1) profile sensory characteristics of ginseng extract solution, caffeine solution, cyclo (L-Pro-L-Val) solution, theobromine solution, and 2 model solutions simulating chocolate bitterness; and (2) determine the changes in the sensory characteristics of ginseng extract solution by the addition of the bitter compounds found in chocolate and coffee. Thirteen solutions were prepared in concentrations similar to the levels of the bitter compounds found in coffee and chocolate products. Twelve panelists participated in a descriptive analysis panel which included time-intensity ratings. Ginseng extract was characterized as sweeter, starchier, and more green tea than the other sample solutions. Those characteristics of ginseng extract were effectively modified by the addition of caffeine, cyclo (L-Pro-L-Val), and 2 model solutions. A model solution simulating dark chocolate bitterness was the least influenced in intensities of bitterness by the addition of ginseng extract. Results from time-intensity ratings show that the addition of ginseng extract increased duration time in certain bitterness of the 2 model solutions. Bitter compounds found in dark chocolate could be proposed to effectively mask the unique flavors of ginseng. Future studies blending aroma compounds of chocolate and coffee into such model solutions may be conducted to investigate the influence on the perception of the unique flavors through the congruent flavors. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Application of EPR spectroscopy to the examination of pro-oxidant activity of coffee.

    PubMed

    Krakowian, Daniel; Skiba, Dominik; Kudelski, Adam; Pilawa, Barbara; Ramos, Paweł; Adamczyk, Jakub; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna

    2014-05-15

    Free radicals present in coffee may be responsible for exerting toxic effects on an organism. The objectives of this work were to compare free radicals properties and concentrations in different commercially available coffees, in solid and liquid states, and to determine the effect of roasting on the formation of free radicals in coffee beans of various origins. The free radicals content of 15 commercially available coffees (solid and liquid) was compared and the impact of processing examined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at X-band (9.3 GHz). First derivative EPR spectra were measured at microwave power in the range of 0.7-70 mW. The following parameters were calculated for EPR spectra: amplitude (A), integral intensity (I), and line-width (ΔBpp); g-Factor was obtained from resonance condition. Our study showed that free radicals exist in green coffee beans (10(16) spin/g), roasted coffee beans (10(18) spin/g), and in commercially available coffee (10(17)-10(18) spin/g). Free radical concentrations were higher in solid ground coffee than in instant or lyophilised coffee. Continuous microwave saturation indicated homogeneous broadening of EPR lines from solid and liquid commercial coffee samples as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes were found to be present in all coffee samples tested, solid and liquid commercial coffees as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Higher free radicals concentrations were obtained for both the green and roasted at 240 °C coffee beans from Peru compared with those originating from Ethiopia, Brazil, India, or Colombia. Moreover, more free radicals occurred in Arabica coffee beans roasted at 240 °C than Robusta. EPR spectroscopy is a useful method of examining free radicals in different types of coffee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Isotopes as Tracers of the Hawaiian Coffee-Producing Regions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Green coffee bean isotopes have been used to trace the effects of different climatic and geological characteristics associated with the Hawaii islands. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry ((MC)-ICP-SFMS and ICP-QMS) were applied to determine the isotopic composition of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N), sulfur (δ34S), and oxygen (δ18O), the isotope abundance of strontium (87Sr/86Sr), and the concentrations of 30 different elements in 47 green coffees. The coffees were produced in five Hawaii regions: Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, and Oahu. Results indicate that coffee plant seed isotopes reflect interactions between the coffee plant and the local environment. Accordingly, the obtained analytical fingerprinting could be used to discriminate between the different Hawaii regions studied. PMID:21838232

  2. Consumption of green tea but not coffee is associated with the oral health-related quality of life among an older Japanese population: Kyoto-Kameoka cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Nanri, Hinako; Yamada, Yosuke; Itoi, Aya; Yamagata, Emi; Watanabe, Yuya; Yoshida, Tsukasa; Miyake, Motoko; Date, Heiwa; Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko; Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi; Kikutani, Takeshi; Kimura, Misaka

    2018-05-23

    The consumption of both green tea and coffee is known to induce positive health effects; however, it remains unclear whether there is an association between the consumption of these beverages and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Thus, the present study investigated the relationship between the consumption of green tea and coffee and OHRQoL. We analyzed cross-sectional baseline data in 2012. The subjects were 7514 Japanese participants (3563 men, 3951 women; ≥65 years of age). Each subject completed a validated self-administered questionnaire that included items on the frequency of the consumption of green tea and coffee. OHRQoL was evaluated using the self-reported General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI), which assesses oral health problems in older adults. A GOHAI score <50 points was defined as a poor OHRQoL. Following adjustment for age, body mass index, total energy intake, alcohol, smoking, medication use, coffee, and fruit and vegetable consumption, increased consumption of green tea showed a strong positive association with the GOHAI score in both men and women (P trend  < 0.001 in both). In contrast, after adjusting for all factors, no statistically significant association was observed between coffee consumption and the GOHAI score in men (P trend  = 0.538) or women (P trend  = 0.607). The respective multivariate-odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for a poor OHRQoL associated with green tea consumption frequencies of none, <1 cup/day, 1-2 cups/day, and ≥3 cups/day were 1.00, 1.01 (0.80-1.27), 0.95 (0.74-1.21), and 0.78 (0.61-0.99) (P trend  = 0.024) in men, and 1.00, 1.19 (0.90-1.57), 0.98 (0.74-1.29), and 0.86 (0.67-1.12) (P trend  = 0.014) in women. Regardless of sex, green tea consumption was positively associated with the GOHAI score. Therefore, ≥3 cups/day of green tea may reduce the risk of a poor OHRQoL, especially in men.

  3. Studies on acrylamide levels in roasting, storage and brewing of coffee.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Ingo; Ternité, Ruediger; Wilkens, Jochen; Hoenicke, Katrin; Guenther, Helmut; van der Stegen, Gerrit H D

    2006-11-01

    The content of acrylamide in coffee reaches a peak early in the roasting process, reflecting occurrence of both formation and destruction of acrylamide during roasting. Levels of acrylamide in the fully roasted product are a small fraction of the peak reached earlier. Glucose and moisture in green coffee do not show a significant correlation with acrylamide in roasted coffee. Pre-roasting levels of asparagine show a correlation only in Arabica coffee. The main factors affecting the level of acrylamide in roasted coffee appear to be the Arabica/Robusta ratio, with Robusta giving higher levels; time and degree of roast, with both shorter and lighter roasting at the edges of the normal roasting range giving higher levels; storage condition and time, with clear reduction at ambient storage. This storage reduction of acrylamide followed second order reaction kinetics with an activation energy of 73 KJ/mole. The acrylamide in roasted coffee is largely extracted into the brew and stable within usual time of consumption. As these four main factors also substantially affect the sensorial characteristics of the brew, and as modifications of the process have to comply with the consumer-accepted boundaries of taste profiles, only small effects on the acrylamide level are expected to be achievable.

  4. Furan levels in coffee as influenced by species, roast degree, and brewing procedures.

    PubMed

    Arisseto, Adriana Pavesi; Vicente, Eduardo; Ueno, Mariana Soares; Tfouni, Silvia Amélia Verdiani; Toledo, Maria Cecília De Figueiredo

    2011-04-13

    Brazilian green coffee beans of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora species were roasted to light, medium, and dark roast degrees and analyzed in relation to furan content by using an in-house validated method based on gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry preceded by headspace solid-phase microextraction. Furan was not detected in green coffees, whereas levels between 911 and 5852 μg/kg were found in the roasted samples. Higher concentrations were found in Coffea canephora species and darker ground coffees. Some of the potential furan precursors were observed in significant amounts in green coffee, especially sucrose and linoleic acid, but their concentrations could not be correlated to furan formation. Additionally, coffee brews were prepared from roasted ground coffees by using two different procedures, and furan levels in the beverages varied from <10 to 288 μg/kg. The factor that most influenced the furan content in coffee brew was the brewing procedure.

  5. Determination of the geographical origin of green coffee by principal component analysis of carbon, nitrogen and boron stable isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Serra, Francesca; Guillou, Claude G; Reniero, Fabiano; Ballarin, Luciano; Cantagallo, Maria I; Wieser, Michael; Iyer, Sundaram S; Héberger, Károly; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2005-01-01

    In this study we show that the continental origin of coffee can be inferred on the basis of coupling the isotope ratios of several elements determined in green beans. The combination of the isotopic fingerprints of carbon, nitrogen and boron, used as integrated proxies for environmental conditions and agricultural practices, allows discrimination among the three continental areas producing coffee (Africa, Asia and America). In these continents there are countries producing 'specialty coffees', highly rated on the market that are sometimes mislabeled further on along the export-sale chain or mixed with cheaper coffees produced in other regions. By means of principal component analysis we were successful in identifying the continental origin of 88% of the samples analyzed. An intra-continent discrimination has not been possible at this stage of the study, but is planned in future work. Nonetheless, the approach using stable isotope ratios seems quite promising, and future development of this research is also discussed. (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. HPLC analysis of phenolic acids, antioxidant activity and in vitro effectiveness of green and roasted Caffea arabica bean extracts: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    El-Nabi, Sobhy El-Sayed Hassab; Dawoud, Gouda T M; El-Garawani, Islam Mohamed; El Shafey, Samraa Samy

    2018-01-24

    Coffee is a popular drink; it is one of the most commercialized food products and a rich source of biologically active compounds that are important for human health. This study aimed to prove the anticancer activity of green coffee (GC) and roasted coffee (RC) bean aqueous extracts (Coffea arabica) on breast cancer adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7) and the safety of both extracts on normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes culture (HPBL). Total phenolic content for GC and RC extracts was measured and result of both extracts were (0.308±0.016 & 0.233±0.013mg/g) respectively. The phenolic acids were screened by HPLC at the wavelength of 254& 278 and 300 nm and 5-caffeoylquinic acids (Chlorogenic acid), the predominant form of phenolic acids, was identified in GC and RC samples. Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) as well as the free radical scavenging activity (DPPH) proved the antioxidant properties of both extracts. The DPPH IC50 mean values of GC and RC extracts were (2.4±0.08, 2.3±0.16 μg/ml) respectively. Cytotoxicity of both extracts on MCF-7 cells were evaluated by neutral red uptake assay which showed the IC50 mean values (377±5.7,500±8.1 μg/ml) for GC and RC extracts respectively. The safety of both extracts (0, 125, 250, 500 μg/ml) on HPBL was evaluated in vitro using trypan blue exclusion method and DNA single strand breaks (alkaline comet assay). Result revealed non-significant cytotoxic difference (P<0.001) between cultures especially at lower doses of GC and RC extracts except the highest dose of BC and GC extract which showed slightly significant damage (P<0.001). In conclusion, this study proved that GC and RC aqueous extracts were found to be selectively cytotoxic in vitro to cancerous cells (MCF-7 cell line) causing cell death with no cytotoxicity on normal human lymphocytes especially at lower doses. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Spent coffee grounds-based activated carbon preparation for sequestering of malachite green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun-Wei; Lam, Keat-Ying; Bashir, Mohammed J. K.; Yeong, Yin-Fong; Lam, Man-Kee; Ho, Yeek-Chia

    2016-11-01

    The key of reported work was to optimize the fabricating factors of spent coffee grounds-based activated carbon (SCG-bAC) used to sequester Malachite Green (MG) form aqueous solution via adsorption process. The fabricating factors of impregnation ratio with ortho-phosphoric acid, activation temperature and activation time were simultaneously optimized by central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM) targeting on maximum removal of MG. At the optimum condition, 96.3% of MG was successfully removed by SCG-bAC at the impregnation ratio with ortho-phosphoric acid of 0.50, activation temperature of 554°C and activation time of 31.4 min. Statistical model that could predict the MG removal percentage was also derived and had been statistically confirmed to be significant. Subsequently, the MG adsorption equilibrium data was found well-fitted to Langmuir isotherm model, indicating the predominance of monolayer adsorption of MG on SCG-bAC surface. To conclude, the findings from the this study unveil the potential of spent coffee grounds as an alternative precursor in fabricating low-cost AC for the treatment of wastewater loaded with MG pollutant.

  8. Rapid mixed mode solid phase extraction method for the determination of acrylamide in roasted coffee by HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bortolomeazzi, Renzo; Munari, Marina; Anese, Monica; Verardo, Giancarlo

    2012-12-15

    In this work, a rapid and reliable purification method based on a single mixed solid phase extraction (SPE) column, for the determination of acrylamide in roasted coffee by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, was developed. Deuterium labelled d(3)-acrylamide was used as internal standard. Acrylamide was extracted by 10 mL of water and the extract purified by a single SPE column consisting of 0.5 g of an in-house prepared mixture of C18, strong cation (SCX) and anion exchange (SAX) sorbents in the ratio 2/1.5/1.5 (w/w/w). The amount of the three sorbents was optimised in order to eliminate the main interfering compounds present in coffee extracts, such as melanoidins, trigonelline, chlorogenic acids and caffeine. The SPE procedure was very simple and consisted of pushing 1 mL of an aqueous coffee extract through the SPE column followed by 1 mL of water which was collected for the analysis. The method was tested on six samples of roasted coffee of different composition and roasting level. The repeatability of the method, expressed as relative standard deviation (n=6), was lower than 5%. The recovery of acrylamide at three spiked levels ranged from 92% to 95%. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were 5 and 16 μg kg(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and caffeine in Yunnan Arabica coffee by microwave-assisted extraction and HPLC with two columns in series.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Shao, Jinliang; Li, Qiwan; Li, Yangang; Yan, Hong Mei; He, Lizhong

    2012-01-01

    A simple, rapid method was developed for simultaneous extraction of trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and caffeine from coffee, and separation by two chromatographic columns in series. The trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and caffeine were extracted with microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The optimal conditions selected were 3 min, 200 psi, and 120 degrees C. The chromatographic separation was performed with two columns in series, polyaromatic hydrocarbon C18 (250 x 4.6 mm id, 5 microm particle size) and Bondapak NH2 (300 x 3.9 mm id, 5 microm particle size). Isocratic elution was with 0.02 M phosphoric acid-methanol (70 + 30, v/v) mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. Good recoveries and RSD values were found for all analytes in the matrix. The LOD of the three compounds was 0.02 mg/L, and the LOQ was 0.005% in the matrix. The concentrations of trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and caffeine in instant coffee, roasted coffee, and raw coffee (Yunnan Arabica coffee) were assessed by MAE and hot water extraction; the correlation coefficients between concentrations of the three compounds obtained were close to 1.

  10. A multi-residue method for pesticides analysis in green coffee beans using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in selective ion monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Pizzutti, Ionara R; de Kok, Andre; Dickow Cardoso, Carmem; Reichert, Bárbara; de Kroon, Marijke; Wind, Wouter; Weber Righi, Laís; Caiel da Silva, Rosselei

    2012-08-17

    In this study, a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method, using the very selective negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode, was developed and applied in combination with a modified acetonitrile-based extraction method (QuEChERS) for the analysis of a large number of pesticide residues (51 pesticides, including isomers and degradation products) in green coffee beans. A previously developed integrated sample homogenization and extraction method for both pesticides and mycotoxins analysis was used. An homogeneous slurry of green milled coffee beans and water (ratio 1:4, w/w) was prepared and extracted with acetonitrile/acetic acid (1%), followed by magnesium sulfate addition for phase separation. Aliquots from this extract could be used directly for LC-MS/MS analysis of mycotoxins and LC-amenable pesticides. For GC-MS analysis, a further clean-up was necessary. C18- and PSA-bonded silica were tested as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) sorbents, separate and as a mixture, and the best results were obtained using C18-bonded silica. For the optimal sensitivity and selectivity, GC-MS detection in the NCI-selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode had to be used to allow the fast analysis of the difficult coffee bean matrix. The validation was performed by analyzing recovery samples at three different spike concentrations, 10, 20 and 50 μg kg(-1), with 6 replicates (n=6) at each concentration. Linearity (r(2)) of calibration curves, estimated instrument and method limits of detection and limits of quantification (LOD(i), LOD(m), LOQ(i) and LOQ(m), respectively), accuracy (as recovery %), precision (as RSD%) and matrix effects (%) were determined for each individual pesticide. From the 51 analytes (42 parent pesticides, 4 isomers and 5 degradation products) determined by GC-MS (NCI-SIM), approximately 76% showed average recoveries between 70-120% and 75% and RSD ≤ 20% at the lowest spike concentration of 10 μg kg(-1), the target method LOQ. For the

  11. Fast simultaneous analysis of caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid and sucrose in coffee by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Daniel; Donangelo, Carmen Marino; Farah, Adriana

    2008-10-15

    A rapid liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid and sucrose in coffee was developed and validated. The method involved extraction with hot water, clarification with basic lead acetate and membrane filtration, followed by chromatographic separation using a Spherisorb(®) S5 ODS2, 5μm chromatographic column and gradient elution with 0.3% aqueous formic acid/methanol at a flow rate of 0.2mL/min. The electrospray ionization source was operated in the negative mode to generate sucrose ions and in the positive mode to generate caffeine, trigonelline and nicotinic acid ions. Ionization suppression of all analytes was found due to matrix effect. Calibrations curves prepared in green and roasted coffee extracts were linear with r(2)>0.999. Roasted coffee was spiked and recoveries ranged from 93.0% to 105.1% for caffeine, from 85.2% to 116.2% for trigonelline, from 89.6% to 113.5% for nicotinic acid and from 94.1% to 109.7% for sucrose. Good repeatibilities (RSD<5%) were found for all analytes in the matrix. The limit of detection (LOD), calculated on the basis of signal-to-noise ratios of 3:1, was 11.9, 36.4, 18.5 and 5.0ng/mL for caffeine, trigonelline, nicotinic acid and sucrose, respectively. Analysis of 11 coffee samples (regular or decaffeinated green, ground roasted and instant) gave results in agreement with the literature. The method showed to be suitable for different types of coffee available in the market thus appearing as a fast and reliable alternative method to be used for routine coffee analysis. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Short-term effects of a green coffee extract-, Garcinia c ambogia- and L-carnitine-containing chewing gum on snack intake and appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Bobillo, Cecilia; Finlayson, Graham; Martínez, Ana; Fischman, Daniela; Beneitez, Analisa; Ferrero, Alejandro J; Fernández, Belisario E; Mayer, Marcos A

    2018-03-01

    Different studies have assessed the influence of chewing gum to aid control of appetite and reduce food intake. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effects of chewing gum on satiety, food hedonics and snack intake and to explore the potential effects of the combination of Garcinia c ambogia, green coffee extract and L-carnitine on satiety, when administered in a gum format. This was a prospective study in which 57 subjects randomly received three kinds of treatments, in a crossover design: (1) active gum; (2) placebo gum; and (3) no gum. Food preferences and appetite sensations were evaluated by means of the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire and visual analog scales. There was a significant reduction in low-fat sweet snack intake with placebo gum and the active gum compared to no gum and a reduction in high-fat sweet snack intake with the active gum compared to placebo gum and no gum. Total caloric intake was only reduced in the active gum condition. Both the active and placebo gum conditions significantly reduced hunger and prospective food consumption and increased fullness compared to no gum and were associated with a reduced wanting for sweet food in the LFPQ, consistent in a reduction in the relative preference for sweet snacks versus savoury snacks. This study supports the notion that chewing gum containing nutraceutical products might aid in the control over snack intake and reduce hunger sensations.

  13. Antioxidant Generation during Coffee Roasting: A Comparison and Interpretation from Three Complementary Assays

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Sebastian E. W.; Smrke, Samo; Goodman, Bernard A.; Keller, Marco; Schenker, Stefan; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2014-01-01

    Coffee is a major source of dietary antioxidants; some are present in the green bean, whereas others are generated during roasting. However, there is no single accepted analytical method for their routine determination. This paper describes the adaption of three complementary assays (Folin-Ciocalteu (FC), ABTS and ORAC) for the routine assessment of antioxidant capacity of beverages, their validation, and use for determining the antioxidant capacities of extracts from coffee beans at different stages in the roasting process. All assays showed a progressive increase in antioxidant capacity during roasting to a light roast state, consistent with the production of melanoidins having a higher antioxidant effect than the degradation of CGAs. However, the three assays gave different numbers for the total antioxidant capacity of green beans relative to gallic acid (GA), although the range of values was much smaller when chlorogenic acid (CGA) was used as reference. Therefore, although all three assays indicated that there was an increase in antioxidant activity during coffee roasting, and the large differences in responses to GA and CGA illustrate their different sensitivities to different types of antioxidant molecule. PMID:28234339

  14. Green coffee oil analysis by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, Nicola; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Navarini, Luciano; Schievano, Elisabetta; Mammi, Stefano

    2013-06-15

    In this work, we show how an extensive and fast quantification of the main components in green coffee oil can be achieved by NMR, with minimal sample manipulation and use of organic solvents. The approach is based on the integration of characteristic NMR signals, selected because of their similar relaxation properties and because they fall in similar spectral regions, which minimizes offset effects. Quantification of glycerides, together with their fatty acid components (oleic, linoleic, linolenic and saturated) and minor species (caffeine, cafestol, kahweol and 16-O-methylcafestol), is achieved in less than 1h making use of (1)H and (13)C spectroscopy. The compositional data obtained are in reasonable agreement with classical chromatographic analyses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Espresso coffee foam delays cooling of the liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Arii, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa, Kaho

    2017-04-01

    Espresso coffee foam, called crema, is known to be a marker of the quality of espresso coffee extraction. However, the role of foam in coffee temperature has not been quantitatively clarified. In this study, we used an automatic machine for espresso coffee extraction. We evaluated whether the foam prepared using the machine was suitable for foam analysis. After extraction, the percentage and consistency of the foam were measured using various techniques, and changes in the foam volume were tracked over time. Our extraction method, therefore, allowed consistent preparation of high-quality foam. We also quantitatively determined that the foam phase slowed cooling of the liquid phase after extraction. High-quality foam plays an important role in delaying the cooling of espresso coffee.

  16. Consumption of Green Coffee Reduces Blood Pressure and Body Composition by Influencing 11β-HSD1 Enzyme Activity in Healthy Individuals: A Pilot Crossover Study Using Green and Black Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Revuelta-Iniesta, R.; Al-Dujaili, E. A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols may have a protective role against the development of CVD. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of green coffee (GC), rich in chlorogenic acid, and black coffee (BC) on cardiovascular markers. A randomised pilot crossover study was performed on healthy subjects who consumed both coffees for 2 weeks. We measured anthropometry, blood pressure, and arterial elasticity after each intervention and collected urine samples to monitor antioxidant capacity. Free cortisol and cortisone levels were obtained from urine and analysed by specific ELISA methods. Systolic blood pressure (P = 0.018) and arterial elasticity (P = 0.001) were significantly reduced after GC. BMI (P = 0.04 for BC; P = 0.01 for GC) and abdominal fat (P = 0.01 for BC; P = 0.009 for GC) were also significantly reduced with no changes in energy intake. Urinary free cortisol was significantly reduced from 125.6 ± 85.9 nmol/day to 76.0 ± 54.9 nmol/day following GC and increased to 132.1 ± 89.1 nmol/day after BC. Urinary free cortisone increased by 18% following BC and 9% following GC (nonsignificant). Cortisol/cortisone ratio (indicating 11β-HSD1 activity) was reduced after GC (from 3.5 ± 1.9 to 1.7 ± 1.04, P = 0.002). This suggests that GC can play a role in reducing cardiovascular risk factors. Further research including hypertensive and overweight individuals will now be justified to clarify whether GC could have a therapeutic role in CVD. PMID:25133164

  17. Interactions of green coffee bean phenolics with wheat bread matrix in a model of simulated in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Świeca, Michał; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula; Sęczyk, Łukasz; Dziki, Dariusz; Sikora, Małgorzata

    2018-08-30

    Interactions of phenolics from green coffee bean flour (GCS) with the matrix of wheat bread have been studied employing direct (electrophoretic and chromatographic techniques) and indirect tests (nutrient digestibility). According to the chromatograms of digests, the antiradical activity of enriched bread was exhibited by free phenolics. An increase the area of chromatograms and some additional peaks observed for enriched bread may confirm some interactions of proteins with phenolics. The electrophoretic profile of these extracts showed that the band corresponding to a protein with molecular mass of 38 kDA had much higher intensity in enriched bread. Electrophoretic analysis of pellets remaining after digestion revealed GCS dose-dependent differences in bands corresponding to proteins with molecular masses of 52 kDa and 23 kDa. The relative digestibility of both starch and proteins was slightly decreased by addition of GCS; however, these changes did not exceed 10%, which justifies the use of this functional material. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The coffee genome hub: a resource for coffee genomes

    PubMed Central

    Dereeper, Alexis; Bocs, Stéphanie; Rouard, Mathieu; Guignon, Valentin; Ravel, Sébastien; Tranchant-Dubreuil, Christine; Poncet, Valérie; Garsmeur, Olivier; Lashermes, Philippe; Droc, Gaëtan

    2015-01-01

    The whole genome sequence of Coffea canephora, the perennial diploid species known as Robusta, has been recently released. In the context of the C. canephora genome sequencing project and to support post-genomics efforts, we developed the Coffee Genome Hub (http://coffee-genome.org/), an integrative genome information system that allows centralized access to genomics and genetics data and analysis tools to facilitate translational and applied research in coffee. We provide the complete genome sequence of C. canephora along with gene structure, gene product information, metabolism, gene families, transcriptomics, syntenic blocks, genetic markers and genetic maps. The hub relies on generic software (e.g. GMOD tools) for easy querying, visualizing and downloading research data. It includes a Genome Browser enhanced by a Community Annotation System, enabling the improvement of automatic gene annotation through an annotation editor. In addition, the hub aims at developing interoperability among other existing South Green tools managing coffee data (phylogenomics resources, SNPs) and/or supporting data analyses with the Galaxy workflow manager. PMID:25392413

  19. Freezing as a treatment to prevent the spread of Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in coffee.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Robert C; Jang, Eric B; Follett, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) is the most serious insect pest of coffee around the world. Although it is already present in most of the world's major coffee growing regions, it is important to delay further spread and to prevent reintroductions that might include hyperparasites or improve the genetic base of existing populations. Green coffee is shipped around the world for custom blending and roasting and such shipments carry the risk of spreading H. hampei. We used heavily infested coffee berries as a surrogate for green coffee to test the freezing tolerance of H. hampei. After freezing, all life stages of H. hampei were dissected from coffee berries and mortality was assessed. Counting all life stages, > 15,000 insects were measured in this study. A temperature of approximately -15 degrees C (range, -13.9 to -15.5) for 48 h provided 100% control of all life stages. A logit regression model predicted < or = 1 survivor in a million for treatments of -20 degrees C for 5 d or -15 degrees C for 6 d. A freezing treatment for green coffee might be more economical and acceptable compared with fumigation with methyl bromide, especially for small-scale and organic growers and millers in Hawaii who ship green coffee beans to other islands for custom roasting. Freezing treatments could also be used to kill H. hampei in coffee seeds before export with minimal effects on seed germination if coffee seeds are first dried to critical water content levels in accordance with published methods.

  20. Puffing, a novel coffee bean processing technique for the enhancement of extract yield and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooki; Kim, Sang-Youn; Kim, Dae-Ok; Kim, Byung-Yong; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2018-02-01

    Puffing of coffee beans, which induces heat- and pressure-derived physicochemical changes, was applied as an alternative to roasting. Roasted or puffed coffee beans with equivalent lightness values were compared. The moisture content was higher while the crude fat and protein compositions were lower in puffed beans than in roasted beans. The pH was lower and the acid content was higher in puffed beans than in roasted beans. The roasted beans exhibited greater specific volumes, while the puffed beans displayed greater extraction yields. The trigonelline and total phenolic contents were greater in puffed beans than in roasted beans resulting in an enhanced antioxidant capacity. Sensory evaluation of roasted and puffed coffee bean brews revealed that puffing did not affect the flavor or overall acceptance. The current study provides evidence that puffing is an alternative to roasting coffee beans with various benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Irradiation for Quarantine Control of Coffee Berry Borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Coffee and a Proposed Generic Dose for Snout Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea).

    PubMed

    Follett, Peter A

    2018-05-05

    Coffee berry borer (CBB), Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is the most serious insect pest of coffee worldwide. Green coffee used in blending and roasting is traded between countries and may be subjected to fumigation for disinfestation of CBB. For example, green coffee shipped to Hawaii from the U.S. mainland must be treated with methyl bromide. Irradiation is an alternative disinfestation treatment option. Dose-response tests were conducted with adult beetles to identify a sterilizing dose, followed by large-scale confirmatory tests with adults infesting coffee berries at 100 Gy (measured doses 84-102 Gy). In total, 6,598 adult CBBs naturally infesting dried coffee berries were irradiated at 100 Gy and produced no viable offspring, whereas 1,033 unirradiated controls produced 327 eggs, 411 larvae, and 58 pupae at 3 wk post treatment. This is the first study to develop a postharvest irradiation treatment for a scolytine bark beetle and supports other studies suggesting 150 Gy is sufficient to prevent reproduction in snout beetles in the superfamily Curculionoidea.

  2. Green extraction of natural products: concept and principles.

    PubMed

    Chemat, Farid; Vian, Maryline Abert; Cravotto, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    The design of green and sustainable extraction methods of natural products is currently a hot research topic in the multidisciplinary area of applied chemistry, biology and technology. Herein we aimed to introduce the six principles of green-extraction, describing a multifaceted strategy to apply this concept at research and industrial level. The mainstay of this working protocol are new and innovative technologies, process intensification, agro-solvents and energy saving. The concept, principles and examples of green extraction here discussed, offer an updated glimpse of the huge technological effort that is being made and the diverse applications that are being developed.

  3. Instant coffee extract with high chlorogenic acids content inhibits hepatic G-6-Pase in vitro, but does not reduce the glycaemia.

    PubMed

    Bassoli, Bruna Kempfer; Cassolla, Priscila; Borba-Murad, Glaucia Regina; Constantin, Jorgete; Salgueiro-Pagadigorria, Clairce Luzia; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa; de Souza, Helenir Medri

    2015-06-01

    Coffee is the main source of chlorogenic acid in the human diet, and it contains several chlorogenic acid isomers, of which the 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA) is the predominant isomer. Because there are no available data about the action of chlorogenic acids from instant coffee on hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) activity and blood glucose levels, these effects were investigated in rats. The changes on G-6-Pase activity and liver glucose output induced by 5-CQA were also investigated. Instant coffee extract with high chlorogenic acids content (37.8%) inhibited (p < 0.05) the G-6-Pase activity of the hepatocyte microsomal fraction in a dose-dependent way (up to 53), but IV administration of this extract did not change the glycaemia (p > 0.05). Similarly, 5-CQA (1 mM) reduced (p < 0.05) the activity of microsomal G-6-Pase by about 40%, but had no effect (p > 0.05) on glucose output arising from glycogenolysis in liver perfusion. It was concluded that instant coffee extract with high content of chlorogenic acids inhibited hepatic G-6-Pase in vitro, but failed to reduce the glycaemia probably because the coffee chlorogenic acids did not reach enough levels within the hepatocytes to inhibit the G-6-Pase and reduce the liver glucose output. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Green bio-oil extraction for oil crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainab, H.; Nurfatirah, N.; Norfaezah, A.; Othman, H.

    2016-06-01

    The move towards a green bio-oil extraction technique is highlighted in this paper. The commonly practised organic solvent oil extraction technique could be replaced with a modified microwave extraction. Jatropha seeds (Jatropha curcas) were used to extract bio-oil. Clean samples were heated in an oven at 110 ° C for 24 hours to remove moisture content and ground to obtain particle size smaller than 500μm. Extraction was carried out at different extraction times 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 60 min and 120 min to determine oil yield. The biooil yield obtained from microwave assisted extraction system at 90 minutes was 36% while that from soxhlet extraction for 6 hours was 42%. Bio-oil extracted using the microwave assisted extraction (MAE) system could enhance yield of bio-oil compared to soxhlet extraction. The MAE extraction system is rapid using only water as solvent which is a nonhazardous, environment-friendly technique compared to soxhlet extraction (SE) method using hexane as solvent. Thus, this is a green technique of bio-oil extraction using only water as extractant. Bio-oil extraction from the pyrolysis of empty fruit bunch (EFB), a biomass waste from oil palm crop, was enhanced using a biocatalyst derived from seashell waste. Oil yield for non-catalytic extraction was 43.8% while addition of seashell based biocatalyst was 44.6%. Oil yield for non-catalytic extraction was 43.8% while with addition of seashell-based biocatalyst was 44.6%. The pH of bio-oil increased from 3.5 to 4.3. The viscosity of bio-oil obtained by catalytic means increased from 20.5 to 37.8 cP. A rapid and environment friendly extraction technique is preferable to enhance bio-oil yield. The microwave assisted approach is a green, rapid and environmental friendly extraction technique for the production of bio-oil bearing crops.

  5. Determination of 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA) as one of the major classes of chlorogenic acid in commercial tea and coffee samples.

    PubMed

    Nevena, Grujić-Letić; Branislava, Rakić; Emilia, Sefer; Dusica, Rakić; Ivan, Nedeljković; Nebojsa, Kladar; Biljana, Božin

    2015-11-01

    Tea and coffee are one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world due to their beneficial health effects which are largely associated with their phenolic compounds composition, including chlorogenic acid. The main aim of this study was to determine 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), as one of the major classes of chlorogenic acid, in various commercial tea and coffee samples present at the Serbian market. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for determination of 5-CQA in plant extracts was applied to determine the content of this active compound in commercial tea and coffee samples. Mobile phase was aqueous 1.5% acetic acid-methanol (80:20, v/v) with the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. Run time was 15 min and column temperature 25°C. The detection was performed at 240 nm. The HPLC method was modified and revalidated. The 5-CQA content varied depending on the type of tea (white, green, black tea and mate) and the processing technology. Green tea had the highest 5-CQA content (16 mg/100 mL) among the analyzed tea samples. The content of 5-CQA in coffee samples ranged 0-36.20 mg/g of coffee and 0-46.98 mg/100 mL of beverage, showing that the content varied depending on the type of coffee, coffee processing technology and the formulation. The modified and revalidated HPLC method showed a good accuracy, repeatability, selectivity and robustness. The highest amount of 5-CQA was determined in green tea in comparison to white, black and mate tea because the increased oxidation level decreases the amount of 5-CQA. The obtained results for commercial coffee samples indicated that the formulation was the most important factor determining the amount of 5-CQA. It can be concluded that plant material selection, processing conditions and formulation have great influence on the amount of chlorogenic acid (5-CQA) in the final tea and coffee products.

  6. Molecularly imprinted coated graphene oxide solid-phase extraction monolithic capillary column for selective extraction and sensitive determination of phloxine B in coffee bean.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Haiyun; Su, Zihao; Chen, Zuanguang; Liu, Zhenping; Yuan, Kaisong; Huang, Lu

    2015-03-20

    A method was developed to sensitively determine phloxine B in coffee bean by molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) coated graphene oxide (GO) solid-phase extraction (GO-MISPE) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography and laser-induced fluorescence detection (HPLC-LIF). The GO-MISPE capillary monolithic column was prepared by water-bath in situ polymerization, using GO as supporting material, phloxine B, methacrylic acid (MAA), and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as template, functional monomer, and cross-linker, respectively. The properties of the homemade GO-MISPE capillary monolithic column, including capacity and specificity, were investigated under optimized conditions. The GO-MIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The mean recoveries of phloxine B in coffee bean ranged from 89.5% to 91.4% and the intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviation (RSD) values all ranged from 3.6% to 4.7%. Good linearity was obtained over 0.001-2.0 μg mL(-1) (r=0.9995) with the detection limit (S/N=3) of 0.075 ng mL(-1). Under the selected conditions, enrichment factors of over 90-fold were obtained and extraction on the monolithic column effectively cleaned up the coffee bean matrix. The results demonstrated that the proposed GO-MISPE HPLC-LIF method can be applied to sensitively determine phloxine B in coffee bean. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Tea, Coffee, and Milk Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Green, Chadwick John; de Dauwe, Palina; Boyle, Terry; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mehdi; Fritschi, Lin; Heyworth, Jane Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Background Data regarding the effects of tea, coffee, and milk on the risk of colorectal cancer are inconsistent. We investigated associations of tea, coffee, and milk consumption with colorectal cancer risk and attempted to determine if these exposures were differentially associated with the risks of proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancers. Methods Data from 854 incident cases and 948 controls were analyzed in a case-control study of colorectal cancer in Western Australia during 2005–07. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the associations of black tea (with and without milk), green tea, herbal tea, hot coffee, iced coffee, and milk with colorectal cancer. Results Consumption of 1 or more cups of herbal tea per week was associated with a significantly decreased risk of distal colon cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.16–0.82; PTrend = 0.044), and consumption of 1 or more cups of iced coffee per week was associated with increased risk of rectal cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.91–2.54; PTrend = 0.004). Neither herbal tea nor iced coffee was associated with the risk of proximal colon cancer. Hot coffee was associated with a possible increased risk of distal colon cancer. Black tea (with or without milk), green tea, decaffeinated coffee, and milk were not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. Conclusions Consumption of herbal tea was associated with reduced risk of distal colon cancer, and consumption of iced coffee was associated with increased rectal cancer risk. PMID:24531002

  8. Microwave superheated water extraction of polysaccharides from spent coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Passos, Cláudia P; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2013-04-15

    The spent coffee grounds (SCG) are a food industry by-product that can be used as a rich source of polysaccharides. In the present work, the feasibility of microwave superheated water extraction of polysaccharides from SCG was studied. Different ratios of mass of SCG to water, from 1:30 to 1:5 (g:mL) were used for a total volume of 80 mL. Although the amount of material extracted/batch (MAE1) increased with the increase of the concentration of the sample, the amount of polysaccharides achieved a maximum of 0.57 g/batch for 1:10. Glycosidic-linkage composition showed that all extraction conditions allowed to obtain mainly arabinogalactans. When the unextracted insoluble material was re-extracted under the same conditions (MAE2), a further extraction of polysaccharides was observed (0.34 g/batch for 1:10), mainly galactomannans. Also, a high amount of oligosaccharides, mainly derived from galactomannans, can be obtained in MAE2 (0.96 g/batch for 1:10). This technology allows to obtain galactomannans and arabinogalactans in proportions that are dependent on the operating conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Adverse effects of concentrated green tea extracts.

    PubMed

    Schönthal, Axel H

    2011-06-01

    A myriad of health claims are being made in favor of the consumption of green tea. However, mostly due to the easy availability and greater than ever popularity of highly concentrated green tea extracts, sometimes combined with an attitude of more-is-better, certain health risks of green tea consumption have begun to emerge. Among such risks are the possibility of liver damage, the potential to interact with prescription drugs to alter their therapeutic efficacy, and the chance to cause harm when combined with other highly popular herbal remedies. This review will summarize documented examples of adverse effects of green tea in humans, and will discuss risks of copious consumption of highly concentrated green tea extracts as indicated by studies in animals. While there is no intention to minimize any of the scientifically established benefits of the use of green tea, the purpose of this review is to focus primarily on the potential for adverse effects and raise awareness of the rare, yet under-appreciated risks. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Analysis of coffee for the presence of acrylamide by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Andrzejewski, Denis; Roach, John A G; Gay, Martha L; Musser, Steven M

    2004-04-07

    A variety of popular instant, ground, and brewed coffees were analyzed using a modified liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method specifically developed for the determination of acrylamide in foods. Coffee test portions were spiked with 13C3-labeled acrylamide as an internal standard prior to their extraction and cleanup. Ground coffees (1 g) and instant coffees (0.5 g) were extracted by shaking with 9 mL of water for 20 min. Brewed coffee test portions (9 mL) were taken through the cleanup procedure without further dilution with extraction solvent. Coffee test portions were cleaned up by passing 1.5 mL first through an Oasis HLB (hydrophilic/lipophilic copolymer sorbent) solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge and then a Bond Elut-Accucat (cation and anion exchange sorbent) SPE cartridge. The cleaned up extracts were analyzed by positive ion electrospray LC-MS/MS. The MS/MS data was used to detect, confirm, and quantitate acrylamide. The limit of quantitation of the method was 10 ng/g for ground and instant coffees and 1.0 ng/mL for brewed coffee. The levels of acrylamide ranged from 45 to 374 ng/g in unbrewed coffee grounds, from 172 to 539 ng/g in instant coffee crystals, and from 6 to 16 ng/mL in brewed coffee.

  11. Population nutrikinetics of green tea extract.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Catharina; Lepper, Anna; Lehr, Thorsten; Hanke, Nina; Schneider, Katharina Luise; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Seufferlein, Thomas; Stingl, Julia Carolin

    2018-01-01

    Green tea polyphenols may contribute to the prevention of cancer and other diseases. To learn more about the pharmacokinetics and interindividual variation of green tea polyphenols after oral intake in humans we performed a population nutrikinetic study of standardized green tea extract. 84 healthy participants took green tea extract capsules standardized to 150 mg epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) twice a day for 5 days. On day 5 catechin plasma concentrations were analyzed using non-compartmental and population pharmacokinetic methods. A strong between-subject variability in catechin pharmacokinetics was found with maximum plasma concentrations varying more than 6-fold. The AUCs of EGCG, EGC and ECG were 877.9 (360.8-1576.5), 35.1 (8.0-87.4), and 183.6 (55.5-364.6) h*μg/L respectively, and the elimination half lives were 2.6 (1.8-3.8), 3.9 (0.9-10.7) and 1.8 (0.8-2.9) h, respectively. Genetic polymorphisms in genes of the drug transporters MRP2 and OATP1B1 could at least partly explain the high variability in pharmacokinetic parameters. The observed variability in catechin plasma levels might contribute to interindividual variation in benefical and adverse effects of green tea polyphenols. Our data could help to gain a better understanding of the causes of variability of green tea effects and to improve the design of studies on the effects of green tea polyphenols in different health conditions. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01360320.

  12. Topical use and systemic action of green and roasted coffee oils and ground oils in a cutaneous incision model in rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus).

    PubMed

    Lania, Bruno Grosselli; Morari, Joseane; Souza, Aglécio Luis de; Silva, Marilene Neves da; de Almeida, Amanda Roberta; Veira-Damiani, Gislaine; Alegre, Sarah Monte; César, Carlos Lenz; Velloso, Lício Augusto; Cintra, Maria Letícia; Maia, Nilson Borlina; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Wounds are a common health problem. Coffee is widely consumed and its oil contains essential fatty acids. We evaluated the local (skin) and systemic effects associated with the topical use of coffee oils in rats. Punch skin wounds (6 mm) incisions were generated on the backs of 75 rats. Saline (SS), mineral oil (MO), green coffee oil (GCO), roasted coffee oil (RCO), green coffee ground oil (GCGO) or roasted coffee ground oil (RCGO) were topically applied to the wounds. Healing was evaluated by visual and histological/morphometric optical microscopy examination; second harmonics generation (SHG) microscopy, wound tissue q-PCR (values in fold-change) and blood serum (ELISA, values in pg/mL). RCO treated animals presented faster wound healing (0.986 vs. 0.422), higher mRNA expression of IGF-1 (2.78 vs. 1.00, p = 0.01), IL-6 (10.72 vs. 1.00, p = 0.001) and IL-23 (4.10 vs. 1.2, p = 0.05) in early stages of wound healing; higher IL-12 (3.32 vs. 1.00, p = 0.05) in the later stages; and lower serum levels of IFN-γ (11.97 vs. 196.45, p = 0.01). GCO treatment led to higher mRNA expression of IL-6 (day 2: 7.94 vs. 1.00, p = 0.001 and day 4: 6.90 vs. 1.00, p = 0.01) and IL-23 (7.93 vs. 1.20, p = 0.001) in the early stages. The RCO treatment also produced higher serum IFN-α levels throughout the experiment (day 2: 52.53 vs. 21.20; day 4: 46.98 vs.21.56; day 10: 83.61 vs. 25.69, p = 0.05) and lower levels of IL-4 (day 4: 0.9 vs.13.36, p = 0.01), adiponectin (day 10: 8,367.47 vs. 16,526.38, p = 0.001) and IFN-γ (day 4: 43.03 vs.196.45, p = 0.05). The SHG analysis showed a higher collagen density in the RCO and GCO treatments (p = 0.05). Topical treatment with coffee oils led to systemic actions and faster wound healing in rats. Further studies should be performed are necessary to assess the safety of topical vegetal oil use for skin lesions.

  13. Aroma recovery from roasted coffee by wet grinding.

    PubMed

    Baggenstoss, J; Thomann, D; Perren, R; Escher, F

    2010-01-01

    Aroma recovery as determined by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was compared in coffees resulting from conventional grinding processes, and from wet grinding with cold and hot water. Freshly roasted coffee as well as old, completely degassed coffee was ground in order to estimate the relationship of internal carbon dioxide pressure in freshly roasted coffee with the aroma loss during grinding. The release of volatile aroma substances during grinding was found to be related to the internal carbon dioxide pressure, and wet grinding with cold water was shown to minimize losses of aroma compounds by trapping them in water. Due to the high solubility of roasted coffee in water, the use of wet-grinding equipment is limited to processes where grinding is followed by an extraction step. Combining grinding and extraction by the use of hot water for wet grinding resulted in considerable losses of aroma compounds because of the prolonged heat impact. Therefore, a more promising two-step process involving cold wet grinding and subsequent hot extraction in a closed system was introduced. The yield of aroma compounds in the resulting coffee was substantially higher compared to conventionally ground coffee. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Comparison of antioxidant, antimicrobial activities and chemical profiles of three coffee (Coffea arabica L.) pulp aqueous extracts.

    PubMed

    Duangjai, Acharaporn; Suphrom, Nungruthai; Wungrath, Jukkrit; Ontawong, Atcharaporn; Nuengchamnong, Nitra; Yosboonruang, Atchariya

    2016-12-01

    This study explored the bioactivities and nutrient compositions of coffee ( Coffea Arabica L.) pulp which was prepared in three different ways [Coffee Pulp Extracts (CPE) 1-3]. The coffee pulp was prepared in three different ways by distinct selecting and freezing processes. The nutritional values, polyphenol contents, antioxidant activity, and antibacterial properties of the coffee pulp as well as the characterization of the active ingredients by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS) were evaluated. The chemical profiles of three aqueous extracts were compared and characterized using LC-ESI-QTOF-MS. They showed slightly different nutrient compositions. The total phenolic content was highest in CPE1, and decreased in the following order: CPE1 > CPE2 > CPE3. Among the CPEs tested, CPE1 showed the most potent antioxidant activity with IC 50 18 μg/mL and 82 μg/mL by 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl assay, respectively. Chlorogenic acid and caffeine were the most prominent in CPE1 and it contained more compounds than the others. Moreover, CPE1 demonstrated antibacterial activity against both gram-positive ( Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis ) and gram-negative bacteria ( Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli ). These findings indicated that CPE1 has powerful nutrients with antioxidant and antibacterial properties-the potency of which is impacted by the preparation process.

  15. Deep eutectic solvent-based valorization of spent coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Da Eun; Jeong, Kyung Min; Han, Se Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Jin, Yan; Lee, Jeongmi

    2018-07-30

    Spent coffee grounds (SCGs) are viewed as a valuable resource for useful bioactive compounds, such as chlorogenic acids and flavonoids, and we suggest an eco-friendly and efficient valorization method. A series of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were tested as green extraction solvents for use with ultrasound-assisted extraction. Extraction efficiency was evaluated based on total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content, total chlorogenic acids, and/or anti-oxidant activity. A binary DES named HC-6, which was composed of 1,6-hexanediol:choline chloride (molar ratio 7:1) was designed to produce the highest efficiency. Experimental conditions were screened and optimized for maximized efficiency using a two-level fractional factorial design and a central composite design, respectively. As a result, the proposed method presented significantly enhanced TPC and anti-oxidant activity. In addition, phenolic compounds could be easily recovered from extracts at high recovery yields (>90%) by adsorption chromatography. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute effects of ingesting Java Fittrade mark energy extreme functional coffee on resting energy expenditure and hemodynamic responses in male and female coffee drinkers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lemuel W; Wilborn, Colin D; Harvey, Travis; Wismann, Jennifer; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2007-10-05

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a functional coffee beverage containing additional caffeine, green tea extracts, niacin and garcinia cambogia to regular coffee to determine the effects on resting energy expenditure (REE) and hemodynamic variables. Subjects included five male (26 +/- 2.1 y, 97.16 +/- 10.05 kg, 183.89 +/- 6.60 cm) and five female (28.8 +/- 5.3 y, 142.2 +/- 12.6 lbs) regular coffee drinkers. Subjects fasted for 10 hours and were assessed for 1 hour prior (PRE) and 3 hours following 1.5 cups of coffee ingestion [JavaFittrade mark Energy Extreme (JF) ~400 mg total caffeine; Folgers (F) ~200 mg total caffeine] in a double-blind, crossover design. REE, resting heart rate (RHR), and systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure was assessed at PRE and 1, 2, and 3-hours post coffee ingestion. Data were analyzed by three-factor repeated measures ANOVA (p < 0.05). JF trial resulted in a significant main effect for REE (p < 0.01), SBP (p < 0.01), RER (p < 0.01), and VO2 (p < 0.01) compared to F, with no difference between trials on the RHR and DBP variables. A significant interaction for trial and time point (p < 0.05) was observed for the variable REE. The JF trial resulted in a significant overall mean increase in REE of 14.4% (males = 12.1%, females = 17.9%) over the observation period (p < 0.05), while the F trial produced an overall decrease in REE of 5.7%. SBP was significantly higher in the JF trial; however, there was no significant increase from PRE to 3-hours post. Results from this study suggest that JavaFittrade mark Energy Extreme coffee is more effective than Folgers regular caffeinated coffee at increasing REE in regular coffee drinkers for up to 3 hours following ingestion without any adverse hemodynamic effects.

  17. Changes in the aromatic profile of espresso coffee as a function of the grinding grade and extraction time: a study by the electronic nose system.

    PubMed

    Severini, C; Ricci, I; Marone, M; Derossi, A; De Pilli, T

    2015-03-04

    The changes in chemical attributes and aromatic profile of espresso coffee (EC) were studied taking into account the extraction time and grinding level as independent variables. Particularly, using an electronic nose system, the changes of the global aromatic profile of EC were highlighted. The results shown as the major amounts of organic acids, solids, and caffeine were extracted in the first 8 s of percolation. The grinding grade significantly affected the quality of EC probably as an effect of the particle size distribution and the percolation pathways of water through the coffee cake. The use of an electronic nose system allowed us to discriminate the fractions of the brew as a function of the percolation time and also the regular coffee obtained from different grinding grades. Particularly, the aromatic profile of a regular coffee (25 mL) was significantly affected by the grinding level of the coffee grounds and percolation time, which are two variables under the control of the bar operator.

  18. Tea, coffee and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andy H; Fraser, Michelle L; Binns, Colin W

    2009-02-01

    Worldwide, prostate cancer has the second highest incidence of all cancers in males with incidence and mortality being much higher in affluent developed countries. Risk and progression of the disease may be linked to both genetic and environmental factors, especially dietary factors. Tea and coffee are two of the most popular beverages in the world and have been investigated for possible effects on health outcomes, including cancer. However, very little dietary advice for their consumption exists. The evidence for a relationship between coffee or tea consumption and prostate cancer is reviewed in this paper. While current evidence indicates that coffee is a safe beverage, its consumption probably has no relationship with prostate cancer. Tea, especially green tea, has shown some potential in the prevention of prostate cancer. While evidence from epidemiologic studies is currently inconclusive, strong evidence has emerged from animal and in vitro studies. We also consider what level of evidence is required to make recommendations for preventive measures to the public. Although evidence on the relationship between coffee, tea and prostate cancer is not complete, we consider it strong enough to recommend tea as a healthier alternative to coffee.

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymer as sorbent in micro-solid phase extraction of ochratoxin A in coffee, grape juice and urine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tien Ping; Saad, Bahruddin; Khayoon, Wejdan Shakir; Salleh, Baharuddin

    2012-01-15

    A simple, environmental friendly and selective sample preparation technique employing porous membrane protected micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE) loaded with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for the determination of ochratoxin A (OTA) is described. After the extraction, the analyte was desorbed using ultrasonication and was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of OTA for coffee, grape juice and urine were 0.06 ng g(-1), 0.02 and 0.02 ng mL(-1), respectively while the quantification limits were 0.19 ng g(-1), 0.06 and 0.08 ng mL(-1), respectively. The recoveries of OTA from coffee spiked at 1, 25 and 50 ng g(-1), grape juice and urine samples at 1, 25 and 50 ng mL(-1) ranged from 90.6 to 101.5%. The proposed method was applied to thirty-eight samples of coffee, grape juice and urine and the presence of OTA was found in eighteen samples. The levels found, however, were all below the legal limits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Behavior of pesticides in coffee beans during the roasting process.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Katsushi; Nishizawa, Hideo; Manabe, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, maximum residue limits for pesticides (MRL) in coffee are set on green coffee beans, but not roasted coffee beans, although roasted beans are actually used to prepare coffee for drinking. Little is known about the behavior of pesticides during the roasting process. In the present study, we examined the changes in the concentration of pesticide (organochlorine: γ-BHC, chlordane and heptachlor) residues in coffee beans during the roasting process. We prepared green coffee beans spiked with these pesticides (0.2 and 1.0 μg/g), and the residue levels in the beans were measured before and after the roasting process. We determined the residual rate after the roasting process. γ-BHC was not detectable at all, and more than 90% of chlordane was lost after the roasting (3.1 and 5.1% of chlordane remained in the beans spiked with 0.2 and 1.0 μg/g of chlordane, respectively). A low level of heptachlor (0.72%) was left in the coffee beans spiked with 1 μg/g of heptachlor. Disappearance of γ-BHC during the roasting process may be due to the high vapor pressure of γ-BHC, while chlordane has a lower vapor pressure. We also examined the behavior of piperonyl butoxide and atrazine during the roasting process. Piperonyl butoxide behaved similarly to chlordane, but atrazine disappeared after the roasting process, because it is unstable to heat.

  1. Coffee and tea: perks for health and longevity?

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Salman K; O'Keefe, James H; Lavie, Carl J

    2013-11-01

    Tea and coffee, after water, are the most commonly consumed beverages in the world and are the top sources of caffeine and antioxidant polyphenols in the American diet. The purpose of this review is to assess the health effects of chronic tea and/or coffee consumption. Tea consumption, especially green tea, is associated with significantly reduced risks for stroke, diabetes and depression, and improved levels of glucose, cholesterol, abdominal obesity and blood pressure. Habitual coffee consumption in large epidemiological studies is associated with reduced mortality, both for all-cause and cardiovascular deaths. In addition, coffee intake is associated with risks of heart failure, stroke, diabetes mellitus and some cancers in an inverse dose-dependent fashion. Surprisingly, coffee is associated with neutral to reduced risks for both atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. However, caffeine at high doses can increase anxiety, insomnia, calcium loss and possibly the risk of fractures. Coffee and tea can generally be recommended as health-promoting additions to an adult diet. Adequate dietary calcium intake may be particularly important for tea and coffee drinkers.

  2. Coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer: a prospective study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Taichi; Inoue, Manami; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Iwasaki, Motoki; Kurahashi, Norie; Yamaji, Taiki; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2008-11-15

    Coffee has been proposed to decrease the circulating insulin and estrogen levels, which are related to the development of endometrial cancer. However, few studies have prospectively assessed the association between coffee consumption and endometrial cancer. We conducted a population-based prospective cohort study in 53,724 Japanese women aged 40-69 years with no history of cancer at baseline in 1990-1994. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of endometrial cancer incidence in relation to coffee consumption. All reported p values are 2-tailed. During the 15-year follow-up period, we documented 117 cases of endometrial cancer. Coffee consumption was significantly associated with a decreased risk of endometrial cancer. After adjustment for age, study area, body mass index, menopausal status, age at menopause for postmenopausal women, parity, use of exogenous female hormones, smoking status and by consumption of green vegetables, beef, pork and green tea, the multivariate HRs (95% CI) of endometrial cancer in women who drank coffee /=3 cups/day were 1.00, 0.97 (0.56-1.68), 0.61 (0.39-0.97) and 0.38 (0.16-0.91), respectively (p for trend = 0.007). In contrast, green tea consumption was not significantly associated with a reduced risk of endometrial cancer (p for trend = 0.22). The inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer was consistently observed in subgroup analyses stratified by potential confounders. Coffee consumption may be associated with a decreased risk of endometrial cancer. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Green Soap: An Extraction and Saponification of Avocado Oil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutheimer, Susan; Caster, Jacqueline M.; Smith, Simone H.

    2015-01-01

    An introductory level green chemistry experiment is described that places a new twist on soap-making in lab. In this experiment, oil is extracted from an avocado, after which the oil is saponified to produce bars of green craft soap. Commonly used extraction solvents, such as petroleum ether, methylene chloride, and hexane, are replaced with safer…

  4. Topical use and systemic action of green and roasted coffee oils and ground oils in a cutaneous incision model in rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus)

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Aglécio Luis; Alegre, Sarah Monte; César, Carlos Lenz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Wounds are a common health problem. Coffee is widely consumed and its oil contains essential fatty acids. We evaluated the local (skin) and systemic effects associated with the topical use of coffee oils in rats. Methods Punch skin wounds (6 mm) incisions were generated on the backs of 75 rats. Saline (SS), mineral oil (MO), green coffee oil (GCO), roasted coffee oil (RCO), green coffee ground oil (GCGO) or roasted coffee ground oil (RCGO) were topically applied to the wounds. Healing was evaluated by visual and histological/morphometric optical microscopy examination; second harmonics generation (SHG) microscopy, wound tissue q-PCR (values in fold-change) and blood serum (ELISA, values in pg/mL). Results RCO treated animals presented faster wound healing (0.986 vs. 0.422), higher mRNA expression of IGF-1 (2.78 vs. 1.00, p = 0.01), IL-6 (10.72 vs. 1.00, p = 0.001) and IL-23 (4.10 vs. 1.2, p = 0.05) in early stages of wound healing; higher IL-12 (3.32 vs. 1.00, p = 0.05) in the later stages; and lower serum levels of IFN-γ (11.97 vs. 196.45, p = 0.01). GCO treatment led to higher mRNA expression of IL-6 (day 2: 7.94 vs. 1.00, p = 0.001 and day 4: 6.90 vs. 1.00, p = 0.01) and IL-23 (7.93 vs. 1.20, p = 0.001) in the early stages. The RCO treatment also produced higher serum IFN-α levels throughout the experiment (day 2: 52.53 vs. 21.20; day 4: 46.98 vs.21.56; day 10: 83.61 vs. 25.69, p = 0.05) and lower levels of IL-4 (day 4: 0.9 vs.13.36, p = 0.01), adiponectin (day 10: 8,367.47 vs. 16,526.38, p = 0.001) and IFN-γ (day 4: 43.03 vs.196.45, p = 0.05). The SHG analysis showed a higher collagen density in the RCO and GCO treatments (p = 0.05). Conclusion Topical treatment with coffee oils led to systemic actions and faster wound healing in rats. Further studies should be performed are necessary to assess the safety of topical vegetal oil use for skin lesions. PMID:29236720

  5. Determination of acrylamide in coffee and coffee products by GC-MS using an improved SPE clean-up.

    PubMed

    Soares, C; Cunha, S; Fernandes, J

    2006-12-01

    An improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method to determine acrylamide (AA) in coffee and coffee products was developed. The method was based on two main purification steps: the first with ethanol and Carrez solutions in order to precipitate polysaccharides and proteins, respectively; and the second with a layered solid-phase extraction (SPE) column which proved to be efficient in the elimination of the main chromatographic interferences. The method is applicable to a wide range of coffee products. Twenty-six samples of different coffee products were analysed. The levels of AA were in the range 11.4-36.2 microg l-1 for 'espresso coffee' and 200.8-229.4 microg l-1 for coffee blends with cereals. The results indicate that the presence of cereals significantly increased the levels of AA.

  6. Direct transesterification of spent coffee grounds for biodiesel production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies of spent coffee grounds (SCGs) as a potential biodiesel feedstock in recent years mostly started from solvent extraction to obtain coffee oil, and then converted it into coffee biodiesel in two steps, acid esterification followed by alkaline transesterification. This paper presents a direct ...

  7. Coffee, tea, and incident type 2 diabetes: the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Andrew O; Pereira, Mark A; Koh, Woon-Puay; Arakawa, Kazuko; Lee, Hin-Peng; Yu, Mimi C

    2009-01-01

    Background Increasing coffee intake was inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes in populations of European descent; however, data from high-risk Asian populations are lacking as are data on tea intake in general. Objective We investigated the prospective associations between intakes of coffee, black tea, and green tea with the risk of type 2 diabetes in Singaporean Chinese men and women. Design We analyzed data from 36 908 female and male participants in the Singapore Chinese Health Study aged 45-74 y in 1993-1998 who had multiple diet and lifestyle measures assessed and then were followed up between 1999 and 2004. We used Cox regression models to investigate the association of baseline coffee and tea intakes with incident type 2 diabetes during follow-up, with adjustment for a number of possible confounding or mediating variables. Results In multivariate models participants reporting ≥4 cups of coffee/d had a 30% reduction in risk of diabetes [relative risk (RR): 0.70; 95% CI: 0.53, 0.93] compared with participants who reported nondaily consumption. Participants reporting ≥1 cup of black tea/d had a suggestive 14% reduction in risk of diabetes (RR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.74, 1.00) compared with participants who reported 0 cups/d, and we observed no association with green tea. Conclusion Regular consumption of coffee and potentially black tea, but not green tea, is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in Asian men and women in Singapore. PMID:18842784

  8. The Antifungal Inhibitory Concentration Effectiveness Test From Ethanol Seed Arabica Coffee (Coffea arabica) Extract Against The Growth Of Candida albicans Patient Isolate With In Vitro Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satria Rakatama, Adam; Pramono, Andri; Yulianti, Retno

    2018-03-01

    Candida albicans are the most frequent cause of Vulvovaginalis Candidiasis infection. Its treatment using antifungal drugs, are oftenly caused side effects. The reduction of C.albicans growth and the reduction of antifungal drugs side effect, were our main purposed. Our study objective is determine the effectiveness of inhibitory power of arabica coffee seed ethanol extract on the growth of C.albicans patient isolates. The type of this research is experimental research. Kirby-bauer method with the Saboraud Dextrose Agar (SDA) media was used in this experiment. Inhibitory zone was observed around the disc, to determine the inhibitory power. The results showed that the inhibitory zone was formed on arabica coffee seed ethanol extract on 10%, 20%, 40%, and 80% concentration. Kruskal-Wallis test results (p<0,05) showed that there was a significant difference in mean between the concentration groups tested against the treatment group. The inhibitory zone was formed because of biochemical compound in arabica coffee seed such as caffeine, phenol, alkaloids, flavonoids, and saponins. Inhibitory zone in C.albicans patient isolates were smaller compared with C.albicans ATCC 90028 as gold standard. This showed that the virulence of C.albicans from patients isolates were higher. We concluded that arabica coffee seed ethanol extract could inhibiting the growth of C.albicans patient isolates. Optimization of coffee seed ethanol extract to obtain maximum active ingredients still needs to be done. This knowledge is expected to be used for the beginning manufacturer antifungal drug from natural product.

  9. Determination of lutein from green tea and green tea by-products using accelerated solvent extraction and UPLC.

    PubMed

    Heo, Ji-Young; Kim, Suna; Kang, Jae-Hyun; Moon, Bokyung

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to identify the optimum conditions for the extraction of lutein from green tea using accelerated solvent extraction, and achieve improved analytical resolution and sensitivity between lutein and zeaxanthin using an ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) system. The optimized method employed 80% ethanol as the extraction solvent, 160 °C as the temperature, 2 static cycles, and 5 min of static time. In the validation of the UPLC method, recovery was found to be in the range approximately 93.73 to 108.79%, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9974 and a relative standard deviation of <9.29% in inter- and intraday precision analyses. Finally, the lutein contents of green tea and green tea by-products were measured as 32.67 ± 0.70 and 18.18 ± 0.68 mg/100g dw, respectively. Furthermore, we verified that green tea by-products, which are discarded after producing green tea beverages, might be used as a great resource for massive lutein production. We have demonstrated that the common problem of inadequate resolution between lutein and zeaxanthin during carotenoid analyses can be overcome by optimizing the combined techniques of accelerated solvent extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). UPLC was highly effective for saving time, solvent, and labor, as well as providing better resolution. The results in this study demonstrated that green tea by-products could be used as new sources for industrial lutein production owing to their massive production during the extraction of green tea beverages. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Espresso coffee residues: a valuable source of unextracted compounds.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rebeca; Cardoso, Maria M; Fernandes, Luana; Oliveira, Marta; Mendes, Eulália; Baptista, Paula; Morais, Simone; Casal, Susana

    2012-08-15

    Espresso spent coffee grounds were chemically characterized to predict their potential, as a source of bioactive compounds, by comparison with the ones from the soluble coffee industry. Sampling included a total of 50 samples from 14 trademarks, collected in several coffee shops and prepared with distinct coffee machines. A high compositional variability was verified, particularly with regard to such water-soluble components as caffeine, total chlorogenic acids (CGA), and minerals, supported by strong positive correlations with total soluble solids retained. This is a direct consequence of the reduced extraction efficiency during espresso coffee preparation, leaving a significant pool of bioactivity retained in the extracted grounds. Besides the lipid (12.5%) and nitrogen (2.3%) contents, similar to those of industrial coffee residues, the CGA content (478.9 mg/100 g), for its antioxidant capacity, and its caffeine content (452.6 mg/100 g), due to its extensive use in the food and pharmaceutical industries, justify the selective assembly of this residue for subsequent use.

  11. Sequential microwave superheated water extraction of mannans from spent coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Passos, Cláudia P; Moreira, Ana S P; Domingues, M Rosário M; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2014-03-15

    The feasibility of using sequential microwave superheated water extraction (MAE) for the recovery of mannans from spent coffee grounds (SCG) was studied. Due to the high contents of mannose still present in the SCG residue left after two consecutive MAE, the unextracted material was re-suspended in water and submitted to a third microwave irradiation (MAE3) at 200 °C for 3 min. With MAE3, mannose recovery achieved 48%, increasing to 56% by MAE4, and reaching a maximum of 69% with MAE5. Glycosidic-linkage analysis showed that in MAE3 mainly galactomannans were recovered, while debranched galactomannans were recovered with MAE4 and MAE5. With increasing the number of extractions, the average degree of polymerization of the mannans decreased, as observed by size-exclusion chromatography and by methylation analysis. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a decrease on cell walls thickness. After final MAE5, the remaining un-extracted insoluble material, representing 22% of the initial SCG, was composed mainly by cellulose (84%). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Application of Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transformed Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy To Determine the Chlorogenic Acid Isomer Profile and Antioxidant Capacity of Coffee Beans.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ningjian; Lu, Xiaonan; Hu, Yaxi; Kitts, David D

    2016-01-27

    The chlorogenic acid isomer profile and antioxidant activity of both green and roasted coffee beans are reported herein using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy combined with chemometric analyses. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) quantified different chlorogenic acid isomer contents for reference, whereas ORAC, ABTS, and DPPH were used to determine the antioxidant activity of the same coffee bean extracts. FTIR spectral data and reference data of 42 coffee bean samples were processed to build optimized PLSR models, and 18 samples were used for external validation of constructed PLSR models. In total, six PLSR models were constructed for six chlorogenic acid isomers to predict content, with three PLSR models constructed to forecast the free radical scavenging activities, obtained using different chemical assays. In conclusion, FTIR spectroscopy, coupled with PLSR, serves as a reliable, nondestructive, and rapid analytical method to quantify chlorogenic acids and to assess different free radical-scavenging capacities in coffee beans.

  13. Green tea extract impairs meat emulsion properties by disturbing protein disulfide cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Jongberg, Sisse; Terkelsen, Linda de S; Miklos, Rikke; Lund, Marianne N

    2015-02-01

    The dose-dependent effects of green tea extract (100, 500, or 1500ppm) on the textural and oxidative stability of meat emulsions were investigated, and compared to a control meat emulsion without extract. All levels of green tea extract inhibited formation of TBARS as a measure for lipid oxidation. Overall protein thiol oxidation and myosin heavy chain (MHC) cross-linking were inhibited by 100ppm green tea extract without jeopardizing the textural stability, while increasing concentrations of extract resulted in reduced thiol concentration and elevated levels of non-reducible protein modifications. Addition of 1500ppm green tea extract was found to modify MHC as evaluated by SDS-PAGE combining both protein staining and specific thiol staining, indicating that protein modifications generated through reactions of green tea phenolic compounds with protein thiols, disrupted the meat emulsion properties leading to reduced water holding capacity and textural stability. Hence, a low dose of green tea extract preserves both the textural and the oxidative stability of the meat proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Coffee seeds isotopic composition as a potential proxy to evaluate Minas Gerais, Brazil seasonal variations during seed maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Carla; Maia, Rodrigo; Brunner, Marion; Carvalho, Eduardo; Prohaska, Thomas; Máguas, Cristina

    2010-05-01

    Plant seeds incorporate the prevailing climate conditions and the physiological response to those conditions (Rodrigues et al., 2009; Rodrigues et al., submitted). During coffee seed maturation the biochemical compounds may either result from accumulated material in other organs such as leafs and/or from new synthesis. Accordingly, plant seeds develop in different stages along a particular part of the year, integrating the plant physiology and seasonal climatic conditions. Coffee bean is an extremely complex matrix, rich in many products derived from both primary and secondary metabolism during bean maturation. Other studies (De Castro and Marraccini, 2006) have revealed the importance of different coffee plant organs during coffee bean development as transfer tissues able to provide compounds (i.e. sugars, organic acids, etc) to the endosperm where several enzymatic activities and expressed genes have been reported. Moreover, it has been proved earlier on that green coffee bean is a particularly suitable case-study (Rodrigues et al., 2009; Rodrigues et al., submitted), not only due to the large southern hemispheric distribution but also because of this product high economic interest. The aim of our work was to evaluate the potential use of green coffee seeds as a proxy to seasonal climatic conditions during coffee bean maturation, through an array of isotopic composition determinations. We have determined carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur isotopic composition (by IRMS - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) as well as strontium isotope abundance (by MC-ICP-MS; Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry), of green coffee beans harvested at different times at Minas Gerais, Brazil. The isotopic composition data were combined with air temperature and relative humidity data registered during the coffee bean developmental period, and with the parent rock strontium isotopic composition. Results indicate that coffee seeds indeed integrate the interactions

  15. Supercritical CO2 decaffeination of unroasted coffee beans produces melanoidins with distinct NF-κB inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yumin; Brown, Peter H; Hu, Kang; Black, Richard M; Prior, Ronald L; Ou, Boxin; Chu, Yi-Fang

    2011-09-01

    The supercritical CO(2)-decaffeination process causes unroasted coffee beans to turn brown. Therefore, we suspected that the decaffeinated beans contained melanoidins. Decaffeinated unroasted coffee extract absorbed light at 405 nm with a specific extinction coefficient, K(mix 405 nm), of 0.02. Membrane dialysis (molecular weight cut-off, 12 to 14 kDa) increased the K(mix 405 nm) value 15 fold. Gel filtration chromatography showed that the high-MW fraction (MW > 12 kDa) had an elution profile closer to that of melanoidins of medium-roast coffee than to the corresponding fraction of unroasted coffee, indicating the presence of melanoidins in decaffeinated unroasted beans. Using murine myoblast C2C12 cells with a stably transfected nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) luciferase reporter gene, we found that the high-MW fraction of decaffeinated unroasted beans had an NF-κB inhibitory activity of IC(50) = 499 μg/mL, more potent than that of regular-roast coffee (IC(50) = 766 μg/mL). Our results indicate that melanoidins form during the supercritical CO(2)-decaffeination process and possess biological properties distinct from those formed during the regular roasting process. We discovered the roasting effect of decaffeination process, reporting the discovery of melanoidins in green (unroasted) decaf coffee beans. Our results indicated that melanoidins form during the supercritical CO2-decaffeination process and possess biological properties distinct from those formed during the regular roasting process. Our results offer new insights into the formation of bioactive coffee components during coffee decaffeination process. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Coffee Berry Borer Joins Bark Beetles in Coffee Klatch

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Juliana; Torto, Baldwyn; Mwenda, Dickson; Troeger, Armin; Borgemeister, Christian; Poehling, Hans-Michael; Francke, Wittko

    2013-01-01

    Unanswered key questions in bark beetle-plant interactions concern host finding in species attacking angiosperms in tropical zones and whether management strategies based on chemical signaling used for their conifer-attacking temperate relatives may also be applied in the tropics. We hypothesized that there should be a common link in chemical signaling mediating host location by these Scolytids. Using laboratory behavioral assays and chemical analysis we demonstrate that the yellow-orange exocarp stage of coffee berries, which attracts the coffee berry borer, releases relatively high amounts of volatiles including conophthorin, chalcogran, frontalin and sulcatone that are typically associated with Scolytinae chemical ecology. The green stage of the berry produces a much less complex bouquet containing small amounts of conophthorin but no other compounds known as bark beetle semiochemicals. In behavioral assays, the coffee berry borer was attracted to the spiroacetals conophthorin and chalcogran, but avoided the monoterpenes verbenone and α-pinene, demonstrating that, as in their conifer-attacking relatives in temperate zones, the use of host and non-host volatiles is also critical in host finding by tropical species. We speculate that microorganisms formed a common basis for the establishment of crucial chemical signals comprising inter- and intraspecific communication systems in both temperate- and tropical-occurring bark beetles attacking gymnosperms and angiosperms. PMID:24073204

  17. Coffee berry borer joins bark beetles in coffee klatch.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Juliana; Torto, Baldwyn; Mwenda, Dickson; Troeger, Armin; Borgemeister, Christian; Poehling, Hans-Michael; Francke, Wittko

    2013-01-01

    Unanswered key questions in bark beetle-plant interactions concern host finding in species attacking angiosperms in tropical zones and whether management strategies based on chemical signaling used for their conifer-attacking temperate relatives may also be applied in the tropics. We hypothesized that there should be a common link in chemical signaling mediating host location by these Scolytids. Using laboratory behavioral assays and chemical analysis we demonstrate that the yellow-orange exocarp stage of coffee berries, which attracts the coffee berry borer, releases relatively high amounts of volatiles including conophthorin, chalcogran, frontalin and sulcatone that are typically associated with Scolytinae chemical ecology. The green stage of the berry produces a much less complex bouquet containing small amounts of conophthorin but no other compounds known as bark beetle semiochemicals. In behavioral assays, the coffee berry borer was attracted to the spiroacetals conophthorin and chalcogran, but avoided the monoterpenes verbenone and α-pinene, demonstrating that, as in their conifer-attacking relatives in temperate zones, the use of host and non-host volatiles is also critical in host finding by tropical species. We speculate that microorganisms formed a common basis for the establishment of crucial chemical signals comprising inter- and intraspecific communication systems in both temperate- and tropical-occurring bark beetles attacking gymnosperms and angiosperms.

  18. Terpenes as green solvents for extraction of oil from microalgae.

    PubMed

    Dejoye Tanzi, Celine; Abert Vian, Maryline; Ginies, Christian; Elmaataoui, Mohamed; Chemat, Farid

    2012-07-09

    Herein is described a green and original alternative procedure for the extraction of oil from microalgae. Extractions were carried out using terpenes obtained from renewable feedstocks as alternative solvents instead of hazardous petroleum solvents such as n-hexane. The described method is achieved in two steps using Soxhlet extraction followed by the elimination of the solvent from the medium using Clevenger distillation in the second step. Oils extracted from microalgae were compared in terms of qualitative and quantitative determination. No significant difference was obtained between each extract, allowing us to conclude that the proposed method is green, clean and efficient.

  19. Supercritical Fluid Extract of Spent Coffee Grounds Attenuates Melanogenesis through Downregulation of the PKA, PI3K/Akt, and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huey-Chun; Wei, Chien-Mei; Siao, Jen-Hung; Tsai, Tsang-Chi; Ko, Wang-Ping; Chang, Kuei-Jen; Hii, Choon-Hoon; Chang, Tsong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The mode of action of spent coffee grounds supercritical fluid CO2 extract (SFE) in melanogenesis has never been reported. In the study, the spent coffee grounds were extracted by the supercritical fluid CO2 extraction method; the chemical constituents of the SFE were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of the SFE and its major fatty acid components on melanogenesis were evaluated by mushroom tyrosinase activity assay and determination of intracellular tyrosinase activity and melanin content. The expression level of melanogenesis-related proteins was analyzed by western blotting assay. The results revealed that the SFE of spent coffee grounds (1–10 mg/mL) and its major fatty acids such as linoleic acid and oleic acid (6.25–50 μM) effectively suppressed melanogenesis in the B16F10 murine melanoma cells. Furthermore, the SFE decreased the expression of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), and tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP-2). The SFE also decreased the protein expression levels of p-JNK, p-p38, p-ERK, and p-CREB. Our results revealed that the SFE of spent coffee grounds attenuated melanogenesis in B16F10 cells by downregulation of protein kinase A (PKA), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/Akt), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways, which may be due to linoleic acid and oleic acid. PMID:27375763

  20. Supercritical Fluid Extract of Spent Coffee Grounds Attenuates Melanogenesis through Downregulation of the PKA, PI3K/Akt, and MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huey-Chun; Wei, Chien-Mei; Siao, Jen-Hung; Tsai, Tsang-Chi; Ko, Wang-Ping; Chang, Kuei-Jen; Hii, Choon-Hoon; Chang, Tsong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The mode of action of spent coffee grounds supercritical fluid CO2 extract (SFE) in melanogenesis has never been reported. In the study, the spent coffee grounds were extracted by the supercritical fluid CO2 extraction method; the chemical constituents of the SFE were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of the SFE and its major fatty acid components on melanogenesis were evaluated by mushroom tyrosinase activity assay and determination of intracellular tyrosinase activity and melanin content. The expression level of melanogenesis-related proteins was analyzed by western blotting assay. The results revealed that the SFE of spent coffee grounds (1-10 mg/mL) and its major fatty acids such as linoleic acid and oleic acid (6.25-50 μM) effectively suppressed melanogenesis in the B16F10 murine melanoma cells. Furthermore, the SFE decreased the expression of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), and tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP-2). The SFE also decreased the protein expression levels of p-JNK, p-p38, p-ERK, and p-CREB. Our results revealed that the SFE of spent coffee grounds attenuated melanogenesis in B16F10 cells by downregulation of protein kinase A (PKA), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/Akt), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways, which may be due to linoleic acid and oleic acid.

  1. Integration of decentralized torrefaction with centralized catalytic pyrolysis to produce green aromatics from coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Chai, Li; Saffron, Christopher M; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Zhongyu; Munro, Robert W; Kriegel, Robert M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to integrate decentralized torrefaction with centralized catalytic pyrolysis to convert coffee grounds into the green aromatic precursors of terephthalic acid, namely benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). An economic analysis of this bioproduct system was conducted to examine BTEX yields, biomass costs and their sensitivities. Model predictions were verified experimentally using pyrolysis GC/MS to quantify BTEX yields for raw and torrefied biomass. The production cost was minimized when the torrefier temperature and residence time were 239°C and 34min, respectively. This optimization study found conditions that justify torrefaction as a pretreatment for making BTEX, provided that starting feedstock costs are below $58 per tonne. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Sequential co-production of biodiesel and bioethanol with spent coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Yi, Haakrho; Jeon, Young Jae

    2013-05-01

    The sequential co-production of bioethanol and biodiesel from spent coffee grounds was investigated. The direct conversion of bioethanol from spent coffee grounds was not found to be a desirable option because of the relatively slow enzymatic saccharification behavior in the presence of triglycerides and the free fatty acids (FFAs) found to exist in the raw materials. Similarly, the direct transformation of the spent coffee grounds into ethanol without first extracting lipids was not found to be a feasible alternative. However, the crude lipids extracted from the spent coffee grounds were themselves converted into fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) via the non-catalytic biodiesel transesterification reaction. The yields of bioethanol and biodiesel were 0.46 g g(-1) and 97.5±0.5%, which were calculated based on consumed sugar and lipids extracted from spent coffee grounds respectively. Thus, this study clearly validated our theory that spent coffee grounds could be a strong candidate for the production of bioethanol and biodiesel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interaction mechanism between green tea extract and human α-amylase for reducing starch digestion.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo; Jiang, Huan; Zhang, Tao; Li, Xingfeng

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of the green tea extract on human pancreatic α-amylase activity and its molecular mechanism. The green tea extract was composed of epicatechin (59.2%), epigallocatechin gallate (14.6%) and epicatechin gallate (26.2%) as determined by HPLC analysis. Enzyme activity measurement showed that % inhibition and IC50 of the green tea extract (10%, based on starch) were 63.5% and 2.07 mg/ml, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant remained unchanged but the maximal velocity decreased from 0.43 (control) to 0.07 mg/(ml × min) (4 mg/ml of the green tea extract), indicating that the green tea extract was an effective inhibitor against α-amylase with a non-competitive mode. The fluorescence data revealed that the green tea extract bound with α-amylase to form a new complex with static quenching mechanism. Docking study showed the epicatechin gallate in the green tea extract presented stronger affinity than epigallocatechin gallate, with more number of amino acid residues involved in amylase binding with hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals forces. Thus, the green tea extract could be used to manipulate starch digestion for potential health benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantification of caffeine, trigonelline and nicotinic acid in espresso coffee: the influence of espresso machines and coffee cultivars.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Giovanni; Cortese, Manuela; Maggi, Filippo; Minnetti, Caterina; Odello, Luigi; Sagratini, Gianni; Vittori, Sauro

    2014-06-01

    Caffeine, trigonelline and nicotinic acid are important bioactive constituents of coffee. In this work, the combination of different water temperatures and pressures in the settings of the espresso coffee (EC) machine was evaluated, to assess how these factors influence how effectively caffeine, trigonelline and nicotinic acid are extracted from both Arabica and Robusta samples. The proposed analytical method, based on a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system coupled to a variable wavelength detector (VWD), showed good linearity (R²> 0.9985) and good recoveries (71-92%); after validation for three monitored compounds, the method was used to analyze 20 commercial samples. The combination of a temperature of 92 °C and pressure at 7 or 9 bar seems to be the ideal setting for the most efficient extraction of these compounds and consequently for their intake; the compound extracted in the greatest quantity was caffeine, which was in the range of 116.87-199.68 mg in a 25 ml cup of coffee.

  5. Characterization and Expression Analysis of Genes Directing Galactomannan Synthesis in Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Pré, Martial; Caillet, Victoria; Sobilo, Julien; McCarthy, James

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Galactomannans act as storage reserves for the seeds in some plants, such as guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) and coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora). In coffee, the galactomannans can represent up to 25 % of the mass of the mature green coffee grain, and they exert a significant influence on the production of different types of coffee products. The objective of the current work was to isolate and characterize cDNA encoding proteins responsible for galactomannan synthesis in coffee and to study the expression of the corresponding transcripts in the developing coffee grain from C. arabica and C. canephora, which potentially exhibit slight galactomannan variations. Comparative gene expression analysis was also carried out for several other tissues of C. arabica and C. canephora. Methods cDNA banks, RACE-PCR and genome walking were used to generate full-length cDNA for two putative coffee mannan synthases (ManS) and two galactomannan galactosyl transferases (GMGT). Gene-specific probe-primer sets were then generated and used to carry out comparative expression analysis of the corresponding genes in different coffee tissues using quantitative RT-PCR Key Results Two of the putative galactomannan biosynthetic genes, ManS1 and GMGT1, were demonstrated to have very high expression in the developing coffee grain of both Coffea species during endosperm development, consistent with our proposal that these two genes are responsible for the production of the majority of the galactomannans found in the grain. In contrast, the expression data presented indicates that the ManS2 gene product is probably involved in the synthesis of the galactomannans found in green tissue. Conclusions The identification of genes implicated in galactomannan synthesis in coffee are presented. The data obtained will enable more detailed studies on the biosynthesis of this important component of coffee grain and contribute to a better understanding of some functional

  6. The Effects of Green Tea Extract on Working Memory in Healthy Women.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Fly, A D; Wang, Z; Klaunig, J E

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of green tea extract on working memory in healthy younger (21 - 29 y) and older (50 - 63 y) women. A single-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design was used. A university laboratory. Twenty non-smoking Caucasian women were recruited in the younger (10) and older (10) age group. Subjects received 5.4 g green tea extract (at least 45% epigallocatechin-3-gallate) or placebo (cornstarch) within a 24-hour period. Working memory was measured by reading span and N-back task paradigm. Blood sample (20 mL) was collected and measured for plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TEAC) concentration. A 24-hour recall was conducted for each treatment period to ensure similar dietary patterns. Green tea extract significantly improved reading span performance in older women, indicated by higher absolute and partial scores of reading span. No significant changes were observed in the younger group. N-back latencies and accuracies were not significantly different after green tea treatment in either age group. Plasma concentration of MDA and TEAC were not different after green tea extract in either group. Acute supplementation of decaffeinated green tea extract may enhance working memory capacity of women between 50 to 63 years of age. This study provides preliminary evidence that consumption of green tea extract may enhance the cognitive performance in older adults and thus provide potential chemopreventive benefits in this group. The mechanism should be explored in future research.

  7. REMPI-TOFMS for on-line monitoring and controlling the coffee roasting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfner, Ralph; Ferge, Thomas; Yeretzian, Chahan; Zimmermann, Ralf; Kettrup, Antonius

    2001-08-01

    REMPI@266nm-TOFMS is used for on-line analysis of the coffee roasting process. Volatile and flavor active compounds of coffee were ionized by REMPI@266nm and monitored on-line and in real-time by TOFMS during the coffee roasting process. The phenol and 4-vinylguaiacol time-intensity profiles, for example, show typical behavior for different roasting temperatures and provide an indicator to the achieved degree of roasting. The impact of the moisture level of the green coffee beans on the time shift of a typical (commercial) roasting time, correlates with REMPI-TOFMS measurements and literature data.

  8. Variability of single bean coffee volatile compounds of Arabica and robusta roasted coffees analysed by SPME-GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Caporaso, Nicola; Whitworth, Martin B; Cui, Chenhao; Fisk, Ian D

    2018-06-01

    We report on the analysis of volatile compounds by SPME-GC-MS for individual roasted coffee beans. The aim was to understand the relative abundance and variability of volatile compounds between individual roasted coffee beans at constant roasting conditions. Twenty-five batches of Arabica and robusta species were sampled from 13 countries, and 10 single coffee beans randomly selected from each batch were individually roasted in a fluidised-bed roaster at 210 °C for 3 min. High variability (CV = 14.0-53.3%) of 50 volatile compounds in roasted coffee was obtained within batches (10 beans per batch). Phenols and heterocyclic nitrogen compounds generally had higher intra-batch variation, while ketones were the most uniform compounds (CV < 20%). The variation between batches was much higher, with the CV ranging from 15.6 to 179.3%. The highest variation was observed for 2,3-butanediol, 3-ethylpyridine and hexanal. It was also possible to build classification models based on geographical origin, obtaining 99.5% and 90.8% accuracy using LDA or MLR classifiers respectively, and classification between Arabica and robusta beans. These results give further insight into natural variation of coffee aroma and could be used to obtain higher quality and more consistent final products. Our results suggest that coffee volatile concentration is also influenced by other factors than simply the roasting degree, especially green coffee composition, which is in turn influenced by the coffee species, geographical origin, ripening stage and pre- and post-harvest processing. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Furanic compounds and furfural in different coffee products by headspace liquid-phase micro-extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: survey and effect of brewing procedures.

    PubMed

    Chaichi, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh-Mohammadi, Vahid; Hashemi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Abdorreza

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the levels of furan, 2-methylfuran, 2,5-dimethylfuran, vinyl furan, 2-methoxymethyl-furan and furfural in different coffee products were evaluated. Simultaneous determination of these six furanic compounds was performed by a head space liquid-phase micro-extraction (HS-LPME) method. A total of 67 coffee powder samples were analysed. The effects of boiling and espresso-making procedures on the levels of furanic compounds were investigated. The results showed that different types of coffee samples contained different concentrations of furanic compounds, due to the various processing conditions such as temperature, degree of roasting and fineness of grind. Among the different coffee samples, the highest level of furan (6320 µg kg⁻¹) was detected in ground coffee, while coffee-mix samples showed the lowest furan concentration (10 µg kg⁻¹). Levels in brewed coffees indicated that, except for furfural, brewing by an espresso machine caused significant loss of furanic compounds.

  10. The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uman, Erol; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Perger, Matthew; Klatt, Christian; Leighton, Stephen; Miller, Brian; Butler, Keith T.; Melot, Brent C.; Speirs, Rory W.; Hendon, Christopher H.

    2016-04-01

    Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily.

  11. The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee.

    PubMed

    Uman, Erol; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Perger, Matthew; Klatt, Christian; Leighton, Stephen; Miller, Brian; Butler, Keith T; Melot, Brent C; Speirs, Rory W; Hendon, Christopher H

    2016-04-18

    Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily.

  12. The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee

    PubMed Central

    Uman, Erol; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Perger, Matthew; Klatt, Christian; Leighton, Stephen; Miller, Brian; Butler, Keith T.; Melot, Brent C.; Speirs, Rory W.; Hendon, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily. PMID:27086837

  13. Quantification of isoflavones in coffee by using solid phase extraction (SPE) and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Giovanni; Navarini, Luciano; Cortese, Manuela; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Torregiani, Elisabetta; Vittori, Sauro; Sagratini, Gianni

    2016-09-01

    A new method for extracting isoflavones from espresso coffee (EC) was coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the first time to analyse five isoflavones, which included both a glycosilated form, genistin and the aglycons daidzein, genistein, formononetin and biochanin A. Isoflavones were extracted from coffee samples using methanol, stored in a freezer overnight to precipitate proteic or lipidic residues and purified on SPE C18 cartridges before high-performance liquid chromatography-MS/MS analysis. The recovery percentages obtained by spiking the matrix at concentrations of 10 and 100 µg l(-1) with a standard mixture of isoflavones were in the range of 70 to 104%. The limits of detection and limits of quantification were in the range of 0.015-0.3 µg l(-1) and 0.05-1 µg l(-1) , respectively. Once validated, the method was used to analyze the concentrations of isoflavones in six ECs and ten ground coffee samples. Only formononetin and biochanin A were found, and their respective concentrations ranged from 0.36 to 0.41 µg l(-1) and from 0.58 to 3.26 µg l(-1) in ECs and from 0.36 to 4.27 µg kg(-1) and from 0.71 to 3.95 µg kg(-1) in ground coffees. This method confirms the high specificity and selectivity of MS/MS systems for detecting bioactives in complex matrices such as coffee.Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Stability of ochratoxin A (OTA) during processing and decaffeination in commercial roasted coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Nehad, E A; Farag, M M; Kawther, M S; Abdel-Samed, A K M; Naguib, K

    2005-08-01

    The fate of ochratoxin A (OTA) during the processing of artificially contaminated green coffee beans, the effect of decaffeination on the production of OTA in green and roasted coffee beans, and the effect of caffeine on the growth and OTA production by Aspergillus ochraceus were studied. The data indicated that the roasting, milling and decoction (brewing and Turkish coffee making) processes caused different percentage reductions in OTA. Decaffeinated samples showed a significantly higher concentration of OTA production than the caffeinated ones. A significantly higher percentage of OTA was reduced when the decaffeination process was performed before roasting treatment. Caffeine at 1.0 and 2.0% concentrations completely prevented OTA production and completely inhibited A. ochraceus growth in YES medium after 3-21 days.

  15. Coffee, tea, and cocoa and risk of stroke.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Susanna C

    2014-01-01

    Current evidence from experimental studies in animals and humans along with findings from prospective studies indicates beneficial effects of green and black tea as well as chocolate on cardiovascular health, and that tea and chocolate consumption may reduce the risk of stroke. The strongest evidence exists for beneficial effects of tea and cocoa on endothelial function, total and LDL cholesterol (tea only), and insulin sensitivity (cocoa only). The majority of prospective studies have reported a weak inverse association between moderate consumption of coffee and risk of stroke. However, there are yet no clear biological mechanisms whereby coffee might provide cardiovascular health benefits. Awaiting the results from further long-term RCTs and prospective studies, moderate consumption of filtered coffee, tea, and dark chocolate seems prudent.

  16. Furan in roasted, ground and brewed coffee

    PubMed

    Gruczyńska, Eliza; Kowalska, Dorota; Kozłowska, Mariola; Majewska, Ewa; Tarnowska, Katarzyna

    2018-01-01

    Coffee is the most popular hot beverage in the world. The annual coffee production in 2010, 2014 and 2016 was 8.1, 9.0 and 9.3 million tons respectively. There are more than 100 coffee species, but only two of them: Arabica (Coffea arabica) and Robusta (Coffea canephora) have gained commercial importance. During roasting of green coffee beans not only desirable compounds are formed, that exert positive influence on the taste and flavour of coffee, but also small quantities of undesirable ones. Furan (C4H4O) is one of the latter. Furan is a volatile compound (boiling temp. of 31.4 oC) formed during thermal processing of food. The toxicity of furan has been well documented and it is classified as “possible human carcinogen” (Group 2B) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Various pathways have been reported for furan formation during food processing. It can be formed from carbohydrates, amino acids by their thermal degradation or thermal re-arrangement and by oxidation of ascorbic acid and polyunsaturated acids and carotenoids. High concentrations of furan have been reported in coffee, baked and roasted food and in food subjected to preserving in cans and jars. Furan levels in brewed coffee are typically near or below 120 μg/L, but it can approach thousands μg/kg in roasted whole beans or ground coffee. The highest concentration of furan in roasted coffee reaches the level of 7000 μg/kg. Taking into account that coffee is the most popular hot drink, it becomes the main contributor to furan exposure from dietary sources for adults. In this article the published scientific papers concerned with the presence of furan in roasted non-brewed and brewed coffee have been reviewed. The formation mechanisms and occurrence of furan in coffee and the harmful influence of furan on the consumer health have been discussed.

  17. Our Everyday Cup of Coffee: The Chemistry behind Its Magic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petracco, Marino

    2005-01-01

    Coffee consumption has spread worldwide and differences in the raw bean consumption, in roasting conditions and in the extraction procedures used to prepare coffee brews result in a great diversity of chemical composition in the final product, the cup of coffee. Hence, beverage preparation is a fundamental step for enjoying the benefits of this…

  18. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section. (c) In coffee as a residue from its use as a solvent in the extraction of caffeine from green coffee beans, at a level not to exceed 10 parts per million (0.001 percent) in decaffeinated roasted coffee and in decaffeinated soluble coffee extract (instant coffee). ...

  19. Provenance establishment of coffee using solution ICP-MS and ICP-AES.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Jenna L; Watling, R John

    2013-11-01

    Statistical interpretation of the concentrations of 59 elements, determined using solution based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), was used to establish the provenance of coffee samples from 15 countries across five continents. Data confirmed that the harvest year, degree of ripeness and whether the coffees were green or roasted had little effect on the elemental composition of the coffees. The application of linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis of the elemental concentrations permitted up to 96.9% correct classification of the coffee samples according to their continent of origin. When samples from each continent were considered separately, up to 100% correct classification of coffee samples into their countries, and plantations of origin was achieved. This research demonstrates the potential of using elemental composition, in combination with statistical classification methods, for accurate provenance establishment of coffee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Green technology approach towards herbal extraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutalib, Tengku Nur Atiqah Tengku Ab; Hamzah, Zainab; Hashim, Othman; Mat, Hishamudin Che

    2015-05-01

    The aim of present study was to compare maceration method of selected herbs using green and non-green solvents. Water and d-limonene are a type of green solvents while non-green solvents are chloroform and ethanol. The selected herbs were Clinacanthus nutans leaf and stem, Orthosiphon stamineus leaf and stem, Sesbania grandiflora leaf, Pluchea indica leaf, Morinda citrifolia leaf and Citrus hystrix leaf. The extracts were compared with the determination of total phenolic content. Total phenols were analyzed using a spectrophotometric technique, based on Follin-ciocalteau reagent. Gallic acid was used as standard compound and the total phenols were expressed as mg/g gallic acid equivalent (GAE). The most suitable and effective solvent is water which produced highest total phenol contents compared to other solvents. Among the selected herbs, Orthosiphon stamineus leaves contain high total phenols at 9.087mg/g.

  1. Development of an extraction method for the quantification of lignans in espresso coffee by using HPLC-MS/MS triple quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Simone; Navarini, Luciano; Sagratini, Gianni; Torregiani, Elisabetta; Vittori, Sauro; Caprioli, Giovanni

    2018-06-20

    Lignans are polyphenolic compounds that are considered phytoestrogens for their plant origins and they possess different biological activities. Three different extraction methods, i.e., 'dilute and shoot', acidic hydrolysis and enzymatic digestion, have been compared for extracting lignans (secoisolariciresinol, SECO, matairesinol, MAT and lariciresinol LARI) from espresso coffee (EC) by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The best recovery values (SECO: 97%, LARI: 98% and MAT: 93%) were obtained by using enzymatic hydrolysis with Clara-Diastase at 10% (w/v), keeping the sample at 37 °C for 3 hours. For this reason, this method has been chosen and then applied to quantify lignans in nine different EC samples from five different geographical origins (Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Ethiopia and India). SECO and LARI were found in all EC samples from 27.9 to 52.0 μg l -1 and from 5.3 to 27.8 μg l -1 , respectively, contrary to MAT that it was not possible to detect it in each type of coffee. This method confirms the high specificity and sensitivity of MS/MS system for detecting bioactives in complex matrix such as coffee. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Covering the different steps of the coffee processing: Can headspace VOC emissions be exploited to successfully distinguish between Arabica and Robusta?

    PubMed

    Colzi, Ilaria; Taiti, Cosimo; Marone, Elettra; Magnelli, Susanna; Gonnelli, Cristina; Mancuso, Stefano

    2017-12-15

    This work was performed to evaluate the possible application of PTR-ToF-MS technique in distinguishing between Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora var. robusta (Robusta) commercial stocks in each step of the processing chain (green beans, roasted beans, ground coffee, brews). volatile organic compounds (VOC) spectra from coffee samples of 7 Arabica and 6 Robusta commercial stocks were recorded and submitted to multivariate statistical analysis. Results clearly showed that, in each stage of the coffee processing, the volatile composition of coffee is highly influenced by the species. Actually, with the exception of green beans, PTR-ToF-MS technique was able to correctly recognize Arabica and Robusta samples. Particularly, among 134 tentatively identified VOCs, some masses (16 for roasted coffee, 12 for ground coffee and 12 for brewed coffee) were found to significantly discriminate the two species. Therefore, headspace VOC analyses was showed to represent a valuable tool to distinguish between Arabica and Robusta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Removal of caffeine from green tea by microwave-enhanced vacuum ice water extraction.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zaixiang; Er, Chaojuan; Li, Jing; Wang, Hongxin; Zhu, Song; Sun, Juntao

    2012-02-24

    In order to selectively remove caffeine from green tea, a microwave-enhanced vacuum ice water extraction (MVIE) method was proposed. The effects of MVIE variables including extraction time, microwave power, and solvent to solid radio on the removal yield of caffeine and the loss of total phenolics (TP) from green tea were investigated. The optimized conditions were as follows: solvent (mL) to solid (g) ratio was 10:1, microwave extraction time was 6 min, microwave power was 350 W and 2.5 h of vacuum ice water extraction. The removal yield of caffeine by MVIE was 87.6%, which was significantly higher than that by hot water extraction, indicating a significant improvement of removal efficiency. Moreover, the loss of TP of green tea in the proposed method was much lower than that in the hot water extraction. After decaffeination by MVIE, the removal yield of TP tea was 36.2%, and the content of TP in green tea was still higher than 170 mg g(-1). Therefore, the proposed microwave-enhanced vacuum ice water extraction was selective, more efficient for the removal of caffeine. The main phenolic compounds of green tea were also determined, and the results indicated that the contents of several catechins were almost not changed in MVIE. This study suggests that MVIE is a new and good alternative for the removal of caffeine from green tea, with a great potential for industrial application. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Formation kinetics of furfuryl alcohol in a coffee model system.

    PubMed

    Albouchi, Abdullatif; Murkovic, Michael

    2018-03-15

    The production of furfuryl alcohol from green coffee during roasting and the effect of multiple parameters on its formation were studied employing HPLC-DAD. Results show that coffee produces furfuryl alcohol in larger quantities (418µg/g) compared to other beans or seeds (up to 132µg/g) roasted under the same conditions. The kinetics of furfuryl alcohol production resemble those of other process contaminants (e.g., HMF, acrylamide) produced in coffee roasting, with temperature and time of roasting playing significant roles in quantities formed. Different coffee species yielded different amounts of furfuryl alcohol. The data point out that the amounts of furfuryl alcohol found in roasted coffee do not reflect the total amounts produced during roasting because great amounts of furfuryl alcohol (up to 57%) are evaporating and released to the atmosphere during roasting. Finally the effect of the moisture content on furfuryl alcohol formation was found to be of little impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Recognition of Roasted Coffee Bean Levels using Image Processing and Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasution, T. H.; Andayani, U.

    2017-03-01

    The coffee beans roast levels have some characteristics. However, some people cannot recognize the coffee beans roast level. In this research, we propose to design a method to recognize the coffee beans roast level of images digital by processing the image and classifying with backpropagation neural network. The steps consist of how to collect the images data with image acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction using Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) method and finally normalization of data extraction using decimal scaling features. The values of decimal scaling features become an input of classifying in backpropagation neural network. We use the method of backpropagation to recognize the coffee beans roast levels. The results showed that the proposed method is able to identify the coffee roasts beans level with an accuracy of 97.5%.

  6. Development and validation of a matrix solid-phase dispersion method to determine acrylamide in coffee and coffee substitutes.

    PubMed

    Soares, Cristina M Dias; Alves, Rita C; Casal, Susana; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Fernandes, José Oliveira

    2010-04-01

    The present study describes the development and validation of a new method based on a matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) sample preparation procedure followed by GC-MS for determination of acrylamide levels in coffee (ground coffee and brewed coffee) and coffee substitute samples. Samples were dispersed in C(18) sorbent and the mixture was further packed into a preconditioned custom-made ISOLUTE bilayered SPE column (C(18)/Multimode; 1 g + 1 g). Acrylamide was subsequently eluted with water, and then derivatized with bromine and quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode. The MSPD/GC-MS method presented a LOD of 5 microg/kg and a LOQ of 10 microg/kg. Intra and interday precisions ranged from 2% to 4% and 4% to 10%, respectively. To evaluate the performance of the method, 11 samples of ground and brewed coffee and coffee substitutes were simultaneously analyzed by the developed method and also by a previously validated method based in a liquid-extraction (LE) procedure, and the results were compared showing a high correlation between them.

  7. Effects of processing method and age of leaves on phytochemical profiles and bioactivity of coffee leaves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu-Min; Ma, Zhili; Kitts, David D

    2018-05-30

    The use of coffee leaves as a novel beverage has recently received consumer interest, but there is little known about how processing methods affect the quality of final product. We applied tea (white, green, oolong and black tea) processing methods to process coffee leaves and then investigated their effects on phytochemical composition and related antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Using Japanese-style green tea-processing of young leaves, and black tea-processing of mature (BTP-M) coffee leaves, produced contrasting effects on phenolic content, and associated antioxidant activity and nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity in IFN-γ and LPS induced Raw 264.7 cells. BTP-M coffee leaves also had significantly (P < .05) higher responses in NO, iNOS, COX-2, as well as a number of cytokines, in non-induced Raw 264.7. Our findings show that the age of coffee leaves and the type of processing method affect phytochemical profiles sufficiently to produce characteristic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance of coffee origin and genotype in organoleptic and physical quality of arabica coffee in North Sumatra Province of Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malau, Sabam; Siagian, Albiner; Sirait, Bilter; Pandiangan, Samse

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this research was to determine effect of coffee origin and genotype on organoleptic and physical quality of Arabica coffea L. growing in North Sumatra. Seven districts treated as origins and 28 genotypes were chosen. The research was conducted with nested design with 3 factors. Organoleptic parameters were fragrance/aroma, flavor, aftertaste, acidity, body, uniformity, balance, clean cup, sweetness, overall and total score. Physical quality was green bean weight. The results revealed that origins affected significantly organoleptic quality. Coffee from Dairi showed the highest total score (90,82). Genotypes were significantly different in organoleptic quality. Genotype Da17, Da18, Da19, Da20 and Hu4 had the best total score (89,85 -91,68). Total score did not correlate with green bean weight but had positive correlation with altitude. Among organoleptic parameters, acidity was more significant for total score (r2 = 0,836). Altitude had more effect on acidity (r2 = 0,486).

  9. Evaluation of the effect of roasting process on the energy transition and the crystalline structures of Arabica, Robusta, and Liberica coffee from Jambi Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdana, B. M.; Manihuruk, R.; Ashyar, R.; Heriyanti; Sutrisno

    2018-04-01

    The effect of the roasting process has been evaluated to determine of the energy transition and the crystalline structure of three types of coffee, Arabica, Robusta, and Liberica coffee both green and roasted coffee with the roasted temperature at 200°C and 230°C. The crystalline structure of the coffee was evaluated with X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The result exposes that the three types of green coffee showed that an amorphous structure whereas the roasted coffee denotes a crystal structure of sucrose. The varied temperature in the roasting process leads to changes in the crystal structure shown by the peak shift of 2θ for all types of coffee. The added cations, such as Fe2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ ions on Liberica coffee induced of changes in the crystal structures, which are assigned by the peak shift, that imply of metal ions of the sucrose complexes happened in the solution, except for the addition of Mg2+ ion.

  10. In vitro health promoting properties of antioxidant dietary fiber extracted from spent coffee (Coffee arabica L.) grounds.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Sánchez, Kenia; Martinez-Saez, Nuria; Rebollo-Hernanz, Miguel; Del Castillo, Maria Dolores; Gaytán-Martínez, Marcela; Campos-Vega, Rocio

    2018-09-30

    Antioxidant dietary fiber extracted from spent coffee grounds (FSCG) was evaluated as a potential functional food ingredient when incorporated in a food model (biscuits), and digested in vitro under simulated human gastrointestinal conditions. FSCG added to biscuits increased its total dietary fiber, antioxidant capacity after in vitro digestion, bioaccessibility of phenolic compounds (gallic acid and catechin) and amino acids. Furthermore, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), involved in chronic diseases, decreased up to 6-folds in the biscuits containing FSCG when compared with the traditional biscuit. The digestible fraction of biscuits containing the highest amount of FSCG (5 g) displayed the higher inhibiting α-glucosidase activity, correlating with the bioaccessibility of ascorbic acid and catechin. Our study seems to indicate that anti-diabetic compounds may be released in the small intestine during FSCG digestion, where biscuits containing FSCG may be able to beneficially regulate sugar metabolism thereby helping in producing foods friendly for diabetes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Activity of Green Propolis Extract and Meadowsweet Extract Against Staphylococcus aureus Bacteria: Importance in Would Care Compounding Preparations.

    PubMed

    Lupatini, Nogueira Rodrigo José; Danopoulos, Panagiota; Swikidisa, Rosita; Alves, Pinheiro Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural products in compounded wound care formulas is an exciting avenue to pursue for compounding pharmacists since these natural products may contain compounds that promote healing on their own. The use of these natural extracts as an alternative therapy for wound care may also provide several benefits, such as decreased inflammation, infection, side effects, and treatment costs. Thus far, several studies have demonstrated antimicrobial activity for various natural product extracts, including green propolis and meadowsweet. The antimicrobial properties of these extracts make them particularly interesting for wound care because the healing process is significantly delayed by bacterial infection and colonization at the site of injury. Therefore, to further investigate the antimicrobial properties of green propolis and meadowsweet extracts, we performed minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration assays against Staphylococcus aureus, a microorganism known to cause wound infections. The antimicrobial activity of green propolis and meadowsweet extracts was tested in vitro against a standard strain of Staphylococcus aureus in brain heart infusion broth and Mueller-Hinton agar plates. Green propolis extract demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 1.25 mg/mL and a minimum bactericidal concentration of 1.25 mg/mL. In contrast, meadowsweet extract failed to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth at the highest concentration tested (30 mg/mL). Green propolis was more effective than meadowsweet extract at inhibiting the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, suggesting that the addition of green propolis extract in wound care formulas might be more beneficial for the treatment of wounds. Therefore, we propose that green propolis extract is a promising natural product for wound care formulations. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  12. Polyphenolic chemistry of tea and coffee: a century of progress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2009-09-23

    Tea and coffee, the most popular beverages in the world, have been consumed for thousands of years for their alluring flavors and health benefits. Polyphenols, particularly flavonoids and phenolic acids, are of great abundance in tea and coffee and contribute a lot to their flavor and health properties. This paper reviews the polyphenol chemistry of tea and coffee, specifically their stability, and scavenging ability of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS). During the manufacturing and brewing process, green tea and black tea polyphenols undergo epimerization and oxidation, respectively. Meanwhile, the lactonization and the polymerization of chlorogenic acid are the major causes for the degradation of polyphenols in coffee. Tea catechins, besides having antioxidant properties, have the novel characteristic of trapping reactive carbonyl species. The A ring of the catechins is the binding site for RCS trapping, whereas the B ring is the preferred site for antioxidation.

  13. Biotechnological conversion of spent coffee grounds into polyhydroxyalkanoates and carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Obruca, Stanislav; Benesova, Pavla; Kucera, Dan; Petrik, Sinisa; Marova, Ivana

    2015-12-25

    Coffee is one of the world's most popular beverages and has been growing steadily in commercial importance. Nowadays, coffee is the second largest traded commodity in the world, after petroleum. Hence, coffee industry is responsible for the generation of large amounts of waste, especially spent coffee grounds (SCG). Various attempts to valorize this waste stream of coffee industry were made. This article summarizes our research and publications aiming at the conversion of SCG into valuable products - polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and carotenoids. At first, oil extracted from SCG (approx. 15 wt% oil in SCG) can be efficiently (YP/S=0.82 g/g) converted into PHA employing Cupriavidus necator H16. Further, the solid residues after oil extraction can be hydrolyzed (by the combination of chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis) yielding fermentable sugars, which can be further used as a substrate for the production of PHAs employing Bacillus megaterium (YP/S=0.04 g/g) or Burkholderia cepacia (YP/S=0.24 g/g). Alternatively, SCG hydrolysate can be used as a substrate for biotechnological production of carotenoids by carotenogenic yeast Sporobolomyces roseus. Solid residues after either oil extraction or hydrolysis can be used as fuel in industrial boilers to generate heat and energy. Therefore, entire biomass of SCG can be used for sustainable production of PHAs and/or carotenoids employing bio-refinery approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Extraction of polysaccharides by autohydrolysis of spent coffee grounds and evaluation of their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Lina F; Teixeira, José A; Mussatto, Solange I

    2017-02-10

    The extraction of polysaccharides by autohydrolysis of spent coffee grounds (SCG) was studied. Experimental assays were performed using different temperatures (160-200°C), liquid/solid ratios (5-15ml water/g SCG) and extraction times (10-50min) in order to determine the conditions that maximize the extraction of polysaccharides with high antioxidant activity. Autohydrolysis was demonstrated to be an efficient technique to recover antioxidant polysaccharides from SCG. The best process conditions consisted in using 15ml water/g SCG, during 10min at 160°C. The polysaccharides obtained under these conditions were mainly in the form of galactomannans and arabinogalactans. They presented high antioxidant activity (assessed by four different methods), were thermostable in a large range of temperature, and had a typical carbohydrate pattern, being of interest for industrial applications, mainly in the food area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of coffee leaves using FT-NIR spectroscopy and SIMCA.

    PubMed

    Mees, Corenthin; Souard, Florence; Delporte, Cedric; Deconinck, Eric; Stoffelen, Piet; Stévigny, Caroline; Kauffmann, Jean-Michel; De Braekeleer, Kris

    2018-01-15

    Abundant literature has been devoted to coffee beans (green or roasted) chemical description but relatively few studies have been devoted to coffee leaves. Given the fact that coffee leaves are used for food and medicinal consumption, it was of interest to develop a rapid screening method in order to identify coffee leaves taxa. Investigation by Fourier - Transform near infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIRS) was performed on nine Coffea taxa leaves harvested over one year in a tropical greenhouse of the Botanic Garden Meise (Belgium). The only process after leaves harvesting was an effective drying and a homogeneous leaves grinding. FT-NIRS with SIMCA analysis allowed to discriminate the spectral profiles across taxon, aging stage (mature and senescence coffee leaves) and harvest period. This study showed that it was possible (i) to classify the different taxa, (ii) to identify their aging stage and (iii) to identify the harvest period for the mature stage with a correct classification rate of 99%, 100% and 90%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Extraction and removal of caffeine from green tea by ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical fluid.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei-Qiang; Li, Di-Cai; Lv, Yang-Xiao; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2010-05-01

    Low-caffeine or caffeine-removed tea and its products are widely welcomed on market in recent years. In the present study, we adopt ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical fluid extraction process to remove caffeine from green tea. An orthogonal experiment (L16 (4(5))) was applied to optimize the best removal conditions. Extraction pressure, extraction time, power of ultrasound, moisture content, and temperature were the main factors to influence the removal rate of caffeine from green tea. The 5 factors chosen for the present investigation were based on the results of a single-factor test. The optimum removal conditions were determined as follows: extraction pressure of 30 MPa, temperature at 55 degrees C, time of 4 h, 30% moisture content, and ultrasound power of 100 W. Chromatogram and ultraviolet analysis of raw material and decaffeinates suggests that under optimized conditions, the caffeine of green tea was effectively removed and minished without damaging the structure of active ingredients in green tea.

  17. Irradiation application for color removal and purification of green tea leaves extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Cheorun; Son, Jun Ho; Lee, Hyun Ja; Byun, Myung Woo

    2003-02-01

    Gamma irradiation was introduced to develop a new processing method for brighter-colored green tea leaves extract without changes of physiological activities. Dried green tea leaves were purchased and extracted by 70% ethanol solution and irradiated at 0, 5, 10, and 20 kGy with gamma rays. Hunter color L-value increased and a- and b-value decreased by irradiation, resulting in bright yellow from dark brown. There was no difference in radical scavenging and tyrosinase inhibition effect by irradiation. The irradiation effect in the solution disappeared during storage for 3 weeks at room temperature but vitamin C addition was effective in reducing the color change. Results indicated that irradiation may be a good technology to remove undesirable color in green tea leaves extract.

  18. Greener synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles using green tea extract and their magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karade, V. C.; Waifalkar, P. P.; Dongle, T. D.; Sahoo, Subasa C.; Kollu, P.; Patil, P. S.; Patil, P. B.

    2017-09-01

    The facile green synthesis method has been employed for the synthesis of biocompatible Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using green tea extract. The effective reduction of ferric ions (Fe3+) were done using an aqueous green tea extract where it acts as reducing as well as capping agent. The effect of iron precursor to green tea extract ratio and reaction temperature was studied. The MNPs were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometer. It was observed that the reaction temperature strongly affects the magnetic and structural properties of MNPs. The magnetic measurements study showed that Fe3O4 MNPs are superparamagnetic at 300 K, while at 60 K have ferromagnetic as well as superparamagnetic contributions.

  19. [Simultaneous extraction of tea-polyphenols and caffeine from green tea].

    PubMed

    Hai, L; Sun, H; Li, Z

    1998-05-01

    Tea-polyphenols and caffeine were extracted simultaneously from green tea. The factors influencing on the process of impregnation and extraction were studied. The result indicated that the content of tea-polyphenols and caffeine in tea was increased with the duration of extraction and decreased with the frequency of extraction. The authors discuss the effect of pH on the precipition of calcium-tea-polyphenols.

  20. Effects of tea and coffee on cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Bøhn, Siv K; Ward, Natalie C; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Croft, Kevin D

    2012-06-01

    Tea and coffee have been associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), both positively and negatively. Epidemiological data suggest that black and green tea may reduce the risk of both coronary heart disease and stroke by between 10 and 20%. Experimental and clinical trial data generally indicate either neutral or beneficial effects on risk factors and pathways linked to the development of CVD. Controversy still exists regarding the effects of coffee, where there have been concerns regarding associations with hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension and myocardial infarction. However, long term moderate intake of coffee is not associated with detrimental effects in healthy individuals and may even protect against the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The detrimental effects of coffee may be associated with the acute pressor effects, most likely due to caffeine at high daily intakes, and lipids from boiled coffee can contribute to raised serum cholesterol. Genetic polymorphisms in enzymes involved in uptake, metabolism and excretion of tea and coffee compounds are also associated with differential biological effects. Potential mechanisms by which tea and coffee phytochemicals can exert effects for CVD protection include the regulation of vascular tone through effects on endothelial function, improved glucose metabolism, increased reverse cholesterol transport and inhibition of foam cell formation, inhibition of oxidative stress, immunomodulation and effects on platelet function (adhesion and activation, aggregation and clotting). The phytochemical compounds in tea and coffee and their metabolites are suggested to influence protective endogenous pathways by modulation of gene-expression. It is not known exactly which compounds are responsible for the suggestive protective effects of tea and coffee. Although many biologically active compounds have been identified with known biological effects, tea and coffee contain many unidentified compounds with potential

  1. Extraction and Enrichment of Protein from Red and Green Macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Harnedy, Pádraigín A; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Macroalgae, in particular red and green species, are gaining interest as protein-rich foods for human consumption and sources of proteinaceous biofunctional peptide ingredients. During protein extraction the starting raw material, the cell disruption method utilized and the reagents employed have a major effect on the yield of protein recovered. A method is described herein for extraction and semi-purification of food-grade aqueous and alkaline soluble proteins from red and green macroalgae. Dried milled macroalgae are disrupted by osmotic shock with subsequent removal of aqueous soluble proteins by centrifugation. Alkaline soluble proteins are removed following consecutive treatment of the resultant pellet with an alkaline solution. Aqueous and alkaline soluble proteins are then enriched from the crude extracts by isoelectric precipitation.

  2. Role of modifier in microwave assisted extraction of oleanolic acid from Gymnema sylvestre: application of green extraction technology for botanicals.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Vivekananda; Dewanjee, Saikat; Mandal, Subhash C

    2009-08-01

    This work highlights the development of a green extraction technology for botanicals with the use of microwave energy. Taking into consideration the extensive time involved in conventional extraction methods, coupled with usage of large volumes of organic solvent and energy resources, an ecofriendly green method that can overcome the above problems has been developed. The work compares the effect of sample pretreatment with untreated sample for improved yield of oleanolic acid from Gymnema sylvestre leaves. The pretreated sample with water produced 0.71% w/w oleanolic acid in one extraction cycle with 500 W microwave power, 25 mL methanol and only an 8 min extraction time. On the other hand, a conventional heat reflux extraction for 6 hours could produce only 0.62% w/w oleanolic acid. The detailed mechanism of extraction has been studied through scanning electron micrographs. The environmental impact of the proposed green method has also been evaluated.

  3. Review and perspective on the composition and safety of green tea extracts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The growing body of evidence regarding the putative health benefits of green tea (Camellia sinensis), including reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease, has led to an increase in the consumption of brewed green tea and the formulation of green tea extracts (GTE) into a variety of food and ...

  4. New approaches on the analyses of thermolabile coffee diterpenes by gas chromatography and its relationship with cup quality.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Fábio Junior Moreira; Oigman, Silvia Siag; de Souza, Rodrigo Octavio Mendonça Alves; Rezende, Claudia Moraes; de Aquino Neto, Francisco Radler

    2015-07-01

    A new gas chromatography method using pulsed split injector (PS-GC) was validated to quantify thermolabile diterpenes cafestol, kahweol and isokahweol in methanolysed Arabica coffee oils. Linearity was 0.99 from 8 to 69mgmL(-1), recovery ranged from 99% to 101% and precision of less than 4% was obtained. Besides, Soxhlet extraction time was evaluated and Tukey׳s test indicated that the mass of diterpenes obtained in 4h is equivalent to a 16h period, which represents a space-time yield four times higher. The microwave assisted methanolysis proved to be efficient to quantitatively convert the natural diterpene esters in their respective alcohols and fatty acid methyl esters, accompanied by PS-GC. Also, the intact diterpene esters were analyzed by GC for the first time by the comparison between cold on-column (COC) and PS injection techniques. In all these stages, the molecular integrity of the thermolabile furokaurane diterpenes was maintained. The methanolysed oils from 13 samples of green Brazilian Arabica coffees were analyzed by PS-GC and the diterpenes composition varied from 8 to 12% w/w in oil and 0.7-1% in coffee beans. The ratio between cafestol and kahweol was successfully used to predict the quality of coffee even before the roasting and brewing processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Discrimination of several Indonesian specialty coffees using Fluorescence Spectroscopy combined with SIMCA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhandy, D.; Yulia, M.

    2018-03-01

    Indonesia is one of the important producers of several specialty coffees, which have a particularly high economic value, including Civet coffee (‘kopi luwak’ in Indonesian language) and Peaberry coffee (‘kopi lanang’ in Indonesian language). The production of Civet and Peaberry coffee is very limited. In order to provide authentication of Civet and Peaberry coffee and protect consumers from adulteration, a robust and easy method for evaluating ground Civet and Peaberry coffee and detection of its adulteration is needed. In this study, we investigate the use of fluorescence spectroscopy combined with SIMCA (soft independent modelling of class analogies) method to discriminate three Indonesian specialty coffee: ground Peaberry, Civet and Pagar Alam coffee. Total 90 samples were used (30 samples for Civet, Peaberry and Pagar Alam coffee, respectively). All coffee samples were ground using a home-coffee-grinder. Since particle size in coffee powder has a significant influence on the spectra obtained, we sieved all coffee samples through a nest of U. S. standard sieves (mesh number of 40) on a Meinzer II sieve shaker for 10 minutes to obtain a particle size of 420 µm. The experiments were performed at room temperature (around 27-29°C). All samples were extracted with distilled water and then filtered. For each samples, 3 mL of extracted sample then was pipetted into 10 mm cuvettes for spectral data acquisition. The EEM (excitation-emission matrix) spectral data of coffee samples were acquired using JASCO FP-8300 Fluorescence Spectrometer. The principal component analysis (PCA) result shows that it is possible to discriminate types of coffee based on information from EEM (excitation-emission matrix) spectral data. Using SIMCA method, the discrimination model of Indonesian specialty coffee was successfully developed and resulted in high performance of discrimination with 100% of sensitivity and specificity for Peaberry, Civet and Pagar Alam coffee. This research

  6. Heavy metals in wet method coffee processing wastewater in Soconusco, Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Siu, Y; Mejia, G; Mejia-Saavedra, J; Pohlan, J; Sokolov, M

    2007-05-01

    One of the driving forces of the economy in southeast Mexico is agriculture. In Soconusco, Chiapas, coffee is one of the main agricultural products and is traded on the international market. Coffee grown in this region is processed using the wet method in order to be commercialized as green coffee. In the beneficio (coffee processing plant) water is an essential resource which is required in great quantities (Matuk et al., 1997; Sokolov, 2002) as it is used to separate good coffee berries from defective ones, as a method of transporting the coffee berries to the processing machinery, in the elimination of the berry husk from the coffee grains (pulping) and finally in the post-fermentation washing process. This process gives rise to one of the smoothest, high-quality coffees available (Zuluaga, 1989; Herrera, 2002). Currently, many producers in Soconusco are opting for ecological coffee production, which has, among its many criteria, human health and environmental protection (Pohlan, 2005). Furthermore, increasing concern during the past few years regarding the production of food that is free from contaminants such as heavy metals, and recent environmental policies in relation to aquatic ecosystem protection, have given rise to questions concerning the quality of water used in coffee processing, as well as pollutants produced by this agroindustry. Water used in the coffee processing plants originates from the main regional rivers whose hydrological basins stretch from the Sierra Madre mountain range down to the coastal plain. As well as providing water, these rivers also receive the wastewater produced during coffee processing (Sokolov, 2002).

  7. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates from spent coffee grounds oil obtained by supercritical fluid extraction technology.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Madalena V; Paiva, Alexandre; Lisboa, Pedro; Freitas, Filomena; Alves, Vítor D; Simões, Pedro; Barreiros, Susana; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-04-01

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG) oil was obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) extraction in a pilot plant apparatus, with an oil extraction yield of 90% at a 35kgkg(-1) CO2/SCG ratio. Cupriavidus necator DSM 428 was cultivated in 2L bioreactor using extracted SCG oil as sole carbon source for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates. The culture reached a cell dry weight of 16.7gL(-1) with a polymer content of 78.4% (w/w). The volumetric polymer productivity and oil yield were 4.7gL(-1)day(-1) and 0.77gg(-1), respectively. The polymer produced was a homopolymer of 3-hydroxybutyrate with an average molecular weight of 2.34×10(5) and a polydispersity index of 1.2. The polymer exhibited brittle behaviour, with very low elongation at break (1.3%), tensile strength at break of 16MPa and Young's Modulus of 1.0GPa. Results show that SCG can be a bioresource for polyhydroxyalkanoates production with interesting properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of acrylamide in coffee using an improved liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method: Investigation of colour changes and acrylamide formation in coffee during roasting.

    PubMed

    Senyuva, Hamide Z; Gökmen, Vural

    2005-03-01

    An improved analytical method for the determination of acrylamide in coffee is described using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS). A variety of instant, ground and laboratory roasted coffee samples were analysed using this method. The sample preparation entails extraction of acrylamide with methanol, purification with Carrez I and II solutions, evaporation and solvent change to water, and clean-up with an Oasis HLB solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. The chromatographic conditions allowed separation of acrylamide and the remaining matrix co-extractives with accurate and precise quantification of acrylamide during MS detection in SIM mode. Recoveries for the spiking levels of 50, 100, 250 and 500?microg/kg ranged between 99 and 100% with relative standard deviations of less than 2%. The effects of roasting on the formation of acrylamide and colour development were also investigated at 150, 200 and 225 degrees C. Change in the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) a* colour value was found to show a good correlation with the change in acrylamide. CIE a* and acrylamide data was fitted to a non-linear logarithmic function for the estimation of acrylamide level in coffee. Measured acrylamide levels in commercial roasted coffees compared well with the predicted acrylamide levels from the CIE a* values.

  9. Green Tea Leaves Extract: Microencapsulation, Physicochemical and Storage Stability Study.

    PubMed

    Zokti, James A; Sham Baharin, Badlishah; Mohammed, Abdulkarim Sabo; Abas, Faridah

    2016-07-26

    Green tea polyphenols have been reported to possess many biological properties. Despite the many potential benefits of green tea extracts, their sensitivity to high temperature, pH and oxygen is a major disadvantage hindering their effective utilization in the food industry. Green tea leaves from the Cameron Highlands Malaysia were extracted using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). To improve the stability, green tea extracts were encapsulated by spray-drying using different carrier materials including maltodextrin (MD), gum arabic (GA) and chitosan (CTS) and their combinations at different ratios. Encapsulation efficiency, total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity were determined and were found to be in the range of 71.41%-88.04%, 19.32-24.90 (g GAE/100 g), and 29.52%-38.05% respectively. Further analysis of moisture content, water activity, hygroscopicity, bulk density and mean particles size distribution of the microparticles were carried out and the results ranged from; 2.31%-5.11%, 0.28-0.36, 3.22%-4.71%, 0.22-0.28 g/cm³ and 40.43-225.64 µm respectively. The ability of the microparticles to swell in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) was determined as 142.00%-188.63% and 207.55%-231.77%, respectively. Release of catechin polyphenol from microparticles in SIF was higher comparable to that of SGF. Storage stability of encapsulated catechin extracts under different temperature conditions was remarkably improved compared to non-encapsulated extract powder. This study showed that total catechin, total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity did not decrease significantly (p ≥ 0.05) under 4 °C storage conditions. The half-life study results were in the range of 35-60, 34-65 and 231-288 weeks at storage temperatures of 40 °C, 25 °C and 4 °C respectively, therefore, for improved shelf-life stability we recommend that microparticles should be stored at temperatures below 25 °C.

  10. Inverse correlation between coffee consumption and prevalence of metabolic syndrome: baseline survey of the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC) Study in Tokushima, Japan.

    PubMed

    Takami, Hidenobu; Nakamoto, Mariko; Uemura, Hirokazu; Katsuura, Sakurako; Yamaguchi, Miwa; Hiyoshi, Mineyoshi; Sawachika, Fusakazu; Juta, Tomoya; Arisawa, Kokichi

    2013-01-01

    It is unclear whether consumption of coffee and green tea is associated with metabolic syndrome. This cross-sectional study enrolled 554 adults who had participated in the baseline survey of the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC) Study in Tokushima Prefecture, Japan. Consumption of coffee and green tea was assessed using a questionnaire. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) and the Japan Society for the Study of Obesity (JASSO). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between consumption of coffee and green tea and prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components. After adjustment for sex, age, and other potential confounders, greater coffee consumption was associated with a significantly lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome, as defined by NCEP ATP III criteria (P for trend = 0.03). Participants who drank more coffee had a lower odds ratio (OR) for high serum triglycerides (P for trend = 0.02), but not for increased waist circumference or high blood pressure. Using JASSO criteria, moderate coffee consumption (1.5 to <3 cups/day) was associated with a significantly lower OR for high plasma glucose (OR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.28-0.93). Green tea consumption was not associated with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome or any of its components. Coffee consumption was inversely correlated with metabolic syndrome diagnosed using NCEP ATP III criteria, mainly because it was associated with lower serum triglyceride levels. This association highlights the need for further prospective studies of the causality of these relationships.

  11. Evaluation of spent coffee obtained from the most common coffeemakers as a source of hydrophilic bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Jimena; Juániz, Isabel; Monente, Carmen; Caemmerer, Bettina; Kroh, Lothar W; De Peña, M Paz; Cid, Concepción

    2012-12-26

    The main hydrophilic antioxidant compounds (3-, 4-, and 5-monocaffeoylquinic and 3,4-, 3,5-, and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids, caffeine, and browned compounds, including melanoidins) and the antioxidant capacity (Folin-Ciocalteu, ABTS, DPPH, Fremy's salt, and TEMPO) were evaluated in Arabica and Robusta spent coffee obtained from the preparation of coffee brews with the most common coffeemakers (filter, espresso, plunger, and mocha). All spent coffee grounds, with the exception of those from the mocha coffeemaker, had relevant amounts of total caffeoylquinic acids (6.22-13.24 mg/g of spent coffee), mainly dicaffeoylquinic acids (3.31-5.79 mg/g of spent coffee), which were 4-7-fold higher than in their respective coffee brews. Caffeine ranged from 3.59 to 8.09 mg/g of spent coffee. The antioxidant capacities of the aqueous spent coffee extracts were 46.0-102.3% (filter), 59.2-85.6% (espresso), and <42% (plunger) in comparison to their respective coffee brews. This study obtained spent coffee extracts with antioxidant properties that can be used as a good source of hydrophilic bioactive compounds.

  12. Daily intake of trace metals through coffee consumption in India.

    PubMed

    Suseela, B; Bhalke, S; Kumar, A V; Tripathi, R M; Sastry, V N

    2001-02-01

    The trace element contents of five varieties of instant coffee powder available in the Indian market have been analysed. Ca, Cr, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, Sr, Zn and Pb, Cd, Cu have been determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry, respectively. The metal levels in the coffee powders observed in this study are comparable with those reported for green coffe beans (Arabica and Robusta variety) reported worldwide with the exception of Sr and Zn, which were on the lower side of the reported values. Concentrations of these metals have been converted into intake figures based on coffee consumption. The daily intakes of the above metals through ingestion of coffee are 1.4 mg, 1.58 microg, 124 microg, 41.5 mg, 4.9 mg, 17.9 microg, 2.9 microg, 3.8 microg, 12.5 microg, 0.2 microg, 0.03 microg and 15.5 microg, respectively. The values, which were compared with the total dietary, intake of metals through ingestion by the Mumbai population, indicate that the contribution from coffee is less than or around 1% for most of the elements except for Cr and Ni which are around 3%.

  13. Portable microwave assisted extraction: An original concept for green analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Perino, Sandrine; Petitcolas, Emmanuel; de la Guardia, Miguel; Chemat, Farid

    2013-11-08

    This paper describes a portable microwave assisted extraction apparatus (PMAE) for extraction of bioactive compounds especially essential oils and aromas directly in a crop or in a forest. The developed procedure, based on the concept of green analytical chemistry, is appropriate to obtain direct in-field information about the level of essential oils in natural samples and to illustrate green chemical lesson and research. The efficiency of this experiment was validated for the extraction of essential oil of rosemary directly in a crop and allows obtaining a quantitative information on the content of essential oil, which was similar to that obtained by conventional methods in the laboratory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Time-course measurements of caffeine and its metabolites extracted from fingertips after coffee intake: a preliminary study for the detection of drugs from fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an ingested drug and its metabolites could be detected in the subject's fingerprints. Caffeine (CF) was chosen as the model drug. Three healthy subjects were asked to consume a cup of coffee (ca. 100 mL) containing 80 micro micro mg CF as the total dose, which is the normal amount in one cup of coffee. After washing hands with water to remove external contaminants, each subject pressed the index fingertip to a collecting matrix just before consuming the test cup of coffee, and then again pressed the index fingertip to the collecting matrix after 1, 3, 5, and 7 h. The time curve of the amounts of CF and its metabolites-theobromine (TB), paraxanthine (PX), and theophylline (TP)-in fingerprints and blood was determined using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS). A filter paper wetted with water (50 μL) was an efficient collecting matrix for extracting the analytes from the fingertip. With optimized sample preparation and LC/MS conditions, the total operating time, from taking the fingerprints to obtaining the analytical result, was approximately 10 min. The lower limits of quantification for CF, TB, PX, and TP were 0.5, 5, 0.5, and 5 ng/fingerprint, respectively. The amount of CF or PX determined in fingerprints obtained over 7 h after coffee intake was significantly greater than the amount determined in fingerprints taken before drinking coffee. Fingerprints were a more efficient source for drug testing than other biological samples, such as blood and sweat, because the procedures for sampling and extracting the drugs were simpler and took less time. The method could be used to prove drug intake in criminal investigations.

  15. Identification of crypto- and neochlorogenic lactones as potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors in roasted coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Honda, Sari; Miura, Yukari; Masuda, Akiko; Masuda, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity has been found in boiling water extracts from roasted coffee beans. Therefore, assay-guided purification of the extracts was performed using size-exclusion column chromatography, and subsequently with reversed phase HPLC to afford lactone derivatives of chlorogenic acids. Among the tested lactones, crypto- and neochlorogenic lactones showed potent XO inhibitory activities compared with three major chlorogenic acids found in coffee beans. These XO inhibitory lactones may ameliorate gout and hyperuricemia in humans who drink coffee.

  16. Interpreting consumer preferences: physicohedonic and psychohedonic models yield different information in a coffee-flavored dairy beverage.

    PubMed

    Li, Bangde; Hayes, John E; Ziegler, Gregory R

    2014-09-01

    Designed experiments provide product developers feedback on the relationship between formulation and consumer acceptability. While actionable, this approach typically assumes a simple psychophysical relationship between ingredient concentration and perceived intensity. This assumption may not be valid, especially in cases where perceptual interactions occur. Additional information can be gained by considering the liking-intensity function, as single ingredients can influence more than one perceptual attribute. Here, 20 coffee-flavored dairy beverages were formulated using a fractional mixture design that varied the amount of coffee extract, fluid milk, sucrose, and water. Overall liking ( liking ) was assessed by 388 consumers using an incomplete block design (4 out of 20 prototypes) to limit fatigue; all participants also rated the samples for intensity of coffee flavor (coffee) , milk flavor (milk) , sweetness (sweetness) and thickness (thickness) . Across product means, the concentration variables explained 52% of the variance in liking in main effects multiple regression. The amount of sucrose (β = 0.46) and milk (β = 0.46) contributed significantly to the model (p's <0.02) while coffee extract (β = -0.17; p = 0.35) did not. A comparable model based on the perceived intensity explained 63% of the variance in mean liking ; sweetness (β = 0.53) and milk (β = 0.69) contributed significantly to the model (p's <0.04), while the influence of coffee flavor (β = 0.48) was positive but marginally (p = 0.09). Since a strong linear relationship existed between coffee extract concentration and coffee flavor, this discrepancy between the two models was unexpected, and probably indicates that adding more coffee extract also adds a negative attribute, e.g. too much bitterness. In summary, modeling liking as a function of both perceived intensity and physical concentration provides a richer interpretation of consumer data.

  17. Interpreting consumer preferences: physicohedonic and psychohedonic models yield different information in a coffee-flavored dairy beverage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bangde; Hayes, John E.; Ziegler, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Designed experiments provide product developers feedback on the relationship between formulation and consumer acceptability. While actionable, this approach typically assumes a simple psychophysical relationship between ingredient concentration and perceived intensity. This assumption may not be valid, especially in cases where perceptual interactions occur. Additional information can be gained by considering the liking-intensity function, as single ingredients can influence more than one perceptual attribute. Here, 20 coffee-flavored dairy beverages were formulated using a fractional mixture design that varied the amount of coffee extract, fluid milk, sucrose, and water. Overall liking (liking) was assessed by 388 consumers using an incomplete block design (4 out of 20 prototypes) to limit fatigue; all participants also rated the samples for intensity of coffee flavor (coffee), milk flavor (milk), sweetness (sweetness) and thickness (thickness). Across product means, the concentration variables explained 52% of the variance in liking in main effects multiple regression. The amount of sucrose (β = 0.46) and milk (β = 0.46) contributed significantly to the model (p’s <0.02) while coffee extract (β = −0.17; p = 0.35) did not. A comparable model based on the perceived intensity explained 63% of the variance in mean liking; sweetness (β = 0.53) and milk (β = 0.69) contributed significantly to the model (p’s <0.04), while the influence of coffee flavor (β = 0.48) was positive but marginally (p = 0.09). Since a strong linear relationship existed between coffee extract concentration and coffee flavor, this discrepancy between the two models was unexpected, and probably indicates that adding more coffee extract also adds a negative attribute, e.g. too much bitterness. In summary, modeling liking as a function of both perceived intensity and physical concentration provides a richer interpretation of consumer data. PMID:25024507

  18. Extraction and preparation of high-aroma and low-caffeine instant green teas by the novel column chromatographic extraction method with gradient elution.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Rong; Wu, Min; Huang, Rui-Jie; Chen, Ya-Fei; Chen, Chan-Jian; Li, Hui; Ni, He; Li, Hai-Hang

    2017-06-01

    The lack of aroma and natural taste is a critical problem in production and consumption of instant green teas. A method to prepare instant green teas high in-natural-aroma and low-caffeine by the novel column chromatographic extraction with gradient elution is reported. This method simultaneously extracted aroma (or volatile) and non-aroma compounds from green tea. Green tea was loaded into columns with 2.0-fold of petroleum ether (PE): ethanol (8:2). After standing for 3 h until the aroma compounds dissolved, the column was sequentially eluted with 3.0-fold 40% ethanol and 3.5-fold water. The eluant was collected together and automatically separated into PE and ethanol aqueous phases. The aroma extracts was obtained by vacuum-evaporation of PE phase at 45 °C. The ethanol aqueous phase was vacuum-concentrated to aqueous and partially or fully decaffeinated with 4% or 9% charcoal at 70 °C. A regular instant green tea with epigallocatechin-3-gallate: caffeine of 3.5:1 and a low-caffeine instant green tea (less than 1% caffeine) with excellent aroma and taste were prepared, by combining the aroma and non-aroma extracts at a 1:10 ratio. This work provides a practical approach to solve the low-aroma and low-taste problems in the production of high quality instant green teas.

  19. Fate of 14C-acrylamide in roasted and ground coffee during storage.

    PubMed

    Baum, Matthias; Böhm, Nadine; Görlitz, Jessica; Lantz, Ingo; Merz, Karl Heinz; Ternité, Rüdiger; Eisenbrand, Gerhard

    2008-05-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is formed during heating of carbohydrate rich foods in the course of the Maillard reaction. AA has been classified as probably carcinogenic to humans. Storage experiments with roasted coffee have shown that AA levels decrease depending on storage time and temperature. In the present study the fate of AA lost during storage of roasted and ground (R&G) coffee was studied, using 14C-labeled AA as radiotracer. Radiolabel was measured in coffee brew, filter residue, and volatiles. In the brew, total (14)C-label decreased during storage of R&G coffee, while activity in the filter residue built up concomitantly. [2,3-14C]-AA (14C-AA) was the only 14C-related water extractable low molecular compound in the brew detected by radio-HPLC. No formation of volatile 14C-AA-related compounds was detected during storage and coffee brewing. Close to 90% of the radiolabel in the filter residue (spent R&G coffee, spent grounds) remained firmly bound to the matrix, largely resisting extraction by aqueous ammonia, ethyl acetate, chloroform, hexane, and sequential polyenzymatic digest. Furanthiols, which are abundant as aroma components in roasted coffee, have not been found to be involved in the formation of covalent AA adducts and thus do not contribute substantially to the decrease of AA during storage.

  20. Wheat bread enriched with green coffee - In vitro bioaccessibility and bioavailability of phenolics and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Świeca, Michał; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula; Dziki, Dariusz; Baraniak, Barbara

    2017-04-15

    The potential bioaccessibility and bioavailability of phenolics, caffeine and antioxidant activity of wheat bread enriched with green coffee were studied. Supplementation enhanced nutraceutical potential by improving phenolic content and lipid protecting capacity. The simulated-digestion-released phenolics (mainly caffeic acid, syringic acid and vanillic acid) from bread, also caused significant qualitative changes (chlorogenic acids were cleaved and significant amounts of caffeic acid and ferulic acid were determined). Compared to the control, for the bread with 1% and 5% of the functional component the contents of phenolics were 1.6 and 3.33 times higher. Also, an approximately 2.3-fold increase in antioxidant activity was found in bread containing 5% of the supplement. The compounds responsible for antioxidant potential have high bioaccessibility but poor bioavailability. The qualitative composition of the phenolic fraction has a key role in developing the antioxidant potential of bread; however, caffeine and synergism between antioxidants are also important considerations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Alkylpyridiniums. 2. Isolation and quantification in roasted and ground coffees.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Richard H; Varga, Natalia; Milo, Christian; Schilter, Benoit; Vera, Francia Arce; Welti, Dieter H

    2002-02-27

    Recent model studies on trigonelline decomposition have identified nonvolatile alkylpyridiniums as major reaction products under certain physicochemical conditions. The quaternary base 1-methylpyridinium was isolated from roasted and ground coffee and purified by ion exchange and thin-layer chromatography. The compound was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H, (13)C) and mass spectrometry techniques. A liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method was developed to quantify the alkaloid in coffee by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The formation of alkylpyridiniums is positively correlated to the roasting degree in arabica coffee, and highest levels of 1-methylpyridinium, reaching up to 0.25% on a per weight basis, were found in dark roasted coffee beans. Analyses of coffee extracts also showed the presence of dimethylpyridinium, at concentrations ranging from 5 to 25 mg/kg. This is the first report on the isolation and quantification of alkylpyridiniums in coffee. These compounds, described here in detail for the first time, may have an impact on the flavor/aroma profile of coffee directly (e.g., bitterness), or indirectly as precursors, and potentially open new avenues in the flavor/aroma modulation of coffee.

  2. Determination of chlorogenic acids and caffeine in homemade brewed coffee prepared under various conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Sup; Kim, Han-Taek; Jeong, Il-Hyung; Hong, Se-Ra; Oh, Moon-Seog; Park, Kwang-Hee; Shim, Jae-Han; Abd El-Aty, A M

    2017-10-01

    Coffee, a complex mixture of more than 800 volatile compounds, is one of the most valuable commodity in the world, whereas caffeine and chlorogenic acids (CGAs) are the most common compounds. CGAs are mainly composed of caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs), dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQAs), and feruloylquinic acids (FQAs). The major CGAs in coffee are neochlorogenic acid (3-CQA), cryptochlorogenic acid (4-CQA), and chlorogenic acid (5-CQA). Many studies have shown that it is possible to separate the isomers of FQAs by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). However, some authors have shown that it is not possible to separate 4-feruloylquinic acid (4-FQA) and 5-feruloylquinic acid (5-FQA) by HPLC. Therefore, the present study was designated to investigate the chromatographic problems in the determination of CGAs (seven isomers) and caffeine using HPLC-DAD. The values of determination coefficient (R 2 ) calculated from external-standard calibration curves were >0.998. The recovery rates conducted at 3 spiking levels ranged from 99.4% to 106.5% for the CGAs and from 98.8% to 107.1% for the caffeine. The precision values (expressed as relative standard deviations (RSDs)) were <7% and <3% for intra and interday variability, respectively. The tested procedure proved to be robust. The seven CGAs isomers except 4-FQA and 5-FQA were well distinguished and all gave good peak shapes. We have found that 4-FQA and 5-FQA could not be separated using HPLC. The method was extended to investigate the effects of different brewing conditions such as the roasting degree of green coffee bean, coffee-ground size, and numbers of boiling-water pours, on the concentration of CGAs and caffeine in homemade brewed coffee, using nine green coffee bean samples of different origins. It was reported that medium-roasted, fine-ground coffees brewed using three pours of boiling water were the healthiest coffee with fluent CGAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Green tea polyphenol extract attenuates lung injury in experimental model of carrageenan-induced pleurisy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Rosanna; Mazzon, Emanuela; Muià, Carmelo; Genovese, Tiziana; Menegazzi, Marta; Zaffini, Raffaela; Suzuki, Hisanory; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    Here we investigate the effects of the green tea extract in an animal model of acute inflammation, carrageenan-induced pleurisy. We report here that green tea extract (given at 25 mg/kg i.p. bolus 1 h prior to carrageenan), exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects in an animal model of acute inflammation in vivo. Injection of carrageenan (2%) into the pleural cavity of mice elicited an acute inflammatory response characterized by fluid accumulation in the pleural cavity that contained many neutrophils (PMNs), an infiltration of PMNs in lung tissues and increased production of nitrite/nitrate, tumour necrosis factor alpha. All parameters of inflammation were attenuated by green tea extract treatment. Furthermore, carrageenan induced an up-regulation of the adhesion molecule ICAM-1, as well as nitrotyrosine and poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) formation, as determined by immunohistochemical analysis of lung tissues. Staining for the ICAM-1, nitrotyrosine, and PARS was reduced by green tea extract. Our results clearly demonstrate that treatment with green tea extract exerts a protective effect and offers a novel therapeutic approach for the management of lung injury. PMID:15987519

  4. Coffee and its waste repel gravid Aedes albopictus females and inhibit the development of their embryos.

    PubMed

    Satho, Tomomitsu; Dieng, Hamady; Ahmad, Muhammad Hishamuddin Itam; Ellias, Salbiah Binti; Hassan, Ahmad Abu; Abang, Fatimah; Ghani, Idris Abd; Miake, Fumio; Ahmad, Hamdan; Fukumitsu, Yuki; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Majid, Abdul Hafiz Ab; Kassim, Nur Faeza Abu; Hashim, Nur Aida; Ajibola, Olaide Olawunmi; Al-Khayyat, Fatima Abdulla; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo

    2015-05-14

    Dengue is a prevalent arboviral disease and the development of insecticide resistance among its vectors impedes endeavors to control it. Coffee is drunk by millions of people daily worldwide, which is associated with the discarding of large amounts of waste. Coffee and its waste contain large amounts of chemicals many of which are highly toxic and none of which have a history of resistance in mosquitoes. Once in solution, coffee is brownish in colour, resembling leaf infusion, which is highly attractive to gravid mosquitoes. To anticipate the environmental issues related to the increasing popularity of coffee as a drink, and also to combat insecticide resistance, we explored the deterrence potentials of coffee leachates against the ovipositing and embryonic stages of the dengue vector, Aedes albopictus. In a series of choice, no-choice, and embryo toxicity bioassays, we examined changes in the ovipositional behaviours and larval eclosion of Ae. albopictus in response to coffee extracts at different concentrations. Oviposition responses were extremely low when ovicups holding highly concentrated extract (HCE) of coffee were the only oviposition sites. Gravid females retained increased numbers of mature eggs until 5 days post-blood feeding. When provided an opportunity to oviposit in cups containing coffee extracts and with water, egg deposition occurred at lower rates in those containing coffee, and HCE cups were far less attractive to females than those containing water only. Females that successfully developed in a coffee environment preferentially oviposited in such cups when in competition with preferred oviposition sites (water cups), but this trait did not continue into the fourth generation. Larval eclosion occurred at lower rates among eggs that matured in a coffee environment, especially among those that were maintained on HCE-moistened substrates. The observations of the present study indicate a pronounced vulnerability of Ae. albopictus to the presence

  5. Landscape context and scale differentially impact coffee leaf rust, coffee berry borer, and coffee root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Avelino, Jacques; Romero-Gurdián, Alí; Cruz-Cuellar, Héctor F; Declerck, Fabrice A J

    2012-03-01

    Crop pest and disease incidences at plot scale vary as a result of landscape effects. Two main effects can be distinguished. First, landscape context provides habitats of variable quality for pests, pathogens, and beneficial and vector organisms. Second, the movements of these organisms are dependent on the connectivity status of the landscape. Most of the studies focus on indirect effects of landscape context on pest abundance through their predators and parasitoids, and only a few on direct effects on pests and pathogens. Here we studied three coffee pests and pathogens, with limited or no pressure from host-specific natural enemies, and with widely varying life histories, to test their relationships with landscape context: a fungus, Hemileia vastatrix, causal agent of coffee leaf rust; an insect, the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); and root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp. Their incidence was assessed in 29 coffee plots from Turrialba, Costa Rica. In addition, we characterized the landscape context around these coffee plots in 12 nested circular sectors ranging from 50 to 1500 m in radius. We then performed correlation analysis between proportions of different land uses at different scales and coffee pest and disease incidences. We obtained significant positive correlations, peaking at the 150 m radius, between coffee berry borer abundance and proportion of coffee in the landscape. We also found significant positive correlations between coffee leaf rust incidence and proportion of pasture, peaking at the 200 m radius. Even after accounting for plot level predictors of coffee leaf rust and coffee berry borer through covariance analysis, the significance of landscape structure was maintained. We hypothesized that connected coffee plots favored coffee berry borer movements and improved its survival. We also hypothesized that wind turbulence, produced by low-wind-resistance land uses such as pasture, favored removal of coffee

  6. Green tea extract as an anti-browning agent for cloudy apple juice.

    PubMed

    Klimczak, Inga; Gliszczyńska-Świgło, Anna

    2017-03-01

    Enzymatic browning of fruits and vegetables and their products is an important factor worsening their quality. The influence of five green tea extracts at the concentrations of 1 g L -1 , 2 g L -1 and 3 g L -1 on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in fresh cloudy apple juice was investigated. Moreover, PPO inhibition by tea extract and colour stability of juice during short-time refrigerated storage was studied. The changes of juice colour during storage was expressed as the total colour differences (ΔE*), browning index (BI), yellowness index (YI), and the absorbance at 420 nm (A 420 ). All extracts inhibited PPO activity in fresh apple juice in concentration-dependent manner. PPO activity in pure apple juice decreased by 7% after 48 h, whereas PPO activity in samples with 1 g L -1 , 2 g L -1 and 3 g L -1 tea extract decreased by 53%, 74%, and 96%, respectively. Browning of apple juice during storage decreased with increased concentration of green tea extract. After 48 h, extract at 1 g L -1 , 2 g L -1 and 3 g L -1 inhibited browning of juice expressed as BI by 48%, 60%, and 86%, respectively, comparing to pure apple juice. Green tea extract may be an effective anti-browning agent for short-time stored cloudy apple juices. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Identification Of Geographical Origin Of Coffee Before And After Roasting By Electronic Noses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sberveglieri, V.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.; Ongo, E.; Pulvirenti, A.; Fava, P.

    2011-09-01

    Geographical origin traceability of food is a relevant issue for both producers' business protection and customers' rights safeguard. Differentiation of coffees on the basis of geographical origin is still a challenging issue, though possible by means of chemical techniques [1]. Between the most widely consumed beverage, coffee is a valuable one, with an aroma constituted by hundreds of volatiles [2]. Since the final global volatile composition is also determined by the cultivation climatic conditions, Electronic Noses (ENs) could be interesting candidates for distinguishing the geographical provenience by exploiting differences in chemical volatile profile. The present investigation is directed toward the characterization of green and roasted coffees samples according to their geographical origin.

  8. Spectral identifiers from roasting process of Arabica and Robusta green beans using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirani, Ayu Puspa; Nasution, Aulia; Suyanto, Hery

    2016-11-01

    Coffee (Coffea spp.) is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. World coffee consumption is around 70% comes from Arabica, 26% from Robusta , and the rest 4% from other varieties. Coffee beverages characteristics are related to chemical compositions of its roasted beans. Usually testing of coffee quality is subjectively tasted by an experienced coffee tester. An objective quantitative technique to analyze the chemical contents of coffee beans using LIBS will be reported in this paper. Optimum experimental conditions was using of 120 mJ of laser energy and delay time 1 μs. Elements contained in coffee beans are Ca, W, Sr, Mg, Na, H, K, O, Rb, and Be. The Calcium (Ca) is the main element in the coffee beans. Roasting process will cause the emission intensity of Ca decreased by 42.45%. In addition, discriminant analysis was used to distinguish the arabica and robusta variants, either in its green and roasted coffee beans. Observed identifier elements are Ca, W, Sr, and Mg. Overall chemical composition of roasted coffee beans are affected by many factors, such as the composition of the soil, the location, the weather in the neighborhood of its plantation, and the post-harvesting process of the green coffee beans (drying, storage, fermentation, and roasting methods used).

  9. Coffee and tea consumption in relation to inflammation and basal glucose metabolism in a multi-ethnic Asian population: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Rebello, Salome A; Chen, Cynthia H; Naidoo, Nasheen; Xu, Wang; Lee, Jeannette; Chia, Kee Seng; Tai, E Shyong; van Dam, Rob M

    2011-06-02

    Higher coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in cohort studies, but the physiological pathways through which coffee affects glucose metabolism are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between habitual coffee and tea consumption and glucose metabolism in a multi-ethnic Asian population and possible mediation by inflammation. We cross-sectionally examined the association between coffee, green tea, black tea and Oolong tea consumption and glycemic (fasting plasma glucose, HOMA-IR, HOMA-beta, plasma HbA1c) and inflammatory (plasma adiponectin and C-reactive protein) markers in a multi-ethnic Asian population (N = 4139). After adjusting for multiple confounders, we observed inverse associations between coffee and HOMA-IR (percent difference: - 8.8% for ≥ 3 cups/day versus rarely or never; Ptrend = 0.007), but no significant associations between coffee and inflammatory markers. Tea consumption was not associated with glycemic markers, but green tea was inversely associated with plasma C-reactive protein concentrations (percent difference: - 12.2% for ≥ 1 cup/day versus < 1 cup/week; Ptrend = 0.042). These data provide additional evidence for a beneficial effect of habitual caffeinated coffee consumption on insulin sensitivity, and suggest that this effect is unlikely to be mediated by anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  10. Evaluation of soluble oxalates content in infusions of different kinds of tea and coffee available on the Polish market.

    PubMed

    Rusinek, Elzbieta

    2012-01-01

    Tea and coffee are the potentially rich source of oxalic acid, which can act as a antinutrient. The aim of this study was to determine and evaluate the content of soluble oxalates in teas and coffees available on the Polish market. The green, red and black teas, and black natural ground and instant coffees were used for preparing the infusions. The manganometric method was used for the determination of the oxalates in the infusions. The mean oxalates content in the infusions from 3 g of black teas was 115.68 mg/100 cm3 and was higher as compared to red teas (101.91 mg/100 cm3) and green teas (87.64 mg/100 cm3). Disregarding the variety of analyzed teas, the largest oxalates content was in infusions of pure one-component tea--"Sir Roger" (164.82-174.22 mg/100 cm3), while the lowest oxalates content was noted in the tea containing the components from other plants ("Bio-Active" with grapefruit juice--reaching as low level as 39.00 mg/100 cm3). Instant coffees contained larger amount of oxalates than natural ground coffees. Irrespective of the kind of the tested coffees, the lowest oxalates content was found in the infusions from the following coffees: Tchibo Exclusive--19.62 mg/100 cm3, Gala ulubiona--37.32 mg/100 cm3, and Maxwell House--38.40 mg/100 cm3, while the highest oxalates content in instant coffee--Nescafe Espiro 51.80 mg/100 cm3. The results revealed a significant relation between phytochemical composition of analyzed teas and coffees and the level of soluble oxalates in infusions prepared from the tested products.

  11. Coffee induces breast cancer resistance protein expression in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Marina; Umezawa, Kazuo; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2011-01-01

    Coffee is a beverage that is consumed world-wide on a daily basis and is known to induce a series of metabolic and pharmacological effects, especially in the digestive tract. However, little is known concerning the effects of coffee on transporters in the gastrointestinal tract. To elucidate the effect of coffee on intestinal transporters, we investigated its effect on expression of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in a human colorectal cancer cell line, Caco-2. Coffee induced BCRP gene expression in Caco-2 cells in a coffee-dose dependent manner. Coffee treatment of Caco-2 cells also increased the level of BCRP protein, which corresponded to induction of gene expression, and also increased cellular efflux activity, as judged by Hoechst33342 accumulation. None of the major constituents of coffee tested could induce BCRP gene expression. The constituent of coffee that mediated this induction was extractable with ethyl acetate and was produced during the roasting process. Dehydromethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, inhibited coffee-mediated induction of BCRP gene expression, suggesting involvement of NF-κB in this induction. Our data suggest that daily consumption of coffee might induce BCRP expression in the gastrointestinal tract and may affect the bioavailability of BCRP substrates.

  12. Coffee intake.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Marilyn C

    2012-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. Its widespread popularity and availability has fostered public health concerns of the potential health consequences of regular coffee consumption. Epidemiological studies of coffee intake and certain health outcomes have been inconsistent. The precise component of coffee potentially contributing to development of these conditions also remains unclear. One step toward addressing the challenges in studying the impact coffee has on health is a better understanding of the factors contributing to its consumption and physiological effects. This chapter focuses on those factors that are genetically determined and briefly summarizes progress in applying this knowledge to epidemiological studies of coffee and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of acrylamide in brewed coffee and coffee powder using polymeric ionic liquid-based sorbent coatings in solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cagliero, Cecilia; Ho, Tien D; Zhang, Cheng; Bicchi, Carlo; Anderson, Jared L

    2016-06-03

    This study describes a simple and rapid sampling method employing a polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) sorbent coating in direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for the trace-level analysis of acrylamide in brewed coffee and coffee powder. The crosslinked PIL sorbent coating demonstrated superior sensitivity in the extraction of acrylamide compared to all commercially available SPME coatings. A spin coating method was developed to evenly distribute the PIL coating on the SPME support and reproducibly produce fibers with a large film thickness. Ninhydrin was employed as a quenching reagent during extraction to inhibit the production of interfering acrylamide. The PIL fiber produced a limit of quantitation for acrylamide of 10μgL(-1) and achieved comparable results to the ISO method in the analysis of six coffee powder samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Spent coffee ground extract suppresses ultraviolet B-induced photoaging in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Park, Eu Ddeum; Park, Yooheon; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of spent coffee ground (SCG) ethanol extract on UVB-induced skin aging in hairless mice. An ethanol extract of SCG (ESCG) was prepared using the residue remaining after extraction of oil from roasted SCG. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that the content of caffeine (41.58 ± 0.54 μg/mg) was higher than that of chlorogenic acid isomers (~9.17 μg/mg) in ESCG. ESCG significantly decreased the UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in HaCaT cells. UVB-induced wrinkle formation in mice dorsal skin was effectively reduced by ESCG administration; high dose of ESCG (5 g/L) caused the reduction of wrinkle area by 30% compared with UVB-treated control (UVBC). This result correlated with the ESCG-mediated decrease in epidermis thickness (25%). In addition, ESCG administration significantly reduced transdermal water loss (20%) and erythema formation (35%) derived from UVB exposure. Collagen type I (COL-1) level in dorsal skin was effectively recovered by ESCG administration. These results were supported by down-regulation of collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and 9 (MMP9) expressions. Our results indicate that ESCG protects mouse skin from UVB-induced photoaging by suppressing the expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Our study suggests that ESCG may be anti-photoaging agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Classification of Ground Roasted Decaffeinated Coffee Using UV-VIS Spectroscopy and SIMCA Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulia, M.; Asnaning, A. R.; Suhandy, D.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, an investigation on the classification between decaffeinated and non- decaffeinated coffee samples using UV-VIS spectroscopy and SIMCA method was investigated. Total 200 samples of ground roasted coffee were used (100 samples for decaffeinated coffee and 100 samples for non-decaffeinated coffee). After extraction and dilution, the spectra of coffee samples solution were acquired using a UV-VIS spectrometer (Genesys™ 10S UV-VIS, Thermo Scientific, USA) in the range of 190-1100 nm. The multivariate analyses of the spectra were performed using principal component analysis (PCA) and soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA). The SIMCA model showed that the classification between decaffeinated and non-decaffeinated coffee samples was detected with 100% sensitivity and specificity.

  16. Assessment of Cellular Mutagenicity of Americano Coffees from Popular Coffee Chains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Chen, Po-Wen; Wang, Jung-Yu; Kuo, Tai-Chen

    2017-09-01

    Coffee is a popular beverage worldwide, but coffee beans can be contaminated with carcinogens. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity test is often used for analysis of carcinogens for mutagenicity. However, previous studies have provided controversial data about the direct mutagenicity of coffee beans based on Ames test results. This study was conducted to determine the mutagenicity of popular Americano coffee based on results from the Ames test. Coffee samples without additives that were served by five international coffee chain restaurants were subjected to the analysis using Salmonella Typhimurium tester strains TA98, TA100, and TA1535. The levels of bacterial revertants in samples from coffee chains were lower than the twofold criterion of the control sets, and no significant dose-response effect was observed with or without rat liver enzyme activation. These data indicate that Americano coffees from the selected coffee chains possessed no direct mutagenic activity with or without enzyme activation. These findings suggest a low mutagenic risk from Americano coffees served by the selected coffee chains and support the use of other methods to confirm the nonmutagenicity of coffee products. These results are consistent with most recent epidemiological reports.

  17. Occurrence of ochratoxin A-producing fungi in raw Brazilian coffee.

    PubMed

    Urbano, G R; Taniwaki, M H; Leitão, M F; Vicentini, M C

    2001-08-01

    Ochratoxin A (OA)-producing fungi were identified in coffee at different stages of maturation. The toxin was quantified in coffee during terrace drying and in coffee stored in barns. By direct plating, a high level of contamination (100%) was found in the coffee beans studied, with the genus Aspergillus representing 33.2%, of which Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus niger represented 10.3 and 22.9%, respectively, of the strains isolated from the coffee beans. The capacity to produce ochratoxin was determined in 155 strains of A. ochraceus and A. niger using both the agar plug method and extraction with chloroform, giving positive results for 88.1% of the A. ochraceus strains and 11.5% of the A. niger strains. Analysis for OA in the terrace and barn coffee samples showed that, independent of cultivar, year harvested, or production region, all except one of the samples analyzed showed mycotoxin levels below the limit suggested by the European Common Market (8 microg/kg), thus indicating that the problem is restricted and due to severe faults in harvesting and storage practices.

  18. Identification of aroma active compounds of cereal coffee brew and its roasted ingredients.

    PubMed

    Majcher, Małgorzata A; Klensporf-Pawlik, Dorota; Dziadas, Mariusz; Jeleń, Henryk H

    2013-03-20

    Cereal coffee is a coffee substitute made mainly from roasted cereals such as barley and rye (60-70%), chicory (15-20%), and sugar beets (6-10%). It is perceived by consumers as a healthy, caffeine free, non-irritating beverage suitable for those who cannot drink regular coffee made from coffee beans. In presented studies, typical Polish cereal coffee brew has been subjected to the key odorants analysis with the application of gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). In the analyzed cereal coffee extract, 30 aroma-active volatiles have been identified with FD factors ranging from 16 to 4096. This approach was also used for characterization of key odorants in ingredients used for the cereal coffee production. Comparing the main odors detected in GC-O analysis of roasted cereals brew to the odor notes of cereal coffee brew, it was evident that the aroma of cereal coffee brew is mainly influenced by roasted barley. Flavor compound identification and quantitation has been performed with application of comprehensive multidimentional gas chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToFMS). The results of the quantitative measurements followed by calculation of the odor activity values (OAV) revealed 17 aroma active compounds of the cereal coffee brew with OAV ranging from 12.5 and 2000. The most potent odorant was 2-furfurylthiol followed by the 3-mercapto-3-methylbutyl formate, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine and 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-thenylthiol, 2,3-butanedione, 2-methoxy phenol and 2-methoxy-4-vinyl phenol, 3(sec-butyl)-2-methoxypyrazine, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 3-(methylthio)-propanal, 2,3-pentanedione, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3-(2H)-furanone, (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, (Z)-4-heptenal, phenylacetaldehyde, and 1-octen-3-one.

  19. Effect of shade on Arabica coffee berry disease development: Toward an agroforestry system to reduce disease impact.

    PubMed

    Mouen Bedimo, J A; Njiayouom, I; Bieysse, D; Ndoumbè Nkeng, M; Cilas, C; Nottéghem, J L

    2008-12-01

    Coffee berry disease (CBD), caused by Colletotrichum kahawae, is a major constraint for Arabica coffee cultivation in Africa. The disease is specific to green berries and can lead to 60% harvest losses. In Cameroon, mixed cropping systems of coffee with other crops, such as fruit trees, are very widespread agricultural practices. Fruit trees are commonly planted at random on coffee farms, providing a heterogeneous shading pattern for coffee trees growing underneath. Based on a recent study of CBD, it is known that those plants can reduce disease incidence. To assess the specific effect of shade, in situ and in vitro disease development was compared between coffee trees shaded artificially by a net and trees located in full sunlight. In the field, assessments confirmed a reduction in CBD on trees grown under shade compared with those grown in full sunlight. Artificial inoculations in the laboratory showed that shade did not have any effect on the intrinsic susceptibility of coffee berries to CBD. Coffee shading mainly acts on environmental parameters in limiting disease incidence. In addition to reducing yield losses, agroforestry system may also be helpful in reducing chemical control of the disease and in diversifying coffee growers' incomes.

  20. Safety assessment of green tea based beverages and dried green tea extracts as nutritional supplements.

    PubMed

    Dekant, Wolfgang; Fujii, Kenkichi; Shibata, Eiichiro; Morita, Osamu; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2017-08-05

    The safety of green tea infusions and green tea extract (GTE)-based products is reviewed regarding catechins. Epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), the major catechin present in green tea, is suspected of being responsible for liver toxicity reported in humans consuming food supplements. Intake of EGCG with green tea infusions and GTE-based beverages is up to about 450mg EGCG/person/day in Europe and higher in Asia. Consumption of green tea is not associated with liver damage in humans, and green tea infusion and GTE-based beverages are considered safe in the range of historical uses. In animal studies, EGCG's potency for liver effects is highly dependent on conditions of administration. Use of NOAELs from bolus administration to derive a tolerable upper intake level applying the margin of safety concept results in acceptable EGCG-doses lower than those from one cup of green tea. NOAELs from toxicity studies applying EGCG with diet/split of the daily dose are a better point of departure for risk characterization. In clinical intervention studies, liver effects were not observed after intakes below 600mg EGCG/person/day. Thus, a tolerable upper intake level of 300mg EGCG/person/day is proposed for food supplements; this gives a twofold safety margin to clinical studies that did not report liver effects and a margin of safety of 100 to the NOAELs in animal studies with dietary administration of green tea catechins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Impacts of discarded coffee waste on human and environmental health.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A S; Mello, F V C; Thode Filho, S; Carpes, R M; Honório, J G; Marques, M R C; Felzenszwalb, I; Ferraz, E R A

    2017-07-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages throughout the world. So far, many studies have shown the properties of coffee beverages, but little is known about its impacts on human and environmental health from its discard in the environment. So, the present work aims to investigate the mutagenic, genotoxic, cytotoxic and ecotoxic effects of leached (LE) and solubilized (SE) extracts from coffee waste, simulating the disposal of this residue in landfills and via sewage systems, respectively. Chemical analyses were also carried out. LE and SE induced mutagenicity in the TA98 Salmonella strain with and without exogenous metabolization (S9). In the TA100 only SE induced mutagenicity, what was observed without S9. An increase in the frequency of micronuclei was observed in HepG2 cell line after 3 and 24h of exposure to both extracts. No cytotoxic effects were observed in HepG2 cells by WST-1 assay. The EC50 values for the LE and SE were 1.5% and 11.26% for Daphnia similis, 0.12% and 1.39% for Ceriodaphnia dubia and 6.0% and 5.5% for Vibrio fischeri, respectively. Caffeine and several transition metals were found in both extracts. Coffee waste discarded in the environment may pose a risk to human and environmental health, since this compound can cause DNA damage and present toxicity to aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using cow dung and spent coffee grounds to enhance the two-stage co-composting of green waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Sun, Xiangyang

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of cow dung (CD) (at 0%, 20%, and 35%) and/or spent coffee grounds (SCGs) (at 0%, 30%, and 45%) as amendments in the two-stage co-composting of green waste (GW); the percentages refer to grams of amendment per 100g of GW based on dry weights. The combined addition of CD and SCGs improved the conditions during co-composting and the quality of the compost product in terms of composting temperature; particle-size distribution; mechanical properties; nitrogen changes; low-molecular weight compounds; humic substances; the degradation of lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose; enzyme activities; the contents of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, total phosphorus, and total potassium; and the toxicity to germinating seeds. The combined addition of 20% CD and 45% SCGs to GW resulted in the production of the highest quality compost product and did so in only 21days. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and validation of ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction of phenolic compounds from waste spent coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Ponmurugan, Karuppiah; Maran Jeganathan, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    In this current work, Box-Behnken statistical experimental design (BBD) was adopted to evaluate and optimize USLE (ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction) of phytochemicals from spent coffee grounds. Factors employed in this study are ultrasonic power, temperature, time and solid-liquid (SL) ratio. Individual and interactive effect of independent variables over the extraction yield was depicted through mathematical models, which are generated from the experimental data. Determined optimum process conditions are 244W of ultrasonic power, 40°C of temperature, 34min of time and 1:17g/ml of SL ratio. The predicted values were in correlation with experimental values with 95% confidence level, under the determined optimal conditions. This indicates the significance of selected method for USLE of phytochemicals from SCG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Reduced survival and infestation of coffee borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), on coffee fruits, in response to neem sprays in laboratory].

    PubMed

    Depieri, Rogério A; Martinez, Sueli S

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of neem oil and aqueous extracts of neem seeds and leaves were sprayed on coffee fruits for laboratory evaluation of their efficiency in reducing infestation of the coffee borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari), in multi-choice preference assays in laboratory. Neem oil and extracts reduced infestation of fruits in a dose-dependent manner, acting as a repellent. At 0.5%, 1% and 1.5%, the oil reduced fruit infestation by 30.2%, 42.5% (P > 0.05), and 58.6% (P < 0.05), respectively, as compared with the control. Seed extracts at 1%, 2% and 4% (w/v) reduced infestation by 30.9%, 38.3% (P > 0.05) and 70.2% (P < 0.05), respectively; seed extracts at 0.15%, 1.5% and 15% (w/v) reduced fruit infestation by 16.5%, 38.5% (P > 0.05) and 56.9% (P < 0.05), respectively. Spraying the emulsifiable oil at 1% on coffee fruits and adult borers was compared with spraying on fruits or adults only. Adult-only spraying caused low mortality (P > 0.05) and low reduction on the number of damaged fruits (P > 0.05). Fruit-only spraying significantly reduced insect survival rates and the number of damaged fruits (P < 0.05). However, spraying on adults and fruits caused the greatest reduction in adult survival (55.6%; P < 0.05) and in fruit infestation (78.7%; P < 0.05), probably due to insect mortality and neem oil repellence acting together.

  5. Facile Separation of 5-O-Galloylquinic Acid from Chinese Green Tea Extract using Mesoporous Zirconium Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yilong; Shang, Yafang; Zhu, Danye; Wang, Caihong; Zhong, Zhifeng; Xu, Ziyang

    2016-05-01

    5-O-Galloylquinic acid from green tea and other plants is attracting increasing attention for its antioxidant and antileishmanial bioactivities. It is always isolated using a silica column, a Sephadex column and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, which are either laborious or instrument dependent. To develop a new method to easily separate 5-O-galloylquinic acid. Mesoporous zirconium phosphate (m-ZrP) was prepared to conveniently separate 5-O-galloylquinic acid from Chinese green tea extract, and the target compound was easily obtained by simple steps of adsorption, washing and desorption. The effects of the green tea extraction conditions, extract concentrations, and m-ZrP adsorption/desorption dynamics on the 5-O-galloylquinic acid separation were evaluated. 5-O-Galloylquinic acid that was separated from a 70% ethanol extract of green tea was of moderate HPLC purity (92%) and recovery (88%), and an increased non-specific binding of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on m-ZrP was observed in the diluted tea extract. The times for maximal adsorption of 5-O-galloylquinic acid in 70% ethanol extract and maximal desorption of 5-O-galloylquinic acid in 0.4% phosphoric acid solution were confirmed as 7 h and 5 h, respectively. A facile method to separate 5-O-galloylquinic acid from Chinese green tea extract using m-ZrP was established. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Zeolite Linde Type L as micro-solid phase extraction sorbent for the high performance liquid chromatography determination of ochratoxin A in coffee and cereal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tien Ping; Saad, Bahruddin; Ng, Eng Poh; Salleh, Baharuddin

    2012-05-11

    Zeolite Linde Type L (LTL) crystals with different length, diameter and particle size (nanosized LTL, rod LTL, cylinder LTL and needle LTL) were synthesized, characterized and were used as sorbent in the micro-solid phase extraction of ochratoxin A (OTA) before the high performance liquid chromatography detection. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of OTA for coffee and cereal were 0.09 ng g(-1) and 0.03 ng g(-1), respectively, while the quantification limits were 0.28 ng g(-1) and 0.08 ng g(-1), respectively. The recoveries of OTA of coffee and cereal spiked at 0.5, 10 and 25 ng g(-1) ranged from 91.7 to 101.0%. The proposed method was applied to forty-five samples of coffee and cereal. The presence of OTA was found in twenty-five samples, ranging from 0.28 to 9.33 ng g(-1). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Coffee and tea consumption in relation to inflammation and basal glucose metabolism in a multi-ethnic Asian population: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Higher coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in cohort studies, but the physiological pathways through which coffee affects glucose metabolism are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between habitual coffee and tea consumption and glucose metabolism in a multi-ethnic Asian population and possible mediation by inflammation. Methods We cross-sectionally examined the association between coffee, green tea, black tea and Oolong tea consumption and glycemic (fasting plasma glucose, HOMA-IR, HOMA-beta, plasma HbA1c) and inflammatory (plasma adiponectin and C-reactive protein) markers in a multi-ethnic Asian population (N = 4139). Results After adjusting for multiple confounders, we observed inverse associations between coffee and HOMA-IR (percent difference: - 8.8% for ≥ 3 cups/day versus rarely or never; Ptrend = 0.007), but no significant associations between coffee and inflammatory markers. Tea consumption was not associated with glycemic markers, but green tea was inversely associated with plasma C-reactive protein concentrations (percent difference: - 12.2% for ≥ 1 cup/day versus < 1 cup/week; Ptrend = 0.042). Conclusions These data provide additional evidence for a beneficial effect of habitual caffeinated coffee consumption on insulin sensitivity, and suggest that this effect is unlikely to be mediated by anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:21631956

  8. A field survey on coffee beans drying methods of Indonesian small holder farmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siagian, Parulian; Setyawan, Eko Y.; Gultom, Tumiur; Napitupulu, Farel H.; Ambarita, Himsar

    2017-09-01

    Drying agricultural product is a post-harvest process that consumes significant energy. It can affect the quality of the product. This paper deals with literature review and field survey of drying methods of coffee beans of Indonesia farmers. The objective is to supply the necessary information on developing continuous solar drier. The results show that intermittent characteristic of sun drying results in a better quality of coffee beans in comparison with constant convective drying. In order to use energy efficiently, the drying process should be divided into several stages. In the first stage when the moist content is high, higher drying air temperature is more effective. After this step, where the moist content is low, lower drying air temperature is better. The field survey of drying coffee beans in Sumatera Utara province reveals that the used drying process is very traditional. It can be divided into two modes and depend on the coffee beans type. The Arabica coffee is firstly fermented and dried to moisture content of 80% using sun drying method, then followed by Green House model of drying up to moisture content about 12%. The latter typically spends 3 days of drying time. On the other hand, The Robusta coffee is dried by exposing to the sun directly without any treatment. After the coffee beans dried follow by peeled process. These findings can be considered to develop a continuous solar drying that suitable for coffee beans drying.

  9. Isolation of polyphenols from spent coffee grounds and silverskin by mild hydrothermal pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Conde, Teresa; Mussatto, Solange I

    2016-05-18

    In this study, a new method for isolation of polyphenols (PP) from spent coffee grounds (SCG) and coffee silverskin (CS) is described. The method consisted of a mild hydrothermal pretreatment at 120°C, for 20 min, using a liquid-to-solid ratio of 20 mL/g. PP (determined as gallic acid equivalents, GAE) were the most abundant components in the extracts produced by this method, corresponding to 32.92 mgGAE/gSCG and 19.17 mgGAE/gCS, among which flavonoids corresponded to 8.29 and 2.73 mg quercetin equivalents/g of SCG and CS, respectively. Both extracts presented antioxidant activity but the results were higher for SCG extract, probably due to the highest content of PP present. Negligible effects (less than 1% solubilization) were caused by the hydrothermal pretreatment on cellulose, hemicellulose, and protein fractions of these materials. Some mineral elements were present in the extracts, with potassium being the most abundant. Hydrothermal pretreatment under mild conditions was demonstrated to be an efficient method to recover antioxidant PP from coffee residues.

  10. Time-Resolved Gravimetric Method To Assess Degassing of Roasted Coffee.

    PubMed

    Smrke, Samo; Wellinger, Marco; Suzuki, Tomonori; Balsiger, Franz; Opitz, Sebastian E W; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2018-05-30

    During the roasting of coffee, thermally driven chemical reactions lead to the formation of gases, of which a large fraction is carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Part of these gases is released during roasting while part is retained inside the porous structure of the roasted beans and is steadily released during storage or more abruptly during grinding and extraction. The release of CO 2 during the various phases from roasting to consumption is linked to many important properties and characteristics of coffee. It is an indicator for freshness, plays an important role in shelf life and in packaging, impacts the extraction process, is involved in crema formation, and may affect the sensory profile in the cup. Indeed, and in view of the multiple roles it plays, CO 2 is a much underappreciated and little examined molecule in coffee. Here, we introduce an accurate, quantitative, and time-resolved method to measure the release kinetics of gases from whole beans and ground coffee using a gravimetric approach. Samples were placed in a container with a fitted capillary to allow gases to escape. The time-resolved release of gases was measured via the weight loss of the container filled with coffee. Long-term stability was achieved using a customized design of a semimicro balance, including periodic and automatic zero value measurements and calibration procedures. The novel gravimetric methodology was applied to a range of coffee samples: (i) whole Arabica beans and (ii) ground Arabica and Robusta, roasted to different roast degrees and at different speeds (roast air temperatures). Modeling the degassing rates allowed structural and mechanistic interpretation of the degassing process.

  11. New Paradigm Shift for the Green Synthesis of Antibacterial Silver Nanoparticles Utilizing Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review covers general information regarding the green synthesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles. Owing to their antibacterial properties, silver nanoparticles are widely used in many areas, especially biomedical applications. In green synthesis practices, the chemical reducing agents are eliminated, and biological entities are utilized to convert silver ions to silver nanoparticles. Among the various biological entities, natural plant extracts have emerged as green reducing agents, providing eco-friendly routes for the preparation of silver nanomaterials. The most obvious merits of green synthesis are the increased biocompatibility of the resulting silver nanoparticles and the ease with which the reaction can be carried out. This review summarizes some of the plant extracts that are used to produce antibacterial silver nanoparticles. Additionally, background information regarding the green synthesis and antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles is provided. Finally, the toxicological aspects of silver nanoparticles are briefly mentioned. PMID:25343010

  12. Separation of major catechins from green tea by ultrahigh pressure extraction.

    PubMed

    Jun, Xi; Shuo, Zhao; Bingbing, Lu; Rui, Zhang; Ye, Li; Deji, Shen; Guofeng, Zhou

    2010-02-15

    This study presents a novel extraction technique, ultrahigh pressure extraction, to obtain major catechins from green tea leaves. The effects of various high pressure level (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MPa) on the extract are examined. HPLC chromatographic analyses determine the concentration of four major catechins and caffeine. The extraction yields of active ingredients with ultrahigh pressure extraction (400 MPa pressure) for only 15 min were given the same as those of organic solvent extraction for 2h. These excellent results for the ultrahigh pressure extraction are promising for the future separation of active ingredients from traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Overview on the mechanisms of coffee germination and fermentation and their significance for coffee and coffee beverage quality.

    PubMed

    Waters, Deborah M; Arendt, Elke K; Moroni, Alice V

    2017-01-22

    Quality of coffee is a complex trait and is influenced by physical and sensory parameters. A complex succession of transformations during the processing of seeds to roasted coffee will inevitably influence the in-cup attributes of coffee. Germination and fermentation of the beans are two bioprocesses that take place during post-harvest treatment, and may lead to significant modifications of coffee attributes. The aim of this review is to address the current knowledge of dynamics of these two processes and their significance for bean modifications and coffee quality. The first part of this review gives an overview of coffee germination and its influence on coffee chemistry and quality. The germination process initiates while these non-orthodox seeds are still inside the cherry. This process is asynchronous and the evolution of germination depends on how the beans are processed. A range of metabolic reactions takes place during germination and can influence the carbohydrate, protein, and lipid composition of the beans. The second part of this review focuses on the microbiota associated with the beans during post-harvesting, exploring its effects on coffee quality and safety. The microbiota associated with the coffee cherries and beans comprise several bacterial, yeast, and fungal species and affects the processing from cherries to coffee beans. Indigenous bacteria and yeasts play a role in the degradation of pulp/mucilage, and their metabolism can affect the sensory attributes of coffee. On the other hand, the fungal population occurring during post-harvest and storage negatively affects coffee quality, especially regarding spoilage, off-tastes, and mycotoxin production.

  14. Gene expression of antioxidant enzymes and coffee seed quality during pre- and post-physiological maturity.

    PubMed

    Santos, F C; Caixeta, F; Clemente, A C S; Pinho, E V; Rosa, S D V F

    2014-12-19

    Seeds collected at different maturation stages vary in physiological quality and patterns of protective antioxidant systems against deterioration. In this study we investigated the expression of genes that codify catalase (CAT), dismutase superoxide (SOD), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) during the pre- and post-physiological maturation phases in whole seeds and in endosperms and embryos extracted from the seeds. Coffea arabica L. berries were collected at the green, yellowish-green, cherry, over-ripe, and dry stages, and the seeds were examined physiologically. The transcription levels of the genes were quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using coffee-specific primers. The highest level of SOD expression was observed in the endosperm at the cherry and over-ripe stages; in addition, these seeds presented the greatest physiological quality (assessed via germination test). The highest CAT3 transcript expression was observed at the green stage in whole seeds, and at the green and over-ripe stages in the embryos and endosperms. High expression of the PPO transcript was observed at the green and yellowish-green stages in whole seeds. In embryos and endosperms, peak expression of the PPO transcript was observed at the green stage; subsequently, peaks at the cherry and over-ripe stages were observed. We concluded that the expression patterns of the SOD and CAT3 transcripts were similar at the more advanced maturation stages, which corresponded to enhanced physiological seed quality. High expression of the PPO transcript at the over-ripe stage, also observed in the embryos and endosperms at the cherry stage, coincided with the highest physiological seed quality.

  15. Characterization of green zero-valent iron nanoparticles produced with tree leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Machado, S; Pacheco, J G; Nouws, H P A; Albergaria, J T; Delerue-Matos, C

    2015-11-15

    In the last decades nanotechnology has become increasingly important because it offers indisputable advantages to almost every area of expertise, including environmental remediation. In this area the synthesis of highly reactive nanomaterials (e.g. zero-valent iron nanoparticles, nZVI) is gaining the attention of the scientific community, service providers and other stakeholders. The synthesis of nZVI by the recently developed green bottom-up method is extremely promising. However, the lack of information about the characteristics of the synthetized particles hinders a wider and more extensive application. This work aims to evaluate the characteristics of nZVI synthesized through the green method using leaves from different trees. Considering the requirements of a product for environmental remediation the following characteristics were studied: size, shape, reactivity and agglomeration tendency. The mulberry and pomegranate leaf extracts produced the smallest nZVIs (5-10 nm), the peach, pear and vine leaf extracts produced the most reactive nZVIs while the ones produced with passion fruit, medlar and cherry extracts did not settle at high nZVI concentrations (931 and 266 ppm). Considering all tests, the nZVIs obtained from medlar and vine leaf extracts are the ones that could present better performances in the environmental remediation. The information gathered in this paper will be useful to choose the most appropriate leaf extracts and operational conditions for the application of the green nZVIs in environmental remediation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of green coffee extract supplementation on anthropometric indices, glycaemic control, blood pressure, lipid profile, insulin resistance and appetite in patients with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Hanieh; Nikpayam, Omid; Sedaghat, Meghdad; Sohrab, Golbon

    2018-02-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate the effects of decaffeinated green coffee bean extract (GCE) on anthropometric indices, glycaemic control, blood pressure, lipid profile, insulin resistance and appetite in patients with the metabolic syndrome (Mets). Subjects were randomly allocated to consume 400 mg GCE or placebo capsules twice per d for 8 weeks. Both groups were advised to follow an energy balanced diet. After GCE supplementation, systolic blood pressure (SBP) significantly reduced compared with the placebo group (-13·76 (sd 8·48) v. -6·56 (sd 9·58) mmHg, P=0·01). Also, GCE treatment significantly reduced fasting blood glucose (FBS) (-5·15 (sd 60·22) v. 29·42 (sd 40·01) mg/dl (-0·28 (SD 3·34) v. 1·63 (SD 2·22) mmol/l); P=0·03) and homoeostatic model of assessment of insulin resistance in comparison to placebo (-1·41 (sd 3·33) v. 1·23 (sd 3·84), P=0·02). In addition, waist circumference (-2·40 (sd 2·54) v. -0·66 (sd 1·17) cm, P=0·009) and appetite score (-1·44 (sd 1·72) v. -0·2 (sd 1·32), P=0·01) of the individuals supplemented with GCE indicated a significant decline. Besides, weight and BMI reduction in the intervention group was almost twice as much as the placebo group; however, this discrepancy was marginally significant (weight: -2·08 (sd 2·11) v. -0·92 (sd 1·30) kg, P=0·05). No difference was observed in terms of glycated Hb (HbA1c) percentage and lipid profile parameters between the two groups. To sum up, GCE administration had an ameliorating effect on some of the Mets components such as high SBP, high FBS and Mets main aetiological factors including insulin resistance and abdominal obesity. Furthermore, GCE supplementation could reduce appetite level.

  17. Determination of volatile marker compounds of common coffee roast defects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ni; Liu, Chujiao; Liu, Xingkun; Degn, Tina Kreuzfeldt; Munchow, Morten; Fisk, Ian

    2016-11-15

    Coffee beans from the same origin were roasted using six time-temperature profiles, in order to identify volatile aroma compounds associated with five common roast coffee defects (light, scorched, dark, baked and underdeveloped). Thirty-seven volatile aroma compounds were selected on the basis that they had previously been identified as potent odorants of coffee and were also identified in all coffee brew preparations; the relative abundance of these aroma compounds was then evaluated using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with headspace solid phase micro extraction. Some of the 37 key aroma compounds were significantly changed in each coffee roast defect and changes in one marker compound was chosen for each defect type, that is, indole for light defect, 4-ethyl-2-methoxyphenol for scorched defect, phenol for dark defect, maltol for baked defect and 2,5-dimethylfuran for underdeveloped defect. The association of specific changes in aroma profiles for different roast defects has not been shown previously and could be incorporated into screening tools to enable the coffee industry quickly identify if roast defects occur during production. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. The influence of brewing water characteristic on sensory perception of pour-over local coffee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibrianto, K.; Ardianti, A. D.; Pradipta, K.; Sunarharum, W. B.

    2018-01-01

    The coffee quality can be characterized by its multisensory perceptions. The content and mineral composition and other substances of brewing water can affect the result of brewed-coffee. The water may influence in extraction capabilities and flavor clarity. The ground Dampit coffee and two commercial instant coffee with pour-over method were used in this study. Various types of commercial drinking water were used to brew the coffee. The result suggests that the different brewing water affects the intensity of sweet and chocolate aroma, as well as oily mouth-feel. Surprisingly, taste and flavour attributes were not affected by the pH of brewing water within the range of 5.5 to 9.1.

  19. Green tea extract-induced lethal toxicity in fasted but not in nonfasted dogs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuei-Meng; Yao, Jiaqin; Boring, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    Recent chronic toxicity studies performed on green tea extracts in fasted dogs have revealed some unique dose-limiting lethal liver, gastrointestinal, and renal toxicities. Key findings included necrosis of hepatic cells, gastrointestinal epithelia and renal tubules, atrophy of reproductive organs, atrophy and necrosis of hematopoietic tissues, and associated hematological changes. The polyphenol cachetins (a mixture of primarily epigallocatechin gallate [≥55%]; plus up to 10% each of epigallocatechin, epicatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate) appeared to be the causative agents for the observed toxicities because they are the active ingredients of green tea extract studied. Conduct of the study in nonfasted dogs under the same testing conditions and dose levels showed unremarkable results. Assuming both studies were valid, at the identified no observed adverse effect levels (NOAEL) of each study, systemic exposures (based on area under the curve [AUC]) were actually lower in fasted than nonfasted dogs, suggesting that fasting may have rendered the target organ systems potentially more vulnerable to the effects of green tea extract. The toxicity mechanisms that produced lethality are not known, but the results are scientifically intriguing. Because tea drinking has become more popular in the United States and abroad, the mode of action and site of action of green tea extract-induced lethal toxicities during fasting and the role of other phytochemical components of Folia Camellia sinensis (including nonpolyphenol fractions, which are often consumed when whole-leaf products are presented) warrant further investigation.

  20. Evaluation of the effect of green tea extract on mouth bacterial activity in the presence of propylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Moghbel, Abdolhossein; Farjzadeh, Ahmad; Aghel, Nasrin; Agheli, Homaun; Raisi, Nafiseh

    2012-01-01

    Compounds present in green tea have proved to inhibit the growth and activity of bacteria associated with infections. To assess the effects of green tea leaves extract in presence of propylene glycol on the aerobic mouth bacteria load. Saliva of 25 volunteer girl students aging 20-25 years were selected and evaluated by a mouthwash sample containing 1% tannin, as the most effective antibacterial complex in green tea. Comparative studies were also conducted between green tea mouthwashes containing 1% tannin and a similar sample with 10% propylene glycol added during extraction. This comparison was applied for a chlorhexidine 0.2% sample as a chemical mouthwash brand, too. There was a meaningful difference between the green tea mouthwashes containing 10% propylene glycol and the simple green tea extract (P < 0.05). Significant difference was also seen between the herbal and chemical mouthwashes (P < 0.05). The extract 1% tannin containing 10% propylene glycol reduced the aerobic mouth bacterial load of the student salvia about 64 percent. The pH monotonousness in different days and temperatures approved the stability of tannin in liquid water medium. Using green tea extract as a herbal mouthwash is safe and harmless specially for children and pregnant women. This result led us to suppose that green tea may prevent plaque formation on teeth, coming over halitosis due to mouth infection, too. These effects need to be approved in an in vivo trial as a second study.

  1. Spices Coffee : Innovation Strategy To Increase Quality On Powder Coffee Farmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, I. T.; Indah, P. N.; Widayanti, S.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study is a) to analyze the condition of internal environment industry spices coffee, b) to analyze the condition of the external environment industry spices coffee, and c) to determine the technological innovation strategy spices coffee in order to improve the competitiveness of the coffee people. Most of the coffee grown in Tutur district is cultivated by smallholder farms, resulting in low quality. The strategy of coffee spice agro-industry aims to increase the added value of the products so that farmers obtain higher coffee prices. Activities include the provision of raw materials, processing, supply of final products, and marketing.The results showed that the internal environmental conditions that have the highest value is the strengthen factors. The highest score of strengthen factors is the availability of coffee, availability of labor and communications group. The highest score of opportunity factors is technological assistance from the government and other government support for the development of people’s coffee industry and high market potential. The development of agrotourism should improve as well as expand the network to seize market. The strategy should be applied in the development of spices coffee industry is to support aggressive growth (Growth-oriented strategy).

  2. Green Chemistry Glucose Biosensor Development using Etlingera elatior Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatoni, A.; Anggraeni, M. D.; Zusfahair; Iqlima, H.

    2018-01-01

    Glucose biosensor development is one of the important strategies for early detection of diabetes mellitus disease. This study was aimed to explore the flower extract of Etlingera elatior for a green-analysis method of glucose biosensor. Flowers were extracted using ethanol: HCl and tested its performances as an indicator of glucose biosensor using glucose oxidase enzyme. The glucose oxidase react with glucose resulted hydrogen peroxide that would change the color of the flower extract. Furthermore, the extract was also studied including their stability to pH, oxidizing and reducing, temperature, and storage. The results showed that the Etlingera elatior extract had high correlation between color change and glucose concentration with regression equation of y = -0.0005x + 0.4724 and R2 of 0.9965. The studied biosensor showed a wide linear range to detect glucose sample of 0 to 500 mM. The extract characterization showed a more stable in low pH (acid), reducing agent addition, heating treatment and storage.

  3. Validation of analytical conditions for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in roasted coffee by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guatemala-Morales, Guadalupe María; Beltrán-Medina, Elisa Alejandra; Murillo-Tovar, Mario Alfonso; Ruiz-Palomino, Priscilla; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Arriola-Guevara, Enrique

    2016-04-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of significant interest due to their genotoxicity in humans. PAHs quantification in coffee is complex since some of its compounds interfere in the chromatographic analysis, which hinders the reliable determination of the PAHs. Analytical conditions for the ultrasound extraction, purification and quantification of 16 PAHs in roasted coffee were studied. The better extraction efficiency of benzo[a]pyrene (68%) from ground-roasted coffee was achieved with a solvent ratio of Hex:MC (9:1 v/v) and three extraction periods of 20 min, followed by alkaline saponification and purification of the extracts. The detection limits were 0.85-39.32 ng mL(-1), and the quantification limits from 2.84 to 131.05 ng mL(-1), obtained for fluoranthene and chrysene, respectively. The extraction was effective for most of the analytes, with recoveries of 39.8% dibenzo[ah]anthracene and 69.0% benzo[b]fluoranthene. For coffee roasted in a spouted bed reactor, the summation of the 16 PAHs ranged from 3.5 to 16.4 μg kg(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Conventional and Accelerated-Solvent Extractions of Green Tea (Camellia sinensis) for Metabolomics-based Chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Kellogg, Joshua J.; Wallace, Emily D.; Graf, Tyler N.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Cech, Nadja B.

    2018-01-01

    Metabolomics has emerged as an important analytical technique for multiple applications. The value of information obtained from metabolomics analysis depends on the degree to which the entire metabolome is present and the reliability of sample treatment to ensure reproducibility across the study. The purpose of this study was to compare methods of preparing complex botanical extract samples prior to metabolomics profiling. Two extraction methodologies, accelerated solvent extraction and a conventional solvent maceration, were compared using commercial green tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze (Theaceae)] products as a test case. The accelerated solvent protocol was first evaluated to ascertain critical factors influencing extraction using a D-optimal experimental design study. The accelerated solvent and conventional extraction methods yielded similar metabolite profiles for the green tea samples studied. The accelerated solvent extraction yielded higher total amounts of extracted catechins, was more reproducible, and required less active bench time to prepare the samples. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of accelerated solvent as an efficient methodology for metabolomics studies. PMID:28787673

  5. Discrimination of complex mixtures by a colorimetric sensor array: coffee aromas.

    PubMed

    Suslick, Benjamin A; Feng, Liang; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2010-03-01

    The analysis of complex mixtures presents a difficult challenge even for modern analytical techniques, and the ability to discriminate among closely similar such mixtures often remains problematic. Coffee provides a readily available archetype of such highly multicomponent systems. The use of a low-cost, sensitive colorimetric sensor array for the detection and identification of coffee aromas is reported. The color changes of the sensor array were used as a digital representation of the array response and analyzed with standard statistical methods, including principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA). PCA revealed that the sensor array has exceptionally high dimensionality with 18 dimensions required to define 90% of the total variance. In quintuplicate runs of 10 commercial coffees and controls, no confusions or errors in classification by HCA were observed in 55 trials. In addition, the effects of temperature and time in the roasting of green coffee beans were readily observed and distinguishable with a resolution better than 10 degrees C and 5 min, respectively. Colorimetric sensor arrays demonstrate excellent potential for complex systems analysis in real-world applications and provide a novel method for discrimination among closely similar complex mixtures.

  6. Discrimination of Complex Mixtures by a Colorimetric Sensor Array: Coffee Aromas

    PubMed Central

    Suslick, Benjamin A.; Feng, Liang; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of complex mixtures presents a difficult challenge even for modern analytical techniques, and the ability to discriminate among closely similar such mixtures often remains problematic. Coffee provides a readily available archetype of such highly multicomponent systems. The use of a low-cost, sensitive colorimetric sensor array for the detection and identification of coffee aromas is reported. The color changes of the sensor array were used as a digital representation of the array response and analyzed with standard statistical methods, including principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA). PCA revealed that the sensor array has exceptionally high dimensionality with 18 dimensions required to define 90% of the total variance. In quintuplicate runs of 10 commercial coffees and controls, no confusions or errors in classification by HCA were observed in 55 trials. In addition, the effects of temperature and time in the roasting of green coffee beans were readily observed and distinguishable with a resolution better than 10 °C and 5 min, respectively. Colorimetric sensor arrays demonstrate excellent potential for complex systems analysis in real-world applications and provide a novel method for discrimination among closely similar complex mixtures. PMID:20143838

  7. Molecular mechanisms of the anti-obesity effect of bioactive compounds in tea and coffee.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min-Hsiung; Tung, Yen-Chen; Yang, Guliang; Li, Shiming; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2016-11-09

    Obesity is a serious health problem in adults and children worldwide. However, the basic strategies for the management of obesity (diet, exercise, drugs and surgery) have limitations and side effects. Therefore, many researchers have sought to identify bioactive components in food. Tea and coffee are the most frequently consumed beverages in the whole world. Their health benefits have been studied for decades, especially those of green tea. The anti-obesity effect of tea and coffee has been studied for at least ten years. The results have shown decreased lipid accumulation in cells via the regulation of the cell cycle during adipogenesis, changes in transcription factors and lipogenesis-related proteins in the adipose tissue of animal models, and decreased body weight and visceral fat in humans. Tea and coffee also influence the gut microbiota in obese animals and humans. Although the anti-obesity mechanism of tea and coffee still needs further clarification, they may have potential as a new strategy to prevent or treat obesity.

  8. Green synthesis of iron nanoparticles by various tea extracts: comparative study of the reactivity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lanlan; Weng, Xiulan; Chen, Zuliang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravendra

    2014-09-15

    Iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) are often synthesized using sodium borohydride with aggregation, which is a high cost process and environmentally toxic. To address these issues, Fe NPs were synthesized using green methods based on tea extracts, including green, oolong and black teas. The best method for degrading malachite green (MG) was Fe NPs synthesized by green tea extracts because it contains a high concentration of caffeine/polyphenols which act as both reducing and capping agents in the synthesis of Fe NPs. These characteristics were confirmed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), UV-visible (UV-vis) and specific surface area (BET). To understand the formation of Fe NPs using various tea extracts, the synthesized Fe NPs were characterized by SEM, X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). What emerged were different sizes and concentrations of Fe NPs being synthesized by tea extracts, leading to various degradations of MG. Furthermore, kinetics for the degradation of MG using these Fe NPs fitted well to the pseudo first-order reaction kinetics model with more than 20 kJ/mol activation energy, suggesting a chemically diffusion-controlled reaction. The degradation mechanism using these Fe NPs included adsorption of MG to Fe NPs, oxidation of iron, and cleaving the bond that was connected to the benzene ring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tobacco use, occupation, coffee, various nutrients, and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Howe, G R; Burch, J D; Miller, A B; Cook, G M; Esteve, J; Morrison, B; Gordon, P; Chambers, L W; Fodor, G; Winsor, G M

    1980-04-01

    In a Canadian population-based case-control study of 480 males and 152 female case-control pairs, the relative risk for development of bladder cancer for ever used versus never used cigarettes was 3.9 for males and 2.4 for females, with a dose-response relationship in both sexes. A reduced risk was associated with the use of filter cigarettes compared to nonfilter cigarettes. After control for cigarette usage, a significant risk was noted for male pipe smokers. For male ex-smokers the risk after 15 years of no smoking was less than one-half that of current male smokers. Bladder cancer risk was found for workers in the chemical, rubber, photographic, petroleum, medical, and food processing industries among males and for workers occupationally exposed to dust or fumes among both sexes. Bladder cancer risk was elevated for males consuming all types of coffee, regular coffee, and instant coffee and for females consuming instant coffee, but no dose-response relationship was found. Risk was found for males consuming water from nonpublic supples but not for females. No risk was observed in males or females consuming nitrate-containing foods, beverages other than coffee, or fiddlehead greens. Hair dye usage in females and phenacetin usage in males and females carried no risk. Divergent findings by area for aspirin suggested that an overall association was not causal. Reevaluation of the data on artificial sweeteners confirmed a significant bladder cancer risk in males and a dose-response relationship. The cumulated population attributable risk for bladder cancer was 90% for males from cigarette smoking, industrial exposure, and exposure to nonpublic water supplies and 29% for females from cigarette smoking, industrial exposure, and instant coffee consumption.

  10. The inhibition of the mammalian DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) by dietary black tea and coffee polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Black tea is, second only to water, the most consumed beverage globally. Previously, the inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 1 was shown by dietary polyphenols and epi-gallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the main polyphenolic constituent of green tea, and 5-caffeoyl quinic acid, the main phenolic constituent of the green coffee bean. Results We studied the inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 3a by a series of dietary polyphenols from black tea such as theaflavins and thearubigins and chlorogenic acid derivatives from coffee. For theaflavin 3,3 digallate and thearubigins IC50 values in the lower micro molar range were observed, which when compared to pharmacokinetic data available, suggest an effect of physiological relevance. Conclusions Since Dnnmt3a has been associated with development, cancer and brain function, these data suggest a biochemical mechanism for the beneficial health effect of black tea and coffee and a possible molecular mechanism for the improvement of brain performance and mental health by dietary polyphenols. PMID:21510884

  11. Evaluation of the Effect of Green Tea Extract on Mouth Bacterial Activity in the Presence of Propylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Moghbel, Abdolhossein; Farjzadeh, Ahmad; Aghel, Nasrin; Agheli, Homaun; Raisi, Nafiseh

    2012-01-01

    Background Compounds present in green tea have proved to inhibit the growth and activity of bacteria associated with infections. Objectives To assess the effects of green tea leaves extract in presence of propylene glycol on the aerobic mouth bacteria load. Materials and Methods Saliva of 25 volunteer girl students aging 20-25 years were selected and evaluated by a mouthwash sample containing 1% tannin, as the most effective antibacterial complex in green tea. Comparative studies were also conducted between green tea mouthwashes containing 1% tannin and a similar sample with 10% propylene glycol added during extraction. This comparison was applied for a chlorhexidine 0.2% sample as a chemical mouthwash brand, too. Results There was a meaningful difference between the green tea mouthwashes containing 10% propylene glycol and the simple green tea extract (P < 0.05). Significant difference was also seen between the herbal and chemical mouthwashes (P < 0.05). The extract 1% tannin containing 10% propylene glycol reduced the aerobic mouth bacterial load of the student salvia about 64 percent. The pH monotonousness in different days and temperatures approved the stability of tannin in liquid water medium. Conclusions Using green tea extract as a herbal mouthwash is safe and harmless specially for children and pregnant women. This result led us to suppose that green tea may prevent plaque formation on teeth, coming over halitosis due to mouth infection, too. These effects need to be approved in an in vivo trial as a second study. PMID:24624155

  12. Ginger extract as green corrosion inhibitor of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidrusli, A.; Suryanto; Mahmood, M.

    2018-01-01

    Ginger extract as corrosion inhibitor from natural resources was studied to prevent corrosion of mild steel in acid media. Ginger rhizome was extracted to produce green corrosion inhibitor (G-1) while ginger powder bought at supermarket was also extract to form green corrosion inhibitor (G-2). Effectiveness of inhibitor in preventing corrosion process of mild steel was studied in 1.0 M of hydrochloric acid. The experiment of weight loss method and polarization technique were conducted to measure corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency of mild steel in solution containing 1.0 M of hydrochloric acid with various concentration of inhibitor at room temperature. The results showed that, the rate of corrosion dropped from 8.09 mmpy in solution containing no inhibitor to 0.72 mmpy in solution containing 150g/l inhibitor while inhibition efficiency up to 91% was obtained. The polarization curve in polarization experiments shows that the inhibition efficiency is 86% with high concentration of inhibitor. The adsorption of ginger extract on the surface of mild steel was observed by using optical microscope and the characterization analysis was done by using pH measurement method. When high concentration of green inhibitor in the acid solution is used, the pH at the surface of steel is increasing.

  13. Qualitative Characteristics and Determining Shelf-Life of Milk Beverage Product Supplemented with Coffee Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Oh, Duk-Geun

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to establish the shelf-life of a milk beverage product supplemented with coffee extracts. Qualitative changes including peroxide value (PV), microorganism content, caffeine content, and sensory evaluation were measured periodically in beverages kept at 10, 20, and 30°C for 8 wk. Lipid oxidation of the product was measured by peroxide value analysis, and apparent changes were observed during a 4 wk storage period. Caffeine analysis revealed that the changes in caffeine content were negligible during the storage period. Total aerobic bacteria, Escherichia coli, yeast, and mold were not detected in the products during an 8 wk storage period. Sensory evaluation revealed that after 4 wk of storage overall acceptance was less than 3 points on a 5-point scale. In this study, PV was used as an indicator of the shelf-life of the milk beverage product. PV analysis revealed that a value of 20 meq/kg was the end of the shelf-life using the Arrhenius equation and the accelerated shelf-life test (ASLT). Assuming that the beverages are kept at 4°C during distribution, calculation of when the PV reached the quality limit point (20 meq/kg) was done with the equation ln(PV) = 0.3644X − 2.21834 and, using that equation, PV = e0.3644X-2.21834 was calculated. Therefore, 14.3086 wk was determined to be the shelf-life of the milk beverage supplemented with coffee when stored at 4°C. PMID:28515654

  14. The solar-coffee connection

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, G.

    2000-04-01

    Coffee connoisseurs, when they quaff a cup of coffee or enjoy a jug of joe, don't generally consider the costs to the environment of their favorite beverage. But the fact is that traditional coffee production is hard on the environment, exacting a toll on the native forests and waterways of Central America and on the migratory birds of the western hemisphere. Coffee growing is the second greatest cause of rainforest destruction after cattle ranching, because a lot of trees are cut down to dry the freshly-picked coffee crop. But espresso-sipping environmentalists and an eco-conscious Joe Public can take comfort inmore » a promising new connection between solar energy and rainforest-friendly coffee--solar-dried coffee. And they can take pleasure in it too, because solar-dried coffee, according to virtually everyone who tries it, is the best-tasting coffee made. Considering that coffee is the second most-traded commodity next to oil, and the second most popular beverage in the world next to water, consumed by billions of people, any new process that reduces the environmental damage occasioned by coffee-growing and processing is significant.« less

  15. The Effect of Time, Roasting Temperature, and Grind Size on Caffeine and Chlorogenic Acid Concentrations in Cold Brew Coffee.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Megan; Rao, Niny Z

    2017-12-21

    The extraction kinetics and equilibrium concentrations of caffeine and 3-chlorogenic acid (3-CGA) in cold brew coffee were investigated by brewing four coffee samples (dark roast/medium grind, dark roast/coarse grind, medium roast/medium grind, medium roast/coarse grind) using cold and hot methods. 3-CGA and caffeine were found at higher concentrations in cold brew coffee made with medium roast coffees, rather than dark roast. The grind size did not impact 3-CGA and caffeine concentrations of cold brew samples significantly, indicating that the rate determining step in extraction for these compounds did not depend on surface area. Caffeine concentrations in cold brew coarse grind samples were substantially higher than their hot brew counterparts. 3-CGA concentrations and pH were comparable between cold and hot brews. This work suggests that the difference in acidity of cold brew coffee is likely not due to 3-CGA or caffeine concentrations considering that most acids in coffee are highly soluble and extract quickly. It was determined that caffeine and 3-CGA concentrations reached equilibrium according to first order kinetics between 6 and 7 hours in all cold brew samples instead of 10 to 24 hours outlined in typical cold brew methods.

  16. Impact of storage conditions on fungal community composition of green coffee beans Coffea arabica L. stored in jute sacks during 1 year.

    PubMed

    Broissin-Vargas, L M; Snell-Castro, R; Godon, J J; González-Ríos, O; Suárez-Quiroz, M L

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of warehouse storage conditions on the composition of the fungal community of green coffee beans (GCB) that were stored in jute sacks for 1 year. Molecular characterization of the fungal community composition and population dynamics obtained by Q-PCR, CE-SSCP (Simpson's diversity index D) and Illumina MiSeq sequencing indicated that Saccharomycetales dominated during the first 6 months of storage period with species as Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Pichia kluyveri. However, after 6 months of storage, the filamentous genus Wallemia became dominant. Principal components analysis correlated this fungal dynamic with storage conditions and other variables as chromaticity (colour), water activity, moisture content, reducing sugars concentration, fungal infection and ochratoxin A production. This study demonstrated that GCB stored in jute sacks after 6 months of storage lead to fungal population dynamics, decreased chromaticity in GCB by bleaching and, then, affected overall quality. Storage plays an important role in the quality evolution during the handling of the GCB. In this context, the composition of the microbial community could be considered a marker to assess the trade value of the coffee beans. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Functional Characterization of Epitheaflagallin 3-O-Gallate Generated in Laccase-Treated Green Tea Extracts in the Presence of Gallic Acid.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Nobuya; Kurokawa, Junji; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Ogasawara, Masaru; Matsunaga, Takayuki; Okubo, Tsutomu; Katsube, Yuji

    2017-12-06

    Epitheaflagallin (ETFG) and epitheaflagallin 3-O-gallate (ETFGg) are minor polyphenols in black tea extract that are enzymatically synthesized from epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), respectively, in green tea extract via laccase oxidation in the presence of gallic acid. The constituents of laccase-treated green tea extract in the presence of gallic acid are thus quite different from those of nonlaccase-treated green tea extract: EGC and EGCg are present in lower concentrations, and ETFG and ETFGg are present in higher concentrations. Additionally, laccase-treated green tea extract contains further polymerized catechin derivatives, comparable with naturally fermented teas such as oolong tea and black tea. We found that ETFGg and laccase-treated green tea extracts exhibit versatile physiological functions in vivo and in vitro, including antioxidative activity, pancreatic lipase inhibition, Streptococcus sorbinus glycosyltransferase inhibition, and an inhibiting effect on the activity of matrix metalloprotease-1 and -3 and their synthesis by human gingival fibroblasts. We confirmed that these inhibitory effects of ETFGg in vitro match well with the results obtained by docking simulations of the compounds with their target enzymes or noncatalytic protein. Thus, ETFGg and laccase-treated green tea extracts containing ETFGg are promising functional food materials with potential antiobesity and antiperiodontal disease activities.

  18. How grinding level and brewing method (Espresso, American, Turkish) could affect the antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds in a coffee cup.

    PubMed

    Derossi, Antonio; Ricci, Ilde; Caporizzi, Rossella; Fiore, Anna; Severini, Carla

    2018-06-01

    Depending on geographical origin and cultural traditions, different brewing procedures are used all over the world to prepare a cup of coffee. In this work, we explored how three grinding levels of coffee powder and three coffee preparation methods - filtration (American), boiling (Turkish) and extraction under pressure (Espresso) - affect healthy compounds and physicochemical attributes in coffee served to consumers. Grinding level slightly affected the quality of coffee, whereas the preparation method significantly influenced all in-cup attributes. When the content per cup was compared, the American coffee presented higher values of antioxidant activity and total phenol content than espresso and Turkish coffees. Caffeine content was 316, 112 and 64 mg for the American, Turkish and espresso coffee cup, respectively. One American, three Turkish and five Espresso coffee cups contain similar amount of caffeine of 316, 336 and 320 mg, respectively which are below the maximum daily consumption (400 mg per day) suggested by the European Food Safety Authority. The extraction method affects the intake of bioactive and antioxidant substances with specific properties. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Green and Sustainable Separation of Natural Products from Agro-Industrial Waste: Challenges, Potentialities, and Perspectives on Emerging Approaches.

    PubMed

    Zuin, Vânia G; Ramin, Luize Z

    2018-01-17

    New generations of biorefinery combine innovative biomass waste resources from different origins, chemical extraction and/or synthesis of biomaterials, biofuels, and bioenergy via green and sustainable processes. From the very beginning, identifying and evaluating all potentially high value-added chemicals that could be removed from available renewable feedstocks requires robust, efficient, selective, reproducible, and benign analytical approaches. With this in mind, green and sustainable separation of natural products from agro-industrial waste is clearly attractive considering both socio-environmental and economic aspects. In this paper, the concepts of green and sustainable separation of natural products will be discussed, highlighting the main studies conducted on this topic over the last 10 years. The principal analytical techniques (such as solvent, microwave, ultrasound, and supercritical treatments), by-products (e.g., citrus, coffee, corn, and sugarcane waste) and target compounds (polyphenols, proteins, essential oils, etc.) will be presented, including the emerging green and sustainable separation approaches towards bioeconomy and circular economy contexts.

  20. Mechanical behaviour of Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) beans under loading compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalingging, R.; Herak, D.; Kabutey, A.; Sigalingging, C.

    2018-02-01

    The uniformity of the product of the grinding process depends on various factors including the brittleness of the roasted coffee bean and it affects the extraction of soluble solids to obtain the coffee brew. Therefore, the reaching of a certain degree of brittleness is very important for the grinding to which coffee beans have to be subjected to before brewing. The aims of this study to show the mechanical behaviour of Arabica coffee beans from Tobasa (Indonesia) with roasted using different roasting time (40, 60 and 80 minutes at temperature 174 °C) under loading compression 225 kN. Universal compression testing machine was used with pressing vessel diameter 60 mm and compression speed 10 mm min-1 with different initial pressing height ranging from 20 to 60 mm. The results showed that significant correlation between roasting time and the brittleness.

  1. The Effect of LAB as Probiotic Starter Culture and Green Tea Extract Addition on Dry Fermented Pork Loins Quality.

    PubMed

    Neffe-Skocińska, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Danuta; Kołożyn-Krajewska, Danuta; Dolatowski, Zbigniew; Jachacz-Jówko, Luiza

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological, physicochemical, and sensory quality of dry fermented pork loin produced with the addition of Lb. rhamnosus LOCK900 probiotic strain, 0.2% glucose, and 1.5% green tea extract. Three loins were prepared: control sample (P0: no additives), sample supplemented with glucose and probiotic strain (P1), and sample with glucose, green tea extract, and probiotic (P2). The samples were analyzed after 21 days of ripening and 180 days of storage. The results indicated that the highest count of LAB was observed both in the samples: with probiotic and with probiotic and green tea extract (7.00 log cfu/g after ripening; 6.00 log cfu/g after storage). The oxidation-reduction potential values were lower in the probiotic loin samples. Probiotic and green tea extract have not caused color changes of study loins during storage. The study demonstrated that an addition of probiotic and green tea extract to dry fermented loins is possible and had no impact on sensory quality after product storage.

  2. The Effect of LAB as Probiotic Starter Culture and Green Tea Extract Addition on Dry Fermented Pork Loins Quality

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Danuta; Kołożyn-Krajewska, Danuta; Dolatowski, Zbigniew; Jachacz-Jówko, Luiza

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological, physicochemical, and sensory quality of dry fermented pork loin produced with the addition of Lb. rhamnosus LOCK900 probiotic strain, 0.2% glucose, and 1.5% green tea extract. Three loins were prepared: control sample (P0: no additives), sample supplemented with glucose and probiotic strain (P1), and sample with glucose, green tea extract, and probiotic (P2). The samples were analyzed after 21 days of ripening and 180 days of storage. The results indicated that the highest count of LAB was observed both in the samples: with probiotic and with probiotic and green tea extract (7.00 log cfu/g after ripening; 6.00 log cfu/g after storage). The oxidation-reduction potential values were lower in the probiotic loin samples. Probiotic and green tea extract have not caused color changes of study loins during storage. The study demonstrated that an addition of probiotic and green tea extract to dry fermented loins is possible and had no impact on sensory quality after product storage. PMID:25961018

  3. Multi-Feature Based Information Extraction of Urban Green Space Along Road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. H.; Guan, H. Y.

    2018-04-01

    Green space along road of QuickBird image was studied in this paper based on multi-feature-marks in frequency domain. The magnitude spectrum of green along road was analysed, and the recognition marks of the tonal feature, contour feature and the road were built up by the distribution of frequency channels. Gabor filters in frequency domain were used to detect the features based on the recognition marks built up. The detected features were combined as the multi-feature-marks, and watershed based image segmentation were conducted to complete the extraction of green space along roads. The segmentation results were evaluated by Fmeasure with P = 0.7605, R = 0.7639, F = 0.7622.

  4. Coffee, tea, caffeine, and risk of hypertension: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    PubMed

    Chei, Choy-Lye; Loh, Julian Kenrick; Soh, Avril; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2018-06-01

    The relationship between coffee and tea, and risk of hypertension remains controversial in Western populations. We investigated these associations in an Asian population. The Singapore Chinese Health Study is a population-based prospective cohort that recruited 63,257 Chinese aged 45-74 years and residing in Singapore from 1993 to 1998. Information on consumption of coffee, tea, and other lifestyle factors was collected at baseline, and self-reported physician-diagnosed hypertension was assessed during two follow-up interviews (1999-2004, 2006-2010). We identified 13,658 cases of incident hypertension after average 9.5 years. Compared to those who drank one cup of coffee/day, the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 0.87 (0.83-0.91) for green tea had slight increase in risk, but these risk estimates were attenuated and became non-significant after adjustment for caffeine. After adjusting for coffee, there was a stepwise dose-response relationship between caffeine intake and hypertension risk; compared to the lowest intake (<50 mg/day), those in the highest intake (≥300 mg/day) had a 16% increase in risk; HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.31 (p trend = 0.02). Drinking coffee <1 cup/week or ≥3 cups/day had lower risk than drinking one cup/day. Caffeine may account for increased risk in daily tea drinkers and in those who drank one cup of coffee/day. The inverse U-shaped association with coffee suggests that at higher doses, other ingredients in coffee may offset the effect of caffeine and confer benefit on blood pressure.

  5. Conventional and accelerated-solvent extractions of green tea (camellia sinensis) for metabolomics-based chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Joshua J; Wallace, Emily D; Graf, Tyler N; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Cech, Nadja B

    2017-10-25

    Metabolomics has emerged as an important analytical technique for multiple applications. The value of information obtained from metabolomics analysis depends on the degree to which the entire metabolome is present and the reliability of sample treatment to ensure reproducibility across the study. The purpose of this study was to compare methods of preparing complex botanical extract samples prior to metabolomics profiling. Two extraction methodologies, accelerated solvent extraction and a conventional solvent maceration, were compared using commercial green tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze (Theaceae)] products as a test case. The accelerated solvent protocol was first evaluated to ascertain critical factors influencing extraction using a D-optimal experimental design study. The accelerated solvent and conventional extraction methods yielded similar metabolite profiles for the green tea samples studied. The accelerated solvent extraction yielded higher total amounts of extracted catechins, was more reproducible, and required less active bench time to prepare the samples. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of accelerated solvent as an efficient methodology for metabolomics studies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase is inversely associated with dietary total and coffee-derived polyphenol intakes in apparently healthy Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Chie; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Kondo, Kazuo; Tohyama, Kazushige; Goda, Toshinao

    2017-10-07

    Serum γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) has been proposed as a marker of oxidative stress. Here, we examined the association between serum GGT and the dietary intake of polyphenols, which have antioxidant properties. A cross-sectional survey including 7960 apparently healthy Japanese men (aged 22-86 years) who participated in health checkups was conducted in Shizuoka, Japan. We analyzed these subjects' clinical serum parameters and lifestyle factors, including dietary polyphenol intake, which was evaluated by a self-administered questionnaire and by matching the subjects' food consumption data with our original polyphenol content database. The average intake of polyphenols was 1157 ± 471 mg/day, and green tea was the largest source of polyphenols at 40%, followed by coffee at 36%. Dividing the population according to quintiles of total polyphenol intake, the difference in polyphenol intake from coffee between the groups was much greater than the difference in polyphenol intake from green tea. The analysis of the association between polyphenol intake and biological parameters showed a significant negative association between polyphenol intake and the levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), GGT, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) after adjusting for age, smoking habit, energy intake and alcohol intake. The GGT levels were inversely associated with the polyphenol intake from coffee, but not with that from green tea. Multivariable linear regression analyses demonstrated that the subjects' GGT levels were negatively and independently associated with their polyphenol intake. The intake of total polyphenol including coffee as a major contributor is inversely associated with the serum GGT concentration in Japanese males.

  7. Effects of coffee intake and intraperitoneal caffeine on bone repair process--a histologic and histometric study.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Rander Moreira; Brentegani, Luiz Guilherme; Lacerda, Suzie Aparecida de

    2015-01-01

    Studies have suggested that caffeine acts on bone promoting an increase of calcium excretion, inhibition of osteoblast proliferation and delay in tissue repair process, raising the risk of fractures, osteoporosis, periodontal disease and affecting the success of bone reconstructive procedures. The aim of this study was to analyze histomorphometrically the process of alveolar bone healing after tooth extraction in rats subjected to daily intake of boiled coffee or intraperitoneal administration of caffeine. Forty-five male rats were divided according to the treatment in Control group (C); Coffee group (CO) - treated with coffee since birth; and Caffeine (CAF) - intraperitoneal injection of aqueous solution of caffeine 1.5% (0.2 mL/100g body weight) for 30 days. When weighing between 250-300 g they were anesthetized, subjected to extraction of the maxillary right incisor, and euthanized 7, 21 and 42 days after surgery for histological assessments of bone volume and the quality of formed bone in the dental socket. The qualitative results demonstrated larger amounts of blood clot and immature bone in animals under treatment of pure caffeine compared to coffee and control. Histometric analysis revealed that coffee treatment led to a 40% drop in bone formation, and caffeine a 60% drop in comparison to control animals (ANOVA p≤0.01). It was concluded that both the daily ingestion of coffee and the intraperitoneal administration of caffeine in rats delayed the alveolar bone reparative process after tooth extraction, and this effect was more aggressive when pure caffeine was used.

  8. The influence of different types of preparation (espresso and brew) on coffee aroma and main bioactive constituents.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Giovanni; Cortese, Manuela; Sagratini, Gianni; Vittori, Sauro

    2015-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most popular hot drinks in the world; it may be prepared by several methods, but the most common forms are boiled (brew) and pressurized (espresso). Analytical studies on the substances responsible for the pleasant aroma of roasted coffee have been carried out for more than 100 years. Brew coffee and espresso coffee (EC) have a different and peculiar aroma profile, demonstrating the importance of the brewing process on the final product sensorial quality. Concerning bioactive compounds, the extraction mechanism plays a crucial role. The differences in the composition of coffee brew in chlorogenic acids and caffeine content is the result of the different procedures of coffee preparation. The aim of the present review is to detail how the brewing process affects coffee aroma and composition.

  9. In-vitro study investigating influence of toothpaste containing green tea extract on the microhardness of demineralized human enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febrian, K.; Triaminingsih, S.; Indrani, DJ

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of toothpaste containing green tea extract on the microhardness of demineralized enamel. Human tooth, which was demineralised in citric acid solution, had a toothpaste containing green tea extract of concentration of 5, 10 or 15% application. Microhardness measurement was carried out on each enamel surface of the teeth for initial, after the demineralization and after application of the tooth pastes. It showed that there was significant decrease between enamel microhardness of the teeth at the initial condition and after demineralization. After application of the toothpaste containing green tea extract of each concentration the microhardnss increased significantly. However, there the microhardness was insignificant between the applications of each green tea concentration.

  10. Artificial neural network modeling and optimization of ultrahigh pressure extraction of green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jun; Xue, Yujing; Xu, Yinxiang; Shen, Yuhong

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the ultrahigh pressure extraction of green tea polyphenols was modeled and optimized by a three-layer artificial neural network. A feed-forward neural network trained with an error back-propagation algorithm was used to evaluate the effects of pressure, liquid/solid ratio and ethanol concentration on the total phenolic content of green tea extracts. The neural network coupled with genetic algorithms was also used to optimize the conditions needed to obtain the highest yield of tea polyphenols. The obtained optimal architecture of artificial neural network model involved a feed-forward neural network with three input neurons, one hidden layer with eight neurons and one output layer including single neuron. The trained network gave the minimum value in the MSE of 0.03 and the maximum value in the R(2) of 0.9571, which implied a good agreement between the predicted value and the actual value, and confirmed a good generalization of the network. Based on the combination of neural network and genetic algorithms, the optimum extraction conditions for the highest yield of green tea polyphenols were determined as follows: 498.8 MPa for pressure, 20.8 mL/g for liquid/solid ratio and 53.6% for ethanol concentration. The total phenolic content of the actual measurement under the optimum predicated extraction conditions was 582.4 ± 0.63 mg/g DW, which was well matched with the predicted value (597.2mg/g DW). This suggests that the artificial neural network model described in this work is an efficient quantitative tool to predict the extraction efficiency of green tea polyphenols. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Solid waste management practices in wet coffee processing industries of Gidabo watershed, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ulsido, Mihret D; Li, Meng

    2016-07-01

    The financial and social contributions of coffee processing industries within most coffee export-based national economies like Ethiopia are generally high. The type and amount of waste produced and the waste management options adopted by these industries can have negative effects on the environment. This study investigated the solid waste management options adopted in wet coffee processing industries in the Gidabo watershed of Ethiopia. A field observation and assessment were made to identify whether the operational characteristics of the industries have any effect on the waste management options that were practiced. The investigation was conducted on 125 wet coffee processing industries about their solid waste handling techniques. Focus group discussion, structured questionnaires, key informant interview and transect walks are some of the tools employed during the investigation. Two major types of wastes, namely hull-bean-pulp blended solid waste and wastewater rich in dissolved and suspended solids were generated in the industries. Wet mills, on average, released 20.69% green coffee bean, 18.58% water and 60.74% pulp by weight. Even though these wastes are rich in organic matter and recyclables; the most favoured solid waste management options in the watershed were disposal (50.4%) and industrial or household composting (49.6%). Laxity and impulsive decision are the driving motives behind solid waste management in Gidabo watershed. Therefore, to reduce possible contamination of the environment, wastes generated during the processing of red coffee cherries, such as coffee wet mill solid wastes, should be handled properly and effectively through maximisation of their benefits with minimised losses. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Stimulatory effect of oral administration of tea, coffee or caffeine on UVB-induced apoptosis in the epidermis of SKH-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Conney, Allan H.; Zhou, Sherry; Lee Maojung

    Oral administration of green tea or a caffeine solution, but not decaffeinated green tea, inhibits UVB-induced complete carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. Oral administration of green tea, coffee or a caffeine solution for 2 weeks enhanced UVB-induced increases in apoptosis in the epidermis, but these treatments had no effect in non-UVB treated normal epidermis. Our results suggest that administration of green tea, coffee and caffeine may inhibit UVB-induced carcinogenesis - at least in part - by enhancing UVB-induced apoptosis. Plasma levels of caffeine observed after its oral administration at cancer-preventive dose levels were within the range observed in moderate coffee drinkers.more » Topical applications of caffeine to mice previously treated with UVB for 20 weeks (high risk mice without tumors) inhibited the formation of tumors and stimulated apoptosis in the tumors but not in areas of the epidermis away from tumors. The selective effects of caffeine administration to stimulate UVB-induced apoptosis or apoptosis in tumors but not in normal epidermis or in areas of the epidermis away from tumors is of considerable interest, but the reasons for the selective effects of caffeine on apoptosis in DNA damaged tissues are unknown. Further studies are needed to determine mechanisms of these effects of caffeine and to determine the effects of caffeine administration on sunlight-induced actinic keratoses and squamous cell carcinomas in humans.« less

  13. Endo-β-mannanase and β-tubulin gene expression during the final phases of coffee seed maturation.

    PubMed

    Santos, F C; Clemente, A C S; Caixeta, F; Rosa, S D V F

    2015-10-02

    Coffee seeds begin to develop shortly after fertilization and can take 6 to 8 months to complete their formation, a period during which all the characteristics of the mature seed are determined, directly influencing physiological quality. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that act during coffee seed maturation. The objective of the current study was to analyze expression of the β-tubulin (TUB) and endo-β-mannanase (MAN) genes during different phases at the end of development and in different tissues of Coffea arabica seeds. The transcription levels of the TUB and MAN genes were quantified in a relative manner using qRT-PCR in whole seeds, and dissected into embryos and endosperms at different developmental stages. Greater expression of MAN was observed in whole seeds and in endosperms during the green stage, and in the embryo during the over-ripe stage. High TUB gene expression was observed in whole seeds during the green stage and, in the embryos, there were peaks in expression during the over-ripe stage. In endosperms, the peak of expression occurred in both the green stage and in the cherry stage. These results suggest participation of endo-β-mannanase during the initial seed developmental stages, and in the stages of physiological maturity in the embryo tissues. TUB gene expression varied depending on the developmental stage and section of seed analyzed, indicating the participation of β-tubulin during organogenesis and coffee seed maturation.

  14. Gas chromatographic determination of formaldehyde in coffee via thiazolidine derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, T.; Reece, C.A.; Shibamoto, T.

    Thiazolidine formed from trace quantities of formaldehyde in an aqueous solution containing cysteamine at pH 8 was extracted with chloroform and subsequently analyzed by a gas chromatograph equipped with a fused silica capillary column and a thermionic nitrogen-phosphorus specific detector. Recoveries of formaldehyde from the aqueous solutions at levels lower than 1 ppm were slightly over 100%. Quantitative analysis of formaldehyde in commercial brewed and instant coffees showed 3.4-4.5 ppm in the brewed and 10-16.3 ppm in the instant coffee.

  15. Identification of Key Odorants in Withering-Flavored Green Tea by Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, Yuzo; Yamaguchi, Yuichi

    This research aims to identify key odorants in withering-flavored green tea. Application of the aroma extract dilution analysis using the volatile fraction of green tea and withering-flavored green tea revealed 25 and 35 odor-active peaks with the flavor dilution factors of≥4, respectively. 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one, (E)-2-nonenal, linalool, (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal and 3-methylnonane-2,4-dione were key odorants in green tea with the flavor dilution factor of≥16. As well as these 5 odorants, 1-octen-3-one, β-damascenone, geraniol, β-ionone, (Z)-methyljasmonate, indole and coumarine contributed to the withering flavor of green tea.

  16. Automated high resolution mapping of coffee in Rwanda using an expert Bayesian network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukashema, A.; Veldkamp, A.; Vrieling, A.

    2014-12-01

    African highland agro-ecosystems are dominated by small-scale agricultural fields that often contain a mix of annual and perennial crops. This makes such systems difficult to map by remote sensing. We developed an expert Bayesian network model to extract the small-scale coffee fields of Rwanda from very high resolution data. The model was subsequently applied to aerial orthophotos covering more than 99% of Rwanda and on one QuickBird image for the remaining part. The method consists of a stepwise adjustment of pixel probabilities, which incorporates expert knowledge on size of coffee trees and fields, and on their location. The initial naive Bayesian network, which is a spectral-based classification, yielded a coffee map with an overall accuracy of around 50%. This confirms that standard spectral variables alone cannot accurately identify coffee fields from high resolution images. The combination of spectral and ancillary data (DEM and a forest map) allowed mapping of coffee fields and associated uncertainties with an overall accuracy of 87%. Aggregated to district units, the mapped coffee areas demonstrated a high correlation with the coffee areas reported in the detailed national coffee census of 2009 (R2 = 0.92). Unlike the census data our map provides high spatial resolution of coffee area patterns of Rwanda. The proposed method has potential for mapping other perennial small scale cropping systems in the East African Highlands and elsewhere.

  17. Green extraction of grape skin phenolics by using deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Cvjetko Bubalo, Marina; Ćurko, Natka; Tomašević, Marina; Kovačević Ganić, Karin; Radojčić Redovniković, Ivana

    2016-06-01

    Conventional extraction techniques for plant phenolics are usually associated with high organic solvent consumption and long extraction times. In order to establish an environmentally friendly extraction method for grape skin phenolics, deep eutectic solvents (DES) as a green alternative to conventional solvents coupled with highly efficient microwave-assisted and ultrasound-assisted extraction methods (MAE and UAE, respectively) have been considered. Initially, screening of five different DES for proposed extraction was performed and choline chloride-based DES containing oxalic acid as a hydrogen bond donor with 25% of water was selected as the most promising one, resulting in more effective extraction of grape skin phenolic compounds compared to conventional solvents. Additionally, in our study, UAE proved to be the best extraction method with extraction efficiency superior to both MAE and conventional extraction method. The knowledge acquired in this study will contribute to further DES implementation in extraction of biologically active compounds from various plant sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Wake up and smell the coffee. Caffeine, coffee, and the medical consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, T

    1992-01-01

    Caffeine is a methylxanthine whose primary biologic effect is antagonism of the adenosine receptor. Its presence in coffee, tea, soda beverages, chocolate, and many prescription and over-the-counter drugs makes it the most commonly consumed stimulant drug. Initially caffeine increases blood pressure, plasma catecholamine levels, plasma renin activity, serum free fatty acid levels, urine production, and gastric acid secretion. Its long-term effects have been more difficult to substantiate. Most of the caffeine consumed in the United States is in coffee, which contains many other chemicals that may have other biologic actions. The consumption of coffee is a self-reinforcing behavior, and caffeine dependence and addiction are common. Coffee and caffeine intake have been linked to many illnesses, but definitive correlations have been difficult to substantiate. Initial trials showing coffee's association with coronary disease and myocardial infarction have been difficult to reproduce and have many confounding variables. Recent studies showing a larger effect over long follow-up periods and with heavy coffee consumption have again brought the question of the role of coffee in disease states to the fore. Caffeine in average dosages does not seem to increase the risk of arrhythmia. At present there is no convincing evidence that caffeine or coffee consumption increases the risk for any solid tumor. The intake of coffee and caffeine has clearly been decreasing in this country over the past two decades, largely brought about by the increasing health consciousness of Americans. Although there have been many studies that hint that the fears of increased disease with coffee drinking may be warranted, many questions have yet to be answered about the health effects of coffee and caffeine use. Images PMID:1441496

  19. Wake up and smell the coffee. Caffeine, coffee, and the medical consequences.

    PubMed

    Chou, T

    1992-11-01

    Caffeine is a methylxanthine whose primary biologic effect is antagonism of the adenosine receptor. Its presence in coffee, tea, soda beverages, chocolate, and many prescription and over-the-counter drugs makes it the most commonly consumed stimulant drug. Initially caffeine increases blood pressure, plasma catecholamine levels, plasma renin activity, serum free fatty acid levels, urine production, and gastric acid secretion. Its long-term effects have been more difficult to substantiate. Most of the caffeine consumed in the United States is in coffee, which contains many other chemicals that may have other biologic actions. The consumption of coffee is a self-reinforcing behavior, and caffeine dependence and addiction are common. Coffee and caffeine intake have been linked to many illnesses, but definitive correlations have been difficult to substantiate. Initial trials showing coffee's association with coronary disease and myocardial infarction have been difficult to reproduce and have many confounding variables. Recent studies showing a larger effect over long follow-up periods and with heavy coffee consumption have again brought the question of the role of coffee in disease states to the fore. Caffeine in average dosages does not seem to increase the risk of arrhythmia. At present there is no convincing evidence that caffeine or coffee consumption increases the risk for any solid tumor. The intake of coffee and caffeine has clearly been decreasing in this country over the past two decades, largely brought about by the increasing health consciousness of Americans. Although there have been many studies that hint that the fears of increased disease with coffee drinking may be warranted, many questions have yet to be answered about the health effects of coffee and caffeine use.

  20. Studies of acrylamide level in coffee and coffee substitutes: influence of raw material and manufacturing conditions.

    PubMed

    Mojska, Hanna; Gielecińska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Many animal studies have shown that acrylamide is both neurotoxic and carcinogenic. The first reports of acrylamide actually having been found in foodstuffs were published in 2002 by the Swedish National Food Agency in conjunction with scientists from the University of Stockholm. It has since been demonstrated that acrylamide arises in foodstuffs by the Maillard reaction, ie. between free asparagine and reducing sugars at temperatures >120 degrees C. Coffee in fact, forms one of the principal dietary sources of acrylamide, where it is normally drunk in large quantities throughout many countries worldwide that includes Poland. Thus, it constitutes a major dietary component in a wide range of population groups, mainly ranging from late adolescents to the elderly. To determine the acrylamide level in commercial samples of roasted and instant coffee and in coffee substitutes by LC-MS/MS method. The influence of coffee species and colour intensity of coffee on acrylamide level was also detailed. A total of 42 samples of coffee were analysed which included 28 that were ground roasted coffee, 11 instant coffees and 3 coffee substitutes (grain coffee). Analytical separation of acrylamide from coffee was performed by liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To evaluate the colour intensity of ground roasted coffee and instant coffee we used method of arranging (sequence). The highest mean acrylamide concentrations were found in coffee substitutes (818 pg/kg) followed by instant coffee (358 microg/kg) and then roasted coffee (179 microg/kg). One single cup of coffee (160 ml) delivered on average from 0.45 microg acrylamide in roasted coffee to 3.21 microg in coffee substitutes. There were no significant differences in acrylamide level between the coffee species ie. Arabica vs Robusta or a mixture thereof. The various methods of coffee manufacture also showed no differences in acrylamide (ie. freeze-dried coffee vs agglomerated coffee). A

  1. Comparative effect of coffee robusta and coffee arabica (Qahwa) on memory and attention.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Waheeb D M; Azmat, Aisha; Ahmed, Muhammad

    2018-04-13

    The comparative effects of coffee robusta and coffee arabica (Qahwa) on different attention and memory related assignments were measured in a double-blind study of 300 healthy young adult women who were randomly assigned to one of three different drinks: Group I (coffee robusta sachet dissolved in 100 ml of hot water): Group II (coffee arabica): and group III (100 ml water only). Cognitive function was assessed by standardized tests. Several monitoring cognitive tests and tasks were specifically chosen and performed to investigate the comparative effects of coffee robusta (CR) and coffee arabica (Qahwa; AC) on sleepiness (sleep and clear headed scale), attention (trail A & B, symbol digit, letter cancellation), general cognitive ability (stroop test) and memory (card test). Data was interpreted by analysis of variance (ANOVA). The present study revealed that coffee robusta has beneficial effects on attention, general cognitive ability and memory. Higher though non-significant cognitive scores were associated with coffee robusta consumption. Although, consumption of coffee arabica (Qahwa) has significant effects (P < 0.05) on sleepiness, attention, general cognitive ability and memory and it significantly improve reaction time and correct responses. Since different tasks were related to the sustained attention and working memory processes, results would suggest that coffee arabica (qahwa) could increase the memory and efficiency of the attentional system might be due to the presence of chlorogenic acids (CGA) which are found in less quantity in coffee robusta. However, more studies using larger samples and different tasks are necessary to better understand the effects of coffee robusta and arabica (Qahwa) on attention and memory.

  2. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in Coffee Beans by Sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, H.; Hormes, J.; Institute of Physics, University of Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn

    2007-02-02

    In this 'feasibility study' the influence of roasting on the sulfur speciation in Mexican coffee beans was investigated by sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy. Spectra of green and slightly roasted beans could be fitted to a linear combination of 'standard' reference spectra for biological samples, whereas longer roasting obviously involves formation of additional sulfur compounds in considerable amounts.

  3. Use of headspace gas chromatographic/FTIR for the monitoring of volatiles in commercial brand coffees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Senja V.; Compton, David A.

    1989-12-01

    Recently, the area of food analysis and product safety has become of major concern to consumers. Therefore, companies involved in the quality assurance of theirproducts have been encouraged to perform extensive analyses to guarantee safety and satisfaction. One of the largest consumer products in the beverage marketplace is coffee. Much emphasis has been placed upon the safety of the decaffeination processes used by various manufacturers; these involve extraction of the caffeine by a solvent system that may be aqueous or organic, and is sometimes,super-critical. Additionally, aroma (fragrance) of brewing coffee has been found to be of major concern to the individual by the marketing departments of the coffee companies. The heads ace analysis of coffees can be used to discover the species retained after the decaffeination of coffee, as well as to distinguish the volatile species released upon treatment of the coffee at boiling water temperatures.

  4. An Integrated Multi-Omics Study Revealed Metabolic Alterations Underlying the Effects of Coffee Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shoko; Saito, Kenji; Jia, Huijuan; Kato, Hisanori

    2014-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies have indicated that coffee consumption may reduce the risks of developing obesity and diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms of these effects are poorly understood. Our previous study revealed the changes on gene expression profiles in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet containing three types of coffee (caffeinated, decaffeinated and green unroasted coffee), using DNA microarrays. The results revealed remarkable alterations in lipid metabolism-related molecules which may be involved in the anti-obesity effects of coffee. We conducted the present study to further elucidate the metabolic alterations underlying the effects of coffee consumption through comprehensive proteomic and metabolomic analyses. Proteomics revealed an up-regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase (a key enzyme in the TCA cycle) and its related proteins, suggesting increased energy generation. The metabolomics showed an up-regulation of metabolites involved in the urea cycle, with which the transcriptome data were highly consistent, indicating accelerated energy expenditure. The TCA cycle and the urea cycle are likely be accelerated in a concerted manner, since they are directly connected by mutually providing each other's intermediates. The up-regulation of these pathways might result in a metabolic shift causing increased ATP turnover, which is related to the alterations of lipid metabolism. This mechanism may play an important part in the suppressive effects of coffee consumption on obesity, inflammation, and hepatosteatosis. This study newly revealed global metabolic alterations induced by coffee intake, providing significant insights into the association between coffee intake and the prevention of type 2 diabetes, utilizing the benefits of multi-omics analyses. PMID:24618914

  5. Coffee and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Manav; Anand, Anil C

    2016-03-01

    Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. Consumption of coffee has been shown to benefit health in general, and liver health in particular. This article reviews the effects of coffee intake on development and progression of liver disease due to various causes. We also describe the putative mechanisms by which coffee exerts the protective effect. The clinical evidence of benefit of coffee consumption in Hepatitis B and C, as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease, has also been presented. Coffee consumption is associated with improvement in liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and GGTP), especially in individuals with risk for liver disease. Coffee intake more than 2 cups per day in patients with preexisting liver disease has been shown to be associated with lower incidence of fibrosis and cirrhosis, lower hepatocellular carcinoma rates, as well as decreased mortality.

  6. Coffee husk waste for fermentation production of mosquitocidal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Poopathi, Subbiah; Abidha, S

    2011-12-01

    Coffee husk waste (CHW) discarded as bio-organic waste, from coffee industries, is rich in carbohydrates. The current study emphasizes the management of solid waste from agro-industrial residues for the production of biopesticides (Bacillus sphaericus, and B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis), to control disease transmitting mosquito vectors. An experimental culture medium was prepared by extracting the filtrates from coffee husk. A conventional culture medium (NYSM) also was prepared. The studies revealed that the quantity of mosquitocidal toxins produced from CHW is at par with NYSM. The bacteria produced in these media, were bioassayed against mosquito vectors (Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi, and Aedes aegypti) and it was found that the toxic effect was statistically comparable. Cost-effective analysis have revealed that, production of biopesticides from CHW is highly economical. Therefore, the utilization of CHW provides dual benefits of effective utilization of environmental waste and efficient production of mosquitocidal toxins.

  7. The effects of green Ocimum basilicum hydroalcoholic extract on retention and retrieval of memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sarahroodi, Shadi; Esmaeili, Somayyeh; Mikaili, Peyman; Hemmati, Zahra; Saberi, Yousof

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was evaluation of green Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) hydroalcoholic extract on memory retention and retrieval of mice by using passive avoidance apparatus. For this purpose, after weighting, coding and classifying the mice, they were grouped (n = 8) as follow as: test groups (electric shock plus sweet basil extract by doses: 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg, i.p.), control group (Only electric shock) and blank group (electric shock plus normal saline). In all mentioned groups delay time of leaving the platform for both retention and retrieval test of memory was measured. In retention test, sweet basil extract was administered immediately after receiving electric shock and in retrieval test it was administered 24 hours after receiving electric shock. The results indicated that hydroalcoholic extract of green Ocimum basilicum significantly (P < 0.05) increased memory retention. The best response was achieved with 400 mg/Kg of the extract. Also, results showed that sweet basil extract significantly (P < 0.05) increased memory retrieval and the best result was achieved with 400 mg/Kg too. It can be concluded that memory enhancing effects of green Ocimum basilicum is because of antioxidant activity of flavonoids, tannins and terpenoids. PMID:23661866

  8. Pressurized hot water extraction followed by miniaturized membrane assisted solvent extraction for the green analysis of alkylphenols in sediments.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro-González, N; Turnes-Carou, I; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2015-02-27

    A novel and Green analytical methodology for the determination of alkylphenols (4-tert-octylphenol, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol) in sediments was developed and validated. The method was based on pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) followed by miniaturized membrane assisted solvent extraction (MASE) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry detection (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The extraction conditions were optimized by a Plackett-Burman design in order to minimize the number of assays according to Green principles. Matrix effect was studied and compensated using deuterated labeled standards as surrogate standards for the quantitation of the target compounds. The analytical features of the method were satisfactory: relative recoveries varied between 92 and 103% and repeatability and intermediate precision were <9% for all compounds. Quantitation limits of the method (MQL) ranged from 0.061 (4-n-nonylphenol) to 1.7ngg(-1) dry weight (nonylphenol). Sensitivity, selectivity, automaticity and fastness are the main advantages of the exposed methodology. Reagent consumption, analysis time and waste generation were minimized. The "greenness" of the proposed method was evaluated using an analytical Eco-Scale approach and satisfactory results were obtained. The applicability of the proposed method was demonstrated analysing sediment samples of Galicia coast (NW of Spain) and the ubiquity of alkylphenols in the environment was demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for analyzing the quality of unroasted and ground coffee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Tiago Varão; Hubinger, Silviane Zanni; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira; Ferreira, Ednaldo José; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Coffee is an important commodity and a very popular beverage around the world. Its economic value as well as beverage quality are strongly dependent of the quality of beans. The presence of defective beans in coffee blends has caused a negative impact on the beverage Global Quality (GQ) assessed by cupping tests. The main defective beans observed in the productive chain has been those Blacks, Greens and Sours (BGS). Chemical composition of BGS has a damaging impact on beverage GQ. That is why analytical tools are needed for monitoring and controlling the GQ in coffee agro-industry. Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) has been successfully applied for assessment of coffee quality. Another potential technique for direct, clean and fast measurement of coffee GQ is Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Elements and diatomic molecules commonly present in organic compounds (structure) can be assessed by using LIBS. In this article is reported an evaluation of LIBS for the main interferents of GQ (BGS defects). Results confirm the great potential of LIBS for discriminating good beans from those with BGS defects by using emission lines of C, CN, C2 and N. Most importantly, some emission lines presented strong linear correlation (r > 0.9) with NIRS absorption bands assigned to proteins, lipids, sugar and carboxylic acids, suggesting LIBS potential to estimate these compounds in unroasted and ground coffee samples.

  10. Effect of Catechins, Green tea Extract and Methylxanthines in Combination with Gentamicin Against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Fazly Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh; Sarabandi, Sahar; Khameneh, Bahman; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bacterial resistant infections have become a global health challenge and threaten the society’s health. Thus, an urgent need exists to find ways to combat resistant pathogens. One promising approach to overcoming bacterial resistance is the use of herbal products. Green tea catechins, the major green tea polyphenols, show antimicrobial activity against resistant pathogens. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of catechins, green tea extract, and methylxanthines in combination with gentamicin against standard and clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and the standard strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of different agents against bacterial strains were determined. The interactions of green tea extract, epigallate catechin, epigallocatechin gallate, two types of methylxanthine, caffeine, and theophylline with gentamicin were studied in vitro by using a checkerboard method and calculating the fraction inhibitory concentration index (FICI). Results: The MICs of gentamicin against bacterial strains were in the range of 0.312 - 320 μg/mL. The MIC values of both types of catechins were 62.5 - 250 μg/ mL. Green tea extract showed insufficient antibacterial activity when used alone. Methylxanthines had no intrinsic inhibitory activity against any of the bacterial strains tested. When green tea extract and catechins were combined with gentamicin, the MIC values of gentamicin against the standard strains and a clinical isolate were reduced, and synergistic activities were observed (FICI < 1). A combination of caffeine with gentamicin did not alter the MIC values of gentamicin. Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed that green tea extract and catechins potentiated the antimicrobial action of gentamicin against some clinical isolates of S. aureus and standard P. aeruginosa strains. Therefore

  11. [Coffee as hepatoprotective factor].

    PubMed

    Szántová, Mária; Ďurkovičová, Zuzana

    The mind about the coffee did change upon the recent studies and metaanalysis of the last years. Consensual protective effect of coffee on the progression of chronic liver diseases (NASH, viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, hepatocelullar carcinoma) was detected in experimental, clinical and large population studies together with decrease of mortality. Antioxidant, antifibrotic, insulinsensitizing and anticarcinogenic effect of coffee were detected. Modulation of genetic expression of key enzymes of fatty acid synthesis, modulation of mRNA included in autophagia, reduction of stress of endoplasmatic reticulum together with decrease of proinflammatory cytokines and decrease of fibrogenesis are main mechanisms. Chlorogenic acids, diterpens (cafestol, kahweol), caffein, polyfenols and melanoidins are key protective components of coffee. Inverse dose-dependent correlation of coffee consumption with liver diseases was found in clinical and population studies. Coffee is non-pharmacological tool of primary and secondary prevention of chronic liver diseases. Review of published data together with supposed mechanisms of hepatoprotection are given.Key words: coffee - hepatoprotective effect - metaanalysis.

  12. Coffee pulp koji of Aspergillus sojae as stable immobilized catalyst of chlorogenate hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Osao; Ano, Yoshitaka; Akakabe, Yoshihiko; Shinagawa, Emiko; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2008-11-01

    Chlorogenate hydrolase (EC 3.1.1.42, CHase) was highly induced in mycelia of Aspergillus sojae AKU 3312 grown in Czapek medium containing either instant coffee powder or coffee pulp as inducer. No CHase formation was observed in the mycelia when cultivated without the inducer. CHase was purified readily from CHase-induced mycelia to high homogeneity, and the purified CHase revealed the molecular weight of 180,000 consisting of two identical subunits of 88 kDa. Equimolar quinate (QA) and caffeate (CA) were confirmed on hydrolysis of chlorogenate (CGA). The purified CHase was only useful for a laboratory scale hydrolysis of CGA. For practical QA and CA production using scaled up hydrolysis of vegetable extracts of natural CGA resources, the enzyme activity of purified CHase decreased and denatured irreversibly. Preparation of coffee pulp koji and its application to QA and CA production were proposed instead of purified CHase. When coffee pulp koji was heated at 60 degrees C for 30 min, CHase survived without any appreciable loss of enzyme activity while vegetative mycelial growth and spore germination were terminated. The heated coffee pulp koji thus prepared was effective itself as stable immobilized catalyst of CHase for QA and CA production from vegetable CGA resources such as coffee powders, coffee pulp, and others.

  13. Effects of Green Tea Extract on Learning, Memory, Behavior and Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Young and Old Male Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaur, Tranum; Pathak, C. M.; Pandhi, P.; Khanduja, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of green tea extract administration on age-related cognition in young and old male Wistar rats. Methods: Young and old rats were orally administered 0.5% green tea extract for a period of eight weeks and were evaluated by passive avoidance, elevated maze plus paradigm and changes in acetylcholinesterase activity.…

  14. Antibacterial Activities of Hibiscus sabdariffa Extracts and Chemical Sanitizers Directly on Green Leaves Contaminated with Foodborne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Torres-Vitela, Ma Refugio; Villarruel-López, Angélica; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio A; Gordillo-Martínez, Alberto J; Godínez-Oviedo, Angélica; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2018-02-01

    Leafy greens have been associated with foodborne disease outbreaks in different countries. To decrease microbial contamination of leafy greens, chemical agents are commonly used; however, a number of studies have shown these agents to have limited antimicrobial effect against pathogenic bacteria on vegetables. The objective of this study was to compare the antibacterial effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx extracts (water, methanol, acetone, and ethyl acetate), sodium hypochlorite, acetic acid, and colloidal silver against foodborne bacteria on leafy greens. Thirteen foodborne bacteria were used in the study: Listeria monocytogenes, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella serotypes Typhimurium Typhi, and Montevideo, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, five E. coli pathotypes (Shiga toxin-producing, enteropathogenic, enterotoxigenic, enteroinvasive, and enteroaggregative), and Vibrio cholerae O1. Each foodborne bacterium was separately inoculated on romaine lettuce, spinach, and coriander leaves. Separately, contaminated leafy greens were immersed in four hibiscus extracts and in sanitizers for 5 min. Next, green leaves were washed with sterile tap water. Separately, each green leaf was placed in a bag that contained 0.1% sterile peptone water and was rubbed for 2 min. Counts were done by plate count using appropriate dilutions (in sterile peptone water) of the bacterial suspensions spread on Trypticase soy agar plates and incubated at 35 ± 2°C for 48 h. Statistically significant differences ( P < 0.05) were calculated with an analysis of variance and Duncan's test. All 13 foodborne bacteria attached to leafy greens. Roselle calyx extracts caused a significantly greater reduction ( P < 0.05) in concentration of all foodborne bacteria on contaminated romaine lettuce, spinach, and coriander than did the sodium hypochlorite, colloidal silver, and acetic acid. Dry roselle calyx extracts may potentially be a useful addition to disinfection procedures for romaine

  15. A facile and green preparation of reduced graphene oxide using Eucalyptus leaf extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengyang; Zhuang, Zechao; Jin, Xiaoying; Chen, Zuliang

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a green and facile synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (GO) by Eucalyptus leaf extract (EL-RGO) was investigated, which was characterized with ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Thermal gravimetric analysis (TG). Eucalyptus leaf extract also play both reducing and capping stabilizing agents prepared EL-RGO as shown a good stability and electrochemical properties. This approach could provide an alternative method to prepare EL-RGO in large-scale production. Moreover, the good electrochemical property and biocompatibility can be used in various applications. In addition, the merit of this study is that both the oxidized products and the reducing agents are environmental friendly by green reduction.

  16. Valorization of spent coffee grounds recycling as a potential alternative fuel resource in Turkey: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Atabani, A E; Mercimek, S M; Arvindnarayan, Sundaram; Shobana, Sutha; Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Cadir, Mehmet; Al-Muhatseb, Ala'a H

    2018-03-01

    In this study, recycling of spent coffee grounds (SCG) as a potential feedstock for alternative fuel production and compounds of added value in Turkey was assessed. The average oil content was found (≈ 13% w/w). All samples (before and after extraction) were tested for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), calorific value, surface analysis and porosity, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and elemental analysis to assess their potential towards fuel properties. Elemental analysis indicated that carbon represents the highest percentages (49.59% and 46.42%, respectively), followed by nitrogen (16.7% and 15.5%), hydrogen (6.74% and 6.04%), and sulfur (0.851% and 0.561%). These results indicate that SCG can be utilized as compost, as it is rich in nitrogen. Properties of the extracted oil were examined, followed by biodiesel production. The quality of biodiesel was compared with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D6751 standards, and all the properties complied with standard specifications. The fatty acid compositions were analyzed by gas chromatography. It was observed that coffee waste methyl ester (CWME) is mainly composed of palmitic (35.8%) and arachidic (44.6%) acids, which are saturated fatty acids. The low degree of unsaturation provides an excellent oxidation stability (10.4 hr). CWME has also excellent cetane number, higher heating value, and iodine value with poor cold flow properties. The studies also investigated blending of biodiesel with Euro diesel and butanol. Following this, a remarkable improvement in cloud and pour points of biodiesel was obtained. Spent coffee grounds after oil extraction is an ideal material for garden fertilizer, feedstock for ethanol, biogas production, and as fuel pellets. The outcome of such research work produces valuable insights on the recycling importance of SCG in Turkey. Coffee is a huge industry, and

  17. [Coffee in Cancer Chemoprevention].

    PubMed

    Neuwirthová, J; Gál, B; Smilek, P; Urbánková, P

    Coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of several diseases including cancer. Its chemopreventive effect has been studied in vitro, in animal models, and more recently in humans. Several modes of action have been proposed, namely, inhibition of oxidative stress and damage, activation of metabolizing liver enzymes involved in carcinogen detoxification processes, and anti-inflammatory effects. The antioxidant activity of coffee relies partly on its chlorogenic acid content and is increased during the roasting process. Maximum antioxidant activity is observed for medium-roasted coffee. The roasting process leads to the formation of several components, e.g., melanoidins, which have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Coffee also contains two specific diterpenes, cafestol and kahweol, which have anticarcinogenic properties. Roasted coffee is a complex mixture of various chemicals. Previous studies have reported that the chemopreventive components present in coffee induce apoptosis, inhibit growth and metastasis of tumor cells, and elicit antiangiogenic effects. A meta-analysis of epidemiological studies showed that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of developing various malignant tumors. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms and the experimental and epidemiological evidence supporting the chemopreventive effect of coffee.Key words: coffee - chemoprevention - antioxidative enzyme - detoxification enzyme - anti-inflammatory effect The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study. The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 11. 9. 2016Accepted: 24. 11. 2016.

  18. Detection of caffeine in tea, instant coffee, green tea beverage, and soft drink by direct analysis in real time (DART) source coupled to single-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Pengyue; Zhang, Fengzu; Bai, Aijuan; Pan, Canping

    2013-01-01

    Ambient ionization direct analysis in real time (DART) coupled to single-quadrupole MS (DART-MS) was evaluated for rapid detection of caffeine in commercial samples without chromatographic separation or sample preparation. Four commercial samples were examined: tea, instant coffee, green tea beverage, and soft drink. The response-related parameters were optimized for the DART temperature and MS fragmentor. Under optimal conditions, the molecular ion (M+H)+ was the major ion for identification of caffeine. The results showed that DART-MS is a promising tool for the quick analysis of important marker molecules in commercial samples. Furthermore, this system has demonstrated significant potential for high sample throughput and real-time analysis.

  19. Green tea extract supplementation induces the lipolytic pathway, attenuates obesity, and reduces low-grade inflammation in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Cláudio A; Lira, Fábio S; Rosa Neto, José C; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Souza, Gabriel I H; da Silva, Camila Morais Gonçalves; de Souza, Cláudio T; Ribeiro, Eliane B; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia M; Rodrigues, Bruno; de Oliveira Carvalho, Patrícia; Oyama, Lila M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of green tea Camellia sinensis extract on proinflammatory molecules and lipolytic protein levels in adipose tissue of diet-induced obese mice. Animals were randomized into four groups: CW (chow diet and water); CG (chow diet and water + green tea extract); HW (high-fat diet and water); HG (high-fat diet and water + green tea extract). The mice were fed ad libitum with chow or high-fat diet and concomitantly supplemented (oral gavage) with 400 mg/kg body weight/day of green tea extract (CG and HG, resp.). The treatments were performed for eight weeks. UPLC showed that in 10 mg/mL green tea extract, there were 15 μg/mg epigallocatechin, 95 μg/mg epigallocatechin gallate, 20.8 μg/mg epicatechin gallate, and 4.9 μg/mg gallocatechin gallate. Green tea administered concomitantly with a high-fat diet increased HSL, ABHD5, and perilipin in mesenteric adipose tissue, and this was associated with reduced body weight and adipose tissue gain. Further, we observed that green tea supplementation reduced inflammatory cytokine TNFα levels, as well as TLR4, MYD88, and TRAF6 proinflammatory signalling. Our results show that green tea increases the lipolytic pathway and reduces adipose tissue, and this may explain the attenuation of low-grade inflammation in obese mice.

  20. Efficacy of methanolic extract of green and black teas against extended-spectrum β-Lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Taherpour, Arezou; Hashemi, Ali; Erfanimanesh, Soroor; Taki, Elahe

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major bacteria causing acute infections. β-Lactamase production is the principal defense mechanism in gram-negative bacteria. The aim of our study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Methanolic Extracts of Green and Black Teas on P. aeruginosa Extended Spectrum-β-Lactamases (ESBLs) production. This research was carried out on burn wounds of 245 hospitalized patients in Kerman, Iran. P. aeruginosa ESBLs and MBL producing strains were detected by Combination Disk Diffusion Test (CDDT) and Epsilometer test (E-test) strips, respectively. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was measured for Ceftazidime, Meropenem, Imipenem, Aztreonam, Cefotaxime and methanollic extracts of Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea). From 245 patients in the burn ward, 120 cases were infected with P. aeruginosa. 41 isolates contained ESBL while MBL was not detected. P. aeruginosa were resistant to Cefotaxime, Aztreonam, Ceftazidime, Meropenem and Imipenem, 72 (60%), 50 (41.66%), 79 (65.83%), 33 (27.5%) and 24 (20%), respectively. Green tea extract had the highest anti-bacterial effect on standard and P. aeruginosa strains in 1.25mg/ml concentration. This study determined that the methanolic extract of green tea has a higher effect against ESBL producing P. aeruginosa than Cefotaxime, Aztreonam and Ceftazidime.

  1. Do Coffee Farmers Benefit in Food Security from Participating in Coffee Cooperatives? Evidence from Southwest Ethiopia Coffee Cooperatives.

    PubMed

    Shumeta, Zekarias; D'Haese, Marijke

    2018-06-01

    Most coffee in Ethiopia is produced by smallholder farmers who face a daily struggle to get sufficient income but also to feed their families. At the same time, many smallholder coffee producers are members of cooperatives. Yet, literature has paid little attention to the effect of cooperatives on combating food insecurity among cash crop producers including coffee farmers. The objective of the study was to investigate how coffee cooperative membership may affect food security among coffee farm households in Southwest Ethiopia. The study used cross-sectional household data on income, expenditure on food, staple food production (maize and teff), and utilization of improved inputs (fertilizer and improved seed) collected from 256 randomly selected farm households (132 cooperative members and 124 nonmembers) and applied an inverse probability weighting (IPW) estimation to assess the impact of cooperative membership on food security. The result revealed that cooperative membership has a positive and significant effect on staple food production (maize and teff) and facilitated technological transformation via increased utilization of fertilizer and improved seeds. Nonetheless, the effect on food expenditure and income could not be confirmed. Findings suggest a trade-off between coffee marketing and input supply functions of the cooperatives, impairing their true food security impact from the pooled income and production effect.

  2. Green ultrasound-assisted extraction of carotenoids based on the bio-refinery concept using sunflower oil as an alternative solvent.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne Sylvie; Tomao, Valérie; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Chemat, Farid

    2013-01-01

    A green, inexpensive and easy-to-use method for carotenoids extraction from fresh carrots assisted by ultrasound was designed in this work. Sunflower oil was applied as a substitute to organic solvents in this green ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE): a process which is in line with green extraction and bio-refinery concepts. The processing procedure of this original UAE was first compared with conventional solvent extraction (CSE) using hexane as solvent. Moreover, the UAE optimal conditions for the subsequent comparison were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and ultra performance liquid chromatography--diode array detector--mass spectroscopy (UPLC-DAD-MS). The results showed that the UAE using sunflower as solvent has obtained its highest β-carotene yield (334.75 mg/l) in 20 min only, while CSE using hexane as solvent obtained a similar yield (321.35 mg/l) in 60 min. The green UAE performed under optimal extraction conditions (carrot to oil ratio of 2:10, ultrasonic intensity of 22.5 W cm(-2), temperature of 40 °C and sonication time of 20 min) gave the best yield of β-carotene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bioactives of coffee cherry pulp and its utilisation for production of Cascara beverage.

    PubMed

    Heeger, Andrea; Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Cantergiani, Ennio; Andlauer, Wilfried

    2017-04-15

    Coffee cherry pulp is a by-product obtained during coffee production. Coffee cherry pulp contains considerable amounts of phenolic compounds and caffeine. An attempt to produce Cascara, a refreshing beverage, has been made. Six dried coffee pulp samples and a beverage called Cascara produced in Switzerland out of one of those samples were investigated. Aqueous extraction of coffee pulps revealed a content of total polyphenols between 4.9 and 9.2mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/gDM. The antioxidant capacity was between 51 and 92μmol Trolox equivalents (TE)/gDM as measured by the assay with ABTS radical. Bourbon variety from Congo and maragogype variety showed highest caffeine contents with 6.5 and 6.8mg/gDM. In all samples chlorogenic acid, protocatechuic acid, gallic acid and rutin were present. The beverage Cascara contained 226mg/L of caffeine and 283mgGAE/L of total polyphenols whereas antioxidant capacity amounted to 8.9mmol TE/L. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Protein Extracts from Various Unicellular Green Sources.

    PubMed

    Teuling, Emma; Wierenga, Peter A; Schrama, Johan W; Gruppen, Harry

    2017-09-13

    Photosynthetic unicellular organisms are considered as promising alternative protein sources. The aim of this study is to understand the extent to which these green sources differ with respect to their gross composition and how these differences affect the final protein isolate. Using mild isolation techniques, proteins were extracted and isolated from four different unicellular sources (Arthrospira (spirulina) maxima, Nannochloropsis gaditana, Tetraselmis impellucida, and Scenedesmus dimorphus). Despite differences in protein contents of the sources (27-62% w/w) and in protein extractability (17-74% w/w), final protein isolates were obtained that had similar protein contents (62-77% w/w) and protein yields (3-9% w/w). Protein solubility as a function of pH was different between the sources and in ionic strength dependency, especially at pH < 4.0. Overall, the characterization and extraction protocol used allows a relatively fast and well-described isolation of purified proteins from novel protein sources.

  5. Comparison of Protein Extracts from Various Unicellular Green Sources

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic unicellular organisms are considered as promising alternative protein sources. The aim of this study is to understand the extent to which these green sources differ with respect to their gross composition and how these differences affect the final protein isolate. Using mild isolation techniques, proteins were extracted and isolated from four different unicellular sources (Arthrospira (spirulina) maxima, Nannochloropsis gaditana, Tetraselmis impellucida, and Scenedesmus dimorphus). Despite differences in protein contents of the sources (27–62% w/w) and in protein extractability (17–74% w/w), final protein isolates were obtained that had similar protein contents (62–77% w/w) and protein yields (3–9% w/w). Protein solubility as a function of pH was different between the sources and in ionic strength dependency, especially at pH < 4.0. Overall, the characterization and extraction protocol used allows a relatively fast and well-described isolation of purified proteins from novel protein sources. PMID:28701042

  6. Antimicrobial potential of green synthesized CeO2 nanoparticles from Olea europaea leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Qaisar; Nazar, Mudassar; Naz, Sania; Hussain, Talib; Jabeen, Nyla; Kausar, Rizwan; Anwaar, Sadaf; Abbas, Fazal; Jan, Tariq

    This article reports the green fabrication of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO 2 NPs) using Olea europaea leaf extract and their applications as effective antimicrobial agents. O. europaea leaf extract functions as a chelating agent for reduction of cerium nitrate. The resulting CeO 2 NPs exhibit pure single-face cubic structure, which is examined by X-ray diffraction, with a uniform spherical shape and a mean size 24 nm observed through scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirms the characteristic absorption peak of CeO 2 NPs at 315 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflects stretching frequencies at 459 cm -1 , showing utilization of natural components for the production of NPs. Thermal gravimetric analysis predicts the successful capping of CeO 2 NPs by bioactive molecules present in the plant extract. The antimicrobial studies show significant zone of inhibition against bacterial and fungal strains. The higher activities shown by the green synthesized NPs than the plant extract lead to the conclusion that they can be effectively used in biomedical application. Furthermore, reduction of cerium salt by plant extract will reduce environmental impact over chemical synthesis.

  7. Antimicrobial potential of green synthesized CeO2 nanoparticles from Olea europaea leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, Qaisar; Nazar, Mudassar; Naz, Sania; Hussain, Talib; Jabeen, Nyla; Kausar, Rizwan; Anwaar, Sadaf; Abbas, Fazal; Jan, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the green fabrication of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) using Olea europaea leaf extract and their applications as effective antimicrobial agents. O. europaea leaf extract functions as a chelating agent for reduction of cerium nitrate. The resulting CeO2 NPs exhibit pure single-face cubic structure, which is examined by X-ray diffraction, with a uniform spherical shape and a mean size 24 nm observed through scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy confirms the characteristic absorption peak of CeO2 NPs at 315 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflects stretching frequencies at 459 cm−1, showing utilization of natural components for the production of NPs. Thermal gravimetric analysis predicts the successful capping of CeO2 NPs by bioactive molecules present in the plant extract. The antimicrobial studies show significant zone of inhibition against bacterial and fungal strains. The higher activities shown by the green synthesized NPs than the plant extract lead to the conclusion that they can be effectively used in biomedical application. Furthermore, reduction of cerium salt by plant extract will reduce environmental impact over chemical synthesis. PMID:27785011

  8. [Fe₃O₄-β-Cyclodextrin Polymer Nano Composites Solid-Phase Extraction-UV-Vis Spectrophotometry for Separation Analysis Malachite Green].

    PubMed

    Feng, Gang; Ping, Wen-hui; Zhu, Xia-shi

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, carboxymethyl-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin polymer modified magnetic particles Fe₃O₄ (CM-HP-β-CD- CP-MNPs) were prepared and applied to magnetic solid phase extraction of malachite green combined with UV-Visible spectrom- etry detection. The synthesized magnetic particles were characterized by element analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectra and transmission electron microscopy. Several variables affecting the extraction and desorption of malachite green such as pH, the amount of adsorbent, the type and volume of eluent, extraction and desorption time, and temperature were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, malachite green could be adsorbed by CM-HP-β-CDCP-MNPs (RE% = 92), and elution by C₂H₅OH (EE% = 90). the preconcentration factor of the proposed method was approximately 7.5, the CM-HP-β-CDCP-MNPs could be used repeatedly for 5 times and offered better recovery. The linear range and detection limit (DL) were found to be 0.08~8.00 µg · mL⁻¹ and 5.6 ng · mL⁻¹ respectively. This technique had been successfully applied to the determination of malachite green in real samples. The inclusion interaction of CM-HP--CDCP-MNPs with malachite green was studied through FTIR.

  9. Rapid and cost-effective determination of acrylamide in coffee by planar chromatography and fluorescence detection after derivatization with dansulfinic acid.

    PubMed

    Alpmann, Alexander; Morlock, Gertrud

    2009-01-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of acrylamide in ground coffee by planar chromatography using prechromatographic in situ derivatization with dansulfinic acid. After pressurized fluid extraction of acrylamide from the coffee samples, the extracts were passed through activated carbon and concentrated. These extracts were applied onto a silica gel 60 HPTLC plate and oversprayed with dansulfinic acid. By heating the plate, acrylamide was derivatized into the fluorescent product dansylpropanamide. The chromatographic separation with ethyl acetate-tert.-butyl methyl ether (8 + 2, v/v) mobile phase was followed by densitometric quantification at 254/>400 nm using a 4 point calibration via the standard addition method over the whole system for which acrylamide was added at different concentrations at the beginning of the extraction process. The method was validated for commercial coffee. The linearity over the whole procedure showed determination coefficients between 0.9995 and 0.9825 (n = 6). Limit of quantitation at a signal-to-noise ratio of 10 was determined to be 48 microg/kg. The within-run precision (relative standard deviation, n = 6) of the chromatographic method was 3%. Commercial coffee samples analyzed showed acrylamide contents between 52 and 191 microg/kg, which was in correlation with amounts reported in previous publications.

  10. Statistical optimization of medium composition for bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter hansenii UAC09 using coffee cherry husk extract--an agro-industry waste.

    PubMed

    Rani, Mahadevaswamy Usha; Rastogi, Navin K; Appaiah, K A Anu

    2011-07-01

    During the production of grape wine, the formation of thick leathery pellicle/bacterial cellulose (BC) at the airliquid interface was due to the bacterium, which was isolated and identified as Gluconacetobacter hansenii UAC09. Cultural conditions for bacterial cellulose production from G. hansenii UAC09 were optimized by central composite rotatable experimental design. To economize the BC production, coffee cherry husk (CCH) extract and corn steep liquor (CSL) were used as less expensive sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. CCH and CSL are byproducts from the coffee processing and starch processing industry, respectively. The interactions between pH (4.5- 8.5), CSL (2-10%), alcohol (0.5-2%), acetic acid (0.5- 2%), and water dilution rate to CCH ratio (1:1 to 1:5) were studied using response surface methodology. The optimum conditions for maximum BC production were pH (6.64), CSL (10%), alcohol (0.5%), acetic acid (1.13%), and water to CCH ratio (1:1). After 2 weeks of fermentation, the amount of BC produced was 6.24 g/l. This yield was comparable to the predicted value of 6.09 g/l. This is the first report on the optimization of the fermentation medium by RSM using CCH extract as the carbon source for BC production by G. hansenii UAC09.

  11. Coffee, alcohol and other beverages in relation to cirrhosis mortality: the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Goh, George Boon-Bee; Chow, Wan-Cheng; Renwei-Wang; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-01-01

    Limited experimental and epidemiologic data suggest that coffee may reduce hepatic damage in chronic liver disease. The association between consumption of coffee and other beverages, and risk of cirrhosis mortality was evaluated in The Singapore Chinese Health Study. This is a prospective population-based cohort of 63,275 middle-aged and older Chinese subjects who provided data on diet, lifestyle and medical histories through in-person interviews using structured questionnaire at enrollment between 1993 and 1998. Mortality from cirrhosis in the cohort was ascertained through linkage analysis with nationwide death registry. After a mean follow-up of 14.7 years, 114 subjects died from cirrhosis; 33 of them from viral hepatitis B (29%), two from hepatitis C (2%), and 14 from alcohol-related cirrhosis (12%). Compared to non-drinkers, daily alcohol drinkers had a strong dose-dependent positive association between amount of alcohol and risk of cirrhosis mortality. Conversely, there was a strong dose-dependent inverse association between coffee intake and risk of non-viral hepatitis related cirrhosis mortality (p for trend=0.014). Compared to non-daily coffee drinkers, those who drank two or more cups per day had 66% reduction in mortality risk (HR=0.34, 95% CI=0.14–0.81). However, coffee intake was not associated with hepatitis B related cirrhosis mortality. The inverse relationship between caffeine intake and nonviral hepatitis-related cirrhosis mortality became null after adjustment for coffee drinking. The consumption of black tea, green tea, fruit juices or soft drinks was not associated with risk of cirrhosis death. Conclusion This study demonstrates the protective effect of coffee on non-viral hepatitis related cirrhosis mortality, and provides further impetus to evaluate coffee as a potential therapeutic agent in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:24753005

  12. Coffee, alcohol and other beverages in relation to cirrhosis mortality: the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    PubMed

    Goh, George Boon-Bee; Chow, Wan-Cheng; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-08-01

    Limited experimental and epidemiologic data suggest that coffee may reduce hepatic damage in chronic liver disease. The association between consumption of coffee and other beverages and risk of cirrhosis mortality was evaluated in the Singapore Chinese Health Study. This is a prospective population-based cohort of 63,275 middle-aged and older Chinese subjects who provided data on diet, lifestyle, and medical histories through in-person interviews using a structured questionnaire at enrollment between 1993 and 1998. Mortality from cirrhosis in the cohort was ascertained through linkage analysis with nationwide death registry. After a mean follow-up of 14.7 years, 114 subjects died from cirrhosis; 33 of them from viral hepatitis B (29%), two from hepatitis C (2%), and 14 from alcohol-related cirrhosis (12%). Compared to nondrinkers, daily alcohol drinkers had a strong dose-dependent positive association between amount of alcohol and risk of cirrhosis mortality. Conversely, there was a strong dose-dependent inverse association between coffee intake and risk of nonviral hepatitis-related cirrhosis mortality (P for trend = 0.014). Compared to non-daily coffee drinkers, those who drank two or more cups per day had a 66% reduction in mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.14-0.81). However, coffee intake was not associated with hepatitis B-related cirrhosis mortality. The inverse relationship between caffeine intake and nonviral hepatitis-related cirrhosis mortality became null after adjustment for coffee drinking. The consumption of black tea, green tea, fruit juices, or soft drinks was not associated with risk of cirrhosis death. This study demonstrates the protective effect of coffee on nonviral hepatitis-related cirrhosis mortality, and provides further impetus to evaluate coffee as a potential therapeutic agent in patients with cirrhosis. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  13. Performance and methane emissions in dairy cows fed oregano and green tea extracts as feed additives.

    PubMed

    Kolling, G J; Stivanin, S C B; Gabbi, A M; Machado, F S; Ferreira, A L; Campos, M M; Tomich, T R; Cunha, C S; Dill, S W; Pereira, L G R; Fischer, V

    2018-05-01

    Plant extracts have been proposed as substitutes for chemical feed additives due to their potential as rumen fermentation modifiers and because of their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities, possibly reducing methane emissions. This study aimed to evaluate the use of oregano (OR), green tea extracts (GT), and their association as feed additives on the performance and methane emissions from dairy between 28 and 87 d of lactation. Thirty-two lactating dairy cows, blocked into 2 genetic groups: 16 Holstein cows and 16 crossbred Holstein-Gir, with 522.6 ± 58.3 kg of body weight, 57.2 ± 20.9 d in lactation, producing 27.5 ± 5.0 kg/cow of milk and with 3.1 ± 1.8 lactations were evaluated (means ± standard error of the means). Cows were allocated into 4 treatments: control (CON), without plant extracts in the diet; oregano extract (OR), with the addition of 0.056% of oregano extract in the dry matter (DM) of the diet; green tea (GT), with the addition of 0.028% of green tea extract in the DM of the diet; and mixture, with the addition of 0.056% oregano extract and 0.028% green tea extract in the DM of the diet. The forage-to-concentrate ratio was 60:40. Forage was composed of corn silage (94%) and Tifton hay (6%); concentrate was based on ground corn and soybean meal. Plant extracts were supplied as powder, which was previously added and homogenized into 1 kg of concentrate in natural matter, top-dressed onto the total mixed diet. No treatment by day interaction was observed for any of the evaluated variables, but some block by treatment interactions were significant. In Holstein cows, the mixture treatment decreased gross energy and tended to decrease the total-tract apparent digestibility coefficient for crude protein and total digestible nutrients when compared with OR. During the gas measurement period, GT and OR increased the digestible fraction of the ingested DM and decreased CH 4 expressed in grams per kilogram of digestible DMI compared with CON. The use

  14. Application of gas chromatography/flame ionization detector-based metabolite fingerprinting for authentication of Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak).

    PubMed

    Jumhawan, Udi; Putri, Sastia Prama; Yusianto; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-11-01

    Development of authenticity screening for Asian palm civet coffee, the world-renowned priciest coffee, was previously reported using metabolite profiling through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, a major drawback of this approach is the high cost of the instrument and maintenance. Therefore, an alternative method is needed for quality and authenticity evaluation of civet coffee. A rapid, reliable and cost-effective analysis employing a universal detector, GC coupled with flame ionization detector (FID), and metabolite fingerprinting has been established for discrimination analysis of 37 commercial and non-commercial coffee beans extracts. gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) provided higher sensitivity over a similar range of detected compounds than GC/MS. In combination with multivariate analysis, GC/FID could successfully reproduce quality prediction from GC/MS for differentiation of commercial civet coffee, regular coffee and coffee blend with 50 wt % civet coffee content without prior metabolite details. Our study demonstrated that GC/FID-based metabolite fingerprinting can be effectively actualized as an alternative method for coffee authenticity screening in industries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Color stability of restorative materials in response to Arabic coffee, Turkish coffee and Nescafe.

    PubMed

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of Arabic coffee, Turkish coffee and Nescafe on the color stability of four different composite resins after a period of aging time 1, 7 and 30 days. Twenty specimens from each type of tested composite resin material were prepared. Five specimens from each tested material (Z350 XT, Artist, GC and Z250) was evaluated after storage in Arabic coffee, Turkish coffee, Nescafe and distil water (control) at 37°C in a dark container for 1, 7 and 30 days. Color measurement was done using colorimeter based on the CIE L* a* b* color scale. Color differences ΔE*ab, Δb* and Δa* among specimens immersed in distil water and staining coffee beverages were evaluated overtime. Mean values were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Tukey test with p < 0.05 as significance level. All tested composite resins showed increase color change after a period of 1, 7 and 30 days. The color change ΔE*ab , Δb* and Δa* exhibited by Arabic coffee, in Turkish coffee and Nescafe except Δa*. The highest total color difference ΔE*ab after 30 days was in group A Arabic coffee (ΔE > 1.5 perceivable) and not perceivable in group B Turkish coffee and group C Nescafe. For Δb* all materials discolored toward yellowness after 30 days except Arabic coffee group which shifted from yellowness toward blueness (Δb*> 1.5 perceivable). The effect of staining beverages on the resin composite materials increases with time of aging toward yellowness and not perceivable in all groups except with Arabic coffee which had highest effect after 30 days and the discoloration shifted from yellowness to blueness perceivable.

  16. Physiological effects of formulation containing tannase-converted green tea extract on skin care: physical stability, collagenase, elastase, and tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yang-Hee; Jung, Eun Young; Noh, Dong Ouk; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2014-03-01

    Green tea contains numerous polyphenols, which have health-promoting effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tannase-converted green tea extract (TGE) formulation on the physical stability and activities of skin-related enzymes. Physical stability was evaluated by measuring the pH, precipitation, and colors at 25 ± 2 °C/ambient humidity and at 40 ± 2 °C/70% ± 5% relative humidity for 4 months. Activities of collagenase, elastase, and tyrosinase as skin-related enzymes were assessed on TGE formulation. The concentrations of epigallocatechin-3-gallate and epicatechin-3-gallate in green tea extract were greatly decreased to the extent of negligible level when treated with tannase. The formulation containing 5% tannase-converted green tea extract showed relatively stable pH, precipitation, and color features for 16 weeks. When TGE was added to the formulation, there was a significant increase in the inhibition of elastase and tyrosinase activities ( p  < 0.05) compared with the formulation containing 5% normal green tea extract. The TGE could be used in cosmetics as skin antiwrinkling or depigmenting agent.

  17. A rapid ATR-FTIR spectroscopic method for detection of sibutramine adulteration in tea and coffee based on hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses.

    PubMed

    Cebi, Nur; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin; Sagdic, Osman

    2017-08-15

    Sibutramine may be illicitly included in herbal slimming foods and supplements marketed as "100% natural" to enhance weight loss. Considering public health and legal regulations, there is an urgent need for effective, rapid and reliable techniques to detect sibutramine in dietetic herbal foods, teas and dietary supplements. This research comprehensively explored, for the first time, detection of sibutramine in green tea, green coffee and mixed herbal tea using ATR-FTIR spectroscopic technique combined with chemometrics. Hierarchical cluster analysis and PCA principle component analysis techniques were employed in spectral range (2746-2656cm -1 ) for classification and discrimination through Euclidian distance and Ward's algorithm. Unadulterated and adulterated samples were classified and discriminated with respect to their sibutramine contents with perfect accuracy without any false prediction. The results suggest that existence of the active substance could be successfully determined at the levels in the range of 0.375-12mg in totally 1.75g of green tea, green coffee and mixed herbal tea by using FTIR-ATR technique combined with chemometrics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrated approach in the assessment of skin compatibility of cosmetic formulations with green coffee oil.

    PubMed

    Wagemaker, T A L; Rijo, P; Rodrigues, L M; Maia Campos, P M B G; Fernandes, A S; Rosado, C

    2015-10-01

    Green coffee oil (GCO) has been used in cosmetic formulations due to its emollient and anti-ageing properties. However, there are insufficient studies about its safety when applied in cosmetic formulations. Cytotoxicity of GCO and of formulations containing 2.5-15% of GCO was evaluated by the MTT reduction assay, in human keratinocytes. Formulations containing 15% of GCO and the vehicle were applied under in use conditions in the volar forearm of human volunteers during 3 days. Transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum water content and erythema index were evaluated each 24 h using biophysical techniques. The same formulations were probed for skin tolerance through a patch test. Neither pure GCO nor its formulations showed cytotoxic effects in concentrations up to 100 μg mL(-1) . Transepidermal water loss values showed a slight reduction when the formulation containing GCO was applied. Stratum corneum water content and erythema index did not show significant differences, as the results observed in the first day of the study were maintained throughout 3 days. None of the volunteers display any reaction after using an occlusive patch. The results obtained in the study indicate that GCO seems to be safe for topical applications and showed good skin compatibility under the experimental conditions of the study. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Caffeine following a Single Administration of Coffee Enema versus Oral Coffee Consumption in Healthy Male Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tosri, Nisanuch; Rojanasthien, Noppamas; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Sangdee, Chaichan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of caffeine after single administration of a coffee enema versus coffee consumed orally in healthy male subjects. The study design was an open-label, randomized two-phase crossover study. Eleven healthy subjects were randomly assigned either to receive 500 mL of coffee enema for 10 minutes or to consume 180 mL of ready-to-drink coffee beverage. After a washout period of at least 10 days, all the subjects were switched to receive the alternate coffee procedure. Blood samples were collected immediately before and at specific time points until 12 hours after coffee administration in each phase. The mean caffeine content in both the coffee solution prepared for the coffee enema and the ready-to-drink coffee beverage was not statistically different. The C max and AUC of caffeine obtained from the coffee enema were about 3.5 times significantly less than those of the coffee consumed orally, despite having slightly but statistically faster T max. The t 1/2 of caffeine obtained following both coffee procedures did not statistically differ. In summary, the relative bioavailability of caffeine obtained from the coffee enema was about 3.5 times significantly less than those of the coffee consumed orally. PMID:23533801

  20. Coffee, hunger, and peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, James A; Geliebter, Allan

    2012-06-01

    There is evidence from several empirical studies suggesting that coffee may help people control body weight. Our objective was to assess the effects of caffeine, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee, both alone and in combination with 75 g of glucose, on perceived hunger and satiety and related peptides. We conducted a placebo-controlled single-blinded randomized 4-way crossover trial. Eleven healthy male volunteers (mean age, 23.5 ± 5.7 years; mean BMI, 23.6 ± 4.2 kg/m(2)) ingested 1 of 3 test beverages (caffeine in water, caffeinated coffee, or decaffeinated coffee) or placebo (water), and 60 minutes later they ingested the glucose. Eight times during each laboratory visit, hunger and satiety were assessed by visual analog scales, and blood samples were drawn to measure 3 endogenous peptides associated with hunger and satiety: ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and leptin. Compared to placebo, decaffeinated coffee yielded significantly lower hunger during the whole 180-minute study period and higher plasma PYY for the first 90 minutes (p < 0.05). Caffeine in water had no effects on hunger or PYY. Caffeinated coffee showed a pattern between that of decaffeinated coffee and caffeine in water. These findings suggest that one or more noncaffeine ingredients in coffee may have the potential to decrease body weight. Glucose ingestion did not change the effects of the beverages. Our randomized human trial showed that decaffeinated coffee can acutely decrease hunger and increase the satiety hormone PYY.

  1. Chlorogenic acid-arabinose hybrid domains in coffee melanoidins: Evidences from a model system.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ana S P; Coimbra, Manuel A; Nunes, Fernando M; Passos, Cláudia P; Santos, Sónia A O; Silvestre, Armando J D; Silva, André M N; Rangel, Maria; Domingues, M Rosário M

    2015-10-15

    Arabinose from arabinogalactan side chains was hypothesized as a possible binding site for chlorogenic acids in coffee melanoidins. To investigate this hypothesis, a mixture of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), the most abundant chlorogenic acid in green coffee beans, and (α1 → 5)-L-arabinotriose, structurally related to arabinogalactan side chains, was submitted to dry thermal treatments. The compounds formed during thermal processing were identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and characterized by tandem MS (ESI-MS(n)). Compounds composed by one or two CQAs covalently linked with pentose (Pent) residues (1-12) were identified, along with compounds bearing a sugar moiety but composed exclusively by the quinic or caffeic acid moiety of CQAs. The presence of isomers was demonstrated by liquid chromatography online coupled to ESI-MS and ESI-MS(n). Pent1-2CQA were identified in coffee samples. These results give evidence for a diversity of chlorogenic acid-arabinose hybrids formed during roasting, opening new perspectives for their identification in melanoidin structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical Characterization of Potentially Prebiotic Oligosaccharides in Brewed Coffee and Spent Coffee Grounds.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Freeman, Samara; Corey, Mark; German, J Bruce; Barile, Daniela

    2017-04-05

    Oligosaccharides are indigestible carbohydrates widely present in mammalian milk and in some plants. Milk oligosaccharides are associated with positive health outcomes; however, oligosaccharides in coffee have not been extensively studied. We investigated the oligosaccharides and their monomeric composition in dark roasted coffee beans, brewed coffee, and spent coffee grounds. Oligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization ranging from 3 to 15, and their constituent monosaccharides, were characterized and quantified. The oligosaccharides identified were mainly hexoses (potentially galacto-oligosaccharides and manno-oligosaccharides) containing a heterogeneous mixture of glucose, arabinose, xylose, and rhamnose. The diversity of oligosaccharides composition found in these coffee samples suggests that they could have selective prebiotic activity toward specific bacterial strains able to deconstruct the glycosidic bonds and utilize them as a carbon source.

  3. Molecular modification of native coffee polysaccharide using subcritical water treatment: Structural characterization, antioxidant, and DNA protecting activities.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Adane Tilahun; Chun, Byung Soo

    2017-06-01

    Polysaccharides are an abundant resource in coffee beans and have proved to show numerous bioactivities. Despite their abundance, their activities are not always satisfactory mostly due to their structure and large molecular size. Molecular modifications of native polysaccharides can overcome this problem. In this study, we used a novel and green method to modify native coffee polysaccharides using subcritical water (SCW) treatment. The SCW treatment was used at the temperature of 180°C-220°C and pressure of 30-60bar. The molecular and structural modification of the polysaccharides was confirmed using several techniques such as FT-IR, UV spectroscopy, XRD, and TGA. The antioxidant activity of the modified polysaccharides was evaluated using several chemical and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based high throughput assays. The modified polysaccharides showed high antioxidant activities in all tested assays. Moreover, the polysaccharides showed high DNA protection activities. Therefore, SCW could be employed as a green solvent for molecular modification of polysaccharides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Garlic, green tea and turmeric extracts-mediated green synthesis of silver nanoparticles: Phytochemical, antioxidant and in vitro cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Arumai Selvan, D; Mahendiran, D; Senthil Kumar, R; Kalilur Rahiman, A

    2018-03-01

    Phyto-synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was achieved using aqueous garlic, green tea and turmeric extracts, and characterized by different spectroscopic techniques. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of rich amount of biochemicals in these extracts, which serve as reducing and capping agents for converting silver nitrate into AgNPs. FT IR spectroscopy confirmed the role of biomolecules in the bioreduction and efficient stabilization of AgNPs. UV-Vis DRS spectra showed a band around 450 nm characteristics of AgNPs. XRD patterns revealed the crystalline nature of the synthesized AgNPs with fcc structure. SEM and TEM analysis revealed the spherical shape of the synthesized AgNPs with an average particle size of 8 nm. EDX analysis confirmed the purity of the synthesized AgNPs with a strong signal at 3.2 keV. The antioxidant activity was assessed by ABTS, DPPH, p-NDA, H 2 O 2 and DMSO scavenging assays, in which the AgNPs synthesized using green method showed remarkable activity with respect to the standard antioxidants ascorbic acid and rutin. In vitro cytotoxicity activity was tested on four cancer cell lines such as human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), cervical (HeLa), epithelioma (Hep-2) and lung (A549) along with one normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) cell line. The AgNPs synthesized using turmeric extract exhibits excellent antioxidant and cytotoxicity activity compared to that synthesized using other extracts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of the inhibitory effect of green tea extract on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase based on multilayer capillary enzyme microreactor.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Liu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Xin; Wang, Yujia; Yang, Jiqing; Yang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Natural herbal medicines are an important source of enzyme inhibitors for the discovery of new drugs. A number of natural extracts such as green tea have been used in prevention and treatment of diseases due to their low-cost, low toxicity and good performance. The present study reports an online assay of the activity and inhibition of the green tea extract of the Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using multilayer capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme microreactors (CE-IMERs). The multilayer CE-IMERs were produced with layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly, which can easily enhance the enzyme loading capacity of the microreactor. The activity of the G6PDH enzyme was determined and the enzyme inhibition by the inhibitors from green tea extract was investigated using online assay of the multilayer CE-IMERs. The Michaelis constant (Km ) of the enzyme, the IC50 and Ki values of the inhibitors were achieved and found to agree with those obtained using offline assays. The results show a competitive inhibition of green tea extract on the G6PDH enzyme. The present study provides an efficient and easy-to-operate approach for determining G6PDH enzyme reaction and the inhibition of green tea extract, which may be beneficial in research and the development of natural herbal medicines. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Properties and antioxidant action of actives cassava starch films incorporated with green tea and palm oil extracts.

    PubMed

    Perazzo, Kátya Karine Nery Carneiro Lins; Conceição, Anderson Carlos de Vasconcelos; dos Santos, Juliana Caribé Pires; Assis, Denilson de Jesus; Souza, Carolina Oliveira; Druzian, Janice Izabel

    2014-01-01

    There is an interest in the development of an antioxidant packaging fully biodegradable to increase the shelf life of food products. An active film from cassava starch bio-based, incorporated with aqueous green tea extract and oil palm colorant was developed packaging. The effects of additives on the film properties were determined by measuring mechanical, barrier and thermal properties using a response surface methodology design experiment. The bio-based films were used to pack butter (maintained for 45 days) under accelerated oxidation conditions. The antioxidant action of the active films was evaluated by analyzing the peroxide index, total carotenoids, and total polyphenol. The same analysis also evaluated unpacked butter, packed in films without additives and butter packed in LDPE films, as controls. The results suggested that incorporation of the antioxidants extracts tensile strength and water vapor barrier properties (15 times lower) compared to control without additives. A lower peroxide index (231.57%), which was significantly different from that of the control (p<0.05), was detected in products packed in film formulations containing average concentration of green tea extracts and high concentration of colorant. However, it was found that the high content of polyphenols in green tea extract can be acted as a pro-oxidant agent, which suggests that the use of high concentration should be avoided as additives for films. These results support the applicability of a green tea extract and oil palm carotenoics colorant in starch films totally biodegradable and the use of these materials in active packaging of the fatty products.

  7. Properties and Antioxidant Action of Actives Cassava Starch Films Incorporated with Green Tea and Palm Oil Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Perazzo, Kátya Karine Nery Carneiro Lins; Conceição, Anderson Carlos de Vasconcelos; dos Santos, Juliana Caribé Pires; Assis, Denilson de Jesus; Souza, Carolina Oliveira; Druzian, Janice Izabel

    2014-01-01

    There is an interest in the development of an antioxidant packaging fully biodegradable to increase the shelf life of food products. An active film from cassava starch bio-based, incorporated with aqueous green tea extract and oil palm colorant was developed packaging. The effects of additives on the film properties were determined by measuring mechanical, barrier and thermal properties using a response surface methodology design experiment. The bio-based films were used to pack butter (maintained for 45 days) under accelerated oxidation conditions. The antioxidant action of the active films was evaluated by analyzing the peroxide index, total carotenoids, and total polyphenol. The same analysis also evaluated unpacked butter, packed in films without additives and butter packed in LDPE films, as controls. The results suggested that incorporation of the antioxidants extracts tensile strength and water vapor barrier properties (15 times lower) compared to control without additives. A lower peroxide index (231.57%), which was significantly different from that of the control (p<0.05), was detected in products packed in film formulations containing average concentration of green tea extracts and high concentration of colorant. However, it was found that the high content of polyphenols in green tea extract can be acted as a pro-oxidant agent, which suggests that the use of high concentration should be avoided as additives for films. These results support the applicability of a green tea extract and oil palm carotenoics colorant in starch films totally biodegradable and the use of these materials in active packaging of the fatty products. PMID:25251437

  8. Coffee induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human neuroblastama SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Kakio, Shota; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Kobata, Kenji; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2017-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that hypoxia-inducible vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects on neuronal and glial cells. On the other hand, recent epidemiological studies showed that daily coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of several neuronal disorders. Therefore, we investigated the effect of coffee on VEGF expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. We found that even low concentration of coffee (<2%) strongly induced VEGF expression via an activation of HIF-1α. The activation of HIF-1α by coffee was attributed to the coffee-dependent inhibition of prolyl hydroxylation of HIF1α, which is essential for proteolytic degradation of HIF-1α. However, no inhibition was observed at the catalytic activity in vitro. Coffee component(s) responsible for the activation of HIF-1α was not major constituents such as caffeine, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and trigonelline, but was found to emerge during roasting process. The active component(s) was extractable with ethyl acetate. Our results suggest that daily consumption of coffee may induce VEGF expression in neuronal cells. This might be related to protective effect of coffee on neural disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  9. Can Coffee Chemical Compounds and Insecticidal Plants Be Harnessed for Control of Major Coffee Pests?

    PubMed

    Green, Paul W C; Davis, Aaron P; Cossé, Allard A; Vega, Fernando E

    2015-11-04

    Pests and pathogens threaten coffee production worldwide and are difficult to control using conventional methods, such as insecticides. We review the literature on the chemistry of coffee, concentrating on compounds most commonly reported from Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora. Differences in chemistry can distinguish coffee species and varieties, and plants grown under different biogeographic conditions exhibit different chemotypes. A number of chemical groups, such as alkaloids and caffeoylquinic acids, are known to be insecticidal, but most studies have investigated their effects on coffee quality and flavor. More research is required to bridge this gap in knowledge, so that coffee can be bred to be more resistant to pests. Furthermore, we report on some pesticidal plants that have been used for control of coffee pests. Locally sourced pesticidal plants have been underutilized and offer a sustainable alternative to conventional insecticides and could be used to augment breeding for resilience of coffee plants.

  10. Mapping the potential beverage quality of coffee produced in the Zona da Mata, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Samuel de Assis; de Queiroz, Daniel Marçal; Ferreira, Williams Pinto Marques; Corrêa, Paulo Cesar; Rufino, José Luis Dos Santos

    2016-07-01

    Detailed knowledge of coffee production systems enables optimization of crop management, harvesting and post-harvest techniques. In this study, coffee quality is mapped as a function of coffee variety, altitude and terrain aspect attributes. The work was performed in the Zona da Mata, Minas Gerais, Brazil. A large range of coffee quality grades was observed for the Red Catuai variety. For the Yellow Catuai variety, no quality grades lower than 70 were observed. Regarding the terrain aspect, samples from the southeast-facing slope (SEFS) and the northwest-facing slope (NWFS) exhibited distinct behaviors. The SEFS samples had a greater range of quality grades than did the NWFS samples. The highest grade was obtained from an NWFS point. The lowest quality values and the largest range of grades were observed at lower altitudes. The extracts from the highest-altitude samples did not produce any low-quality coffee. The production site's position and altitude are the primary variables that influenced the coffee quality. The study area has micro-regions with grades ranging from 80 to 94. These areas have the potential for producing specialty coffees. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Electrochemical Determination of Caffeine Content in Ethiopian Coffee Samples Using Lignin Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode.

    PubMed

    Amare, Meareg; Aklog, Senait

    2017-01-01

    Lignin film was deposited at the surface of glassy carbon electrode potentiostatically. In contrast to the unmodified glassy carbon electrode, an oxidative peak with an improved current and overpotential for caffeine at modified electrode showed catalytic activity of the modifier towards oxidation of caffeine. Linear dependence of peak current on caffeine concentration in the range 6 × 10 -6 to 100 × 10 -6  mol L -1 with determination coefficient and method detection limit (LoD = 3 s/slope) of 0.99925 and 8.37 × 10 -7  mol L -1 , respectively, supplemented by recovery results of 93.79-102.17% validated the developed method. An attempt was made to determine the caffeine content of aqueous coffee extracts of Ethiopian coffees grown in four coffee cultivating localities (Wonbera, Wolega, Finoteselam, and Zegie) and hence to evaluate the correlation between users preference and caffeine content. In agreement with reported works, caffeine contents (w/w%) of 0.164 in Wonbera coffee; 0.134 in Wolega coffee; 0.097 in Finoteselam coffee; and 0.089 in Zegie coffee were detected confirming the applicability of the developed method for determination of caffeine in a complex matrix environment. The result indicated that users' highest preference for Wonbera and least preference for Zegie cultivated coffees are in agreement with the caffeine content.

  12. A meta-analysis of risk of pregnancy loss and caffeine and coffee consumption during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Zhao, Hong; Song, Ju-Min; Zhang, Jing; Tang, Yin-Lan; Xin, Chang-Mao

    2015-08-01

    Previous reports of the relationship between pregnancy loss and caffeine/coffee consumption have been inconsistent. To evaluate the association between pregnancy loss and caffeine and coffee consumption. PubMed was searched for reports published before September 2014, with the keywords "caffeine," "coffee," "beverage," "miscarriage," "spontaneous abortion," and "fetal loss." Case-control and cohort studies were included when they had been reported in English, the exposure of interest was caffeine/coffee consumption during pregnancy, the outcome of interest was spontaneous abortion or fetal death, and multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) or risk ratios were provided or could be calculated. Data were extracted and combined ORs calculated. Overall, 26 studies were included (20 of caffeine and eight of coffee). After adjustment for heterogeneity, caffeine consumption was associated with an increased risk of pregnancy loss (OR 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-1.40), as was coffee consumption (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.02-1.21). A dose-response analysis suggested that risk of pregnancy loss rose by 19% for every increase in caffeine intake of 150 mg/day and by 8% for every increase in coffee intake of two cups per day. Consumption of caffeine and coffee during pregnancy seems to increase the risk of pregnancy loss. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of green extraction processes for Nannochloropsis gaditana biomass valorization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Camargo, Andrea Del Pilar; Pleite, Natalia; Mendiola, José Antonio; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Herrero, Miguel; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Ibáñez, Elena

    2018-04-23

    In the present work, the valorization of Nannochloropsis gaditana biomass is proposed within the concept of biorefinery. To this aim, high-pressure homogenization (HPH) was used to break down the strong cell wall and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with pure CO 2 was applied as a first step to extract valuable compounds (such as non-polar lipids and pigments). Extraction of the remaining residue for the recovery of bioactive compounds was studied by means of an experimental design based on response surface methodology (RSM) employing pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) with green solvents such as water and ethanol. Optimum extract was achieved with pure ethanol at 170°C for 20 min, providing an important antioxidant capacity (0.72 ± 0.03 mmol trolox eq g -1 extract). Complete chemical characterization of the optimum extract was carried out by using different chromatographic methods such as reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (RP-HPLC-DAD), normal-phase HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection (NP-HPLC-ELSD) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detection (GC-MS); carotenoids (e.g. violaxanthin), chlorophylls and polar lipids were the main compounds observed while palmitoleic, palmitic, myristic acids and the polyunsaturated eicosapentanoic (EPA) acid were the predominant fatty acids in all PLE extracts. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Liver-related safety assessment of green tea extracts in humans: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Isomura, T; Suzuki, S; Origasa, H; Hosono, A; Suzuki, M; Sawada, T; Terao, S; Muto, Y; Koga, T

    2016-01-01

    There remain liver-related safety concerns, regarding potential hepatotoxicity in humans, induced by green tea intake, despite being supposedly beneficial. Although many randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of green tea extracts have been reported in the literature, the systematic reviews published to date were only based on subjective assessment of case reports. To more objectively examine the liver-related safety of green tea intake, we conducted a systematic review of published RCTs. A systematic literature search was conducted using three databases (PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) in December 2013 to identify RCTs of green tea extracts. Data on liver-related adverse events, including laboratory test abnormalities, were abstracted from the identified articles. Methodological quality of RCTs was assessed. After excluding duplicates, 561 titles and abstracts and 119 full-text articles were screened, and finally 34 trials were identified. Of these, liver-related adverse events were reported in four trials; these adverse events involved seven subjects (eight events) in the green tea intervention group and one subject (one event) in the control group. The summary odds ratio, estimated using a meta-analysis method for sparse event data, for intervention compared with placebo was 2.1 (95% confidence interval: 0.5–9.8). The few events reported in both groups were elevations of liver enzymes. Most were mild, and no serious liver-related adverse events were reported. Results of this review, although not conclusive, suggest that liver-related adverse events after intake of green tea extracts are expected to be rare. PMID:27188915

  15. Ochratoxigenic fungi associated with green coffee beans (Coffea arabica L.) in conventional and organic cultivation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Fátima Rezende, Elisângela; Borges, Josiane Gonçalves; Cirillo, Marcelo Ângelo; Prado, Guilherme; Paiva, Leandro Carlos; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The genera Aspergillus comprises species that produce mycotoxins such as aflatoxins, ochratoxins and patulin. These are cosmopolitan species, natural contaminants of agricultural products. In coffee grains, the most important Aspergillus species in terms of the risk of presenting mycotoxins belong to the genera Aspergillus Section Circumdati and Section Nigri. The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of isolated ochratoxigenic fungi of coffee grains from organic and conventional cultivation from the South of Minas Gerais, Brazil, as well as to evaluate which farming system presents higher contamination risk by ochratoxin A (OTA) produced by fungi. Thirty samples of coffee grains (Coffea arabica L.) were analysed, being 20 of them of conventional coffee grains and 10 of them organic. The microbiological analysis was done with the Direct Plating Technique in a Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol Agar (DRBC) media. The identification was done based on the macro and micro morphological characteristics and on the toxigenic potential with the Plug Agar technique. From the 30 samples analysed, 480 filamentous fungi of the genera Aspergillus of the Circumdati and Nigri Sections were isolated. The ochratoxigenic species identified were: Aspergillus auricoumus, A. ochraceus, A. ostianus, A. niger and A. niger Aggregate. The most frequent species which produces ochratoxin A among the isolated ones was A. ochraceus, corresponding to 89.55%. There was no significant difference regarding the presence of ochratoxigenic A. ochreceus between the conventional and organic cultivation systems, which suggests that the contamination risk is similar for both cultivation systems.

  16. Ochratoxigenic fungi associated with green coffee beans (Coffea arabica L.) in conventional and organic cultivation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Fátima Rezende, Elisângela; Borges, Josiane Gonçalves; Cirillo, Marcelo Ângelo; Prado, Guilherme; Paiva, Leandro Carlos; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The genera Aspergillus comprises species that produce mycotoxins such as aflatoxins, ochratoxins and patulin. These are cosmopolitan species, natural contaminants of agricultural products. In coffee grains, the most important Aspergillus species in terms of the risk of presenting mycotoxins belong to the genera Aspergillus Section Circumdati and Section Nigri. The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of isolated ochratoxigenic fungi of coffee grains from organic and conventional cultivation from the South of Minas Gerais, Brazil, as well as to evaluate which farming system presents higher contamination risk by ochratoxin A (OTA) produced by fungi. Thirty samples of coffee grains (Coffea arabica L.) were analysed, being 20 of them of conventional coffee grains and 10 of them organic. The microbiological analysis was done with the Direct Plating Technique in a Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol Agar (DRBC) media. The identification was done based on the macro and micro morphological characteristics and on the toxigenic potential with the Plug Agar technique. From the 30 samples analysed, 480 filamentous fungi of the genera Aspergillus of the Circumdati and Nigri Sections were isolated. The ochratoxigenic species identified were: Aspergillus auricoumus, A. ochraceus, A. ostianus, A. niger and A. niger Aggregate. The most frequent species which produces ochratoxin A among the isolated ones was A. ochraceus, corresponding to 89.55%. There was no significant difference regarding the presence of ochratoxigenic A. ochreceus between the conventional and organic cultivation systems, which suggests that the contamination risk is similar for both cultivation systems. PMID:24294225

  17. Protective effect of coffee consumption on all-cause mortality of French HIV-HCV co-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Maria Patrizia; Protopopescu, Camelia; Marcellin, Fabienne; Rosellini, Silvia; Wittkop, Linda; Esterle, Laure; Zucman, David; Raffi, François; Rosenthal, Eric; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Salmon-Ceron, Dominique; Dabis, François; Spire, Bruno

    2017-12-01

    Coffee has anti-inflammatory and hepato-protective properties. In the general population, drinking ≥3cups of coffee/day has been associated with a 14% reduction in the risk of all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between coffee consumption and the risk of all-cause mortality in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). ANRS CO13 HEPAVIH is an ongoing French nationwide prospective cohort of patients co-infected with HIV-HCV collecting both medical and psychosocial/behavioural data (annual self-administered questionnaires). We used a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate the effect of elevated coffee consumption (≥3cups/day) at baseline on all-cause mortality during the cohort's five-year follow-up. Over a median [interquartile range] follow-up of 5.0 [3.9-5.9] years, 77 deaths occurred among 1,028 eligible patients (mortality rate 1.64/100 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-2.05). Leading causes of death were HCV-related diseases (n=33, 43%), cancers unrelated to AIDS/HCV (n=9, 12%), and AIDS (n=8, 10%). At the first available visit, 26.6% of patients reported elevated coffee consumption. Elevated coffee consumption at baseline was associated with a 50% reduced risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.5; CI 0.3-0.9; p=0.032), after adjustment for gender and psychosocial, behavioral and clinical time-varying factors. Drinking three or more cups of coffee per day halves all-cause mortality risk in patients co-infected with HIV-HCV. The benefits of coffee extracts and supplementing dietary intake with other anti-inflammatory compounds need to be evaluated in this population. Coffee has anti-inflammatory and hepato-protective properties but its effect on mortality risk has never been investigated in patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). This study shows that elevated coffee consumption (≥3cups

  18. Coffee and liver health.

    PubMed

    Morisco, Filomena; Lembo, Vincenzo; Mazzone, Giovanna; Camera, Silvia; Caporaso, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely used beverages in the world. It includes a wide array of components that can have potential implications for health. Several epidemiological studies associate coffee consumption with a reduced incidence of various chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past 20 years, an increasing number of epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated the positive effects of coffee on chronic liver diseases. Coffee consumption has been inversely associated with the activity of liver enzymes in subjects at risk, including heavy drinkers. Coffee favours an improvement in hepatic steatosis and fibrosis, and a reduction in cirrhosis and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanisms of action through which it exerts its beneficial effects are not fully understood. Experimental studies show that coffee consumption reduces fat accumulation and collagen deposition in the liver and promotes antioxidant capacity through an increase in glutathione as well as modulation of the gene and protein expression of several inflammatory mediators. Animal and in vitro studies indicate that cafestol and kahweol, 2 diterpens, can operate by modulating multiple enzymes involved in the detoxification process of carcinogens causing hepatocellular carcinoma. It is unclear whether the benefits are significant enough to "treat" patients with chronic liver disease. While we await clarification, moderate daily unsweetened coffee use is a reasonable adjuvant to therapy for these patients.

  19. Plant extracts of spices and coffee synergistically dampen nuclear factor-κB in U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Marit; Paur, Ingvild; Balstad, Trude R; Pedersen, Sigrid; Jacobs, David R; Blomhoff, Rune

    2013-10-01

    A large array of bioactive plant compounds (phytochemicals) has been identified and synergy among these compounds might contribute to the beneficial effects of plant foods. The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has been suggested as a target for many phytochemicals. Due to the complexity of mechanisms involved in NF-κB regulation, including numerous feedback loops, and the large number of phytochemicals which regulate NF-κB activity, we hypothesize that synergistic or antagonistic effects are involved. The objectives of our study were to develop a statistical methodology to evaluate the concept of synergy and antagonism and to use this methodology in a monocytic cell line (U937 expressing an NF-κB-luciferase reporter) treated with lipopolysaccharide and phytochemical-rich plant extracts. Both synergistic and antagonistic effects were clearly observed. Observed synergy was most pronounced for the combinations of oregano and coffee, and thyme and oregano. For oregano and coffee the synergistic effect was highest at 5 mg/mL with 13.9% (P < .001), and for thyme and oregano the highest synergistic effects was at 3 mg/mL with 13.7% (P < .001). Dose dependent synergistic and antagonistic effects were observed for all combinations tested. In conclusion, this work presents a methodological tool to define synergy in experimental studies. Our results support the hypothesis that phytochemical-rich plants may exert synergistic and antagonistic effects on NF-κB regulation. Such complex mechanistic interactions between phytochemicals are likely to underlie the protective effects of a plant-based diet on life-style related diseases. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Water and coffee: a systems approach to improving coffee harvesting work in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Barbara A; Bao, Stephen S; Russell, Steven; Stewart, Kate

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the physical load on coffee-harvesting workers while maintaining productivity. Coffee is second to oil in commodity trading. Water is becoming scarce worldwide. The global virtual water footprint for one cup of coffee is 140 liters. Shade-grown coffee is one approach to reducing the water footprint. A participatory ergonomics approach was used during two Nicaraguan shade-grown coffee harvesting seasons to reduce the physical load on harvesters with the use of a newly designed bag instead of a basket strapped around the waist. Productivity in the mountainous, shade-grown coffee farms was maintained while physical load on the worker was improved somewhat.Among basket users, 84.2% reported pain in at least one body area compared with 78.9% of bag users (ns). Nonetheless, 74% of participants liked the bag "much better" than the basket. Workers identified ways the bag could be improved further with the use of local materials.These suggestions included (a) reducing the horizontal distance of the bag to reduce reach and (b) having waterproof material on the bag between the worker and the bag to reduce moisture and damage to the berries.There was no difference in productivity between using the bag and using the small basket. Workers are extending this participatory approach to how to get the harvested coffee cherries down the mountain other than carrying 40-kg bags on their backs. The ultimate goal is to make the coffee-harvesting bag design available to harvesters around the world.

  1. Inhibitory effect of marine green algal extracts on germination of Lactuca sativa seeds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon

    2016-03-01

    The allelopathic potential of nine green seaweed species was examined based on germination and seedling growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). Out of nine methanol extracts, Capsosiphon fulvescens and Monostroma nitidum extracts completely inhibited germination of L. sativa at 4 mg/filter paper after 24 hr of treatment. Water extracts of these seaweeds generally showed low anti-germination activities than methanol extracts. Of the nine water extracts, Enteromorpha linza extract completely inhibited L. sativa germination at 16 mg/filter paper after 24 hrs. To identify the primary active compounds, C. fulvescens. powder was successively fractionated according to polarity, and the main active agents against L. sativa were determined to be lipids (0.0% germination at 0.5 mg of lipids/paper disc). According to these results, extracts of C. fulvescens can be used to develop natural herbicidal agents and manage terrestrial weeds.

  2. Procedure optimization for green synthesis of silver nanoparticles by aqueous extract of Eucalyptus oleosa.

    PubMed

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Taghdiri, Mehdi; Makari, Vajihe; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi

    2015-02-05

    The present study is dealing with the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the aqueous extract of Eucalyptus oleosa as a green synthesis procedure without any catalyst, template or surfactant. Colloidal silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reacting aqueous AgNO3 with E. oleosa leaf extract at non-photomediated conditions. The significance of some synthesis conditions such as: silver nitrate concentration, concentration of the plant extract, time of synthesis reaction and temperature of plant extraction procedure on the particle size of synthesized silver particles was investigated and optimized. The participations of the studied factors in controlling the particle size of reduced silver were quantitatively evaluated via analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results of this investigation showed that silver nanoparticles could be synthesized by tuning significant parameters, while performing the synthesis procedure at optimum conditions leads to form silver nanoparticles with 21nm as averaged size. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy was used to monitor the development of silver nanoparticles formation. Meanwhile, produced silver nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, and FT-IR techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. And coffee too.

    PubMed

    Cameron, P; Boehmer, J

    1982-04-01

    Two hundred and seventy-two persons aged 11 to 80 were interviewed regarding whether and why they had tried and/or used coffee, tobacco, liquor, and marijuana. The attracting and capturing power of tobacco and marijuana registered as lower than those associated with coffee and liquor. A guilt/shame index was derived from avowed motives. Trying tobacco and liquor was associated with greater guilt/shame than that associated with coffee and marijuana. Most tobacco users offered motives that indicated continued guilt/shame, while the majority of the other users expressed contentment with their habits.

  4. Alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits alpha-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Aulus E A D; Albuquerque, Erika V S; Silva, Maria C M; Souza, Djair S L; Oliveira-Neto, Osmundo B; Valencia, Arnubio; Rocha, Thales L; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2010-06-17

    Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hypotheneumus hampei), is responsible for worldwide annual losses of around US$500 million. The coffee berry borer exclusively damages the coffee berries, and it is mainly controlled by organochlorine insecticides that are both toxic and carcinogenic. Unfortunately, natural resistance in the genus Coffea to H. hampei has not been documented. To overcome these problems, biotechnological strategies can be used to introduce an alpha-amylase inhibitor gene (alpha-AI1), which confers resistance against the coffee berry borer insect-pest, into C. arabica plants. We transformed C. arabica with the alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 gene (alpha-AI1) from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, under control of the seed-specific phytohemagglutinin promoter (PHA-L). The presence of the alpha-AI1 gene in six regenerated transgenic T1 coffee plants was identified by PCR and Southern blotting. Immunoblotting and ELISA experiments using antibodies against alpha-AI1 inhibitor showed a maximum alpha-AI1 concentration of 0.29% in crude seed extracts. Inhibitory in vitro assays of the alpha-AI1 protein against H. hampei alpha-amylases in transgenic seed extracts showed up to 88% inhibition of enzyme activity. This is the first report showing the production of transgenic coffee plants with the biotechnological potential to control the coffee berry borer, the most important insect-pest of crop coffee.

  5. α-Amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits α-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hypotheneumus hampei), is responsible for worldwide annual losses of around US$500 million. The coffee berry borer exclusively damages the coffee berries, and it is mainly controlled by organochlorine insecticides that are both toxic and carcinogenic. Unfortunately, natural resistance in the genus Coffea to H. hampei has not been documented. To overcome these problems, biotechnological strategies can be used to introduce an α-amylase inhibitor gene (α-AI1), which confers resistance against the coffee berry borer insect-pest, into C. arabica plants. Results We transformed C. arabica with the α-amylase inhibitor-1 gene (α-AI1) from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, under control of the seed-specific phytohemagglutinin promoter (PHA-L). The presence of the α-AI1 gene in six regenerated transgenic T1 coffee plants was identified by PCR and Southern blotting. Immunoblotting and ELISA experiments using antibodies against α-AI1 inhibitor showed a maximum α-AI1 concentration of 0.29% in crude seed extracts. Inhibitory in vitro assays of the α-AI1 protein against H. hampei α-amylases in transgenic seed extracts showed up to 88% inhibition of enzyme activity. Conclusions This is the first report showing the production of transgenic coffee plants with the biotechnological potential to control the coffee berry borer, the most important insect-pest of crop coffee. PMID:20565807

  6. Determination of the alkylpyrazine composition of coffee using stable isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SIDA-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Pickard, Stephanie; Becker, Irina; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Richling, Elke

    2013-07-03

    A stable isotope dilution analysis based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (SIDA-GC-MS) was developed for the quantitative analysis of 12 alkylpyrazines found in commercially available coffee samples. These compounds contribute to coffee flavor. The accuracy of this method was tested by analyzing model mixtures of alkylpyrazines. Comparisons of alkylpyrazine-concentrations suggested that water as extraction solvent was superior to dichloromethane. The distribution patterns of alkylpyrazines in different roasted coffees were quite similar. The most abundant alkylpyrazine in each coffee sample was 2-methylpyrazine, followed by 2,6-dimethylpyrazine, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-6-methylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine, and 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine, respectively. Among the alkylpyrazines tested, 2,3-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-3-methylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine, and 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine revealed the lowest concentrations in roasted coffee. By the use of isotope dilution analysis, the total concentrations of alkylpyrazines in commercially available ground coffee ranged between 82.1 and 211.6 mg/kg, respectively. Decaffeinated coffee samples were found to contain lower amounts of alkylpyrazines than regular coffee samples by a factor of 0.3-0.7, which might be a result of the decaffeination procedure.

  7. Toward systems epidemiology of coffee and health.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Marilyn C

    2015-02-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has been associated with many health conditions. This review examines the limitations of the classic epidemiological approach to studies of coffee and health, and describes the progress in systems epidemiology of coffee and its correlated constituent, caffeine. Implications and applications of this growing body of knowledge are also discussed. Population-based metabolomic studies of coffee replicate coffee-metabolite correlations observed in clinical settings but have also identified novel metabolites of coffee response, such as specific sphingomyelin derivatives and acylcarnitines. Genome-wide analyses of self-reported coffee and caffeine intake and serum levels of caffeine support an overwhelming role for caffeine in modulating the coffee consumption behavior. Interindividual variation in the physiological exposure or response to any of the many chemicals present in coffee may alter the persistence and magnitude of their effects. It is thus imperative that future studies of coffee and health account for this variation. Systems epidemiological approaches promise to inform causality, parse the constituents of coffee responsible for health effects, and identify the subgroups most likely to benefit from increasing or decreasing coffee consumption.

  8. Green reduction of graphene oxide via Lycium barbarum extract

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Dandan, E-mail: houdandan114@163.com; Liu, Qinfu, E-mail: lqf@cumtb.edu.cn; Cheng, Hongfei, E-mail: h.cheng@cumtb.edu.cn

    The synthesis of graphene from graphene oxide (GO) usually involves toxic reducing agents that are harmful to human health and the environment. Here, we report a facile approach for effective reduction of GO, for the first time, using Lycium barbarum extract as a green and natural reducing agent. The morphology and de-oxidation efficiency of the reduced graphene were characterized and results showed that Lycium barbarum extract can effectively reduce GO into few layered graphene with a high carbon to oxygen ratio (6.5), comparable to that of GO reduced by hydrazine hydrate (6.6). The possible reduction mechanism of GO may bemore » due to the active components existing in Lycium barbarum fruits, which have high binding affinity to the oxygen containing groups to form their corresponding oxides and other by-products. This method avoided the use of any nocuous chemicals, thus facilitating the mass production of graphene and graphene-based bio-materials. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the preparation of reduced graphene by Lycium barbarum extract. - Highlights: • The Lycium barbarum extract was used for the reduction of graphene oxide. • The obtained few layered graphene exhibited high carbon to oxygen ratio. • This approach can be applied in the preparation of graphene-based bio-materials.« less

  9. Encapsulation of antioxidant phenolic compounds extracted from spent coffee grounds by freeze-drying and spray-drying using different coating materials.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Lina F; Ramirez, Monica J; Orrego, Carlos E; Teixeira, José A; Mussatto, Solange I

    2017-12-15

    Freeze-drying and spray-drying techniques were evaluated for encapsulation of phenolic compounds (PC) extracted from spent coffee grounds. Additionally, the use of maltodextrin, gum arabic and a mixture of these components (ratio 1:1) as wall material to retain the PC and preserve their antioxidant activity was also assessed. The contents of PC and flavonoids (FLA), as well as the antioxidant activity of the encapsulated samples were determined in order to verify the efficiency of each studied condition. Additional analyses for characterization of the samples were also performed. Both the technique and the coating material greatly influenced the encapsulation of antioxidant PC. The best results were achieved when PC were encapsulated by freeze-drying using maltodextrin as wall material. Under these conditions, the amount of PC and FLA retained in the encapsulated sample corresponded to 62% and 73%, respectively, and 73-86% of the antioxidant activity present in the original extract was preserved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of mutagenic activity in grain-based coffee-substitute blends and instant coffees

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, M.A.E.; Knize, M.G.; Felton, J.S.

    1994-06-01

    Several grain-based coffee-substitute blends and instant coffees showed a mutagenic response in the Ames/Salmonella test using TA98, YG1024 and YG1O29 with metabolic activation. The beverage powders contained 150 to 500 TA98 and 1150 to 4050 YG1024 revertant colonies/gram, respectively. The mutagenic activity in the beverage powders was shown to be stable to heat and the products varied in resistance to acid nitrite treatment. Characterization of the mutagenic activity, using HPLC-and the Ames test of the collected fractions, showed the coffee-substitutes and instant coffees contain several mutagenic compounds, which are most likely aromatic amines.

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation on the extraction yield, antioxidant, and antityrosinase activities of pistachio green hull extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolhasani, Ali; Barzegar, Mohsen; Sahari, Mohammad Ali

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the antioxidant activity and tyrosinase inhibitory of non-irradiated and irradiated pistachio green hull (PGH) extracts were investigated. After irradiation of PGH by different doses of gamma ray (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy), their phenolic compounds were extracted by water. Antioxidant activities of extracts were examined by DPPH• and FRAP methods. The results showed that irradiation not only do not have negative effects on antioxidant activity but also it can increase the amount of total phenolic compounds of water extract in comparison with non-irradiated sample. Water extract of irradiated PGH at the dose of 30 kGy, showed the highest antioxidant activity in the DPPH° test with EC50 equal to 289.0 ± 1.2 μg/ml. Irradiated (30 kGy) and non-irradiated water extracts had the highest antityrosinase activities with IC50 of 10.8 ± 1.1 and 11.9 ± 1.2 μg phenolic/ml, respectively. In addition, it was found that the water extract of irradiated PGH can prevent enzymatic browning in sliced raw potatoes. According to the antityrosinase potential of PGH extract, it may be suggested as an antibrowning agent in some foodstuffs or cosmetic products.

  12. Decontamination of Salmonella, Shigella, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 from leafy green vegetables using edible plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Orue, Nydia; García, Santos; Feng, Peter; Heredia, Norma

    2013-02-01

    Fresh cilantro, parsley, and spinach are products that are regularly consumed fresh, but are difficult to decontaminate, as a result, they are common vehicles of transmission of enteropathogenic bacteria. In this study, the efficacy of plant extracts as alternatives for disinfection of cilantro, parsley, and spinach that were artificially contaminated with Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Shigella sonnei was determined. Edible plant extracts obtained using ethanol as the extraction solvent were tested to determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and those that exhibited the lowest MBC were selected for further studies. Leaves of fresh greens were washed with sterile water and dried. For seeding, leaves were submerged in suspensions of 2 different concentrations of bacteria (1.5 × 10(8) and 1 × 10(5) ), dried, and then stored at 4 °C until use. To determine the effects of the extracts, inoculated leafy greens were submerged in a container and subjected to treatments with chlorine, Citrol®, or selected plant extracts. Each treatment type was stored at 4 °C for 0, 1, 5, and 7 d, and the bacterial counts were determined. From the 41 plant extracts tested, the extracts from oregano leaves and from the peel and pulp of limes were found to be as effective as chlorine or Citrol® in reducing by > 2 logs, the population of pathogenic bacteria on leafy greens and therefore, may be a natural and edible alternative to chemicals to reduce the risk of Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7 and S. sonnei contamination on leafy vegetables. The antimicrobial efficacy of the extracts of Mexican lime and oregano was clearly demonstrated on cilantro, parsley, and spinach. The extracts of Mexican lime and oregano provide alternatives to chlorine to significantly reduce bacterial pathogens that have been associated with outbreaks from contaminated leafy green vegetables. A simple, low cost, and labor-saving extraction system for production of the extracts was used.

  13. Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide, causing millions of dollars in yearly losses to coffee growers. We present the third genomic analysis for a Coleopteran species, a draft genome of female coffee berry borers. The genome s...

  14. Nondairy creamer, but not milk, delays the appearance of coffee phenolic acid equivalents in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Mathieu; Marmet, Cynthia; Guy, Philippe; Fraering, Anne-Lise; Longet, Karin; Moulin, Julie; Enslen, Marc; Barron, Denis; Cavin, Christophe; Dionisi, Fabiola; Rezzi, Serge; Kochhar, Sunil; Steiling, Heike; Williamson, Gary

    2010-02-01

    Chlorogenic acids (CGA) are antioxidants found in coffee. They are becoming of interest for their health-promoting effects, but bioavailability in humans is not well understood. We hypothesized that adding whole milk or sugar and nondairy creamer to instant coffee might modulate the bioavailability of coffee phenolics. Nine healthy participants were asked to randomly drink, in a crossover design, instant coffee (Coffee); instant coffee and 10% whole milk (Milk); or instant coffee, sugar, and nondairy creamer already premixed (Sugar/NDC). All 3 treatments provided the same amount of total CGA (332 mg). Blood was collected for 12 h after ingestion and plasma samples treated using a liquid-liquid extraction method that included a full enzymatic cleavage to hydrolyze all CGA and conjugates into phenolic acid equivalents. Hence, we focused our liquid chromatography-Electrospray ionization-tandem MS detection and quantification on caffeic acid (CA), ferulic acid (FA), and isoferulic acid (iFA) equivalents. Compared with a regular black instant coffee, the addition of milk did not significantly alter the area under the curve (AUC), maximum plasma concentration (C(max)), or the time needed to reach C(max) (T(max)). The C(max) of CA and iFA were significantly lower and the T(max) of FA and iFA significantly longer for the Sugar/NDC group than for the Coffee group. However, the AUC did not significantly differ. As a conclusion, adding whole milk did not alter the overall bioavailability of coffee phenolic acids, whereas sugar and nondairy creamer affected the T(max) and C(max) but not the appearance of coffee phenolics in plasma.

  15. Thermal effusivity measurement of conventional and organic coffee oils via photopyroelectric technique.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, A; Gordillo-Delgado, F; Cruz-Santillana, Y E; Plazas, J; Marin, E

    2017-12-01

    In this work, oil samples extracted from organic and conventional coffee beans were studied. A fatty acids profile analysis was done using gas chromatography and physicochemical analysis of density and acidity index to verify the oil purity. Additionally, Mid-Infrared Fourier Transform Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) aided by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to identify differences between the intensities of the absorption bands related to functional groups. Thermal effusivity values between 592±3 and 610±4Ws 1/2 m -2 K -1 were measured using the photopyroelectric technique in a front detection configuration. The acidity index was between 1.11 and 1.27% and the density changed between 0.921 and 0.94g/mL. These variables, as well as the extraction yield between 12,6 and 14,4%, showed a similar behavior than that observed for the thermal effusivity, demonstrating that this parameter can be used as a criterion for discrimination between oil samples extracted from organic and conventional coffee beans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Matrix-compatible sorbent coatings based on structurally-tuned polymeric ionic liquids for the determination of acrylamide in brewed coffee and coffee powder using solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Cagliero, Cecilia; Nan, He; Bicchi, Carlo; Anderson, Jared L

    2016-08-12

    Nine crosslinked polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-based SPME sorbent coatings were designed and screened in this study for the trace level determination of acrylamide in brewed coffee and coffee powder using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The structure of the ionic liquid (IL) monomer was tailored by introducing different functional groups to the cation and the nature of the IL crosslinker was designed by altering both the structure of the cation as well as counteranions. The extraction efficiency of the new PIL coatings towards acrylamide was investigated and compared to a previously reported PIL sorbent coating. All PIL fibers exhibited excellent analytical precision and linearity. The PIL fiber coating consisting of 50% 1,12-di(3-vinylbenzylbenzimidazolium)dodecane dibis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide as IL crosslinker in 1-vinyl-3-(10-hydroxydecyl)imidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide IL monomer resulted in a limit of quantitation of 0.5μgL(-1) with in-solution SPME sampling. The hydroxyl moiety appended to the IL cation was observed to significantly increase the sensitivity of the PIL coating toward acrylamide. The quantitation of acrylamide in brewed coffee and coffee powder was performed using the different PIL-based fibers by the method of standard addition after a quenching reaction using ninhydrin to inhibit the formation of interfering acrylamide in the GC inlet, mainly by asparagine thermal degradation. Excellent repeatability with relative standard deviations below 10% were obtained on the real coffee samples and the structure of the coatings appeared intact by scanning electron microscopy after coffee sampling proving the matrix-compatibility of the PIL sorbent coatings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of endogenous and exogenous enzymatic treatment of green vanilla beans on extraction of vanillin and main aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Pardío, Violeta T; Flores, Argel; López, Karla M; Martínez, David I; Márquez, Ofelia; Waliszewski, Krzysztof N

    2018-06-01

    Endogenous and exogenous enzymatic hydrolysis carried out to obtain vanilla extracts with higher concentrations of vanillin using green vanilla beans. Sequences initiated with freezing of green vanilla beans at - 1 °C for 24 h, followed by endogenous hydrolysis under optimal β-glucosidase activity at 4.2 and 35 °C for 96 h, exogenous hydrolysis with Crystalzyme PML-MX at pH 5.0 and 40 °C for 72 h, and ethanol extraction at 40% (v v -1 ) for 30 days. In the proposed method, 200 g of fresh green vanilla beans with 84% moisture (32 g dry base) were used to obtain a liter of single fold vanilla extract. This method allowed the release of 82.57% of the theoretically available vanillin from its precursor glucovanillin with 5.78 g 100 g -1 green vanilla beans (dry base). Vanillic acid, p -hydroxybenzaldehyde and vanillyl alcohol were also released and found in commercial and enzymatic extracts. Glucovanillin was detected in commercial and traditional extracts but was absent in enzymatic extracts, indicating incomplete hydrolysis during the curing process. An in vitro assay was conducted to determine if the presence of peroxidase during hydrolysis might affect overall vanillin concentration. Results showed that POD can use vanillin as a substrate under conditions similar to those in which hydrolysis was conducted (pH 5.0 and 50 °C), possibly explaining why vanillin concentration was not complete at the end of the process.

  18. Influence of foam structure on the release kinetics of volatiles from espresso coffee prior to consumption.

    PubMed

    Dold, Susanne; Lindinger, Christian; Kolodziejczyk, Eric; Pollien, Philippe; Ali, Santo; Germain, Juan Carlos; Perin, Sonia Garcia; Pineau, Nicolas; Folmer, Britta; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Barron, Denis; Hartmann, Christoph

    2011-10-26

    The relationship between the physical structure of espresso coffee foam, called crema, and the above-the-cup aroma release was studied. Espresso coffee samples were produced using the Nespresso extraction system. The samples were extracted with water with different levels of mineral content, which resulted in liquid phases with similar volatile profiles but foams with different structure properties. The structure parameters foam volume, foam drainage, and lamella film thickness at the foam surface were quantified using computer-assisted microscopic image analysis and a digital caliper. The above-the-cup volatile concentration was measured online by using PTR-MS and headspace sampling. A correlation study was done between crema structure parameters and above-the-cup volatile concentration. In the first 2.5 min after the start of the coffee extraction, the presence of foam induced an increase of concentration of selected volatile markers, independently if the crema was of high or low stability. At times longer than 2.5 min, the aroma marker concentration depends on both the stability of the crema and the volatility of the specific aroma compounds. Mechanisms of above-the-cup volatile release involved gas bubble stability, evaporation, and diffusion. It was concluded that after the initial aroma burst (during the first 2-3 min after the beginning of extraction), for the present sample space a crema of high stability provides a stronger aroma barrier over several minutes.

  19. Impact of crema on the aroma release and the in-mouth sensory perception of espresso coffee.

    PubMed

    Barron, D; Pineau, N; Matthey-Doret, W; Ali, S; Sudre, J; Germain, J C; Kolodziejczyk, E; Pollien, P; Labbe, D; Jarisch, C; Dugas, V; Hartmann, C; Folmer, B

    2012-09-01

    A set of six espresso coffees with different foam characteristics and similar above cup and in-mouth flavour sensory profiles was produced by combination of two varying parameters, the extraction pressure and the filtration of the coffee beverage. The coffees were subsequently evaluated in a comparative manner by a set of analytical (headspace, nose-space) and sensory (Temporal Dominance of Sensations) techniques. The presence of espresso crema in its standard quantity was demonstrated to be associated with the optimum release of pleasant high volatiles, both in the above cup headspace and in-mouth. On the other hand, the TDS study demonstrated that increasing amount of crema was associated with increasing roasted dominance along coffee consumption. Furthermore, a parallel was established between the roasted sensory dominance and the dominant release of 2-methylfuran in the nose-space. This was, however, an indirect link as 2-methylfuran was indeed a chemical marker of roasting but does not contribute to the roasted aroma. Lowering the standard amount of crema by filtration clearly decreased the release of pleasant high volatiles and the in-mouth roasted sensory dominance. On the other hand, increasing the usual crema volume by increasing the extraction pressure did not bring any added value concerning the above cup and in-mouth release of pleasant high volatiles.

  20. Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in a population-based prospective cohort of Japanese men and women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Inoue, Manami; Otani, Tetsuya; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2007-09-15

    We prospectively examined the association between coffee consumption and the risk of developing colorectal cancer in a large population-based cohort study (the JPHC Study) of Japanese men and women. Data were analyzed from a population-based cohort of 96,162 subjects (46,023 men and 50,139 women). A total of 1,163 incident colorectal cancers were identified during the follow-up period, including 763 cases of colon cancer and 400 of rectal cancer. We observed a significant inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of developing invasive colon cancer among women. Compared with those who almost never consumed coffee, women who regularly consumed 3 or more cups of coffee per day had a RR of 0.44 (95% CI = 0.19-1.04; p for trend = 0.04) after adjustment for potential confounding factors. However, no significant association was found for rectal cancer in women. In men, no significant decrease was observed in any colorectal cancer site. Further, additional analyses on the association of green tea consumption with colorectal cancer risk found no significant association in men or women. These findings suggest that coffee consumption may lower the risk of colon cancer among Japanese women. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. The coffee-machine bacteriome: biodiversity and colonisation of the wasted coffee tray leach

    PubMed Central

    Vilanova, Cristina; Iglesias, Alba; Porcar, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities are ubiquitous in both natural and artificial environments. However, microbial diversity is usually reduced under strong selection pressures, such as those present in habitats rich in recalcitrant or toxic compounds displaying antimicrobial properties. Caffeine is a natural alkaloid present in coffee, tea and soft drinks with well-known antibacterial properties. Here we present the first systematic analysis of coffee machine-associated bacteria. We sampled the coffee waste reservoir of ten different Nespresso machines and conducted a dynamic monitoring of the colonization process in a new machine. Our results reveal the existence of a varied bacterial community in all the machines sampled, and a rapid colonisation process of the coffee leach. The community developed from a pioneering pool of enterobacteria and other opportunistic taxa to a mature but still highly variable microbiome rich in coffee-adapted bacteria. The bacterial communities described here, for the first time, are potential drivers of biotechnologically relevant processes including decaffeination and bioremediation. PMID:26592442

  2. The coffee-machine bacteriome: biodiversity and colonisation of the wasted coffee tray leach.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Cristina; Iglesias, Alba; Porcar, Manuel

    2015-11-23

    Microbial communities are ubiquitous in both natural and artificial environments. However, microbial diversity is usually reduced under strong selection pressures, such as those present in habitats rich in recalcitrant or toxic compounds displaying antimicrobial properties. Caffeine is a natural alkaloid present in coffee, tea and soft drinks with well-known antibacterial properties. Here we present the first systematic analysis of coffee machine-associated bacteria. We sampled the coffee waste reservoir of ten different Nespresso machines and conducted a dynamic monitoring of the colonization process in a new machine. Our results reveal the existence of a varied bacterial community in all the machines sampled, and a rapid colonisation process of the coffee leach. The community developed from a pioneering pool of enterobacteria and other opportunistic taxa to a mature but still highly variable microbiome rich in coffee-adapted bacteria. The bacterial communities described here, for the first time, are potential drivers of biotechnologically relevant processes including decaffeination and bioremediation.

  3. Thrips (Thysanoptera) of coffee flowers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A survey of thrips (Thysanoptera) associated with coffee flowers was conducted in coffee plantations in Chiapas, Mexico. The main objectives were to identify them and to determine whether they were carrying coffee pollen grains. A total of 40 thrips species in 22 genera were identified. The most com...

  4. Caffeine content of decaffeinated coffee.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Rachel R; Fuehrlein, Brian; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; Cone, Edward J

    2006-10-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed drug in the world with coffee representing a major source of intake. Despite widespread availability, various medical conditions necessitate caffeine-restricted diets. Patients on certain prescription medications are advised to discontinue caffeine intake. Such admonition has implications for certain psychiatric patients because of pharmacokinetic interactions between caffeine and certain anti-anxiety drugs. In an effort to abstain from caffeine, patients may substitute decaffeinated for caffeinated coffee. However, decaffeinated beverages are known to contain caffeine in varying amounts. The present study determined the caffeine content in a variety of decaffeinated coffee drinks. In phase 1 of the study, 10 decaffeinated samples were collected from different coffee establishments. In phase 2 of the study, Starbucks espresso decaffeinated (N=6) and Starbucks brewed decaffeinated coffee (N=6) samples were collected from the same outlet to evaluate variability of caffeine content of the same drink. The 10 decaffeinated coffee samples from different outlets contained caffeine in the range of 0-13.9 mg/16-oz serving. The caffeine content for the Starbucks espresso and the Starbucks brewed samples collected from the same outlet were 3.0-15.8 mg/shot and 12.0-13.4 mg/16-oz serving, respectively. Patients vulnerable to caffeine effects should be advised that caffeine may be present in coffees purported to be decaffeinated. Further research is warranted on the potential deleterious effects of consumption of "decaffeinated" coffee that contains caffeine on caffeine-restricted patients. Additionally, further exploration is merited for the possible physical dependence potential of low doses of caffeine such as those concentrations found in decaffeinated coffee.

  5. Quantification of coffee blends for authentication of Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak) via metabolomics: A proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Jumhawan, Udi; Putri, Sastia Prama; Yusianto; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-07-01

    Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak), an animal-digested coffee with an exotic feature, carries a notorious reputation of being the rarest and most expensive coffee beverage in the world. Considering that illegal mixture of cheap coffee into civet coffee is a growing concern among consumers, we evaluated the use of metabolomics approach and orthogonal projection to latent structures (OPLS) prediction technique to quantify the degree of coffee adulteration. Two prediction sets, consisting of certified and commercial coffee, were made from a blend of civet and regular coffee with eleven mixing percentages. The prediction model exhibited accurate estimation of coffee blend percentage thus, successfully validating the prediction and quantification of the mixing composition of known-unknown samples. This work highlighted proof of concept of metabolomics application to predict degree of coffee adulteration by determining the civet coffee fraction in blends. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Clean-Up Methods for Ochratoxin A on Wine, Beer, Roasted Coffee and Chili Commercialized in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Prelle, Ambra; Spadaro, Davide; Denca, Aleksandra; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2013-01-01

    The most common technique used to detect ochratoxin A (OTA) in food matrices is based on extraction, clean-up, and chromatography detection. Different clean-up cartridges, such as immunoaffinity columns (IAC), molecular imprinting polymers (MIP), Mycosep™ 229, Mycospin™, and Oasis® HLB (Hydrophilic Lipophilic balance) as solid phase extraction were tested to optimize the purification for red wine, beer, roasted coffee and chili. Recovery, reproducibility, reproducibility, limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were calculated for each clean-up method. IAC demonstrated to be suitable for OTA analysis in wine and beer with recovery rate >90%, as well as Mycosep™ for wine and chili. On the contrary, MIP columns were the most appropriate to clean up coffee. A total of 120 samples (30 wines, 30 beers, 30 roasted coffee, 30 chili) marketed in Italy were analyzed, by applying the developed clean-up methods. Twenty-seven out of 120 samples analyzed (22.7%: two wines, five beers, eight coffees, and 12 chili) resulted positive to OTA. A higher incidence of OTA was found in chili (40.0%) more than wine (6.6%), beers (16.6%) and coffee (26.6%). Moreover, OTA concentration in chili was the highest detected, reaching 47.8 µg/kg. Furthermore, three samples (2.5%), two wines and one chili, exceeded the European threshold. PMID:24152987

  7. Process technology of luwak coffee through bioreactor utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadipernata, M.; Nugraha, S.

    2018-01-01

    Indonesia has an advantage in producing exotic coffee that is Luwak coffee. Luwak coffee is produced from the fermentation process in digestion of civet. Luwak coffee production is still limited due to the difficulty level in the use of civet animals as the only medium of Luwak coffee making. The research was conducted by developing technology of luwak coffee production through bioreactor utilization and addition the bacteria isolate from gastric of civet. The process conditions in the bioreactor which include temperature, pH, and bacteria isolate of civet are adjusted to the process that occurs in civet digestion, including peristaltic movement on the stomach and small intestine of the civet will be replaced by the use of propellers that rotate on the bioreactor. The result of research showed that proximat analysis data of artificial/bioreactor luwak coffee did not significant different with original luwak coffee. However, the original luwak coffee has higher content of caffeine compared to bioreactor luwak coffee. Based on the cuping test the bioreactor luwak coffee has a value of 84.375, while the original luwak coffee is 84.875. As the result, bioreactor luwak coffee has excellent taste that similiar with original luwak coffee taste.

  8. Chamomile Flower, Myrrh, and Coffee Charcoal, Components of a Traditional Herbal Medicinal Product, Diminish Proinflammatory Activation in Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vissiennon, Cica; Hammoud, Dima; Rodewald, Steffen; Fester, Karin; Goos, Karl-Heinz; Nieber, Karen; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2017-07-01

    A traditional herbal medicinal product, containing myrrh, chamomile flower, and coffee charcoal, has been used in Germany for the relief of gastrointestinal complaints for decades. Clinical studies suggest its use in the maintenance therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. However, the pharmacological mechanisms underlying the clinical effects are not yet fully understood.The present study aims to elucidate immunopharmacological activities of myrrh, chamomile flower, and coffee charcoal by studying the influence of each plant extract on gene expression and protein release of activated human macrophages.The plant extracts effect on gene and protein expression of activated human monocyte-derived macrophages was investigated by microarray gene expression analysis and assessment of the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators (TNF α , chemokine CXCL13, and interleukin-10) using an ELISA test system.The extracts of myrrh, chamomile flower, and coffee charcoal influenced gene expression of activated human macrophages within the cytokine/chemokine signaling pathway. Particularly, chemokine gene expression was suppressed. Subsequently, the production of CXCL13 and, to a minor extent, cytokine TNF α was inhibited by all herbal extracts. Chamomile flower and coffee charcoal extracts enhanced interleukin-10 release from activated macrophages. The observed effects on protein release were comparable to the effect of budesonide, which decreased TNF α and CXCL13 and enhanced interleukin-10 release.The components of the herbal medicinal product influence the activity of activated human macrophages on both gene and protein level. The induced alterations within chemokine/cytokine signaling could contribute to a positive effect on the immunological homeostasis, which is disturbed in patients with chronic intestinal inflammation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The Impact of Coffee on Health.

    PubMed

    Nieber, Karen

    2017-11-01

    Coffee is one of the most popular and widely consumed beverages worldwide due to its stimulating effects on the central nervous system as well as its taste and aroma. Coffee is a complex mixture of more than 800 volatile compounds whereas caffeine and chlorogenic acids are the most common compounds. During the last years, coffee has progressively moved to a less negative position on health due to its better-known pharmacology. Caffeine, e.g., in a cup of coffee, appears to exert most of its effects through an antagonism of the adenosine receptors. Novel approaches in epidemiological studies and experimental researches suggest that coffee consumption may help to prevent several chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and liver disease. Most prospective cohort studies have not found coffee consumption to be associated with a significantly increased cardiovascular disease risk. There is also evidence that decaffeinated coffee may, in some respect, have similar benefits as regular coffee, indicating that besides caffeine other components contribute to the health protecting effects. For adults consuming moderate amounts of coffee (3 - 4 cups/d providing 300 - 400 mg/d of caffeine), there is little evidence of health risks and some evidence of health benefits. This review provides up-to-date information about coffee on health. Topics addressed include the cardiovascular system, liver diseases, and diabetes as well as gastrointestinal disorders. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Development of new antioxidant active packaging films based on ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH) and green tea extract.

    PubMed

    Lopez de Dicastillo, Carol; Nerin, Cristina; Alfaro, Pilar; Catala, Ramon; Gavara, Rafael; Hernandez-Munoz, Pilar

    2011-07-27

    Ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH) films containing green tea extract were successfully produced by extrusion. The films were brown and translucent, and the addition of the extract increased the water and oxygen barrier at low relative humidity but increased the water sensitivity, the glass transition temperature, and the crystallinity of the films and improved their thermal resistance. An analysis by HPLC revealed that the antioxidant components of the extract suffered partial degradation during extrusion, reducing the content of catechin gallates and increasing the concentration of free gallic acid. Exposure of the films to various food simulants showed that the liquid simulants increased their capacity to reduce DPPH(•) and ABTS(•+) radicals. The release of green tea extract components into the simulant monitored by HPLC showed that all compounds present in the green tea extract were partially released, although the extent and kinetics of release were dependent on the type of food. In aqueous food simulants, gallic acid was the main antioxidant component released with partition coefficient values ca. 200. In 95% ethanol (fatty food simulant) the K value for gallic acid decreased to 8 and there was a substantial contribution of catechins (K in the 1000 range) to a greatly increased antioxidant efficiency. Kinetically, gallic acid was released more quickly than catechins, owing to its faster diffusivity in the polymer matrix as a consequence of its smaller molecular size, although the most relevant effect is the plasticization of the matrix by alcohol, increasing the diffusion coefficient >10-fold. Therefore, the materials here developed with the combination of antioxidant substances that constitute the green tea extract could be used in the design of antioxidant active packaging for all type of foods, from aqueous to fatty products, the compounds responsible for the protection being those with the higher compatibility with the packaged product.

  11. The suitability of the simplified method of the analysis of coffee infusions on the content of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn and the study of the effect of preparation conditions on the leachability of elements into the coffee brew.

    PubMed

    Stelmach, Ewelina; Pohl, Pawel; Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna

    2013-12-01

    A fast and straightforward method of the analysis of coffee infusions was developed for measurements of total concentrations of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Its validity was proved by the analysis of spiked samples; recoveries of added metals were found to be within 98-104% while the precision was better than 4%. The method devised was used for the analysis of re-distilled water infusions of six popular ground coffees available in the Polish market. Using the mud coffee preparation it was established that percentages of metals leached in these conditions varied a lot among analysed coffees, especially for Ca (14-42%), Mg (6-25%) and Zn (1-24%). For remaining metals, the highest extractabilities were assessed for Mn (30-52%) while the lowest for Fe (4-16%) and Cu (2-12%). In addition, it was found that the water type and the coffee brewing preparation method influence the concentration of studied metals in coffee infusions the most. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Green Tea Extracts Epigallocatechin-3-gallate for Different Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chenyu; Deng, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a component extracted from green tea, has been proved to have multiple effects on human pathological and physiological processes, and its mechanisms are discrepant in cancer, vascularity, bone regeneration, and nervous system. Although there are multiple benefits associated with EGCG, more and more challenges are still needed to get through. For example, EGCG shows low bioactivity via oral administration. This review focuses on effects of EGCG, including anti-cancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticollagenase, and antifibrosis effects, to express the potential of EGCG and necessity of further studies in this field. PMID:28884125

  13. Comparison of reduced sugar high quality chocolates sweetened with stevioside and crude stevia 'green' extract.

    PubMed

    Torri, Luisa; Frati, Alessandra; Ninfali, Paolino; Mantegna, Stefano; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Morini, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    The demand for zero and reduced-sugar food products containing cocoa is expanding continuously. The present study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of producing high-quality chocolate sweetened with a crude extract of Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) prepared by a green microwave-assisted water-steam extraction procedure. Seven approximately isosweet chocolate formulations were developed, mixing cocoa paste, sucrose, commercial stevioside, crude green extract and maltitol in different proportions. All samples were analyzed for the determination of polyphenol and flavonoid content, antioxidant activity, and sensory acceptability. The use of a crude stevia extract allowed low-sugar, high-quality chocolates to be obtained that were also acceptable by consumers and had a significant increased antioxidant activity. Moreover, consumers' segmentation revealed a cluster of consumers showing the same overall liking for the sample with 50% sucrose replaced by the stevia crude extract as that obtained with the commercial stevioside and the control sample (without sucrose replacement). The results provide information that can contribute to promoting the development of sweet food products, with advantages in terms of an improved nutritional value (reduced sugar content and increased antioxidant activity) and a reduced impact of the production process on the environment. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Fruit peel extract mediated green synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, O. J.; Soto-Robles, C. A.; Gómez-Gutiérrez, C. M.; Vilchis-Nestor, A. R.; Castro-Beltrán, A.; Olivas, A.; Luque, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    This work presents a study of the effects on the photocatalytic capabilities of zinc oxide nanoparticles when prepared via green synthesis using different fruit peel extracts as reducing agents. Zinc nitrate was used as a source of the zinc ions, while Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato), Citrus sinensis (orange), Citrus paradisi (grapefruit) and Citrus aurantifolia (lemon) contributed their peels for extracts. The Synthesized Samples were studied and characterized through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). All samples presented a band at 618 cm-1, indicating the presence of the Znsbnd O bond. The different samples all presented the same hexagonal crystal growth in their structure, the Wurtzite phase. The surface morphology of the nanoparticles showed that, depending on the extract used, the samples vary in size and shape distribution due to the chemical composition of the extracts. The photocatalytic properties of the zinc oxide samples were tested through UV light aided degradation of methylene blue. Most samples exhibited degradation rates at 180 min of around 97%, a major improvement when compared to chemically synthesized commercially available zinc oxide nanoparticles.

  15. Enzymatic mitigation of 5-O-chlorogenic acid for an improved digestibility of coffee.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Mareike; Berger, Ralf G; Nieter, Annabel

    2018-08-30

    A p-coumaroyl esterase from Rhizoctonia solani was used to decrease 5-O-chlorogenic acid (5-CQA) content in coffee powder. HPLC-UV showed a decline of up to 98% of 5-CQA after the enzyme treatment. Effects on aroma were determined by means of aroma extract dilution analysis. Flavour dilution factors of treated and control extract differed in four volatile compounds only. Effect on aroma and taste was evaluated by sensory tests. No significant differences were perceived, and no off-flavour nor off-taste was noted. As chlorogenic acids are suspected to cause stomach irritating effects in sensitive people, the enzyme treatment offers a technically feasible approach to improve the quality of coffee beverages by reducing 5-CQA concentration without significantly affecting the aroma and taste profile. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Total phenolics and antioxidant activities of fenugreek, green tea, black tea, grape seed, ginger, rosemary, gotu kola, and ginkgo extracts, vitamin E, and tert-butylhydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Rababah, Taha M; Hettiarachchy, Navam S; Horax, Ronny

    2004-08-11

    The total phenolics and antioxidant activities of fenugreek, green tea, black tea, grape seed, ginger, rosemary, gotu kola, and ginkgo extracts, vitamin E, and tert-butylhydroquinone, were determined. Grape seed and green tea were analyzed for their phenolic constituents using high-performance liquid chromatography. The total phenolics of the plant extracts, determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, ranged from 24.8 to 92.5 mg of chlorogenic acid equivalent/g dry material. The antioxidant activities of methanolic extracts determined by conjugated diene measurement of methyl linoleate were 3.4-86.3%. The antioxidant activity of the extracts using chicken fat by an oxidative stability instrument (4.6-10.2 h of induction time) followed a similar trend in antioxidant activity as determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Seven phenolics in grape seed and green tea extracts were identified that ranged from 15.38 to 1158.49 and 18.3 to 1087.02 mg/100 g of extract, respectively. Plant extracts such as green tea and grape seed extracts can be used to retard lipid oxidation in a variety of food products.

  17. Effects of phytoestrogen extracts isolated from rye, green and yellow pea seeds on hormone production and proliferation of trophoblast tumor cells Jeg3.

    PubMed

    Matscheski, A; Richter, D-U; Hartmann, A-M; Effmert, U; Jeschke, U; Kupka, M S; Abarzua, S; Briese, V; Ruth, W; Kragl, U; Piechulla, B

    2006-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are a diverse group of non-steroidal plant compounds. Because they have chemical structures similar to estrogens they are able to bind on estrogen receptors in humans. In this study, we tested the effects of crude phytoestrogen extracts from rye (Secale cereale), green pea (Pisum sativum) and yellow pea seeds (Pisum sativum cv.) on cell proliferation and the production of progesterone in trophoblast tumor cells of the cell line Jeg3. Isoflavone extracts from green and yellow pea seeds and lignan extracts from rye seeds were obtained, using different extraction methods. Isolated extracts were incubated in different concentrations with trophoblast tumor cells. Untreated cells were used as controls. At designated times, aliquots were removed and tested for estradiol and progesterone production. In addition, we tested the effects of the phytoestrogen extracts on cell proliferation. Cell proliferation is significantly inhibited by potential phytoestrogens isolated from rye, green and yellow pea seeds in trophoblast tumor cells of the cell line Jeg3. We found a correlation between the effects of proliferation and production of estradiol in isoflavone extracts from green and yellow pea seeds in Jeg3 cells. In addition, higher concentrations of isoflavones isolated from green pea seeds and lignans from rye showed also a inhibition of progesterone production whereas higher concentrations of rye lignans elevated estradiol production in Jeg3 cells. A useful indicator test system for potential phytoestrogens could be established. Based on the obtained results it is proposed that green and yellow pea seeds contain measurable concentrations of isoflavones and rye seeds contain lignans which can be isolated and used for special human diet programs. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Polymer modified glassy carbon electrode for the electrochemical determination of caffeine in coffee.

    PubMed

    Amare, Meareg; Admassie, Shimelis

    2012-05-15

    4-Amino-3-hydroxynaphthalene sulfonic acid (AHNSA) was electropolymerized on a glassy carbon electrode. The deposited film showed electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of caffeine. The polymer-modified electrode showed high sensitivity, selectivity and stability in the determination of caffeine in coffee. The peak current increased linearly with the concentration of caffeine in the range of 6 × 10(-8) to 4 × 10(-5) mol L(-1), with a detection limit of 1.37 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) (LoD = 3δ/slope). Analysis of caffeine in coffee was affected neither by sample matrices nor by structurally similar compounds. Recoveries ranging between 93.75 ± 2.32 and 100.75 ± 3.32 were achieved from coffee extracts indicating the applicability of the developed method for real sample analyses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The immediate and short-term chemosensory impacts of coffee and caffeine on cardiovascular activity.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Michael K; Whitehouse, Julie M; Shine, Gillian; Whitton, Peter A; Towell, Anthony

    2011-09-01

    The immediate and short-term chemosensory impacts of coffee and caffeine on cardiovascular activity. Caffeine is detected by 5 of the 25 gustatory bitter taste receptors (hTAS2Rs) as well as by intestinal STC-1 cell lines. Thus there is a possibility that caffeine may elicit reflex autonomic responses via chemosensory stimulation. The cardiovascular impacts of double-espresso coffee, regular (130 mg caffeine) and decaffeinated, and encapsulated caffeine (134 mg) were compared with a placebo-control capsule. Measures of four post-ingestion phases were extracted from a continuous recording of cardiovascular parameters and contrasted with pre-ingestion measures. Participants (12 women) were seated in all but the last phase when they were standing. Both coffees increased heart rate immediately after ingestion by decreasing both the diastolic interval and ejection time. The increases in heart rate following the ingestion of regular coffee extended for 30 min. Encapsulated caffeine decreased arterial compliance and increased diastolic pressure when present in the gut and later in the standing posture. These divergent findings indicate that during ingestion the caffeine in coffee can elicit autonomic arousal via the chemosensory stimulation of the gustatory receptors which extends for at least 30 min. In contrast, encapsulated caffeine can stimulate gastrointestinal receptors and elicit vascular responses involving digestion. Research findings on caffeine are not directly applicable to coffee and vice versa. The increase of heart rate resulting from coffee drinking is a plausible pharmacological explanation for the observation that coffee increases risk for coronary heart disease in the hour after ingestion. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  20. Cloud-point extraction of green-polymers from Cupriavidus necator lysate using thermoseparating-based aqueous two-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Yoong Kit; Lan, John Chi-Wei; Loh, Hwei-San; Ling, Tau Chuan; Ooi, Chien Wei; Show, Pau Loke

    2017-03-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), a class of renewable and biodegradable green polymers, have gained attraction as a potential substitute for the conventional plastics due to the increasing concern towards environmental pollution as well as the rapidly depleting petroleum reserve. Nevertheless, the high cost of downstream processing of PHA has been a bottleneck for the wide adoption of PHAs. Among the options of PHAs recovery techniques, aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) outshines the others by having the advantages of providing a mild environment for bioseparation, being green and non-toxic, the capability to handle a large operating volume and easily scaled-up. Utilizing unique properties of thermo-responsive polymer which has decreasing solubility in its aqueous solution as the temperature rises, cloud point extraction (CPE) is an ATPE technique that allows its phase-forming component to be recycled and reused. A thorough literature review has shown that this is the first time isolation and recovery of PHAs from Cupriavidus necator H16 via CPE was reported. The optimum condition for PHAs extraction (recovery yield of 94.8% and purification factor of 1.42 fold) was achieved under the conditions of 20 wt/wt % ethylene oxide-propylene oxide (EOPO) with molecular weight of 3900 g/mol and 10 mM of sodium chloride addition at thermoseparating temperature of 60°C with crude feedstock limit of 37.5 wt/wt %. Recycling and reutilization of EOPO 3900 can be done at least twice with satisfying yield and PF. CPE has been demonstrated as an effective technique for the extraction of PHAs from microbial crude culture. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Green reduction of graphene oxide via Lycium barbarum extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dandan; Liu, Qinfu; Cheng, Hongfei; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Sen

    2017-02-01

    The synthesis of graphene from graphene oxide (GO) usually involves toxic reducing agents that are harmful to human health and the environment. Here, we report a facile approach for effective reduction of GO, for the first time, using Lycium barbarum extract as a green and natural reducing agent. The morphology and de-oxidation efficiency of the reduced graphene were characterized and results showed that Lycium barbarum extract can effectively reduce GO into few layered graphene with a high carbon to oxygen ratio (6.5), comparable to that of GO reduced by hydrazine hydrate (6.6). The possible reduction mechanism of GO may be due to the active components existing in Lycium barbarum fruits, which have high binding affinity to the oxygen containing groups to form their corresponding oxides and other by-products. This method avoided the use of any nocuous chemicals, thus facilitating the mass production of graphene and graphene-based bio-materials.

  2. The analysis of aroma/flavor compounds in green tea using ice concentration linked with extractive stirrer.

    PubMed

    Alluhayb, Abdullah H; Logue, Brian A

    2017-10-06

    Worldwide, green tea is one of the most popular beverages. It promotes blood circulation, liver function, and lowers the risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. This drink is characterized by the distinctive odors and flavors produced by its constituent compounds, with its value predicated on the amount and type of constituents extracted from the tea leaves during brewing. Ice concentration linked with extractive stirrer (ICECLES) is a novel sample preparation technique, especially applicable for the extraction of relatively polar compounds while retaining excellent extraction efficiencies for non-polar compounds. In this study, ICECLES was used to prepare green tea for analysis of aroma/flavor compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). ICECLES performed very well, revealing 301 constituents as compared to 245 for SBSE (i.e., 56 more constituents were detected via ICECLES). Moreover, ICECLES produced stronger signal to noise ratios for all except 4 of 301 constituents, with a maximum signal enhancement of 19. Of the constituents which were only detectable using ICECLES, some very important aroma/flavor and/or medicinal compounds were easily identified, including furfural, furfural alcohol, maltol, eugenol, 2-methylpyrazine, phenethyl alcohol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, and α-terpineol. Overall, we confirmed that ICECLES sample preparation followed by GC-MS consistently allowed more complete green tea aroma/flavor analysis, especially for relatively polar compounds, some of which are critical for flavor quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Capsule shell material impacts the in vitro disintegration and dissolution behaviour of a green tea extract.

    PubMed

    Glube, Natalie; Moos, Lea von; Duchateau, Guus

    2013-01-01

    In vitro disintegration and dissolution are routine methods used to assess the performance and quality of oral dosage forms. The purpose of the current work was to determine the potential for interaction between capsule shell material and a green tea extract and the impact it can have on the release. A green tea extract was formulated into simple powder-in-capsule formulations of which the capsule shell material was either of gelatin or HPMC origin. The disintegration times were determined together with the dissolution profiles in compendial and biorelevant media. All formulations disintegrated within 30 min, meeting the USP criteria for botanical formulations. An immediate release dissolution profile was achieved for gelatin capsules in all media but not for the specified HPMC formulations. Dissolution release was especially impaired for HPMCgell at pH 1.2 and for both HPMC formulations in FeSSIF media suggesting the potential for food interactions. The delayed release from studied HPMC capsule materials is likely attributed to an interaction between the catechins, the major constituents of the green tea extract, and the capsule shell material. An assessment of in vitro dissolution is recommended prior to the release of a dietary supplement or clinical trial investigational product to ensure efficacy.

  4. Green synthesis and spectral characterization of silver nanoparticles from Lakshmi tulasi (Ocimum sanctum) leaf extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subba Rao, Y.; Kotakadi, Venkata S.; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.; Reddy, A. V.; Sai Gopal, D. V. R.

    2013-02-01

    A simple method for the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using aqueous extract of Lakshmi tulasi (Ocimum sanctum) leaf as a reducing and stabilizing agent. AgNPs were rapidly synthesized using aqueous extract of tulasi leaf with AgNO3 solution within 15 min. The green synthesized AgNPs were characterized using physic-chemical techniques viz., UV-Vis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Characterization data reveals that the particles were crystalline in nature and triangle shaped with an average size of 42 nm. The zeta potential of AgNPs were found to be -55.0 mV. This large negative zeta potential value indicates repulsion among AgNPs a