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Sample records for grief disorder psychometric

  1. Measuring Grief Following Miscarriage: Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Perinatal Grief Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Beatrice P. Y.; Chung, Tony K. H.; Lee, Dominic T. S.; Kong, Grace W. S.; Lok, Ingrid H.

    2013-01-01

    Grief following miscarriage is a complex psychological response. This study was conducted to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS). A total of 280 Chinese women completed the PGS immediately following a diagnosis of miscarriage (baseline) and were reassessed at 12 months follow-up. The factor…

  2. Grief

    MedlinePlus

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Powell AD. Grief, bereavement, and adjustment disorders. ...

  3. Diagnostic and clinical considerations in prolonged grief disorder

    PubMed Central

    Maercker, Andreas; Lalor, John

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the similarities and differences between prolonged grief disorder (PGD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It highlights how a PTSD-related understanding aids the investigation and clinical management of PGD. Grief has long been understood as a natural response to bereavement, as serious psychological and physiological stress has been regarded as a potential outcome of extreme or traumatic stress. PTSD was first included in DSM-III in 1980. In the mid-1980s, the first systematic investigation began into whether there is an extreme or pathological form of mourning. Meanwhile, there is much research literature on complicated, traumatic, or prolonged grief This literature is reviewed in this article, with the following questions: Is it possible to distinguish normal from non-normal grief? Which clinical presentation does PGD have—and how does this compare with PTSD? Finally, diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic approaches and existing tools are presented. PMID:22754289

  4. [Bereavement and complicated grief: towards a definition of Prolonged Grief Disorder for DSM-5].

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Luigi; Lai, Carlo; Luciani, Massimiliano; Morelli, Emanuela; Buttinelli, Elena; Aceto, Paola; Lai, Silvia; D'Onofrio, Marianna; Galli, Federico; Bellizzi, Fernando; Penco, Italo

    2014-01-01

    Mourning is a natural response to a loss and a condition which most people experience several times during their lives. Most individuals adjust adequately to the loss of a relative, neverthless, a small but noteworthy proportion of bereaved individuals experience a syndrome of prolonged psychological distress in relation to bereavement. Prolonged distress and disability in connection with bereavement has been termed Complicated Grief (CG) or Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD). The purpose of this paper is to analyze the literature on loss and mourning making a review of the main studies published between 1993 and 2013, identified through a search conducted on Medline/PubMed, in order to describe the epidemiological and clinical aspects of "normal" grief and "complicated" grief, pointing out the path of the clinical definition of PGD and proposed diagnostic criteria for inclusion in the next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth edition (DSM-5). The two main diagnostic systems proposed by Horowitz and Prigerson are also compared.

  5. Should prolonged grief be reclassified as a mental disorder in DSM-5?: reconsidering the empirical and conceptual arguments for complicated grief disorder.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2012-06-01

    The proposed changes to DSM-5 will create new categories of mental disorder (referred to here generically as Prolonged Grief Disorder'' [PGD]) to diagnose individuals experiencing prolonged intense grief reactions to the loss of a loved one. Individuals could be diagnosed even if they have no depressive or anxiety symptoms but only symptoms typical of grief (e.g., yearning, avoidance of reminders, disbelief, feelings of emptiness). The main challenge for such proposals is to establish that the proposed diagnostic criteria validly discriminate a genuine psychiatric disorder of grief from intense normal grief. With this test in mind, I evaluate the soundness of four empirical arguments and one conceptual argument that have been put forward to support such proposals: (1) PGD has discriminant validity because distinctive, pathognomonic symptoms distinguish it from normal grief; (2) PGD has discriminant validity because it identifies grief symptoms that are of greater absolute severity than in normal grief; (3) PGD has predictive validity because it implies a chronic, interminable process of grieving, thus a derailment of the normal process of grief resolution; (4) PGD has predictive validity because it predicts negative mental and physical health outcomes unlikely in normal grief; and (5) PGD has conceptual validity because grief is analogous to a wound or, alternatively, lengthy grief is analogous to a wound that does not heal. Upon close examination, each of these arguments turns out to have serious empirical or conceptual deficiencies. I conclude that the proposed diagnostic criteria for PGD fail to discriminate disorder from intense normal grief and are likely to yield massive false-positive diagnoses. Consequently, the proposal to add pathological grief categories to DSM-5 should be withdrawn pending further research to identify more valid criteria for diagnosing PGD.

  6. Measuring grief and loss after spinal cord injury: Development, validation and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Grief and Loss item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kalpakjian, Claire Z.; Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Bombardier, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop an item response theory (IRT) calibrated Grief and Loss item bank as part of the Spinal Cord Injury – Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) measurement system. Design A literature review guided framework development of grief/loss. New items were created from focus groups. Items were revised based on expert review and patient feedback and were then field tested. Analyses included confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), graded response IRT modeling and evaluation of differential item functioning (DIF). Setting We tested a 20-item pool at several rehabilitation centers across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Department of Veterans Affairs hospital. Participants A total of 717 individuals with SCI answered the grief and loss questions. Results The final calibrated item bank resulted in 17 retained items. A unidimensional model was observed (CFI = 0.976; RMSEA = 0.078) and measurement precision was good (theta range between −1.48 to 2.48). Ten items were flagged for DIF, however, after examination of effect sizes found this to be negligible with little practical impact on score estimates. Conclusions This study indicates that the SCI-QOL Grief and Loss item bank represents a psychometrically robust measurement tool. Short form items are also suggested and computer adaptive tests are available. PMID:26010969

  7. An initial assessment of the psychometric properties of the Complicated Grief Questionnaire for People with Intellectual Disabilities (CGQ-ID).

    PubMed

    Guerin, Suzanne; Dodd, Philip; Tyrell, Janette; McEvoy, John; Buckley, Sarah; Hillery, John

    2009-01-01

    Given the research evidence that people with intellectual disability (ID) do grieve following bereavement, the present study aimed to describe and gather preliminary psychometric data for a version of the Inventory of Complicated Grief [Prigerson, H. G., Maciejewski, P. K., Reynolds, C. F., Bierhals, A. J., Newsom, J. T., Fasiczka, A., et al. (1995). Inventory of Complicated Grief: A scale to measure maladaptive symptoms of loss. Psychiatry Research, 59, 65-79] adapted for use with this population. Carers completed the Complicated Grief Questionnaire for People with ID (CGQ-ID) for 76 individuals with ID, half of whom had experienced a parental bereavement within the last 2 years. The final scale and subscales (Separation Distress and Traumatic Grief) showed very good internal and inter-rater reliability and distinguished between the two groups. While the findings suggest that the CGQ-ID is suitable for identifying complicated grief-type symptoms among adults with ID, further research must be conducted to ascertain whether the findings can be replicated.

  8. Complicated grief in those bereaved by violent death: the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder on complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Satomi; Ito, Masaya; Shirai, Akemi; Konishi, Takako

    2012-06-01

    Violent death, such as homicide, accident, and suicide, is sudden, unexpected, and caused by intentional power, The prevalence of complicated grief among those bereaved by violent death is 12.5% to 78.0%. The factors affecting this prevalence rate are considered to be comorbid mental disorders, lack of readiness for the death, difficulty in making sense of the death, high level of negative appraisal about the self and others, and various social stressors. Post-traumatic stress disorder is, in particular, considered to contribute to the development of complicated grief by suppressing function of the medial prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex, which works at facilitating the normal mourning process. An understanding of the mechanism and biological basis of complicated grief by violent death will be helpful in developing effective preventive intervention and treatment.

  9. Underutilization of Mental Health Services Among Bereaved Caregivers With Prolonged Grief Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenthal, Wendy G.; Nilsson, Matthew; Kissane, David W.; Breitbart, William; Kacel, Elizabeth; Jones, Eric C.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined grief and mental health service use among 86 bereaved caregivers of advanced cancer patients. Methods Caregivers were assessed before (median=3.1 months) and after (median=6.6 months) patients’ deaths for prolonged grief disorder, axis I psychiatric disorders, mental health service use, suicidality, and health-related quality of life. Results Sixteen percent of the bereaved sample met criteria for prolonged grief disorder, which was significantly associated with suicidality and poorer health-related quality of life, but not with mental health service use. The majority of bereaved caregivers with prolonged grief disorder did not access mental health services. In multivariable analyses, having discussed psychological concerns with a health care professional when the patient was ill was the only significant predictor of mental health service use during bereavement. Conclusions Because bereaved caregivers with prolonged grief disorder underutilize mental health services, connecting them with services while the patient is still alive may be beneficial. PMID:21969652

  10. Associations between Prolonged Grief Disorder, Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Anxiety in Rwandan Genocide Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaal, Susanne; Dusingizemungu, Jean-Pierre; Jacob, Nadja; Neuner, Frank; Elbert, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that symptoms of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) represent a symptom cluster distinct from bereavement-related depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of the present study was to confirm and extend these findings using the most recent criteria defining PGD. The authors interviewed…

  11. Elevated rates of prolonged grief disorder in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, B; Morrison, R S; Vanderwerker, L C; Prigerson, H G

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD) in non-Whites is currently unknown. This study was performed to explore the prevalence of PGD in African Americans (AAs). Multivariable analysis of two studies of recently bereaved individuals found AAs to have significantly higher rates of PGD than Whites (21% [14 of 66] vs. 12% [55 of 471], respectively; p = 0.03). Experiencing a loved one's death as sudden or unexpected was also significantly associated with PGD over and above the effects of race/ethnicity. AAs may be at increased risk for the development of PGD. The development of effective interventions to treat PGD highlights the need to identify high-risk individuals and refer them to therapy and suggests the potential need for such therapies to adopt culturally sensitive approaches to care.

  12. Korean Version of Inventory of Complicated Grief Scale: Psychometric Properties in Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to validate the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG)-Korean version among 1,138 Korean adolescents, representing a response rate of 57% of 1,997 students. Participants completed a set of questionnaires including demographic variables (age, sex, years of education, experience of grief), the ICG, the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and the Lifetime Incidence of Traumatic Events-Child (LITE-C). Exploratory factor analysis was performed to determine whether the ICG items indicated complicated grief in Korean adolescents. The internal consistency of the ICG-Korean version was Cronbach's α=0.87. The test-retest reliability for a randomly selected sample of 314 participants in 2 weeks was r=0.75 (P<0.001). Concurrent validity was assessed using a correlation between the ICG total scores and the CDI total scores (r=0.75, P<0.001). The criterion-related validity based on the comparison of ICG total scores between adolescents without complicated grief (1.2±3.7) and adolescent with complicated grief (3.2±6.6) groups was relatively high (t=5.71, P<0.001). The data acquired from the 1,138 students was acceptable for a factor analysis (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy=0.911; Bartlett's Test of Sphericity, χ2=13,144.7, P<0.001). After omission of 3 items, the value of Cronbach's α increased from 0.87 for the 19-item ICG-Korean version to 0.93 for the 16-item ICG-Korean version. These results suggest that the ICG is a useful tool in assessing for complicated grief in Korean adolescents. However, the 16-item version of the ICG appeared to be more valid compared to the 19-item version of the ICG. We suggest that the 16-item version of the ICG be used to screen for complicated grief in Korean adolescents. PMID:26770046

  13. Supporting Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder through Grief and Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Kara; Regan, Tara; Megronigle, Laura; Rhinehalt, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    All student populations require support from school staff during times of grief and loss. The grief process is highly personalized and depends on multiple factors, including the type of bond and relationship with the person, the student's prior experience of loss, and the age and developmental stage of the student (Quinn-Lee, 2014). Grief…

  14. The younger sibling of PTSD: similarities and differences between complicated grief and posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Maercker, Andreas; Znoj, Hansjörg

    2010-01-01

    Just as traumatic experiences may lead to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in some individuals, grief may also be a serious health concern for individuals who have experienced bereavement. At present, neither the DSM-IV nor the ICD-10 recognizes any form of grief as a mental disorder. The aim of this review is to summarize recent advances in definition, assessment, prevention, and treatment of complicated grief disorder (CGD) and to compare CGD with PTSD. Four areas are identified to be of importance to clinicians and researchers: (a) the recently proposed consensus criteria of CGD for DSM-V and ICD-11, (b) available assessment instruments, (c) recent prevention and treatment techniques and related effectiveness studies, and (d) emerging disorder models and research on risks and protective factors. This review focuses on the similarities and differences between CGD and PTSD and highlights how a PTSD-related understanding aids the investigation and clinical management of CGD. PMID:22893801

  15. Prolonged grief disorder and depression in widows due to the Rwandan genocide.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Susanne; Elbert, Thomas; Neuner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Should pathological grief be viewed as a nosological category, separate from other forms of mental diseases? Diagnostic criteria for "Prolonged Grief Disorder" (PGD) have recently been specified by Prigerson and her coworkers. We interviewed a total of 40 widows who had lost their husbands during the Rwandan genocide in 1994. We assessed Major Depression using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) and prolonged grief reactions with the PG-13. In order to examine the distinctiveness of the two syndromes we performed a multitrait correlational matrix analysis using modified versions of Generalized Proximity Functions (GPFs). 12.5% (n = 5) of the sample fulfilled the criteria for a diagnosis of PGD; 40% (n = 16) met criteria for Major Depressive Episode. The two syndromes were strongly associated. No discriminant validity was found between the two constructs suggesting that PGD may rather be an appearance of depression than a separate nosological entity.

  16. Distinctiveness of prolonged grief disorder symptoms among survivors of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Takumi; Hasegawa, Yukako; Hiraga, Masashi; Ishiki, Mikihito; Asukai, Nozomu

    2014-06-30

    Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD) has been proposed for diagnostic classification as an independent psychiatric disorder. Previous research has investigated it in relation to other axis I disorders in order to determine whether it could be considered an independent nosological entity. The distinctiveness of this condition was apparent in cases of ordinary bereavement and in those following human-made disasters. However, this disorder may be expanded to include bereavement resulting from natural disasters. The present study aims to explore the differences between this disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder or major depressive disorder as experienced after the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. The subjects were 82 hospital workers. Each type of disorder was assessed by means of the Inventory of Complicated Grief, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Exploratory factor analysis showed 3 dimensions, with PGD items independently clustering in the same dimension. Our findings support the uniqueness of PGD even in a post-natural disaster situation in a non-Western culture and warrant grief intervention for high-risk bereaved survivors.

  17. Efficacy of metacognitive therapy for prolonged grief disorder: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wenn, Jenine; O'Connor, Moira; Breen, Lauren J; Kane, Robert T; Rees, Clare S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Studies of effective psychotherapy for individuals suffering from the effects of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) are scarce. This paper describes the protocol for an evaluation of a metacognitive therapy programme designed specifically for PGD, to reduce the psychological distress and loss of functioning resulting from bereavement. Methods and analysis The proposed trial comprises three phases. Phase 1 consists of a review of the literature and semistructured interviews with key members of the target population to inform the development of a metacognitive therapy programme for Prolonged Grief. Phase 2 involves a randomised controlled trial to implement and evaluate the programme. Male and female adults (N=34) will be randomly assigned to either a wait list or an intervention group. Measures of PGD, anxiety, depression, rumination, metacognitions and quality of life will be taken pretreatment and posttreatment and at the 3-month and 6-month follow-up. The generalised linear mixed model will be used to assess treatment efficacy. Phase 3 will test the social validity of the programme. Discussion This study is the first empirical investigation of the efficacy of a targeted metacognitive treatment programme for PGD. A focus on identifying and changing the metacognitive mechanisms underpinning the development and maintenance of prolonged grief is likely to be beneficial to theory and practice. Ethics Ethics approval was obtained from Curtin University Human Research Ethics Committee (Approval number HR 41/2013.) Trial registration number ACTRN12613001270707. PMID:26646828

  18. Dreams of the Dead among Cambodian Refugees: Frequency, Phenomenology, and Relationship to Complicated Grief and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Devon E.; Field, Nigel P.; Nickerson, Angela; Bryant, Richard A.; Simon, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the importance of dreams of the deceased in the experiencing of prolonged grief (PG) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Cambodian refugees who survived the Pol Pot genocide (1975-1979). Such dreams were frequent in the last month (52% of those surveyed), and most often involved a relative who died in the Pol…

  19. Cognitive behavioral variables mediate the associations of neuroticism and attachment insecurity with Prolonged Grief Disorder severity.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Paul A; Klugkist, Irene

    2011-05-01

    Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD) is a debilitating syndrome of grief. A recent cognitive behavioral model asserts that three processes are critical to this condition: (1) insufficient integration of the loss with autobiographical knowledge about the self and the lost person; (2) negative cognitions; and (3) anxious and depressive avoidance behaviors. These processes are assumed to contribute to PGD symptoms and to mediate the influence of personality-related vulnerabilities on the development and maintenance of these symptoms. The present study examined the mediational role of these three processes in the linkage between neuroticism, attachment anxiety, and attachment avoidance on the one hand and PGD symptom severity on the other hand. Self-reported data from 348 bereaved people were used. The results showed that the three personality variables were significantly associated with PGD symptom severity. Moreover, the results provided support for the mediating effects of indices of insufficient integration, negative cognitions, as well as avoidance behaviors - even after controlling for the shared variance between mediators. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

  20. Psychometric evaluation of the depressive personality disorder inventory.

    PubMed

    Huprich, Steven K; Sanford, Keith; Smith, Marinell

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory (DPDI; Huprich, Margrett, Barthelemy, & Fine, 1996). The DPDI was found to have strong internal consistency in both an undergraduate and a veteran, psychiatric outpatient population. The DPDI had significant, positive correlations with other measures of depressive personality, supporting its convergent validity. These relationships remained even after controlling for state-like depression, suggesting that the DPDI has incremental validity. The DPDI also significantly predicted scores on measures of interpersonal loss, even after controlling for state-like depression, suggesting that the DPDI has good construct validity. In support of discriminant validity, the DPDI was more correlated with another measure of depressive personality than it was with measures of other personality disorders. Finally, the DPDI had strong diagnostic efficiency statistics: (a) Sensitivity = .82, (b) Specificity = .80, (c) Positive Predictive Power = .75, (d) Negative Predictive Power = .86, and (e) Overall Diagnostic Power = .81. It appears that the DPDI has good psychometric properties.

  1. Posttraumatic stress disorder and prolonged grief in refugees exposed to trauma and loss

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While a large proportion of conflict-affected populations have been dually exposed to trauma and loss, there is inadequate research identifying differential symptom profiles related to bereavement and trauma exposure in these groups. The objective of this study were to (1) determine whether there are distinct classes of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and prolonged grief disorder (PGD) symptoms in bereaved trauma survivors exposed to conflict and persecution, and (2) examine whether particular types of refugee experiences and stressors differentially predict symptom profiles. Methods Participants were 248 Mandaean adult refugees who were assessed at an average of 4.3 years since entering Australia following persecution in Iraq. PTSD, PGD, trauma exposure, adjustment difficulties since relocation, and English proficiency were measured. Latent class analysis was used to elucidate symptom profiles of PTSD and PGD in this sample. Results Latent class analysis revealed four classes of participants: a combined PTSD/PGD class (16%), a predominantly PTSD class (25%), a predominantly PGD class (16%), and a resilient class (43%). Whereas membership in the PTSD/PGD class was predicted by exposure to traumatic loss, those in the PGD class were more likely to have experienced adaptation difficulties since relocation, and individuals in the PTSD class were more likely to have experienced difficulties related to loss of culture and support. Conclusions This study provides evidence that specific symptom patterns emerge following exposure to mass trauma and loss. These profiles are associated with distinct types of traumatic experiences and post-migration living difficulties. These results have substantial public health implications for assessment and intervention following mass trauma. PMID:24712883

  2. Dreams of the dead among Cambodian refugees: frequency, phenomenology, and relationship to complicated grief and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Field, Nigel P; Nickerson, Angela; Bryant, Richard A; Simon, Naomi

    2013-09-01

    The authors investigated the importance of dreams of the deceased in the experiencing of prolonged grief (PG) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Cambodian refugees who survived the Pol Pot genocide (1975-1979). Such dreams were frequent in the last month (52% of those surveyed), and most often involved a relative who died in the Pol Pot period. Past month frequency was correlated with PG severity (r = .59) and PTSD severity (r = .52). The dreams were almost always deeply upsetting because the dreams indicated the deceased to be in a difficult spiritual state. Dreams of the deceased as a central component of PG and PTSD among Cambodian refugees is discussed.

  3. Treating Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The death of a loved one is one of life’s greatest, universal stressors to which most bereaved individuals successfully adapt without clinical intervention. For a minority of bereaved individuals, grief is complicated by superimposed problems and healing does not occur. The resulting syndrome of complicated grief causes substantial distress and functional impairment even years after a loss, yet knowing when and how to intervene can be a challenge. OBJECTIVE To discuss the differential diagnosis, risk factors for and management of complicated grief based on available evidence and clinical observations. EVIDENCE REVIEW MEDLINE was searched from January 1990 to October 2012. Additional citations were procured from references of select research and review articles. Available treatment studies targeting complicated grief were included. RESULTS A strong research literature led to inclusion of complicated grief in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) (termed persistent complex bereavement disorder as a subtype of other specified trauma and stressor-related disorders), although it is a condition for which more research is formally recommended, and there is still ongoing discussion about the optimal name and diagnostic criteria for the disorder. Reliable screening instruments are available, and the estimated prevalence rate is 7% of bereaved people. Randomized controlled data support the efficacy of a targeted psychotherapy including elements that foster resolution of complicating problems and facilitate the natural healing process. Preliminary studies suggest antidepressant medications may be helpful. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Individuals with complicated grief have greater risk of adverse health outcomes, should be diagnosed and assessed for suicide risk and comorbid conditions such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, and should be considered for treatment. PMID:23917292

  4. Understanding and Treating Complicated Grief: What Can We Learn from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Anke

    2013-01-01

    The paper outlines possible parallels between the phenomenology and treatment of complicated grief and PTSD. In particular, it explores how treatment procedures used in Cognitive Therapy for PTSD (Ehlers & Clark, 2000) may be adapted for the treatment of complicated grief. Stimulus Discrimination may be helpful in breaking the link between everyday triggers and “felt presence” memories of the deceased. Memory Updating procedures may help the patient accept that the deceased is no longer alive and no longer suffering. Reclaiming your Life procedures may help the patient access autobiographical memories that are not linked to the deceased and counteract beliefs about the value of life without the deceased. The paper further addresses the necessity of specifying the idiosyncratic beliefs that prevent coming to terms with the death, of understanding the relationship between beliefs and coping strategies, and of distinguishing memories from rumination. PMID:23814410

  5. Further Psychometric Properties of the Tourette's Disorder Scale-Parent Rated Version (TODS-PR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Geffken, Gary R.; Soto, Ohel; Sajid, Muhammad; Allen, Pam; Roberti, Jonathan W.; Killiany, Erin M.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Tourette's Disorder Scale-Parent Rated (TODS-PR), a 15-item parent-rated instrument that assesses a range of common symptoms seen in childhood Tourette's Disorder (TD) patients including tics, obsessions, compulsions, inattention, hyperactivity, aggression, and emotional disturbances.…

  6. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-06-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide.

  7. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  8. Grief counseling.

    PubMed Central

    Borins, M.

    1995-01-01

    Patients grieve the loss of loved ones, jobs, marriages, or even functioning. They seek comfort, understanding, respect, and especially hope. The "work of grief" progresses through stages. Mixed with the sadness can be feelings of anger, fear, and guilt. Psychotherapy can relieve self-destructive anger and guilt, advance the recovery phase, and stimulate psychological strength and personality growth. PMID:7647626

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Parenting Stress Index with Parents of Children with Autistic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dardas, L. A.; Ahmad, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties and the theoretical structure of the Parenting Stress Index-short form (PSI-SF) with Jordanian parents of children with autistic disorder. Methods: Using a cross-sectional design for data collection, the convenience sample of the study was composed of 184 Jordanian…

  10. Psychometric Profile of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Anxious, and Healthy Vietnam Veterans: Correlations with Psychophysiologic Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Scott P.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Vietnam combat veterans who had posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, N=25), were anxious (N=7), or were healthy (N=18) completed psychometric test battery. PTSD subjects differed significantly from healthy subjects on almost all measures but showed fewer differences from anxious subjects. Typical PTSD subject was characterized as anxious,…

  11. Further Psychometric Examination of the Tourette's Disorder Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Grabill, Kristen M.; Geffken, Gary R.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2007-01-01

    The Tourette's Disorder Scales (Shytle et al., 2003) are parent- (Tourette's Disorder Scales-Parent Rated; TODS-PR) and clinician-rated (Tourette's Disorder Scales-Clinician Rated; TODS-CR) measures that assess tics, obsessions, compulsions, inattention, hyperactivity, aggression, and emotional disturbances among children with tics. Although the…

  12. Psychometric properties of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Inventory in a Canadian sample.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Leigh C; Antony, Martin M; Koerner, Naomi

    2014-05-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder Inventory is a recently developed self-report measure that assesses symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder. Its psychometric properties have not been investigated further since its original development. The current study investigated its psychometric properties in a Canadian student/community sample. Exploratory principal component analysis replicated the original three-component structure. The total scale and subscales demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability (α = 0.84-0.94) and correlated strongly with the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (r = 0.41-0.74, all ps <0.001) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (r = 0.55-0.84, all ps <0.001). However, only the total scale and cognitive subscale (r = 0.48-0.49, all ps <0.05) significantly predicted generalized anxiety disorder diagnosis established by diagnostic interview. The somatic subscale in particular may require revision to improve predictive validity. Revision may also be necessary given changes in required somatic symptoms for generalized anxiety disorder diagnostic criteria in more recent versions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (i.e. although major changes occurred from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-III-R to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV, changes in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 were minimal) and the possibility of changes in the upcoming 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases.

  13. Complicated grief in late life

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is a syndrome that affects 10% to 20% of grievers regardless of age, although proportionally more will face the death of loved ones in late life, CG is characterized by preoccupying and disabling symptoms that can persist for decades such as an inability to accept the death, intense yearning or avoidance, frequent reveries, deep sadness, crying, somatic distress, social withdrawal, and suicidal ideation. This syndrome is distinct from major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, but CG maybe comorbid with each. This communication will focus on the impact of CG in late life (over age 60) and will include a case vignette for illustrating complicated grief therapy. PMID:22754292

  14. Measuring Migratory Grief and Loss Associated with the Experience of Immigration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casado, Banghwa Lee; Hong, Michin; Harrington, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The Migratory Grief and Loss Questionnaire (MGLQ) was designed to measure the grief experience associated with immigration. This article reports the development and psychometric properties of a Chinese-version of MGLQ. Methods: An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using maximum likelihood extraction with varimax rotation was conducted…

  15. Understanding Grief and Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... worker, psychologist, or spiritual counselor. Grief in different cultures Although each person's grief is unique, the experience is shaped by his or her society and culture. Each culture has its own set of beliefs ...

  16. Penn Inventory for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Psychometric Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammarberg, Melvyn

    1992-01-01

    A three-phase study was conducted to develop and validate the Penn Inventory for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), a 26-item self-report measure. Results with 83 and 98 combat veterans and with 76 general population patients and disaster survivors support usefulness of the measure. (SLD)

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Revised Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Brenda N.; Crawford, Susan G.; Green, Dido; Roberts, Gwen; Aylott, Alice; Kaplan, Bonnie J.

    2009-01-01

    The Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ) is a parent-completed measure designed to identify subtle motor problems in children of 8 to 14.6 years of age. The purpose of this study was to extend the lower age range to children aged 5 to 7 years, revise items to ensure clarity, develop new scoring, and evaluate validity of the…

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for DSM-IV Among Four Racial Groups

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christina M.; Klenck, Suzanne C.; Norton, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-IV (GAD-Q-IV) is a self-report diagnostic measure of generalized anxiety disorder. Previous studies have established the psychometric properties of the GAD-Q-IV revealing excellent diagnostic specificity and sensitivity as well as good test-retest reliability and convergent and discriminant validity (Newman et al., 2002). Recent analyses with other measures of anxiety symptoms have revealed differences across racial or national groups. Given that the GAD-Q-IV was tested primarily on Caucasian (78%) participants, the purpose of this study was to demonstrate the psychometric properties of the GAD-Q-IV across four racial groups: African American, Caucasian, Hispanic/Latino, and Asian. A student sample of 585 undergraduate psychology students completed the GAD-Q-IV as well as other measures of anxiety symptoms. A clinical replication sample was obtained from 188 clinical participants who completed the GAD-Q-IV as part of a larger psychotherapy study. Results indicated excellent and very similar factor structures in the student sample, and similar psychometric properties across both samples across the racial groups. Implications for the use of the GAD-Q-IV across racial groups are discussed. PMID:20830629

  19. [Complicated Grief in DSM-5 era].

    PubMed

    Carmassi, Claudia; Conversano, Ciro; Pinori, Marialisa; Bertelloni, Carlo Antonio; Dalle Luche, Riccardo; Gesi, Camilla; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of data has been recently focused on recognizing pathological grief reactions and on the distinction from physiological processes. Particularly, several studies have supported Complicated Grief (CG) as an independent disorder, in order to define the failure of spontaneous physiological mourning resolution. Upon these studies, the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) with the name of "Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder". This article aims at retracing the history of clinical research about the physiological and psychopathological processes related to grief and aims at presenting the main scientific studies that have described the features of the CG defining it as a distinct disorder. Similarities and distinctions among CG and Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Adjustment Disorder were also reported.

  20. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  1. The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5): Development and Initial Psychometric Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Christy A; Weathers, Frank W; Davis, Margaret T; Witte, Tracy K; Domino, Jessica L

    2015-12-01

    The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL) is a widely used DSM-correspondent self-report measure of PTSD symptoms. The PCL was recently revised to reflect DSM-5 changes to the PTSD criteria. In this article, the authors describe the development and initial psychometric evaluation of the PCL for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Psychometric properties of the PCL-5 were examined in 2 studies involving trauma-exposed college students. In Study 1 (N = 278), PCL-5 scores exhibited strong internal consistency (α = .94), test-retest reliability (r = .82), and convergent (rs = .74 to .85) and discriminant (rs = .31 to .60) validity. In addition, confirmatory factor analyses indicated adequate fit with the DSM-5 4-factor model, χ2 (164) = 455.83, p < .001, standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) = .07, root mean squared error of approximation (RMSEA) = .08, comparative fit index (CFI) = .86, and Tucker-Lewis index (TLI) = .84, and superior fit with recently proposed 6-factor, χ2 (164) = 318.37, p < .001, SRMR = .05, RMSEA = .06, CFI = .92, and TLI = .90, and 7-factor, χ2 (164) = 291.32, p < .001, SRMR = .05, RMSEA = .06, CFI = .93, and TLI = .91, models. In Study 2 (N = 558), PCL-5 scores demonstrated similarly strong reliability and validity. Overall, results indicate that the PCL-5 is a psychometrically sound measure of PTSD symptoms. Implications for use of the PCL-5 in a variety of assessment contexts are discussed.

  2. Psychometric Properties of Eating Disorder Instruments in Black and White Young Women: Internal Consistency, Temporal Stability, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardone-Cone, Anna M.; Boyd, Clarissa A.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the major instruments in the eating disorder field have documented psychometric support only in predominantly White samples. The current study examined the internal consistency, temporal stability, and convergent and discriminant validity of a variety of eating disorder measures in Black (n = 97) and White (n = 179) female undergraduates.…

  3. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Psychosocial Quality-of-Life Questionnaire for Individuals with Autism and Related Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Leslie A.; Reyes, Charina; Embacher, Rebecca A.; Speer, Leslie L.; Roizen, Nancy; Frazier, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Child and Family Quality of Life scale, a measure of psychosocial quality of life in those with autism and related developmental disorders. Parents of 212 children suspected of autism spectrum disorder completed the Child and Family Quality of Life prior to a diagnostic evaluation. Results…

  4. Schizophrenia spectrum personality disorders in psychometrically identified schizotypes at two-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bolinskey, P Kevin; Smith, Elizabeth A; Schuder, Kelly M; Cooper-Bolinskey, Dianna; Myers, Kevin R; Hudak, Daniel V; James, Alison V; Hunter, Helen K; Novi, Jonathan H; Guidi, Janice P; Gonzalez, Yelena; McTiernan, Erin F; Arnold, Kaitlin M; Iati, Carina A; Gottesman, Irving I

    2017-03-08

    Earlier (Bolinskey et al., 2015), we reported that psychometrically identified schizotypes displayed greater symptom levels and higher incidences of schizophrenia spectrum (schizotypal, schizoid, paranoid, and avoidant) personality disorders (PDs). In this study, 49 schizotypes and 39 matched controls participated in follow-up assessments after two years. Participants were previously identified as schizotypes or controls based on scores on the Chapman Psychosis Proneness Scales (CPPS), and were interviewed at baseline and follow-up with the Personality Disorder Interview for DSM-IV (PDI-IV). At follow-up, schizotypes displayed significantly higher symptom levels compared to controls, with medium to large effects, and appeared to meet criteria for diagnosis of each PD more often than controls, although significant differences were only observed for paranoid PD. Overall, schizotypes were more likely to have met criteria for a diagnosis at either baseline or follow-up. Finally, we observed a widening disparity over time between schizotypes and controls in avoidant and schizoid PDs. These results suggest that schizophrenia spectrum PDs, as well as subthreshold symptoms of these disorders, can represent a greater liability for schizophrenia in individuals identified as at-risk on the basis of psychometric means only. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate that such differences persist, and in some cases increase, over time.

  5. [Psychometric properties of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2) in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Schneider, Nora; Bürger, Arne; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Holzhausen, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The present study examines the psychometric properties of the German version of the Eating Disorder Inventory EDI-2 (1997) in 371 adolescents aged 13 to 18 years. Internal consistency, convergent and divergent validity were examined and a confirmatory factor analysis was conducted. Internal consistency was high for the group of patients and satisfactory for both control groups. Associations with other clinical instruments point in the expected direction and support the external validity of the EDI-2. The EDI-2 differentiated very well between the group of eating disorder patients (n=71) and the female (n=150) and male control groups (n=150). A discriminant analysis demonstrated that 86.0% of the cases were correctly classified, and a confirmatory factor analysis largely supported the six-factor structure generated by the German version of the EDI-2 (Thiel et al., 1997).

  6. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Revised Home Situations Questionnaire for Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Home Situations Questionnaire-Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowdhury, Monali; Aman, Michael G.; Lecavalier, Luc; Smith, Tristram; Johnson, Cynthia; Swiezy, Naomi; McCracken, James T.; King, Bryan; McDougle, Christopher J.; Bearss, Karen; Deng, Yanhong; Scahill, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we adapted the Home Situations Questionnaire to measure behavioral non-compliance in everyday settings in children with pervasive developmental disorders. In this study, we further revised this instrument for use in autism spectrum disorder and examined its psychometric properties (referred to as the Home Situations…

  7. Abnormal Grief: Should We Consider a More Patient-Centered Approach?

    PubMed

    Moayedoddin, Babak; Markowitz, John C

    2015-01-01

    Grief, the psychological reaction to the loss of a significant other, varies complexly in its cause, experience, evolution, and prognosis. Although most bereaved individuals experience a normal grieving process, some develop complicated grief (CG) or major depressive disorder (MDD). The DSM-5, which controversially altered the nosology, recognizes grief-related major depression (GRMD) as a diagnostic subtype if a patient meets MDD criteria two weeks post bereavement. The (DSM-5) tries to distinguish between grief and MDD, but remains a symptom-based, centered approach to grief that is not patient centered. This article reviews grief in its normal and abnormal dimensions. Using an illustrative clinical case in which interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) was employed, we discuss the need for a more patient-centered approach to treating abnormal grief, considering the patient's personal history, perceptions, experiences of bereavement, and interpersonal environment. Clinical studies need to better identify subgroups of individuals susceptible to abnormal grief and to evaluate their response to early interventions.

  8. Psychometric Properties of the Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children (PANAS-C) in Children with Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Alicia A.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children (PANAS-C) (Laurent et al. Psychol Asses 1: 326-338, 1999) in a sample of 139 children (ages 7-14 years) diagnosed with a principal anxiety disorder. Results from this study provided support for the convergent validity of the PANAS-C with…

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Caregiver Assessment of Movement Participation Scale for Screening Children with Development Coordination Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Kwan Lan; Bond, Trevor; Lo, Sing Kai

    2010-01-01

    Using Rasch analysis, the psychometric properties of a newly developed 35-item parent-proxy instrument, the Caregiver Assessment of Movement Participation (CAMP), designed to measure movement participation problems in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder, were examined. The CAMP was administered to 465 school children aged 5-10 years.…

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale in a Longitudinal Study of Latinos with Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Courtney; Rodriguez, Benjamin F.; Weisberg, Risa B.; Perry, Ashley; Keller, Martin B.

    2012-01-01

    The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) is one of the most commonly used measures of social anxiety symptoms. To date, no study has examined its psychometric properties in a Latino sample. The authors examined the reliability, temporal stability, and convergent validity of the LSAS in 73 Latinos diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. The original…

  11. Empirical Validation and Psychometric Evaluation of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Fresco, David M.; Hart, Trevor A.; Turk, Cynthia L.; Schneier, Franklin R.; Liebowitz, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    The Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE; M. R. Leary, 1983a) is often used to assess fear of negative evaluation, the core feature of social anxiety disorder. However, few studies have examined its psychometric properties in large samples of socially anxious patients. Although the BFNE yields a single total score, confirmatory factor…

  12. Initial Psychometric Properties of a Brief Parent-Report Instrument for Assessing Tic Severity in Children with Chronic Tic Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Susanna; Himle, Michael B.; Tucker, Benjamin T. P.; Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development and initial psychometric properties of the Parent Tic Questionnaire (PTQ)--a new measure assessing the number, frequency, and intensity of motor and vocal tics in children and adolescents with Chronic Tic Disorder (CTD). Parents of 40 children with a CTD completed the PTQ as part of a larger assessment…

  13. Psychometric Properties of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory: Child Version in Children and Adolescents with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna M.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Arnold, Elysse B.; McGuire, Joseph F.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Child Version (OCI-CV) were examined in ninety-six youth with a primary/co-primary diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A confirmatory factor analysis revealed an acceptable model of fit with factors consisting of doubting/checking, obsessing, hoarding, washing,…

  14. Understanding Grief & Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Judith

    1995-01-01

    Although death is the one certainty in life, death or the grieving process is rarely discussed. Grief includes physical, emotional, spiritual, and psychological reactions to loss, and is not limited to feelings about death. Grief can be the response to loss of home or country, separation or displacement, and changes resulting from new life stages.…

  15. Death and Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to a death or loss. Grief can affect our body, mind, emotions, and spirit. People might notice or show grief in several ways: Physical reactions: These might be things like changes in appetite or sleep, an upset stomach, tight chest, crying, tense muscles, ...

  16. Psychometric analysis of the Systematic Observation of Red Flags for autism spectrum disorder in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Dow, Deanna; Guthrie, Whitney; Stronach, Sheri T; Wetherby, Amy M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of the Systematic Observation of Red Flags as an observational level-two screening measure to detect risk for autism spectrum disorder in toddlers when used with a video-recorded administration of the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales. Psychometric properties of the Systematic Observation of Red Flags were examined in a sample of 247 toddlers of 16- to 24 months old: 130 with autism spectrum disorder, 61 with developmental delays, and 56 typically developing. Individual items were examined for performance to create an algorithm with improved sensitivity and specificity, yielding a total Composite score and Domain scores for Social Communication and Restricted Repetitive Behaviors. Codes indicating clear symptom presence were collapsed to yield a count of the number of Red Flags for the overall scale and each symptom domain. Results indicated significant group differences with large effects for the Composite, both Domain scores, and Red Flags score, and good discrimination (area under the curve = 0.84-0.87) between autism spectrum disorder and nonspectrum groups for the Composite, Social Communication Domain, and Social Communication Red Flags score. The Systematic Observation of Red Flags provides an observational screening measure for 16- to 24-month-olds with good discrimination, sensitivity, and specificity. A cutoff of 20 on the Composite is recommended to optimally detect autism spectrum disorder risk.

  17. Death and Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... a death or loss. Grief can affect our body, mind, emotions, and spirit. People might notice or show ...

  18. Psychometric evaluation of the Borderline Personality Disorder Severity Index-IV--adolescent version and parent version.

    PubMed

    Schuppert, H Marieke; Bloo, Josephine; Minderaa, Ruud B; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Nauta, Maaike H

    2012-08-01

    The Borderline Personality Disorder Severity Index-IV-adolescent and parent versions (BPDSI-IV-ado/p) are DSM-IV based semi-structured interviews for the assessment of the severity of symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in adolescents. The present study evaluates the psychometric properties of the BPDSI-IV-ado/p. The interviews were administered to 122 adolescents, aged 14-19 years and their parents/caretakers who were referred to mental health centres for emotion regulation problems, and to 45 healthy controls. The interrater reliability and internal consistency of all nine subscales (following the nine BPD symptoms in DSM-IV) proved to be good to excellent. Discriminant, concurrent, and construct validity were satisfactory. Cut-off scores that optimize sensitivity and specificity were derived. Informant agreement between adolescents and parents/caretakers was modest. The results of this study suggest that the BPDSI-IV adolescent and parent versions are valid and reliable instruments for the assessment of BPD symptom severity in adolescents.

  19. A psychometric evaluation of the panic disorder severity scale for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Elkins, R Meredith; Pincus, Donna B; Comer, Jonathan S

    2014-06-01

    The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS; Shear et al., 1997) is a well-validated measure that assesses symptoms of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PDA) in adults. The Panic Disorder Severity Scale for Children (PDSS-C) is an adaptation of the PDSS for youth ages 11-17. The current study evaluated the psychometric properties of the PDSS-C. Participants included 60 adolescents from a randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of an intensive cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) for adolescent PDA. Convergent and discriminant validity of PDSS-C scores were evaluated via observed associations between the PDSS-C and the Childhood Anxiety Sensitivity Index (CASI; Silverman, Fleisig, Rabian, & Peterson, 1991), Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC; March, Parker, Sullivan, Stallings, & Conners, 1997), and Children's Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 2003). Baseline and posttreatment data afforded the opportunity to evaluate the measure's sensitivity to treatment-related change. PDSS-C scores demonstrated acceptable internal consistency (α = .82) and adequate 1-day test-retest reliability (r = .79). Convergent and discriminant validity of the PDSS-C scores were supported through significant associations with the CASI and the MASC, and nonsignificant associations with the CDI, respectively. Linear regression analysis demonstrated sensitivity to treatment-related changes-that is, greater PDSS-C change scores were significantly associated with assignment to CBT vs. waitlist condition. Clinical utility was further established through significant associations between PDSS-C change scores and MASC and CASI change scores, and through nonsignificant associations with CDI change scores. Results support the use of PDSS-C scores as reliable, valid, and clinically useful for the assessment of youth panic disorder in research and clinical settings.

  20. Psychometric properties of the Wender-Reimherr Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Scale.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Barrie K; Reimherr, Fred W; Robison, Diane; Robison, Reid J; Wender, Paul H

    2013-09-01

    The Wender-Reimherr adult attention deficit disorder scale (WRAADDS; Wender, 1995) is a clinician-rated scale based on the Utah Criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. It assesses ADHD symptom severity across 7 domains: attention difficulties, hyperactivity/restlessness, temper, affective lability, emotional over-reactivity, disorganization, and impulsivity. The normative sample consisted of 120 males and females ages 20-49 with no personal or family history of ADHD. Patients with ADHD met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) criteria, included males and females ages 20-60, and came from 5 clinical trials. Measures of reliability (test-retest r = .96; interrater r = .75) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.78) were acceptable. The WRAADDS correlated with the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CAARS; Conners, Erhardt, & Sparrow, 1999) total scores (r = .501, p < .001). WRAADDS hyperactivity + impulsivity correlated with the CAARS hyperactivity/impulsivity (r = .601, p < .001), and WRAADDS attention + disorganization correlated with the CAARS inattention (r = .430, p < .001). Discriminate validity (adults with vs. without ADHD) was significant for all domains (p < .001). Factor analysis yielded a 2-factor solution accounting for 58% of the variance, one containing the emotional dimensions and the second containing attention and disorganization. Hyperactivity/restlessness and impulsivity were split between both factors. Changes in response to treatment for the WRAADDS and CAARS were highly correlated (p < .001). These psychometric data support continued use of the WRAADDS in adults with ADHD.

  1. How to Deal with Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... life. Grief is a typical reaction to death, divorce, job loss, a move away from family and ... to return to work. While these feelings and behaviors are normal during grief, they will pass. How ...

  2. Inpatients with major depressive disorder: Psychometric properties of the new Multidimensional Depression Scale.

    PubMed

    Darharaj, Mohammad; Habibi, Mojtaba; Power, Michael J; Farzadian, Farzaneh; Rahimi, Maesoumeh; Kholghi, Habibeh; Kazemitabar, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    The New Multi-dimensional Depression Scale (NMDS) is one of the most comprehensive scales that measures depression symptoms in four domains, including emotional, cognitive, somatic, and interpersonal. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the NMDS in a group of Iranian inpatients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). At first, the scale was translated into Persian and used as part of a battery consisting of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The battery was administered to 271 inpatients with MDD (90 men and 181 women) aged from 18 to 60 who had been referred to psychiatric hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Persian version of the NMDS upheld its original four-factor structure. Moreover, the results showed its good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient ranging from 0.70 for the emotional subscale to 0.83 for the interpersonal subscale). In addition, the NMDS scores were correlated with other constructs in empirically and theoretically expected ways, which provides evidence for the convergent (positive significant relationships with anxiety and cognitive and somatic-affective symptoms of depression) and divergent (negative significant relationships with happiness and mental health and physical health) validity of the scale. These findings supported the Persian version of the NMDS as a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of depression symptoms in patients with MDD.

  3. Comparative psychometric analyses of the SCL-90-R and its short versions in patients with affective disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread application of Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90-R), its psychometric weaknesses have repeatedly been noted. This study aimed to comparatively assess the psychometric properties of the SCL-90-R scales and the scales of its short versions Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), Symptom Checklist-27 (SCL-27), Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18), Symptom Checklist-14 (SCL-14), and Symptom Checklist short version-9 (SCL-K-9) in patients with affective disorders. Methods The data of 2,727 patients within the main treatment group of affective disorders were assessed according to the DSM-IV. Patients completed the SCL-90-R and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results There were no significant differences regarding the internal consistency of the SCL-90-R scales and the scales of the short versions. The dimensional structure was only supported for the short versions BSI-18, SCL-14 and SCL-K-9. The assessment of convergent validity revealed high correlations. With regard to the discriminant validity, there were medium correlations. With regard to the sensitivity of change, no significant differences between the scales were found. Conclusions In summary, the scales of the short versions show mostly satisfactory psychometric properties in comparison to the scales of the SCL-90-R. The results support the application of the short versions as screening instruments, especially the BSI-18, and more economic variants of the SCL-90-R covering a wide range of psychopathological symptoms. PMID:23537095

  4. Psychometric Properties of Difficulties of Working with Patients with Personality Disorders and Attitudes Towards Patients with Personality Disorders Scales

    PubMed Central

    EREN, Nurhan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we aimed to develop two reliable and valid assessment instruments for investigating the level of difficulties mental health workers experience while working with patients with personality disorders and the attitudes they develop tt the patients. Methods The research was carried out based on the general screening model. The study sample consisted of 332 mental health workers in several mental health clinics of Turkey, with a certain amount of experience in working with personality disorders, who were selected with a random assignment method. In order to collect data, the Personal Information Questionnaire, Difficulty of Working with Personality Disorders Scale (PD-DWS), and Attitudes Towards Patients with Personality Disorders Scale (PD-APS), which are being examined for reliability and validity, were applied. To determine construct validity, the Adjective Check List, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and State and Trait Anxiety Inventory were used. Explanatory factor analysis was used for investigating the structural validity, and Cronbach alpha, Spearman-Brown, Guttman Split-Half reliability analyses were utilized to examine the reliability. Also, item reliability and validity computations were carried out by investigating the corrected item-total correlations and discriminative indexes of the items in the scales. Results For the PD-DWS KMO test, the value was .946; also, a significant difference was found for the Bartlett sphericity test (p<.001). The computed test-retest coefficient reliability was .702; the Cronbach alpha value of the total test score was .952. For PD-APS KMO, the value was .925; a significant difference was found in Bartlett sphericity test (p<.001); the computed reliability coefficient based on continuity was .806; and the Cronbach alpha value of the total test score was .913. Analyses on both scales were based on total scores. Conclusion It was found that PD-DWS and PD-APS have good psychometric properties, measuring the

  5. Communication During Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Charles U.

    The physical and psychological difficulties which accompany grief resulting from another's death are described, and the intrapersonal and interpersonal communication behaviors exhibited by bereaved individuals are outlined. The role of intrapersonal communication--the mourner communicating with himself--and interpersonal communication--the mourner…

  6. The Calculus of Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lee Burdette

    2010-01-01

    On a college campus, educators and students live on the edge of tragedy. They walk that edge everyday, aware that the possibility of death is always one misstep away. One careless move by any of the hundreds or thousands of them walking that edge, and their whole community falls into a canyon of grief from which they will climb only after weeks,…

  7. A Meta-Analysis of the Cross-Cultural Psychometric Properties of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, William W.; Crocetti, Elisabetta; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Accumulating studies have demonstrated that the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), a modern youth anxiety questionnaire with scales explicitly designed to map onto specific DSM-IV-TR anxiety disorders, has good psychometric properties for children and adolescents from various countries. However, no study has…

  8. Improving the understanding and treatment of complex grief: an important issue for psychotraumatology

    PubMed Central

    Boelen, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    In the Netherlands, every year 500,000 people are confronted with the death of a close relative. Many of these people experience little emotional distress. In some, bereavement precipitates severe grief, distress, and dysphoria. A small yet significant minority of bereaved individuals develops persistent and debilitating symptoms of persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) (also termed prolonged grief disorder), posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression. Knowledge about early identification of, and preventive care for complex grief has increased. Moreover, in recent years there has been an increase in treatment options for people for whom loss leads to persistent psychological problems. That said, preventive and curative treatments are effective for some, but not all bereaved individuals experiencing distress and dysfunction following loss. This necessitates further research on the development, course, and treatment of various stages of complex grief, including PCBD. Highlights of the article “Complex grief” is an informal term referring to debilitating, non-normative grief. It will likely be named Prolonged Grief Disorder in the forthcoming ICD-11. It is named Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder in DSM-5. Research on the development, course, and treatment of complex grief is needed. This research should address different stages and manifestations of complex grief. PMID:27667723

  9. Psychometric validation of the Korean version of Structured Interview for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (K-SIP).

    PubMed

    Kim, Won; Kim, Daeho; Seo, Ho-Jun; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Kim, Jung-Bum; Chung, Moon Yong; Koo, Young Jin; Ryu, Seong Gon; Kim, Eui Jung; Kim, Tae-Suk; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Woo, Jong-Min; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2009-02-01

    For diagnosis and management of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the easily administered assessment tool is essential. Structured Interview for PTSD (SIP) is a validated, 17-item, simple measurement being used widely. We aimed to develop the Korean version of SIP (K-SIP) and investigated its psychometric properties. Ninety-three subjects with PTSD, 73 subjects with mood disorder or anxiety disorder as a psychiatric control group, and 88 subjects as a healthy control group were enrolled in this study. All subjects completed psychometric assessments that included the K-SIP, the Korean versions of the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and other assessment tools. The K-SIP presented good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.92) and test-retest reliability (r=0.87). K-SIP showed strong correlations with CAPS (r=0.72). Among three groups including PTSD patients, psychiatric controls, and normal controls, there were significant differences in the K-SIP total score. The potential cut-off total score of K-SIP was 20 with highest diagnostic efficiency (91.9%). At this point, the sensitivity and specificity were 95.5% and 88.4%, respectively. Our result showed that K-SIP had good reliability and validity. We expect that K-SIP will be used as a simple but structured instrument for assessment of PTSD.

  10. An examination of the psychometric structure of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory in temporomandibular disorder patients: a confirmatory factor analysis

    PubMed Central

    Andreu, Yolanda; Galdon, Maria J; Durá, Estrella; Ferrando, Maite; Pascual, Juan; Turk, Dennis C; Jiménez, Yolanda; Poveda, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper seeks to analyse the psychometric and structural properties of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI) in a sample of temporomandibular disorder patients. Methods The internal consistency of the scales was obtained. Confirmatory Factor Analysis was carried out to test the MPI structure section by section in a sample of 114 temporomandibular disorder patients. Results Nearly all scales obtained good reliability indexes. The original structure could not be totally confirmed. However, with a few adjustments we obtained a satisfactory structural model of the MPI which was slightly different from the original: certain items and the Self control scale were eliminated; in two cases, two original scales were grouped in one factor, Solicitous and Distracting responses on the one hand, and Social activities and Away from home activities, on the other. Conclusion The MPI has been demonstrated to be a reliable tool for the assessment of pain in temporomandibular disorder patients. Some divergences to be taken into account have been clarified. PMID:17169143

  11. Screening Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in children: Outcomes from utilitarian versus specialist psychometrics.

    PubMed

    Dovey, Terence M; Aldridge, Victoria K; Martin, Clarissa I; Wilken, Markus; Meyer, Caroline

    2016-12-01

    This study assessed the specificity and sensitivity of two commonly used psychometric methods to assess ARFID in children. To achieve this, a sample of 329 mothers and one father completed the Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale (BPFAS) and the Child Food Neophobia Scale (CFNS). A Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that both measures were able to successfully differentiate a known clinical sample from those of typically developing population. Although the BPFAS was more accurate at differentiating ARFID from the general population, the CFNS was acceptable and on some metrics better than its longer counterpart. The ability of a food neophobia scale to differentiate clinical and population samples, and detect gradation of food avoidance within the population sample, suggests that the multitude of psychometric measures available may be measuring similar constructs. Therefore, confidence can be expected in cross-site comparisons despite each using different psychometric measures of food avoidance in children.

  12. Postabortion Grief: Evaluating the Possible Efficacy of a Spiritual Group Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layer, Susan Dyer; Roberts, Cleora; Wild, Kelli; Walters, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Although not every woman is negatively affected by an abortion, researchers have identified a subgroup of women susceptible to grief and trauma. The primary providers for postabortion grief (PAG) groups are community faith-based agencies. Principle features of PAG are shame and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Method:…

  13. Psychometric Evaluation of the Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Goldin, Philippe R.; Gross, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale (FPES; J. W. Weeks, R. G. Heimberg, & T. L. Rodebaugh, 2008) was designed to assess fear of positive evaluation, a proposed cognitive component of social anxiety. Although previous findings on the psychometric properties of the FPES have been highly encouraging, only 1 previous study has examined the…

  14. Facets of Pejorative Self-Processing in Complicated Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Ann-Marie J.; Dalgleish, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Complicated grief (CG) has been proposed as a psychiatric response to bereavement distinct from established mood and anxiety disorder diagnoses. Little is known about the nature of cognitive-affective processing in CG, nor any similarities or differences compared with the processing profiles associated with other emotional disorders.…

  15. Assessment of stigma associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: psychometric evaluation of the ADHD stigma questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kellison, Ida; Bussing, Regina; Bell, Lindsay; Garvan, Cynthia

    2010-07-30

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Stigma Questionnaire (ASQ) among a community sample of 301 adolescents ages 11-19 years at high (n=192) and low risks (n=109) for ADHD. Study subjects were drawn from a cohort study assessing ADHD detection and service use. The 26-item ASQ demonstrated good internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis using random parceling supported a three-factor structure with highly correlated subscales of disclosure concerns, negative self image, and concern with public attitudes, and a Schmid-Leiman analysis supported an overall stigma factor. Test-retest stability was assessed after two weeks (n=45) and found to be adequate for all three subscales. Construct validity was supported by relationships with related constructs, including clinical maladjustment, depression, self-esteem, and emotional symptoms, and the absence of a relationship with school maladjustment. Findings indicate that the ASQ has acceptable psychometric properties in a large community sample of adolescents, some of whom met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for ADHD.

  16. The grief map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, L. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Grieving is a natural human reaction to a significant loss. According to a psychiatric model, this process is characterized by a typical sequence of psychological changes. Here, I propose a discrete-time dynamical system, called the grief map, in order to represent the grieving process. The corresponding bifurcation diagram, which exhibits stationary, periodic, and chaotic behavior, is related to the stages of this sorrowful journey occurring during about 12 months post-loss.

  17. The effectiveness of family-based cognitive-behavior grief therapy to prevent complicated grief in relatives of suicide victims: the mediating role of suicide ideation.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Marieke; Neeleman, Jan; van der Meer, Klaas; Burger, Huibert

    2010-10-01

    Grief interventions are more effective for high risk individuals. The presence of suicide ideation following suicide bereavement was examined to determine whether it indicates a high risk status. Using data from a randomized controlled trial (n = 122) on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy, the effect of suicide ideation on the effectiveness of grief therapy on the bereavement outcome at 13 months post loss was examined. Results show that suicide ideators more often have a history of mental disorder and suicidal behavior than non-ideators, and suicide ideation indicates a high risk for adverse bereavement outcome. Grief therapy likely reduces the risk of maladaptive grief reactions among suicide ideators. Therefore, suicide ideators may benefit from grief therapy following a loss through suicide.

  18. [Abnormal grief reaction].

    PubMed

    Meyer, J E

    1977-01-01

    Pathological grief reactions following the death of a child are reported on the basis of five case studies. In contrast to acute grief reactions these pathological syndromes are of long standing. One parent had not truly accepted the death of the child. The denial of reality is sometimes a defence against aggression towards the deceased, because of his having left one behind. The mourning process comes to no end but remains in its initial phase. At the same time the life of the mourner stands still, as in the house and the family everything is left unchanged. Family interactions alter, particularly between the parents. For the genesis of these grief syndromes the following is of relevance: The death occurs at a time, when another child cannot replace the one who died. Mature independence had not been reached by either parent or child. Death destroyed expectations that this child would succeed in that which the parent had been unable to achieve. The parent had not seen the child after death--a gap in the continuity of experiencing which made acceptance of the irreversibility of the loss even more difficult.

  19. Grief: Helping Young Children Cope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Frances B.

    2008-01-01

    In their role as caregivers supporting the children they teach, it is important for teachers to understand the grieving process and recognize symptoms of grief. The author explains Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's five stages of grief and offers 10 classroom strategies to help young children cope with their feelings.

  20. Strategies Used by Families to Simplify Tasks for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders: Psychometric Analysis of the Task Management Strategy Index (TMSI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitlin, Laura N.; Winter, Laraine; Dennis, Marie P.; Corcoran, Mary; Schinfeld, Sandy; Hauck, Walter W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about the specific behavioral strategies used by families to manage the physical dependency of persons with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders (ADRD). This study reports the psychometric properties of the Task Management Strategy Index (TMSI), a measure designed to identify actions taken by caregivers to simplify…

  1. Psychometric Evaluation of the Theory of Mind Inventory (ToMI): A Study of Typically Developing Children and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Tiffany L.; Prelock, Patricia A.; Bonazinga, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined the psychometric properties of the Theory of Mind Inventory (ToMI). In Study One, 135 caregivers completed the ToMI for children (ages 3 through 17) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Findings revealed excellent test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Principle Components Analysis revealed three subscales related…

  2. Building metaphors and extending models of grief.

    PubMed

    VandeCreek, L

    1985-01-01

    Persons in grief turn to metaphors as they seek to understand and express their experience. Metaphors illustrated in this article include "grief is a whirlwind," "grief is the Great Depression all over again" and "grief is gray, cloudy and rainy weather." Hospice personnel can enhance their bereavement efforts by identifying and cultivating the expression of personal metaphors from patients and families. Two metaphors have gained wide cultural acceptance and lie behind contemporary scientific explorations of grief. These are "grief is recovery from illness" (Bowlby and Parkes) and "death is the last stage of growth and grief is the adjustment reaction to this growth" (Kubler-Ross). These models have developed linear perspectives of grief but have neglected to study the fluctuating intensity of symptoms. Adopting Worden's four-part typology of grief, the author illustrates how the pie graph can be used to display this important aspect of the grief experience, thus enhancing these models.

  3. The psychometric properties of the iowa personality disorder screen in methadone-maintained patients: an initial investigation.

    PubMed

    Beitel, Mark; Peters, Skye; Savant, Jonathan D; Cutter, Christopher J; Cecero, John J; Barry, Declan T

    2015-02-01

    The psychometric properties of the Iowa Personality Disorder Screen (IPDS) were examined in 150 methadone-maintained patients who completed measures of demographic, psychopathology, substance use, pain, and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) characteristics. An exploratory factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution that explained 45% of the scale variance. The first factor captured internalizing tendencies, such as inhibition and hypersensitivity to others. The second factor comprised externalizing tendencies, such as impulsivity and insensitivity to others. The IPDS item subsets, derived factors, and the total score were significantly related to race/ethnicity but not sex. The effects of race/ethnicity were controlled statistically when the IPDS was compared to other measures of psychopathology, self-reported substance use, pain variables, and MMT characteristics. In general, the IPDS appears to be reliable and valid for use with methadone-maintained patients. The two-factor structure found in this study may have clinical utility and merits further investigation in other MMT samples.

  4. Psychometric Validation of the English and French Versions of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5)

    PubMed Central

    Ashbaugh, Andrea R.; Houle-Johnson, Stephanie; Herbert, Christophe; El-Hage, Wissam; Brunet, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the psychometric properties of a French version of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5), a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and to further validate the existing English version of the measure. Undergraduate students (n = 838 English, n = 262 French) completed the PCL-5 as well as other self-report symptom measures of PTSD and depression online. Both the English and French versions PCL-5 total scores demonstrated excellent internal consistency (English: α = .95; French: α = .94), and strong convergent and divergent validity. Strong internal consistency was also observed for each of the four subscales for each version (α’s > .79). Test-retest reliability for the French version of the measure was also very good (r = .89). Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the four-factor DSM-5 model was not a good fit of the data. The seven-factor hybrid model best fit the data in each sample, but was only marginally superior to the six-factor anhedonia model. The French version of the PCL-5 demonstrated the same psychometric qualities as both the English version of the same measure and previous versions of the PCL. Thus clinicians serving French-speaking clients now have access to this highly used screening instrument. With regards to the structural validity of the PCL-5 and of the new PTSD diagnostic structure of the DSM-5, additional research is warranted. Replication of our results in clinical samples is much needed. PMID:27723815

  5. Psychometric Validation of the English and French Versions of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5).

    PubMed

    Ashbaugh, Andrea R; Houle-Johnson, Stephanie; Herbert, Christophe; El-Hage, Wissam; Brunet, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the psychometric properties of a French version of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5), a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and to further validate the existing English version of the measure. Undergraduate students (n = 838 English, n = 262 French) completed the PCL-5 as well as other self-report symptom measures of PTSD and depression online. Both the English and French versions PCL-5 total scores demonstrated excellent internal consistency (English: α = .95; French: α = .94), and strong convergent and divergent validity. Strong internal consistency was also observed for each of the four subscales for each version (α's > .79). Test-retest reliability for the French version of the measure was also very good (r = .89). Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the four-factor DSM-5 model was not a good fit of the data. The seven-factor hybrid model best fit the data in each sample, but was only marginally superior to the six-factor anhedonia model. The French version of the PCL-5 demonstrated the same psychometric qualities as both the English version of the same measure and previous versions of the PCL. Thus clinicians serving French-speaking clients now have access to this highly used screening instrument. With regards to the structural validity of the PCL-5 and of the new PTSD diagnostic structure of the DSM-5, additional research is warranted. Replication of our results in clinical samples is much needed.

  6. Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG): toward integrated treatment of symptoms related to traumatic loss

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Geert E.; Kleber, Rolf J.; de la Rie, Simone M.; Bos, Jannetta B. A.; Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Boelen, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic events such as disasters, accidents, war, or criminal violence are often accompanied by the loss of loved ones, and may then give rise to traumatic grief. Traumatic grief refers to a clinical diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) with comorbid (symptoms of) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) following confrontation with a traumatic loss. Trauma survivors, who are frequently from different cultural backgrounds, have often experienced multiple losses and ambiguous loss (missing family members or friends). Current evidence-based treatments for PTSD do not focus on traumatic grief. Objective To develop a treatment for traumatic grief combining treatment interventions for PTSD and PCBD that may accommodate cultural aspects of grief. Method To provide a rationale for treatment, we propose a cognitive stress model of traumatic grief. Based on this model and on existing evidence-based treatments for PTSD and complicated grief, we developed Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG) for the treatment of patients with traumatic grief. The treatment is presented along with a case vignette. Results Processes contributing to traumatic grief include inadequately integrating the memory of the traumatic loss, negative appraisal of the traumatic loss, sensitivity to matching triggers and new stressors, and attempting to avoid distress. BEP-TG targets these processes. The BEP-TG protocol consists of five parts with proven effectiveness in the treatment of PCBD, PTSD, and MDD: information and motivation, grief-focused exposure, memorabilia and writing assignments, finding meaning and activation, and a farewell ritual. Conclusion Tailored to fit the needs of trauma survivors, BEP-TG can be used to address traumatic grief symptoms related to multiple losses and ambiguous loss, as well as cultural aspects of bereavement through its different components. PMID:26154434

  7. Psychometric Properties of a Self-Report Instrument for the Assessment of Tic Severity in Adults With Tic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Amitai; Reese, Hannah; Woods, Douglas W; Peterson, Alan; Deckersbach, Thilo; Piacentini, John; Scahill, Lawrence; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2015-11-01

    The gold-standard measure of tic severity in tic disorders (TD), the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS), is a semistructured clinician-administered interview that can be time consuming and requires highly trained interviewers. Moreover, the YGTSS does not provide information regarding frequency and intensity of specific tics because all motor and all vocal tics are rated as a group. The aim of the present study is to describe and test the Adult Tic Questionnaire (ATQ), a measure for the assessment of tic severity in adults, and to report its preliminary psychometric properties. The ATQ is a brief self-report questionnaire that provides information regarding frequency, intensity, and severity of 27 specific tics. In addition, the ATQ produces total frequency, intensity, and severity scores for vocal and motor tics, as well as a global total tic severity score. Results showed that the ATQ demonstrated very good internal consistency and temporal stability. The total, vocal, and motor tic severity scales of the ATQ showed strong correlation with corresponding subscales of the YGTSS, indicating strong convergent validity. Weak correlations with measures of severity of obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, indicated strong discriminant validity. The ATQ, a promising measure for the assessment of tic severity in adults with TD, may be a valuable supplement to the current recommended assessment battery for TD. Furthermore, the ATQ enables clinicians and researchers to track changes in the frequency and intensity of specific tics, which is important given their complex and dynamic nature.

  8. Factor structure and psychometric properties of the revised Home Situations Questionnaire for autism spectrum disorder: The Home Situations Questionnaire-Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Monali; Aman, Michael G; Lecavalier, Luc; Smith, Tristram; Johnson, Cynthia; Swiezy, Naomi; McCracken, James T; King, Bryan; McDougle, Christopher J; Bearss, Karen; Deng, Yanhong; Scahill, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Previously, we adapted the Home Situations Questionnaire to measure behavioral non-compliance in everyday settings in children with pervasive developmental disorders. In this study, we further revised this instrument for use in autism spectrum disorder and examined its psychometric properties (referred to as the Home Situations Questionnaire-Autism Spectrum Disorder). To cover a broader range of situations and improve reliability, we prepared seven new items describing situations in which children with autism spectrum disorder might display non-compliance. Parents completed ratings of 242 children with autism spectrum disorder with accompanying disruptive behaviors (ages 4-14 years) participating in one of two randomized clinical trials. Results from an exploratory factor analysis indicated that the Home Situations Questionnaire-Autism Spectrum Disorder consists of two 12-item factors: Socially Inflexible (α = 0.84) and Demand Specific (α = 0.89). One-to-two-week test-retest reliability was statistically significant for all scored items and also for subscale totals. The pattern of correspondence between the Home Situations Questionnaire-Autism Spectrum Disorder and parent-rated problem behavior, clinician-rated repetitive behavior, adaptive behavior, and IQ provided evidence for concurrent and divergent validity of the Home Situations Questionnaire-Autism Spectrum Disorder. Overall, the results suggest that the Home Situations Questionnaire-Autism Spectrum Disorder is an adequate measure for assessing non-compliance in a variety of situations in this population, and use of its two subscales will likely provide a more refined interpretation of ratings.

  9. Impact of obesity on the psychometric properties of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Hrabosky, Joshua I; Francione, Caren; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy; Galione, Janine N

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is associated with several symptoms that are components of the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD). Compared with nonobese individuals, obese individuals report more fatigue, sleep disturbance, and overeating. Obesity might, therefore, impact the psychometric properties of the MDD criteria. The goal of the present report from the Rhode Island Hospital Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project was to examine the impact of obesity on the psychometric characteristics of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition symptom criteria for major depression. Two thousand four hundred forty-eight psychiatric outpatients were administered a semistructured diagnostic interview. We inquired about all symptoms of depression for all patients. The mean sensitivity of the 9 criteria in the nonobese and obese patients was nearly identical (74.6% vs 74.3%). The mean specificity was slightly higher in the nonobese patients (82.0% vs 79.5%). No symptom was more specific in the obese than the nonobese patients, whereas the specificity of increased appetite, increased weight, and fatigue was more than 5% lower in the obese patients. Increased appetite, increased weight, hypersomnia, and fatigue had a higher sensitivity in the obese than the nonobese patients, whereas decreased appetite, weight loss, and diminished concentration had a higher sensitivity in the nonobese than the obese patients. Thus, although there were small differences between obese and nonobese patients in the operating characteristics of some symptoms, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for MDD generally performed equally well for obese and nonobese patients.

  10. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms in Preschool Children: Examining Psychometric Properties Using Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purpura, David J.; Wilson, Shauna B.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Clear and empirically supported diagnostic symptoms are important for proper diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders. Unfortunately, the symptoms of many disorders presented in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) lack sufficient psychometric…

  11. Psychometric Properties of the Consensus Sleep Diary in Those With Insomnia Disorder.

    PubMed

    Maich, Kristin H G; Lachowski, Angela M; Carney, Colleen E

    2016-05-27

    The Consensus Sleep Diary (CSD) is a standardized, prospective tool for tracking nightly subjective sleep. The current study evaluated the validity and utility of the CSD, with consideration for challenges inherent to psychometric evaluation of diary measures. Results showed that the CSD indices differentiated good sleepers from those with insomnia and were associated with similar objective indices and a subjective insomnia severity measure. The ability to detect treatment improvements after cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) was tested by comparing pre- and post-CBT-I CSD indices with a subjective rating of insomnia symptom severity. Improvement in insomnia symptom severity was significantly related to improvement on the CSD indices. Completion rate of the CSD amongst participants across all 14 days was 99.8%. These findings provide support for the validity, clinical utility, and usability of the CSD.

  12. Anticipatory Grief: A Mere Concept?

    PubMed

    Moon, Paul J

    2016-06-01

    Anticipatory grief (AG) has been studied, debated, and written about for several decades. This type of grief is also recognized in hospice and palliative care (HPC). The question, however, is whether the reality of AG is sufficiently upheld by professionals at the point of concrete service delivery. In other words, is AG a mere concept or is everyday practice of HPC duly informed of AG as evidenced by the resulting care delivery?

  13. Tlaxcalan constructions of acute grief.

    PubMed

    Fabrega, H; Nutini, H

    1994-12-01

    In rural Tlaxcala, Mexico, the sudden and unexpected death of infants and young children was a relatively common occurrence during the time when this study was conducted. Not surprisingly, the deaths constituted major social tragedies and operated as psychological traumas to the family, especially the parents. Acute grief reactions inevitably resulted and these were suffused with bodily and psychological disturbances of different types, some of which were handled in the society as illness. The article grows out of a longitudinal study about these tragedies to families of the region. Attention is given to the grief reactions of parents, with special emphasis placed on psychological and behavioral manifestations. Of particular interest is the way local, cultural symbols pertaining to the cause of the deaths, which involved the malevolent attack of blood-sucking witches, were configured in the verbalizations and behavioral reactions that comprised the grief reactions. Details of the way symbols entered into the construction of meaningful accounts of the tragedies during the ordeal of the grief reactions are discussed and analyzed. Although the manifestations of grief could be said to have clinical, psychiatric implications, it is the way these manifestations served to explain the tragedies, in the process regulating and restoring social relations, that is given principal attention. A description of one mother's grief reaction is provided as a case illustration.

  14. Themes of grief.

    PubMed

    Carter, S L

    1989-01-01

    A thematic analysis of 30 narrative accounts of bereavement revealed nine themes that included five core themes in bereavement--being stopped, hurting, missing, holding, and seeking; three meta-themes about bereavement--change, expectations, and inexpressibility; and a contextual theme--personal history. The themes were compared with three theoretical perspectives on bereavement by Freud, Kübler-Ross, and one defined as existential-phenomenological. Features of bereavement that are dissimilar or unaddressed by the theoretical perspectives were: (a) the quality of grief's changing character, including "waves" and intense pain which may be triggered years after the death; (b) holding, an individual process of preserving the fact and meaning of the loved one's existence; (c) expectations, both social and personal, as to how the bereaved should be overlaying the experience; and (d) the critical importance of personal history in affecting the quality and meaning of individual bereavement.

  15. Psychometric properties of the Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children (PANAS-C) in children with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alicia A; Kendall, Philip C

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children (PANAS-C) (Laurent et al. Psychol Asses 1: 326-338, 1999) in a sample of 139 children (ages 7-14 years) diagnosed with a principal anxiety disorder. Results from this study provided support for the convergent validity of the PANAS-C with established measures of childhood anxiety and depression. As predicted, negative affect was significantly associated with measures of anxiety and depression whereas positive affect was associated with depression. However, weaknesses in discriminant validity were found, most notably with regard to social anxiety. Consistent with previous research, social anxiety was significantly associated with low levels of positive affect (PA). Furthermore, results from regression analyses indicated that PA made a significant unique contribution to the prediction of social anxiety as well as depression scores. Findings are discussed with regard to the usefulness of the PANAS-C to differentiate anxiety and depression in children with anxiety disorders.

  16. Grief, Bereavement, and Coping with Loss (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a loved one include rituals, beliefs, and roles. Cultures have different ways of coping with death. Grief ... personal experiences of grief are similar in different cultures. The ways in which people of all cultures ...

  17. Psychometric properties of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale in patients with gambling disorders, hypersexuality, and methamphetamine dependence.

    PubMed

    Reid, Rory C; Cyders, Melissa A; Moghaddam, Jacquelene F; Fong, Timothy W

    2014-11-01

    Although the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS; Patton, Stanford, & Barratt, 1995) is a widely-used self-report measure of impulsivity, there have been numerous questions about the invariance of the factor structure across clinical populations (Haden & Shiva, 2008, 2009; Ireland & Archer, 2008). The goal of this article is to examine the factor structure of the BIS among a sample consisting of three populations exhibiting addictive behaviors and impulsivity: pathological gamblers, hypersexual patients, and individuals seeking treatment for methamphetamine dependence to determine if modification to the existing factors might improve the psychometric properties of the BIS. The current study found that the factor structure of the BIS does not replicate in this sample and instead produces a 12-item three-factor solution consisting of motor-impulsiveness (5 items), non-planning impulsiveness (3 items), and immediacy impulsiveness (4 items). The clinical utility of the BIS in this population is questionable. The authors suggest future studies to investigate comparisons with this modified version of the BIS and other impulsivity scales such as the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale in clinical populations when assessing disposition toward rash action.

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) in Public First Responders.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeonseok S; Park, Shinwon; Lim, Soo Mee; Ma, Jiyoung; Kang, Ilhyang; Kim, Jungyoon; Kim, Eui-Jung; Choi, Yejee J; Lim, Jae-Ho; Chung, Yong-An; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Yoon, Sujung; Kim, Jieun E

    2017-03-21

    Problematic alcohol consumption is prevalent among first responders because alcohol is commonly used to cope with occupational stress and frequent exposure to traumatic incidents, making them an at-risk population for alcohol use disorders (AUD). This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) among public first responders. The Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Text Revision (SCID), AUDIT-C, AUDIT, and CAGE were administered to 222 public first responders, who were recruited by convenience sampling. One-week test-retest reliability was evaluated in a subsample (n = 24). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and estimate the optimal cut-off scores for any AUD and alcohol dependence. Three different analytic criteria were utilized to calculate the cut-off scores. The AUDIT-C demonstrated good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability = 0.91) and satisfactory convergent validity. The areas under the ROC curves for any AUD and alcohol dependence of the AUDIT-C were 0.87 and 0.93, respectively. For any AUD, all three criteria suggested a cut-off score of 7.5 (sensitivity = 81.8%, specificity = 79.8%), whereas for alcohol dependence, a cut-off score of 8.5 (sensitivity = 85.7%, specificity = 86.1%) was derived from two criteria. In conclusion, the AUDIT-C demonstrated good reliability and validity and proved to be a brief and effective screening test for AUD among first responders.

  19. Psychometric comparison of the generalized anxiety disorder scale-7 and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for measuring response during treatment of generalised anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Dear, Blake F; Titov, Nickolai; Sunderland, Matthew; McMillan, Dean; Anderson, Tracy; Lorian, Carolyn; Robinson, Emma

    2011-01-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) is a widely used measure of the worry characteristic of generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). The 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) is a new brief screening tool for GAD, which is being increasingly used in research and clinical practice. The present study sought to provide comparison data on the relative psychometric properties of these two scales. The data of 195 adults who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria for GAD and who participated in two randomised treatment controlled trials were used. Factor analyses, internal consistency, correlational analyses, responsiveness to change, and agreement between the scales based on indentified clinical cutoffs were conducted. Factor analyses confirmed a one-factor structure for the GAD-7 and a three-factor structure involving two method factors for the PSWQ. Both the GAD-7 and the PSWQ demonstrated adequate internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: .79-.91 and .86-.91, respectively), and moderate correlations (r = .51-.71) were observed between the scales across the treatment time points. The scales exhibited small correlations with the Sheehan Disability Scale at pretreatment (GAD-7 r = .38; PSWQ r = .26), but moderate correlations at posttreatment and follow-up (r = .59-.79). Agreement between the scales was limited using various clinical cutoffs identified within the literature. Both measures were sensitive to change, although the GAD-7 appeared to be more sensitive and may, therefore, confer some advantages in clinical work.

  20. Sensitivity to the prototype in children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: An example of Bayesian cognitive psychometrics.

    PubMed

    Voorspoels, Wouter; Rutten, Isa; Bartlema, Annelies; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Vanpaemel, Wolf

    2017-03-13

    We present a case study of hierarchical Bayesian explanatory cognitive psychometrics, examining information processing characteristics of individuals with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). On the basis of previously published data, we compare the classification behavior of a group of children with HFASD with that of typically developing (TD) controls using a computational model of categorization. The parameters in the model reflect characteristics of information processing that are theoretically related to HFASD. Because we expect individual differences in the model's parameters, as well as differences between HFASD and TD children, we use a hierarchical explanatory approach. A first analysis suggests that children with HFASD are less sensitive to the prototype. A second analysis, involving a mixture component, reveals that the computational model is not appropriate for a subgroup of participants, which implies parameter estimates are not informative for these children. Focusing only on the children for whom the prototype model is appropriate, no clear difference in sensitivity between HFASD and TD children is inferred.

  1. Motives for online gaming questionnaire: Its psychometric properties and correlation with Internet gaming disorder symptoms among Chinese people.

    PubMed

    Wu, Anise M S; Lai, Mark H C; Yu, Shu; Lau, Joseph T F; Lei, Man-Wai

    2017-03-01

    Background and aims Internet gaming disorder (IGD) imposes a potential public health threat worldwide. Gaming motives are potentially salient factors of IGD, but research on Chinese gaming motives is scarce. This study empirically evaluated the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Motives for Online Gaming Questionnaire (C-MOGQ), the first inventory that measures seven different gaming motives applicable to all type of online games. We also investigated the associations between various gaming motives and IGD symptoms among Chinese gamers. Methods Three hundred and eighty-three Chinese adult online gamers (Mean age = 23.7 years) voluntarily completed our online, anonymous survey in December 2015. Results The confirmatory factor analysis results supported a bi-factor model with a general factor subsuming all C-MOGQ items (General Motivation) and seven uncorrelated domain-specific factors (Escape, Coping, Fantasy, Skill Development, Recreation, Competition, and Social). High internal consistencies of the overall scale and subscales were observed. The criterion-related validity of this Chinese version was also supported by the positive correlations of C-MOGQ scale scores with psychological need satisfaction and time spent gaming. Furthermore, we found that high General Motivation (coupled with high Escape motive and low Skill Development motive) was associated with more IGD symptoms reported by our Chinese participants. Discussion and conclusions Our findings demonstrated the utility of C-MOGQ in measuring gaming motives of Chinese online gamers, and we recommend the consideration of both its total score and subscale scores in future studies.

  2. Psychometric properties of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) in Brazilian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Isolan, Luciano; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Osowski, Andrea Tochetto; Amaro, Estácio; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) in a large community sample of Brazilian children and adolescents. A total of 2410 students completed the 41-item Brazilian-Portuguese version of the SCARED. The one-factor and the five-factor structure of the SCARED fit this sample well. However, the five-factor model had a significantly better fit than the one-factor model and an adequate fit for age and gender subgroups. Anxiety symptoms in Brazilian youth were reported at a moderate-high level as compared to other studies. Females were found to score significantly higher on the total score and on all of the subscales as compared to the males. The total score and each of the five factors for both children and adolescents showed good internal consistency, test-retest and construct validity. According to our findings the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the SCARED is a reliable and valid instrument to assess anxiety in Brazilian children and adolescents.

  3. The Psychometric Properties of the Iowa Personality Disorder Screen in Methadone-Maintained Patients: An Initial Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Beitel, Mark; Peters, Skye; Savant, Jonathan D.; Cutter, Christopher J.; Cecero, John J.; Barry, Declan T.

    2012-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Iowa Personality Disorder Screen (IPDS) were examined in 150 methadone-maintained patients who completed measures of demographic, psychopathology, substance use, pain, and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) characteristics. An exploratory factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution that explained 45 percent of the scale variance. The first factor captured internalizing tendencies, such as inhibition and hypersensitivity to others. The second factor comprised externalizing tendencies, such as impulsivity and insensitivity to others. The IPDS item subsets, derived factors, and the total score were significantly related to race/ethnicity but not sex. The effects of race/ethnicity were controlled statistically when the IPDS was compared to other measures of psychopathology, self-reported substance use, pain variables, and MMT characteristics. In general, the IPDS appears to be reliable and valid for use with methadone-maintained patients. The two-factor structure found in this study may have clinical utility and merits further investigation in other MMT samples. PMID:23398100

  4. Traumatic grief and traumatic stress in survivors 12 years after the genocide in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Mutabaruka, Jean; Séjourné, Nathalène; Bui, Eric; Birmes, Philippe; Chabrol, Henri

    2012-10-01

    The relationship between exposure to traumatic events and traumatic grief and the role of mediating and moderating variables [peritraumatic distress, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and symptoms of depression] were studied in survivors of the genocide of Batutsi in Rwanda in 1994. One hundred and two survivors (70 women, mean age 45 ± 7.53 years) participated in this retrospective study. All of them had lost a member of their family. The severity of traumatic exposure (Comprehensive Trauma Inventory), peritraumatic distress (Peritraumatic Distress Inventory), current PTSD symptoms (PTSD Checklist), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) and traumatic grief symptoms (Inventory of Traumatic Grief) was evaluated. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was then conducted to examine the relative contribution of each variable to the symptoms of traumatic grief. The severity of traumatic exposure was related to traumatic grief symptoms (B=0.06, R=0.6, R(2) =0.36 and ß=0.6, t=7.54, p=0.00). The Baron and Kenny procedure (1986) (including three separate regressions), along with the Sobel test, was used to test mediation effects. Peritraumatic distress and PTSD symptoms may be mediating variables between traumatic exposure and traumatic grief. Traumatic grief is a complex but assessable entity, where previous distress and suffering result from both psychological trauma and the loss of a loved one.

  5. A psychometric investigation of gender differences and common processes across borderline and antisocial personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Chun, Seokjoon; Harris, Alexa; Carrion, Margely; Rojas, Elizabeth; Stark, Stephen; Lejuez, Carl; Lechner, William V; Bornovalova, Marina A

    2017-01-01

    The comorbidity between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is well-established, and the 2 disorders share many similarities. However, there are also differences across disorders: most notably, BPD is diagnosed more frequently in women and ASPD in men. We investigated if (a) comorbidity between BPD and ASPD is attributable to 2 discrete disorders or the expression of common underlying processes, and (b) if the model of comorbidity is true across sex. Using a clinical sample of 1,400 drug users in residential substance abuse treatment, we tested 3 competing models to explore whether the comorbidity of ASPD and BPD should be represented by a single common factor, 2 correlated factors, or a bifactor structure involving a general and disorder-specific factors. Next, we tested whether our resulting model was meaningful by examining its relationship with criterion variables previously reported to be associated with BPD and ASPD. The bifactor model provided the best fit and was invariant across sex. Overall, the general factor of the bifactor model significantly accounted for a large percentage of the variance in criterion variables, whereas the BPD and AAB specific factors added little to the models. The association of the general and specific factor with all criterion variables was equal for men and women. Our results suggest common underlying vulnerability accounts for both the comorbidity between BPD and AAB (across sex), and this common vulnerability drives the association with other psychopathology and maladaptive behavior. This in turn has implications for diagnostic classification systems and treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Perinatal grief and mourning.

    PubMed

    Menke, J A; McClead, R E

    1990-01-01

    The grief and mourning that parents experience following a perinatal loss is as devastating as the loss of an older loved one. The pattern of mourning can be anticipated and interventions can be implemented. With proper help, the parents can pass through this catastrophic time in their lives with a minimum of scars. If the physician stops, reaches out, listens, and supports the parents, he or she can have a dramatic effect on the lives of these parents. In the same manner in which we started this paper, we close with a quotation from another parent who suffered a loss: Daughters may die, But why? For even daughters can't live with half a heart. Three days isn't much a life. But long enough to remember thin blue lips, uneven gasps in incubators, Racking breaths that cause a pain to those who watched. Long enough to remember I never held her Or felt her softness Or counted her toes. I didn't even know the color of her eyes. Dead paled hands not quite covered by the gown she Was to go home in. Moist earth smell. One small casket. And the tears. You see, I hold in my hand but souvenirs of an occasion. A sheet of paper filled with statistics, A certificate with smudged footprints, A tiny bracelet engraved "Girl, Smith." You say that you are sorry That you know how I feel. But you can't know because I don't feel. Not yet.

  7. Exploration of dimensionality and psychometric properties of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in cases with temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study assessed the dimensional structure of sleep quality with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and investigated its psychometric properties in cases with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Methods A convenience sample of 609 TMD cases (age: 37.1 ± 13.1 yrs, 18–67 yrs, 85% female) of the multi-center Validation Project meeting Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) and with sufficient PSQI data were included in this study. To investigate PSQI scores’ dimensionality, exploratory factor analysis was used. Factors were identified using the Scree plot. To investigate internal consistency, Cronbach’s alpha was calculated. Analyses were separately performed for TMD cases with (N = 496) and TMD cases withouta pain-related diagnosis (N = 113). Results The mean PSQI score for all TMD cases was 7.1 ± 4.0 units, range: 0–19. The exploratory factor analysis identified one factor for cases with at least one pain-related TMD diagnosis as well as one factor for cases with a pain-free TMD diagnosis that explained 41% of the variance in cases with pain-related TMD and 37% in cases with pain-free TMD. Internal consistency for PSQI scores was alpha of 0.75 in cases with pain-related TMD, alpha of 0.66 in cases with pain-free TMD and alpha = 0.75 for all TMD cases. Conclusions Sleep quality in TMD patients is a unidimensional construct and can therefore be represented by one summary score; a finding that is in line with previous reports in TMD patients. PMID:24443942

  8. Descriptive Characteristics and Initial Psychometric Properties of the Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Disorder Scale.

    PubMed

    Victor, Sarah E; Davis, Tchiki; Klonsky, E David

    2016-06-07

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent and associated with tissue damage, emotional distress, and psychiatric disorders. While often discussed in the context of Borderline Personality Disorder and suicide, research demonstrates that NSSI is distinct from these constructs and should be viewed as an independent diagnostic category. Recently, Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Disorder (NSSID) was included in the revised Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as a condition for further study. In this article, we describe the properties of a self-report measure designed to assess proposed criteria for NSSID. Undergraduate students at 2 large, public universities completed the NSSID Scale (NSSIDS) along with other measures of NSSI characteristics and psychopathology. Among participants with a history of NSSI, approximately half (54.55%) met diagnostic criteria for NSSID. Participants were most frequently excluded from an NSSID diagnosis on the basis of criterion A (frequency of NSSI) and criterion E (distress or impairment related to NSSI), while participants were least likely to be excluded from diagnosis on the basis of criterion D (NSSI method exclusions) and criterion F (diagnostic "rule-outs"). Consistent with previous literature, the most commonly reported precipitants to NSSI were negative feelings or thoughts (criterion C2). Participants who met criteria for NSSID reported more severe depression, anxiety, and NSSI than participants who engaged in NSSI but did not meet criteria for NSSID. These results support the use of the NSSIDS as a reliable and valid self-report measure of NSSID symptoms.

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Korean Version of the Clinical Language Disorder Rating Scale (CLANG)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Jang, Eun Young; Lee, Kang Uk; Lee, Jung Goo; Lee, Hwa-Young; Choi, Joonho

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our study aimed to measure inter-rater and test-retest reliability, concurrent and convergent validity, and factor solutions of the Korean version of the Clinical Language Disorder Rating Scale (CLANG). Methods The Korean version of the CLANG for assessing thought, language, and communication, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia were used to evaluate language disorder, formal thought disorder, positive and negative symptoms, manic symptoms, and depressive symptoms, respectively, in 167 hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. The factor solution was obtained by the direct oblimin method. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to find the optimal cut-off score for discriminating schizophrenia patients with and without disorganized speech. Results Inter-rater reliability was considered moderate (intraclass coefficient=0.67, F=3.30, p=0.04), and test-retest reliability was considered high (r=0.94, p<0.001). Five factors, namely, pragmatics, disclosure, production, prosody, and association, were identified. An optimal cut-off score of 7 points with 84.5% sensitivity and 81.7% specificity was proposed for distinguishing schizophrenia patients with and without disorganized speech. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the Korean version of the CLANG is a promising tool for evaluating language disorder in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26792040

  10. Psychometric Testing of the Personal Internet Gaming Disorder Evaluation-9: A New Measure Designed to Assess Internet Gaming Disorder.

    PubMed

    Pearcy, Benjamin T D; Roberts, Lynne D; McEvoy, Peter M

    2016-05-01

    Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) is in the early stages of recognition as a disorder, following its inclusion in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association(1)) as a condition for further study. Existing measures of Internet gaming pathology are limited in their ability to measure IGD as defined in the DSM-5. We present the initial development and validation of a new measure derived from the proposed DSM-5 criteria for IGD, the Personal Internet Gaming Disorder Evaluation-9 (PIE-9). A student sample (n = 119) and a community sample (n = 285), sourced through a variety of online gaming forums, completed an online survey comprising the new measure, existing measures of IGD, and a range of health and demographic questions. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis supported a single factor structure for the 9-item PIE-9. Internal consistency (α = 0.89) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation [ICC] = 0.77) were high. Convergent validity was demonstrated with similar gaming addiction measures. Predictive validity was established through significant differences in distress and disability between those who met the criteria for IGD and those who did not. The distress and disability associated with meeting IGD criteria fell within the range of other common DSM-5 disorders. Preliminary testing of the PIE-9 has demonstrated that it is an efficient and straightforward measure for use in further research of IGD, and as a potential screening measure in clinical practice.

  11. The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales in a Dutch non-clinical sample: psychometric properties including the adult separation anxiety disorder scale.

    PubMed

    Möller, Eline L; Bögels, Susan M

    2016-09-01

    With DSM-5, the American Psychiatric Association encourages complementing categorical diagnoses with dimensional severity ratings. We therefore examined the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales, a set of brief dimensional scales that are consistent in content and structure and assess DSM-5-based core features of anxiety disorders. Participants (285 males, 255 females) completed the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales for social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder that were included in previous studies on the scales, and also for separation anxiety disorder, which is included in the DSM-5 chapter on anxiety disorders. Moreover, they completed the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Adult version (SCARED-A). The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales demonstrated high internal consistency, and the scales correlated significantly and substantially with corresponding SCARED-A subscales, supporting convergent validity. Separation anxiety appeared present among adults, supporting the DSM-5 recognition of separation anxiety as an anxiety disorder across the life span. To conclude, the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales are a valuable tool to screen for specific adult anxiety disorders, including separation anxiety. Research in more diverse and clinical samples with anxiety disorders is needed. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales in a Dutch non‐clinical sample: psychometric properties including the adult separation anxiety disorder scale

    PubMed Central

    Bögels, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With DSM‐5, the American Psychiatric Association encourages complementing categorical diagnoses with dimensional severity ratings. We therefore examined the psychometric properties of the DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales, a set of brief dimensional scales that are consistent in content and structure and assess DSM‐5‐based core features of anxiety disorders. Participants (285 males, 255 females) completed the DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales for social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder that were included in previous studies on the scales, and also for separation anxiety disorder, which is included in the DSM‐5 chapter on anxiety disorders. Moreover, they completed the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Adult version (SCARED‐A). The DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales demonstrated high internal consistency, and the scales correlated significantly and substantially with corresponding SCARED‐A subscales, supporting convergent validity. Separation anxiety appeared present among adults, supporting the DSM‐5 recognition of separation anxiety as an anxiety disorder across the life span. To conclude, the DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales are a valuable tool to screen for specific adult anxiety disorders, including separation anxiety. Research in more diverse and clinical samples with anxiety disorders is needed. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27378317

  13. Reading Guidance: Death and Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alice Gullen

    1989-01-01

    Gives guidelines for the librarian using reading guidance (similar to bibliotherapy). Provides a nine-item annotated bibliography of novels for children and adolescents on the subject of death and grief. Appends an embryo list of categories suitable for content analysis of any file librarians might wish to keep on books suitable for use in this…

  14. Children and Grief. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEntire, Nancy

    Noting that the death of a loved one brings grief to children as well as adults, this Digest draws on research to examine how children respond to death and the role of parents and teachers in helping children cope with loss. The Digest delineates children's "tasks" during mourning that are essential to their adjustment to loss, such as…

  15. Helping Teens Work Through Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perschy, Mary Kelly

    Teens who have experienced the death of a parent, grandparent, friend, or relative often find it difficult to grieve openly. When adults whom teens trust are aware of the cycle of grief, they can provide a safe atmosphere to allow teens to experience the turmoil of the intense and conflicting emotions in order to move toward healing. This guide is…

  16. The psychometric properties of the generalized anxiety disorder-7 scale in Hispanic Americans with English or Spanish language preference.

    PubMed

    Mills, Sarah D; Fox, Rina S; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Roesch, Scott C; Champagne, Brian R; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2014-07-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale (GAD-7) is a self-report questionnaire that is widely used to screen for anxiety. The GAD-7 has been translated into numerous languages, including Spanish. Previous studies evaluating the structural validity of the English and Spanish versions indicate a unidimensional factor structure in both languages. However, the psychometric properties of the Spanish language version have yet to be evaluated in samples outside of Spain, and the measure has not been tested for use among Hispanic Americans. This study evaluated the reliability, structural validity, and convergent validity of the English and Spanish language versions of the GAD-7 for Hispanic Americans in the United States. A community sample of 436 Hispanic Americans with an English (n = 210) or Spanish (n = 226) language preference completed the GAD-7. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the goodness-of-fit of the unidimensional factor structure of the GAD-7 across language-preference groups. Results from the multiple-group CFA indicated a similar unidimensional factor structure with equivalent response patterns and item intercepts, but different variances, across language-preference groups. Internal consistency was good for both English and Spanish language-preference groups. The GAD-7 also evidenced good convergent validity as demonstrated by significant correlations in expected directions with the Perceived Stress Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Physical Health domain of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF assessment. The unidimensional GAD-7 is suitable for use among Hispanic Americans with an English or Spanish language preference.

  17. Grief as pathology: The evolution of grief theory in psychology from Freud to the present.

    PubMed

    Granek, Leeat

    2010-02-01

    The emergence of grief as a topic worthy of psychological study is an early 20th century invention. Freud published his influential essay on mourning and melancholia in 1917. Since he proposed the concept of "grief work," contemporary psychologists have examined his theory empirically and have claimed that grief is a pathology that should be included within the psychological domain. How, and why, has grief theory evolved within the discipline of psychology in this way? In what ways do these changes in the understanding of grief coincide with other historical developments within the discipline? In this article, I trace the development of grief, originally conceived by Freud within a psychoanalytic and nonpathological framework, to the current conceptualization of grief within the disease model. I show how grief theory has evolved within the discipline of psychology to become (a) an object worthy of scientific study within the discipline, and subsequently, (b) a pathology to be privatized, specialized, and treated by mental health professionals.

  18. Pathological Grief: Causes, Recognition, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gort, George

    1984-01-01

    Although the incidence of pathological grief does not appear to be high, the morbidity and mortality of sufferers is significant. Because of attitudes about grieving and the reluctance to experience grief, patients may avoid sharing grief with the family physician, who may then fail to recognize pathological grief. This article discusses clinical manifestations and situations which can lead to pathological grief. The types of pathological grief—chronic, inhibited, delayed, and atypical—are also discussed, along with personality variables which predispose some people to difficult grieving. Failure to grieve may also lead to a higher incidence of physical disease and various forms of mental illness. In order to manage grief, the physician must encourage the patient to express all his feelings of sadness, anger, and guilt; reassure him that his anger and guilt are a normal reaction to loss; and later, give him permission to stop grieving. PMID:21279045

  19. [A Clinical Case of Grief Hallucination through the Mourning Work Normal Grief and Spiritual Care].

    PubMed

    Kurotori, Isaku; Kato, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Auditory or visual hallucinations of a deceased person are well known in the normal course of the bereavement process. According to DSM-5, this symptom is included in the associated features supporting diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder. In Japan, however, little is known about these hallucinatory experiences during grieving, and few reports on their prevalence are available. Here, we have reported a clinical case of such experiences following the loss of a spouse. A 66-year-old patient presented to the outpatient department with insomnia after her husband's death. She was preoccupied with a sense of loss and absolute loneliness. One day, she confessed to regularly encountering her husband's ghost at night; the ghost was distinguishable from a dream and provided the bereaved wife with some degree of comfort. The appearances lasted for 15 months and occurred several times a week without disturbing her social functioning. She gradually became aware that her husband was returning from the spirit world to give her solace. Her treatment was focused on resolving her conflicting feelings concerning her grief at his death and her relief at his no longer suffering from disease. While accepting her experiences, she started to review the days they spent together and appreciated his attachment. Therefore she completed the work of mourning and the ghost no longer appeared. One year after the departure of the ghost, she still attends the hospital regularly and there has been no recurrence. A reconstruction of her internal world leads us to conclude that the support of normal grief with such hallucinations prevents the intense experience of loss from generating pathological grief. Furthermore, we suggest reconsidering the importance of the mourning work and the inclusion of both the bereaved and deceased person in the medical context.

  20. Pathological grief: two Victorian case studies.

    PubMed

    Ramchandani, D

    1996-01-01

    Despite 75 years of investigation, the concept of pathological grief remains tenuous and controversial. The author turns to the stories of two nineteenth century women, one real and the other fictitious to examine the syndrome of grief gone away. He concludes that pathological grief may be best viewed on a continuum of psychopathology, the expression of which depends upon the interaction between the personality of the patient, the nature of the lost relationship, and the circumstances of its loss.

  1. The Spectrum of Grief: Identification and Management

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Daphne

    1989-01-01

    Loss is a common human experience, and grief is frequently seen in a physician's office. Grief occurs not only after a death, but also during chronic or serious illness, infertility, divorce, job changes, surgery, rape, and so forth. Some patients somatize distress, presenting with physical symptoms rather than acknowledging their grief. Bereavement increases the risk of both psychiatric and physical disease and can exacerbate pre-existing illness. In the majority, grief resolves normally, but in some the process becomes morbid. The family physician is in a unique position to identify, educate, assess, and intervene with the grieving patient and his family. PMID:21248941

  2. Autonomy and social norms in a three factor grief model predicting perinatal grief in India.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lisa R; Lee, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal grief following stillbirth is a significant social and mental health burden. We examined associations among the following latent variables: autonomy, social norms, self-despair, strained coping, and acute grief-among poor, rural women in India who experienced stillbirth. A structural equation model was built and tested using quantitative data from 347 women of reproductive age in Chhattisgarh. Maternal acceptance of traditional social norms worsens self-despair and strained coping, and increases the autonomy granted to women. Greater autonomy increases acute grief. Greater despair and acute grief increase strained coping. Social and cultural factors were found to predict perinatal grief in India.

  3. Dream Work in Grief Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Konrad Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Working with dreams is useful with grief and loss clients who present with dreams. Adlerian dream analysis is one-way of exploring dreams. It incorporates the life-style of the client. This case report demonstrates how Adlerian dream analysis was used with a client. Progress was noted in improved life-style once the client began to talk about her dream. PMID:25035561

  4. The Appraisal of Social Concerns Scale: Psychometric Validation with a Clinical Sample of Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Luke T.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Schneier, Franklin R.; Liebowitz, Michael R.; Telch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The Appraisal of Social Concerns (ASC) Scale was created by Telch et al. (2004) to improve upon existing self-report measures of social anxiety-related cognition. In a largely nonclinical sample, the ASC was found to possess three factors and was psychometrically sound. In a smaller clinical sample, the ASC demonstrated sensitivity to the effects…

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents and Use for Youth with Psychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince-Embury, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    This study examines psychometric properties of the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA) in two clinical samples: one child sample (n = 110) and one adolescent sample (n = 178). The purpose of the study was to examine the distribution characteristics and internal consistency of RSCA scale, subscale, and index scores for youth who…

  6. Divergent Gene Expression Responses to Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The “widowhood effect” (i.e., morbidity/mortality in recently bereaved spouses) may be related to changes in immune function, but little is known about the impact of bereavement on gene transcription in immune cells. This study examined how Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief responses to bereavement differentially affect leukocyte gene expression. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and bioinformatic analyses were completed on 63 older adults. Thirty-six of them had lost their spouse/partner on average 2 years ago, and 27 were nonbereaved, married controls. Twelve of the bereaved participants met criteria for Complicated Grief. Compared to nonbereaved controls, bereavement (both Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief) was associated with upregulated expression of genes involved in general immunologic activation and a selective downregulation of genes involved in B lymphocyte responses. However, Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief differed markedly in their expression of Type I interferon-related transcripts, with Non-complicated Grief subjects showing substantial upregulation relative to nonbereaved controls and Complicated Grief subjects showing substantial downregulation. Bereavement significantly modulates immune function gene expression. The magnitude of bereavement-related distress (i.e., Complicated Grief vs. Non-complicated Grief) is linked to differential patterns of transcription factor activation and gene expression involved in innate antiviral responses. These findings provide a molecular framework for understanding the health effects of bereavement, as well as new insights into the particular gene modules that are most sensitive to the individual's psychological response to loss. PMID:24380850

  7. Psychometric properties of the PTSD Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (PCL-5) in veterans.

    PubMed

    Bovin, Michelle J; Marx, Brian P; Weathers, Frank W; Gallagher, Matthew W; Rodriguez, Paola; Schnurr, Paula P; Keane, Terence M

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (PCL-5; Weathers, Litz, et al., 2013b) in 2 independent samples of veterans receiving care at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center (N = 468). A subsample of these participants (n = 140) was used to define a valid diagnostic cutoff score for the instrument using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5; Weathers, Blake, et al., 2013) as the reference standard. The PCL-5 test scores demonstrated good internal consistency (α = .96), test-retest reliability (r = .84), and convergent and discriminant validity. Consistent with previous studies (Armour et al., 2015; Liu et al., 2014), confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the data were best explained by a 6-factor anhedonia model and a 7-factor hybrid model. Signal detection analyses using the CAPS-5 revealed that PCL-5 scores of 31 to 33 were optimally efficient for diagnosing PTSD (κ(.5) = .58). Overall, the findings suggest that the PCL-5 is a psychometrically sound instrument that can be used effectively with veterans. Further, by determining a valid cutoff score using the CAPS-5, the PCL-5 can now be used to identify veterans with probable PTSD. However, findings also suggest the need for research to evaluate cluster structure of DSM-5. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Grief Counseling: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneker, Darlene; Cashwell, Craig

    2005-01-01

    Grief counseling has grown over the past two decades to become a well respected specialty within the field of counseling. This article examines books, articles, and literature developed by leading agencies in the field. Grief counseling is an interdisciplinary field focusing on the clinical aspects of working with individuals involved in dying and…

  9. The Continuing Process of Parental Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Joan; Gemma, Penelope Buschman

    2008-01-01

    The death of a child is an incomprehensible and devastating loss. Grief for parents is lifelong, becoming the connection between parent and child. To extend and deepen current understanding of parental grief, a new survey instrument was developed, combining quantitative and qualitative measures. The qualitative findings from this combined…

  10. The Grief Resolution Process in Divorce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, John F.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Compares grief in divorce to the Kubler-Ross model of grief resolution in bereavement in 17 persons who wrote essays about their divorce. The results suggested a conceptual model based on three chronological stages with linear progression through the stages, characterized by circularity within each stage. (JAC)

  11. Integrating Buddhist Psychology into Grief Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wada, Kaori; Park, Jeeseon

    2009-01-01

    The field of grief counseling has yet to see an integration of Buddhist psychology. Drawing on Buddhist psychology literature and Western models of grief, this article explores possible integrations of two approaches. To lay the foundation for this discussion, the authors introduced a brief overview of the history of Buddhism as well as a Buddhist…

  12. The Grief Account: Dimensions of a Contemporary Bereavement Genre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Michael Robert

    2008-01-01

    The genre of the grief account is identified to include published narratives of surviving grief. Thematic analysis of Andrew Holleran's (2006) "Grief: A Novel," Lolly Winston's (2004) "Good Grief: A Novel," Joan Didion's (2005) "The Year of Magical Thinking," and J. Canfield and M. V. Hansen's (2003) "Chicken Soup for the Grieving Soul: Stories…

  13. The Role of Defense Mechanisms, Personality and Demographical Factors on Complicated Grief following Death of a loved one by Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rahimian Boogar, Isaac; Talepasand, Siavash

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Identification of the risk factors and psychological correlates of prolonged grief disorder is vital for health promotions in relatives of persons who died of cancer. The aim of this research was to investigate the role of defense mechanisms, character dimension of personality and demographic factors on complicated grief following a loss of a family member to cancer. Method: A number of 226 persons who had lost a family member to cancer in a cancer institute at Tehran University of Medical Science were selected through compliance sampling and completed the Inventory of complicated Grief-Revised (ICG-R), the Defense Styles Questionnaire (DSQ), the Character dimension of Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), and the Demographical questionnaire. Data were analyzed by stepwise multiple regression analysis, using the PASW version 18. Results: Findings revealed that neurotic defense style had a significant positive predictive role in the complicated grief; and cooperativeness, age of the deceased person, self-transcendence and mature defense style had a significant negative predictive role in complicated grief (p<0.001). R2 was 0.73 for the final model (p<.001). Conclusion: The results revealed that two character dimensions (low cooperativeness and self-transcendence), high neurotic defense style and young age of the deceased person were involved in the psychopathological course of the complicated and prolonged grief. It was concluded that personality characteristics of the grieving persons and demographics of the deceased person should be addressed in designing tailored interventions for complicated grief. PMID:26884783

  14. The Youth Anxiety Measure for DSM-5 (YAM-5): Development and First Psychometric Evidence of a New Scale for Assessing Anxiety Disorders Symptoms of Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; Simon, Ellin; Lijphart, Hester; Bos, Arjan; Hale, William; Schmeitz, Kelly

    2017-02-01

    The Youth Anxiety Measure for DSM-5 (YAM-5) is a new self- and parent-report questionnaire to assess anxiety disorder symptoms in children and adolescents in terms of the contemporary classification system. International panels of childhood anxiety researchers and clinicians were used to construct a scale consisting of two parts: part one consists of 28 items and measures the major anxiety disorders including separation anxiety disorder, selective mutism, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas part two contains 22 items that focus on specific phobias and (given its overlap with situational phobias) agoraphobia. In general, the face validity of the new scale was good; most of its items were successfully linked to the intended anxiety disorders. Notable exceptions were the selective mutism items, which were frequently considered as symptoms of social anxiety disorder, and some specific phobia items especially of the natural environment, situational and other type, that were regularly assigned to an incorrect category. A preliminary investigation of the YAM-5 in non-clinical (N = 132) and clinically referred (N = 64) children and adolescents indicated that the measure was easy to complete by youngsters. In addition, support was found for the psychometric qualities of the measure: that is, the internal consistency was good for both parts, as well as for most of the subscales, the parent-child agreement appeared satisfactory, and there was also evidence for the validity of the scale. The YAM-5 holds promise as a tool for assessing anxiety disorder symptoms in children and adolescents.

  15. Psychometric assessment of subjective sleep quality using the Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI-J) in psychiatric disordered and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Doi, Y; Minowa, M; Uchiyama, M; Okawa, M; Kim, K; Shibui, K; Kamei, Y

    2000-12-27

    Subjective sleep quality has been identified as an important clinical construct in psychiatric disordered patients. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), one of the most widely used standardized measures to assess subjective sleep quality, generates a global score and scores seven components. The present study psychometrically assessed clinical profiles of subjective sleep quality in 82 control and 92 psychiatric disordered subjects (primary insomnia, n=14; major depression, n=30; generalized anxiety disorder, n=24; and schizophrenia, n=24), using the Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI-J). The overall reliability coefficient of the PSQI-J was high (Cronbach's alpha=0.77). Correlation coefficients between the PSQI-J global and component scores were statistically significant. The PSQI-J global and component mean scores were significantly higher in psychiatric disordered subjects than control subjects, except for the component of sleep duration. Using a cut-off point of 5.5 in the PSQI-J global score, estimations of sensitivity and specificity provided 85.7 and 86.6% for primary insomnia, 80.0 and 86.6% for major depression, 83.3 and 86.6% for generalized anxiety disorder, and 83.3 and 86.6% for schizophrenia, respectively. The present study supports the utility of the PSQI-J as a reliable and valid measure for subjective sleep quality in clinical practice and research.

  16. An exploration of associations between separation anxiety in childhood and complicated grief in later life.

    PubMed

    Vanderwerker, Lauren C; Jacobs, Selby C; Parkes, Colin Murray; Prigerson, Holly G

    2006-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the vulnerability to complicated grief (CG) may be rooted in insecure attachment styles developed in childhood. The aim of this study was to examine the etiologic relevance of childhood separation anxiety (CSA) to the onset of CG relative to major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder in bereaved individuals. The Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV, Inventory of Complicated Grief-Revised, and CSA items from the Panic Agoraphobic Spectrum Questionnaire were administered to 283 recently bereaved community-dwelling residents at an average of 10.6 months postloss. CSA was significantly associated with CG (OR = 3.2; 95% CI, 1.2-8.9), adjusting for sex, level of education, kinship relationship to the deceased, prior history of psychiatric disorder, and history of childhood abuse. CSA was not significantly associated with major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, or generalized anxiety disorder.

  17. The Short Inventory of Problems - revised (SIP-R): psychometric properties within a large, diverse sample of substance use disorder treatment seekers.

    PubMed

    Kiluk, Brian D; Dreifuss, Jessica A; Weiss, Roger D; Morgenstern, Jon; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2013-03-01

    Assessment of the adverse consequences of substance use serves an important function in both clinical and research settings, yet there is no universally agreed upon measure of consequences relevant to multiple types of substance use disorders. One of the most commonly used measures, the Short Inventory of Problems (SIP), has been adapted and evaluated in several specific populations, but evidence is needed of its reliability and validity across broader samples of persons with substance use disorders. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of a revised version of the SIP (SIP-R) in a large combined sample of alcohol and drug use disorder treatment seekers, with participants pooled from two national, multisite, randomized clinical trials. A total of 886 participants across 10 outpatient treatment facilities completed a common assessment battery that included the SIP-R, Addiction Severity Index (ASI), University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA), HIV Risk Behavior Scale (HRBS), and a substance use calendar. Results supported the SIP-R's internal reliability (α = .95). Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the hypothesized 5-factor model with one higher-order factor produced the best fit. Convergent validity was evident through the SIP-R's correlation with several composite scores from the ASI and the URICA, and analyses supported its conceptual distinction from quantity indices of drug/alcohol use. The SIP-R also demonstrated an ability to predict treatment retention, with higher scores associated with poorer retention. These results provide support for the SIP-R's psychometric properties as a measure of consequences across a broad sample of treatment-seeking drug and alcohol users.

  18. The Grief and Meaning Reconstruction Inventory (GMRI): Initial Validation of a New Measure.

    PubMed

    Gillies, James M; Neimeyer, Robert A; Milman, Evgenia

    2015-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of grief theorists, researchers, and therapists have begun to focus on the quest for meaning in lives disrupted by loss, no convenient and psychometrically validated measure of meanings made specifically in bereavement has been available to guide their efforts. To construct such a measure, the authors began with a systematic content analysis of sense-making, benefit finding, and identity reconstruction themes gleaned from the narrative responses of a sample of 162 adults who were diverse in their age, ethnicity, relationship to the decedent, cause of death, and severity of their grief response. These were then formulated into a set of 65 candidate items in a Likert scale format representing the level of the respondent's endorsement of the item in the past week. Subsequent administration to a second sample of 300 bereaved respondents permitted factor analysis of this pilot version of the Grief and Meaning Reconstruction Inventory (GMRI), and reduced the items to 29, which loaded on 5 distinct factors, labeled Continuing Bonds, Personal Growth, Sense of Peace, Emptiness and Meaninglessness, and Valuing Life. Both the overall GMRI and its constituent factors showed good internal consistency and strong convergent validity in the form of negative correlations with established measures of bereavement-related negative emotions, symptoms of complicated grief, and more general psychological distress and mental health symptomatology, and positive correlations with grief related personal growth. The authors close by noting several specific research and clinical applications of the measure, which could play a useful role in testing and refining contemporary models of meaning made in the wake of loss.

  19. Perinatal grief in Latino parents.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Claudia; Kavanaugh, Karen; Klima, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research exists that describes the meaning of perinatal loss to some parents, but the experience of loss from the perspective of Latino parents is not clearly understood. Additionally, current perinatal bereavement practices used often to facilitate memory making for parents (such as viewing or holding the baby, taking photographs, or collecting mementos) are based on research done primarily with non-Latino families. Are these common practices appropriate for this population? Because there is a paucity of research on this topic, this article describes what has been written over the past 30 years on the topic of grief and perinatal loss in Latino culture.

  20. Perinatal Grief in Latino Parents

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Claudia; Kavanaugh, Karen; Klima, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research exists that describes the meaning of perinatal loss to some parents, but the experience of loss from the perspective of Latino parents is not clearly understood. Additionally, current perinatal bereavement practices used often to facilitate memory-making for parents (such as viewing or holding the baby, taking photographs, or collecting mementos) are based upon research done primarily with non-Latino families. Are these common practices appropriate for this population? Because there is a paucity of research on this topic, this article describes what has been written over the past 30 years on the topic of grief and perinatal loss in Latino culture. PMID:20975393

  1. Mourning and Grief on Facebook.

    PubMed

    Willis, Erin; Ferrucci, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Facebook not only changed the way we communicate but also the way we mourn and express grief. The social networking site allows users to interact with deceased users' walls after death. This study utilized textual analysis to categorize Facebook posts ( N = 122) on 30 deceased users' walls according to uses and gratifications theory. Most posts were found to be motivated by entertainment, followed by integration and social interaction. Facebook users posted memories, condolences, and interacted with friends and family members in the deceased user's network. Implications and potential future research are discussed.

  2. Normal grief and its correlates in Lubumbashi, an urban city in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Katabwa Kabongo; Mapatano, Mala Ali; Manyonga, Tshibangu; Mwadianvita, Costa Kazadi; Valérien, Mutombo; Stanis, Wembonyama; Kavulu, Mukendi; Espérance, Kashala

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Grief is a universal experience faced at one time or another by most people during their lives. Response to grief and bereavement losses can lead to psychiatric disorders such as mood disorders, post traumatic responses, insomnia loss of appetite, anxiety, and depression. The aim of our study is to value in our community the physical and psychological complications of a normal grief. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from March 2012 to September 2012 in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo. Two questionnaires, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory scale were used as screening tool. A snow ball sampling method was performed and the questionnaires were administered only to those who consented to participate in the study. Results A total of 78 subjects were included in the study of which 87.2% were aged between 14-50 years old. The majority of the subjects were female 65.4%, and about a quarter (28%) was unemployed. The main correlates of the grief reported in the present study were being treated as witchcraft or accused to be responsible of a death (68%), being rejected by family and not being allowed to inherit (32%). Being homeless was reported in 26%. The main psychological symptoms reported were psychological distress after 1 year (65%) and related physical health problems after the death (72%). Depression and mild anxiety were the most reported disorders, with respectively 92.3% and 74.4% of the subjects. Conclusion Grief in Lubumbashi is associated with a large number of psychological, social and health problems. Health problems such as gastric is, high blood pressure were often reported. Being accused of witchcraft remains the main social impact. Depression and anxiety were the most psychological problem associated with grief. PMID:27583088

  3. A psychometric investigation of the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory among highly sexually active gay and bisexual men: An item response theory analysis

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Ventuneac, Ana; Cook, Karon F.; Grov, Christian; Mustanski, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI) was designed as an instrument for the screening of hypersexuality by the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5 taskforce. Aim Our study sought to conduct a psychometric analysis of the HDSI, including an investigation of its underlying structure and reliability utilizing Item Response Theory (IRT) modeling, and an examination of its polythetic scoring criteria in comparison to a standard dimensionally-based cutoff score. Methods We examined a diverse group of 202 highly sexually active gay and bisexual men in New York City. We conducted psychometric analyses of the HDSI, including both confirmatory factor analysis of its structure and item response theory analysis of the item and scale reliabilities. Main Outcome Measures We utilized the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory. Results The HDSI adequately fit a single-factor solution, although there was evidence that two of the items may measure a second factor that taps into sex as a form of coping. The scale showed evidence of strong reliability across much of the continuum of hypersexuality and results suggested that, in addition to the proposed polythetic scoring criteria, a cutoff score of 20 on the severity index might be used for preliminary classification of HD. Conclusion The HDSI was found to be highly reliable and results suggested that a unidimensional, quantitative conception of hypersexuality with a clinically relevant cutoff score may be more appropriate than a qualitative syndrome comprised of multiple distinct clusters of problems. However, we also found preliminary evidence that three clusters of symptoms may constitute an HD syndrome as opposed to the two clusters initially proposed. Future research is needed to determine which of these issues are characteristic of the hypersexuality and HD constructs themselves and which are more likely to be methodological artifacts of the HDSI. PMID:23534845

  4. Predictors of Complicated Grief among Adolescents Exposed to a Peer's Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melhem, Nadine M.; Day, Nancy; Shear, M. Katherine; Day, Richard; Reynolds, Charles F.; Brent, David

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the predictors of complicated grief, depression, and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among adolescents exposed to the suicide of a peer. One hundred and forty six peers of adolescent suicide victims were interviewed at 6, 12-18, and 36 months following the suicide. The roles of previous psychiatric…

  5. Emotion regulation in disordered eating: Psychometric properties of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale among Spanish adults and its interrelations with personality and clinical severity

    PubMed Central

    Wolz, Ines; Agüera, Zaida; Granero, Roser; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Gratz, Kim L.; Menchón, José M.; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aims of the study were to (1) validate the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) in a sample of Spanish adults with and without eating disorders, and (2) explore the role of emotion regulation difficulties in eating disorders (ED), including its mediating role in the relation between key personality traits and ED severity. Methods: One hundred and thirty four patients (121 female, mean age = 29 years) with anorexia nervosa (n = 30), bulimia nervosa (n = 54), binge eating (n = 20), or Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorders (n = 30) and 74 healthy control participants (51 female, mean age = 21 years) reported on general psychopathology, ED severity, personality traits and difficulties in emotion regulation. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to examine the psychometrics of the DERS in this Spanish sample (Aim 1). Additionally, to examine the role of emotion regulation difficulties in ED (Aim 2), differences in emotion regulation difficulties across eating disorder subgroups were examined and structural equation modeling was used to explore the interrelations among emotion regulation, personality traits, and eating disorder severity. Results: Results support the validity and reliability of the DERS within this Spanish adult sample and suggest that this measure has a similar factor structure in this sample as in the original sample. Moreover, emotion regulation difficulties were found to differ as a function of eating disorder subtype and to mediate the relation between two specific personality traits (i.e., high harm avoidance and low self-directedness) and ED severity. Conclusions: Personality traits of high harm avoidance and low self-directedness may increase vulnerability to ED pathology indirectly, through emotion regulation difficulties. PMID:26175710

  6. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist and DSM-5 PTSD Symptom Set in a Long-Term Postearthquake Cohort in Armenia.

    PubMed

    Demirchyan, Anahit; Goenjian, Armen K; Khachadourian, Vahe

    2015-10-01

    Psychometric properties of the Armenian-language posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist-Civilian version (PCL-C) and the DSM-5 PTSD symptom set were examined in a long-term cohort of earthquake survivors. In 2012, 725 survivors completed the instruments. Item-/scale-level analysis and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed for both scales. In addition, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted for DSM-5 symptoms. Also, the differential internal versus external specificity of PTSD symptom clusters taken from the most supported PTSD structural models was examined. Both scales had Cronbach's alpha greater than .9. CFA of PCL-C structure demonstrated an excellent fit by a four-factor (reexperiencing, avoidance, numbing, and hyperarousal) model known as numbing model; however, a superior fit was achieved by a five-factor model (Elhai et al.). EFA yielded a five-factor structure for DSM-5 symptoms with the aforementioned four domains plus a negative state domain. This model achieved an acceptable fit during CFA, whereas the DSM-5 criteria-based model did not. The Armenian-language PCL-C was recommended as a valid PTSD screening tool. The study findings provided support to the proposed new classification of common mental disorders, where PTSD, depression, and generalized anxiety are grouped together as a subclass of distress disorders. Recommendations were made to further improve the PTSD diagnostic criteria.

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and Norms for Rural and Urban Adolescent Males and Females in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Penelo, Eva; Raich, Rosa M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To contribute new evidence to the controversy about the factor structure of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and to provide, for the first time, norms based on a large adolescent Mexican community sample, regarding sex and area of residence (urban/rural). Methods A total of 2928 schoolchildren (1544 females and 1384 males) aged 11-18 were assessed with the EDE-Q and other disordered eating questionnaire measures. Results Confirmatory factor analysis of the attitudinal items of the EDE-Q did not support the four theorized subscales, and a two-factor solution, Restraint and Eating-Shape-Weight concern, showed better fit than the other models examined (RMSEA = .054); measurement invariance for this two-factor model across sex and area of residence was found. Satisfactory internal consistency (ω ≥ .80) and two-week test-retest reliability (ICCa ≥ .84; κ ≥ .56), and evidence for convergent validity with external measures was obtained. The highest attitudinal EDE-Q scores were found for urban females and the lowest scores were found for rural males, whereas the occurrence of key eating disorder behavioural features and compensatory behaviours was similar in both areas of residence. Conclusions This study reveals satisfactory psychometric properties and provides population norms of the EDE-Q, which may help clinicians and researchers to interpret the EDE-Q scores of adolescents from urban and rural areas in Mexico. PMID:24367587

  8. Psychometric Characteristics of a Measure of Emotional Dispositions Developed to Test a Developmental Propensity Model of Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahey, Benjamin B.; Applegate, Brooks; Chronis, Andrea M.; Jones, Heather A.; Williams, Stephanie Hall; Loney, Jan; Waldman, Irwin D.

    2008-01-01

    Lahey and Waldman proposed a developmental propensity model in which three dimensions of children's emotional dispositions are hypothesized to transact with the environment to influence risk for conduct disorder, heterogeneity in conduct disorder, and comorbidity with other disorders. To prepare for future tests of this model, a new measure of…

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Sexual Interest and Desire Inventory-Female for Diagnosis of Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: The Persian Version

    PubMed Central

    Malary, Mina; Pourasghar, Mehdi; Khani, Soghra; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Hypoactive sexual desire Disorder (HSDD) is a common sexual problem among women. Sexual interest and desire inventory –female (SIDI-F) has been widely validated and used to measure sexual desire in women. The aim of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Persian version of SIDI-F for Iranian population. Method: This was a methodological study on the psychometric properties of SIDI –F. This report describes the process and principles used in the translation and cultural adaptation of the SIDI-F on 40 women of reproductive age who were selected using convenience sampling method. The content validity of this inventory was proved by analyzing the feedback solicited from women of reproductive age; professions specialized in health, sociology and psychology. Reliability was assessed through test-retest and internal consistency reliability. Results: Few cultural differences were identified and considered during the process of translation and validation. In Content Validity Ratio (CVR) measurement, the total score of SIDI-F was higher than Lawsche table (%51 for 14 experts), indicating the importance of including the mentioned items in the tool. CVR scores for all items were equal or more than 0.79. The internal consistency reliability measured for the whole tool was 0.89, showing considerable total reliability. Conclusion: The Persian version of the SIDI-F seems to be valid and reliable and can be used to identify women with low sexual desire through research and sexual health programs provided by the health centers in Iran, and to design appropriate interventions to treat HSDD. PMID:28050188

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Sexual Interest and Desire Inventory-Female for Diagnosis of Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: The Persian Version.

    PubMed

    Malary, Mina; Pourasghar, Mehdi; Khani, Soghra; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab

    2016-10-01

    Objective: Hypoactive sexual desire Disorder (HSDD) is a common sexual problem among women. Sexual interest and desire inventory -female (SIDI-F) has been widely validated and used to measure sexual desire in women. The aim of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Persian version of SIDI-F for Iranian population. Method: This was a methodological study on the psychometric properties of SIDI -F. This report describes the process and principles used in the translation and cultural adaptation of the SIDI-F on 40 women of reproductive age who were selected using convenience sampling method. The content validity of this inventory was proved by analyzing the feedback solicited from women of reproductive age; professions specialized in health, sociology and psychology. Reliability was assessed through test-retest and internal consistency reliability. Results: Few cultural differences were identified and considered during the process of translation and validation. In Content Validity Ratio (CVR) measurement, the total score of SIDI-F was higher than Lawsche table (%51 for 14 experts), indicating the importance of including the mentioned items in the tool. CVR scores for all items were equal or more than 0.79. The internal consistency reliability measured for the whole tool was 0.89, showing considerable total reliability. Conclusion: The Persian version of the SIDI-F seems to be valid and reliable and can be used to identify women with low sexual desire through research and sexual health programs provided by the health centers in Iran, and to design appropriate interventions to treat HSDD.

  11. The assessment of generalized anxiety disorder: psychometric validation of the Spanish version of the self-administered GAD-2 scale in daily medical practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim To psychometrically validate the Spanish version of the self-administered 2-item GAD-2 scale for screening probable patients with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods The GAD-2 was self-administered by patients diagnosed with GAD according to DSM-IV criteria and by age- and sex-matched controls who were recruited at random in mental health and primary care centres. Criteria validity was explored using ROC curve analysis, and sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were determined for different cut-off values. Concurrent validity was also established using the HAM-A, HADS, and WHODAS II scales. Results The study sample consisted of 212 subjects (106 patients with GAD) with a mean age of 50.38 years (SD = 16.76). No items of the scale were left blank. Floor and ceiling effects were negligible. No patients with GAD had to be assisted to complete the questionnaire. Reliability (internal consistency) was high; Cronbach’s α = 0.875. A cut-off point of 3 showed adequate sensitivity (91.5%) and specificity (85.8%), with a statistically significant area under the curve (AUC = 0.937, p < 0.001), to distinguish GAD patients from controls. Concurrent validity was also high and significant with HAM-A (0.806, p < 0.001), HADS (anxiety domain, 0.825, p < 0.001) and WHO-DAS II (0.642, p < 0.001) scales. Conclusion The Spanish version of the GAD-2 scale has been shown to have appropriate psychometric properties to rapidly detect probable cases of GAD in the Spanish cultural context under routine clinical practice conditions. PMID:22992432

  12. [ASRS v.1.1., a tool for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder screening in adults treated for addictive behaviors: psychometric properties and estimated prevalence].

    PubMed

    Pedrero Pérez, Eduardo J; Puerta García, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    ASRS v.1.1. is a self-applied brief instrument for the screening of individuals presenting symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and proposed by the WHO. The purpose of the present work was to test the instrument and examine the results of its application to a sample of 280 individuals in treatment for substance-related disorders (cross-sectional descriptive study). We administered simultaneously in the initial phases of treatment the ASRS v.1.1. (short form) and the MCMI-II to the full sample and the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS), ADHD-Rating Scale-IV and ASRS v.1.1. (complete form) to various sub-samples. Diagnostic interviews were also carried out and the psychometric properties and factorial structure of ASRS v.1.1. were explored. Good convergent validity, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic capability were obtained for the six-item version of ASRS v.1.1., even though 4 out of 6 items did not discriminate between Axis I and II disorders assessed through the MCMI-II and diagnostic interviews. According to DSM-IV-TR criteria the estimated prevalence of ADHD in the sample of addicts was 8.2%. ASRS v.1.1. is criticized as a specific instrument for ADHD detection, since most of its items appear to measure a non-specific dimension of compulsiveness/impulsiveness, common to Axis-I and Axis-II disorders. Other criticisms made in the discussion concern the lack of specificity of DSM criteria and the confusion they generate among the concepts of symptom, sign and trait (including the impact on study results), the general use of the A criterion but the omission of the B, C, D and E criteria of the DSM category, differences in samples (with regard to both severity and selection criteria), and the artifactual increases in prevalence found in many studies.

  13. Grief in the context of HIV: recommendations for practice.

    PubMed

    Mallinson, R Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Grief is a universal human response to loss. While the symptoms of grief are distressing and uncomfortable, they usually diminish over time without therapy. For persons grieving an HIV-related death, however, a variety of unique factors may interfere with the healthy resolution of symptoms. When the grief process becomes complicated, a person may experience serious alterations in physical health and/or disruptions in daily functioning. To assess grief, nurses need to apply interpersonal skills and therapeutic communication techniques in a compassionate manner; currently, no one screening instrument is optimal for evaluating grief in the clinical setting. The person experiencing grief or complicated grief may be referred for support services or counseling, pharmacologic interventions, or cognitive behavioral therapy. This report summarizes evidence from the literature and clinical practice to support recommendations for the practice of nurses caring for persons with HIV-associated grief; recommended strategies are illustrated through an exemplar case study.

  14. Acute versus chronic grief: the case of pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Lasker, J N; Toedter, L J

    1991-10-01

    Conceptual and measurement problems in identifying those at risk of chronic grief are reviewed, and results are presented of a longitudinal study of people who have experienced pregnancy loss. Coping resources, particularly prior mental health and social support, were the best predictors of low scores on subscales of the Perinatal Grief Scale that indicate chronic grief reactions. Results also offer some evidence of delayed grief responses, especially among men and those who experienced early losses.

  15. An Initial Psychometric Evaluation of the CBCL 6-18 in a Sample of Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandolfi, Vincent; Magyar, Caroline I.; Dill, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often present with co-occurring emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). The Child Behavior Checklist 6-18 (CBCL; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) is an EBD measure that contains several norm-referenced scales derived through factor analysis of data from the general pediatric population. The…

  16. Complicated Grief and Suicidal Ideation in Adult Survivors of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Ann M.; Kim, Yookyung; Prigerson, Holly G.; Mortimer, Mary Kay

    2005-01-01

    While the prevalence of complicated grief has been demonstrated to be elevated in survivors of suicide, the association between complicated grief and suicidal ideation among adult survivors of suicide has not been explored. The purpose of the present study is to examine the association between complicated grief and suicidal ideation in suicide…

  17. Financial Perils in Higher Education--Good Grief!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Kenneth A.; Britton, Thomas C.

    The premise that institutions pass through a grief process in adjusting to declining resources and radical changes, is proposed. In addition, strategies that administrators can use to respond to institutional grief are suggested. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's paradigm of five grief stages/reactions to serious loss are described: denial, anger,…

  18. Brief Information on Childhood Traumatic Grief for School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This information sheet summarizes material found in the "In-Depth General Information Guide to Childhood Traumatic Grief" and "In-Depth Information on Childhood Traumatic Grief for School Personnel." Childhood traumatic grief is a condition that some children develop after the death of a close friend or family member. Children who develop…

  19. Residential Grief Camps: An Initial Phenomenological Study of Staff Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tiffany B.; Kimball, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Research has focused primarily on the impact of death on family functioning and the stages and tasks of grief, though little attention has been given to grief camps or the experiences of those who work there. This study explored the experiences of staff at a four-day overnight children's grief camp. Eight participants reported their experience of…

  20. Tweeting Prayers and Communicating Grief over Michael Jackson Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Jimmy; Cheong, Pauline Hope

    2010-01-01

    Death and bereavement are human experiences that new media helps facilitate alongside creating new social grief practices that occur online. This study investigated how people's postings and tweets facilitated the communication of grief after pop music icon Michael Jackson died. Drawing on past grief research, religion, and new media studies, a…

  1. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Serious Stress Anxiety Disorders Death and Grief Stress & Coping Center Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care Coping With Stressful Situations Date Rape Suicide Rape Contact Us Print Resources Send to a ...

  2. The grief involved in change.

    PubMed

    Linney, B J

    1999-01-01

    In this era of rapid change, people need to be helped through the grieving process at work. "By acknowledging and articulating what is involved, you facilitate people's movement through it ... successful people in growing organizations need to learn to move through the process as quickly and efficiently as possible and help others do the same." Morris Shectman, in Working Without a Net says, "Contrary to the old paradigm--which held that others don't have a right to know about your personal life--the new paradigm says that it's a necessity that they know." If people are to move through the grief that is caused by undesired change, they will have to tell some of their personal feelings. "Each stage of the process--shock and denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance--is functional ... when people go through the process in a healthy manner, they'll recycle through it in a diluted fashion." Leaders in the organization can help people start the process or move through it if they get stuck at a particular stage.

  3. The grief account: dimensions of a contemporary bereavement genre.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Michael Robert

    2008-01-01

    The genre of the grief account is identified to include published narratives of surviving grief. Thematic analysis of Andrew Holleran's (2006) Grief: A Novel, Lolly Winston's (2004) Good Grief: A Novel, Joan Didion's (2005) The Year of Magical Thinking, and J. Canfield and M. V. Hansen's (2003) Chicken Soup for the Grieving Soul: Stories About Life, Death and Overcoming the Loss of a Loved One is informed by recent scholarship regarding eulogies and illness and dying narratives. Six dimensions (restorative, evaluative, interpretive, affirmative, affective, transformative) of contemporary grief accounts are recognized as sources of inspiration for the practice and experience of bereavement.

  4. The Italian version of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems Personality Disorders Scales (IIP-47): psychometric properties and clinical usefulness as a screening measure.

    PubMed

    Ubbiali, Alessandro; Chiorri, Carlo; Donati, Deborah

    2011-08-01

    The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-47 (IIP-47) is a brief and valid self-report measure for screening Personality Disorders (PDs). This study examined internal consistency, factor structure, criterion validity, temporal stability, and operating characteristics of the Italian version of the IIP-47 in two independent samples: PD subjects (n = 120) and nonclinical subjects (n = 475). Alpha coefficients ranged from .70 to .90. Multiple-Group Confirmatory Factor Analyses showed that the five-correlated-factor model reported in literature had the highest measurement invariance across the two groups. Criterion validity was supported by correlations among IIP-47 scale scores and scores on established measures of personality dimensions and pathology. Test-retest indices ranged from .71 to .95. PD subjects scored significantly higher than nonclinical subjects on all IIP-47 scales and cut-off scores for different levels of specificity and sensibility are reported. It is concluded that the psychometric properties of the original IIP-47 were preserved in its Italian version.

  5. [Grief and crises in Norse literature].

    PubMed

    Høyersten, J G

    1993-03-30

    The significance of literature for psychiatry and vice versa is commented on, as an introduction to a study of Norse literature. This was written down mainly in Iceland in the 13th Century on the basis of oral traditions, some of which date back to the 9th century. From a psychological point of view, the Icelandic Sagas, the Royal Sagas of Snorri Sturluson and the earliest hero-poems of the Edda are of particular interest. This literature includes detailed descriptions of grief and crisis reactions, the management and rituals of grief, and the associated rituals. These patterns have a striking similarity to modern principles of crisis intervention.

  6. The narrative dynamics of grief after homicide.

    PubMed

    Rynearson, Edward K

    2012-01-01

    The homicidal death of a loved one is horrific. Dying from homicide can be more sudden, frightening, and stigmatizing than natural dying and may be followed by a sub-type of prolonged grief complicated by vivid narrative reenactment of the dying, intense feelings of remorse, and nihilistic despair. After a literature review of grief after homicide, the author clarifies the salient narrative themes of homicidal dying and their specific effects on trauma and separation distress. A preliminary model is then developed and illustrated in a therapy case outlining a technique (imaginative exposure) to diminish the disabling fixation of reenactment imagery, remorse, and despair.

  7. Perinatal loss and parental grief: the challenge of ambiguity and disenfranchised grief.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ariella; Fleiszer, Andrea R; Duhamel, Fabie; Sword, Wendy; Gilbert, Kathleen R; Corsini-Munt, Serena

    2011-01-01

    Following perinatal loss, a type of ambiguous loss, bereaved couples struggle with and experience distress due to various forms of ambiguity. Moreover, the juxtaposition of their grief with society's minimization often disenfranchises them from traditional grieving processes. The purpose of this study was to explore sources of ambiguity and disenfranchised grief related to perinatal loss. Audio-taped interviews with 13 bereaved couples at 2, 6, and 13 months following the death of their fetus or infant were analyzed. Several categories of ambiguity and disenfranchised grief emerged, pertaining to: (a) the viability of the pregnancy; (b) the physical process of pregnancy loss; (c) making arrangements for the remains; and (d) sharing the news. This study uncovers the many sources of ambiguity and disenfranchised grief that bereaved couples face in interactions with family, friends, society, and healthcare professionals. These insights may inform healthcare professionals in their attempts to ease distress related to perinatal loss.

  8. An investigation of the validity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition avoidant personality disorder construct as a prototype category and the psychometric properties of the diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Hummelen, Benjamin; Wilberg, Theresa; Pedersen, Geir; Karterud, Sigmund

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated several aspects of the validity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition avoidant personality disorder (APD) construct, with emphasis on the psychometric properties of the diagnostic criteria and the prototype nature of the construct. A sample of 1,058 patients from the Norwegian Network of Psychotherapeutic Day Hospitals was examined by means of exploratory factor analysis, correlation, and diagnostic efficiency statistics, chi(2) analysis, and frequency distribution. The results indicated that APD is a 1-dimensional construct with good internal consistency. The criteria had acceptable diagnostic efficiency; criterion 3 performed poorest. Number of APD criteria showed no distinct threshold between No-APD and patients with APD. Sixty-two different combinations of any 4 APD criteria occurred. It can be concluded that the prototype model fitted the data well and that the APD diagnostic criteria perform well in the current classification system. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition hierarchy of criteria was not supported.

  9. Nursing 433: Uncomplicated Grief and Bereavement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, James J.

    A description is provided of "Uncomplicated Grief and Bereavement," a course designed to provide the graduate nursing student with the assessment, diagnosis, planning, intervention, and evaluation skills required to facilitate a normal bereavement outcome among persons experiencing the loss of a significant other. The course description first…

  10. Living with Grief: Children, Adolescents, and Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doka, Kenneth J., Ed.

    Noting that the best way to help and prepare children to cope with death and trauma is through education and understanding of the day-to-day ramifications that loss and grief have on them, this book is designed to help adults involved with children and adolescents to provide that education and understanding. Chapters in the first section of the…

  11. Treating Childhood Traumatic Grief: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Knudsen, Kraig

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the potential efficacy and specific timing of treatment response of individual child and parent trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy for childhood traumatic grief (CTG), a condition in which trauma symptoms impinge on the child's ability to successfully address the normal tasks of grieving. Method: Twenty-two children…

  12. Grief Experiences and Expectance of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtkowiak, Joanna; Wild, Verena; Egger, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is generally viewed as an unexpected cause of death. However, some suicides might be expected to a certain extent, which needs to be further studied. The relationships between expecting suicide, feeling understanding for the suicide, and later grief experiences were explored. In total, 142 bereaved participants completed the Grief…

  13. Symptoms of Major Depression and Complicated Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of a Loved One Symptoms of major depression and complicated grief Depression It’s common for people to have sadness, pain, ... might be getting worse—going into a major depression. About 1 in 5 bereaved people will develop ...

  14. Grief and Horses: Putting the Pieces Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symington, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of grief counseling may be enhanced through the utilization of equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP). An experiential, solution-focused, and natural approach, EAP provides clients with the opportunity to discover solutions to challenges that exist within themselves. Counselors and equine specialists team with horses to provide a…

  15. Complicated grief and manic comorbidity in the aftermath of the loss of a son.

    PubMed

    Carmassi, Claudia; Shear, M Katherine; Socci, Chiara; Corsi, Martina; Dell'osso, Liliana; First, Michael B

    2013-09-01

    Based on the recommendations of the sub-workgroup on trauma and dissociative disorders, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) removed the "bereavement exclusion" from the criteria for major depression in DSM-5. In addition, proposed DSM-5 research criteria for persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) were included in the new manual in a section for conditions and criteria needing further research. We describe a case that warranted such a diagnosis. The patient was a 52- year-old woman who was admitted to the inpatient unit of our clinic on the birthday of her son who had died 18 months earlier. She was diagnosed with a manic episode with psychotic symptoms according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria and was treated accordingly. Three months after discharge, she made a suicide attempt and was admitted and re-assessed. During this admission, she completed the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG), the Mood-Spectrum Rating Scale (MOODS-SR), and the Trauma and Loss Spectrum questionnaire (TALS-SR). She endorsed symptoms of intense yearning for her son, feelings of shock and disbelief, anger and bitterness related to his death, estrangement from others, auditory, tactile and visual hallucinations of the deceased, and intense emotional reactivity to memories of her son. These symptoms were sufficiently prolonged and severe to meet criteria for complicated grief. While complicated grief appeared to be the primary diagnosis for this patient, when she was diagnosed using only DSMIV-TR criteria, her treatment failed to address herprimary problem. This case draws attention to the occurrence of manic-like symptoms as well as depression-like manifestations following bereavement and highlights the importance of including the syndrome of complicated grief in the diagnostic nomenclature.

  16. Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Psychometrics and Associations With Child and Parent Variables

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Stephanie L.; Duku, Eric; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Szatmari, Peter; Bryson, Susan; Fombonne, Eric; Volden, Joanne; Waddell, Charlotte; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Mirenda, Pat; Bennett, Teresa; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Georgiades, Stelios

    2015-01-01

    Objective The factor structure and validity of the Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale (BPFAS; Crist & Napier-Phillips, 2001) were examined in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Methods Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the original BPFAS five-factor model, the fit of each latent variable, and a rival one-factor model. None of the models was adequate, thus a categorical exploratory factor analysis (CEFA) was conducted. Correlations were used to examine relations between the BPFAS and concurrent variables of interest. Results The CEFA identified an acceptable three-factor model. Correlational analyses indicated that feeding problems were positively related to parent-reported autism symptoms, behavior problems, sleep problems, and parenting stress, but largely unrelated to performance-based indices of autism symptom severity, language, and cognitive abilities, as well as child age. Conclusion These results provide evidence supporting the use of the identified BPFAS three-factor model for samples of young children with ASD. PMID:25725217

  17. Birth mother grief and the challenge of adoption reunion contact.

    PubMed

    March, Karen

    2014-07-01

    A large body of work exists on the grief expressed by birth mothers over the loss of their children to adoption. Less is known about the grief emotions that surface when these women are contacted by adopted adults who seek contact relationships. The themes of mourning, grief, and bereavement that emerged in the qualitative interview data of 33 reunited birth mothers indicate more attention be given to these social psychological processes. Suggestions for future research possibilities and implications for clinical practice are explored.

  18. AN INTERNET TOOL TO NORMALIZE GRIEF*

    PubMed Central

    DOMINICK, SALLY A.; IRVINE, A. BLAIR; BEAUCHAMP, NATASHA; SEELEY, JOHN R.; NOLEN-HOEKSEMA, SUSAN; DOKA, KENNETH J.; BONANNO, GEORGE A.

    2009-01-01

    This research evaluated the efficacy of a psycho-educational Internet self-help tool to educate and support recently (1–6 months) bereaved individuals. The goal of the website was to help users normalize their grief to enhance their adaptive adjustment. A randomized controlled trial evaluated the gains in social cognitive theory constructs and state anxiety. Compared to the control group (N = 34), treatment participants (N = 33) reported significant multivariate gains (eta-square = .191). Significant program effects were obtained on all three outcome measures: attitude (eta-square = .177), self-efficacy (eta-square = .106), and state anxiety (eta-square = .083). These findings suggest the potential efficacy of an Internet-based grief support tool to enhance adaptive adjustment of the bereaved. PMID:20039532

  19. The grief process: a preparation for death.

    PubMed

    Curry, L C; Stone, J G

    1991-01-01

    Despite the multitude of losses we experience in our lifetime, death is likely to be the most paramount. Acceptance of losses and death takes time and energy as an individual passes through various phases of a process known as the grief process. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross (1969) has defined five stages in the grief process that individuals pass through in moving toward acceptance of losses. A case study has been presented to share one family's journey through these five stages. If a strict disease-oriented viewpoint is adopted, then the case was a failure: the patient died. From an emotional and spiritual viewpoint, however, this individual and his family achieved success, as they had time to complete their journey to acceptance.

  20. Using multidimensional grief theory to explore the effects of deployment, reintegration, and death on military youth and families.

    PubMed

    Kaplow, Julie B; Layne, Christopher M; Saltzman, William R; Cozza, Stephen J; Pynoos, Robert S

    2013-09-01

    To date, the US military has made major strides in acknowledging and therapeutically addressing trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in service members and their families. However, given the nature of warfare and high rates of losses sustained by both military members (e.g., deaths of fellow unit members) and military families (e.g., loss of a young parent who served in the military), as well as the ongoing threat of loss that military families face during deployment, we propose that a similar focus on grief is also needed to properly understand and address many of the challenges encountered by bereaved service members, spouses, and children. In this article, we describe a newly developed theory of grief (multidimensional grief theory) and apply it to the task of exploring major features of military-related experiences during the phases of deployment, reintegration, and the aftermath of combat death--especially as they impact children. We also describe implications for designing preventive interventions during each phase and conclude with recommended avenues for future research. Primary aims are to illustrate: (1) the indispensable role of theory in guiding efforts to describe, explain, predict, prevent, and treat maladaptive grief in military service members, children, and families; (2) the relevance of multidimensional grief theory for addressing both losses due to physical death as well as losses brought about by extended physical separations to which military children and families are exposed during and after deployment; and (3) a focus on military-related grief as a much-needed complement to an already-established focus on military-related PTSD.

  1. Using Multidimensional Grief Theory to Explore Effects of Deployment, Reintegration, and Death on Military Youth and Families

    PubMed Central

    Kaplow, Julie B.; Layne, Christopher M.; Saltzman, William R.; Cozza, Stephen J.; Pynoos, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    To date, the U.S. military has made major strides in acknowledging and therapeutically addressing trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in service members and their families. However, given the nature of warfare and high rates of losses sustained by both military members (e.g., deaths of fellow unit members) and military families (e.g., loss of a young parent who served in the military), as well as the ongoing threat of loss that military families face during deployment, we propose that a similar focus on grief is also needed to properly understand and address many of the challenges encountered by bereaved service members, spouses, and children. In this article, we describe a newly developed theory of grief (Multidimensional Grief Theory) and apply it to the task of exploring major features of military-related experiences during the phases of deployment, reintegration, and the aftermath of combat death—especially as they impact children. We also describe implications for designing preventive interventions during each phase and conclude with recommended avenues for future research. Primary aims are to illustrate: (1) the indispensable role of theory in guiding efforts to describe, explain, predict, prevent, and treat maladaptive grief in military service members, children, and families; (2) the relevance of multidimensional grief theory for addressing both losses due to physical death as well as losses brought about by extended physical separations to which military children and families are exposed during and after deployment; and (3) a focus on military-related grief as a much-needed complement to an already-established focus on military-related PTSD. PMID:23760905

  2. Psychometric properties of the HI-FI problem checklist in a sample of adults with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders: factors contributing to life satisfaction after long-term disability.

    PubMed

    Mitrushina, Maura; Tomaszewski, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To assess psychometric properties of the problem checklist (PCL) in a sample of individuals with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders many years after trauma; to identify factors that impact life satisfaction and promote functional competence after long-term disability. Method Cross-sectional, interview- and assessment-based study. Participants were community-dwelling adults with disabilities resulting from neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders (N = 53), who participated in a pre-vocational readiness and social skills training program. The Problem Checklist from the New York University Head Injury Family Interview (PCL), a battery of self-rated and clinician-rated measures of social/emotional status, and neuropsychological tests were main outcome measures. Results PCL is a valid and reliable instrument with acceptable psychometric properties (reliability coefficients for two scales and the total score are above (0.795). Use of maladaptive coping strategies in our sample was reflected in inverse relationship between depression and denial of disability, and in the tendency to overrate self-reported symptoms by participants with acquired trauma. Considerably lower self-ratings of symptoms across all PCL scales were seen in those of our participants who live with parents. Conclusions The study offers initial support for the use of PCL as a measure of long-term functional outcome in individuals with neurological and neuropsychiatric diagnoses. The goal of rehabilitation in patients with long-term disabilities is increase in life satisfaction. Implications for Rehabilitation An important goal of rehabilitation and training programs for individuals with long-term disabilities due to dysfunction of the central nervous system is to improve their quality of life. The HI-FI Problem Checklist (PCL) is a brief and efficient instrument for assessing functional outcomes after long-term disability. This study demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties

  3. John Bowlby's Model of Grief and the Problem of Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klass, Dennis

    1988-01-01

    Asserts that John Bowlby's model of grief is inadequate to account for phenomena associated with most grief. Also examines work of Freud and the Freudians, and works of Parkes, Raphael, and Worden. Suggests possible modifications in the Bowlby model by reviewing the work of Attig, Lopata, and Marris. (Author/NB)

  4. Grief and Loss Education: Recommendations for Curricular Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty Horn, Elizabeth A.; Crews, Judith A.; Harrawood, Laura K.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (2009) does not require course work on grief and loss, and it is possible for counselors to practice without any formal training in the area. The purpose of this article is to highlight the need for additional grief and loss education in the curriculum, provide…

  5. Radical Acceptance: A Nondual Psychology Approach to Grief and Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theriault, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the application of nondual psychology in transforming grief and loss into the experience of nondual consciousness. Nondual consciousness is the collapse of the dualistic notions of self and other through the direct realization of the stateless state of no-self. The experience of grief and loss serves as a catalyst to this…

  6. Alexithymia and Grief Reactions in Bereaved Japanese Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Kashiwagi, Masayo; Yano, Eiji

    2005-01-01

    To examine the relationship between grief reactions and alexithymia, 54 Japanese women (33 outpatients attending a psychosomatic clinic and 21 normal healthy participants) completed the Texas Inventory of Grief (TIG), the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Each woman had experienced the death of a…

  7. Rhetorical Dimensions of the Post-September Eleventh Grief Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, Roy; Tibbles, David

    2005-01-01

    This essay examines Presidential rhetoric and popular culture practices in light of the stages of grief enumerated by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross. The authors find a consistent retrenchment of grief into the anger phase, where the pain of losing national invulnerability is transferred to externalized aggression. Reconciliation is suggested by means of…

  8. The Grief Grapevine: Facebook Memorial Pages and Adolescent Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Mardi

    2014-01-01

    How adolescents use the social networking site Facebook to express grief is a growing area of research. In reviewing current literature, it is evident that many questions still remain unanswered. Additionally, this ever-evolving platform for grief, mourning and bereavement may hold many implications for educators, policy developers and school…

  9. Personal Fear of Death and Grief in Bereaved Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Peter; Cacciatore, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    The study explored the relation of fear of death (Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale) to maternal grief (Perinatal Grief Scale-33) following miscarriage, stillbirth, neonatal death, or infant/child death. The 400 women participants were recruited from the website, e-mail lists, and parent groups of an organization that supports bereaved parents.…

  10. Attachment, Loss of Spouse, and Grief in Elderly Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Pat

    1991-01-01

    Administered Texas Inventory of Grief to and conducted interviews with 81 widows between the ages of 26 and 82. Compared to younger women, older women showed more intense grief at time of interview and reported more feelings of anxiety and depression. Findings showed that older women did not tolerate or adapt to bereavement more successfully than…

  11. Grief and Loss: Towards an Existential Phenomenology of Child Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Western cultures have taken on a death-denying and grief-avoiding dimension, suggesting that children in particular are to be protected from the harshness of loss and death. As a result, many children grow up without having consciously experienced the pain of major loss and grief. It is argued that having been spared from suffering, from the pain…

  12. Families and the Grief Process. ARCH Factsheet Number 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braza, Kathleen

    This fact sheet points out that knowledge of the process of grief (defined as one's own personal experience of loss) and ways of helping individuals and families cope with their loss experiences can be an invaluable asset to crisis nurseries and respite care programs and their service providers. The fact sheet lists the emotions of grief, and…

  13. Coping with Grief: Guidelines and Resources for Assisting Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Melissa Allen; Leavy, Deon; Hansen, Kristina; Ryan, Katherine; Lawrence, Lacey; Sonntag, Amy Gerritsen

    2008-01-01

    This article provides basic information for school-based mental health professionals, teachers, staff, and administrators to support students coping with grief, and more specifically, grief related to death. The information is consolidated into guidelines and key points in providing support; suggested children's books and activities; Web sites…

  14. The Role of Hardiness in the Resolution of Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jane; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated relation of personality factor of hardiness to resolution of grief. In anonymous sample of 70 widows, hardiness was significant predictor of grief resolution in addition to general mental health, time since death, and widow's age. Whether death was expected did not relate to course of resolution. (Author/NB)

  15. "It May Not Be Pretty, but It's Honest": Examining Parental Grief on the Callapitter Blog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGroot, Jocelyn M.; Carmack, Heather J.

    2013-01-01

    Following the death of a child, parents are turning to alternative means of communication to express their grief. In this instrumental case study, the authors explore how 1 woman, Amy Ambrusko, communicates her grief experience on her blog, emotionally negotiating loss and parental grief. Guided by M. S. Miles's (1984) parental grief model, the…

  16. Psychometrics: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furr, Mike; Bacharach, Verne R.

    2007-01-01

    The authors center their presentation of material around a conceptual understanding of psychometric issues, such as validity and reliability, and on purpose rather than procedure, the "why" rather than the "how to." Their goal is to introduce psychometric principles at a level that is deeper and more focused than found in introductory…

  17. Helping Children in Times of Need: Grief, Loss, Separation & Divorce. A Handbook for Parents Assisting Children through Grief and Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Judith A.

    Although a world of uncertainty and continual change is difficult to explain to children, by exploring and discussing the process of grief, parents can begin to understand the significance and necessity of the grief process and help their children to cope with difficult events. This booklet offers parents advice on how to talk with children about…

  18. Psychometric properties of the Japanese version of the Adult Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Self-Report Scale (ASRS-J) and its short scale in accordance with DSM-5 diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Tsuji, Yui; Kurita, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    We developed the Japanese version of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-J) and report its psychometric properties. The ASRS-J and other questionnaires were administered to 48 adults with ADHD, 46 adults with non-ADHD psychiatric disorders, 96 non-clinical adults, and 894 university students. ADHD diagnoses were made using the Japanese semi-structured diagnostic interview for adult ADHD, which is compatible with the DSM-5. The ASRS-J, its subscales, and the short form, all had Cronbach's α values of around 0.80. Total scores on the ASRS-J and the ASRS-J-6 were highly correlated with readministration after a two-week interval. The total and 18 individual item scores in the ASRS-J were significantly higher in the ADHD group than the other three groups. ASRS-J scores were correlated with scores on the Japanese version of Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scales-Self Report subscales (0.59≤r≤0.77), with one exception. ASRS-J scores were also correlated (albeit more weakly; r=0.38) with Beck Depression Inventory-II total scores. Employing optimal cut-offs, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the ASRS-J and ASRS-J-6 are all above 0.69. The ASRS-J and ASRS-J-6 showed acceptable psychometric properties, although further study is necessary.

  19. [A nurse's experience applying grief counseling to a bereaved family].

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Wen-Ling

    2010-04-01

    This case report describes a nurse's experience applying William Worden's Grief Counseling on a young woman whose mother had passed away after a brief period in a coma. The report describes how the nurse facilitated this case and assisted the woman though the grief process, during which the woman completed the four tasks of mourning. Seven behavioral process records were analyzed base on Worden's grief responses. Emotional reactions included shock, denial, guilt and fear. Insomnia was the sole physical reaction indicated. Cognitive reactions included disbelief with regard to the death and preoccupation with her mother. Social withdrawal, avoidance of mentioning her mother, calling out, sighing and crying comprised the main behavioral reactions. The author applied the concepts and principles of grief counseling by accompanying and supporting this case though the grief process, and helping the patient complete the four tasks of mourning, which are: (1) to experience the pain of grief, (2) to accept the reality of the death, (3) to adjust to life after the death, and (4) to move on with life. It is hoped that this case report will help nursing staffs be more sensitive and receptive to family grieving and be better equipped to provide proper grief care.

  20. Grief and Women: Stillbirth in the Social Context of India

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lisa R.; Anderson, Barbara A.; Lee, Jerry W.; Montgomery, Susanne B.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Few in Western society would argue the potentially devastating impact of stillbirth related grief; but in many developing countries where stillbirth remains the highest in the world, perinatal grief is barely recognized as an issue. The purpose of this study was to explore how poor, rural central Indian women perceive and cope with stillbirths. METHODS Seventeen key informant interviews and two focus groups (N = 33) with local health care providers, family members, and women who experienced stillbirth were conducted over a 1-month period in 2011 and then systematically coded for emerging themes using grounded theory methods to explore how women experienced stillbirth. RESULTS Although usually never talked about and not recognized as an issue, perinatal grief emerged as a significant shared experience by all. The perceptions of stillbirth-related grief emerged in three major themes and bear evidence of gender and power issues and indicate that local social norms negatively factor heavily into their perinatal grief experiences. DISCUSSION The findings in this richly textured study add to the limited literature regarding rural, central Indian women's experiences with stillbirth and factors influencing their resulting perinatal grief. In light of the void of recognition of this phenomenon in Indian society, a better understanding of the context in which poor Indian women experience perinatal grief will be a first step toward developing much needed culturally rooted interventions to positively impact the women's abilities to better cope with stillbirth in the context of their realities. PMID:26594592

  1. The grief process for patient, family, and physician.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Christine A

    2002-09-01

    In the grieving process, patient, family, and health professionals have the same needs-rest, relaxation, nourishment, a sense of security, trust, hope in the future, and humor among them. Grief, defined as a shared, universal, and natural neuropsychobiologic expression in response to loss, is distinct from mourning, a practice that varies in expression across diverse cultures. To aid in an understanding of grief and its effects, the author looks at the models for grief proposed by Kubler-Ross, Bowlby, Parkes, Worden, and Wolfelt. Addressing patients' concerns requires physicians be empathic, attentive, and respective and have willingness to take time, be present, and listen.

  2. Keeping the Music Alive: Using the "Grief and Hope Box" with Adult Offenders with Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Robert; Springer, Paul; Bitar, George; Drew, Faith; Graff, Chad

    2005-01-01

    Individuals with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorder (COD) present unique challenges for counselors. When individuals are incarcerated, they suffer unique forms of losses, including the loss and grief of their family members. In addition, they often struggle with stigma and cultural stereotypes that are oppressive and…

  3. Planting hope in loss and grief: self-care applications of horticultural therapy for grief caregivers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yeh-Jen; Lin, Chi Yun; Li, Yu-Chan

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Taiwan Association for Care and Counseling for Loss organized a workshop about Horticultural Therapy, conducted as a participatory action research (PAR). Nineteen grief caregivers participated. Specific goals were designed according to a survey of participant expectations and focus-group discussions. The workshop content included lectures and interactive activities. Results demonstrated that most participants displayed an increased awareness of personal loss and meaning in grief, indicating that horticulture and nature appreciation might relieve individual grief and stress. The report introduces the rationale, evolution, execution, and results of the program development.

  4. Insomnia and complicated grief symptoms in bereaved college students.

    PubMed

    Hardison, Heather Gaines; Neimeyer, Robert A; Lichstein, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we extended previous research by concentrating on sleep- and grief-related symptoms in a cohort of bereaved college students, in view of the potential for each of these problems to exacerbate the other. A sample of 815 college students completed the Inventory of Complicated Grief (H. G. Prigerson & S. C. Jacobs, 2001), along with an assessment of diagnostic criteria for insomnia and associated sleep behaviors. As predicted, the rate of insomnia was significantly higher (22%) in the bereaved sample than in a nonbereaved comparison group (17%), a difference that was particularly pronounced in terms of middle insomnia. Also as hypothesized, bereaved insomniacs reported higher complicated grief scores than bereaved noninsomniacs, and several specific sleep variables (including sleep-onset insomnia related to nighttime rumination about the loss and sleep-maintenance insomnia associated with dreaming of the deceased) were significantly related to complicated grief symptomatology.

  5. Early Family Deaths May Create 'Grief Gap' for Blacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163190.html Early Family Deaths May Create 'Grief Gap' for Blacks Compared to ... 000 racially diverse Americans, the researchers found that death strikes black families significantly earlier than whites on ...

  6. End of Life: Dealing with Grief and Confronting Painful Emotions

    MedlinePlus

    ... who aren't prepared for the avalanche of emotions that sweep over them when the final moment ... know how challenging and devastating the raw, intense emotions of grief can be, because it's happened to ...

  7. Grief: Coping with the Reminders After a Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... professional help, however, you can re-establish a sense of control and direction in your life — and return to the path toward healing. References Shear MK. Grief and bereavement in adults: Clinical ...

  8. Child and adolescent homicide survivors. Complicated grief and altered worldviews.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Gloria J; Clements, Paul T

    2003-01-01

    The act of homicide may influence the worldviews of children and adolescents. Problematic beliefs of uncertainty, inadequacy, perceiving the world as dangerous, self-denial, and lack of control can contribute to complicated grief in children and adolescents, and can potentially disrupt their normal psychosocial growth and development. Mental health professionals' understanding of grief after the homicide of a family member enhances their ability to intervene with and support young people struggling to cope with and adapt to a sudden loss.

  9. Grief elaboration in families with handicapped member.

    PubMed

    Calandra, C; Finocchiaro, G; Raciti, L; Alberti, A

    1992-01-01

    Families with handicapped member seem to follow the same five stages (rejection and isolation, anger, dealing with the problem, depression, acceptance) of Kubler-Ross grief elaboration theory while dealing with the narcissistic wound of a handicapped child. Some of these families show a block in one of the stages. The effort of psychotherapy is to remove the block and let them reach the last stage. In this paper families under systemic psychotherapeutic treatment are analyzed, who had in common the birth of a child with low or modest invalidating signs and psychotic or autistic features. The families structure did not show the characteristics of a psychotic family. Nevertheless either one or both parents ignored the evidence of their child disease and they built a "disease-incongrous" wait around the child, trying to push away the painful reality. The authors explain the importance of this approach for the improvement of the autistic traits.

  10. Psychometric profiles and facial pain.

    PubMed

    Eversole, L R; Stone, C E; Matheson, D; Kaplan, H

    1985-09-01

    The myofacial pain-dysfunction syndrome and atypical facial pain are the most prevalent chronic pain disorders of the facial region. Previously, the myofacial pain-dysfunction syndrome included all TMJ/masticatory muscle pain, jaw dysfunction, and joint clicking. We have segregated two major subgroups subsumed within this diagnostic classification and have assigned them to a myogenic facial pain (MFP) group and a TMJ internal derangement (TMJID) group. Significant age and personality differences were uncovered when these subpopulations were compared to subjects with atypical facial pain (AFP). Both MFP and TMJID groups are relatively homologous, involving younger persons than AFP subjects. Alternatively, when MFP, TMJID, and AFP subjects were compared for differences in MMPI psychometric scales, MFP and AFP subjects exhibited significantly higher scores, particularly for hypochondriasis, depression, and hysteria, than did TMJID subjects. It is concluded that subcategorization of myofascial pain-dysfunction patients into a myogenic pain group and a TMJ internal derangement group is justified on the basis of psychometric differences. Furthermore, psychopathologic factors are more significant among MFP and AFP subjects than among TMJID patients.

  11. An Investigation of the Relationship of Personality, Coping, and Grief Intensity among Bereaved Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Tristan; Marwit, Samuel J.

    2006-01-01

    A mediational model of grief intensity (Meuser & Marwit, 2000) was examined in a population at risk for complicated grief. Coping strategies (emotion-oriented, task-oriented, and avoidance-oriented coping) were hypothesized to mediate the influence of personality factors (neuroticism and extraversion) on grief. Bereaved mothers (N =138)…

  12. Grief Counseling Groups for Adolescents Based on Re-Membering Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granados, Stephanie; Winslade, John; De Witt, Megan; Hedtke, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    Focusing on "re-membering" practices is new to grief counseling. Traditional approaches to grief counseling are guided by the concepts of stages or tasks, usually to move the person toward accepting the reality of loss and to "say goodbye" to their deceased loved one. This alternative approach to grief counseling, driven by…

  13. The effects of gestational age and gender on grief after pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Goldbach, K R; Dunn, D S; Toedter, L J; Lasker, J N

    1991-07-01

    The roles of gestational age and gender in grief reactions following loss of pregnancy were explored. Parents with losses later in pregnancy reported more intense grief than did those whose losses were earlier. Women expressed higher levels of grief than did men six to eight weeks after the loss; however, this difference had decreased by one and two years after the loss.

  14. Do Grief Self-Help Books Convey Contemporary Perspectives on Grieving?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Michael Robert

    2012-01-01

    Grief therapy and psychology literatures of the modern Western world conceptualized bereavement and grief as processes to be "worked through" so that other relationships could be pursued. In the last decade or so, however, grief theorists have endorsed the value of attaining new meaning(s) and continuing bonds with our lost loved ones instead of…

  15. The Experience of Grief after Bereavement: A Phenomenological Study with Implications for Mental Health Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Elizabeth D.; Thompson, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    Phenomenological methods were used to explore the experience of grief after bereavement. Nine bereaved adults volunteered to participate in interviews in which they discussed their experience of grief after the death of a loved one. An analysis of the interviews revealed the following themes in the experience of grief after bereavement: Coping,…

  16. Psychometric Research in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Frederick B.

    This review of psychometric research in reading analyzes the factors which seem related to reading comprehension skills. Experimental analysis of reading comprehension by L. E. Thorndike revealed two major components: knowledge of word meanings and verbal reasoning abilities. Subsequent analysis of experimental studies of reading comprehension…

  17. Acculturation: A Psychometric Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo, Esteban L.

    1979-01-01

    Traditional measurement models based on cultural group or generational typologies do not adequately address conceptual and methodological problems in the psychometric approach to acculturation. A model is proposed that provides for the examination of relationships between multidimensional sets of quantitatively defined cultural variables.…

  18. Grief and its Complications in Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Brickell, Claire; Munir, Kerim

    2011-01-01

    Bereavement and loss have significant impact on the lives of individuals with intellectual disability (ID). Although there is a growing impetus to define the symptoms of grief that predict long-term functional impairment, little is known about maladaptive grieving among individuals with ID. We examine the literature concerning the phenomenology of traumatic grief (TG) in the general population, along with what is known about the manifestations of grief in individuals with ID. We then apply modern theories of grief and grief resolution to individuals with ID in order to highlight potential areas of vulnerability in this population and to lay the groundwork for interventions that will facilitate their adaptation to loss. We provide a theoretical framework for the proposition that individuals (including children and adults) with ID are more susceptible to TG, based on an increased risk of secondary loss, barriers to communicating about the loss, and difficulty finding meaning in the loss. We conclude that individuals with ID should be considered as potential candidates for targeted bereavement interventions. Further research is required, however, in order to develop population-appropriate measurement scales for testing these hypotheses. PMID:18306095

  19. African Americans in bereavement: grief as a function of ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Anna; Neimeyer, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Few empirical studies have explored the grieving process among different ethnic groups within the United States, and very little is known about how African Americans and Caucasians may differ in their experience of loss. The purpose of this study was to examine the African-American experience of grief, with particular emphasis on issues of identity change, interpersonal dimensions of the loss, and continuing attachments with the deceased. Participants were 1,581 bereaved college students (940 Caucasians and 641 African Americans) attending classes at a large southern university. Each participant completed the Inventory of Complicated Grief-Revised, the Continuing Bonds Scale, and questions regarding the circumstances surrounding his or her loss. Results revealed that African Americans experienced more frequent bereavement by homicide, maintenance of a stronger continuing bond with the deceased, greater grief for the loss of extended kin beyond the immediate family, and a sense of support in their grief, despite their tendency to talk less with others about the loss or seek professional support for it. Overall, African Americans reported higher levels of complicated grief symptoms than Caucasians, especially when they spent less time speaking to others about their loss experience. Implications of these findings for bereavement support services for African Americans were briefly noted.

  20. Psychometric Properties and Correlates of the Beck Hopelessness Scale in Family Caregivers of Nigerian Patients with Psychiatric Disorders in Southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Aloba, Olutayo; Ajao, Olayinka; Alimi, Taiwo; Esan, Olufemi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the construct and correlates of hopelessness among family caregivers of Nigerian psychiatric patients. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study involving 264 family caregiver-patients’ dyads recruited from two university teaching hospitals psychiatric clinics in Southwestern Nigeria. Results: Exploratory factor analysis revealed a two-factor 9-item model of the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) among the family caregivers. Confirmatory factor analysis of the model revealed satisfactory indices of fitness (goodness of fit index = 0.97, comparative fit index = 0.96, Chi-square/degree of freedom (CMIN/DF) = 1.60, root mean square error of approximation = 0.048, expected cross-validation index = 0.307, and standardized root mean residual = 0.005). Reliability of the scale was modestly satisfactory (Cronbach's alpha 0.72). Construct validity of scale was supported by significant correlations with the family caregivers’ scores on the Zarit Burden Interview, mini international neuropsychiatric interview suicidality module, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), and Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The greatest variance in the family caregivers’ scores on the BHS was contributed by their scores on the psychological distress scale (GHQ-12). Conclusions: The BHS has adequate psychometric properties among Nigerian psychiatric patients’ family caregivers. There is the need to pay attention to the psychological well-being of the family caregivers of Nigerian psychiatric patients. PMID:28163498

  1. Development and Psychometric Validation of the EDE-QS, a 12 Item Short Form of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q)

    PubMed Central

    Gideon, Nicole; Hawkes, Nick; Mond, Jonathan; Saunders, Rob; Tchanturia, Kate; Serpell, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop and validate a short form of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) for routine, including session by session, outcome assessment. Method The current, 28-item version (6.0) of the EDE-Q was completed by 489 individuals aged 18–72 with various eating disorders recruited from three UK specialist eating disorder services. Rasch analysis was carried out on factors identified by means of principal component analysis, which in combination with expert ratings informed the development of an EDE-Q short form. The shortened questionnaire’s reliability, validity and sensitivity was assessed based on online data collected from students of a UK university and volunteers with a history of eating disorders recruited from a national eating disorders charity aged 18–74 (N = 559). Results A 12-item short form, the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire Short (EDE-QS) was derived. The new measure showed high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .913) and temporal stability (ICC = .93; p < .001). It was highly correlated with the original EDE-Q (r = .91 for people without ED; r = .82 for people with ED) and other measures of eating disorder and comorbid psychopathology. It was sufficiently sensitive to distinguish between people with and without eating disorders. Discussion The EDE-QS is a brief, reliable and valid measure of eating disorder symptom severity that performs similarly to the EDE-Q and that lends itself for the use of sessional outcome monitoring in treatment and research. PMID:27138364

  2. Complicated grief therapy as a new treatment approach

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief therapy (CGT) is a relatively new psychotherapy model designed to address symptoms of complicated grief. Drawn from attachment theory and with roots in both interpersonal therapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy, CGT includes techniques similar to prolonged exposure (repeatedly telling the story of the death and in vivo exposure activities). The treatment also involves focusing on personal goals and relationships. CGT has been demonstrated to be effective in a trial in which participants with complicated grief were randomly assigned to CGT or IPT; individuals receiving CGT responded more quickly and were more likely to respond overall (51 % vs 28%). This article briefly summarizes the conceptual underpinnings of CGT, discusses the empirical evidence for its efficacy, describes its techniques, and presents a case example of a client treated in a 16-session manualized CGT protocol. The article concludes with a description of future research directions for CGT. PMID:22754288

  3. Complicated grief after suicide bereavement and other causes of death.

    PubMed

    Tal, Ilanit; Mauro, Christine; Reynolds, Charles F; Shear, M Katherine; Simon, Naomi; Lebowitz, Barry; Skritskaya, Natalia; Wang, Yuanjia; Qiu, Xin; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Avanzino, Julie; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Karp, Jordan F; Robinaugh, Don; Zisook, Sidney

    2016-11-28

    The authors compared baseline demographic characteristics, clinical features, and grief-related thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals bereaved by suicide, accident/homicide and natural causes participating in a complicated grief (CG) treatment clinical trial. Severity of CG and depression and current depression diagnosis did not vary by loss type. After adjusting for baseline demographic features, time since death and relationship to the deceased, those with CG after suicide had the highest rates of lifetime depression, preloss passive suicidal ideation, self-blaming thoughts, and impaired work and social adjustment. Even among this treatment-seeking sample of research participants with CG, suicide survivors may face unique challenges.

  4. Exploring Oncology Nurses’ Grief: A Self-study

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Lisa C.

    2016-01-01

    Oncology nursing, like many other nursing fields, often provides nurses with the opportunity to get to know their patients and their families well. This familiarity allows oncology nurses to show a level of compassion and empathy that is often helpful to the patient and their family during their struggle with cancer. However, this familiarity can also lead to a profound sense of grief if the patient loses that struggle. This self-study provided me the opportunity to systematically explore my own experience with grief as an oncology nurse, helping me to identify specific stressors and also sources of stress release. PMID:27981166

  5. Data mining the ScanBrit study of a gluten- and casein-free dietary intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders: behavioural and psychometric measures of dietary response.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lennart; Parlar, Sarah; Kvist, Kajsa; Whiteley, Paul; Shattock, Paul

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported results based on the examination of a gluten- and casein-free diet as an intervention for children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder as part of the ScanBrit collaboration. Analysis based on grouped results indicated several significant differences between dietary and non-dietary participants across various core and peripheral areas of functioning. Results also indicated some disparity in individual responses to dietary modification potentially indicative of responder and non-responder differences. Further examination of the behavioural and psychometric data garnered from participants was undertaken, with a view to determining potential factors pertinent to response to dietary intervention. Participants with clinically significant scores indicative of inattention and hyperactivity behaviours and who had a significant positive changes to said scores were defined as responders to the dietary intervention. Analyses indicated several factors to be potentially pertinent to a positive response to dietary intervention in terms of symptom presentation. Chronological age was found to be the strongest predictor of response, where those participants aged between 7 and 9 years seemed to derive most benefit from dietary intervention. Further analysis based on the criteria for original study inclusion on the presence of the urine compound, trans-indolyl-3-acryloylglycine may also merit further investigation. These preliminary observations on potential best responder characteristics to a gluten- and casein-free diet for children with autism require independent replication.

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Social Communication Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Lee, Chi-Mei; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Huang, Ya-Fen; Kao, Jen-Der; Wu, Yu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ). We assessed 736 participants (male, 80.1%) aged 2-18, who were clinically diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) including autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, or pervasive developmental disorders, not…

  7. Psychometric Characteristics and Clinical Correlates of NEO-PI-R Fearless Dominance and Impulsive Antisociality in the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Edward A.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Morey, Leslie C.; Markowitz, John C.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Shea, M. Tracie; Skodol, Andrew E.; Gunderson, John G.; Donnellan, M. Brent

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the validity of derived measures of the psychopathic personality traits of Fearless Dominance and Impulsive Antisociality from the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992) using data from the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study (baseline N = 733). These 3 issues were examined:…

  8. Psychometric Evaluation of a Dutch Version of the Mini PAS-ADD for Assessing Psychiatric Disorders in Adults with Different Levels of Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, R.; Maes, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities (ID) have an increased vulnerability to develop psychiatric problems. Moreover, the early recognition and the accurate diagnosis of psychiatric disorders in the population of persons with ID are challenging. Method: A Dutch version of the Mini PAS-ADD, which is a screening instrument for…

  9. Psychometric Validation of a Multidimensional Schema of Substance Use Topology: Discrimination of High and Low Risk Youth and Prediction of Substance Use Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirisci, Levent; Tarter, Ralph E.

    2001-01-01

    Designs and evaluates a multidimensional schema for the assessment of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use topology. Findings illustrate the value of multidimensional assessment for identifying youth at high risk for substance use disorder (SUD) as well as for elucidating the factors contributing to the transition to suprathreshold SUD. (Contains…

  10. Assessing the Job-Related Social Skills of Adolescents and Young Adults with Behavioral Disorders: Development and Preliminary Psychometric Characteristics of Two Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullis, Michael; And Others

    This report describes the development and testing of two measures of job-related social behavior of adolescents and young adults, ages 14-21, with behavior disorders (BD). Following an introduction of the concept of job-related social behavior, detailed descriptive information and data are provided on development and field testing of the…

  11. Psychometric Evaluation of the Behavioral Inhibition/Behavioral Activation Scales in a Large Sample of Outpatients With Anxiety and Mood Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell-Sills, Laura; Liverant, Gabrielle I.; Brown, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    The latent structure, reliability, and validity of the Behavioral Inhibition/Behavioral Activation Scales (BIS/BAS; C. L. Carver & T. L. White, 1994) were examined in a large sample of outpatients (N = 1,825) with anxiety and mood disorders. Four subsamples were used for exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. In addition to generally…

  12. How to Use the ADI-R for Classifying Autism Spectrum Disorders? Psychometric Properties of Criteria from the Literature in 1,204 Dutch Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bildt, Annelies; Oosterling, Iris J.; van Lang, Natasja D. J.; Kuijper, Sanne; Dekker, Vera; Sytema, Sjoerd; Oerlemans, Anoek M.; van Steijn, Daphne J.; Visser, Janne C.; Rommelse, Nanda N.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; van Engeland, Herman; van der Gaag, Rutger-Jan; Buitelaar, Jan K.; de Jonge, Maretha V.

    2013-01-01

    The algorithm of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised provides criteria for autism versus non-autism according to DSM-IV. Criteria for the broader autism spectrum disorders are needed. This study investigated the validity of seven sets of criteria from the literature, in 1,204 Dutch children (aged 3-18 years) with and without mental…

  13. Innovative Moments in Grief Therapy: Reconstructing Meaning Following Perinatal Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alves, Daniela; Mendes, Ines; Goncalves, Miguel M.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an intensive analysis of a good outcome case of constructivist grief therapy with a bereaved mother, using the Innovative Moments Coding System (IMCS). Inspired by M. White and D. Epston's narrative therapy, the IMCS conceptualizes therapeutic change as resulting from the elaboration and expansion of unique outcomes (or as we…

  14. Religiosity Related to Grief Levels of Bereaved Mothers and Fathers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohannon, Judy Rollins

    1991-01-01

    Examined religiosity and bereaved mothers' (n=143) and fathers' (n=129) scores on Grief Experience Inventory. High church attendance had significant inverse relationship with death anxiety. Mothers who attended church more frequently reported significantly less loss of control, rumination, depersonalization, and optimism/despair. Church attendance…

  15. Phenomenology and Correlates of Complicated Grief in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melhem, Nadine M.; Moritz, Grace; Walker, Monica; Shear, M. Katherine; Brent, David

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenomenology of complicated grief (CG) in parentally bereaved children and adolescents and to examine its correlates. Method: This is a preliminary report from an ongoing 5-year, population-based, longitudinal study of the impact of parental loss on family members. Analyses of cross-sectional data at intake are…

  16. Assessment of Emotional Experience and Emotional Recognition in Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alcántara, Manuel; Cruz-Quintana, Francisco; Pérez-Marfil, M. N.; Catena-Martínez, Andrés; Pérez-García, Miguel; Turnbull, Oliver H.

    2016-01-01

    There is substantial evidence of bias in the processing of emotion in people with complicated grief (CG). Previous studies have tended to assess the expression of emotion in CG, but other aspects of emotion (mainly emotion recognition, and the subjective aspects of emotion) have not been addressed, despite their importance for practicing clinicians. A quasi-experimental design with two matched groups (Complicated Grief, N = 24 and Non-Complicated Grief, N = 20) was carried out. The Facial Expression of Emotion Test (emotion recognition), a set of pictures from the International Affective Picture System (subjective experience of emotion) and the Symptom Checklist 90 Revised (psychopathology) were employed. The CG group showed lower scores on the dimension of valence for specific conditions on the IAPS, related to the subjective experience of emotion. In addition, they presented higher values of psychopathology. In contrast, statistically significant results were not found for the recognition of emotion. In conclusion, from a neuropsychological point of view, the subjective aspects of emotion and psychopathology seem central in explaining the experience of those with CG. These results are clinically significant for psychotherapists and psychoanalysts working in the field of grief and loss. PMID:26903928

  17. Play and Healing: Therapeutic Recreation's Role in Coping with Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Beth; King, Kathryn

    1999-01-01

    Camp Releaf, a weekend camp in North Carolina, uses therapeutic recreation to help children in grades K-8 develop positive coping skills for dealing with the recent death of a family member. The camp's therapeutic activities are described. Sidebars outline the nature of grief in different age groups and suggestions for working with grieving…

  18. Supporting Children with Traumatic Grief: What Educators Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.

    2011-01-01

    Following traumatic deaths children may develop Childhood Traumatic Grief (CTG), a condition in which trauma symptoms interfere with adaptive child grieving. Educators have an important role in supporting children who have CTG. Key contributions that educators can make are to (a) recognize CTG symptoms in school settings; (b) refer children for…

  19. Grief and Needs of Adults with Acquired Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Shirley A.; McKay, Robert C.; Nieuwoudt, Johan M.

    2010-01-01

    This report aims to illuminate the complex phenomenon of grief and the needs experienced throughout the time course of their impairments by adults with acquired visual impairments. The study applied a phenomenological research strategy using 10 case studies of South African adults, visually impaired within and beyond six years. Qualitative…

  20. The Stigmatized Deaths in Jonestown: Finding a Locus for Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the stigmatized deaths in Jonestown, Guyana, in 1978, in which more than 900 Americans died of mass murder and suicide, and how this led to the disenfranchisement of grief. It examines the rituals of exclusion by which bodies were handled and describes the experiences of Jonestown survivors. It then looks at the ways in…

  1. Effectiveness of Grief Therapy: A Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allumbaugh, Denise Litterer; Hoyt, William T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes analyses based on 35 studies on effectiveness of Grief Therapy. Clients with no-treatment control groups showed little improvement, possibly because of the relatively long delay between loss and treatment. Client selection procedures appear to contribute strongly to variability in effect size (ESs). The majority of studies involving…

  2. Group Composition and Group Therapy for Complicated Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, William E.; Ogrodniczuk, John S.; Joyce, Anthony S.; Weideman, Rene; Rosie, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This prospective study investigated the impact of group composition on the outcome of 2 forms of time-limited, short-term group therapy (interpretive, supportive) with 110 outpatients from 18 therapy groups, who presented with complicated grief. The composition variable was based on the patient's level of quality of object relations. The higher…

  3. Scrapbooking as an Intervention for Grief Recovery with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kristie; Lent, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    This article describes scrapbooking in the context of bereavement counseling. For the purposes of this article, scrapbooking combines many different types of art-related therapy interventions into one concrete format to utilize in counseling with children who are working to overcome grief or trauma related to the loss of a parent. A case…

  4. The Grief Group: A University and Hospice Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Daniel; Fry, Michele

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a joint effort of a community hospice and a university counseling center to provide a campus grief group for university students led by a hospice counselor and a counseling center clinical psychologist. Hospice provided a curriculum outlining topics and activities for each of the group's six meetings. Notices announcing…

  5. Grief in Two Guises: "Mourning and Melancholia" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Viviane

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a re-reading of Freud's classic paper. The themes of mourning and melancholia are viewed in relation to children and adolescents with illustrations from case histories. Mourning is interpreted in a broader sense: not only as grief (both expectable and traumatic) but as a response to the developmental process itself as phases of…

  6. Music Therapy with Bereaved Youth: Expressing Grief and Feeling Better

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerran, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Music therapy is a promising intervention with bereaved youth. In comparison to other programs, it appears particularly effective for promoting the resolution of grief-related feelings; providing opportunities to express and release feelings through musical participation. Descriptions from music therapy participants are supported by research…

  7. The Grief Evaluation Measure (GEM): An Initial Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, John R.; Baker, John; Matteis, Margherite; Rosenthal, Saul; Ware, Eugenia S.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Grief Evaluation Measure (GEM), a new instrument designed to screen for the development of a complicated mourning response in a bereaved adult. The GEM provides a quantitative and qualitative assessment of risk factors, including the mourner's loss and medical history, coping resources before and after…

  8. Grief in Separated, Divorced, and Widowed Women: Similarities and Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petiet, Carole Anne

    To systematically test previous assumptions about grief in widows and divorcing women, 410 separated, divorced, or widowed women, between the ages of 23 and 76, with at least one child, completed the Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist, the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale, the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory--Form C, the Attachment Index, and the…

  9. Predictors of Complicated Grief: A Systematic Review of Empirical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Elizabeth A.; Kristjanson, Linda J.; Aoun, Samar M.; Monterosso, Leanne; Halkett, Georgia K. B.; Davies, Anna

    2010-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature on predictors of complicated grief (CG) was undertaken with the aim of clarifying the current knowledge and to inform future planning and work in CG following bereavement. Predictors of CG prior to the death include previous loss, exposure to trauma, a previous psychiatric history, attachment style, and the…

  10. Strengthening Grief Support for Adolescents Coping with a Peer's Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balk, David E.; Zaengle, Donna; Corr, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    This article offers suggestions for strengthening school-based grief support following an adolescent's death. Such interventions must be considered within the context of: (a) development during adolescence; (b) the role of peers in adolescent development; and (c) the fact that an adolescent peer's death is a non-normative life crisis in developed…

  11. Enhancement of Death Acceptance by a Grief Counseling Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Harvey J.; Melbin-Helberg, Elizabeth B.

    1992-01-01

    Investigated impact of grief counseling course in terms of two-component formulation of death acceptance. Compared to controls, participants showed significant and sustained increase in cognitive confrontation of death and in assimilation of attitudes at emotional level. Identified predictors of extent of effect included individual's initial death…

  12. Treatment of Complicated Grief Using Virtual Reality: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, C.; Osma, J.; Palacios, A. Garcia; Guillen, V.; Banos, R.

    2008-01-01

    This is the first work exploring the application of new technologies, concretely virtual reality, to facilitate emotional processing in the treatment of Complicated Grief. Our research team has designed a virtual reality environment (EMMA's World) to foster the expression and processing of emotions. In this study the authors present a description…

  13. Helping People Cope with Tragedy and Grief: Information, Resources & Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Garry R., Ed.; Kirkman, Chris J.

    Following the horrific experiences of September 11th, 2001, efforts were undertaken to gather information to provide counselors with the help they need for counseling those in the face of tragedy. With this publication, information about trauma and grief counseling becomes readily available. Guides for responding to tragedies are included from…

  14. Race as a Factor in Teachers' Responses to Children's Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Trudie L.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated how teachers respond to children in death-related situations. When Black and non-Black teachers were compared, no differences were evident in attitudes toward death or belief in an afterlife. However, significant differences appeared in the responses they chose to children's grief. (Author)

  15. Future of Psychometrics: Ask What Psychometrics Can Do for Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sijtsma, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    I address two issues that were inspired by my work on the Dutch Committee on Tests and Testing (COTAN). The first issue is the understanding of problems test constructors and researchers using tests have of psychometric knowledge. I argue that this understanding is important for a field, like psychometrics, for which the dissemination of…

  16. [Clinical case: Complicated grief in primary care. Care plan].

    PubMed

    Ruymán Brito-Brito, Pedro; Rodríguez-Ramos, Mercedes; Pérez-García-Talavera, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This is the case of a 61-year-old patient woman that visits her nurse in Primary Health Care to get the control of blood pressure and glycemia. In the last two years has suffered the loss of her husband and of two brothers beside having lived through other vital stressful events that have taken her to a situation of complicated grief. The care plan is realized using the M. Gordon assessment system and standardized languages NANDA, NOC and NIC. The principal aims were the improvement of the depression level and the improvement in the affliction resolution. As suggested interventions were proposed to facilitate the grief and the derivation to a mental health unit. A follow-up of the patient was realized in nursing consultation at Primary health care to weekly intervals, in the beginning, and monthly, later. The evaluation of the care plan reflects an improvement in the criteria of Prigerson's complicated grief; an increase of the recreative activities; the retreat of the mourning that still she was guarding; as well as an improvement in the control of the blood pressure numbers. The attention of nurses before a case of complicated grief turns out to be complex. Nevertheless the suitable accomplishment of certain interventions orientated to facilitating the grief, with a follow-up in consultation, shows the efficiency. The difficulty in the boarding of the psychosocial problems meets increased at the moment of are necessary the nursing diagnostics adapted for every individual case. The work in group between nurses could improves the consensus.

  17. Psychometric Properties of Teacher SKAMP Ratings from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Desiree W.; Bussing, Regina; Fernandez, Melanie; Hou, Wei; Garvan, Cynthia Wilson; Swanson, James M.; Eyberg, Sheila M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the basic psychometric properties of the Swanson, Kotkin, Agler, M-Flynn, and Pelham Scale (SKAMP), a measure intended to assess functional impairment related to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, in a sample of 1,205 elementary students. Reliability, factor structure, and convergent, discriminant and predictive validity…

  18. Brain Mechanisms and Intelligence: Psychometric g and Executive Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crinella, Francis M.; Yu, Jen

    1999-01-01

    Presents three lines of evidence that fail to support R. Sternberg's theory of general intelligence ("g"): (1) animal problem solving studies; (2) studies of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; and (3) studies of patients with frontal lobe damage. Discusses differences between psychometric "g" and practical…

  19. The Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale: Psychometric Properties in Depressed Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Gregory M.; Park, Jong-Hyo; Essex, Marilyn J.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Silva, Susan G.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Curry, John F.; Feeny, Norah C.; Kennard, Betsy; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Pathak, Sanjeev; Reinecke, Mark A.; Rosenberg, David R.; Weller, Elizabeth B.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties and factor structure of the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale were examined in a sample of 422 male and female adolescents (ages 12-17) with current major depressive disorder. The scale demonstrated high internal consistency ([alpha] = 0.93) and correlated significantly with self-report and interview-based measures of…

  20. Development and Preliminary Psychometric Evaluation of the Children's Saving Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Muroff, Jordana; Lewin, Adam B.; Geller, Daniel; Ross, Abigail; McCarthy, Katherine; Morgan, Jessica; Murphy, Tanya K.; Frost, Randy; Steketee, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the development and initial psychometric properties of the Children's Saving Inventory (CSI), a parent-rated measure designed to assess child hoarding behaviors. Subjects included 123 children and adolescents diagnosed with primary Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and their parents. Trained clinicians administered the…

  1. Parental Grief Following the Brain Death of a Child: Does Consent or Refusal to Organ Donation Affect Their Grief?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellali, Thalia; Papadatou, Danai

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the grieving process of parents who were faced with the dilemma of donating organs and tissues of their underage brain dead child, and to explore the impact of their decision on their grief process. A grounded theory methodology was adopted and a semi-structured interview was conducted with 11 bereaved…

  2. Development of a Psychometric Instrument Based on the Inference-Based Approach to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: The Obsessional Probabilistic Inference Scale

    PubMed Central

    GÜLEÇ, Mustafa; DEVECİ, Erdem; BEŞİROĞLU, Lutfullah; BOYSAN, Murat; KALAFAT, Temel; ORAL, Elif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The current article addresses the validation of the construct of obsessional probabilistic inference in clinical and non-clinical samples. Obsessional probabilistic inference or obsessional doubt refers to a type of inferential process resulting in the belief that a state of affairs “maybe” causes development of a maladaptive cognitive coping style in terms of obsessing. Methods The latent structure of the Obsessional Probabilistic Inference Scale (OPIS) was evaluated with confirmatory factor analysis. Results Explanatory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated that a one-factor solution was satisfactory for the instrument, assessing a unidimensional psychological construct. The OPIS was shown to have high internal consistency in all samples, as well as temporal stability, relying on predominantly non-clinical individuals. The scale exhibited high convergent validity and successfully discriminated patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder from both depressive patients and controls. Conclusion The findings replicated and extended the role of reasoning process in the development and maintenance of obsessive compulsive symptoms. The results are discussed in regard to assumptions of the inference-based approach to obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  3. Psychometric Properties of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) in a Non-Clinical Sample of Children and Adolescents in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Arab, Arwa; El Keshky, Mogeda; Hadwin, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    This paper examined the reliability, convergent validity and factor structure of the self-report Screen for Child Anxiety Disorders (SCARED; Birmaher et al. in J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 36:545-553, 1997) in a large community sample of children and adolescents in Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire showed moderate to high internal consistency and satisfactory test-retest reliability over a 2 week period. In addition, there were significant positive correlations between reported anxiety symptoms with parent report behavioural difficulties. The five factor structure model of the SCARED also had a good model fit in this population. The results showed that self-report anxiety symptoms decreased with age (for boys and not girls) and were higher in adolescent girls. The results suggest that the SCARED could be useful in this population to identify individuals who are at risk of developing anxiety disorders in childhood with a view to implementing prevention and intervention methods to ensure positive developmental outcome over time.

  4. In memoriam: the disenfranchised grief of chaplains and the recovery of memory.

    PubMed

    Helsel, Philip Browning

    2008-01-01

    The article explores the disenfranchised grief of the chaplain from the perspective of the author's own experience in hospice chaplaincy. Borrowing from the works of Kenneth J. Doka on disenfranchised grief, Robert C. Dykstra on crisis ministry, and James Dittes on grief work in ministry, this article focuses on the grief work of chaplains. In doing so, it analyzes the theological perspective of remembrance, explaining how personal remembrances connect the chaplain with his or her own repressed grief in a way that communal events can not accomplish because of the chaplain's responsibility for the grief of the community in these settings. From the perspective of the Christian faith in its sacramental connections with the Lord's Supper, the spiritual practice of honoring the deceased and praying for their guidance is posed as a possible model of healing remembrance.

  5. Do grief self-help books convey contemporary perspectives on grieving?

    PubMed

    Dennis, Michael Robert

    2012-01-01

    Grief therapy and psychology literatures of the modern Western world conceptualized bereavement and grief as processes to be "worked through" so that other relationships could be pursued. In the last decade or so, however, grief theorists have endorsed the value of attaining new meaning(s) and continuing bonds with our lost loved ones instead of "moving on from," "letting go of" or "achieving closure from" them. This article tracks the evolution of thought pertaining to this shift and examines its relevance to grief self-help books that may offer Americans guidance in the ways of grieving.

  6. Disciplinary Wounds: Has Grief Become the Identified Patient for a Field Gone Awry?

    PubMed Central

    GRANEK, LEEAT

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades, grief and loss research in the psychological domain has focused almost exclusively on its dysfunctional nature. I examine what is underneath these questions about pathology and suggest that our discipline is suffering from an attachment wound where we have dissociated from our historical roots when it comes to the study of grief and loss. I argue that we need to ask new questions about grief and loss and present two examples of my collaborative work to illustrate innovative ways of thinking about and researching grief. PMID:24976797

  7. Grieving online: newcomers' constructions of grief in an online support group.

    PubMed

    Varga, Mary Alice; Paulus, Trena M

    2014-01-01

    Research into peer conversations in online grief support groups remains scarce. The authors used discourse analysis to examine 107 initial posts to one such group to examine how newcomers constructed their initial posts to display their eligibility for membership. The authors identified three discursive features: formulating unusual stories of loss, describing uncontrollable emotional and physical states, and engaging in "troubles telling." These discursive patterns illustrate how grief is constructed in ways that may simultaneously conform to and resist norms around grief that exist offline. Implications for practitioners include the need to support individuals through validation of their "nonnormal" grief.

  8. Politics, religions, and grief: the cases of American spiritualism and the Deuteronomic reform in Israel.

    PubMed

    Klass, Dennis; Goss, Robert

    2002-11-01

    The article is a contribution to the task of developing a cross-cultural model of grief. It shows that grief narratives can be complexly interwoven with the religious and political narratives of the culture. Two political reforms in which religious narratives figured prominently are given as case examples: 19th-century Spiritualism in North America and the Deuteronomic reform in 7th-century BCE Israel. Similarities and differences between the two are discussed. The article concludes that an adequate cross-cultural model of grief must be capable of explaining how a particular grief narrative relates to the politics and religious narratives in which it is set.

  9. [Parents' grief at the loss of a premature infant and approaches to their care].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiu-Mei

    2007-10-01

    The more than 3,000 deaths of premature infants due to low weight in Taiwan cause deep personal grief in their parents, for whom there is no pain greater than losing a child. This loss, nearly always sudden and unexpected, is an issue often ignored by clinic nursing staff. The purpose of this paper was to consider various grief counseling theories in order to help nurses attend to the grief counseling needs of parents who lose a premature infant. Better understanding of parents' grief responses by nursing staffs will help nurses to accept and address such. Grief processes identified include: shock and numbness, searching and yearning, disorientation and reorganization. Grief responses include: feel, physiology and sense organs, cognition and behavior. The four tasks essential to grief recovery include: to accept the reality of the loss, to work through the pain of grief, to adjust to an environment in which the deceased is missing, and to emotionally relocate the deceased and move on with life. Coaching through grief counseling theory puts forward and looks after concrete measures, and provides three suggestions for the parents who lose a premature infant. These can be used as reference by clinical staffs, help promote nursing staff understanding of this topic, help improve care for grieving parents and improve care quality.

  10. DSM-5: proposed changes to depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2012-03-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is currently undergoing a revision that will lead to a fifth edition in 2013. Proposed changes for DSM-5 include the creation of several new categories of depressive disorder. Some nosologists have expressed concern that the proposed changes could yield many 'false-positive diagnoses' in which normal distress is mislabeled as a mental disorder. Such confusion of normal distress and mental disorder undermines the interpretability of clinical trials and etiological research, causes inefficient allocation of resources, and incurs risks of unnecessary treatment. To evaluate these concerns, I critically examine five proposed DSM-5 expansions in the scope of depressive and grief disorders: (1) a new mixed anxiety/depression category; (2) a new premenstrual dysphoric disorder category; (3) elimination of the major depression bereavement exclusion; (4) elimination of the adjustment disorder bereavement exclusion, thus allowing the diagnosis of subsyndromal depressive symptoms during bereavement as adjustment disorders; and (5) a new category of adjustment disorder related to bereavement for diagnosing pathological non-depressive grief. I examine each proposal's face validity and conceptual coherence as well as empirical support where relevant, with special attention to potential implications for false-positive diagnoses. I conclude that mixed anxiety/depression and premenstrual dysphoric disorder are needed categories, but are too broadly drawn and will yield substantial false positives; that the elimination of the bereavement exclusion is not supported by the evidence; and that the proposed elimination of the adjustment-disorder bereavement exclusion, as well as the new category of grief-related adjustment disorder, are inconsistent with recent grief research, which suggests that these proposals would massively pathologize normal grief responses.

  11. Loss and grief in the workplace: the challenge of leadership.

    PubMed

    Tehan, Mary; Thompson, Neil

    There is no part of human existence that loss and grief do not reach, and the workplace is no exception to this. This article is therefore concerned with some of the implications of loss and grief in work settings in general and for workplace leaders in particular. By way of example, it explores in particular the needs of bereaved caregivers returning to work and the potential for stigma to emerge in relation to employment and bereavement. Central to the article is an argument in favor of the need for change within the workplace, specifically within the structures and systems that support bereaved caregivers returning to work. This article critically reflects on the leadership management challenge of supporting bereaved caregivers returning to, or seeking, work and addressing the problem of stigma in relation to employment and bereavement. Some structural and policy changes are highlighted to assist employers and bereaved caregivers faced with this situation.

  12. Prevalence and psychological correlates of complicated grief among bereaved adults 2.5-3.5 years after September 11th attacks.

    PubMed

    Neria, Yuval; Gross, Raz; Litz, Brett; Maguen, Shira; Insel, Beverly; Seirmarco, Gretchen; Rosenfeld, Helena; Suh, Eun Jung; Kishon, Ronit; Cook, Joan; Marshall, Randall D

    2007-06-01

    A Web-based survey of adults who experienced loss during the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was conducted to examine the prevalence and correlates of complicated grief (CG) 2.5-3.5 years after the attacks. Forty-three percent of a study group of 704 bereaved adults across the United States screened positive for CG. In multivariate analyses, CG was associated with female gender, loss of a child, death of deceased at the World Trade Center, and live exposure to coverage of the attacks on television. Posttraumatic stress disorder, major depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, and increase in post-9/11 smoking were common among participants with CG. A majority of the participants with CG reported receiving grief counseling and psychiatric medication after 9/11. Clinical and policy implications are discussed.

  13. Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation: Results of the Initial Psychometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinkham, Amy E.; Penn, David L.; Green, Michael F.; Harvey, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of social cognition in treatment trials remains problematic due to poor and limited psychometric data for many tasks. As part of the Social Cognition Psychometric Evaluation (SCOPE) study, the psychometric properties of 8 tasks were assessed. One hundred and seventy-nine stable outpatients with schizophrenia and 104 healthy controls completed the battery at baseline and a 2–4-week retest period at 2 sites. Tasks included the Ambiguous Intentions Hostility Questionnaire (AIHQ), Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Task (BLERT), Penn Emotion Recognition Task (ER-40), Relationships Across Domains (RAD), Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task (Eyes), The Awareness of Social Inferences Test (TASIT), Hinting Task, and Trustworthiness Task. Tasks were evaluated on: (i) test-retest reliability, (ii) utility as a repeated measure, (iii) relationship to functional outcome, (iv) practicality and tolerability, (v) sensitivity to group differences, and (vi) internal consistency. The BLERT and Hinting task showed the strongest psychometric properties across all evaluation criteria and are recommended for use in clinical trials. The ER-40, Eyes Task, and TASIT showed somewhat weaker psychometric properties and require further study. The AIHQ, RAD, and Trustworthiness Task showed poorer psychometric properties that suggest caution for their use in clinical trials. PMID:25943125

  14. Resident work hours: the five stages of grief.

    PubMed

    Barone, James E; Ivy, Michael E

    2004-05-01

    The authors describe their reactions, as surgical educators, to the mandate of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education to reduce resident work hours. They explain these reactions in terms of Dr. Elizabeth Kübler-Ross's five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and finally acceptance ("which should not be mistaken for a happy stage"). The authors describe each stage of grief and use it to make specific comments on the difficulties that the mandate imposes. They then reveal that their views about the work-hours regulations differ: Dr. Ivy now sees them as an opportunity to grow and improve, and likens the resistance to the new restrictions to that of Europeans to the printing press. But Dr. Barone ("the older of the coauthors and a known curmudgeon") is not so sure, and shares many of the concerns described earlier in the five stages of grief, even though he has outwardly accepted the work-hours rules and insists on full compliance by his residents and faculty. In particular, he is saddened that some residents feel they have the absolute right to go home regardless of the situation on the surgery service, and this feeling is validated by the work-hours rules.

  15. Identity, grief and self-awareness after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Emma; Coetzer, Rudi

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate perceived identity change in adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore associations between identity change, grief, depression, self-esteem and self-awareness. The participants were 29 adults with TBI who were being followed up by a community brain injury rehabilitation service. Participants were longer post-injury than those more commonly studied. Time since injury ranged from 2.25 to 40 years (mean = 11.17 years, SD = 11.4 years). Participants completed a battery of questionnaires. Significant others and clinicians completed a parallel version of one of these measures. Questionnaires included the Head Injury Semantic Differential Scale (HISDS-III), Brain Injury Grief Inventory (BIGI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale - Depression, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and the Awareness Questionnaire (Self/Significant other/Clinician versions). The main findings were that participants reported significant changes in self-concept with current self being viewed negatively in comparison to pre-injury self. Perceived identity change was positively associated with depression and grief and negatively associated with self-esteem and awareness. Awareness was negatively associated with self-esteem and positively associated with depression. These findings were consistent with previous research, revealing changes in identity following TBI. Further research is needed to increase our understanding of the psychological factors involved in emotional adjustment after TBI and to inform brain injury rehabilitation interventions, including psychotherapy approaches.

  16. The Structured Clinical Interview for Complicated Grief: Reliability, Validity, and Exploratory Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Eric; Mauro, Christine; Robinaugh, Donald J.; Skritskaya, Natalia A.; Wang, Yuanjia; Gribbin, Colleen; Ghesquiere, Angela; Horenstein, Arielle; Duan, Naihua; Reynolds, Charles; Zisook, Sidney; Simon, Naomi M.; Shear, M. Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Complicated grief (CG) has been recently included in the DSM-5, under the term “Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder”, as a condition requiring further study. To our knowledge, no psychometric data on any structured clinical interview of CG is available to date. In this manuscript, we introduce the Structured Clinical Interview for CG (SCI-CG) a 31-item “SCID-like” clinician-administered instrument to assess the presence of CG symptoms. Methods Participants were 281 treatment-seeking adults with CG (77.9% (n=219) women, mean age = 52.4, SD = 17.8) who were assessed with the SCI-CG and measures of depression, posttraumatic stress, anxiety, functional impairment. Results The SCI-CG exhibited satisfactory internal consistency (α = .78), good test-retest reliability (Inter-class correlation [ICC] 0.68, 95% CI [0.60, 0.75]), and excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC=0.95, 95% CI [0.89, 0.98]). Exploratory factor analyses revealed that a five-factor structure, explaining 50.3% of the total variance, was the best fit for the data. Conclusions The clinician-rated SCI-CG demonstrates good internal consistency, reliability, and convergent validity in treatment-seeking individuals with CG and therefore can be a useful tool to assess CG. Although diagnostic criteria for CG have yet to be adequately validated, the SCI-CG may facilitate this process. The SCI-CG can now be used as a validated instrument in research and clinical practice. PMID:26061724

  17. Grief after second-trimester termination for fetal anomaly: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Marguerite; Light, Alexis; Kuppermann, Miriam; Dalton, Vanessa K.; Steinauer, Jody E.; Kerns, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to qualitatively evaluate factors that contribute to and alleviate grief associated with termination of a pregnancy for a fetal anomaly and how that grief changes over time. Study design We conducted a longitudinal qualitative study of decision satisfaction, grief and coping among women undergoing termination (dilation and evacuation or induction termination) for fetal anomalies and other complications. We conducted three postprocedure interviews at 1–3 weeks, 3 months and 1 year. We used a generative thematic approach to analyze themes related to grief using NVivo software program. Results Of the 19 women in the overall study, 13 women’s interviews were eligible for analysis of the grief experience. Eleven women completed all three interviews, and two completed only the first interview. Themes that contributed to grief include self-blame for the diagnosis, guilt around the termination decision, social isolation related to discomfort with abortion and grief triggered by reminders of pregnancy. Social support and time are mechanisms that serve to alleviate grief. Conclusions Pregnancy termination in this context is experienced as a significant loss similar to other types of pregnancy loss and is also associated with real and perceived stigma. Women choosing termination for fetal anomalies may benefit from tailored counseling that includes dispelling misconceptions about cause of the anomaly. In addition, efforts to decrease abortion stigma and increase social support may improve women’s experiences and lessen their grief response. Implications The nature and course of grief after second-trimester termination for fetal anomaly are, as of yet, poorly understood. With improved understanding of how women grieve over time, clinicians can better recognize the significance of their patients’ suffering and offer tools to direct their grief toward positive coping. PMID:25499590

  18. Factors Related to Complicated Grief among Bereaved Individuals after the Wenchuan Earthquake in China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Lin; Li, Xiao-Lin; Dou, Xin-Man; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Wenchuan earthquake in China caused shock and grief worldwide. Sudden bereavement caused by the earthquake led to physical disorders as well as psychological disturbances in the bereaved individuals. The bereaved had a high risk for complicated grief (CG), which may have led to significant distress and impairment in their health. However, there was few available studies on CG among disaster-bereaved individuals in China after the disaster. The aim of this study was to identify factors (demographic characteristics and disaster-related variables) associated with symptoms of CG among the bereaved 18 months after the Wenchuan earthquake. Methods: This study was conducted with a cross-sectional design and a convenience sample of 271 bereaved individuals from three of the hardest hit areas. Data were collected by questionnaires and the instruments used in the study were: General questionnaire and Inventory of CG (ICG). Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with symptoms of CG. Results: The mean score on ICG was 52.77 (standard deviation: 10.00). Being female and loss of a child were related to higher level of CG while having another child after the disaster and receiving psychological counseling experience were associated with lower level of CG. Forty-nine percent of the variance of CG was explained by these identified factors. Conclusions: Eighteen months after the Wenchuan earthquake, the symptoms of CG among the bereaved were higher than the previous studies with bereaved individuals. This study uncovers a vulnerable population of the bereaved at high risk for CG. Early assessments, targeted interventions, and policy support tailored for the disaster-bereaved individuals are necessary to identify and alleviate symptoms of CG and to improve their well-being. PMID:26021497

  19. A Nationwide Random Sampling Survey of Potential Complicated Grief in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizuno, Yasunao; Kishimoto, Junji; Asukai, Nozomu

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of significant loss, potential complicated grief (CG), and its contributing factors, we conducted a nationwide random sampling survey of Japanese adults aged 18 or older (N = 1,343) using a self-rating Japanese-language version of the Complicated Grief Brief Screen. Among them, 37.0% experienced their most significant…

  20. An Item Response Theory Analysis of a Measure of Complicated Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boelen, Paul A.; Hoijtink, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Item response theory modeling was applied to the data of 1,321 bereaved individuals who completed the Dutch version of the Inventory of Complicated Grief-Revised (ICG-R)--a 29-item self-report measure of complicated grief (CG). The authors aimed to examine the information that each of the ICG-R items contributes to the measurement of overall CG…

  1. Use of Bibliotherapy in the Treatment of Grief and Loss: A Guide to Current Counseling Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Cynthia A.; Pehrsson, Dale-Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Grief is a complex and dynamic process influencing individuals of all ages. This article provides an overview of historical and contemporary constructs of grief counseling. Bibliotherapy, a creative counseling tool, is presented as an appropriate intervention when counseling grieving clients. Guidelines for using bibliotherapy with grieving…

  2. Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Complicated Grief: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Birgit; Knaevelsrud, Christine; Maercker, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigates the efficacy of an Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy program for bereaved people suffering complicated grief. The program combines established methods of psychotherapy with new technology--therapists and patients communicated exclusively by e-mail. Bereaved individuals diagnosed with complicated grief (n =…

  3. Grief among Surviving Family Members of Homicide Victims: A Causal Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprang, M. Virginia; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Proposed causal model to delineate predictors of self-reported grief among surviving family members of homicide victims. Evaluated model using data from survey of members of "Victims of Violence" support groups. Results generally supported model and indicated that correlates of grief differed across gender-specific subgroups in terms of their…

  4. Development and Validation of a Christian-Based Grief Recovery Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jen Der Pan, Peter; Deng, Liang-Yu F.; Tsai, S. L.; Chen, Ho-Yuan J.; Yuan, Sheng-Shiou Jenny

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a Christian-based Grief Recovery Scale (CGRS) which was used to measure Christians recovering from grief after a significant loss. Taiwanese Christian participants were recruited from churches and a comprehensive university in northern Taiwan. They were affected by both the Christian faith and…

  5. A Pilot Study of Modified Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Childhood Traumatic Grief (CBT-CTG)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Staron, Virginia R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study evaluated outcomes for a modified 12-session protocol of cognitive-behavioral therapy for childhood traumatic grief (CBT-CTG) conducted between March 2004 and October 2005. CTG is an emerging condition characterized by a combination of posttraumatic stress and unresolved grief symptoms. This two-module treatment model…

  6. Caregiver Grief in Terminal Illness and Bereavement: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, Deborah P.

    2007-01-01

    Caregivers experience multiple losses during the downhill trajectory of a loved one's terminal illness. Using mixed methods, this two-stage study explored caregiver grief during a terminal illness and after the care recipient's death. Caregiver grief was a state of heightened responsiveness during end-stage care: anxiety, hostility, depression,…

  7. Evaluation of Individual and Group Grief and Trauma Interventions for Children Post Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salloum, Alison; Overstreet, Stacy

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated a community-based grief and trauma intervention for children conducted postdisaster. Fifty six children (7 to 12 years old) who reported moderate to severe levels of symptoms of posttraumatic stress were randomly assigned to group or individual treatment. Treatment consisted of a manualized 10-session grief- and trauma-focused…

  8. Distinguishing Symptoms of Grief and Depression in a Cohort of Advanced Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Juliet C.; Zhang, Baohui; Block, Susan D.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the symptoms of grief are different from symptoms of depression among bereaved family members. This study is an attempt to replicate this finding among advanced cancer patients and examine clinical correlates of patient grief and depression. Analyses were conducted on data from interviews with 123 advanced cancer…

  9. Parental Reactions to the Special Education Individual Education Program Process: Looking through the Lens of Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Melinda; Hammond, Helen; Ingalls, Lawrence; Marín, Merranda Romaro

    2013-01-01

    Parental grief reactions have typically been examined in situations where parents have a child diagnosed with a major medical or mental health condition. This study used the grief and loss model as conceptualized by Kubler-Ross (1969), Lamb (1988), and Kubler-Ross and Kessler (2005) as a foundation in examining parental reactions when a child has…

  10. Engaging Parents of Students with Disabilities: Moving beyond the Grief Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allred, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Educators in many Western nations have used the Kübler-Ross stage model of grief for five decades as a lens to explain parental response to disability. A recent article in "Improving Schools," representing this deficit model, asserted that the grief lens is useful in understanding parent's response to learning that their child qualified…

  11. Staff Grief Resolution and Care for the Elderly: Artificial Intelligence Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibert, Phyllis M.; Pastorello, Thomas

    Literature on health professionals describes the problems associated with unresolved or poorly resolved grief. Previous research has indicated that the most important reason why health professionals stay in their jobs is their relationship to patients. This study examined how nursing home personnel resolve their grief following deaths of clients.…

  12. Parents' Grief Following Pregnancy Loss: A Comparison of Mothers and Fathers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Kandi M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined gender differences in bereavement following miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth, and neonatal death. Interviewed 56 couples using Perinatal Grief Scale. Women scored significantly higher than men on most dimensions of grief at two months, one year, and two years postloss, except on dimension indicating most serious consequences of…

  13. The Relationship of Resilience with Attitude toward Grief in University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Seher Balci

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal whether university students' level of resilience differ by gender and attitude toward grief, and to identify to what extent resilience predicts attitude toward grief. 259 students studying at Ondokuz Mayis University participated in the study. The average age of the participants was 20.27 plus or minus 1.19.…

  14. Death and Grief: A Plan for Principals to Deal with Tragedy Affecting the School Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Harry L.

    1987-01-01

    Spurred by the "Challenger" space shuttle tragedy, this article provides principals with guidelines for informing individual students about family deaths and dealing with grief affecting the entire school community. Thorough preparation can reduce intensity and misconceived actions associated with grief and demonstrate administrative leadership.…

  15. Observing a Client's Grieving Process: Bringing Logical Positivism into Qualitative Grief Counselling Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, John; Gabriel, Lynne; James, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    This positional paper originates from our need as researcher/practitioners to establish a meaningful epistemological framework for research into bereaved people's journey through loss and grief over time. We describe how the field of grief research has a long and established biological basis, in keeping with a positivist epistemology.…

  16. A Large Scale Study of the Psychometric Characteristics of the IBR Modified Overt Aggression Scale: Findings and Evidence for Increased Self-Destructive Behaviors in Adult Females with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Ira L.; Tsiouris, John A.; Flory, Michael J.; Kim, Soh-Yule; Freedland, Robert; Heaney, Glenn; Pettinger, Jill; Brown, W. Ted

    2010-01-01

    The psychometric characteristics of the IBR Modified Overt Aggression Scale were studied in over 2,000 people with Intellectual Disability (ID). Reliability ranged from good to excellent. Aggression toward others and objects was highest in the youngest adults, in those in the moderate to severe range of ID, and in those with an autism spectrum…

  17. Exploiting loss?: ethical considerations, boundaries, and opportunities for the study of death and grief online.

    PubMed

    Carmack, Heather J; DeGroot, Jocelyn M

    More people are turning to the Internet to communicate about dying, death, and grief experiences. This theoretical article explores the ethical dilemmas, challenges, and opportunities presented to researchers interested in exploring how death and grief are communicated online. Weaving together the literatures of computer-mediated communication and thanatology (dying and death), we discuss the ways in which many common ethical dilemmas uniquely manifest related to death and grief. We also explore the emotional impact studying death and grief online has on researchers and the importance of thinking about researcher emotions on scholars who study these issues. We end with recommendations of how to move forward in the dialogue about ethics and studying death and grief online.

  18. Coping with grief responses among African American family members of homicide victims.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Tanya L; Osteen, Philip; Frey, Jodi Jacobson; Michalopoulos, Lynn Murphy

    2014-01-01

    Research relevant to coping with grief for African American family members of homicide victims is limited. This retrospective study was conducted to determine the effects of gender, length of time since death, the traumatic impact of experiencing the homicide of a loved one, and the use of coping strategies to current grief reactions of African American family members of homicide victims (N = 44). Multiple regression analysis results suggest that gender and level of traumatic stress, related to posttraumatic stress symptomatology, predict current symptoms of grief. Women reported higher levels of current grief symptoms than men. Family members of homicide victims who reported higher levels of posttraumatic stress symptomology reported higher levels of current grief. Implications for research and recommendations for practitioners are discussed.

  19. Counselling Adolescents Through Loss, Grief and Trauma Malone Pamela Counselling Adolescents Through Loss, Grief and Trauma 168pp £24.99 Routledge 9780415857055 0415857058 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2016-10-07

    Adolescents experience loss, grief and trauma more often than many adults recognise. Their responses are different from those of children and adults, and they can struggle to share their experiences or express emotions.

  20. Parent Spirituality, Grief, and Mental Health at 1 and 3 Months After Their Infant's/Child's Death in an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, Dawn M.; Youngblut, JoAnne M.; Brooten, Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    Problem The death of an infant/child is one of the most devastating experiences for parents and immediately throws them into crisis. Research on the use of spiritual/religious coping strategies is limited, especially with Black and Hispanic parents after a neonatal (NICU) or pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) death. Purpose The purpose of this longitudinal study was to test the relationships between spiritual/religious coping strategies and grief, mental health (depression and post-traumatic stress disorder) and personal growth for mothers and fathers at 1 (T1) and 3 (T2) months after the infant's/child's death in the NICU/ PICU, with and without control for race/ethnicity and religion. Results Bereaved parents' greater use of spiritual activities was associated with lower symptoms of grief, mental health (depression and post-traumatic stress), but not post-traumatic stress in fathers. Use of religious activities was significantly related to greater personal growth for mothers, but not fathers. Conclusion Spiritual strategies and activities helped parents cope with their grief and helped bereaved mothers maintain their mental health and experience personal growth. PMID:26320884

  1. Narrative reconstruction therapy for prolonged grief disorder—rationale and case study

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Tuvia; Hasson-Ohayon, Ilanit; Garber, Sharon; Tuval-Mashiach, Rivka; Boelen, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged grief disorder (PGD) is a potentially disabling condition affecting approximately 10% of bereaved people. It has been suggested that the impaired integration of the loss memory, as expressed in recurrent memories of the loss and disorganization of memory, is involved in the development of PGD. Narrative reconstruction (NR), originally designed for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in an integrative therapy module, and consisting of exposure to the loss memory, detailed written reconstruction of the loss memory narrative and an elaboration of the personal significance of that memory for the bereaved, has been shown to be effective in the treatment of intrusion symptoms. Objective In light of findings that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), including cognitive restructuring and exposure, is effective in the treatment of PGD, we suggest the implementation of a somewhat novel therapy module, NR, for the treatment of intrusive phenomena in bereaved patients. Method The rationale for the implementation of NR for PGD and a case study of the treatment of a woman suffering from PGD after the death of her father are presented. Therapy took place in a university outpatient training clinic. Results Evaluations conducted before and after treatment and at a 3-month follow-up demonstrated the effectiveness of NR in reducing symptoms of PGD and depression. The analysis of spontaneous narratives recorded before and after treatment showed an increased organization of the narratives. Conclusions This case report demonstrates an adaptation of NR for the treatment of PGD. The results provide preliminary support for the effectiveness of NR for PGD. The significance of the study and its limitations are discussed. Highlights of the article Prolonged grief disorder (PGD) affects approximately ten percent of bereaved people. Narrative Reconstruction (NR), an integrative therapy module originally used for PTSD patients, was adapted for PGD. NR consists

  2. Normal grief and complicated bereavement among traumatized Cambodian refugees: cultural context and the central role of dreams of the dead.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Peou, Sonith; Joshi, Siddharth; Nickerson, Angela; Simon, Naomi M

    2013-09-01

    This article profiles bereavement among traumatized Cambodian refugees and explores the validity of a model of how grief and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) interact in this group to form a unique bereavement ontology, a model in which dreams of the dead play a crucial role. Several studies were conducted at a psychiatric clinic treating Cambodian refugees who survived the Pol Pot genocide. Key findings included that Pol Pot deaths were made even more deeply disturbing owing to cultural ideas about "bad death" and the consequences of not performing mortuary rites; that pained recall of the dead in the last month was common (76 % of patients) and usually caused great emotional and somatic distress; that severity of pained recall of the dead was strongly associated with PTSD severity (r = .62); that pained recall was very often triggered by dreaming about the dead, usually of someone who died in the Pol Pot period; and that Cambodians have a complex system of interpretation of dreams of the deceased that frequently causes those dreams to give rise to great distress. Cases are provided that further illustrate the centrality of dreams of the dead in the Cambodian experiencing of grief and PTSD. The article shows that not assessing dreams and concerns about the spiritual status of the deceased in the evaluation of bereavement results in "category truncation," i.e., a lack of content validity, a form of category fallacy.

  3. Developing a Blended Course on Dying, Loss, and Grief

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Karen; Andreoni, V. Ann; Wilkie, Diana J.; Burgener, Sandra; Buschmann, MaryBeth Tank; Henderson, Gloria; Hsiung, Yi-Fang Yvonne; Zhao, Zhongsheng

    2010-01-01

    An important component of end-of-life education is to provide health professionals with content related to dying, loss, and grief. The authors describe the strategies used to develop and offer a blended course (integration of classroom face-to-face learning with online learning) that addressed the sensitive and often emotional content associated with grieving and bereavement. Using Kolb’s experiential learning theory, a set of 4 online learning modules, with engaging, interactive elements, was created. Course evaluations demonstrated the success of the blended course in comparison to the traditional, exclusive face-to-face approach. PMID:19412055

  4. Peritraumatic Distress and Dissociation in Prolonged Grief and Posttraumatic Stress Following Violent and Unexpected Deaths.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined associations between the violence of a loss and the suddenness of a loss and symptom levels of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after the death of a loved one. A further aim was to investigate whether peritraumatic distress (i.e., fear, helplessness, and horror) and peritraumatic dissociation mediate the emotional impact of violent losses and unexpected losses. We obtained self-reported data from 265 individuals bereaved in the previous 3 years by losses due to violent causes (17%) or illness (83%). Outcomes showed that participants who experienced violent losses (due to homicide, suicide, or accident) reported more PGD symptoms and PTSD symptoms compared to those confronted with illness loss. In this latter group, greater perceived unexpectedness was positively associated with PGD severity and PTSD severity. Multiple mediation analyses showed that the impact of violent loss and unexpectedness of the loss on PGD severity and PTSD severity was fully mediated by peritraumatic distress and dissociation; peritraumatic helplessness and peritraumatic dissociation (but not peritraumatic fear and horror) emerged as unique mediators. Findings suggest that both violent and unexpected losses exacerbate postloss psychopathology, which is at least partially because of such losses yielding more intense acute helplessness and dissociative responses.

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality in a PTSD Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Erika J.; Harrington, Kelly M.; Miller, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric characteristics of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP; Clark, 1996) in 280 individuals who screened positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The SNAP validity, trait, temperament, and personality disorder (PD) scales were compared with scales on the Brief Form of the…

  6. The Separation Anxiety Daily Diary: Child Version--Feasibility and Psychometric Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jennifer L.; Blatter-Meunier, Judith; Ursprung, Antonia; Schneider, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the feasibility and psychometric properties of the child version of the Separation Anxiety Daily Diary (SADD-C) in 125 children (ages 7-14 years) from German-speaking areas of Switzerland. Children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD; n = 58), "other" anxiety disorders (n = 36), and healthy controls (n = 31)…

  7. A Psychometric Evaluation of the CDRS and MADRS in Assessing Depressive Symptoms in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Shailesh; Carmody, Thomas J.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Hughes, Carroll; Bernstein, Ira H.; Morris, David W.; Emslie, Graham J.; Rush, A. John

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study compared the psychometric properties of the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) in children with major depressive disorder. Method: Children (N = 96; ages 8 to 11 years inclusive) with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder were enrolled. Participants…

  8. Utility of a grief services program for medical examiners' offices.

    PubMed

    Berry, Ryan S; Aurelius, Michelle B; Barickman, Nancy; Lathrop, Sarah L

    2013-03-01

    Medical examiner/coroner's (ME/C) offices investigate sudden, violent, and unexpected deaths, leaving those close to the deceased suffering traumatic loss with little in terms of support and counseling. We investigated a grief services program (GSP) at the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator (OMI) to better understand the needs of bereaved individuals, identify the services provided, and propose our findings as a model for others. A total of 1085 contacts occurred over 1 year, with the majority occurring at OMI (60.5%), followed by telephone (23.1%). Support was primarily provided to those suffering a loss due to homicide (28.8%) and suicide (26.1%). The roles grief counselors play in the setting of a GSP and ME/C office are multiple. Given the frequent utilization of OMI's GSP and diverse reasons for visits, it is apparent there is a need for GSPs at ME/C offices, particularly given the traumatic nature of deaths investigated by ME/Cs.

  9. Coping With Loss: Mapping Digital Rituals for the Expression of Grief.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Fiorenza

    2016-11-29

    Although death has been frequently discussed in health communication, there has been a lack of research on coping with loss. Nevertheless, there are many websites and social network sites that offer suggestions to people as to how to cope with loss, including sites for support, sharing of experiences, and expressing grief. This article provides a theoretical understanding of grief by considering it as an emotional experience in terms of how it is expressed, its consequences, and the confrontation between the offline and online grief experience.

  10. Mindfulness-based Intervention for Perinatal Grief after Stillbirth in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lisa R.; Montgomery, Susanne B.

    2015-01-01

    We explored the concept of using a Mindfulness-based intervention to reduce perinatal grief among Indian women. Data were collected using mixed methods to explore concept acceptability, receptivity, modality, and feasibility of the intervention. The intervention was piloted and evaluated with measures of perinatal grief, psychosocial wellbeing, religious coping, perceived social provision of support, and mindfulness. The intervention was well received and effective in teaching skills to help women deal with high levels of grief and subsequent mental health challenges. To overcome attendance barriers modification is necessary. Partnership with a local nursing school is critical to enhance sustainability of the intervention. PMID:25898268

  11. Conducting Simulation Studies in Psychometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Rubright, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation studies are fundamental to psychometric discourse and play a crucial role in operational and academic research. Yet, resources for psychometricians interested in conducting simulations are scarce. This Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement Series (ITEMS) module is meant to address this deficiency by providing a comprehensive…

  12. Impact of a Neonatal-Bereavement-Support DVD on Parental Grief: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Joan L; Smith, Joan R; Yan, Yan; Abram, Nancy; Jeffe, Donna B

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the effect of a neonatal-bereavement-support DVD on parental grief after their baby's death in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit compared with standard bereavement care (controls). Following a neonatal death, the authors measured grief change from a 3- to 12-month follow-up using a mixed-effects model. Intent-to-treat analysis was not significant, but only 18 parents selectively watched the DVD. Thus, we subsequently compared DVD viewers with DVD nonviewers and controls. DVD viewers reported higher grief at 3-month interviews compared with DVD nonviewers and controls. Higher grief at 3 months was negatively correlated with social support and spiritual/religious beliefs. These findings have implications for neonatal-bereavement care.

  13. Parental control, partner dependency, and complicated grief among widowed adults in the community.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeffrey G; Zhang, Baohui; Greer, Joseph A; Prigerson, Holly G

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Yale Bereavement Study, a community-based longitudinal study, were used to investigate the association of 192 widowed individuals' recollections of parenting affection and control during childhood with dependency on the deceased spouse and the development of severe grief symptoms following bereavement. The hypothesis that dependency on the deceased spouse mediates the association of parental affection and control during childhood with the development of severe grief following bereavement was investigated. Findings indicated that a high level of perceived parental control during childhood was associated with elevated levels of dependency on the deceased spouse and with symptoms of complicated grief. Dependency on the deceased spouse mediated the association of perceived parental control with the development of complicated grief following bereavement.

  14. Predictors of husbands' and wives' grief reactions following infant death: the role of marital intimacy.

    PubMed

    Lang, A; Gottlieb, L N; Amsel, R

    1996-01-01

    This follow-up study examined how bereaved couples' grief reactions change over time and how the quality of the marriage can predict these reactions for men and women. A group of 31 bereaved couples who 2 to 4 years earlier had lost an infant ( greater than 20 weeks gestation and less than 1 year of age) were revisited in their home 24 months after the initial home visit. With the exception of somatization, couples' grief reactions were less intense at follow-up than at the initial visit. Overall, husbands experienced less guilt, meaninglessness, yearning, and morbid fear than wives. Both husbands and wives who reported lower levels of marital intimacy soon after the loss experienced more intense grief at follow-up. Finally, couples continued to be vulnerable to a resurgence of grief even years later.

  15. The Unique Impact of Late-Life Bereavement and Prolonged Grief on Diurnal Cortisol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study expands on previous research by examining the effects of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) symptoms and bereavement on diurnal cortisol patterns above and beyond depressive symptomatology. Methods. Drawing on information from 56 depressed older adults, 3 groups were compared: (1) a depressed nonbereaved group, (2) a depressed bereaved without elevated PGD symptoms group, and (3) a depressed bereaved with elevated PGD symptoms group. Multilevel modeling was used to examine differences in diurnal cortisol profiles between these 3 groups, controlling for demographic factors and depressive symptoms. Results. Results revealed that those who were bereaved had more dysregulated cortisol patterns, but PGD symptomatology seemed to have little effect. Subsidiary analysis with just the bereaved participants suggests that those who were recently widowed may have had greater cortisol dysregulation compared with other bereaved individuals in the sample. Discussion. These findings suggest that the circumstance of being bereaved may be associated with more dysregulated cortisol, regardless of PGD symptomatology. This pattern of results might reflect greater disturbance in daily routines among bereaved individuals and acute stress in the case of those experiencing the recent loss of a spouse, which leads to disruption in circadian rhythms and the diurnal cycle of cortisol. PMID:23740094

  16. Grief Reporting: A Print Media Content Analysis of the Gander, Newfoundland Air Disaster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-11

    SUBJXCTTERMS Media; newspaper reporting; Gander, Newfoundland1s. NUMBEROF PAGES disasters; grief reporting; thanatology ; media-military 125...Purpose of Study 2 Statement of the Problem 3 Chapter II Conceptual Framework Crisis and Grief Reporting 11 Thanatology 15 Hypothesis to be Tested 21...reporters, they all set their jobs aside and we talked as people. I really appreciated that.ŕ 6 Thanatology Thanatology , "the secular study of death and

  17. Languages of Grief: a model for understanding the expressions of the bereaved

    PubMed Central

    Corless, Inge B.; Limbo, Rana; Bousso, Regina Szylit; Wrenn, Robert L.; Head, David; Lickiss, Norelle; Wass, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an overview of the key features of the expressions of grief. Grief is a response to loss or anticipated loss. Although universal, its oral and nonverbal expression varies across cultures and individuals. Loss is produced by an event perceived to be negative to varying degrees by the individuals involved and has the potential to trigger long-term changes in a person's cognitions and relationships. The languages used by the bereaved to express grief differ from the language used by professionals, creating dissonance between the two. Data were obtained from English language Medline and CINAHL databases, from professional and personal experiences, interviews with experts, and exploration of cemetery memorials. Blog websites and social networks provided additional materials for further refinement of the model. Content analysis of the materials and agreement by the authors as to the themes resulted in the development of the model. To bridge the gap between professional language and that used by the bereaved, a Languages of Grief model was developed consisting of four Modes of Expression, four Types of Language, plus three Contingent Factors. The Languages of Grief provides a framework for comprehending the grief of the individual, contributing to clinical understanding, and fruitful exploration by professionals in better understanding the use of languages by the bereaved. Attention to the Modes of Expression, Types of Language, and Contingent Factors provides the professional with a richer understanding of the grieving individual, a step in providing appropriate support to the bereaved. The Languages of Grief provides a framework for application to discrete occurrences with the goal of understanding grief from the perspective of the bereaved. PMID:25750773

  18. End-of-life issues: difficult decisions and dealing with grief.

    PubMed

    Loomis, Beth

    2009-06-01

    People face many challenging psychosocial and spiritual issues as they approach the end of their lives, and caregivers need advice on how to help them. Choosing among treatment options, handling grief, addressing unfinished business, and coping with loss of self-sufficiency are difficult for the dying person, and caregivers must deal with surrogate decision making, raw emotions in the patient and in family members, and the caregivers' own grief. Listening and coping skills are discussed.

  19. Graduate students' self assessment of competency in grief education and training in core accredited rehabilitation counseling programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchetti, Richard Jude

    The study examined whether 93 master's level rehabilitation counselor trainees from select Midwestern CORE-accredited schools report having been adequately trained to identify and work with clients who are having grief-related issues from a loss or disability. Using the Grief Counseling Competency Scale (GCCS), participants showed a wide range of scores regarding personal competency related to grief; however, scores tended to be low when examining skills and knowledge relating to grief, with most respondents scoring between "this barely describes me" and "this somewhat describes me." Although presence or history of a disability was found to be related to personal competency, a number of variables were not related, including: gender, age, race/ethnicity, course work in grief theories and grief interventions, practica/internship setting, and attitudes toward people with disabilities. Implications for further research are discussed.

  20. Opportunities for mourning when grief is disenfranchised: descendants of Nazi perpetrators in dialogue with Holocaust survivors.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the concepts of unmourned and disenfranchised grief as a way to understand the experiences of adult children of Nazi perpetrators, who grew up with cultural norms of grieving alone or in silence. The scholarly literature on descendants of Nazis reflects a group unlikely to warrant empathy or support from others because of the stigma surrounding their family's possible involvement in the Holocaust atrocities. This article uses, as a case study approach, the testimony given by Monika Hertwig, the adult daughter of a high ranking Nazi, who appears in the documentary film, Inheritance. From the perspective of disenfranchised grief, defined as grief that is not socially recognized or supported, the article links Monika's testimony with existing research from in-depth interviews with other descendants of Nazis to suggest that, as a group, they lacked permission to grieve their deceased parents, acknowledgment of their grief, and opportunities to mourn. Based on the theory that the effects of grief can be transgenerational, the disenfranchisement experienced by the "children of the Third Reich" does not have to pass to subsequent generations if opportunities for mourning are made possible and some resolution of grief occurs. Studies have shown that ongoing dialogue groups between Holocaust survivors and descendants of Nazis provide opportunities for mourning to both groups.

  1. Tangled up in grief: Bob Dylan's songs of separation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Keverne

    This article argues that much can be learned about the ways in which individuals grieve through a careful analysis of the presentation of loss in creative fiction, especially in terms of unconscious and uncensored responses presented indirectly through figurative language and structural patterns. It takes Bob Dylan's collection of songs about the anguish caused by lost love, Blood on the Tracks, as an example. An examination of the songs included in, and some rejected for, the album reveals developing responses to grief resulting from relationship breakdown, including the search for the absent one and for reconciliation; the intrusion of deep pain into everyday situations; the problem of infidelity and guilt; the attempt to reach a more detached perspective; the consequences of the pain becoming unbearable; and the attempt at a kind of closure. Taken together, the songs reveal how complex and contradictory responses to the agony of loss can be.

  2. Grief consolation in eulogy rhetoric: an integrative framework.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Adrianne Dennis; Dennis, Michael Robert

    2003-01-01

    In an ever more deadly and uncertain world, rhetoric honoring the deceased is still examined as though that was its primary, if not only, function. Some critics of eulogia also identify the consolation of survivors but rarely define it precisely or analyze its rhetorical execution. This article introduces a framework for the critical analysis and production of eulogia that draws from comforting mechanisms recognized in the interpersonal communication, social psychology, and grief therapy literatures. Self-disclosure, problem-focused coping, positive reappraisal, and the affirmation and continuation of relationships with the deceased are shown to inform criticism of five contemporary eulogies. Challenges inherent in the invention and appreciation of eulogy rhetoric are thus illuminated and addressed.

  3. “Prolonged grief disorder” and “persistent complex bereavement disorder”, but not “complicated grief”, are one and the same diagnostic entity: an analysis of data from the Yale Bereavement Study

    PubMed Central

    Maciejewski, Paul K.; Maercker, Andreas; Boelen, Paul A.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2016-01-01

    There exists a general consensus that prolonged grief disorder (PGD), or some variant of PGD, represents a distinct mental disorder worthy of diagnosis and treatment. Nevertheless, confusion remains over whether different names and proposed symptom criteria for this disorder identify the same or different diagnostic entities. This study aimed to determine whether PGD, complicated grief (CG), and persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) as described by the DSM‐5 are substantively or merely semantically different diagnostic entities. Data were derived from the Yale Bereavement Study, a longitudinal community‐based study of bereaved individuals funded by the US National Institute of Mental Health, designed explicitly to evaluate diagnostic criteria for disordered grief. The results suggested that the difference between PGD and PCBD is only semantic. The level of agreement between the original PGD test, a new version of the PGD test proposed for ICD‐11 and the PCBD test was high (pairwise kappa coefficients = 0.80‐0.84). Their estimates of rate of disorder in this community sample were similarly low (∼10%). Their levels of diagnostic specificity were comparably high (95.0‐98.3%). Their predictive validity was comparable. In contrast, the test for CG had only moderate agreement with those for PGD and PCBD; its estimate of rate of disorder was three‐fold higher (∼30%); its diagnostic specificity was poorer, and it had no predictive validity. We conclude that PGD, PCBD and proposed ICD‐11, but not CG, symptom‐diagnostic tests identify a single diagnostic entity. Ultimately, brief symptom‐diagnostic tests, such as the one proposed here for ICD‐11, may have the greatest clinical utility. PMID:27717273

  4. The Effectiveness of Family-Based Cognitive-Behavior Grief Therapy to Prevent Complicated Grief in Relatives of Suicide Victims: The Mediating Role of Suicide Ideation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Marieke; Neeleman, Jan; van der Meer, Klaas; Burger, Huibert

    2010-01-01

    Grief interventions are more effective for high risk individuals. The presence of suicide ideation following suicide bereavement was examined to determine whether it indicates a high risk status. Using data from a randomized controlled trial (n = 122) on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy, the effect of suicide ideation on the…

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Social Responsiveness Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Liu, Li-Ting; Wu, Yu-Yu; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Tsai, Wen-Che

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Social Responsiveness Scale (Chinese SRS). We assessed 1419 grade 1 to grade 8 students from northern Taiwan and 401 clinic-based participants (aged 3-20, male 90.3%). All clinic-based participants were clinically diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs),…

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) in Cypriot Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Anastassiou-Hadjicharalambous, Xenia; Munoz, Luna C.

    2011-01-01

    The Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) is a 38-item self-report questionnaire which measures symptoms of DSM-IV anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. This study examined the psychometric properties of the Greek translation of SCAS in a large community sample of children and adolescents (N = 1,072), aged 12-17 years, in the…

  7. Assessing AD/HD in College Students: Psychometric Properties of the Barkley Self-Report Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladner, Jennifer M.; Schulenberg, Stefan E.; Smith, C. Veronica; Dunaway, Marcella H.

    2011-01-01

    The Barkley Current Symptoms Scale (BCSS)--Self-Report Form was designed to assess attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The purpose of the current study was to add to BCSS psychometric literature in a sample of university students. Comparisons with normative data are provided, and implications for these findings are offered. (Contains 5…

  8. Psychometric Properties of the Caregiver Strain Questionnaire (CGSQ) among Caregivers of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanna, Rahul; Madhavan, S. Suresh; Smith, Michael J.; Tworek, Cindy; Patrick, Julie H.; Becker-Cottrill, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Caregiver Strain Questionnaire (CGSQ) among caregivers of children with autism. The CGSQ was originally developed to assess burden experienced by parents of children and adolescents with serious emotional and behavioral disorders. Study data was collected from 304 primary…

  9. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale--Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Rasmussen, Steven A.; Price, Lawrence H.; Larson, Michael J.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS; Goodman, Price, Rasmussen, Mazure, Delgado, et al., 1989) is acknowledged as the gold standard measure of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptom severity. A number of areas where the Y-BOCS may benefit from revision have emerged in past psychometric studies of the Severity Scale and Symptom…

  10. Psychometric Properties of IRT Proficiency Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.; Tong, Ye

    2010-01-01

    Psychometric properties of item response theory proficiency estimates are considered in this paper. Proficiency estimators based on summed scores and pattern scores include non-Bayes maximum likelihood and test characteristic curve estimators and Bayesian estimators. The psychometric properties investigated include reliability, conditional…

  11. Social and Cultural Factors Associated with Perinatal Grief in Chhattisgarh, India

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lisa R.; Montgomery, Susanne; Lee, Jerry W.; Anderson, Barbara A.

    2017-01-01

    Stillbirth is a globally significant public health problem with many medical causes. There are also indirect causal pathways including social and cultural factors which are particularly salient in India's traditional society. The purpose of this study was to explore women's perceptions of stillbirth and to determine how issues of gender and power, social support, coping efforts, and religious beliefs influence perinatal grief outcomes among poor women in rural Chhattisgarh, India. Structured interviews were done face-to-face in 21 randomly selected villages among women of reproductive age (N = 355) who had experienced stillbirth (n = 178) and compared to those who had not (n = 177), in the Christian Hospital, Mungeli catchment area. Perinatal grief was significantly higher among women with a history of stillbirth. Greater perinatal grief was associated with lack of support, maternal agreement with social norms, and younger maternal age. These predictors must be understood in light of an additional finding—distorted sex ratios, which reflect gender discrimination in the context of Indian society. The findings of this study will allow the development of a culturally appropriate health education program which should be designed to increase social support and address social norms, thereby reducing psychological distress to prevent complicated perinatal grief. Perinatal grief is a significant social burden which impacts the health women. PMID:21956647

  12. Social and cultural factors associated with perinatal grief in Chhattisgarh, India.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lisa R; Montgomery, Susanne; Lee, Jerry W; Anderson, Barbara A

    2012-06-01

    Stillbirth is a globally significant public health problem with many medical causes. There are also indirect causal pathways including social and cultural factors which are particularly salient in India's traditional society. The purpose of this study was to explore women's perceptions of stillbirth and to determine how issues of gender and power, social support, coping efforts, and religious beliefs influence perinatal grief outcomes among poor women in rural Chhattisgarh, India. Structured interviews were done face-to-face in 21 randomly selected villages among women of reproductive age (N=355) who had experienced stillbirth (n=178) and compared to those who had not (n=177), in the Christian Hospital, Mungeli catchment area. Perinatal grief was significantly higher among women with a history of stillbirth. Greater perinatal grief was associated with lack of support, maternal agreement with social norms, and younger maternal age. These predictors must be understood in light of an additional finding-distorted sex ratios, which reflect gender discrimination in the context of Indian society. The findings of this study will allow the development of a culturally appropriate health education program which should be designed to increase social support and address social norms, thereby reducing psychological distress to prevent complicated perinatal grief. Perinatal grief is a significant social burden which impacts the health women.

  13. Perspectives of US Direct Care Workers on the Grief Process of Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Jennifer A.; Abendroth, Maryann

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study explored the grief process of persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (PWIDDs) as perceived by direct care workers (DCWs) and how such workers can guide and support PWIDDs experiencing grief. Materials and Methods: A thematic analysis approach was used to examine data from nine focus groups with 60 DCWs from…

  14. Grief and Personal Growth Experience of Spouses and Adult-Child Caregivers of Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Carol H.; Sanders, Sara; Kelber, Sheryl T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the grief and personal growth experience of spouses and adult children of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias and the factors contributing to these experiences. Design and Methods: We used a modification of the Marwit-Meuser-Sanders Caregiver Grief model to examine the…

  15. College Students' Comfort Level Discussing Death with Faculty and Perceptions of Faculty Support for Grief-Affected Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedman, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Students' comfort discussing death with faculty, views regarding faculty's likelihood to provide accommodations to grief-affected students, and perceived empathy of faculty were assessed. Undergraduate students (n = 371) attending a Midwestern university completed the Student Survey on Grief Issues. Twenty-six percent reported the death of at…

  16. Grief-Processing-Based Psychological Intervention for Children Orphaned by AIDS in Central China: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Xiuyun; Fang, Xiaoyi; Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Chen, Wenrui; Heath, Melissa Allen

    2014-01-01

    A group of 124 children orphaned by AIDS (COA), who resided in two orphanages funded by the Chinese government, participated in a study investigating the efficacy of a grief-processing-based psychological group intervention. This psychological intervention program was designed to specifically help COA process their grief and reduce their…

  17. Tibetan Buddhism and the resolution of grief: the Bardo-thodol for the dying and the grieving.

    PubMed

    Goss, R E; Klass, D

    1997-01-01

    This article is a contribution to the cross-cultural study of grief. The Bardo-thodol (sometimes translated the Tibetan Book of the Dead) and the ritual associated with it provides a way to understand how Buddhism in Tibetan culture manages the issues associated with what is called grief in Western psychology. The resolution of grief in the survivors is intertwined with the journey to rebirth of the deceased. The present article describes (a) the progression of the deceased, (b) the rituals by which survivors separate from the physical incarnation of the deceased, (c) how, by channeling the feelings of grief to support the progress of the deceased, grief is brought to a positive resolution, and (d) the continuing bond survivors maintain with the dead even though the dead has moved on to the next life.

  18. Psychometric properties and factorial structure of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS) in Spanish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Orgilés, Mireia; Spence, Susan H; Marzo, Juan C; Méndez, Xavier; Espada, José P

    2014-01-01

    The Spence Children's Anxiety Scale is an instrument widely applied in the assessment of the most common anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. This study examines its psychometric properties and the factorial structure in a large community sample of Spanish-speaking adolescents (N = 1,374) aged 13 to 17 years. The scale demonstrated strong internal consistency and good convergent and discriminant validity. Factor analysis confirmed the 6-factor original model, providing a good fit of the data for the Spanish sample. The good psychometric properties support its use by clinicians and researchers, adding evidence to the international empirical support for this measure.

  19. Commentary on the Inclusion of Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder in DSM-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boelen, Paul A.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2012-01-01

    The DSM-5 Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorders Work Group has proposed criteria for Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder (PCBRD) for inclusion in the appendix of DSM-5. The authors feel that it is important that dysfunctional grief will become a formal condition in DSM-5 because that would…

  20. Complicated Grief and Associated Risk Factors Among Parents Following a Child’s Death in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Meert, Kathleen L.; Donaldson, Amy E.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick; Berger, John; Zimmerman, Jerry; Anand, K. J. S.; Carcillo, Joseph; Dean, J. Michael; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol; Shear, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the extent of complicated grief symptoms and associated risk factors among parents whose child died in a pediatric intensive care unit. Design Cross-sectional survey conducted by mail and telephone. Setting Seven children’s hospitals affiliated with the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network from January 1, 2006, to June 30, 2008. Participants Two hundred sixty-one parents from 872 families whose child died in a pediatric intensive care unit 6 months earlier. Main Exposure Assessment of potential risk factors, including demographic and clinical variables, and parent psychosocial characteristics, such as attachment style, caregiving style, grief avoidance, and social support. Main Outcome Measure Parent report of complicated grief symptoms using the Inventory of Complicated Grief. Total scale range is from 0 to 76; scores of 30 or higher suggest complicated grief. Results Mean(SD)Inventory of Complicated Grief scores among parents were 33.7 (14.1). Fifty-nine percent of parents (95% confidence interval, 53%–65%) had scores of 30 or higher. Variables independently associated with higher symptom scores in multivariable analysis included being the biological mother or female guardian, trauma as the cause of death, greater attachment-related anxiety and attachment-related avoidance, and greater grief avoidance. Conclusions Parents who responded to our survey experienced a high level of complicated grief symptoms 6 months after their child’s death in the pediatric intensive care unit. However, our estimate of the extent of complicated grief symptoms may be biased because of a high number of nonresponders. Better understanding of complicated grief and its risk factors among parents will allow those most vulnerable to receive professional bereavement support. PMID:21041597

  1. After the death of a friend: Young Men’s grief and masculine identities

    PubMed Central

    Creighton, Genevieve; Oliffe, John L.; Butterwick, Shauna; Saewyc, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Young men can have an uncomfortable relationship with grief. Socially constructed masculine ideals dictate that men be stoic in the aftermath of loss, most often expressing their sadness and despair as anger. Perhaps because of alignment to such masculine ideals little research has been done to explore young men’s grief – and chronicle the ways they think about loss, their responses and how they go about describing their identities after a tragic event. Using qualitative individual interviews and photo elicitation methods, we investigated the ways in which 25 men aged 19–25 grieved the accidental death of a male friend. The study was conducted from April 2010–December 2011. Causes of death were diverse, and included motor vehicle accidents, adventure sports, drug overdose and fights. The findings revealed men’s predominant grief responses as emptiness, anger, stoicism and sentimentality. Participants’ description of their grief responses illustrated the ways in which they struggled to reconcile feelings of vulnerability and manly ideals of strength and stoicism. We gained insight into men’s grief practices by looking at the ways in which they aligned themselves with a post-loss masculine identity. These identities, which included the adventurer, father-figure and the lamplighter, revealed gender-specific processes through which men understood and actively dealt with their tragic loss. The results offer novel insights to men’s grief and identity work that may serve to affirm other men’s experiences as well as guide counselling services targeted to young men. PMID:23517702

  2. Empathy and silence in pastoral care for traumatic grief and loss.

    PubMed

    Capretto, Peter

    2015-02-01

    This paper evaluates silence as a therapeutic practice in pastoral care for traumatic grief and loss. Informed by the history of attachment and mourning theory, its research considers the basic effect that empathy has upon the therapeutic relationship around psychic difference. The study appraises the potential resources and detriments that empathic language may have for the grief process. Offering clinical examples in hospice chaplaincy, it refutes the idea that silence is formulaic tool to be used. It instead offers silence as the acceptance of the limits of empathic language and the affirmation of psychological difference and theological wholeness.

  3. Before Kubler-Ross: lessons about grief from the book of Job.

    PubMed

    Lyon, D S

    2000-07-01

    Medicine is as old as the human species, and medical literature is among the earliest writing. Current research is of great help in identifying new interventions, but a great deal of the art of medicine is showcased in ancient works. The 20th century saw a plethora of books, articles, and monographs on the subjects of grief, death and dying, and suffering, but none of these has provided greater insight than the biblical book of Job. Excerpts from Job illustrate both the nature of grief and appropriate intervention when it is confronted.

  4. Psychometrics behind Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-03-01

    The paper provides a survey of 18 years' progress that my colleagues, students (both former and current) and I made in a prominent research area in Psychometrics-Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). We start with a historical review of the establishment of a large sample foundation for CAT. It is worth noting that the asymptotic results were derived under the framework of Martingale Theory, a very theoretical perspective of Probability Theory, which may seem unrelated to educational and psychological testing. In addition, we address a number of issues that emerged from large scale implementation and show that how theoretical works can be helpful to solve the problems. Finally, we propose that CAT technology can be very useful to support individualized instruction on a mass scale. We show that even paper and pencil based tests can be made adaptive to support classroom teaching.

  5. Physical capability scale: psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Boltz, Marie; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychometric testing of the Basic Physical Capability Scale. The study was a secondary data analysis of combined data sets from three studies. Study participants included 93 older adults, recruited from 2 acute-care settings and 110 older adults living in long-term care facilities. Rasch analysis was used for the testing of the measurement model. There was some support for construct validity based on the fit of the items to the scale across both samples. In addition, there was support for hypothesis testing as physical function was significantly associated with physical capability. There was evidence for internal consistency (Alpha coefficients of .77-.83) and interrater reliability based on an intraclass correlation of .81. This study provided preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the Basic Physical Capability Scale, and guidance for scale revisions and continued use.

  6. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2003-12-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener's task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model's interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed changes

  7. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    PubMed Central

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2010-01-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener’s task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model’s interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed

  8. Negotiating governance in virtual worlds: grief play, hacktivism, and LeakOps in Second Life®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakioğlu, Burcu S.

    2012-12-01

    The acts of transgression in cyberspace have grown in visibility with grief play and griefing in virtual worlds. Briefly defined, griefing is the intentional harassment of other players. This paper argues that in recent years, griefing has developed from a set of trolling practices that manifests itself as offensive language and tasteless pranks into political initiatives with hacktivist undertones. Because the tactical nature of role-playing and gaming provides the anonymity and the cunningness required for hacktivistic initiatives, griefing bears the potential to take part in the transgressive politics of civil disobedience. Arguing that grief play and griefing are tactical uses of media that lead to transgressive politics, this paper will examine the role of such activities in influencing virtual politics. In order to demonstrate how this transformation has occurred, this paper will discuss the birth of vigilante organizations, specifically, that of Justice League Unlimited (JLU), and the operation conducted against them by The Wrong Hands. The said operation, whose intention was to leak JLU's secret papers, Brainiac Wiki, exposed a grid-wide surveillance operation that the vigilante group was conducting in Second Life®.

  9. Long-term Effects of the Family Bereavement Program on Multiple Indicators of Grief in Parentally Bereaved Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Irwin N.; Ma, Yue; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Ayers, Tim S.; Wolchik, Sharlene; Kennedy, Cara L.; Millsap, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This paper reports on results from a randomized experimental trial of the effects of the Family Bereavement Program (FBP) on multiple measures of grief experienced by parentally-bereaved children and adolescents over a six year period of time. Method Participants were 244 youth (ages 8–16, mean age = 11.4 years) from 156 families that had experienced the death of a parent. The sample consisted of 53% boys; ethnicity was 67% non-Hispanic white and 33% ethnic minority. Families were randomly assigned to the FBP (N=135) or a literature control condition (N=109). Two grief measures, the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief (TRIG) and the Intrusive Grief Thoughts Scale (IGTS) were administered at four times over six years, pre-test, post-test, eleven-month and six-year follow-ups. A third measure, an adaptation of the Inventory of Traumatic Grief (ITG) was administered only at the six-year follow-up. Results The FBP showed a greater reduction as compared to controls in their level of problematic grief (IGTS) at post-test and six-year follow-up and in the percent at clinical levels of problematic grief at the post-test. The FBP also reduced scores on a dimension of the ITG, Social Detachment/Insecurity, at six-year follow-up for three subgroups; those who experienced lower levels of grief at program entry, older youth, and boys. Conclusion These are the first findings from a randomized trial with long-term follow-up of the effects of a program to reduce problematic levels of grief of parentally-bereaved youth. PMID:20350025

  10. Grief and older people: the making or breaking of emotional bonds following partner loss in later life.

    PubMed

    Costello, J; Kendrick, K

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this ethnographic study was to explore retrospectively the grief experiences of 12 older people whose partners had recently died in hospital, following a period of terminal illness. The rationale was based upon developing an understanding of the grief experiences of newly bereaved older people. In doing so, it is important to consider that grief is not only shaped by culture and social context but also by the nature of the relationship between the mourner and the deceased. For most of this century, the dominant conceptualization relating to grief and the social experience of bereavement has been based on the psychoanalytical school of thought. This process is said to involve the mourner passing through a number of stages or phases and forms the basis of the 'grief work hypothesis'. Using in-depth ethnographic interviews, the mourner's reactions to and perceptions of the loss were explored. Tape-recorded interview data were analysed using the inductive process of both content analysis and discourse evaluation. The findings from this study shed light on an area of conjugal bereavement that has received little attention in the past and challenges traditional models of grief. The indications are that in the first year of bereavement, the bereaved retain and modify the emotional relationship with their deceased partners, through a range of symbolic behaviours. The discussion raises issues concerning the need to consider the extent to which contemporary conceptualizations of grief explain the reactions of older people whose grief experiences are shaped by their social situation. The study also highlights important issues concerning the need to understand the complexity of grief experiences and bereavement support for older people which has a number of implications for nurses in both hospital and community settings.

  11. Taxonomic Separation of Attention Deficit Disorders and Developmental Reading Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, J. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    The behavior ratings and psychometric profiles of children with attention deficit disorders (ADD) and children with developmental reading disorders (DRD) were compared. DRD children were more impaired in academic attainment and showed evidence of qualitative disturbances in reading and spelling. ADD children showed no qualitative reading or…

  12. Representations of African Americans in the Grief and Mourning Literature from 1998 to 2014: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Granek, Leeat; Peleg-Sagy, Tal

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined representations of African Americans in the grief literature to assess (a) frequencies; (b) content; and (c) use of universalist or a contextualized framework. They conducted searches in 3 databases that target the grief literature published in the last 15 years. Fifty-nine articles met the criteria. There are a small number of studies published on African Americans and these tend to focus on homicide. Many studies had incomplete methods. Comparison studies were common and pathological grief outcomes that were validated on White populations were used as outcome variables with African American participants.

  13. Confirming the Distinctiveness of Complicated Grief from Depression and Anxiety among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillen, Let; Fontaine, Johnny R. J.; Verhofstadt-Deneve, Leni

    2009-01-01

    Studies in adult populations have shown that symptoms of complicated grief (CG) constitute a form of bereavement-related distress distinct from symptoms of depression and anxiety. The purpose of this article is to replicate these findings in two samples of bereaved adolescents by investigating the latent structure of symptoms of CG, anxiety, and…

  14. Understanding Parental Grief as a Response to Mental Illness: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penzo, Jeanine A.; Harvey, Pat

    2008-01-01

    Parents who are raising children with mental illness struggle with feelings of grief and loss. Kubler-Ross' (1969) stages of grieving (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) are examined as experienced by parents raising children with chronic mental illness. Practice implications for social workers who are working with children and…

  15. Disciplinary Wounds: Has Grief become the Identified Patient for a Field Gone Awry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granek, Leeat

    2013-01-01

    In the last few decades, grief and loss research in the psychological domain has focused almost exclusively on its dysfunctional nature. I examine what is underneath these questions about pathology and suggest that our discipline is suffering from an attachment wound where we have dissociated from our historical roots when it comes to the study of…

  16. Continuing Bonds, Risk Factors for Complicated Grief, and Adjustment to Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Nigel P.; Filanosky, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This study examined type of continuing bonds (CB) expression in relation to risk factors for complicated grief and measures of bereavement-related adjustment. Externalized CB expressions involving illusions and hallucinations with the deceased were distinguished from internalized CB expressions involving use of the deceased as an autonomy…

  17. Understanding Funeralization and Post-Funeralization Rituals: The Facilitation of Grief Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Delpha; Bolton, Christopher

    Although thanatologists agree that grieving is essential in adjusting to the loss of a loved one, numerous questions about what facilitates the grieving process remain. To examine the relationship between funeral and post-funeral ritual and grief adjustment, 50 widowed persons (47 females, 3 males) were interviewed and completed two life…

  18. The Winding Valley of Grief: When a Dog Guide Retires or Dies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Katherine Standish

    2005-01-01

    Schools that train dog guides work hard to help their clients bond with their new partners, but during the initial training, little is said about the other end of the process, for example, when it is time to say good-bye. When people return for subsequent dogs, a grief group or individual counseling may be offered, but the focus remains on moving…

  19. Sense-Making, Grief, and the Experience of Violent Loss: Toward a Mediational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currier, Joseph M.; Holland, Jason M.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Bereavement following violent loss by accident, homicide or suicide increases the risk for complications in grieving. This is the first study to examine a constructivist model of grief that proposes that sense-making, or the capacity to construct an understanding of the loss experience, mediates the association between violent death and…

  20. Art Therapy Applications of Dolls in Grief Recovery, Identity, and Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feen-Calligan, Holly; McIntyre, Barbara; Sands-Goldstein, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the history of dollmaking that is relevant to art therapy, and the application of dolls as therapeutic media in clinical and educational settings. The authors describe their experiences using dollmaking in the resolution of grief, in professional identity construction, and in community service. The article addresses the…

  1. Trauma, Grief and Depression in Nairobi Children After the 1998 Bombing of the American Embassy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; North, Carol S.; Doughty, Debby E.; Pfefferbaum, Rose L.; Dumont, Cedric E.; Pynoos, Robert S.; Gurwitch, Robin H.; Ndetei, David

    2006-01-01

    Despite the increasingly dangerous world where trauma and loss are common, relatively few studies have explored traumatic grief in children. The 1998 American Embassy bombing in Nairobi, Kenya, provided an unfortunate opportunity to examine this topic. This report describes findings in 156 children who knew someone killed in the incident, assessed…

  2. Similarities and differences in couples' grief reactions following a miscarriage: results from a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Beutel, M; Willner, H; Deckardt, R; Von Rad, M; Weiner, H

    1996-03-01

    Recent studies have documented grief and depressive reactions in women after a miscarriage. However, the men's reactions to their partner's experience have been neglected. In a controlled follow-up study, 56 couples were studied shortly after the miscarriage, and 6 (N = 47) and 12 months later (N = 45). The participants completed standardized questionnaires for depression, physical complaints, anxiety, and grief. Contrary to commonly held beliefs, men do grieve, but less intensely and enduringly than their partners. The manner in which they experience their grief is similar to that of the women, except that the men cry less and feel less need to talk about it. Unlike the women they do not react with an increased depressive reaction (compared to age- and sex-matched community control groups). Giving up their personal expectations, hopes for, and fantasies about the unborn child is a major source of grieving for both. Some men feel burdened by their wives' grief or depressive reactions. Conflicting reactions may affect the couples' interactions and promote depressive reactions in the women.

  3. Old Pain or New Pain: A Social Psychological Approach to Recurrent Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brabant, Sarah

    1990-01-01

    Draws on work of George Herbert Mead to question premise that acute grief that continues or reoccurs two or more years following loss of loved one is pathological. Suggests that onset of intense pain years after loss may be response to "new" death or loss. (Author/NB)

  4. Do Incarcerated Offenders Experience the Five Stages of Grief as Do Terminally Ill Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pledger, Carolyn Brastow

    1985-01-01

    Examines Kubler-Ross' five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance) as they are experienced not by terminally ill persons, but by 20 criminal offenders and their families during incarceration. Concludes that shock of arrest and incarceration stimulates reactions similar to those of persons coping with terminal diagnosis.…

  5. Grief, Anger, Social Action: Experiences of the Windsor Chapter, Mothers against Drunk Driving (MADD).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroeker, B. J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The experiences of the Windsor, Ontario, Canada, chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), in its development and progress through the grief-anger-social action continuum, are described. This article also portrays a model for problem resolution which emphasizes incorporating the respective strengths and efficiencies of self-help groups and…

  6. Couples at Risk Following the Death of Their Child: Predictors of Grief versus Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijngaards-de Meij, Leoniek; Stroebe, Margaret; Schut, Henk; Stroebe, Wolfgang; van den Bout, Jan; van der Heijden, Peter; Dijkstra, Iris

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the relative impact of major variables for predicting adjustment (in terms of both grief and depression) among bereaved parents following the death of their child. Couples (N = 219) participated 6, 13, and 20 months postloss. Use of multilevel regression analyses enabled assessment of the impact of several…

  7. Suicide Survivors' Mental Health and Grief Reactions: A Systematic Review of Controlled Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sveen, Carl-Aksel; Walby, Fredrik A.

    2008-01-01

    There has been a debate over several decades whether suicide survivors experience more severe mental health consequences and grief reactions than those who have been bereaved through other causes of death. This is the first systematic review of suicide survivors' reactions compared with survivors after other modes of death. Studies were identified…

  8. The Impact of Anticipatory Grief on Caregiver Burden in Dementia Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Caitlin K.; Mast, Benjamin T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Interest in anticipatory grief (AG) has typically focused on terminal diseases such as cancer. However, the issues involved in AG are unique in the context of dementia due to the progressive deterioration of both cognitive and physical abilities. The current study investigated the nature of AG in a sample of dementia caregivers and…

  9. Mourning Child Grief Support Group Curriculum: Preschool Edition. Denny the Duck Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Linda; Jimerson, Shane R.; Gaasch, Ann

    The Mourning Child Preschool grief support curriculum is intended for use with preschool children who have experienced the death of someone special to them. It is designed for use by professionals who work in schools, hospitals, hospices, mental health agencies, or any setting that serves bereaved children. The curriculum contains lesson plans for…

  10. The Daily Life of Complicated Grief Patients--What Gets Missed, What Gets Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Timothy H.; Houck, Patricia R.; Shear, M. Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Many patients with complicated grief suffer severe symptoms for several years after the loss, interfering with daily life. We sought to determine which elements of a patient's daily routine were likely to be missed or added. Sixty-four patients completed a diary each evening for 2 weeks. The diary asked whether each of 13 daily life activities…

  11. Dream Content in Complicated Grief: A Window into Loss-Related Cognitive Schemas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Anne; Shear, Katherine M.; Walsh, Colleen; Buysse, Daniel J.; Monk, Timothy H.; Reynolds, Charles F., III; Frank, Ellen; Silowash, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement and its accompanying psychological response (grief) constitute potent experiences that necessitate the reorganization of cognitive-affective representations of lost significant attachment figures during both wakefulness and dreaming. The goals of this preliminary study were to explore whether the dream content of 77 adults with…

  12. Development and Preliminary Evaluation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Perinatal Grief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Shannon M.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Litz, Brett T.; Boisseau, Christina L.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal loss, typically defined as fetal death beyond 20 weeks gestation through infant death 1-month postpartum, is a potentially traumatizing experience for parents occurring in approximately 1% of births in the United States. Although many women recover, 15% to 25% have enduring grief-related symptomatology and functional impairment.…

  13. Parents' Grief in the Context of Adult Child Mental Illness: A Qualitative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Meg; Cobham, Vanessa; Murray, Judith; McDermott, Brett

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates that parents and other family members often grieve their child or relative's mental illness. This grief appears resultant from a profound sense of loss, which has been described as complicated and nonfinite (e.g., Atkinson in "Am J Psychiatry" 151(8):1137-1139, 1994; Davis and Schultz in "Soc Sci Med" 46(3):369-379, 1998; Jones…

  14. A Systemic Approach to Facilitating Family Grief Resolution Following the Death of a Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charkow, Wendy B.

    This paper provides counselors and other helping professionals with tools for assessment of and intervention in grieving families that have suffered the loss of a child or fetus through illness, accident, violence, or miscarriage. Helping professionals who don't specialize in grief issues can especially benefit from this information, as many…

  15. Fluctuating asymmetry and psychometric intelligence.

    PubMed Central

    Furlow, F B; Armijo-Prewitt, T; Gangestad, S W; Thornhill, R

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic nature of human psychometric intelligence (IQ), but it is widely assumed that IQ's heritability is at loci for intelligence per se. We present evidence consistent with a hypothesis that interindividual IQ differences are partly due to heritable vulnerabilities to environmental sources of developmental stress, an indirect genetic mechanism for the heritability of IQ. Using fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of the body (the asymmetry resulting from errors in the development of normally symmetrical bilateral traits under stressful conditions), we estimated the relative developmental instability of 112 undergraduates and administered to them Cattell's culture fair intelligence test (CFIT). A subsequent replication on 128 students was performed. In both samples, FA correlated negatively and significantly with CFIT scores. We propose two non-mutually exclusive physiological explanations for this correlation. First, external body FA may correlate negatively with the developmental integrity of the brain. Second, individual energy budget allocations and/or low metabolic efficiency in high-FA individuals may lower IQ scores. We review the data on IQ in light of our findings and conclude that improving developmental quality may increase average IQ in future generations. PMID:9265189

  16. Innovative moments in grief therapy: the meaning reconstruction approach and the processes of self-narrative transformation.

    PubMed

    Alves, Daniela; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Baptista, João; Ribeiro, Eugénia; Sousa, Inês; Gonçalves, Miguel M

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have proposed that self-narrative transformation occurs through the elaboration of "Innovative Moments" (IMs), which are alternative experiences to the problematic self-narrative. This study aimed to analyze the emergence of IMs among 6 complicated grief women undergoing grief therapy according to the meaning reconstruction approach and to examine associations of IMs to the severity of grief symptomatology, assessed by the "Inventory of Complicated Grief." Eighty-three sessions were analyzed using the "Innovative Moments Coding System" (IMCS). A generalized linear model analysis (GLM) showed a significant association between the emergence of IMs and the interaction between time and symptomatic improvement, indicating a higher rate of IM production over time in cases with better clinical outcomes. These results reinforce IMs' relevance in studying narrative change among cases with distinct clinical progressions.

  17. Assessing Readiness for Change in Adolescents with Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Josie; Brown, Krista E.; Zaitsoff, Shannon L.; Menna, Rosanne; Bates, Mollie E.; Dunn, Erin C.

    2008-01-01

    The Readiness and Motivation Interview (RMI) is a semistructured interview measure of readiness and motivation to change that can be used for all eating disorder diagnoses. The RMI has demonstrated excellent psychometric properties and has both clinical and predictive utility in adult samples. This study examined the psychometric properties of the…

  18. Psychometric properties of the modified Symptom Severity Index (SSI)

    PubMed Central

    Nixdorf, Donald R.; John, Mike T.; Wall, Melanie M.; Fricton, James R.; Schiffman, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the modified Symptom Severity Index were investigated to assess the relationships among dimensions of pain in temporomandibular disorders. The 15-item instrument is composed of ordinal scales assessing five pain dimensions (intensity, frequency, duration, unpleasantness, and difficulty to endure) as experienced in three locations (temple, temporomandibular joint, masseter). In 108 closed-lock subjects, Cronbach’s alpha was used to measure internal consistency resulting in 31 of the 105 pair-wise comparisons ≥0.71. Multilevel exploratory factor analysis was used to assess dimensionality between items. Two factors emerged, termed temple pain and jaw pain. The jaw pain factor comprised the temporomandibular joint and masseter locations, indicating that subjects did not differentiate between these two locations. With further analysis, the jaw pain factor could be separated into temporal aspects of pain (frequency, duration) and affective dimensions (intensity, unpleasantness, endurability). Temple pain could not be further reduced; this may have been influenced by concurrent orofacial pains such as headache. Internal consistency was high, with alphas ≥0.92 for scales associated with all factors. Excellent test-retest reliability was found for repeat testing at 2–48 hours in 55 subjects (ICC=0.97, 95%CI 0.96–0.99). In conclusion, the modified Symptom Severity Index has excellent psychometric properties for use as an instrument to measure pain in subjects with temporomandibular disorders. The most important characteristic of this pain is location, while the temporal dimensions are important for jaw pain. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and assess relationships between dimensions of pain as experienced in other chronic pain disorders. PMID:19889036

  19. Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire-Brief Revised: psychometric replication and extension.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Dallas A; Cohen, Alex S; Matthews, Russell A; Dinzeo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The psychometric screening and detection of schizotypy through the use of concise self-report assessment instruments such as the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire-Brief Revised (SPQ-BR; Cohen, Matthews, Najolia, & Brown, 2010) enables an expeditious identification of individuals at putatively elevated risk to develop schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Using 2 large, culturally diverse, independent samples, this study expanded the psychometric evaluation of this instrument by presenting a series of confirmatory factor analyses; reviewing internal consistency reliabilities; and evaluating the construct validity of the scale by way of examining group differences in SPQ-BR scores between individuals with and without self-reported family histories of schizophrenia. The results indicate a 2-tier factor solution of the measure and indicate strong internal reliability for the scale. Findings regarding construct validity of the SPQ-BR are more variable with the Cognitive-Perceptual Deficits superordinate factor receiving the strongest evidentiary support. Limitations of this study and directions for future research are discussed.

  20. "DSM-5" and Bereavement: The Loss of Normal Grief?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jesse; Jones, K. Dayle

    2013-01-01

    The mood disorder work group has proposed to eliminate the bereavement exclusion criterion from the diagnosis of major depression in the 5th edition of the American Psychiatric Association's (2012) "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders." The proposal would break tradition with the long-held distinction between…

  1. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Children's Negative Cognitive Error Questionnaire with a Clinically Depressed Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingery, Julie Newman; Kepley, Hayden O.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Walkup, John T.; Silva, Susan G.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Reinecke, Mark A.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The factor structure and psychometric properties of the Children's Negative Cognitive Error Questionnaire (CNCEQ) were examined with 427 adolescents ages 12 to 18 (193 boys) with current major depressive disorder. Results of confirmatory factor analysis supported a four-factor model comprised of three content area factors (i.e., social, academic,…

  2. Psychometric properties of the Child Anxiety Life Interference Scale (CALIS).

    PubMed

    Lyneham, Heidi J; Sburlati, Elizabeth S; Abbott, Maree J; Rapee, Ronald M; Hudson, Jennifer L; Tolin, David F; Carlson, Sarah E

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the development and psychometric evaluation of a parent and child report measure of life interference and impairment associated with childhood anxiety, the Child Anxiety Life Interference Scale (CALIS). The CALIS is designed to measure life interference and impairment experienced by the child from the child (9 items) and parent (16 items) point of view and also the interference experienced by the parent in their own life. A total of 622 children between 6 and 17 years of age, and their parents, completed the CALIS. Results indicated that the CALIS has good internal consistency, moderate-to-high test re-test reliability, significant inter rater reliability, good convergent and divergent validity and is sensitive to treatment change. The CALIS is a reliable and valid tool for the assessment of life interference and impairment associated with anxiety disorders in childhood.

  3. Constructions of Mexican American family grief after the death of a child: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Doran, Gerry; Downing Hansen, Nancy

    2006-04-01

    Using a collective case study ethnographic approach, nine individuals comprising three Mexican American families were interviewed about their family bereavement experiences after the death of a child. All families were Catholic, had surviving siblings, and had had three or more years to grieve their loss when interviewed. The deceased children ranged in age from 3 to 14, and all experienced sudden, traumatic, nonsuicide deaths. To provide a broader, contextual picture of their grief experiences, four individuals who supported these family members after the loss were also interviewed. Unique grief experiences were identified, and eight common themes emerged, reflecting the ways in which family members maintained their bond to the deceased: dreams, storytelling, keepsakes, sense of presence, faith-based connections, proximity connections, ongoing rituals, and pictorial remembrances. The cultural implications of family bereavement are highlighted.

  4. Disenfranchised grief following African American Homicide loss: an inductive case study.

    PubMed

    Piazza-Bonin, Elizabeth; Neimeyer, Robert A; Burke, Laurie A; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E; Young, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Disenfranchised grief is experienced when a mourner's grief response is socially invalidated, unacknowledged, or discouraged. When the circumstances of death or the emotional reactions of the griever violate social norms, empathic failures can occur within the bereaved individual's support systems. This study used conventional content analysis, an intensive and inductive qualitative research method, to analyze the experience of one African American woman who lost her only son to homicide, a particularly distressing and marginalized form of loss. Results elucidate both the empathic failings and resiliencies within the social systems of this griever and emerged from the perspectives offered by the bereaved mother and her primary supporter. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  5. Let me hear of your mercy in the mourning: forgiveness, grief, and continuing bonds.

    PubMed

    Gassin, Elizabeth A; Lengel, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Clarity about the utility of continuing bonds (CB) continues to be evasive in the research. In 2 different correlational studies, the authors explored the relationship between CB and 2 other variables: 1 representing mental health (forgiveness of the deceased) and the other representing psychological distress (prolonged grief). Although researchers have addressed the latter relationship in the literature, assessing the relationship between CB and forgiveness has not been undertaken. Results suggest that forgiveness in general, and affective aspects of forgiveness in particular, predict psychological forms of CB. Results related to grief depended on how CB was assessed. These findings provide evidence of the relative health of certain types of relationship with deceased persons and also suggest that forgiveness interventions may be a way of promoting such healthy bonds.

  6. Forgotten grievers: an exploration of the grief experiences of bereaved grandparents (part 2).

    PubMed

    Gilrane-McGarry, Ursula; O Grady, Tom

    2012-04-01

    The death of a child is a traumatic family life event. Although parental bereavement has received substantial attention, little research has focused on the grief experiences of bereaved grandparents. The aims of this Irish national study were to identify and describe the bereavement experiences of grandparents following the death of their grandchild and to explore their needs and supports throughout. A previous paper provided background to the study, covered the methods used in depth, and presented one of the three key findings: 'cumulative pain'. The present paper discusses the remaining two findings: factors that facilitate and factors that inhibit the resolution of the cumulative pain. Several factors were perceived by the bereaved grandparents as being either helpful or unhelpful in easing the pain of their grief. Among these were acknowledgment of the deceased grandchild and the grandparents themselves, the relationship with the bereaved son or daughter, family dynamics, and support mechanisms.

  7. The Influence of Anxiety Sensitivity on a Wish to Die in Complicated Grief.

    PubMed

    Baker, Amanda W; Goetter, Elizabeth M; Bui, Eric; Shah, Riva; Charney, Meredith E; Mauro, Christine; Shear, M Katherine; Simon, Naomi M

    2016-04-01

    Individuals with complicated grief are at elevated risk of suicidal thoughts. Anxiety sensitivity has recently emerged as a risk factor of suicide. This study aimed to investigate a possible association between anxiety sensitivity and a wish to die in individuals with complicated grief. Participants were evaluated for participation in a treatment study and completed an ancillary questionnaire-based study. Participants were 51 bereaved adults evaluated (age: mean, 54 [SD, 13.6] years; 78% [n = 40] women). Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and a wish to die. Overall, anxiety sensitivity was associated with a wish to die at the level of a medium effect size, although it did not reach statistical significance. The anxiety sensitivity social concerns subscale was significantly associated with a wish to die. These findings add to a growing literature implicating anxiety sensitivity in reporting a wish to die.

  8. African American homicide bereavement: aspects of social support that predict complicated grief, PTSD, and depression.

    PubMed

    Burke, Laurie A; Neimeyer, Robert A; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E

    2010-01-01

    Psychological adaptation following homicide loss is challenged not only by the violent nature of the death itself but also by the bereaved's relationships with would-be supporters. Recruiting a sample of 54 African-American homicidally bereaved individuals, we examined perceived and actual support, the size of the support network, family versus non-family support, and number of negative relationships to gauge the role of social support in bereavement outcomes such as complicated grief, PTSD, and depression. Results of quantitative assessments revealed that size of available network, quantity of negative relationships, and levels of grief-specific support were correlated with bereavement outcome. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research on the role of social support in adaptation of African Americans to traumatic loss are discussed.

  9. Complicated Grief Treatment for older adults: The critical role of a supportive person.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ilsung

    2016-10-30

    In the wake of the increased interest in treatment for complicated grief (CG) symptoms, research has reported the promising effect of CG treatment (CGT) on CG symptoms. This study compared CGT with supportive counseling (SC) in terms of improvement in CG symptoms. A randomized trial design was used to compare the effectiveness of CGT with that of SC in treating CG symptoms, depressive symptoms, and social impairments. The primary outcome was the Inventory of Complicated Grief. Relative to SC, CGT resulted in improved CG symptoms and depressive symptoms. Among those receiving CGT, participants with a supportive person in their sessions showed more beneficial results in CG and depressive symptoms than those without a supportive person did. This suggests that CGT is superior to SC in reducing CG symptoms and depressive symptoms, and in improving work and social functions during bereavement. Moreover, having a supportive person plays a critical role in the effectiveness of CGT sessions.

  10. The development and psychometric validation of the central sensitization inventory.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Tom G; Neblett, Randy; Cohen, Howard; Howard, Krista J; Choi, Yun H; Williams, Mark J; Perez, Yoheli; Gatchel, Robert J

    2012-04-01

    Central sensitization (CS) has been proposed as a common pathophysiological mechanism to explain related syndromes for which no specific organic cause can be found. The term "central sensitivity syndrome (CSS)" has been proposed to describe these poorly understood disorders related to CS. The goal of this investigation was to develop the Central Sensitization Inventory (CSI), which identifies key symptoms associated with CSSs and quantifies the degree of these symptoms. The utility of the CSI, to differentiate among different types of chronic pain patients who presumably have different levels of CS impairment, was then evaluated. Study 1 demonstrated strong psychometric properties (test-retest reliability = 0.817; Cronbach's alpha = 0.879) of the CSI in a cohort of normative subjects. A factor analysis (including both normative and chronic pain subjects) yielded 4 major factors (all related to somatic and emotional symptoms), accounting for 53.4% of the variance in the dataset. In Study 2, the CSI was administered to 4 groups: fibromyalgia (FM); chronic widespread pain without FM; work-related regional chronic low back pain (CLBP); and normative control group. Analyses revealed that the patients with FM reported the highest CSI scores and the normative population the lowest (P < 0.05). Analyses also demonstrated that the prevalence of previously diagnosed CSSs and related disorders was highest in the FM group and lowest in the normative group (P < 0.001). Taken together, these 2 studies demonstrate the psychometric strength, clinical utility, and the initial construct validity of the CSI in evaluating CS-related clinical symptoms in chronic pain populations. 

  11. Dealing with stress, burnout, and grief in the practice of oncology.

    PubMed

    Lyckholm, L

    2001-12-01

    There is a substantial amount of published work describing how to help patients and families deal with stress, grief, and loss, but there is much less advice available for clinicians dealing with similar issues. Working as an oncologist is inherently difficult, and racked by emotional and psychological traumas. However, it can also be tremendously rewarding. In this review, I discuss the extent of stress and burnout in the practice of oncology, its causes and manifestations, and strategies for overcoming it.

  12. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  13. Psychometric Intelligence Dissociates Implicit and Explicit Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebauer, Guido F.; Mackintosh, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that performance on implicit learning tasks is unrelated to psychometric intelligence was examined in a sample of 605 German pupils. Performance in artificial grammar learning, process control, and serial learning did not correlate with various measures of intelligence when participants were given standard implicit instructions.…

  14. Psychometric Measurement Models and Artificial Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sese, Albert; Palmer, Alfonso L.; Montano, Juan J.

    2004-01-01

    The study of measurement models in psychometrics by means of dimensionality reduction techniques such as Principal Components Analysis (PCA) is a very common practice. In recent times, an upsurge of interest in the study of artificial neural networks apt to computing a principal component extraction has been observed. Despite this interest, the…

  15. Psychometric Evaluation of the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duan, Wenjie; Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Bai, Yu; Tang, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Chinese Virtues Questionnaire (CVQ). The reliability, factor structure, construct validity, and temporal stability of the inventory were examined. Method: A university student sample ("n" = 878) and a working adult sample ("n" = 153) were recruited.…

  16. What Is Embodiment? A Psychometric Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Matthew R.; Schuur, Friederike; Kammers, Marjolein P. M.; Tsakiris, Manos; Haggard, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    What is it like to have a body? The present study takes a psychometric approach to this question. We collected structured introspective reports of the rubber hand illusion, to systematically investigate the structure of bodily self-consciousness. Participants observed a rubber hand that was stroked either synchronously or asynchronously with their…

  17. Automated Essay Scoring: Psychometric Guidelines and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramineni, Chaitanya; Williamson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of psychometric procedures and guidelines Educational Testing Service (ETS) uses to evaluate automated essay scoring for operational use. We briefly describe the e-rater system, the procedures and criteria used to evaluate e-rater, implications for a range of potential uses of e-rater, and directions for…

  18. Psychometric Analysis of the Appreciative Advising Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crone, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    The Appreciative Advising Inventory is an instrument created for use in academic advising. The inventory helps the advisor get to know and understand the student, which in turn allows the advisor to better assist the student. This research provides a psychometric analysis of the Appreciative Advising Inventory to measure its validity and…

  19. Emotional Considerations in Spasmodic Dysphonia: Psychometric Quantification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannito, Michael P.

    1991-01-01

    This study examined emotional characteristics of 18 female spasmodic dysphonic subjects in comparison to matched normal controls across psychometric measures of depression, anxiety, and somatic complaints. Statistically significant differences were noted between groups for all measures and over half of the dysphonic subjects exhibited clinically…

  20. Occupation and Income Related to Psychometric "g".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyborg, Helmuth; Jensen, Arthur R.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the regressions of occupational status and income on psychometric "g" factor scores in large samples of white (n=3,484) and black (n=493) U.S. armed forces veterans in their late 30s. Results indicate that, for both job status and income, whites were relatively more disadvantaged when the level of "g" is taken into…

  1. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Neck Disability Index and Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale for patients with neck pain due to degenerative and discopathic disorders. Psychometric properties of the Polish versions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Even though there are several region-specific functional outcome questionnaires measuring neck disorders that have been developed in English-speaking countries, no Polish version has ever been validated. The purpose of our study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale (CDS) for Polish-speaking patients with neck pain. Methods The translation was carried out according to the International Quality of Life Association (IQOLA) Project. Sixty patients were treated due to degenerative and discopathic disorders in the cervical spine filled out the NDI-PL and the CDS-PL. The pain level was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale. The mean age of the assessed group was 47.1 years (SD 8.9). We used Cronbach's alpha to assess internal consistency. We assessed the test-retest reliability using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs). The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rS) was used to determine dependency between quantitative characteristics. The Mann-Whitney test was applied to determine dependency between quantitative and qualitative characteristics. Results The Cronbach's alpha values were excellent for the NDI-PL in the test and in the retest (0.84, 0.85, respectively), and for the CDS-PL (0.90 in the test and in the retest). Intraclass Correlation Coefficients were excellent for the CDS-PL and NDI-PL and equalled 0.93 (95% CI from 0.89 to 0.95) and 0.87 (95% CI from 0.80 to 0.92), respectively The concurrent validity was good in the test and in the retest (rs = 0.42 p < 0.001; rs = 0.40 p = 0.002, respectively) for NDI-PL and for CDS-PL (rs = 0.42 p < 0.001; rs = 0.40 p = 0.001, respectively). The adapted questionnaires showed a strong inter-correlation both in the test (0.87 p < 0.001) and in the retest (0.79 p < 0.001). Conclusions The present versions of the NDI-PL and CDS-PL, the first to be published in Polish, have proven to be reliable and valid for

  2. Psychometric Properties of "Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences": Review and Meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Mark, Winifred; Toulopoulou, Timothea

    2016-01-01

    The Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) has been used extensively as a measurement for psychosis proneness in clinical and research settings. However, no prior review and meta-analysis have comprehensively examined psychometric properties (reliability and validity) of CAPE scores across different studies. To study CAPE's internal reliability--ie, how well scale items correlate with one another--111 studies were reviewed. Of these, 18 reported unique internal reliability coefficients using data at hand, which were aggregated in a meta-analysis. Furthermore, to confirm the number and nature of factors tapped by CAPE, 17 factor analytic studies were reviewed and subjected to meta-analysis in cases of discrepancy. Results suggested that CAPE scores were psychometrically reliable--ie, scores obtained could be attributed to true score variance. Our review of factor analytic studies supported a 3-factor model for CAPE consisting of "Positive", "Negative", and "Depressive" subscales; and a tripartite structure for the Negative dimension consisting of "Social withdrawal", "Affective flattening", and "Avolition" subdimensions. Meta-analysis of factor analytic studies of the Positive dimension revealed a tridimensional structure consisting of "Bizarre experiences", "Delusional ideations", and "Perceptual anomalies". Information on reliability and validity of CAPE scores is important for ensuring accurate measurement of the psychosis proneness phenotype, which in turn facilitates early detection and intervention for psychotic disorders. Apart from enhancing the understanding of psychometric properties of CAPE scores, our review revealed questionable reporting practices possibly reflecting insufficient understanding regarding the significance of psychometric properties. We recommend increased focus on psychometrics in psychology programmes and clinical journals.

  3. Psychometric Properties of “Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences”: Review and Meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Winifred; Toulopoulou, Timothea

    2016-01-01

    The Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) has been used extensively as a measurement for psychosis proneness in clinical and research settings. However, no prior review and meta-analysis have comprehensively examined psychometric properties (reliability and validity) of CAPE scores across different studies. To study CAPE’s internal reliability—ie, how well scale items correlate with one another—111 studies were reviewed. Of these, 18 reported unique internal reliability coefficients using data at hand, which were aggregated in a meta-analysis. Furthermore, to confirm the number and nature of factors tapped by CAPE, 17 factor analytic studies were reviewed and subjected to meta-analysis in cases of discrepancy. Results suggested that CAPE scores were psychometrically reliable—ie, scores obtained could be attributed to true score variance. Our review of factor analytic studies supported a 3-factor model for CAPE consisting of “Positive”, “Negative”, and “Depressive” subscales; and a tripartite structure for the Negative dimension consisting of “Social withdrawal”, “Affective flattening”, and “Avolition” subdimensions. Meta-analysis of factor analytic studies of the Positive dimension revealed a tridimensional structure consisting of “Bizarre experiences”, “Delusional ideations”, and “Perceptual anomalies”. Information on reliability and validity of CAPE scores is important for ensuring accurate measurement of the psychosis proneness phenotype, which in turn facilitates early detection and intervention for psychotic disorders. Apart from enhancing the understanding of psychometric properties of CAPE scores, our review revealed questionable reporting practices possibly reflecting insufficient understanding regarding the significance of psychometric properties. We recommend increased focus on psychometrics in psychology programmes and clinical journals. PMID:26150674

  4. Treating Trauma and Traumatic Grief in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith, A.; Mannarino, Anthony, P.; Deblinger, Esther

    2006-01-01

    This is one of the first books to present a systematic treatment approach, grounded in cognitive-behavioral therapy, for traumatized children and their families. Provided is a comprehensive framework for assessing posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, and other symptoms; developing a flexible, individualized treatment plan; and…

  5. Predictors of Complicated Grief after a Natural Disaster: A Population Study Two Years after the 2004 South-East Asian Tsunami

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristensen, Pal; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined predictors of complicated grief (CG) in Norwegians 2 years after bereavement in the 2004 South-East Asian tsunami. A cross-sectional postal survey retrospectively covering disaster experiences and assessing CG according to the Inventory of Complicated Grief yielded 130 respondents (35 directly disaster-exposed and 95 not…

  6. Adult separation anxiety: psychometric properties of a new structured clinical interview.

    PubMed

    Cyranowski, Jill M; Shear, M Katherine; Rucci, Paola; Fagiolini, Andrea; Frank, Ellen; Grochocinski, Victoria J; Kupfer, David J; Banti, Susanna; Armani, Antonella; Cassano, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Separation anxiety has traditionally been characterized and assessed as a disorder that is unique to childhood. Yet the core symptoms of separation anxiety, i.e. excessive and often disabling distress when faced with actual or perceived separation from major attachment figures, may persist or even arise during adulthood. We report on the psychometric properties of a new structured clinical interview designed to assess symptoms of separation anxiety as experienced both during childhood and adulthood. This instrument, called the Structured Clinical Interview for Separation Anxiety Symptoms (or SCI-SAS), was administered as part of an assessment battery to 91 adult psychiatric outpatients and 20 non-psychiatric controls. Results indicate that this instrument displays excellent psychometric properties, including good internal consistency, a clear factor structure, and exceptional levels of convergent and discriminate validity. These results highlight the feasibility and potential clinical utility of assessing age-appropriate symptoms of separation anxiety experienced during adulthood.

  7. Psychometric properties of an innovative self-report measure: The Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults

    PubMed Central

    Caballo, Vicente E.; Arias, Benito; Salazar, Isabel C.; Irurtia, María Jesús; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the psychometric properties of a new measure of social anxiety, the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for adults (SAQ), composed of 30 items that were developed based on participants from 16 Latin American countries, Spain, and Portugal. Two groups of participants were included in the study: a non-clinical group involving 18,133 persons and a clinical group comprising 334 patients with a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (social phobia). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a 5-factor structure of the questionnaire. The factors were labeled: 1) Interactions with strangers, 2) Speaking in public/talking with people in authority, 3) Interactions with the opposite sex, 4) Criticism and embarrassment, and 5) Assertive expression of annoyance, disgust or displeasure. Psychometric evidence supported the internal consistency, convergent validity, and measurement invariance of the SAQ. To facilitate clinical applications, a ROC analysis identified cut scores for men and women for each factor and for the global score. PMID:25774643

  8. Psychometric properties of an innovative self-report measure: The Social Anxiety Questionnaire for adults.

    PubMed

    Caballo, Vicente E; Arias, Benito; Salazar, Isabel C; Irurtia, María Jesús; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the psychometric properties of a new measure of social anxiety, the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for adults (SAQ), composed of 30 items that were developed based on participants from 16 Latin American countries, Spain, and Portugal. Two groups of participants were included in the study: a nonclinical group involving 18,133 persons and a clinical group comprising 334 patients with a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (social phobia). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a 5-factor structure of the questionnaire. The factors were labeled as follows: (1) Interactions with strangers, (2) Speaking in public/talking with people in authority, (3) Interactions with the opposite sex, (4) Criticism and embarrassment, and (5) Assertive expression of annoyance, disgust, or displeasure. Psychometric evidence supported the internal consistency, convergent validity, and measurement invariance of the SAQ. To facilitate clinical applications, a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis identified cut scores for men and women for each factor and for the global score.

  9. Panic disorder in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Beitman, B D

    1992-05-27

    Several lines of investigation strongly support the notion that panic disorder afflicts at least one third of patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries and unexplained chest pain. Panic disorder is a common problem, affecting 1-2% of the U.S. population. Current research suggests an etiology that is both psychophysiologic and cognitive. The locus ceruleus and cortico-releasing factor are implicated in the biological circuit associated with panic attacks, while psychological research indicates that catastrophic thinking, phobic responses to somatic sensations, and repressed anger, grief, and traumatic events play a part in triggering attacks. Treatment consists of pharmacologic interventions, including antidepressants and benzodiazepines, as well as psychotherapeutic work focusing on catastrophic thinking and repressed anger, grief responses, and other traumatic experiences.

  10. The Alliance Negotiation Scale: A psychometric investigation.

    PubMed

    Doran, Jennifer M; Safran, Jeremy D; Muran, J Christopher

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the utility and psychometric properties of a new measure of psychotherapy process, the Alliance Negotiation Scale (ANS; Doran, Safran, Waizmann, Bolger, & Muran, 2012). The ANS was designed to operationalize the theoretical construct of negotiation (Safran & Muran, 2000), and to extend our current understanding of the working alliance concept (Bordin, 1979). The ANS was also intended to improve upon existing measures such as the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI; Horvath & Greenberg, 1986, 1989) and its short form (WAI-S; Tracey & Kokotovic, 1989) by expanding the emphasis on negative therapy process. The present study investigates the psychometric validity of the ANS test scores and interpretation-including confirming its original factor structure and evaluating its internal consistency and construct validity. Construct validity was examined through the ANS' convergence and divergence with several existing scales that measure theoretically related constructs. The results bolster and extend previous findings about the psychometric integrity of the ANS, and begin to illuminate the relationship between negotiation and other important variables in psychotherapy research. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Measuring Anhedonia in Adolescents: A Psychometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Sussman, Steve; Volk, Healther E.; Strong, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia—the reduced capacity to experience pleasure—is a trait implicated in mental and physical health. Yet, psychometric data on anhedonia measures in adolescents are absent. We conducted an in-depth psychometric analysis of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS; Snaith et al., 1995)—a self-report measure of anticipated pleasure response to 14 pleasant experiences—in adolescents. Adolescents (N=585; M age=14.5) completed the SHAPS and other paper-and-pencil surveys. Item response theory models were used to evaluate the psychometric performance of each SHAPS item. Correlations of the SHAPS with other personality and psychopathology measures were calculated to evaluate construct validity. Results showed that: (1) certain items (e.g., reported pleasure from basic experiences like “seeing smiling faces” or “smelling flowers”) provided more information about latent anhedonia than others; and (2) SHAPS scales exhibited construct-consistent convergent and discriminant validity (i.e., stronger correlations with low positive affect constructs; weaker correlations with negative affect). Reporting diminished pleasure from basic pleasant experiences accurately indicates adolescent anhedonia, which is important for future scale development and understanding the phenomenology of anhedonia in teens. These data support using the SHAPS for assessing anhedonia in epidemiological research and school-based universal prevention programming in general adolescent populations. PMID:25893676

  12. Measuring Anhedonia in Adolescents: A Psychometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Unger, Jennifer B; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Sussman, Steve; Volk, Heather E; Strong, David R

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia-the reduced capacity to experience pleasure-is a trait implicated in mental and physical health. Yet, psychometric data on anhedonia measures in adolescents are absent. We conducted an in-depth psychometric analysis of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS; Snaith et al., 1995 )-a self-report measure of anticipated pleasure response to 14 pleasant experiences-in adolescents. Adolescents (N = 585, M age = 14.5) completed the SHAPS and other paper-and-pencil surveys. Item response theory models were used to evaluate the psychometric performance of each SHAPS item. Correlations of the SHAPS with other personality and psychopathology measures were calculated to evaluate construct validity. Results showed that (a) certain items (e.g., reported pleasure from basic experiences like "seeing smiling faces" or "smelling flowers") provided more information about latent anhedonia than others; and (b) SHAPS scales exhibited construct-consistent convergent and discriminant validity (i.e., stronger correlations with low positive affect constructs, weaker correlations with negative affect). Reporting diminished pleasure from basic pleasant experiences accurately indicates adolescent anhedonia, which is important for future scale development and understanding the phenomenology of anhedonia in teens. These data support using the SHAPS for assessing anhedonia in epidemiological research and school-based universal prevention programming in general adolescent populations.

  13. The Desire Thinking Questionnaire: development and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Gabriele; Spada, Marcantonio M

    2011-11-01

    Desire thinking is a voluntary cognitive process involving verbal and imaginal elaboration of a desired target. Recent research has highlighted the role of desire thinking in the maintenance of addictive, eating and impulse control disorders. The goal of this research project was to develop the first self-report measure of desire thinking. In Study 1 we constructed the Desire Thinking Questionnaire (DTQ) and conducted a preliminary factor analysis which identified two factors. The first factor concerned the perseveration of verbal thoughts about desire-related content and experience and was named 'Verbal Perseveration'. The second factor concerned the tendency to prefigure images about desire-related content and experience and was named 'Imaginal Prefiguration'. In Study 2 we performed a confirmatory factor analysis which provided support for this two factor solution, with both factors achieving adequate internal consistency. Divergent validity was also established through correlation analyses. In Study 3 the temporal stability of the DTQ was examined and confirmed. Finally, in Study 4, the predictive validity of the DTQ in a sample of alcohol abusers was investigated. The DTQ was shown to possess good psychometric properties, as well as divergent and predictive validity. This self-report measure may aid future research into desire thinking and craving, as well as facilitate assessment and case formulation within the context of addictive, eating and impulse control disorders.

  14. Complicated grief and depression in young adults: personality and relationship quality.

    PubMed

    Mash, Holly B Herberman; Fullerton, Carol S; Shear, M Katherine; Ursano, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    Young adults experience problematic responses to loss more often than is commonly recognized. Few empirical studies have examined the contribution of intrapersonal and interpersonal characteristics to grief and depression in bereaved young adults. This study investigated the association of dependency and quality of the relationship with the deceased (i.e., depth and conflict) with complicated grief (CG) and depression. Participants were 157 young adults aged 17 to 29 years who experienced loss of a family member or close friend within the past 3 years (mean = 1.74 years). Participants completed the Inventory of Complicated Grief, Beck Depression Inventory, Depth and Conflict subscales of the Quality of Relationships Inventory, and the Dependency subscale of the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire. Relationships among dependency and interpersonal depth and conflict and CG and depression were examined through analyses of covariance. Sixteen percent of participants met criteria for CG and 34% had mild to severe depression. Dependency and depth were independently related to CG and dependency was related to depression, but the pattern of associations was somewhat different for each outcome. Greater depth was associated with CG, at both high and low levels of dependency. High levels of dependency were related to more depressive symptoms. Interpretation of the findings is limited by the relatively small sample size and cross-sectional design. CG and depression are related but distinct responses to loss. Although dependency is associated with both CG and depression after loss, relationships between the bereaved and deceased that are characterized by high levels of depth are particularly related to the development of CG symptoms.

  15. Psychometric properties of the dimensional anxiety scales for DSM-5 in a Brazilian community sample.

    PubMed

    DeSousa, Diogo A; Moreno, André L; Osório, Flávia L; Crippa, José Alexandre S; LeBeau, Richard; Manfro, Gisele G; Salum, Giovanni A; Koller, Silvia H

    2016-10-16

    The DSM-5 highlights the use of dimensional assessments of mental health as a supplement to categorical diagnoses. This study investigated the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales in a Brazilian community sample. Dimensional scales for generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia, and specific phobia were administered to 930 adults aged 18 to 70, 64.2% female. Psychometric properties investigated were: unidimensionality; measurement invariance; internal consistency; composite reliability; test-retest reliability; convergent and divergent validity; category thresholds and item performance analyses. Analyses revealed unidimensionality for all scales except for specific phobia. Measurement invariance, high internal consistency and composite reliability, and convergent and divergent validity were demonstrated. Test-retest reliability was high for all scales but generalized anxiety disorder. Item-based analyses evidenced that none of the items were very easy to endorse and that the scales offered more information about subjects with high severity estimates of anxiety. The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales are a valid and reliable alternative to assess anxiety symptomatology in community settings, although further evaluation is needed, especially for specific phobia. The scales seem to be more useful for characterizing dimensionality of symptoms for subclinical or clinical cases than for slight or mildly anxious subjects.

  16. Examining the Screen for Child Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorder-71 as an Assessment Tool for Anxiety in Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Steensel, Francisca J. A.; Deutschman, Amber A. C. G.; Bögels, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a questionnaire developed to assess symptoms of anxiety disorders (SCARED-71) were compared between two groups of children: children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder and comorbid anxiety disorders (ASD-group; "n" = 115), and children with anxiety disorders (AD-group; "n" = 122).…

  17. Psychometric properties of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 in older primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Gloster, Andrew T; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane; Klotsche, Jens; Senior, Ashley; Kunik, Mark; Wilson, Nancy; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-10-01

    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) was designed to efficiently measure the core symptoms of anxiety and depression and has demonstrated positive psychometric properties in adult samples of anxiety and depression patients and student samples. Despite these findings, the psychometric properties of the DASS remain untested in older adults, for whom the identification of efficient measures of these constructs is especially important. To determine the psychometric properties of the DASS 21-item version in older adults, we analyzed data from 222 medical patients seeking treatment to manage worry. Consistent with younger samples, a three-factor structure best fit the data. Results also indicated good internal consistency, excellent convergent validity, and good discriminative validity, especially for the Depression scale. Receiver operating curve analyses indicated that the DASS-21 predicted the diagnostic presence of generalized anxiety disorder and depression as well as other commonly used measures. These data suggest that the DASS may be used with older adults in lieu of multiple scales designed to measure similar constructs, thereby reducing participant burden and facilitating assessment in settings with limited assessment resources.

  18. Psychometric properties of the Revised Physical and Social Anhedonia Scales in non-clinical young adults.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Paino, Mercedes; Lemos-Giráldez, Serafín; García-Cueto, Eduardo; Villazón-García, Ursula; Bobes, Julio; Muñiz, José

    2009-11-01

    Anhedonia, a central dimension within the schizotypy construct, has been considered to be a promising vulnerability marker for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The Revised Physical Anhedonia Scale (RPhA) and Revised Social Anhedonia Scale (RSAS) are two self-reports widely used in the assessment of anhedonia; however, they psychometric characteristics have been scarcely investigated in Spanish population. The objective of the current work was to study the psychometric properties of the Revised Physical and Social Anhedonia Scales in non-clinical young adults. The sample was composed of 728 college students with a mean age of 20.1 years (SD = 2.5). The data indicated that the scales showed adequate psychometric characteristics. The Cronbach alpha was 0.95 (RSAS) and 0.92 (RPhA) respectively. The confirmatory factor analysis carried out on the matrix of tetrachoric correlations showed that both scales presented an essentially unidimensional solution. The Revised Physical and Social Anhedonia Scales seem to be adequate for psychosis-risk assessment in non-clinical populations. Future research should further investigate the construct validity in other populations and cultures as well as study its relation to emotional aspects and cognitive endophenotypes.

  19. The Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory: Measurement Invariance and Psychometric Properties among Portuguese Youths

    PubMed Central

    Pechorro, Pedro; Ribeiro da Silva, Diana; Andershed, Henrik; Rijo, Daniel; Abrunhosa Gonçalves, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) among a mixed-gender sample of 782 Portuguese youth (M = 15.87 years; SD = 1.72), in a school context. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed the expected three-factor first-order structure. Cross-gender measurement invariance and cross-sample measurement invariance using a forensic sample of institutionalized males were also confirmed. The Portuguese version of the YPI demonstrated generally adequate psychometric properties of internal consistency, mean inter-item correlation, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and criterion-related validity of statistically significant associations with conduct disorder symptoms, alcohol abuse, drug use, and unprotected sex. In terms of known-groups validity, males scored higher than females, and males from the school sample scored lower than institutionalized males. The use of the YPI among the Portuguese male and female youth population is psychometrically justified, and it can be a useful measure to identify adolescents with high levels of psychopathic traits. PMID:27571095

  20. Two Georgian fathers: diverse in experience, united in grief.

    PubMed

    James, R M; Williams, A N

    2008-12-01

    The history of paediatrics and child health is increasingly recognised to be about children themselves and how they and their families cope and adapt to their medical condition rather than about medical practitioners and august institutions. This article considers two case studies, showing how two Georgian fathers cared for their children when sickness struck and their reactions when the children died. Davies (Giddy) Gilbert, FRS (1767-1840), was a member of Parliament first for Helston and later for Bodmin. (He married Ann Mary Gilbert in 1808 and formally changed his name to Gilbert; the change received royal approbation in January 1817.) Gilbert recorded the birth and development of his son Charles (1810-1813), in one of the very earliest developmental chronicles. He regularly recorded his child's progress, including height, weight, social interaction, communication skills and speech. Apparently in good health for most of his life, Charles developed an acute abdominal disorder and died unexpectedly. John Tremayne (1780-1851) was a member of Parliament for Cornwall. His son Harry (1814-1823) had increasing bilious attacks, headaches and a squint from the age of 6 years, and died despite the best medical advice available. Current medical opinion would presume an intracranial tumour. Tremayne graphically expressed his pain as he closely observed his son suffer, apparently as much from the treatments as from the disease itself. This study sheds light on clinical aspects of Georgian medical practice, the medical marketplace and the nature of relationships between these fathers and their children.

  1. Grief and trauma intervention for children after disaster: exploring coping skills versus trauma narration.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alison; Overstreet, Stacy

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the differential effects of the Grief and Trauma Intervention (GTI) with coping skills and trauma narrative processing (CN) and coping skills only (C). Seventy African American children (6-12 years old) were randomly assigned to GTI-CN or GTI-C. Both treatments consisted of a manualized 11-session intervention and a parent meeting. Measures of trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, depression, traumatic grief, global distress, social support, and parent reported behavioral problems were administered at pre, post, 3 and 12 months post intervention. In general, children in both treatment groups demonstrated significant improvements in distress related symptoms and social support, which, with the exception of externalizing symptoms for GTI-C, were maintained up to 12 months post intervention. Results suggest that building coping skills without the structured trauma narrative may be a viable intervention to achieve symptom relief in children experiencing trauma-related distress. However, it may be that highly distressed children experience more symptom relief with coping skills plus narrative processing than with coping skills alone. More research on the differential effects of coping skills and trauma narration on child distress and adaptive functioning outcomes is needed.

  2. A Greek perspective on concepts of death and expression of grief, with implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Tsilika, Eleni; Parpa, Efi; Katsouda, Emmanuela; Vlahos, Lambros

    2003-12-01

    Death has been conceptualised in different ways by different cultures and civilizations. It is increasingly entering into the public consciousness and society is now more ready to discuss and lessen the fear of dying and grief than it has been in the past few decades. In Greece, by Classical times there was an increase in burial rituals and commemorative practices compared to earlier periods. When Christianity was introduced into Greece it attempted to change the way the dead were mourned, preaching immortality of the soul and resurrection of the dead. Nevertheless, the way people grieve and bury their dead in Greece has not changed greatly since before the introduction of Christianity, except for the difficulty experienced in witnessing burial procedures observed in the large cities. Burial and bereavement traditions were introduced to help Greeks cope with death and bereavement. In Greece today beliefs about grief and death are based both on the ancient and the Christian Orthodox traditions. Healthcare professionals need to develop cultural competence to improve nursing and future health care. If care is culturally informed and tailored its quality is improved.

  3. Size acceptance as a grief process: observations from psychotherapy with lesbian feminists.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Jeanne

    2008-01-01

    Based on observations from my psychotherapy practice, I apply Kubler-Ross' five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) to the process a woman goes through when she learns about size acceptance and lets go of the unrealistic wish to make her body size conform to fat-phobic societal ideals of female beauty. Clients' presentations, therapeutic interventions, and countertransference are discussed for each stage. Lesbian feminists are likely to embrace size acceptance politics but may retain negative feelings about their own body size. In the bargaining stage, they may confound health concerns with body image issues, and it is important in their therapy to provide a holding environment that can tolerate ambivalence. My own depression stage was marked by countertransference that caused me to avoid the topic of body image with my clients. Therapists can help women in the size acceptance grief process by exploring their own evolving feelings about body image, bringing up the topic, and providing a non-judgmental holding environment.

  4. Examination of Proposed Criteria for Complicated Grief in People Confronted with Violent or Non-Violent Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boelen, Paul A.; van den Bout, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In the late 1990s, a panel of experts proposed criteria for complicated grief (CG) and found these to have satisfactory operating characteristics. The present study aimed to replicate that finding in 4 groups of mourners divided by cause of loss and time from loss. Data were available from 1,052 bereaved individuals. All had completed the revised…

  5. Unresolved grief in women and men in Sweden three years after undergoing unsuccessful in vitro fertilization treatment

    PubMed Central

    Volgsten, Helena; Skoog Svanberg, Agneta; Olsson, Pia

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To explore the experience of undergoing unsuccessful in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment and of remaining childless 3 years after IVF in both women and men. Design. Qualitative-approach study. Sample. Ten women and nine men who had attended a public fertility clinic in Sweden. Methods. Individual qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with qualitative content analysis guiding the analysis. Results. Three years after the end of IVF treatment, most men and women were still processing and had not adapted to childlessness, indicating that the grieving process was unresolved. Unsuccessful IVF was experienced by women in terms of grief, whereas men took upon themselves a supportive role and did not express grief. A need for professional support and counseling in how to handle grief was described. An unstructured end after IVF treatment left unanswered questions. Conclusions. The grieving process after unsuccessful IVF treatment was hampered among both men and women. The provision of additional individual support during IVF is recommended as men and women experienced childlessness differently. Support and counseling concerning grief reactions following IVF failure, and a structured final consultation after IVF may facilitate the grieving process after undergoing unsuccessful IVF treatment. PMID:20846062

  6. The Experience of High Levels of Grief in Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Sara; Ott, Carol H.; Kelber, Sheryl T.; Noonan, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    An abundance of literature on caregivers of individuals with dementia has been written since the mid-1980s. However, most of this literature focused on the experience of stress, burden, and depression in caregivers, thus excluding the grief experience that also accompanies the caregiving experience. The purpose of this multimethod study is to…

  7. Grief Reactions and Depression in Caregivers of Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease: Results from a Pilot Study in an Urban Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Sara; Adams, Kathryn Betts

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between grief and depression in caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease has not been clearly defined through empirical research. This pilot study examined the relationship between these two variables and determined the strength of their relationship. A racially diverse sample of caregivers was drawn from an urban…

  8. Assessing the Role of Attachment to God, Meaning, and Religious Coping as Mediators in the Grief Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Melissa M.; Chan, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    Research has examined the relationship of styles of attachment to others and meaning with grief and the stress-related growth process. Less has been written on styles of attachment to God and patterns of religious coping and how these constructs may impact adjustment in persons dealing with loss. This study examines the roles of attachment to God,…

  9. Assessing the role of attachment to God, meaning, and religious coping as mediators in the grief experience.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Melissa M; Chan, Keith T

    2012-03-01

    Research has examined the relationship of styles of attachment to others and meaning with grief and the stress-related growth process. Less has been written on styles of attachment to God and patterns of religious coping and how these constructs may impact adjustment in persons dealing with loss. This study examines the roles of attachment to God, meaning, and religious coping as mediators in the grief experience for a sample of 93 individuals who experienced a significant death in the prior year. Results suggest that a more secure style of attachment to God was directly and indirectly associated with lower depression and grief and increased stress-related growth for this sample. Meaning, defined as a sense of purpose and coherence, also emerged as an important construct in this process. Overall goodness-of fit statistics were examined for competing models using structural equation modeling. Secure attachment to God, meaning, and positive religious coping were found to have significant direct and indirect effects on grief and stress-related growth. For some individuals, attachment to God may be an important construct in the experience of meaning following a significant death and may have tremendous potential in its direct and indirect effects on overall outcomes.

  10. Grief Shortly after Suicide and Natural Death: A Comparative Study among Spouses and First-Degree Relatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, M. H.; de Keijser, J.; Neeleman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic dysfunction after complicated grief is not rare and emphasizes the need to identify bereaved individuals at risk. Three months following bereavement, self-reported psychiatric and general health of 153 relatives of 74 suicides was worse than of 70 relatives of 39 natural deaths. Moreover, the felt need for professional help was higher…

  11. Master's Students' Self-Assessment of Competency in Grief Education and Training in CACREP-Accredited Counseling Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    Counseling can promote positive outcomes for grieving clients by addressing personal loss and helping the client process their grief. However, a lack of understanding on the part of counselors of how people grieve may result in negative client outcomes such as psychological stress, poor health, or an increased risk of depression. Education and…

  12. "Dulling the Edges": Young Men's Use of Alcohol to Deal With Grief Following the Death of a Male Friend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creighton, Genevieve; Oliffe, John; Matthews, Jennifer; Saewyc, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background: The death of a male friend can be challenging for men because expressions of grief can be governed and restrained by dominant ideals of masculinity. It is common for young men to engage in health risk practices, such as alcohol overuse, to deal with feelings of sadness. Objective: This qualitative study investigated the ways that young…

  13. Modification and Factor Analysis of the Grief Experience Inventory in Non-Death Loss/Bereavement Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinner, Ellen S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Administered Grief Experience Inventory (GEI) to 102 mothers of brain-injured adolescents and young adults across 3 years postinjury. Factor analysis of data was computed and compared to factors derived from original GEI General Reference Group (n=135). Found strikingly similar factor structures between modified nondeath form and original GEI.…

  14. Modified Test Administration Using Assistive Technology: Preliminary Psychometric Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warschausky, Seth; Van Tubbergen, Marie; Asbell, Shana; Kaufman, Jacqueline; Ayyangar, Rita; Donders, Jacobus

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of test presentation and response formats that were modified to be accessible with the use of assistive technology (AT). First, the stability of psychometric properties was examined in 60 children, ages 6 to 12, with no significant physical or communicative impairments. Population-specific…

  15. Psychometric Characteristics of the Gesell School Readiness Screening Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenstein, Robert

    The Gesell School Readiness Screening Test (GSRST) is widely used to identify "developmentally immature" children for placement in extra-year, transition programs in spite of a problematic absence of psychometric evidence and research support. In this study of psychometric characteristics of the GSRST, teacher ratings of classroom…

  16. Psychometric Evaluation and Discussions of English Language Learners' Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Daeryong; Taherbhai, Husein; Frantz, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The importance of listening in the context of English language acquisition is gaining acceptance, but its unique attributes in language performance, while substantively and qualitatively justifiable, are generally not psychometrically defined. This article psychometrically supports listening as a distinct domain among the three other domains of…

  17. Measuring Mathematics Anxiety: Psychometric Analysis of a Bidimensional Affective Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan; Wang, LihShing; Pan, Wei; Frey, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretically and methodologically sound bidimensional affective scale measuring mathematics anxiety with high psychometric quality. The psychometric properties of a 14-item Mathematics Anxiety Scale-Revised (MAS-R) adapted from Betz's (1978) 10-item Mathematics Anxiety Scale were empirically analyzed on a…

  18. Modern Psychometrics for Assessing Achievement Goal Orientation: A Rasch Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muis, Krista R.; Winne, Philip H.; Edwards, Ordene V.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A program of research is needed that assesses the psychometric properties of instruments designed to quantify students' achievement goal orientations to clarify inconsistencies across previous studies and to provide a stronger basis for future research. Aim: We conducted traditional psychometric and modern Rasch-model analyses of the…

  19. Four theorems on the psychometric function.

    PubMed

    May, Keith A; Solomon, Joshua A

    2013-01-01

    In a 2-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) discrimination task, observers choose which of two stimuli has the higher value. The psychometric function for this task gives the probability of a correct response for a given stimulus difference, Δx. This paper proves four theorems about the psychometric function. Assuming the observer applies a transducer and adds noise, Theorem 1 derives a convenient general expression for the psychometric function. Discrimination data are often fitted with a Weibull function. Theorem 2 proves that the Weibull "slope" parameter, β, can be approximated by β(Noise) x β(Transducer), where β(Noise) is the β of the Weibull function that fits best to the cumulative noise distribution, and β(Transducer) depends on the transducer. We derive general expressions for β(Noise) and β(Transducer), from which we derive expressions for specific cases. One case that follows naturally from our general analysis is Pelli's finding that, when d' ∝ (Δx)(b), β ≈ β(Noise) x b. We also consider two limiting cases. Theorem 3 proves that, as sensitivity improves, 2AFC performance will usually approach that for a linear transducer, whatever the actual transducer; we show that this does not apply at signal levels where the transducer gradient is zero, which explains why it does not apply to contrast detection. Theorem 4 proves that, when the exponent of a power-function transducer approaches zero, 2AFC performance approaches that of a logarithmic transducer. We show that the power-function exponents of 0.4-0.5 fitted to suprathreshold contrast discrimination data are close enough to zero for the fitted psychometric function to be practically indistinguishable from that of a log transducer. Finally, Weibull β reflects the shape of the noise distribution, and we used our results to assess the recent claim that internal noise has higher kurtosis than a Gaussian. Our analysis of β for contrast discrimination suggests that, if internal noise is stimulus

  20. A randomized controlled effectiveness trial of cognitive behavior therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in terrorist-affected people in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    BRYANT, RICHARD A.; EKASAWIN, SUPARAT; CHAKRABHAND, SOMCHAI; SUWANMITRI, SOAWALUK; DUANGCHUN, ORAWAN; CHANTALUCKWONG, THANANET

    2011-01-01

    Although cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), there is no evidence of its success with PTSD patients still under direct threat of terrorist attacks. This study reports the first randomized controlled trial of CBT for PTSD terrorist-affected people. Twenty-eight survivors of terrorist attacks in southern Thailand were randomized to 8 sessions of either CBT or treatment as usual (TAU). CBT was modified to accommodate the realistic threats facing patients. There were independent assessments conducted before, immediately after, and 3 months following treatment. Main outcome measures included symptoms of PTSD (PTSD Symptom Scale Interview), depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and complicated grief (Inventory of Complicated Grief). CBT resulted in significantly greater reduction in symptoms, including PTSD, depression, and complicated grief, at follow-up than TAU. Relative to TAU, CBT had stronger effect sizes at follow-up for PTSD, depression, and complicated grief. More patients in the CBT condition (75%) achieved high end-state functioning than participants in the TAU (33%). This preliminary evidence suggests that PTSD, depression, and complicated grief can be effectively treated despite ongoing threats of terrorism. Further, it demonstrates that non-specialist mental health workers in a non-western setting can be efficiently trained in using CBT, and this training can translate into successful treatment gains in trauma-affected individuals. PMID:21991280

  1. The Chinese Parental Stress Scale: psychometric evidence using Rasch modeling on clinical and nonclinical samples.

    PubMed

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra K M

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the psychometric properties of the Parental Stress Scale (PSS; Berry & Jones, 1995) with Chinese parents. Participants included 162 parents recruited through primary schools and 38 parents with children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Rasch analysis results indicated that 2 items were outside the accepted fit statistics range and that the Likert scale response categories were not functioning properly. We identified a reduced 16-item scale with 5 categories as unidimensional, with a person reliability of .86; the Likert scale response categories worked well. The revised PSS correlated with measures of child behavior and parenting stress and could differentiate between the 2 groups of parents.

  2. A Psychometric Review of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5): Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Al-Dajani, Nadia; Gralnick, Tara M; Bagby, R Michael

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm of personality psychopathology is shifting from one that is purely categorical in nature to one grounded in dimensional individual differences. Section III (Emerging Measures and Models) of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed. [DSM-5]; American Psychiatric Association, 2013), for example, includes a hybrid categorical/dimensional model of personality disorder classification. To inform the hybrid model, the DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group developed a self-report instrument to assess pathological personality traits-the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 (PID-5). Since its recent introduction, 30 papers (39 samples) have been published examining various aspects of its psychometric properties. In this article, we review the psychometric characteristics of the PID-5 using the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing as our framework. The PID-5 demonstrates adequate psychometric properties, including a replicable factor structure, convergence with existing personality instruments, and expected associations with broadly conceptualized clinical constructs. More research is needed with specific consideration to clinical utility, additional forms of reliability and validity, relations with psychopathological personality traits using clinical samples, alternative methods of criterion validation, effective employment of cut scores, and the inclusion of validity scales to propel this movement forward.

  3. Psychometric development of the hypersexual behavior consequences scale.

    PubMed

    Reid, Rory C; Garos, Sheila; Fong, Timothy

    2012-09-01

    Background and aims The past decade has seen an increased interest in understanding hypersexual behavior and its associated features. Beyond the obvious risks for sexually transmitted infections, there is a paucity of literature examining specific challenges encountered by hypersexual individuals. This study investigated and developed a new scale, the Hypersexual Behavior Consequences Scale (HBCS), to assess the various consequences reported among hypersexual patients. Methods Participants were drawn from a sample of patients recruited in a DSM-5 Field Trial for Hypersexual Disorder (HD). Participants completed the Hypersexual Behavior Inventory, a structured diagnostic interview to assess for psychopathology and HD, and self-report measures of personality, life satisfaction, and the initial item pool for the HBCS. Results Factor analysis reduced the HBCS items to a single factor solution which showed high internal consistency and stability over time. Higher HBCS scores were positively correlated with higher levels of emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, and stress proneness and lower levels of satisfaction with life and happiness. HBCS scores among the hypersexual patients were significantly higher than non-hypersexual patients. Conclusions The HBCS possesses good psychometric properties and appears to capture various consequences associated with the DSM-5 proposed criteria for HD. The HBCS can be used to aid clinicians and researchers in identifying consequences associated with hypersexual behavior. The HBCS may also prove a useful tool to guide treatment interventions aimed at reducing the negative impact of hypersexuality in patient populations.

  4. The Psychometrics of the Mini-K.

    PubMed

    Richardson, George B; Chen, Ching-Chen; Dai, Chia-Liang; Brubaker, Michael D; Nedelec, Joseph L

    2017-01-01

    Many published studies have employed the Mini-K to measure a single fast-slow life history dimension. However, the internal structure of the Mini-K has not been determined and it is not clear that a single higher order K-factor fits the data. It is also not clear that the Mini-K is measurement invariant across groups such as the sexes. To establish the construct validity of K as well as the broader usefulness of applying life history theory to humans, it is crucial that these psychometric issues are addressed as a part of measure validation efforts. Here we report on three studies that used latent variable modeling and data drawn from two college student samples ( ns = 361 and 300) to elucidate the psychometrics of the Mini-K. We found that (a) the Mini-K had a six dimensional first-order structure, (b) the K-factor provided a parsimonious explanation of the associations among the lower order factors at no significant cost to fit, (c) the Mini-K measured the same K-factor across the sexes, (d) K-factor means did not have the same meaning across the sexes and thus the first-order factors should be used in studies of mean sex differences, and finally, (e) the K-factor was only associated with environment and aspects of mating competition in females. Implications and future directions for life history research are discussed.

  5. Persistent grief in the aftermath of mass violence: the predictive roles of posttraumatic stress symptoms, self-efficacy, and disrupted worldview.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew J; Abeyta, Andrew A; Hughes, Michael; Jones, Russell T

    2015-03-01

    This study tested a conceptual model merging anxiety buffer disruption and social-cognitive theories to predict persistent grief severity among students who lost a close friend, significant other, and/or professor/teacher in tragic university campus shootings. A regression-based path model tested posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptom severity 3 to 4 months postshooting (Time 1) as a predictor of grief severity 1 year postshootings (Time 2), both directly and indirectly through cognitive processes (self-efficacy and disrupted worldview). Results revealed a model that predicted 61% of the variance in Time 2 grief severity. Hypotheses were supported, demonstrating that Time 1 PTS severity indirectly, positively predicted Time 2 grief severity through undermining self-efficacy and more severely disrupting worldview. Findings and theoretical interpretation yield important insights for future research and clinical application.

  6. Convergent Validity of the Autism Spectrum Disorder-Diagnostic for Children (ASD-DC) and Childhood Autism Rating Scales (CARS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Mahan, Sara; Hess, Julie A.; Fodstad, Jill C.; Neal, Daniene

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies analyzed the reliability as well as sensitivity and specificity of the Autism Spectrum Disorder-Diagnostic for Children (ASD-DC). This study further examines the psychometric properties of the ASD-DC by assessing whether the ASD-DC has convergent validity against a psychometrically sound observational instrument for Autistic…

  7. A psychometric analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales--parent version in a school sample.

    PubMed

    Ebesutani, Chad; Chorpita, Bruce F; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K; Nakamura, Brad J; Regan, Jennifer; Lynch, Roxanna E

    2011-02-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale-Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a parent-report questionnaire of youth anxiety and depression with scales corresponding to the DSM diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and major depressive disorder. The RCADS-P was recently developed and has previously demonstrated strong psychometric properties in a clinic-referred sample (Ebesutani et al., Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 38, 249-260, 2010b). The present study examined the psychometric properties of the RCADS-P in a school-based population. As completed by parents of 967 children and adolescents, the RCADS-P demonstrated high internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and good convergent/divergent validity, supporting the RCADS-P as a measure of internalizing problems specific to depression and five anxiety disorders in school samples. Normative data are also reported to allow for the derivation of T-scores to enhance clinicians' ability to make classification decisions using RCADS-P subscale scores.

  8. Prolonged grief following the recent death of a daughter among mothers who experienced distal losses during the Khmer Rouge era: Validity of the prolonged grief construct in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Field, Nigel P; Strasser, Judith; Taing, Sopheap; Horiuchi, Shoko; Chhim, Sotheara; Packman, Wendy

    2014-09-30

    This study addressed the validity of the prolonged grief (PG) construct in a Cambodian context. Eighty mothers who lost a young adult daughter stemming from a crowd stampede incident during the annual water festival were interviewed at the six-month post-loss point along with a control group of similarly aged women who were not recently bereaved. Both groups were assessed for PG, PTSD, anxiety, and depression symptoms and well as for the number of distal losses experienced during the Khmer Rouge (KR) regime - knowing that all the women were old enough to have lived through the KR regime. Support for the discriminant validity of PG was shown in a factor analysis in which its core symptoms were distinguished from anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms. Also, support was found for its incremental validity as shown in the unique sensitivity of PG in distinguishing the two groups when controlling for the other symptoms. Lastly, a positive relationship was found between the number of distal deaths experienced during the KR regime and PG symptom severity among the group of recently bereaved mothers, providing support for the predictive validity of PG. Implications as well as study limitations are discussed.

  9. Assessing decentering: validation, psychometric properties, and clinical usefulness of the Experiences Questionnaire in a Spanish sample.

    PubMed

    Soler, Joaquim; Franquesa, Alba; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Cebolla, Ausias; García-Campayo, Javier; Tejedor, Rosa; Demarzo, Marcelo; Baños, Rosa; Pascual, Juan Carlos; Portella, Maria J

    2014-11-01

    Decentering is defined as the ability to observe one's thoughts and feelings in a detached manner. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ) is a self-report instrument that originally assessed decentering and rumination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of EQ-Decentering and to explore its clinical usefulness. The 11-item EQ-Decentering subscale was translated into Spanish and psychometric properties were examined in a sample of 921 adult individuals, 231 with psychiatric disorders and 690 without. The subsample of nonpsychiatric participants was also split according to their previous meditative experience (meditative participants, n=341; and nonmeditative participants, n=349). Additionally, differences among these three subgroups were explored to determine clinical validity of the scale. Finally, EQ-Decentering was administered twice in a group of borderline personality disorder, before and after a 10-week mindfulness intervention. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated acceptable model fit, sbχ(2)=243.8836 (p<.001), CFI=.939, GFI=.936, SRMR=.040, and RMSEA=.06 (.060-.077), and psychometric properties were found to be satisfactory (reliability: Cronbach's α=.893; convergent validity: r>.46; and divergent validity: r<-.35). The scale detected changes in decentering after a 10-session intervention in mindfulness (t=-4.692, p<.00001). Differences among groups were significant (F=134.8, p<.000001), where psychiatric participants showed the lowest scores compared to nonpsychiatric meditative and nonmeditative participants. The Spanish version of the EQ-Decentering is a valid and reliable instrument to assess decentering either in clinical and nonclinical samples. In addition, the findings show that EQ-Decentering seems an adequate outcome instrument to detect changes after mindfulness-based interventions.

  10. The Child PTSD Symptom Scale: Psychometric Properties in Female Adolescent Sexual Assault Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Gillihan, Seth J.; Aderka, Idan M.; Conklin, Phoebe H.; Capaldi, Sandra; Foa, Edna B.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic experiences are common among youths and can lead to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In order to identify traumatized children who need PTSD treatment, instruments that can accurately and efficiently evaluate pediatric PTSD are needed. One such measure is the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS), which has been found to be a reliable and valid measure of PTSD symptom severity in school-age children exposed to natural disasters (Foa, Johnson, Feeny & Treadwell, 2001). However, the psychometric properties of the CPSS are not known in youths who have experienced other types of trauma. The current study aims to fill this gap by examining the psychometric properties of the interview (CPSS-I) and self-report (CPSS-SR) administrations of the CPSS in a sample of 91 female youths with sexual abuse-related PTSD, a population that is targeted in many treatment studies. Scores on both the CPSS-I and CPSS-SR demonstrated good to excellent internal consistency. One week test-retest reliability assessed for CPSS-SR scores was excellent (r = .86); inter-rater reliability of CPSS-I scores was also excellent (r = .87). Symptom-based diagnostic agreement between the CPSS-SR and CPSS-I was excellent at 85.5%; scores on both the CPSS-SR and CPSS-I also demonstrated good convergent validity (74.5–76.5% agreement) with the PTSD module of The Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children–Revised for DSM-IV (K-SADS; Kaufman, Birmaher, Brent, & Rao, 1997). The strong psychometric properties of the CPSS render it a valuable instrument for PTSD screening as well as for assessing symptom severity. PMID:22867010

  11. Good grief: bereavement literature for young adults and A Monster Calls.

    PubMed

    Day, Giskin

    2012-12-01

    Recent years have seen a proliferation of critically acclaimed novels for young adults dealing with bereavement. This is part of a 'bereavement turn'--a contemporary cultural movement to examine publicly our attitudes to death and grieving. This paper examines the narrative strategies in Patrick Ness's award-winning novel A Monster Calls to look at the ways in which the psychic burden of the impending loss of a parent through cancer is managed. The book draws on conventions of children's literature to create a sense of familiarity that helps to balance the emotional stress of the story. The Kübler-Ross stages of grief serve as a heuristic that helps the story deliver catharsis in spite of its inevitably traumatic subject matter. A Monster Calls is an important addition to the canon of fictional pathography.

  12. Mindfulness-based Intervention for Perinatal Grief Education and Reduction among Poor Women in Chhattisgarh, India: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lisa; Montgomery, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Stillbirth is a significant public health problem in low-to-middle-income countries and results in perinatal grief, often with negative psychosocial impact. In low-resource settings, such as Chhattisgarh, India, where needs are high, it is imperative to utilize low-cost, effective interventions. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is an empirically sound intervention that has been utilized for a broad range of physical and mental health problems, and is adaptable to specific populations. The main objective of this pilot study was to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of a shortened, culturally adapted mindfulness-based intervention to address complex grief after stillbirth. Methods We used an observational, pre-post-6-week post study design. The study instrument was made up of descriptive demographic questions and validated scales and was administered as a structured interview due to low literacy rates. We used a community participatory approach to culturally adapt the five-week mindfulness-based intervention and delivered it through two trained local nurses. Quantitative and qualitative data analyses explored study outcomes as well as acceptability and feasibility of the intervention. Results 29 women with a history of stillbirth enrolled, completed the pretest and began the intervention; 26 completed the five-week intervention and post-test (89.7%), and 23 completed the six-week follow-up assessment (88.5%). Pretest results included elevated psychological symptoms and high levels of perinatal grief, including the active grief, difficulty coping, and despair subscales. General linear modeling repeated measures was used to explore posttest and six-week follow up changes from baseline, controlling for significantly correlated demographic variables. These longitudinal results included significant reduction in psychological symptoms; four of the five facets of mindfulness changed in the desired direction, two significantly; as well as

  13. Paranoid personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Triebwasser, Joseph; Chemerinski, Eran; Roussos, Panos; Siever, Larry J

    2013-12-01

    Paranoid personality disorder (PPD) is currently included in DSM-IV's "odd cluster" or "cluster A." In the present article, the authors review available information pertaining to the psychometric properties of PPD, as derived from the relevant literature and from databases of personality disorder study groups. There is comparatively little published evidence for the reliability and validity of PPD, and researchers by and large have tended not to study the disorder, either because of investigators' difficulty recruiting individuals with PPD into research studies, or (as seems more likely) because the trait-paranoia from which many psychiatric patients suffer has seemed better explained by other DSM-IV disorders on Axis I and/or Axis II than by PPD. Given the scant empirical evidence on PPD, it seems reasonable to remove it as an independent diagnosis from the next edition of DSM, and instead to encourage clinicians to code trait-paranoia using a dimensional approach.

  14. Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Thougth-Shape Fusion Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui Lobera, Ignacio; Santed, Miguel Angel; Shafran, Roz; Santiago, Maria José; Estébanez, Sonia

    2012-03-01

    The objectives of the study were to analyze the psychometric properties, factor structure and internal consistency of the Spanish version of the Thought-Shape Fusion Questionnaire (TSF-Q), as well as to determine its validity by evaluating the relationship of the TSF-Q to different instruments. Two groups were studied: one comprising 146 patients with a diagnosis of anorexia (n = 82), bulimia (n = 33) or unspecified eating disorder (n = 31), and another group of 115 undergraduates with no history of psychological disorder. All participants completed the TSF-Q, TAF-Q, EDI-2, STAI, BDI and SCL-90-R. Differences in TSF-Q scores between the diagnostic subgroups were also analyzed. Two factors were obtained which coincided with the two sections indicated by the authors of the questionnaire: conceptual and interpretative. The internal consistency of the TSF-Q and its subscales was determined by means of Cronbach's alpha, with values ranging between .93 and .96. The correlations with other instruments reflected adequate validity. There were no significant differences between the diagnostic subgroups. The Spanish version of the TSF-Q meets the psychometric requirements for measuring thought-shape fusion and shows adequate internal consistency and validity.

  15. Psychometric Validation Study of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale - Self-Reported Version for Brazilian Portuguese

    PubMed Central

    Forni dos Santos, Larissa; Loureiro, Sonia Regina; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Osório, Flávia de Lima

    2013-01-01

    Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is prevalent and rarely diagnosed due to the difficulty in recognizing its symptoms as belonging to a disorder. Therefore, the evaluation/screening scales are of great importance for its detection, with the most used being the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS). Thus, this study proposed to evaluate the psychometric properties of internal consistency and convergent validity, as well as the confirmatory factorial analysis and reliability of the self-reported version of the LSAS (LSAS-SR), translated into Brazilian Portuguese, in a sample of the general population (N = 413) and in a SAD clinical sample (N = 252). The convergent validity with specific scales for the evaluation of SAD and a general anxiety scale presented correlations ranging from 0.21 to 0.84. The confirmatory factorial analysis did not replicate the previously indicated findings of the literature, with the difficulty being in obtaining a consensus factorial structure common to the diverse cultures in which the instrument was studied. The LSAS-SR presented excellent internal consistency (α = 0.90–0.96) and test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient = 0.81; Pearson’s = 0.82). The present findings support those of international studies that attest to the excellent psychometric properties of the LSAS-SR, endorsing its status as the gold standard. PMID:23922961

  16. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Bodzin, Danielle; Mutch, P. Jane; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Aman, Michael; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Although effective in treating a range of childhood psychiatric conditions, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been implicated in the induction of an “activation syndrome” (characterized by symptoms of irritability, restlessness, emotional labiality, etc.) that may represent an intermediary state change that fosters suicidality. SSRI-induced activation syndrome is well-accepted by many clinicians and thought to be relatively common, particularly in children and teens. However, gaps exist in empirical data on phenomenology and tools for early detection. With this in mind, we report on a recently funded National Institutes of Health grant to develop a measure of behavioral activation to be completed in a clinical setting. We discuss the development of this measure—the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile (TE-ASAP)—as well as psychometric results from a sample of youth with internalizing disorders who were at varying stages of SSRI treatment. Overall, psychometric data were quite promising, with the TE-ASAP demonstrating excellent reliability (i.e., internal consistency, inter-rater, short-term test–retest stability) and strong validity properties. Through further evaluation of the TE-ASAP in the context of a controlled multimodal trial in youth with obsessive–compulsive disorder, we hope to augment understanding of activation syndrome and, in turn, mitigate risks through early detection of this potentially lifethreatening adverse effect. PMID:20473344

  17. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jeannette M; Storch, Eric A; Murphy, Tanya K; Bodzin, Danielle; Mutch, P Jane; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Aman, Michael; Goodman, Wayne K

    2010-02-04

    Although effective in treating a range of childhood psychiatric conditions, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been implicated in the induction of an "activation syndrome" (characterized by symptoms of irritability, restlessness, emotional labiality, etc.) that may represent an intermediary state change that fosters suicidality. SSRI-induced activation syndrome is well-accepted by many clinicians and thought to be relatively common, particularly in children and teens. However, gaps exist in empirical data on phenomenology and tools for early detection. With this in mind, we report on a recently funded National Institutes of Health grant to develop a measure of behavioral activation to be completed in a clinical setting. We discuss the development of this measure-the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile (TE-ASAP)-as well as psychometric results from a sample of youth with internalizing disorders who were at varying stages of SSRI treatment. Overall, psychometric data were quite promising, with the TE-ASAP demonstrating excellent reliability (i.e., internal consistency, inter-rater, short-term test-retest stability) and strong validity properties. Through further evaluation of the TE-ASAP in the context of a controlled multimodal trial in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder, we hope to augment understanding of activation syndrome and, in turn, mitigate risks through early detection of this potentially lifethreatening adverse effect.

  18. [Psychometric instruments for the diagnosis of tinnitus].

    PubMed

    Seydel, C; Zirke, N; Haupt, H; Szczepek, A; Olze, H; Mazurek, B

    2012-08-01

    Tinnitus is a very complex phenomenon with various mechanisms of origin. Multimodal and interdisciplinary treatment is the most effective form of treatment for patients with chronic tinnitus. In order to assess existing comorbidity in tinnitus patients as well as to treat the patients individually, a comprehensive and differentiated diagnosis is needed. Since standardized guidelines for the use of relevant instruments in the diagnosis of tinnitus have been lacking hitherto, we present here psychometric questionnaires which have already been used effectively in the research, diagnosis and therapy of tinnitus in the present article. The questionnaires measure the severity of tinnitus, depression and anxiety, the perceived stress, personal resources as well as the quality of life of patients.

  19. Children's Separation Anxiety Scale (CSAS): Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Xavier; Espada, José P.; Orgilés, Mireia; Llavona, Luis M.; García-Fernández, José M.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the psychometric properties of the Children's Separation Anxiety Scale (CSAS), which assesses separation anxiety symptoms in childhood. Participants in Study 1 were 1,908 schoolchildren aged between 8 and 11. Exploratory factor analysis identified four factors: worry about separation, distress from separation, opposition to separation, and calm at separation, which explained 46.91% of the variance. In Study 2, 6,016 children aged 8–11 participated. The factor model in Study 1 was validated by confirmatory factor analysis. The internal consistency (α = 0.82) and temporal stability (r = 0.83) of the instrument were good. The convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated by means of correlations with other measures of separation anxiety, childhood anxiety, depression and anger. Sensitivity of the scale was 85% and its specificity, 95%. The results support the reliability and validity of the CSAS. PMID:25072402

  20. Psychometric Properties of the HEXACO-100.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibeom; Ashton, Michael C

    2016-07-13

    Psychometric properties of the 100-item English-language HEXACO Personality Inventory-Revised (HEXACO-PI-R) were examined using samples of online respondents (N = 100,318 self-reports) and of undergraduate students (N = 2,868 self- and observer reports). The results were as follows: First, the hierarchical structure of the HEXACO-100 was clearly supported in two principal components analyses: each of the six factors was defined by its constituent facets and each of the 25 facets was defined by its constituent items. Second, the HEXACO-100 factor scales showed fairly low intercorrelations, with only one pair of scales (Honesty-Humility and Agreeableness) having an absolute correlation above .20 in self-report data. Third, the factor and facet scales showed strong self/observer convergent correlations, which far exceeded the self/observer discriminant correlations.

  1. Psychometric intelligence dissociates implicit and explicit learning.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Guido F; Mackintosh, Nicholas J

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that performance on implicit learning tasks is unrelated to psychometric intelligence was examined in a sample of 605 German pupils. Performance in artificial grammar learning, process control, and serial learning did not correlate with various measures of intelligence when participants were given standard implicit instructions. Under an explicit rule discovery instruction, however, a significant relationship between performance on the learning tasks and intelligence appeared. This finding provides support for Reber's hypothesis that implicit learning, in contrast to explicit learning, is independent of intelligence, and confirms thereby the distinction between the 2 modes of learning. However, because there were virtually no correlations among the 3 learning tasks, the assumption of a unitary ability of implicit learning was not supported.

  2. Reinforcement sensitivity of sex offenders and non-offenders: an experimental and psychometric study of reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    PubMed

    Leue, Anja; Brocke, Burkhard; Hoyer, Jürgen

    2008-08-01

    This study tested predictions of Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) in subgroups of sex offenders and male non-offenders using an experimental choice task consisting of a reward and a non-reward phase. In addition, RST-related psychometric measures were used. Both experimental and psychometric data were of interest to determine whether sex offenders could be reliably differentiated from non-offenders. Paraphilic (N=50) and impulse control-disordered (N=48) sex offenders showed greater sensitivity to continuous reward than male non-offenders (N=51). Impulse control-disordered sex offenders showed less behavioural adaptation under non-reward than both paraphilic sex offenders and male non-offenders. In addition, reward sensitivity, rash-spontaneous impulsivity, and anxiety measures discriminated sex offenders from male non-offenders. The results suggest that reinforcement sensitivity is a promising personality trait for differentiating subgroups of sex offenders from non-offenders. The experimental and psychometric results illustrate that predictive accuracy in forensic settings could be improved by combining several types of data.

  3. Complicated Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your key personal information, especially any additional major stress or change you've experienced since your loved one died, such as serious illness, significant family disruptions or financial problems. Medical information, including other physical or mental ...

  4. Confronting Grief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensley, Loren B.; Bertsch, Donald P.

    1987-01-01

    Since no school district is immune to death, the concepts of death and dying, stress management, and suicide should be worked into the curriculum beginning in the fourth grade. Advice is given concerning planning for potential tragedy, responding to a student's or staff member's death, and establishing memorials. Two figures cite teenage suicide…

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Cyberbullying Test, a Screening Instrument to Measure Cybervictimization, Cyberaggression, and Cyberobservation.

    PubMed

    Garaigordobil, Maite

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Cyberbullying Test. The sample included 3,026 participants from the Basque Country (northern Spain), aged 12 to 18 years. Results confirmed high internal consistency and moderate temporal stability. Exploratory factor analysis yielded three moderately correlated factors (cyberobserver, cyberaggressor, and cybervictim). Confirmatory factor analysis ratified adequate model fit of the three factors. Convergent and discriminant validity were confirmed: (a) cybervictims use a variety of conflict resolution strategies, scoring high in neuroticism, openness, antisocial behavior, emotional attention, school-academic problems, shyness-withdrawal, psychopathological disorders, anxiety, and psychosomatic complaints, and low in agreeableness, responsibility, self-esteem, and social adjustment and (b) cyberaggressors use many aggressive conflict resolution strategies, scoring high in neuroticism, antisocial behavior, school-academic problems, psychopathological and psychosomatic disorders, and low in empathy, agreeableness, responsibility, emotion regulation, and social adjustment. The study confirms the test's reliability and validity.

  6. The psychometric properties of the MASC in a pediatric psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    Rynn, Moira A; Barber, Jacques P; Khalid-Khan, Sarosh; Siqueland, Lynne; Dembiski, Michelle; McCarthy, Kevin S; Gallop, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The goals of this study were twofold: to examine the psychometric properties of the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) in a clinical sample of 193 children and adolescents who had received a diagnosis of major depressive or anxiety disorder, and to discriminate between these two groups of patients. Participants had volunteered in randomized psychopharmacological clinical trials. The MASC four-factor structure was confirmed and its subscales were found to be reliable. The MASC correlated well with other self-report measures of anxiety, and less so with measures of depressive symptoms. The MASC subscales and two MASC items as well as age differentiated between anxious and depressed pediatric patients. If these results are replicated in an independent study, those items could be used by clinicians to discriminate between these two disorders. The MASC is a clinically useful measure to discriminate between anxious and depressed pediatric patients. Limitations due to the highly selective sample are noted.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Attitudes Scale facing Alcohol and Alcoholism in nursing students 1

    PubMed Central

    de Vargas, Divane; Rocha, Fernanda Mota

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to verify the psychometric properties of the Attitudes Scale facing Alcohol and Alcoholism (EAFAA) and people with disorders related to the use of alcohol in nursing students. Method: a convenience sample (n=420) completed the EAFAA, the data were submitted to Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Results: the EFA resulted in an instrument composed of 48 items divided into four factors. The CFA has established the validity of the factorial structure. The internal consistency of the scale was considered adequate (α=0.85) presenting a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 75%. Conclusion: the EAFAA constitutes a reliable instrument to identify the attitudes of nursing students towards alcohol, alcoholism and persons with disorders related to alcohol use. PMID:27992026

  8. Psychometric properties of the IES-R in traumatized substance dependent individuals with and without PTSD.

    PubMed

    Rash, Carla J; Coffey, Scott F; Baschnagel, Joseph S; Drobes, David J; Saladin, Michael E

    2008-08-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common among treatment-seeking substance abusers. Despite the high prevalence of these co-occurring conditions, few PTSD screening tools have been evaluated for their utility in identifying PTSD in substance use disorder (SUD) populations. The present study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) in a sample of 124 substance dependent individuals. All participants had a history of a DSM-IV Criterion A traumatic event, and 71 individuals met diagnostic criteria for PTSD. Participants with comorbid PTSD reported significantly more symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD compared to substance dependent individuals without PTSD. Acceptable internal consistency and convergent validity of the IES-R were established among a substance dependent sample. Examination of diagnostic effectiveness suggested a cutoff value of 22 as optimal for a substance using population, resulting in adequate classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity.

  9. Effectiveness of a trauma/grief-focused group intervention: a qualitative study with war-exposed Bosnian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jonathan; Davies, D Rob; Burlingame, Gary M; Campbell, J Eric; Layne, Christopher M; Katzenbach, R Jason

    2007-07-01

    The effectiveness and impacts of a school-based, trauma/grief-focused group treatment program for war-exposed youth in Bosnia and Herzegovina were investigated using semistructured focus groups, conducted separately for students and their school counselor group leaders. Overall, students' and leaders' evaluations of the groups were generally positive. General themes of outcomes and impacts perceived by students and group leaders include: acquisition of coping skills and attitudes, willingness to advocate for peers, improved interpersonal relationships, negative impacts, general positive impacts, impacts in the schools, impacts on the group and logistics of the program, and broader impacts on the perception of mental health in the community. The broad positive impacts of this program suggest that trauma/grief-focused group treatment intervention programs targeting trauma-exposed youth may be effective on multiple levels with war-exposed youth and their communities.

  10. Follow-Up Study of Complicated Grief among Parents Eighteen Months after a Child's Death in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Shear, Katherine; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Harrison, Rick; Berger, John; Zimmerman, Jerry; Anand, K.J.S.; Carcillo, Joseph; Donaldson, Amy E.; Dean, J. Michael; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective We previously demonstrated that parents whose children die in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) have a high level of complicated grief symptoms 6 months after the death. In this study, we investigate the change in the extent of complicated grief symptoms among these parents between 6 and 18 months postdeath and identify factors predicting improvement. Methods One hundred thirty-eight parents of 106 children completed surveys at 6 and 18 months. Surveys included the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG), measures of grief avoidance, attachment, caregiving and social support, and demographics. Multivariable analysis was performed using generalized estimating equations to identify characteristics independently associated with improvement in ICG score. Results ICG scores were 33.4 ± 13.6 at 6 months and 28.0 ± 13.5 at 18 months, representing an improvement in ICG score of 5.4 + 8.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.1–6.8, p < 0.001). Variables independently associated with greater improvement in ICG score included traumatic death and greater grief avoidance. Variables independently associated with less improvement included being the biological parent and having more responsive caregiving. Parents with one or two surviving children had more improvement in ICG score than those with no surviving children whereas parents with three or more surviving children had less improvement. Conclusion Complicated grief symptoms decrease among parents between 6 and 18 months after their child's death in the PICU; however, high symptom levels persists for some. Better understanding of the trajectory of complicated grief will allow parents at risk for persistent distress to receive professional support. PMID:21281122

  11. Psychometric Properties of Three Measures of Protective Factors for Depression and Suicidal Behaviour Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Labelle, Réal; Breton, Jean-Jacques; Berthiaume, Claude; Royer, Chantal; Raymond, Sylvie; Cournoyer, Marilou; Balan, Bogdan; Zaloum, Terry; Bibaud, Antoine; Gauvin, Geoffrey; Janelle, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the reliability of French versions of the Adolescent Coping Scale (ACS), the Reasons for Living Inventory for Adolescents (RFL-A), and the Spirituality Scale (SS); to examine the construct validity of these psychometric instruments; and to determine their convergent validity with French versions of the Life Events Questionnaire for Adolescents (LEQ-A), the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II), and the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) among French-Canadian adolescents. Methods: Participants were 429 adolescents from high schools (n = 283) and the Mood Disorder Clinic (n = 146) in Montreal. The instruments were translated into French following the back-translation method. The internal consistency was assessed through Cronbach alpha coefficients. Exploratory analyses were conducted to document the content of their dimensions. Convergent validity was examined by correlating the ACS, the RFL-A, and the SS with the French versions of the LEQ-A, the BDI-II, and the BHS. Results: The findings confirm that the ACS, RFL-A, and SS are psychometric instruments well suited to assess protective factors for depression and suicidal behaviour among French-speaking adolescents in community and clinical settings. However, results must be interpreted with some circumspection as 2 SS subscales obtained reliability coefficients in the moderate range only and the instructions for the RFL-A were reframed in response to ethical considerations. Conclusions: Our results add to those already available on the original English versions of the ACS, RFL-A, and SS and advance the knowledge of the psychometric properties of protective measures. PMID:25886667

  12. Estimating Driver Risk Using Alcohol Biomarkers, Interlock BAC Tests and Psychometric Assessments: Initial Descriptives

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Paul; Tippetts, Scott; Allen, John; Javors, Martin; Alling, Christer; Yegles, Michel; Pragst, Fritz; Wurst, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    Aim To identify alcohol biomarker and psychometric measures that relate to drivers’ blood alcohol concentration (BAC) patterns from ignition interlock devices (IIDs). Design, Setting, Participants, Measurements In Alberta, Canada, 534 drivers, convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI), installed IIDs and agreed to participate in a research study. IID BAC tests are an established proxy for predicting future DUI convictions. Three risk groups were defined by rates of failed BAC tests. Program entry and followup blood samples (n=302, 171) were used to measure phosphatidyl ethanol (PETH), carbohydrate deficient transferrin (%CDT), gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT) and other biomarkers. Program entry urine (n=130) was analyzed for ethyl glucuronide (ETG) and ethyl sulfate (ETS). Entry hair samples were tested for fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) (n=92) and ETG (n=146). Psychometric measures included the DSM-4 Diagnostic Interview Schedule Alcohol Module, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), the Timeline Followback (TLFB), the Drinker Inventory of Consequences (DRINC), and the Temptation and Restraint Inventory (TRI). Findings Except for FAEE, all alcohol biomarkers were significantly related to the interlock BAC test profiles; higher marker levels predicted higher rates of interlock BAC test failures. PETH, the strongest with an overall ANOVA F ratio of 35.5, had significant correlations with all nine of the other alcohol biomarkers and with 16 of 19 psychometric variables. Urine ETG and ETS were strongly correlated with the IID BAC tests. Conclusions The findings suggest several alcohol biomarkers and assessments could play an important role in the prediction and control of driver alcohol risk when relicensing. PMID:19922520

  13. The MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical Scales in the Assessment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Comorbid Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Erika J.; Miller, Mark W.; Orazem, Robert J.; Weierich, Mariann R.; Castillo, Diane T.; Milford, Jaime; Kaloupek, Danny G.; Keane, Terence M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Restructured Clinical Scales (RCSs) in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) receiving clinical services at Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers. Study 1 included 1,098 men who completed the MMPI-2 and were…

  14. Core dimensions of recovery: a psychometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sarah E; Ellis, Pete M; Siegert, Richard J; Walkey, Frank H

    2014-07-01

    Core recovery dimensions lie between the large general factor of recovery and its underlying components. Identifying these could enhance recovery frameworks, practice and research. In contrast to existing conceptually based taxonomies, we sought to empirically identify the core dimensions of recovery through further psychometric analysis of a robust eleven factor (sub-scale) consumer recovery outcome measure, My Voice, My Life. We subjected the sub-scale scores of 504 consumers to further principal components analyses, beginning with a single unrotated factor and progressing through two to nine factors with varimax rotation. We found the five-factor solution to provide an orderly intermediate configuration with the eleven recovery factors having either aligned and/or disengaged through the process to result in the following core dimensions: (1) Belonging and relating (encompassing the individual factors of spirituality, culture, and relationships); (2) Being and doing (encompassing the individual factors of physical health, day-to-day life, and quality of life); (3) Thinking and feeling (encompassing the individual factors of recovery, mental health, and hope and empowerment); (4) Resources (which maintained its independence); and (5) Satisfaction with Services (which also maintained its independence). We compare this empirical configuration with conceptually based taxonomies.

  15. The pornography craving questionnaire: psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Shane; Rosenberg, Harold

    2014-04-01

    Despite the prevalence of pornography use, and recent conceptualization of problematic use as an addiction, we could find no published scale to measure craving for pornography. Therefore, we conducted three studies employing young male pornography users to develop and evaluate such a questionnaire. In Study 1, we had participants rate their agreement with 20 potential craving items after reading a control script or a script designed to induce craving to watch pornography. We dropped eight items because of low endorsement. In Study 2, we revised both the questionnaire and cue exposure stimuli and then evaluated several psychometric properties of the modified questionnaire. Item loadings from a principal components analysis, a high internal consistency reliability coefficient, and a moderate mean inter-item correlation supported interpreting the 12 revised items as a single scale. Correlations of craving scores with preoccupation with pornography, sexual history, compulsive internet use, and sensation seeking provided support for convergent validity, criterion validity, and discriminant validity, respectively. The enhanced imagery script did not impact reported craving; however, more frequent users of pornography reported higher craving than less frequent users regardless of script condition. In Study 3, craving scores demonstrated good one-week test-retest reliability and predicted the number of times participants used pornography during the following week. This questionnaire could be applied in clinical settings to plan and evaluate therapy for problematic users of pornography and as a research tool to assess the prevalence and contextual triggers of craving among different types of pornography users.

  16. A psychometric analysis of the three gunas.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D B

    1999-06-01

    The Vedic Personality Inventory was devised to assess the validity of the Vedic concept of the three gunas or modes of nature as a psychological categorization system. The sample of 619 subjects included persons of varying ages and occupations from a middle-size city in southeastern United States, and also of subscribers to a magazine focusing on Eastern-style spirituality. The original 90-item inventory was shortened to 56 items on the basis of reliability and validity analyses. Cronbach alpha for the three subscales ranged from .93 to .94, and the corrected item-total correlation of every item score with its subscale score was greater than .50. Three measures of convergent validity and four measures of discriminant validity provide evidence for construct validity. The loading of every item on the scale is stronger for the intended subscale than for any other subscale. Although each subscale contains congeneric items, the factors are not independent. The nonorthogonality is consistent with Vedic theory. This inventory requires psychometric development and testing cross-culturally as well as to be experimentally implemented in group research and individual assessment.

  17. Theory of Mind and psychometric schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Diane Carol; Pflum, Madeline Johnson

    2011-07-30

    The extent to which Theory of Mind impairments are a trait associated with schizotypy is unclear. To date, findings have been mixed. We compared two groups of psychometrically identified schizotypes, namely, those characterized by positive schizotypy (perceptual aberrations and magical ideation; n=36) and those characterized by negative schizotypy (social anhedonia; n=30) to a low schizotypy comparison group (n=68) in terms of their Theory of Mind performance. Theory of Mind was assessed in two ways: a composite Hinting Task and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test. The groups were also compared in terms of their self-reported levels of referential thinking. Our results indicate that individuals characterized by positive schizotypy show Theory of Mind deficits, as measured by the Hinting Task. The three groups did not differ in terms of the Eyes Test. Referential thinking was significantly associated with the Eyes Test but not the Hinting Task. Overall these findings suggest that different aspects of schizotypy are associated differentially with Theory of Mind deficits. The results also provide further rationale for the inclusion of multiple tasks when attempting to study multifaceted constructs such as Theory of Mind.

  18. The Process of Change in Complicated Grief Group Therapy for Bereaved Dementia Caregivers: an Evaluation Using the Meaning of Loss Codebook.

    PubMed

    Supiano, Katherine P; Haynes, Lara Burns; Pond, Vicki

    2017-01-04

    Caring for a person with dementia is challenging and has adverse health and mental health effects that, for 9-25% of caregivers persist into bereavement in the form of complicated grief (CG). For those bereaved dementia caregivers unable to satisfactorily process grief, specialized Complicated Grief Group Therapy (CGGT) can restore a healthy grief process. We investigated the progression of therapeutic change in CGGT participants (N = 16 in three treatment groups), using an adapted version of Meaning of Loss Codebook (MLC; Gillies et al., 2014, 2015) that captured both negatively and positively valenced meaning of death themes in CGGT participants. We evaluated MLC coded video segments of group therapy sessions focusing on inflection points in grief transitions including retelling of the death story, voiced interpretation of imaginal conversations with the deceased care recipient and self-statements of change. Participants demonstrated positive gains in 16 thematic areas, most notably in moving on with life, in summoning pleasant memories, and in ascribing bad memories to disease rather than the decedent. Our hypothesis that meaning of loss themes would transition from negatively to positively valenced interpretations of the death over the course of treatment was supported, and will contribute to refinement of CGGT treatment.

  19. Psychometric properties and construct validity of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale among Hungarian men.

    PubMed

    Babusa, Bernadett; Urbán, Róbert; Czeglédi, Edit; Túry, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    Limited studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale (MASS), a measure of muscle dysmorphia, in different cultures and languages. The aims were to examine the psychometric properties of the Hungarian version of the MASS (MASS-HU), and to investigate its relationship with self-esteem and exercise-related variables. Two independent samples of male weight lifters (ns=289 and 43), and a sample of undergraduates (n=240) completed the MASS, Eating Disorder Inventory, and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Exploratory factor analysis supported the original five-factor structure of the MASS only in the weight lifter sample. The MASS-HU had excellent scale score reliability and good test-retest reliability. The construct validity of the MASS-HU was tested with multivariate regression analyses which indicated an inverse relationship between self-esteem and muscle dysmorphia. The 18-item MASS-HU was found to be a useful measure for the assessment of muscle dysmorphia among male weight lifters.

  20. Psychometric evaluation of the adolescent and parent versions of the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT).

    PubMed

    Vadlin, Sofia; Åslund, Cecilia; Rehn, Mattias; Nilsson, Kent W

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT) and its parent version (GAIT-P), in a representative community sample of adolescents and parents in Västmanland, Sweden. Self-rated and parent-rated gaming addictive symptoms identified by GAIT and GAIT-P were analyzed for frequency of endorsement, internal consistency, concordance, factor structure, prevalence of Internet gaming disorder (IGD), concurrence with the Gaming Addiction Scale for Adolescents, 7-item version (GAS) and the parent version of GAS (GAS-P), and for sex differences. The 12-month prevalence of IGD was found to be 1.3% with GAIT and 2.4% with GAIT-P. Results also indicate promising psychometric results within this population, with high internal consistency, and high concurrent validity with GAS and GAS-P. Concordance between adolescents and parents ratings was high, although moderate in girls. Although exploratory factor analysis indicated poor model fit, it also indicated unidimensionality and high factor loadings in all analyses. GAIT and GAIT-P are suitable for continued use in measuring gaming addiction in adolescents, and, with the additional two items, they now cover all nine IGD criteria.

  1. Psychometric properties of the Japanese version of the Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale: Self-Report.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Tsuji, Yui; Kanazawa, Junichiro; Sakai, Takanobu; Weiss, Margaret D

    2016-12-24

    The Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale Self-Report has been translated into nine languages and has been widely used in assessing functional impairment of adults with ADHD. This study is a psychometric validation of the WFIRS-S in Japanese. The WFIRS-S-J and other questionnaires were administered to 46 adults with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), 104 control adults, and 889 university students. ADHD diagnoses were made using the Japanese semi-structured diagnostic interview for adult ADHD, which is compatible with the DSM-5. All subscales of the WFIRS-S-J had Cronbach's α values of around 0.80. Total scores on the WFIRS-S-J had high test-retest reliability after a 2-week interval. The total score, subscale scores, and 59 of the individual item scores of the 70 items in the WFIRS-S-J were significantly higher in the ADHD group than in the other two groups, although more than half of the items in subdomain G (risk) showed floor effects and did not reach significance. Generally WFIRS-S-J subdomain scores were moderately correlated with scores on the Japanese version of Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scales Self-Report subscales. WFIRS-S-J scores were also correlated (albeit more weakly; 0.31 ≤ r ≤ 0.55) with Beck Depression Inventory II total scores. The WFIRS-S-J showed acceptable psychometric properties, although further study is necessary.

  2. Working alliance inventory applied to virtual and augmented reality (WAI-VAR): psychometrics and therapeutic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Miragall, Marta; Baños, Rosa M.; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Botella, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric properties of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short (WAI-S) adaptation to Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) therapies (WAI-VAR). The relationship between the therapeutic alliance (TA) with VR and AR and clinically significant change (CSC) is also explored. Seventy-five patients took part in this study (74.7% women, Mage = 34.41). Fear of flying and adjustment disorder patients received VR therapy, and cockroach phobia patients received AR therapy. Psychometric properties, CSC, one-way ANOVA, Spearman’s Correlations and Multiple Regression were calculated. The WAI-VAR showed a unidimensional structure, high internal consistency and adequate convergent validity. “Not changed” patients scored lower on the WAI-VAR than “improved” and “recovered” patients. Correlation between the WAI-VAR and CSC was moderate. The best fitting model for predicting CSC was a linear combination of the TA with therapist (WAI-S) and the TA with VR and AR (WAI-VAR), due to the latter variable slightly increased the percentage of variability accounted for in CSC. The WAI-VAR is the first validated instrument to measure the TA with VR and AR in research and clinical practice. This study reveals the importance of the quality of the TA with technologies in achieving positive outcomes in the therapy. PMID:26500589

  3. Working alliance inventory applied to virtual and augmented reality (WAI-VAR): psychometrics and therapeutic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miragall, Marta; Baños, Rosa M; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Botella, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric properties of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short (WAI-S) adaptation to Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) therapies (WAI-VAR). The relationship between the therapeutic alliance (TA) with VR and AR and clinically significant change (CSC) is also explored. Seventy-five patients took part in this study (74.7% women, M age = 34.41). Fear of flying and adjustment disorder patients received VR therapy, and cockroach phobia patients received AR therapy. Psychometric properties, CSC, one-way ANOVA, Spearman's Correlations and Multiple Regression were calculated. The WAI-VAR showed a unidimensional structure, high internal consistency and adequate convergent validity. "Not changed" patients scored lower on the WAI-VAR than "improved" and "recovered" patients. Correlation between the WAI-VAR and CSC was moderate. The best fitting model for predicting CSC was a linear combination of the TA with therapist (WAI-S) and the TA with VR and AR (WAI-VAR), due to the latter variable slightly increased the percentage of variability accounted for in CSC. The WAI-VAR is the first validated instrument to measure the TA with VR and AR in research and clinical practice. This study reveals the importance of the quality of the TA with technologies in achieving positive outcomes in the therapy.

  4. The measurement of executive function at age 3 years: psychometric properties and criterion validity of a new battery of tasks.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Michael T; Blair, Clancy B; Wirth, R J; Greenberg, Mark

    2010-06-01

    In this study, the authors examined the psychometric properties and criterion validity of a newly developed battery of tasks that were designed to assess executive function (EF) abilities in early childhood. The battery was included in the 36-month assessment of the Family Life Project (FLP), a prospective longitudinal study of 1,292 children oversampled from low-income and African American families. Ninety-one percent of children were able to complete 1 or more of the tasks. Psychometric analyses were used to test the dimensionality of each task, evaluate the item and task properties, test the dimensionality of the task battery, and evaluate the criterion validity of the battery with multi-informant measures of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomatology and child performance on two subtests of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence. Results indicated that the tasks were successful in measuring interindividual differences in child EF ability, that task scores were most informative about ability level for children in the low to moderate range of ability, that children's performance across the entire battery was adequately summarized by a single factor, and that individual differences on the EF battery were related to ADHD symptomatology and intelligence in expected ways. Results are discussed with respect to the importance of developing psychometrically sound, scalable instruments that facilitate the measurement of interindividual differences in intraindividual change of EF across the early childhood period.

  5. Music Therapy Helping to Work Through Grief and Finding a Personal Identity.

    PubMed

    Smeijsters; van Den Hurk J

    1999-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative single-case study of the treatment of a woman having problems with grief and finding a personal identity. In this case the treatment has been supported by research techniques like categorizing, developing themes, writing memos, member checking, peer debriefing, and triangulation. During treatment, diagnostic themes were generated such as: problems of identity, low self-esteem, a lack of assertiveness, and problems expressing feelings and problems in relationships. These themes became important along with feelings of depression which she experienced since the death of her beloved husband. The study describes how the client was able to express, in an unconscious way, a part of her personality, which she had been suppressing since childhood, through playing the piano and vocalizing during the music therapy process. The music therapist used several techniques of improvisation to support the client's cautious steps into a new musical and a new personal world. Tables of music therapy improvisations show how the client became musically expressive, how she found a personal melody and how she developed a closer relationship with the music therapist through musical interaction. Guidelines for similar cases and generated hypotheses about the contribution of music are enclosed as results of research.

  6. The AAP Resilience in the Face of Grief and Loss Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Serwint, Janet R; Bostwick, Susan; Burke, Ann E; Church, Annamaria; Gogo, Albina; Hofkosh, Dena; King, Marta; Linebarger, Jennifer; McCabe, Megan E; Moon, Margaret; Osta, Amanda; Rana, Deborah T; Sahler, O J; Smith, Keely; Rivera, Florence; Baldwin, Constance

    2016-11-01

    A career in pediatrics can bring great joy and satisfaction. It can also be challenging and lead some providers to manifest burnout and depression. A curriculum designed to help pediatric health providers acquire resilience and adaptive skills may be a key element in transforming times of anxiety and grief into rewarding professional experiences. The need for this curriculum was identified by the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Medical Students, Residents and Fellowship Trainees. A working group of educators developed this curriculum to address the professional attitudes, knowledge, and skills essential to thrive despite the many stressors inevitable in clinical care. Fourteen modules incorporating adult learning theory were developed. The first 2 sections of the curriculum address the knowledge and skills to approach disclosure of life-altering diagnoses, and the second 2 sections focus on the provider's responses to difficult patient care experiences and their needs to develop strategies to maintain their own well-being. This curriculum addresses the intellectual and emotional characteristics patient care medical professionals need to provide high-quality, compassionate care while also addressing active and intentional ways to maintain personal wellness and resilience.

  7. The Journey through Grief: Insights from a Qualitative Study of Electronic Health Record Implementation

    PubMed Central

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Hefner, Jennifer L; Sieck, Cynthia J; Huerta, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Objective To improve understanding of facilitators of EHR system implementation, paying particular attention to opportunities to maximize physician adoption and effective deployment. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected from 47 physician and 35 administrative key informants from six U.S. health care organizations identified because of purported success with EHR implementation. Study Design We conducted interviews and focus groups in an extensive qualitative study. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Verbatim transcripts were analyzed both deductively and inductively using the constant comparative method. Principal Findings Conceptualizing EHR adoption as loss through the lens of Kübler-Ross's five stages of grief model may help individuals and organizations more effectively orient to the challenge of change. Coupled with Kotter's eight-step change management framework, we offer a structure to facilitate organizations' movement through the EHR implementation journey. Combining insights from these frameworks, we identify 10 EHR strategies that can help address EHR implementation barriers. Conclusions Loss is one part of change often overlooked. Addressing it directly and compassionately can potentially facilitate the EHR implementation journey. We offer a summarized list of deployment strategies that are sensitive to these issues to support physician transition to new technologies that will bring value to clinical practice. PMID:25219627

  8. Care arrangement, grief, and psychological problems among children orphaned by AIDS in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoxiang; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Junfeng; Yang, Hongmei; Stanton, Bonita

    2007-01-01

    The China Ministry of Health has estimated that there are at least 100,000 AIDS orphans in China. The UNICEF China Office estimates that between 150,000 and 250,000 additional children will be orphaned by AIDS over the next five years. However, limited data are available regarding the socio-demographic characteristics, care arrangement, barriers to appropriate grief resolution and psychological problems among AIDS orphans in China. In this article, we review secondary data and reports from scientific literature, government, non-governmental organizations, and public media regarding children orphaned by AIDS in China to address their living situation, bereavement process, and psychological problems. Our review suggests that AIDS orphans in China are living in a stressful environment with many orphans struggling with psychological problems and unmet basic needs such as food, shelter, education, and medical care. Based on our review, we suggest that future studies should address the psychosocial needs of AIDS orphans in China and develop health promotion programs to mitigate the negative impact of parental death on the physical and psychosocial well-being of these orphans. PMID:18058390

  9. A space for mothers: grief as identity construction on memorial websites created by SIDS parents.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Christopher J; Krueger, Guenther

    2011-01-01

    In this article we conduct a textual analysis of memorial websites created by mothers who have experienced a loss due to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Using an online Internet ethnographic approach, we reviewed a series of 20 sites in an attempt to analyze the motivations of the site creators as manifested in their online projects. We spent time on the sites, moving through all facets of them, following links, and experiencing them the way a visitor would encounter them. In this virtual exploration we uncovered personal narratives, community building, religious imagery, and numerous examples of social networking. We also analyzed guest books in order to understand who visits these sites and their reasons for doing so. We conclude that development of these sites are a process that helps some mothers in their grief and gives them a focus and activity that is helpful and perhaps healing. More importantly perhaps is the potential for community building and networking that this type of activity allows. As an extension of a real-world memorial such as a gravesite, a virtual mourning space provides more in the way of these types of communications. Our work suggests that memorial websites constructed by SIDS parents help in meaning and identity reconstruction after loss.

  10. Cohesion and outcome in short-term psychodynamic groups for complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Kipnes, Dianne R; Piper, William E; Joyce, Anthony S

    2002-10-01

    This study used two measures of cohesion for the process analysis of 12 short-term, time-limited groups for complicated grief. The measures had similar theoretical definitions but differed in terms of rater source (member vs. observer), measurement score (mean of items vs. global rating), and rating unit (individual vs. group). We examined the relationship between the measures, assessed the development of cohesion over the life of the group, and evaluated each measure's relationship to outcome. A principal components analysis with each measure yielded one cohesion component, which supported a unidimensional model; however, the two cohesion components were independent of each other, which supported a multidimensional model. Repeated measures analyses indicated that observer-rated cohesion developed in a quadratic manner (v pattern) across sessions, while member-rated cohesion developed in a linear manner. The object focus (the group, other members, the therapist) of the members' ratings determined whether cohesion increased or decreased across sessions. No significant relationships between cohesion and outcome were identified. Implications of the findings for the understanding of group cohesion are considered.

  11. Is post-mortem harm possible? Understanding death harm and grief.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, Floris

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this article is not to affirm or deny particular philosophical positions, but to explore the limits of intelligibility about what post-mortem harm means, especially in the light of improper post-mortem procedures at Bristol and Alder Hey hospitals in the late 1990s. The parental claims of post-mortem harm to dead children at Alder Hey Hospital are reviewed from five different philosophical perspectives, eventually settling on a crucial difference of perspective about how we understand harm to the dead. On the one hand there is the broadly 'analytical' tradition(1) of thinking that predicates the notion of harm on the basis of an existing subject. Since the dead are non-existent persons, it makes little sense to view the dead as being harmed. On the other hand, there is a phenomenological perspective, where the dead, in respect to the experience of grief, are existentially absent. This forms the basis that it is possible to harm grieving parent's experiences of how their dead are treated. The article ends with a short examination of what harming the dead implies for traditional bioethical concerns, namely, obtaining informed consent from significant others when planning medical research on the newly dead.

  12. Attachment, continuing bonds, and complicated grief following violent loss: testing a moderated model.

    PubMed

    Currier, Joseph M; Irish, Jennifer E F; Neimeyer, Robert A; Foster, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing consensus that mourners' general attachment security and ongoing sense of connectedness to the deceased figure prominently in adjustment to bereavement. However, the interplay between these variables has not been investigated thoroughly. We therefore studied 195 young adults who were bereaved by violent causes (homicide, suicide, and fatal accidents) in the previous 2 years, measuring their attachment-related insecurities (anxiety and avoidance), their specific ongoing attachment or "continuing bond" (CB) to the deceased, and their complicated grief (CG) symptomatology over the loss of this relationship. Analyses indicated that CBs were concurrently linked with greater CG symptomatology. However, other results also suggested that attachment could moderate the adaptiveness of maintaining a sense of connection to the deceased loved one. Specifically, CBs were less predictive of CG symptomatology for individuals with high anxiety and low avoidance, and most predictive of intense grieving for bereaved people whose attachment styles were more highly avoidant and minimally anxious. These findings suggest the relevance of evaluating the appropriateness of clinical techniques that emphasize or deemphasize the CB for mourners who differ in their styles of attachment. Such studies could potentially promote a better match of interventions to clients whose styles of coping are congruent with these procedures.

  13. Schizoid personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Triebwasser, Joseph; Chemerinski, Eran; Roussos, Panos; Siever, Larry J

    2012-12-01

    Schizoid personality disorder (ScPD) is one of the "odd cluster" or "cluster A" personality disorders in DSM-IV. In the present article, the authors review information pertaining to the psychometric characteristics of ScPD as gleaned from a search of relevant publications as well as from databases of personality disorder study groups. Comparatively little evidence exists for the validity and reliability of ScPD as a separate, multifaceted personality disorder. Some authors, moreover, have contended that the group of patients termed "schizoid" actually fall into two distinct groups--an "affect constricted" group, who might better be subsumed within schizotypal personality disorder, and a "seclusive" group, who might better be subsumed within avoidant personality disorder. The research-based justification for retaining ScPD as an independent diagnosis is sufficiently sparse for it to seem reasonable to remove ScPD from the list of personality disorders in DSM-V, and instead to invite clinicians to code for schizoid traits using a dimensional model.

  14. Psychometric properties of the mobility inventory for agoraphobia: convergent, discriminant, and criterion-related validity.

    PubMed

    Chambless, Dianne L; Sharpless, Brian A; Rodriguez, Dianeth; McCarthy, Kevin S; Milrod, Barbara L; Khalsa, Shabad-Ratan; Barber, Jacques P

    2011-12-01

    Aims of this study were (a) to summarize the psychometric literature on the Mobility Inventory for Agoraphobia (MIA), (b) to examine the convergent and discriminant validity of the MIA's Avoidance Alone and Avoidance Accompanied rating scales relative to clinical severity ratings of anxiety disorders from the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (ADIS), and (c) to establish a cutoff score indicative of interviewers' diagnosis of agoraphobia for the Avoidance Alone scale. A meta-analytic synthesis of 10 published studies yielded positive evidence for internal consistency and convergent and discriminant validity of the scales. Participants in the present study were 129 people with a diagnosis of panic disorder. Internal consistency was excellent for this sample, α=.95 for AAC and .96 for AAL. When the MIA scales were correlated with interviewer ratings, evidence for convergent and discriminant validity for AAL was strong (convergent r with agoraphobia severity ratings=.63 vs. discriminant rs of .10-.29 for other anxiety disorders) and more modest but still positive for AAC (.54 vs. .01-.37). Receiver operating curve analysis indicated that the optimal operating point for AAL as an indicator of ADIS agoraphobia diagnosis was 1.61, which yielded sensitivity of .87 and specificity of .73.

  15. Depression and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Marshall, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains four articles related to depression and aging. Compares normal adults with those having a major depressive disorder. Focuses on life satisfaction in the elderly, describing an individualized measure of life satisfaction. Describes similarities and differences between grief and depression. Contains a psychometric analysis of the Zung…

  16. The psychometric properties of the personality inventory for DSM-5 in an APA DSM-5 field trial sample.

    PubMed

    Quilty, Lena C; Ayearst, Lindsay; Chmielewski, Michael; Pollock, Bruce G; Bagby, R Michael

    2013-06-01

    Section 3 of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes a hybrid model of personality pathology, in which dimensional personality traits are used to derive one of seven categorical personality disorder diagnoses. The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) was developed by the DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders workgroup and their consultants to produce a freely available instrument to assess the personality traits within this new system. To date, the psychometric properties of the PID-5 have been evaluated primarily in undergraduate student and community adult samples. In the current investigation, we extend this line of research to a psychiatric patient sample who participated in the APA DSM-5 Field Trial (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health site). A total of 201 psychiatric patients (102 men, 99 women) completed the PID-5 and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R). The internal consistencies of the PID-5 domain and facet trait scales were acceptable. Results supported the unidimensional structure of all trait scales but one, and the convergence between the PID-5 and analogous NEO PI-R scales. Evidence for discriminant validity was mixed. Overall, the current investigation provides support for the psychometric properties of this diagnostic instrument in psychiatric samples.

  17. Integrating Cognitive and Psychometric Models to Measure Document Literacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    AD-A215 504 INTEGRATING COGNITIVE AND PSYCHOMETRIC MODELS TO MEASURE DOCUMENT LITERACY Kathleen Sheehan and Robert J. Mislevy DTICEtET -C NOV 2 4 19...Psychometric Models to Measure Document Literacy (Unclassified’) P ERSONAL ~RS Kathleen Sheehan and Robert J. Mislevv 𔃽a -vPS OF REPOR 3o 󈧏ME CD...Logistic Test ’,’ode’ literacy assessment; National Assessment of fducational Pl.jress * ,BS-DAC- Continue on reverse ,f necessary and ’dentify Oy

  18. Psychometric properties of the Pyramids and Palm Trees Test.

    PubMed

    Klein, Liesa A; Buchanan, Jeffrey A

    2009-10-01

    The Pyramids and Palm Trees Test (PPT) is a nonverbal measure of semantic memory that has been frequently used in previous aphasia, agnosia, and dementia research. Very little psychometric information regarding the PPT is available. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the PPT in a population of healthy college students. Results indicated that the PPT achieved poor test-retest reliability, failed to obtain adequate internal consistency, and demonstrated poor convergent validity, but showed acceptable discriminant validity. The results of this study suggest that the PPT lacks acceptable reliability and validity for use with a college student population.

  19. Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: psychometric evidence and taxonomic implications.

    PubMed

    Clark, L A; Watson, D

    1991-08-01

    We review psychometric and other evidence relevant to mixed anxiety-depression. Properties of anxiety and depression measures, including the convergent and discriminant validity of self- and clinical ratings, and interrater reliability, are examined in patient and normal samples. Results suggest that anxiety and depression can be reliably and validly assessed; moreover, although these disorders share a substantial component of general affective distress, they can be differentiated on the basis of factors specific to each syndrome. We also review evidence for these specific factors, examining the influence of context and scale content on ratings, factor analytic studies, and the role of low positive affect in depression. With these data, we argue for a tripartite structure consisting of general distress, physiological hyperarousal (specific anxiety), and anhedonia (specific depression), and we propose a diagnosis of mixed anxiety-depression.

  20. Psychometric properties of the self-rating organization scale with adult samples.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Tsuji, Yui; Ando, Mizuho

    2016-01-01

    Organization skills are defined broadly to include both materials and temporal features. Given its symptoms and neurobiological features, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) should be susceptible to impairment in organization. A valid organization scale is imperative to assess and intervene individuals with ADHD. However, there is no validated organization scale in Japan. Referring to existing scales and clinical experience, the self-rating organization scale (SOS) was developed and tested in terms of its psychometric properties with 1,017 adults and students including 47 adults with ADHD. Additionally, cutoffs for disorganization were set for clinical utility. Three factors (materials disorganization, temporal disorganization, and mess) were extracted by factor analyses. The index for reliability and validity of the SOS was acceptable. The factor "mess" could reflect the unique aspect of the Japanese environment. Further study is needed to enhance the clinical utility of the SOS.