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Sample records for grit-blasted titanium stems

  1. Acid etching and plasma sterilization fail to improve osseointegration of grit blasted titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Saksø, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Stig S; Saksø, Henrik; Baas, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between implant surface and surrounding bone influences implant fixation. We attempted to improve the bone-implant interaction by 1) adding surface micro scale topography by acid etching, and 2) removing surface-adherent pro-inflammatory agents by plasma cleaning. Implant fixation was evaluated by implant osseointegration and biomechanical fixation.The study consisted of two paired animal sub-studies where 10 skeletally mature Labrador dogs were used. Grit blasted titanium alloy implants were inserted press fit in each proximal tibia. In the first study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants. In the second study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants that were further treated with plasma sterilization. Implant performance was evaluated by histomorphometrical investigation (tissue-to-implant contact, peri-implant tissue density) and mechanical push-out testing after four weeks observation time.Neither acid etching nor plasma sterilization of the grit blasted implants enhanced osseointegration or mechanical fixation in this press-fit canine implant model in a statistically significant manner.

  2. Acid Etching and Plasma Sterilization Fail to Improve Osseointegration of Grit Blasted Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Saksø, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Stig S; Saksø, Henrik; Baas, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between implant surface and surrounding bone influences implant fixation. We attempted to improve the bone-implant interaction by 1) adding surface micro scale topography by acid etching, and 2) removing surface-adherent pro-inflammatory agents by plasma cleaning. Implant fixation was evaluated by implant osseointegration and biomechanical fixation. The study consisted of two paired animal sub-studies where 10 skeletally mature Labrador dogs were used. Grit blasted titanium alloy implants were inserted press fit in each proximal tibia. In the first study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants. In the second study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants that were further treated with plasma sterilization. Implant performance was evaluated by histomorphometrical investigation (tissue-to-implant contact, peri-implant tissue density) and mechanical push-out testing after four weeks observation time. Neither acid etching nor plasma sterilization of the grit blasted implants enhanced osseointegration or mechanical fixation in this press-fit canine implant model in a statistically significant manner. PMID:22962567

  3. Adult Stem Cells Properties in Terms of Commitment, Aging and Biological Safety of Grit-Blasted and Acid-Etched Ti Dental Implants Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo - Guirado, José L.; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces. PMID:25635249

  4. Early bone healing around 2 different experimental, HA grit-blasted, and dual acid-etched titanium implant surfaces. A pilot study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gobbato, Luca; Arguello, Emilio; Martin, Ignacio Sanz; Hawley, Charles E; Griffin, Terrence J

    2012-12-01

    To compare early bone healing around different experimental titanium implant surfaces and to evaluate the role of a calcium phosphate-coated implant surface because it relates to bone-implant contact (BIC). An experimental hydroxyapatite (HA) grit-blasted and dual acid-etched titanium surface (BAE-1) was compared to an experimental HA grit-blasted and dual acid-etched surface treated with nanometer-scale crystals of HA (BAE-2). Both experimental implant surfaces were implanted onto the tibias of 4 New Zealand white rabbits. The animals were killed at 1,6, 21, and 90 days after the implant surgery. Descriptive histology was performed at the healing responses of both implant surfaces. Quantitative morphology assessment provided measurements of BIC, number of bone multicellular units (BMUs), average penetration of BMUs, and maximum penetration of BMUs that were manually made using imaging computer software. The overall BIC for the BAE-2 implant was higher than that for the BAE-1 implant at 21 days of healing. However, there was no significant difference at 90 days of healing. It is concluded from this animal pilot study that the bioactive BAE-2 implant surface provided a better BIC with healthy bone remodeling at 21 days of healing.

  5. Acid and alkali etching of grit blasted zirconia: Impact on adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of MG63 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Reinhard; Hedbom, Erik; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Heuberger, Roman; Buser, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for evaluating zirconia surface modifications and their potential impact on the biological response of osteogenic cells. Grit blasted zirconia discs were either left untreated or underwent acid or alkaline etching. Adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of MG63 cells was determined after one week of culture. The macro-scaled roughness of the grit blasted zirconia discs, independent of the surface treatment, was within a narrow range and only slightly smoother than titanium discs. However, the alkaline- and acid-etching led to an increase of the micro-roughness of the surface. The surface modifications had no effect on cell spreading and did not cause significant change in the expression of differentiation markers. Thus, in this respective setting, morphologic changes observed upon treatment of grit blasted zirconia discs with acid or alkaline do not translate into changes in MG63 cell adhesion or differentiation and are comparable to findings with anodized titanium discs.

  6. Metallurgical Evaluation of Grit Blasted Versus Non-Grit Blasted Iridium Alloy Clad Vent Set Cup Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, George B; Longmire, Hu Foster

    2010-02-01

    Metallurgical evaluations were conducted to determine what, if any, grain size differences exist between grit blasted and non-grit blasted DOP-26 iridium alloy cup surfaces and if grit blasting imparts sufficient compressive cold work to induce abnormal grain growth during subsequent temperature exposures. Metallographic measurements indicated that grit blasting cold worked the outside cup surface to a depth of approximately 19 {micro}m. Subsequent processing through the air burn-off (635 C/4h) and vacuum outgassing (1250 C/1h) operations was found to uniformly recrystallize the cold worked surface to produce grains with an average diameter of approximately 8.5 {micro}m (American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) grain size number 11). Follow-on heat treatments at 1375 C, 1500 C, and 1900 C for durations ranging from 1 min to 70 h yielded uniform grain sizes and no abnormal grain growth from grit blasting. Abnormal grain growth was noted at the 1500 C and 1900 C heat treatments in areas of cold work from excessive clamping during sample preparation.

  7. SURFACE PREPARATION OF STEEL SUBSTRATES USING GRIT-BLASTING

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; D. J. Varacalle, Jr.; D. Deason; W. Rhodaberger; E. Sampson

    2005-05-01

    The primary purpose of grit blasting for thermal spray applications is to ensure a strong mechanical bond between the substrate and the coating by the enhanced roughening of the substrate material. This study presents statistically designed experiments that were accomplished to investigate the effect of abrasives on roughness for A36/1020 steel. The experiments were conducted using a Box statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. Three grit blasting parameters and their effect on the resultant substrate roughness were investigated. These include blast media, blast pressure, and working distance. The substrates were characterized for roughness using surface profilometry. These attributes were correlated with the changes in operating parameters. Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) coatings of aluminum and zinc/aluminum were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates. These coatings were then tested for bond strength. Bond strength studies were conducted utilizing a portable adhesion tester following ASTM standard D4541.

  8. Grit Blasting Scribes Coats For Tests Of Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.

    1991-01-01

    Grit-blasting technique for cutting line gaps in paints, hard coats, lubricants, and other coating films undergoing development. Line gaps cut in chevron patterns, groups of parallel lines, or other prescribed patterns, in preparation for testing adhesions of coats to substrates by attempting to peel patterned areas off with adhesive tapes. Damage to substrate reduced.

  9. Grit Blasting Scribes Coats For Tests Of Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.

    1991-01-01

    Grit-blasting technique for cutting line gaps in paints, hard coats, lubricants, and other coating films undergoing development. Line gaps cut in chevron patterns, groups of parallel lines, or other prescribed patterns, in preparation for testing adhesions of coats to substrates by attempting to peel patterned areas off with adhesive tapes. Damage to substrate reduced.

  10. Mechanical assessment of grit blasting surface treatments of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the influence of surface preparation treatments of dental implants on their potential (mechanical) fatigue failure, with emphasis on grit-blasting. The investigation includes limited fatigue testing of implants, showing the relationship between fatigue life and surface damage condition. Those observations are corroborated by a detailed failure analysis of retrieved fracture dental implants. In both cases, the negative effect of embedded alumina particles related to the grit-blasting process is identified. The study also comprises a numerical simulation part of the grit blasting process that reveals, for a given implant material and particle size, the existence of a velocity threshold, below which the rough surface is obtained without damage, and beyond which the creation of significant surface damage will severely reduce the fatigue life, thus increasing fracture probability. The main outcome of this work is that the overall performance of dental implants comprises, in addition to the biological considerations, mechanical reliability aspects. Fatigue fracture is a central issue, and this study shows that uncontrolled surface roughening grit-blasting treatments can induce significant surface damage which accelerate fatigue fracture under certain conditions, even if those treatments are beneficial to the osseointegration process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Diffuse reflectance FTIR of stains on grit blasted metals

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.L.; Hallman, R.L. Jr.; Cox, R.L.

    1997-08-09

    Diffuse reflectance mid-infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy has been applied to the detection of oil contamination on grit-blasted metals. The object of this application is to detect and discriminate between silicone and hydrocarbon oil contamination at levels approaching 10 mg/m{sup 2}. A portable FTIR spectrometer with dedicated diffuse reflectance optics was developed for this purpose. Using translation devices positioned by instructions from the spectrometer operating system, images of macroscopic substrates were produced with millimeter spatial resolution. The pixels that comprise an image are each a full mid-infrared spectrum with excellent signal-to-noise, each determined as individual files and uniquely saved to disc. Reduced spectra amplitudes, based on peak height, area, or other chemometric techniques, mapped as a function of the spatial coordinates of the pixel are used to display the image. This paper demonstrates the application of the technique to the analysis of stains on grit-blasted metals, including the calibration of the method, the inspection of substrates, and the migration of oil contamination.

  12. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  13. Novel growth method of carbon nanotubes using catalyst-support layer developed by alumina grit blasting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Ishii, Juntaro; Ota, Keishin

    2016-08-19

    We propose an efficient method of growing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on a variety of metals, alloys, and carbon materials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) assisted by a simple surface treatment of the materials. The main feature of this method is the application of grit blasting with fine alumina particles to the development of a catalyst-support layer required for the growth of CNTs on various conductive materials, including ultra-hard metals such as tungsten. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that grit blasting can form a non-continuous layer where alumina nanoparticles are embedded as residues in the blasting media left on the treated surfaces. This work reveals that such a non-continuous alumina layer can behave as the catalyst-support layer, which is generally prepared by sputter or a vacuum evaporation coating process that considerably restricts the practical applications of CNTs. We have attempted to grow CNTs on grit-blasted substrates of eighteen conventionally used conductive materials using CVD together with a floating iron catalyst. The proposed method was successful in growing multi-walled CNT arrays on the grit-blasted surfaces of all the examined materials, demonstrating its versatility. Furthermore, we found that the group IV metal oxide films thermally grown on the as-received substrates can support the catalytic activity of iron nanoparticles in the CVD process just as well as the alumina film developed by grit blasting. Spectral emissivity of the CNT arrays in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges has been determined to assess the applicability of the CNT arrays as a black coating media.

  14. Alumina grit blasting parameters for surface preparation in the plasma spraying operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellali, M.; Grimaud, A.; Leger, A. C.; Fauchais, P.; Lu, J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper examines how the grit blasting process influences the surface roughness of different sub-strates, the grit residue, and the grit erosion. The influence of grit blasting conditions on induced sub-strate residual stresses is also discussed. Aluminum alloy, cast iron, and hard steel were blasted with white alumina grits of 0.5,1, and 1.4 mm mean diameters. Grit blasting was performed using either a suction-type or a pressure-type machine equipped with straight nozzles made of B4C. The influence of the follow-ing parameters was studied: grit blasting distance (56 to 200 mm), blasting time (3 to 30 s), angle between nozzle and blasted surface (30°, 60°, 90°), and blasting pressure (0.2 to 0.7 MPa). The roughness of the substrate was characterized either by using a perthometer or by image analysis. The grit residue remain-ing at the blasted surface was evaluated after cleaning by image analysis. The residual stresses induced by grit blasting were determined by using the incremental hole drilling method and by measuring the de-flection of grit-blasted beams. Grit size was determined to be the most important influence on roughness. The average values of Ra and Rt and the percentage of grit residue increased with grit size as well as the depth of the plastic zone under the substrate. An increase of the pressure slightly increased the values of Äa and Rt but also promoted grit breakdown and grit residue. A blasting time of 3 to 6 s was sufficient to obtain the highest roughness and limit the grit breakdown. The residual stresses generated under the blasted surface were compressive, and the depth of the affected zone depended on the grit diameter, the blasting pressure, and the Young’s modulus of the substrate. More-over, the maximum residual stress was reached at the limit of the plastic zone (i.e., several tenths of a mil-limeter below the substrate surface).

  15. Grit blast/silane surface treatment for structural bonding of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Mazza, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    The use of silane coupling agents as prebond surface treatments for aluminum aircraft structure is not new. The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has extensively used a silane surface preparation in applications of bonded composite repairs to aircraft structure. Recently, the USAF has begun to employ bonded composite repair technology as a means to extend the service lives of its aging aircraft. A grit blast/silane surface treatment optimized by the USAF Wright Laboratory Materials Directorate (ML) has been used in many of the applications, most notably on the C-141 aircraft. The ML process is desirable for many USAF applications since it does not contain acids which could harm aircraft structure, and it is similar to the Australian technique which has claimed years of success. The ML grit blast/silane surface treatment was inspired by the Australian process which was developed by the Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory (AMRL). The Australians generated considerable interest in their process, however, several key organizations were unable to duplicate the performance cited by AMRL. Some questioned the viability of the Australian silane process. To resolve this question for Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (WR-ALC) personnel, as well as continue ML`s ongoing silane work, a program was run to understand the AMRL surface prep. This led to the development of the ML grit blast/silane process and its on-aircraft applications.

  16. Nondestructive thermoelectric evaluation of the grit blasting induced effects in metallic biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon, H.; Ruiz, A.; Barriuso, S.; González-Carrasco, J. L.; Caballero, F. G.; Lieblich, M.

    2013-01-01

    Grit blasting is a surface treatment process widely used to enhance mechanical fixation of the implants through increasing their roughness. Test samples of two metallic biomaterial alloys such 316LVM and Ti6Al4V were blasted by projecting Al2O3 and ZrO2 particles which yield a coarse and a fine rough surface. Then, the blasted samples were thermally treated before and after partial stress relaxation and measured by non-destructive thermoelectric techniques (NDTT), the non-contacting and contacting thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements respectively. It has been found that the TEP measurements are associated directly with the subtle material variations such as cold work and compressive residual stresses due to plastic deformation produced by grit blasting. The TEP measurements clearly demonstrate that the non-contact NDTT technique is very sensitive to the reverse transformation of the α'-martensite (blasted 316LVM) and the expected relaxation of compressive residual stresses with increasing the severity of the thermal treatment (blasted 316LVM and Ti-6Al-4V), while the contact NDTT results are closely related to grain size refinement and work hardening.

  17. Enhanced Cell Integration to Titanium Alloy by Surface Treatment with Microarc Oxidation: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young Wook; Kwon, Soon Yong; Sun, Doo Hoon; Kim, Hyoun Ee

    2009-01-01

    Microarc oxidation (MAO) is a surface treatment that provides nanoporous pits, and thick oxide layers, and incorporates calcium and phosphorus into the coating layer of titanium alloy. We presumed such modification on the surface of titanium alloy by MAO would improve the ability of cementless stems to osseointegrate. We therefore compared the in vitro ability of cells to adhere to MAOed titanium alloy to that of two different types of surface modifications: machined and grit-blasted. We performed energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanned electron microscopy investigations to assess the structure and morphology of the surfaces. Biologic and morphologic responses to osteoblast cell lines (SaOS-2) were then examined by measuring cell proliferation, cell differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity), and αvβ3 integrin. The cell proliferation rate, alkaline phosphatase activity, and cell adhesion in the MAO group increased in comparison to those in the machined and grit-blasted groups. The osteoblast cell lines of the MAO group were also homogeneously spread on the surface, strongly adhered, and well differentiated when compared to the other groups. This method could be a reasonable option for treating the surfaces of titanium alloy for better osseointegration. PMID:19434468

  18. Effect of cold spray deposition of a titanium coating on fatigue behavior of a titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T. S.; Shipway, P. H.; McCartney, D. G.

    2006-12-01

    The deposition of titanium on a titanium alloy substrate is being examined for potential use as a surface treatment for medical prostheses. A Ti6Al4V alloy was coated with pure titanium by cold gas dynamic spraying. Coatings were deposited onto samples with two different surface preparation methods (as-received and grit-blasted). The fatigue life of the as-received and grit-blasted materials, both before and after coating, was measured with a rotating-bend fatigue rig. A 15% reduction in fatigue endurance limit was observed after application of the coating to the as-received substrate, but no significant reduction was observed on its application to the grit-blasted substrate. The reduction in fatigue endurance limit has been related to the substrate-coating interface properties, the elastic modulus, and the residual stress states.

  19. Grit Blasting for Removal of Recast Layer from EDM Process on Inconel 718 Shaft: An Evaluation of Surface Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Jonas; Wretland, Anders; Berglund, Johan

    2016-12-01

    The heat generated during EDM melts the work material and thereby allows large amounts to be removed, but an unfavorable surface of a recast layer (RCL) will also be created. This layer has entirely different properties compared to the bulk. Hence, it is of great interest to efficiently remove this layer and to verify that it has been removed. The main objective of this work has been to study the efficiency of grit blasting for removal of RCL on an EDM aero space shaft. Additionally, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) has been evaluated as a nondestructive measurement to determine RCL presence. The results show that the grit-blasting processing parameters have strong influence on the ability to remove RCL and at the same time introduce beneficial compressive stresses even after short exposure time. Longer exposure will remove the RCL from the surface but also increase the risk that a larger amount of the blasting medium will get stuck into the surface. This investigation shows that a short exposure time in combination with a short grit-blasting nozzle distance is the most preferable process setting. It was further found that handheld XRF equipment can be used as a nondestructive measurement in order to evaluate the amount of RCL present on an EDM surface. This was realized by analyzing the residual elements from the EDM wire.

  20. Significance of the contacting and no contacting thermoelectric power measurements applied to grit blasted medical Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Carreon, H; Barriuso, S; Lieblich, M; González-Carrasco, J L; Jimenez, J A; Caballero, F G

    2013-04-01

    Grit blasting is a surface plastic deformation technique aimed to increase the surface area available for bone/implant apposition, which contributes to improve fixation and mechanical stability of Ti-6Al-4V implants. Besides roughening, grit blasting also causes surface contamination with embedded grit particles and subtle subsurface microstructural changes that, although does not challenge their biocompatibility, might influence other surface dominated properties like corrosion and ion release. Additional benefits are expected due to the induced compressive residual stresses, hence enhancing fatigue strength. The net effect depends on the type of particles used for blasting, but also on the amount of the subsurface cold work associated to the severe surface plastic deformation. In this work we study the potential of the non-contacting and contacting thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements in the analysis of the global changes induced in the Ti6Al4V when blasting the alloy with Al2O3 or ZrO2 particles, which yields a coarse and a fine rough surface, respectively. To reveal the effect of residual stresses, a set of specimens were thermally treated. The study proves that the non-contacting technique is more sensitive to the presence of residual stresses, whereas the contact technique is strongly influenced by the grain size refinements, work hardening and changes in solute.

  1. Optimization of Grit-Blasting Process Parameters for Production of Dense Coatings on Open Pores Metallic Foam Substrates Using Statistical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati, S.; Coyle, T. W.; Mostaghimi, J.

    2015-10-01

    Open pore metallic foam core sandwich panels prepared by thermal spraying of a coating on the foam structures can be used as high-efficiency heat transfer devices due to their high surface area to volume ratio. The structural, mechanical, and physical properties of thermally sprayed skins play a significant role in the performance of the related devices. These properties are mainly controlled by the porosity content, oxide content, adhesion strength, and stiffness of the deposited coating. In this study, the effects of grit-blasting process parameters on the characteristics of the temporary surface created on the metallic foam substrate and on the twin-wire arc-sprayed alloy 625 coating subsequently deposited on the foam were investigated through response surface methodology. Characterization of the prepared surface and sprayed coating was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, roughness measurements, and adhesion testing. Using statistical design of experiments, response surface method, a model was developed to predict the effect of grit-blasting parameters on the surface roughness of the prepared foam and also the porosity content of the sprayed coating. The coating porosity and adhesion strength were found to be determined by the substrate surface roughness, which could be controlled by grit-blasting parameters. Optimization of the grit-blasting parameters was conducted using the fitted model to minimize the porosity content of the coating while maintaining a high adhesion strength.

  2. On the fatigue behavior of medical Ti6Al4V roughened by grit blasting and abrasiveless waterjet peening.

    PubMed

    Lieblich, M; Barriuso, S; Ibáñez, J; Ruiz-de-Lara, L; Díaz, M; Ocaña, J L; Alberdi, A; González-Carrasco, J L

    2016-10-01

    Flat fatigue specimens of biomedical Ti6Al4V ELI alloy were surface-processed by high pressure waterjet peening (WJP) without abrasive particles using moderate to severe conditions that yield roughness values in the range of those obtained by commercial grit blasting (BL) with alumina particles. Fatigue behavior of WJP and BL specimens was characterized under cyclical uniaxial tension tests (R=0.1). The emphasis was put on a comparative analysis of the surface and subsurface induced effects and in their relevance on fatigue behavior. Within the experimental setup of this investigation it resulted that blasting with alumina particles was less harmful for fatigue resistance than abrasiveless WJP. BL specimens resulted in higher subsurface hardening and compressive residual stresses. Specimens treated with more severe WJP parameters presented much higher mass loss and lower compressive residual stresses. From the analysis performed in this work, it follows that, in addition to roughness, waviness emerges as another important topographic parameter to be taken into account to try to predict fatigue behavior. It is envisaged that optimization of WJP parameters with the aim of reducing waviness and mass loss should lead to an improvement of fatigue resistance.

  3. Machining of Aircraft Titanium with Abrasive-Waterjets for Fatigue Critical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. T.; Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E.

    2012-02-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the fatigue performance of abrasive-waterjet- (AWJ-) machined aircraft titanium. Dog-bone specimens machined with AWJs were prepared and tested with and without sanding and dry-grit blasting with Al2O3 as secondary processes. The secondary processes were applied to remove the visual appearance of AWJ-generated striations and to clean up the garnet embedment. The fatigue performance of AWJ-machined specimens was compared with baseline specimens machined with CNC milling. Fatigue test results of the titanium specimens not only confirmed our previous findings in aluminum dog-bone specimens but in comparison also further enhanced the fatigue performance of the titanium. In addition, titanium is known to be difficult to cut, particularly for thick parts, however AWJs cut the material 34% faster han stainless steel. AWJ cutting and dry-grit blasting are shown to be a preferred ombination for processing aircraft titanium that is fatigue critical.

  4. Evaluation and comparison of the effect of different surface treatment modifications on the shear bond strength of a resin cement to titanium: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Veljee, Tahsin Mansur; Shruthi, C. S.; Poojya, R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of grit blasting, chemical treatment, and application of alloy primer combinations on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a self-cure resin cement to titanium surface. Materials and Methods: Fifty cast commercially pure titanium discs (9 mm × 2 mm) were divided into five groups (n = 10), which received the following surface treatments: Control group (no surface treatment), group 1 (grit blasting using 110 µm Al2O3 particles and application of alloy primer), group 2 (grit blasting using 110 µm Al2O3 particles and chemical treatment using 1N HCl), group 3 (chemical treatment using 1N HCl and application of alloy primer), and group 4 (Grit blasting using 110 µm Al2O3 particles, chemical treatment using 1N HCl and application of alloy primer). Superbond C and B resin cement was applied to the treated titanium surfaces including controls. SBSs were determined after thermocycling for 5000 cycles. Data (megapascal) were analyzed by ANOVA and Bonferroni test. Results: Group 4 (grit blasting using 110 µm Al2O3 particles, chemical treatment using 1N hydrochloric acid, and application of alloy primer) produced the highest bond strength followed by group 1, group 3, group 2, and the control group which showed the least bond strength. Conclusion: (1) Air-abrasion with alumina particles increases the micromechanical retention of the resin to titanium. (2) The alloy primer promotes wettability, which increases the adhesive bonding of resin cement to titanium. (3) Chemical treatment using hydrochloric acid effectively pretreats the titanium surface thereby increasing the SBS values. PMID:26929532

  5. Morphometric and mechanical evaluation of titanium implant integration: comparison of five surface structures.

    PubMed

    Svehla, M; Morberg, P; Zicat, B; Bruce, W; Sonnabend, D; Walsh, W R

    2000-07-01

    Achieving a stable bone-implant interface is an important factor in the long-term outcome of joint arthroplasty. In this study, we employed an ovine bicortical model to compare the bone-healing response to five different surfaces on titanium alloy implants: grit blasted (GB), grit blasted plus hydroxyapatite (50 microm thick) coating (GBHA), Porocoat(R) (PC), Porocoat(R) with HA (PCHA) and smooth (S). Push-out testing, histology, and backscatter scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging were employed to assess the healing response at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Push-out testing revealed PC and PCHA surfaces resulted in significantly greater mechanical fixation over all other implant types at all time points (p <.05). HA coating on the grit-blasted surface significantly improved fixation at 8 and 12 weeks (p <.05). The addition of HA onto the porous coating did not significantly improve fixation in this model. Quantification of ingrowth/ongrowth from SEM images revealed that HA coating of the grit-blasted surfaces resulted in significantly more ongrowth at 4 weeks (p <.05).

  6. Machining of Aircraft Titanium with Abrasive-Waterjets for Fatigue Critical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. T.; Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E.

    2010-10-04

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the fatigue performance of AWJ-machined aircraft titanium. Dog-bone specimens machined with AWJs were prepared and tested with and without sanding and dry-grit blasting with Al2O3 as secondary processes. The secondary processes were applied to remove the visual appearance of AWJ-generated striations and to clean up the garnet embedment. The fatigue performance of AWJ-machined specimens was compared with baseline specimens machined with CNC milling. Fatigue test results not only confirmed the findings of the aluminum dog-bone specimens but also further enhance the fatigue performance. In addition, titanium is known to be notoriously difficult to cut with contact tools while AWJs cut it 34% faster than stainless steel. AWJ cutting and dry-grit blasting are shown to be a preferred combination for processing aircraft titanium that is fatigue critical.

  7. The Otto Aufranc Award: Enhanced Biocompatibility of Stainless Steel Implants by Titanium Coating and Microarc Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young Wook; Kwon, Soon Yong; Sun, Doo Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Background Stainless steel is one of the most widely used biomaterials for internal fixation devices, but is not used in cementless arthroplasty implants because a stable oxide layer essential for biocompatibility cannot be formed on the surface. We applied a Ti electron beam coating, to form oxide layer on the stainless steel surface. To form a thicker oxide layer, we used a microarc oxidation process on the surface of Ti coated stainless steel. Modification of the surface using Ti electron beam coating and microarc oxidation could improve the ability of stainless steel implants to osseointegrate. Questions/purposes The ability of cells to adhere to grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated stainless steel in vitro was compared with that of two different types of surface modifications, machined and titanium-coated, and microarc-oxidated. Methods We performed energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy investigations to assess the chemical composition and structure of the stainless steel surfaces and cell morphology. The biologic responses of an osteoblastlike cell line (SaOS-2) were examined by measuring proliferation (cell proliferation assay), differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity), and attraction ability (cell migration assay). Results Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, migration, and adhesion were increased in the grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated group compared to the two other groups. Osteoblastlike cells on the grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated surface were strongly adhered, and proliferated well compared to those on the other surfaces. Conclusions The surface modifications we used (grit blasting, titanium coating, microarc oxidation) enhanced the biocompatibility (proliferation and migration of osteoblastlike cells) of stainless steel. Clinical Relevance This process is not unique to stainless steel; it can be applied to many metals to improve their biocompatibility

  8. Elevated Serum Titanium Level as a Marker for Failure in a Titanium Modular Fluted Tapered Stem.

    PubMed

    McAlister, Ian P; Abdel, Matthew P

    2016-07-01

    Serum ion concentrations of cobalt and chromium are commonly used to monitor for the development of local metal reactions in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties, as well as dual-modular constructs. Although rarely used in clinical practice, elevated serum titanium levels have the ability to indicate a failure with contemporary revision constructs, such as with titanium modular fluted tapered (TMFT) stems. The authors report the case of a 64-year-old man with a TMFT stem after revision total hip arthroplasty for a dual-modular neck construct who had set screw disengagement with subsequent proximal body loosening. The patient's serum cobalt and chromium levels were normal, but he had a markedly elevated serum titanium level, indicating failure of the titanium modular junction. Implant failures at modular junctions in femoral components are well described. Although several different failure mechanisms have been defined, to the authors' knowledge this is the first reported failure of this particular TMFT stem. In addition, this is the first report describing the use of serum titanium levels in identifying a novel failure mechanism. With the popularity of this stem, surgeons should be aware that an elevated serum titanium level may aid in the diagnosis of this unique complication. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e768-e770.].

  9. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology and Migration on Microtextured Titanium

    PubMed Central

    Banik, Brittany L.; Riley, Thomas R.; Platt, Christina J.; Brown, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    The implant used in spinal fusion procedures is an essential component to achieving successful arthrodesis. At the cellular level, the implant impacts healing and fusion through a series of steps: first, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) need to adhere and proliferate to cover the implant; second, the MSCs must differentiate into osteoblasts; third, the osteoid matrix produced by the osteoblasts needs to generate new bone tissue, thoroughly integrating the implant with the vertebrate above and below. Previous research has demonstrated that microtextured titanium is advantageous over smooth titanium and PEEK implants for both promoting osteogenic differentiation and integrating with host bone tissue; however, no investigation to date has examined the early morphology and migration of MSCs on these surfaces. This study details cell spreading and morphology changes over 24 h, rate and directionality of migration 6–18 h post-seeding, differentiation markers at 10 days, and the long-term morphology of MSCs at 7 days, on microtextured, acid-etched titanium (endoskeleton), smooth titanium, and smooth PEEK surfaces. The results demonstrate that in all metrics, the two titanium surfaces outperformed the PEEK surface. Furthermore, the rough acid-etched titanium surface presented the most favorable overall results, demonstrating the random migration needed to efficiently cover a surface in addition to morphologies consistent with osteoblasts and preosteoblasts. PMID:27243001

  10. Osteoconductivity of hydrophilic microstructured titanium implants with phosphate ion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Woo; Jang, Je-Hee; Lee, Chong Soo; Hanawa, Takao

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and bone response of titanium implants produced by hydrothermal treatment using H(3)PO(4), and compared them with those of implants produced by commercial surface treatment methods - machining, acid etching, grit blasting, grit blasting/acid etching or spark anodization. The surface characteristics were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, thin-film X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle measurement and stylus profilometry. The osteoconductivity of experimental implants was evaluated by removal torque testing and histomorphometric analysis after 6 weeks of implantation in rabbit tibiae. Hydrothermal treatment with H(3)PO(4) and subsequent heat treatment produced a crystalline phosphate ion-incorporated oxide (titanium oxide phosphate hydrate, Ti(2)O(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2); TiP) surface approximately 5microm in thickness, which had needle-like surface microstructures and superior wettability compared with the control surfaces. Significant increases in removal torque forces and bone-to-implant contact values were observed for TiP implants compared with those of the control implants (p<0.001). After thorough cleaning of the implants removed during the removal torque testing, a considerable quantity of attached bone was observed on the surfaces of the TiP implants.

  11. The durability of adhesively bonded titanium: Performance of plasma-sprayed polymeric coating pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, F.; Dillard, J.; Dillard, D.

    1996-12-31

    The role of a surface treatment of an adherend is to promote highly stable adhesive-adherend interactions; high stability is accomplished by making the chemistry of the adherend and adhesive compatible. The common surface preparations used to enhance durability include grit blasting, chromic acid or sodium hydroxide anodization, and other chemical treatments for titanium. As interest has grown in the development of environmentally benign surface treatments, other methods have been explored. In this study, plasma-sprayed polymeric materials have been evaluated as a surface coating pretreatment for adhesively bonding titanium alloy. Polyimide and polyether powders were plasm-sprayed onto grit-blasted titanium-6Al-4V. The alloy was adhesively bonded using a high performance polyimide adhesive. The coating was characterized using surface sensitive analytical measurements. The durability performance of the plasma-sprayed adherends was compared to the performance for chromic acid anodized titanium. Among the plasma-sprayed coatings, a LaRC-TPI polyimide-based coating exhibited performance comparable to that for chromic acid anodized specimens.

  12. Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Surface Treatment on the Strength of a Titanium Carbide - 30 Percent Nickel Base Cermet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, Leonard; Grala, Edward M

    1957-01-01

    Specimens of a nickel-bonded titanium carbide cermet were given the following surface treatments: (1) grinding, (2) lapping, (3) blast cleaning, (4) acid roughening, (5) oxidizing, and (6) oxidizing and refinishing. Room-temperature modulus-of-rupture and impact strength varied with the different surface treatments. Considerable strength losses resulted from the following treatments: (1) oxidation at 1600 F for 100 hours, (2) acid roughening, and (3) severe grinding with 60-grit silicon carbide abrasive. The strength loss after oxidation was partially recovered by grit blasting or diamond grinding.

  13. Alkali-treated titanium selectively regulating biological behaviors of bacteria, cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Guifang; Wang, Donghui; Wu, Qianju; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-12-15

    Many attentions have been paid to the beneficial effect of alkali-treated titanium to bioactivity and osteogenic activity, but few to the other biological effect. In this work, hierarchical micro/nanopore films were prepared on titanium surface by acid etching and alkali treatment and their biological effects on bacteria, cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells were investigated. Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and human cholangiocarcinoma cell line RBE were used to investigate whether alkali-treated titanium can influence behaviors of bacteria and cancer cells. Responses of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) to alkali-treated titanium were also subsequently investigated. The alkali-treated titanium can potently reduce bacterial adhesion, inhibit RBE and BMMSCs proliferation, while can better promote BMMSCs osteogenesis and angiogenesis than acid-etched titanium. The bacteriostatic ability of the alkali-treated titanium is proposed to result from the joint effect of micro/nanotopography and local pH increase at bacterium/material interface due to the hydrolysis of alkali (earth) metal titanate salts. The inhibitory action of cell proliferation is thought to be the effect of local pH increase at cell/material interface which causes the alkalosis of cells. This alkalosis model reported in this work will help to understand the biologic behaviors of various cells on alkali-treated titanium surface and design the intended biomedical applications.

  14. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions on cathodic arc plasma-treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Teel, George; O'Brien, Christopher M; Zhuang, Taisen; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Surface modification of titanium for use in orthopedics has been explored for years; however, an ideal method of integrating titanium with native bone is still required to this day. Since human bone cells directly interact with nanostructured extracellular matrices, one of the most promising methods of improving titanium's osseointegration involves inducing bio-mimetic nanotopography to enhance cell-implant interaction. In this regard, we explored an approach to functionalize the surface of titanium by depositing a thin film of textured titanium nanoparticles via a cathodic arc discharge plasma. The aim is to improve human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment and differentiation and to reduce deleterious effects of more complex surface modification methods. Surface functionalization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle testing, and specific protein adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination demonstrate the deposition of titanium nanoparticles and the surface roughness change after coating. The specific fibronectin adsorption was enhanced on the modified titanium surface that associates with the improved hydrophilicity. MSC adhesion and proliferation were significantly promoted on the nanocoated surface. More importantly, compared to bare titanium, greater production of total protein, deposition of calcium mineral, and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase were observed from MSCs on nanocoated titanium after 21 days. The method described herein presents a promising alternative method for inducing more cell favorable nanosurface for improved orthopedic applications.

  15. The role of whole blood in thrombin generation in contact with various titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Thor, Andreas; Rasmusson, Lars; Wennerberg, Ann; Thomsen, Peter; Hirsch, Jan-Michael; Nilsson, Bo; Hong, Jaan

    2007-02-01

    Understanding of the thrombotic response (activation of the intrinsic coagulation system followed by platelet activation) from blood components upon contact with a titanium dental implant is important and not fully understood. The aims of this study were to evaluate: (1) the thrombogenic response of whole blood, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) in contact with a highly thrombogenic surface as titanium, (2) the thrombogenic response of clinically used surfaces as hydroxyapatite (HA), machined titanium (mTi), TiO2 grit-blasted titanium (TiOB) and fluoride ion-modified grit-blasted titanium (TiOB-F). An in vitro slide chamber model, furnished with heparin, was used in which whole blood, PRP or PPP came in contact with slides of the test surfaces. After incubation (60 min rotation at 22 rpm in a 37 degrees C water bath), blood/plasma was mixed with EDTA or citrate, further centrifuged at +4 degrees C (2200 g at 10 min). Finally, plasma was collected pending analysis. Whole blood in contact with Ti alloy resulted in the binding of platelets to the material surface and in the generation of thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complexes. With whole blood TAT levels increased 1000-fold compared with PRP and PPP, in which both almost no increase of TAT could be detected. In addition, the platelet activation showed a similar pattern with a 15-fold higher release of beta-TG in whole blood. In the in vitro chamber model with the clinically relevant materials, the fluoride-modified surface (TiOB-F) showed pronounced TAT generation compared with TiOB, mTi and HA. Similar results were achieved for platelet consumption and activation markers of the intrinsic coagulation system. Taken together these results implicate first that whole blood is necessary for sufficient thrombin generation and platelet activation during placement of implants. Second, a fluoride ion modification seems to augment the thrombogenic properties of titanium.

  16. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions on cathodic arc plasma-treated titanium

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Teel, George; O’Brien, Christopher M; Zhuang, Taisen; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Surface modification of titanium for use in orthopedics has been explored for years; however, an ideal method of integrating titanium with native bone is still required to this day. Since human bone cells directly interact with nanostructured extracellular matrices, one of the most promising methods of improving titanium’s osseointegration involves inducing bio-mimetic nanotopography to enhance cell–implant interaction. In this regard, we explored an approach to functionalize the surface of titanium by depositing a thin film of textured titanium nanoparticles via a cathodic arc discharge plasma. The aim is to improve human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment and differentiation and to reduce deleterious effects of more complex surface modification methods. Surface functionalization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle testing, and specific protein adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination demonstrate the deposition of titanium nanoparticles and the surface roughness change after coating. The specific fibronectin adsorption was enhanced on the modified titanium surface that associates with the improved hydrophilicity. MSC adhesion and proliferation were significantly promoted on the nanocoated surface. More importantly, compared to bare titanium, greater production of total protein, deposition of calcium mineral, and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase were observed from MSCs on nanocoated titanium after 21 days. The method described herein presents a promising alternative method for inducing more cell favorable nanosurface for improved orthopedic applications. PMID:26677327

  17. Antimicrobial design of titanium surface that kill sessile bacteria but support stem cells adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Bao, Ni-Rong; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-12-01

    Implant-related bacterial infection is one of the most severe postoperative complications in orthopedic or dental surgery. In this context, from the perspective of surface modification, increasing efforts have been made to enhance the antibacterial capability of titanium surface. In this work, a hierarchical hybrid surface architecture was firstly constructed on titanium surface by two-step strategy of acid etching and H2O2 aging. Then silver nanoparticles were firmly immobilized on the hierarchical surface by ion implantation, showing no detectable release of silver ions from surface. The designed titanium surface showed good bioactivity. More importantly, this elaborately designed titanium surface can effectively inactivate the adherent S. aureus on surface by virtue of a contact-killing mode. Meanwhile, the designed titanium surface can significantly facilitate the initial adhesion and spreading behaviors of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on titanium. The results suggested that, the elaborately designed titanium surface might own a cell-favoring ability that can help mammalian cells win the initial adhesion race against bacteria. We hope the present study can provide a new insight for the better understanding and designing of antimicrobial titanium surface, and pave the way to satisfying clinical requirements.

  18. Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The article contains a summary of factors pertinent to titanium use. Geology and exploitation, production processes, global production, titanium dioxide and alloy applications, and the titanium market are reviewed. Potential applications outlined are for oil and gas equipment and for the automotive industry. Titanium alloys were selected for drilling risers for North Sea oil and gas drilling platforms due to a high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. These properties also make titanium alloys attractive for auto parts, although the cost is currently prohibitive.

  19. Titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth’s crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and spreading on microwave plasma-nitrided titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Clem, William C; Konovalov, Valery V; Chowdhury, S; Vohra, Yogesh K; Catledge, Shane A; Bellis, Susan L

    2006-02-01

    Improved methods to increase surface hardness of metallic biomedical implants are being developed in an effort to minimize the formation of wear debris particles that cause local pain and inflammation. However, for many implant surface treatments, there is a risk of film delamination due to the mismatch of mechanical properties between the hard surface and the softer underlying metal. In this article, we describe the surface modification of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition to induce titanium nitride formation by nitrogen diffusion. The result is a gradual transition from a titanium nitride surface to the bulk titanium alloy, without a sharp interface that could otherwise lead to delamination. We demonstrate that vitronectin adsorption, as well as the adhesion and spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells to plasma-nitrided titanium is equivalent to that of Ti-6Al-4V, while hardness is improved 3- to 4-fold. These in vitro results suggest that the plasma nitriding technique has the potential to reduce wear, and the resulting debris particle release, of biomedical implants without compromising osseointegration; thus, minimizing the possibility of implant loosening over time. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and spreading on microwave plasma-nitrided titanium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Clem, William C.; Konovalov, Valery V.; Chowdhury, S.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Catledge, Shane A.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Improved methods to increase surface hardness of metallic biomedical implants are being developed in an effort to minimize the formation of wear debris particles that cause local pain and inflammation. However, for many implant surface treatments, there is a risk of film delamination due to the mismatch of mechanical properties between the hard surface and the softer underlying metal. In this article, we describe the surface modification of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition to induce titanium nitride formation by nitrogen diffusion. The result is a gradual transition from a titanium nitride surface to the bulk titanium alloy, without a sharp interface that could otherwise lead to delamination. We demonstrate that vitronectin adsorption, as well as the adhesion and spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells to plasma-nitrided titanium is equivalent to that of Ti-6Al-4V, while hardness is improved 3- to 4-fold. These in vitro results suggest that the plasma nitriding technique has the potential to reduce wear, and the resulting debris particle release, of biomedical implants without compromising osseointegration; thus, minimizing the possibility of implant loosening over time. PMID:16265649

  2. Fabrication of Titanium Bonded Joint Specimens for High Temperature Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Kovach, Michael P.; Hudson, Wanda

    2005-01-01

    Four sets of adhesively bonded, titanium lap-shear coupon specimens were fabricated for ultimate strength testing according to the ASTM D1002 and D3165 standards. Important features of the fabrication methods, processing details, and lap-shear test results are presented for specimens fabricated using a modified bismaleimide adhesive, EA 9673, on titanium. Surface treatment of the titanium was performed using surface abrasion followed by one of two separate chemical etching processes. Although cure cycle requirements are different among most adhesives, a single surface preparation method was sought as the preferred method for conditioning the titanium specimens prior to bonding and curing. A fabrication process using a combination of low-pressure grit-blasting of the titanium surface followed by anodization with a sodium hydroxide solution applied to the D1002 specimen geometry provided the highest lapshear strengths in the study. Additionally, difficulties documented during the fabrication process of the D3165 specimens along with features of the D3165 geometry were identified as factors that contributed to lower lap-shear strength results for the D3165 specimens as compared to the results for the D1002 specimens.

  3. Cytocompatibility of implants coated with titanium nitride and zirconium nitride.

    PubMed

    Prachar, P; Bartakova, S; Brezina, V; Cvrcek, L; Vanek, J

    2015-01-01

    The positive cell response to the implant material is reflected by the capacity of cells to divide, which leads to the tissue regeneration and osseointegration. Technically pure titanium and its alloys are mostly used for implant manufacturing. These alloys have the adequate mechanical, physical and biological properties; nevertheless, the superior biocompatibility of bioceramics has been proven. With the arrival of new coating techniques, surface modification of materials used for implants has become a widely investigated issue. The paper studied properties of titanium nitride (TiN) and zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings deposited by PVD (Physical Vapour Deposition). Coatings were applied to substrates of pure titanium, Ti6Al4V, Ti35Nb6Ta titanium alloys and CoCrMo dental alloy. Different treatments of substrate surfaces were used: polishing, etching and grit blasting. Cytocompatibility tests assessed the cell colonization and their adherence to substrates. Results showed that TiN layers deposited by PVD are suitable for coating all substrates studied. The polished samples and those with TiN coating exhibited a higher cell colonization. This coating technique meets the requirements for the biocompatibility of the implanted materials; furthermore, their colour range solves the issue of red aesthetics in oral implantology as the colour of these coatings prevents titanium from showing through the gingiva. This is one the most important criteria for the aesthetic success of implant therapy (Tab. 5, Ref. 18).

  4. Effects of nanoporous anodic titanium oxide on human adipose derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Malec, Katarzyna; Góralska, Joanna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Głowacz, Paulina; Jarosz, Magdalena; Brzewski, Pawel; Sulka, Grzegorz D; Jaskuła, Marian; Wybrańska, Iwona

    The aim of current bone biomaterials research is to design implants that induce controlled, guided, successful, and rapid healing. Titanium implants are widely used in dental, orthopedic, and reconstructive surgery. A series of studies has indicated that cells can respond not only to the chemical properties of the biomaterial, but also, in particular, to the changes in surface topography. Nanoporous materials remain in focus of scientific queries due to their exclusive properties and broad applications. One such material is nanostructured titanium oxide with highly ordered, mutually perpendicular nanopores. Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide (TiO2) films were fabricated by a three-step anodization process in propan-1,2,3-triol-based electrolyte containing fluoride ions. Adipose-derived stem cells offer many interesting opportunities for regenerative medicine. The important goal of tissue engineering is to direct stem cell differentiation into a desired cell lineage. The influence of nanoporous TiO2 with pore diameters of 80 and 108 nm on cell response, growth, viability, and ability to differentiate into osteoblastic lineage of human adipose-derived progenitors was explored. Cells were harvested from the subcutaneous abdominal fat tissue by a simple, minimally invasive, and inexpensive method. Our results indicate that anodic nanostructured TiO2 is a safe and nontoxic biomaterial. In vitro studies demonstrated that the nanotopography induced and enhanced osteodifferentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells from the abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue.

  5. Effects of nanoporous anodic titanium oxide on human adipose derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Malec, Katarzyna; Góralska, Joanna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Głowacz, Paulina; Jarosz, Magdalena; Brzewski, Pawel; Sulka, Grzegorz D; Jaskuła, Marian; Wybrańska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    The aim of current bone biomaterials research is to design implants that induce controlled, guided, successful, and rapid healing. Titanium implants are widely used in dental, orthopedic, and reconstructive surgery. A series of studies has indicated that cells can respond not only to the chemical properties of the biomaterial, but also, in particular, to the changes in surface topography. Nanoporous materials remain in focus of scientific queries due to their exclusive properties and broad applications. One such material is nanostructured titanium oxide with highly ordered, mutually perpendicular nanopores. Nanoporous anodic titanium dioxide (TiO2) films were fabricated by a three-step anodization process in propan-1,2,3-triol-based electrolyte containing fluoride ions. Adipose-derived stem cells offer many interesting opportunities for regenerative medicine. The important goal of tissue engineering is to direct stem cell differentiation into a desired cell lineage. The influence of nanoporous TiO2 with pore diameters of 80 and 108 nm on cell response, growth, viability, and ability to differentiate into osteoblastic lineage of human adipose-derived progenitors was explored. Cells were harvested from the subcutaneous abdominal fat tissue by a simple, minimally invasive, and inexpensive method. Our results indicate that anodic nanostructured TiO2 is a safe and nontoxic biomaterial. In vitro studies demonstrated that the nanotopography induced and enhanced osteodifferentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells from the abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue. PMID:27789947

  6. Neutron radiography and tomography investigations on the porosity of the as-cast titanium femoral stem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutiyoko; Suyitno; Mahardika, M.; Akbar, F.; Juliani; Setiawan; Baroto

    2017-02-01

    Gating system design in the centrifugal casting is one of the factors that influence the porosity of the femoral stem. The objective of this research is to analysis the porosity in the as-cast titanium femoral stem by neutron radiography and tomography. Three gating system designs which in three-ingates, four-ingates, and four-ingates by inversed position of the femoral stem were casted by a vertical centrifugal casting in investment mold. The porosity distribution in the titanium femoral stem was investigated by the neutron radiography film and followed by neutron tomography. The results indicate that there are large internal porosity in the subsurface region on both of the four-ingates designs but only small internal porosity on the three-ingates design. The large porosity also takes place in largest part of the femoral stem at all of the gating system designs. The product may be rejected due to the sub-surface porosity. The three-ingates design has the smallest risk on the reject product.

  7. Fatigue and cyclic deformation behaviour of surface-modified titanium alloys in simulated physiological media.

    PubMed

    Leinenbach, Christian; Eifler, Dietmar

    2006-03-01

    In this investigation, the cyclic deformation behaviour of the binary titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb was characterized in axial stress-controlled constant amplitude and load increase tests as well as in rotating bending tests. The influence of different clinically relevant surface treatments (polishing, corundum grit blasting, thermal and anodic oxidizing) on the fatigue behaviour was investigated. All tests were realized in oxygen-saturated Ringer's solution. The cyclic deformation behaviour was characterized by mechanical hysteresis measurements. In addition, the change of the free corrosion potential and the corrosion current during testing in simulated physiological media indicated surface damages such as slip bands, intrusions and extrusions or finally microcracks. Microstructural changes on the specimen surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  8. Particulate endocytosis mediates biological responses of human mesenchymal stem cells to titanium wear debris.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chukwuka C; Haleem-Smith, Hana; Laqueriere, Patrice; Manner, Paul A; Tuan, Rocky S

    2006-03-01

    Continual loading and articulation cycles undergone by metallic (e.g., titanium) alloy arthroplasty prostheses lead to liberation of a large number of metallic debris particulates, which have long been implicated as a primary cause of periprosthetic osteolysis and postarthroplasty aseptic implant loosening. Long-term stability of total joint replacement prostheses relies on proper integration between implant biomaterial and osseous tissue, and factors that interfere with this integration are likely to cause osteolysis. Because multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) located adjacent to the implant have an osteoprogenitor function and are critical contributors to osseous tissue integrity, when their functions or activities are compromised, osteolysis will most likely occur. To date, it is not certain or sufficiently confirmed whether MSCs endocytose titanium particles, and if so, whether particulate endocytosis has any effect on cellular responses to wear debris. This study seeks to clarify the phenomenon of titanium endocytosis by human MSCs (hMSCs), and investigates the influence of endocytosis on their activities. hMSCs incubated with commercially pure titanium particles exhibited internalized particles, as observed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy, with time-dependent reduction in the number of extracellular particles. Particulate endocytosis was associated with reduced rates of cellular proliferation and cell-substrate adhesion, suppressed osteogenic differentiation, and increased rate of apoptosis. These cellular effects of exposure to titanium particles were reduced when endocytosis was inhibited by treatment with cytochalasin D, and no significant effect was seen when hMSCs were treated only with conditioned medium obtained from particulate-treated cells. These findings strongly suggest that the biological responses of hMSCs to wear debris are triggered primarily by the direct endocytosis of titanium particulates, and

  9. Titanium phosphate glass microcarriers induce enhanced osteogenic cell proliferation and human mesenchymal stem cell protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Lakhkar, Nilay J; M Day, Richard; Kim, Hae-Won; Ludka, Katarzyna; Mordan, Nicola J; Salih, Vehid; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have developed 50- to 100-µm-sized titanium phosphate glass microcarriers (denoted as Ti5) that show enhanced proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and MG63 osteosarcoma cells, as well as enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell expression of bone differentiation markers, in comparison with commercially available glass microspheres at all time points. We also demonstrate that these microcarriers provide superior human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation with conventional Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle medium than with a specially developed commercial stem cell medium. The microcarrier proliferative capacity is revealed by a 24-fold increase in MG63 cell numbers in spinner flask bioreactor studies performed over a 7-day period, versus only a 6-fold increase in control microspheres under the same conditions; the corresponding values of Ti5 and control microspheres under static culture are 8-fold and 7-fold, respectively. The capability of guided osteogenic differentiation is confirmed by ELISAs for bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin, which reveal significantly greater expression of these markers, especially osteopontin, by human mesenchymal stem cells on the Ti5 microspheres than on the control. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy images reveal favorable MG63 and human mesenchymal stem cell adhesion on the Ti5 microsphere surfaces. Thus, the results demonstrate the suitability of the developed microspheres for use as microcarriers in bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26668711

  10. In vivo evaluation of micro-rough and bioactive titanium dental implants using histometry and pull-out tests.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Conrado; Padrós, Alejandro; Gil, Francisco-Javier

    2011-11-01

    We report on the in vivo histological and mechanical performance of titanium dental implants with a new surface treatment (2Step) consisting of an initial grit-blasting process to produce a micro-rough surface, followed by a combined chemical and thermal treatment that produces a potentially bioactive surface, i.e., that can form an apatitic layer when exposed to biomimetic conditions in vitro. Our aim was to assess the short- and mid-term bone regenerative potential and mechanical retention of 2Step implants in mandible and maxilla of minipigs and compare them with micro-rough grit-blasted, micro-rough acid-etched, and smooth as-machined titanium implants. The percent of bone-to-implant contact after 2, 4, 6, and 10 weeks of implantation as well as the mechanical retention after 4, and 6 weeks of implantation were evaluated with histometric and pull-out tests, respectively, as a measure of the osseointegration of the implants. We also aimed to assess the bioactive nature of 2Step surfaces in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the 2Step treatment produced micro-rough and bioactive implants that accelerated bone tissue regeneration and increased mechanical retention in the bone bed at short periods of implantation in comparison with all other implants tested. This was mostly attributed to the ability of 2Step implants to form in vivo a layer of apatitic mineral that coated the implant and could rapidly stimulate (a) bone nucleation directly on the implant surface, and (b) bone growing from the implant surface. We also proved that roughness values of Ra≈4.5 μm favoured osseointegration of dental implants at short- and mid-term healing periods, as grit-blasted implants and 2Step implants had higher retention values than as machined and acid-etched implants. The surface quality resulting from the 2Step treatment applied on cpTi provided dental implants with a unique combination of rapid bone regeneration and high mechanical retention.

  11. UV-activated 7-dehydrocholesterol-coated titanium implants promote differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Satué, María; Ramis, Joana M; Monjo, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolites are essential for bone regeneration and mineral homeostasis. The vitamin D precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol can be used after UV irradiation to locally produce active vitamin D by osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, UV-irradiated 7-dehydrocholesterol is a biocompatible coating for titanium implants with positive effects on osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we examined the impact of titanium implants surfaces coated with UV-irradiated 7-dehydrocholesterol on the osteogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells. First, the synthesis of cholecalciferol (D3) was achieved through the incubation of the UV-activated 7-dehydrocholesterol coating for 48 h at 23℃. Further, we investigated in vitro the biocompatibility of this coating in human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and its potential to enhance their differentiation towards the osteogenic lineage. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells cultured onto UV-irradiated 7-dehydrocholesterol-coated titanium implants surfaces, combined with osteogenic supplements, upregulated the gene expression of several osteogenic markers and showed higher alkaline phosphatase activity and calcein blue staining, suggesting increased mineralization. Thus, our results show that the use of UV irradiation on 7-dehydrocholesterol -treated titanium implants surfaces generates a bioactive coating that promotes the osteogenic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells, with regenerative potential for improving osseointegration in titanium-based bone anchored implants.

  12. Effects of titanium nanoparticles on adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanhua; Cai, Kaiyong; Li, Jinghua; Chen, Xiuyong; Lai, Min; Hu, Yan; Luo, Zhong; Ding, Xingwei; Xu, Dawei

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influences of nanoscale wear particles derived from titanium/titanium alloy-based implants on integration of bone. Here we report the potential impact of titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the cellular level to the molecular level in the Wistar rat. A series of TiO2 nanoparticles (14 nm, 108 nm, and 196 nm) were synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The TiO2 nanoparticles had negative effects on cell viability, proliferation, and the cell cycle of MSC in a dose-dependent and size-dependent manner. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to investigate the effects of particle internalization on adhesion, spreading, and morphology of MSC. The integrity of the cell membrane, cytoskeleton, and vinculin of MSC were negatively influenced by large TiO2 nanoparticles. The Transwell migration assay and a wound healing model suggested that TiO2 nanoparticles had a strong adverse impact on cell migration as particle size increased (P < 0.01). Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase, gene expression of osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OPN), and mineralization measurements indicate that the size of the TiO2 nanoparticles negatively affected osteogenic differentiation of MSC.

  13. Behavior of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Various Titanium-Based Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chengjuan; Kaitainen, Salla; Kröger, Heikki; Lappalainen, Reijo; Lammi, Mikko J.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition and texture of titanium coatings can influence the growth characteristics of the adhered cells. An enhanced proliferation of the human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) would be beneficial. The present study was aimed to investigate whether titanium deposited at different atmospheres would affect the cell growth properties, cellular morphology, and expression of surface markers of hMSCs. Titanium-based coatings were deposited on silicon wafers under oxygen, nitrogen, or argon atmospheres by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition using two different gas pressures followed by heating at 400 °C for 2 h. The characteristics of the coated surfaces were determined via contact angle, zeta potential, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Human MSCs were cultivated on differently coated silicon wafers for 48 h. Subsequently, the cell proliferation rates were analyzed with an MTT assay. The phenotype of hMSCs was checked via immunocytochemical stainings of MSC-associated markers CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the adhesion, spreading, and morphology of hMSCs on coated materials via SEM. The cell proliferation rates of the hMSCs were similar on all coated silicon wafers. The hMSCs retained the MSC phenotype by expressing MSC-associated markers and fibroblast-like morphology with cellular projections. Furthermore, no significant differences could be found in the size of the cells when cultured on all various coated surfaces. In conclusion, despite certain differences in the contact angles and the zeta potentials of various titanium-based coatings, no single coating markedly improved the growth characteristics of hMSCs. PMID:28773947

  14. Skeletal stem cell and bone implant interactions are enhanced by LASER titanium modification

    SciTech Connect

    Sisti, Karin E.; Andrés, María C. de; Johnston, David; Almeida-Filho, Edson; Guastaldi, Antonio C.; Oreffo, Richard O.C.

    2016-05-06

    Purpose: To evaluate the osteo-regenerative potential of Titanium (Ti) modified by Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) beam (Yb-YAG) upon culture with human Skeletal Stem Cells (hSSCs{sup 1}). Methods: Human skeletal cell populations were isolated from the bone marrow of haematologically normal patients undergoing primary total hip replacement following appropriate consent. STRO-1{sup +} hSSC{sup 1} function was examined for 10 days across four groups using Ti discs: i) machined Ti surface group in basal media (Mb{sup 2}), ii) machined Ti surface group in osteogenic media (Mo{sup 3}), iii) LASER-modified Ti group in basal media (Lb{sup 4}) and, iv) LASER-modified Ti group in osteogenic media (Lo{sup 5}). Molecular analysis and qRT-PCR as well as functional analysis including biochemistry (DNA, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP{sup 6}) specific activity), live/dead immunostaining (Cell Tracker Green (CTG{sup 7})/Ethidium Homodimer-1 (EH-1{sup 8})), and fluorescence staining (for vinculin and phalloidin) were undertaken. Inverted, confocal and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) approaches were used to characterise cell adherence, proliferation, and phenotype. Results: Enhanced cell spreading and morphological rearrangement, including focal adhesions were observed following culture of hSSCs{sup 1} on LASER surfaces in both basal and osteogenic conditions. Biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced ALP{sup 6} specific activity on the hSSCs{sup 1}-seeded on LASER-modified surface in basal culture media. Molecular analysis demonstrated enhanced ALP{sup 6} and osteopontin expression on titanium LASER treated surfaces in basal conditions. SEM, inverted microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed extensive proliferation and migration of human bone marrow stromal cells on all surfaces evaluated. Conclusions: LASER-modified Ti surfaces modify the behaviour of hSSCs.{sup 1} In particular, SSC{sup 1} adhesion, osteogenic gene expression, cell

  15. Femtosecond laser nano/micro patterning of titanium influences mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and commitment.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Virginie; Guignandon, Alain; Vico, Laurence; Mauclair, Cyril; Zapata, Ximena; Linossier, Marie Thérèse; Bouleftour, Wafa; Granier, Julien; Peyroche, Sylvie; Dumas, Jean-Claude; Zahouani, Hassan; Rattner, Aline

    2015-09-03

    Surface improvement of implants is essential for achieving a fast osseo-integration. Technically, the creation of a precise pattern on a titanium alloy surface is challenging. Here, the femtosecond laser was chosen as an innovative technology for texturing with accuracy a nano-micro topography. By adjusting the laser parameters, three biomimetic textures were fabricated on the titanium surface: micropits with nano-ripples in the pits, micropits with nano-ripples around the pits, and a texture with only nano-ripples. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, C3H10T1/2) grown on these surfaces displayed altered morphometric parameters, and modified their focal adhesions in term of number, size, and distribution depending on surface type. These results indicate that the MSCs perceived subtle differences in topography. Dynamic analyses of early cellular events showed a higher speed of spreading on all the textured surfaces as opposed to the polished titanium. Concerning commitment, all the laser-treated surfaces strongly inhibited the expression of adipogenic-related genes (PPARϒ2, C/EBPα) and up-regulated the expression of osteoblastic-related genes (RUNX2, osteocalcin). Interestingly, the combination of micropits to nano-ripples enhanced their osteogenic potential as seen by a twofold increase in osteocalcin mRNA. Alkaline phosphatase activity was increased on all the textured surfaces, and lipid production was down-regulated. The functionalization of metallic surfaces by this high-resolution process will help us understand the MSCs' interactions with substrates for the development of textured implants with predictable tissue integrative properties.

  16. The Effect of Taper Angle and Spline Geometry on the Initial Stability of Tapered, Splined Modular Titanium Stems.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Jeffery L; Small, Scott R; Rodriguez, Jose A; Kang, Michael N; Glassman, Andrew H

    2015-07-01

    Design parameters affecting initial mechanical stability of tapered, splined modular titanium stems (TSMTSs) are not well understood. Furthermore, there is considerable variability in contemporary designs. We asked if spline geometry and stem taper angle could be optimized in TSMTS to improve mechanical stability to resist axial subsidence and increase torsional stability. Initial stability was quantified with stems of varied taper angle and spline geometry implanted in a foam model replicating 2cm diaphyseal engagement. Increased taper angle and a broad spline geometry exhibited significantly greater axial stability (+21%-269%) than other design combinations. Neither taper angle nor spline geometry significantly altered initial torsional stability.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell growth behavior on micro/nano hierarchical surfaces of titanium substrates.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinkun; Ma, Pingping; Hu, Yan; Xu, Gaoqiang; Zhou, Jun; Cai, Kaiyong

    2015-03-01

    Surface topography of an orthopedic implant plays an essential role in the regulation of bone formation with surrounding bone tissue. To investigate the effects of surface topography of titanium (Ti) substrates on cellular behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a series of micro/nano hierarchical structures were fabricated onto micro-structured titanium (Micro-Ti) substrates via a sol-gel method with spin-coat technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface profiler, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurement were employed to certify the successful fabrication of micro/nano hierarchical structures with the presence of various nano-sized TiO2 grains (20 nm, 40 nm and 80 nm, respectively) onto micro-structured surfaces. The formation mechanism of the micro/nano hierarchical structures was proposed. Moreover, the effects of those hierarchical structures on the growth behavior of MSCs were evaluated both on cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The results confirmed that micro/nano hierarchical structures with large grains (80 nm) greatly promoted the proliferation and differentiation of MSCs comparing with other small grains (20 nm and 40 nm). The study provides an alternative for the fabrication of hierarchically structured Ti implants for potential orthopedic application.

  18. Selective fibronectin adsorption against albumin and enhanced stem cell attachment on helium atmospheric pressure glow discharge treated titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Inho; Vagaska, Barbora; Joo Park, Bong; Lee, Mi Hee; Jin Lee, Seung; Park, Jong-Chul

    2011-06-01

    Successful tissue integration of implanted medical devices depends on appropriate initial cellular response. In this study, the effect of helium atmospheric pressure glow discharge (He-APGD) treatment of titanium on selective protein adsorption and the initial attachment processes and focal adhesion formation of osteoprogenitor cells and stem cells were examined. Titanium disks were treated in a self-designed He-APGD system. Initial attachment of MC3T3-E1 mouse pre-osteoblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was evaluated by MTT assay and plasma membrane staining followed by morphometric analysis. Fibronectin adsorption was investigated by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbant Assay. MSCs cell attachment to treated and non-treated titanium disks coated with different proteins was verified also in serum-free culture. Organization of actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions was evaluated microscopically. He-APGD treatment effectively modified the titanium surfaces by creating a super-hydrophilic surface, which promoted selectively higher adsorption of fibronectin, a protein of critical importance for cell/biomaterial interaction. In two different types of cells, the He-APGD treatment enhanced the number of attaching cells as well as their attachment area. Moreover, cells had higher organization of actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions. Faster acceptance of the material by the progenitor cells in the early phases of tissue integration after the implantation may significantly reduce the overall healing time; therefore, titanium treatment with He-APGD seems to be an effective method of surface modification of titanium for improving its tissue inductive properties.

  19. Comparative effects of chlorhexidine and essential oils containing mouth rinse on stem cells cultured on a titanium surface.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Beom; Lee, Gil; Yun, Byeong Gon; Kim, Chang-Hyen; Ko, Youngkyung

    2014-04-01

    Chlorhexidine (CHX) and Listerine (LIS), an essential oil compound, are the two commonly used adjunctive agents for mechanical debridement, for reducing the bacterial load in the treatment of peri-implant inflammation. However, antimicrobial agents have been reported to be cytotoxic to the alveolar bone cells and gingival epithelial cells. The present study was performed to examine the effects of antiseptics CHX and LIS, on the morphology and proliferation of stem cells. Stem cells derived from the buccal fat pad were grown on machined titanium discs. Each disc was immersed in CHX or LIS for 30 sec, 1.5 min or 4.5 min. Cell morphology was evaluated with a confocal laser microscope and the viability of the cells was quantitatively analyzed with the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). The untreated cells attached to the titanium discs demonstrated well-organized actin cytoskeletons. No marked alterations in the cytoskeletal organization were observed in any of the treated groups. The treatment with CHX and LIS of the titanium discs decreased the viability of the cells grown on the treated discs (P<0.05). The stem cells derived from the buccal fat pad were sensitive to CHX and LIS, and a reduction in cellular viability was observed when these agents were applied to the discs for 30 sec. Further studies are required to determine the optimal application time and concentration of this antimicrobial agent for maximizing the reduction of the bacterial load and minimizing the cytotoxicity to the surrounding cells.

  20. Use of an Electron Beam Melting Manufactured Titanium Collared Cementless Femoral Stem to Resist Subsidence After Canine Total Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Liska, William D; Doyle, Nancy D

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of a collared electron beam melting (EBM)-manufactured titanium cementless femoral stem on implant subsidence after total hip replacement (THR). Prospective study Dogs (n = 26); 33 THR. Records were maintained on the first 110 consecutive THR using an EBM collared femoral stem. Radiographs on the first 33 THR that had 6-months follow-up were evaluated for implant subsidence. These results were compared to 27 dogs with subsidence after THR with a Co Cr collarless stem. Dogs that had EBM collared stem THR had a mean body weight of 35.4 kg, body condition score (BCS) of 6.21, and mean canal flare index (CFI) of 1.56. EBM stem sizes used (number implanted) were #7 (13), #8 (10), #9 (8), and #10 (2). Subsidence of collared stems did not occur if the collar was in contact with cortical bone during surgery. Subsidence of 1-3 mm occurred closing a gap between the collar and bone if contact was not made during surgery, but subsidence stopped once contact was made. No major complications directly related to the EBM collared stem were encountered. A collar on a cementless femoral stem in contact with cortical bone resists subsidence. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. Aging impairs osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells grown on titanium by favoring adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    ABUNA, Rodrigo Paolo Flores; STRINGHETTA-GARCIA, Camila Tami; FIORI, Leonardo Pimentel; DORNELLES, Rita Cassia Menegati; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aging negatively affects bone/titanium implant interactions. Our hypothesis is that the unbalance between osteogenesis and adipogenesis induced by aging may be involved in this phenomenon. Objective We investigated the osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from young and aged rats cultured on Ti. Material and Methods Bone marrow MSCs derived from 1-month and 21-month rats were cultured on Ti discs under osteogenic conditions for periods of up to 21 days and osteoblast and adipocyte markers were evaluated. Results Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization and gene expression of RUNX2, osterix, ALP, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and osteocalcin were reduced in cultures of 21-month rats compared with 1-month rats grown on Ti. Gene expression of PPAR-γ , adipocyte protein 2, and resistin and lipid accumulation were increased in cultures of 21-month rats compared with 1-month rats grown on the same conditions. Conclusions These results indicate that the lower osteogenic potential of MSCs derived from aged rats compared with young rats goes along with the higher adipogenic potential in cultures grown on Ti surface. This unbalance between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation should be considered in dental implant therapy to the elderly population. PMID:27556209

  2. Zinc-modified titanium surface enhances osteoblast differentiation of dental pulp stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yusa, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Osamu; Takano, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Masayuki; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element that plays an important role in differentiation of osteoblasts and bone modeling. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the osteoblast differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on zinc-modified titanium (Zn-Ti) that releases zinc ions from its surface. Based on real-time PCR, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Western blot analysis data, we investigated osteoblast differentiation of DPSCs cultured on Zn-Ti and controls. DPSCs cultured on Zn-Ti exhibited significantly up-regulated gene expression levels of osteoblast-related genes of type I collagen (Col I), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), ALP, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osteopontin (OPN), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF A), as compared with controls. We also investigated extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization by Alizarin Red S (ARS) staining and found that Zn-Ti significantly promoted ECM mineralization when compared with controls. These findings suggest that the combination of Zn-Ti and DPSCs provides a novel approach for bone regeneration therapy. PMID:27387130

  3. Mapping the strain distribution on the proximal femur with titanium and flexible-stemmed implants using digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Tayton, E; Evans, S; O'Doherty, D

    2010-08-01

    We implanted titanium and carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) femoral prostheses of the same dimensions into five prosthetic femora. An abductor jig was attached and a 1 kN load applied. This was repeated with five control femora. Digital image correlation was used to give a detailed two-dimensional strain map of the medial cortex of the proximal femur. Both implants caused stress shielding around the calcar. Distally, the titanium implant showed stress shielding, whereas the CFRP prosthesis did not produce a strain pattern which was statistically different from the controls. There was a reduction in strain beyond the tip of both the implants. This investigation indicates that use of the CFRP stem should avoid stress shielding in total hip replacement.

  4. Antimicrobial properties and dental pulp stem cell cytotoxicity using carboxymethyl cellulose-silver nanoparticles deposited on titanium plates.

    PubMed

    Laredo-Naranjo, Martha Alicia; Carrillo-Gonzalez, Roberto; De La Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angelica; Garza-Navarro, Marco Antonio; Torre-Martinez, Hilda H H; Del Angel-Mosqueda, Casiano; Mercado-Hernandez, Roberto; Carrillo-Fuentevilla, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial properties and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) cytotoxicity of synthesized carboxymethyl cellulose-silver nanoparticles impregnated on titanium plates. Material and methods: The antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles in a carboxymethyl cellulose matrix impregnated on titanium plates (Ti-AgNPs) in three concentrations: 16%, 50% and 100% was determined by adding these to bacterial cultures of Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The Ti-AgNPs cytotoxicity on DPSCs was determined using a fluorimetric cytotoxicity assay with 0.12% chlorhexidine as a positive control. Results: Silver nanoparticles in all concentrations were antimicrobial, with concentrations of 50% and 100% being more cytotoxic with 4% cell viability. Silver nanoparticles 16% had a cell viability of 95%, being less cytotoxic than 0.12% chlorhexidine. Conclusions: Silver nanoparticles are a promising structure because of their antimicrobial properties. These have high cell viability at a concentration of 16%, and are less toxic than chlorhexidine.

  5. Antimicrobial properties and dental pulp stem cell cytotoxicity using carboxymethyl cellulose-silver nanoparticles deposited on titanium plates

    PubMed Central

    Laredo-Naranjo, Martha Alicia; Carrillo-Gonzalez, Roberto; De La Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angelica; Garza-Navarro, Marco Antonio; Torre-Martinez, Hilda H. H.; Del Angel-Mosqueda, Casiano; Mercado-Hernandez, Roberto; Carrillo-Fuentevilla, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial properties and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) cytotoxicity of synthesized carboxymethyl cellulose-silver nanoparticles impregnated on titanium plates. Material and methods: The antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles in a carboxymethyl cellulose matrix impregnated on titanium plates (Ti-AgNPs) in three concentrations: 16%, 50% and 100% was determined by adding these to bacterial cultures of Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The Ti-AgNPs cytotoxicity on DPSCs was determined using a fluorimetric cytotoxicity assay with 0.12% chlorhexidine as a positive control. Results: Silver nanoparticles in all concentrations were antimicrobial, with concentrations of 50% and 100% being more cytotoxic with 4% cell viability. Silver nanoparticles 16% had a cell viability of 95%, being less cytotoxic than 0.12% chlorhexidine. Conclusions: Silver nanoparticles are a promising structure because of their antimicrobial properties. These have high cell viability at a concentration of 16%, and are less toxic than chlorhexidine. PMID:28642914

  6. Effectiveness of Hypochlorous Acid to Reduce the Biofilms on Titanium Alloy Surfaces in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ju; Chen, Chun-Cheng; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents have been used as an adjunct to mechanical debridement for peri-implantitis treatment. The present in vitro study evaluated and compared the effectiveness of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and chlorhexidine (CHX) at eliminating Gram-negative (E. coli and P. gingivalis) and Gram-positive (E. faecalis and S. sanguinis) bacteria. The effect of irrigating volume and exposure time on the antimicrobial efficacy of HOCl was evaluated, and a durability analysis was completed. Live/dead staining, morphology observation, alamarBlue assay, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) detection were examined on grit-blasted and biofilm-contaminated titanium alloy discs after treatment with the three chemotherapeutic agents. The results indicated that HOCl exhibited better antibacterial efficacy with increasing irrigating volumes. HOCl achieved greater antibacterial efficacy as treatment time was increased. A decrease in antimicrobial effectiveness was observed when HOCl was unsealed and left in contact with the air. All the irrigants showed antibacterial activity and killed the majority of bacteria on the titanium alloy surfaces of biofilm-contaminated implants. Moreover, HOCl significantly lowered the LPS concentration of P. gingivalis when compared with NaOCl and CHX. Thus, a HOCl antiseptic may be effective for cleaning biofilm-contaminated implant surfaces. PMID:27447617

  7. Effectiveness of Hypochlorous Acid to Reduce the Biofilms on Titanium Alloy Surfaces in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Ju; Chen, Chun-Cheng; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2016-07-19

    Chemotherapeutic agents have been used as an adjunct to mechanical debridement for peri-implantitis treatment. The present in vitro study evaluated and compared the effectiveness of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and chlorhexidine (CHX) at eliminating Gram-negative (E. coli and P. gingivalis) and Gram-positive (E. faecalis and S. sanguinis) bacteria. The effect of irrigating volume and exposure time on the antimicrobial efficacy of HOCl was evaluated, and a durability analysis was completed. Live/dead staining, morphology observation, alamarBlue assay, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) detection were examined on grit-blasted and biofilm-contaminated titanium alloy discs after treatment with the three chemotherapeutic agents. The results indicated that HOCl exhibited better antibacterial efficacy with increasing irrigating volumes. HOCl achieved greater antibacterial efficacy as treatment time was increased. A decrease in antimicrobial effectiveness was observed when HOCl was unsealed and left in contact with the air. All the irrigants showed antibacterial activity and killed the majority of bacteria on the titanium alloy surfaces of biofilm-contaminated implants. Moreover, HOCl significantly lowered the LPS concentration of P. gingivalis when compared with NaOCl and CHX. Thus, a HOCl antiseptic may be effective for cleaning biofilm-contaminated implant surfaces.

  8. Contact damage failure analyses of fretting wear behavior of the metal stem titanium alloy-bone cement interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanfeng; Ge, Shirong; Liu, Hongtao; Wang, Qingliang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-11-01

    Although cemented titanium alloy is not favored currently in the Western world for its poor clinical and radiography outcomes, its lower modulus of elasticity and good biocompatibility are instrumental for its ability supporting and transforming physical load, and it is more suitable for usage in Chinese and Japanese populations due to their lower body weights and unique femoral characteristics. Through various friction tests of different cycles, loads and conditions and by examining fretting hysteresis loops, fatigue process curves and wear surfaces, the current study investigated fretting wear characteristics and wear mechanism of titanium alloy stem-bone cement interface. It was found that the combination of loads and displacement affected the wear quantity. Friction coefficient, which was in an inverse relationship to load under the same amplitude, was proportional to amplitudes under the same load. Additionally, calf serum was found to both lubricate and erode the wear interface. Moreover, cement fatigue contact areas appeared black/oxidative in dry and gruel in 25% calf serum. Fatigue scratches were detected within contact areas, and wear scars were found on cement and titanium surfaces, which were concave-shaped and ring concave/ convex-shaped, respectively. The coupling of thermoplastic effect and minimal torque damage has been proposed to be the major reason of contact damage. These data will be important for further studies analyzing metal-cement interface failure performance and solving interface friction and wear debris production issues.

  9. Erosion-Resistant Water-And-Grit-Blasting Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Marion L.; Rice, R. M.; Cosby, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Nozzle assembly adds abrasive particles to high-pressure water jet. Abrasive nozzle combined with high-pressure tapered stripping nozzle and standard connector. Partial vacuum in relatively large chamber of abrasive-injector housing entrains grit particles from abrasive supply.

  10. Erosion-Resistant Water-And-Grit-Blasting Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Marion L.; Rice, R. M.; Cosby, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Nozzle assembly adds abrasive particles to high-pressure water jet. Abrasive nozzle combined with high-pressure tapered stripping nozzle and standard connector. Partial vacuum in relatively large chamber of abrasive-injector housing entrains grit particles from abrasive supply.

  11. In vivo evaluation of bone deposition in macroporous titanium implants loaded with mesenchymal stem cells and strontium-enriched hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Lovati, Arianna B; Lopa, Silvia; Talò, Giuseppe; Previdi, Sara; Recordati, Camilla; Mercuri, David; Segatti, Francesco; Zagra, Luigi; Moretti, Matteo

    2015-02-01

    Bone-implant integration represents a major requirement to grant implant stability and reduce the risk of implant loosening. This study investigates the effect of progenitor cells and strontium-enriched hydrogel on the osseointegration of titanium implants. To mimic implant-bone interaction, an ectopic model was developed grafting Trabecular Titanium(™) (TT) implants into decellularized bone seeded with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). TT was loaded or not with strontium-enriched amidated carboxymethylcellulose (CMCA) hydrogel and/or hBMSCs. Constructs were implanted subcutaneously in athymic mice and osteodeposition was investigated with microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and pull-out test at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Fluorescence imaging was performed at 8 and 12 weeks, histology at 4 and 8 weeks. Micro-CT demonstrated the homogeneity of the engineered bone in all groups, supporting the reproducibility of the ectopic model. Fluorescence imaging, histology, SEM and pull-out mechanical testing showed superior tissue ingrowth in TT implants loaded with both strontium-enriched CMCA and hBMSCs. In our model, the synergic action of the bioactive hydrogel and hBMSCs increased both the bone deposition and TT integration. Thus, we suggest that using orthopedic prosthetic implant preloaded with strontium-enriched CMCA and seeded with BMSCs could represent a valid single-step surgical strategy to improve implant osseointegration.

  12. In vitro osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and human dental pulp stem cells on poly-L-lysine-treated titanium-6-aluminium-4-vanadium.

    PubMed

    Galli, Daniela; Benedetti, Laura; Bongio, Matilde; Maliardi, Valentina; Silvani, Giulia; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Ronzoni, Flavio; Conte, Silvio; Benazzo, Francesco; Graziano, Antonio; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; De Angelis, Maria Gabriella Cusella

    2011-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) titanium-6-aluminium-4-vanadium (Ti6Al4V) is a widely used biomaterial for orthopedic prosthesis and dental implants; thanks to its very high-mechanical strength and resistance to corrosion. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) are responsible for bone regeneration following colonization of prosthesis or dental implants. Both hMSCs and hDPSCs have lower ability to colonize this biomaterial in comparison with tissue culture-treated plastic. Both hMSCs and hDPSCs show lack of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation when grown on Ti6Al4V. This signal is restored in the presence of poly-L-lysine (poly-L-lys). Poly-L-lys has been used as part of organoapatite or together with zinc and calcium ions. Our results suggest that poly-L-lys alone induces FAK activation through β1-INTEGRIN, because the presence of β1-INTEGRIN blocking antibody avoided FAK autophosphorylation. Presence of poly-L-lys also increases expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes in hMSCs and hDPSCs grown on Ti6Al4V.

  13. Comparative analysis of adherence, viability, proliferation and morphology of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells seeded on different titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hollweck, Trixi; Marschmann, Michaela; Hartmann, Isabel; Akra, Bassil; Meiser, Bruno; Reichart, Bruno; Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich; Eissner, Günther

    2010-12-01

    Umbilical cord tissue comprises an attractive new source for mesenchymal stem cells. Umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) exhibit self-renewal, multipotency and immunological naivity, and they can be obtained without medical intervention. The transfer of UCMSC to the ischemic region of the heart may have a favorable impact on tissue regeneration. Benefit from typical cell delivery by injection to the infarcted area is often limited due to poor cell retention and survival. Another route of administration is to use populated scaffolds implanted into the infarcted zone. In this paper, the seeding efficiency of UCMSC on uncoated and titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) scaffolds with different surface structures was determined. Dualmesh (DM) offers a corduroy-like surface in contrast to the comparatively planar surface of cardiovascular patch (CVP). The investigation of adherence, viability and proliferation of UCMSC demonstrates that titanium-coated scaffolds are superior to uncoated scaffolds, independent of the surface structure. Microscopic images reveal spherical UCMSC seeded on uncoated scaffolds. In contrast, UCMSC on titanium-coated scaffolds display their characteristic spindle-shaped morphology and a homogeneous coverage of CVP. In summary, titanium coating of clinically approved CVP enhances the retention of UCMSC and thus offers a potential cell delivery system for the repair of the damaged myocardium.

  14. Antibacterial activity and increased bone marrow stem cell functions of Zn-incorporated TiO2 coatings on titanium.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Zhang, W; Qiao, Y; Jiang, X; Liu, X; Ding, C

    2012-02-01

    In this work, zinc was incorporated into TiO2 coatings on titanium by plasma electrolytic oxidation to obtain the implant with good bacterial inhibition ability and bone-formability. The porous and nanostructured Zn-incorporated TiO2 coatings are built up from pores smaller than 5 μm and grains 20-100 nm in size, in which the element Zn exists as ZnO. The results obtained from the antibacterial studies suggest that the Zn-incorporated TiO2 coatings can greatly inhibit the growth of both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and the ability to inhibit bacteria can be improved by increasing the Zn content in the coatings. Moreover, the in vitro cytocompatibility evaluation demonstrates that the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of rat bone marrow stem cells (bMSC) on Zn-incorporated coatings are significantly enhanced compared with Zn-free coating and commercially pure Ti plate, and no cytotoxicity appeared on any of the Zn-incorporated TiO2 coatings. Moreover, bMSC express higher level of alkaline phosphatase activity on Zn-incorporated TiO2 coatings and are induced to differentiate into osteoblast cells. The better antibacterial activity, cytocompatibility and the capability to promote bMSC osteogenic differentiation of Zn-incorporated TiO2 coatings may be attributed to the fact that Zn ions can be slowly and constantly released from the coatings. In conclusion, innovative Zn-incorporated TiO2 coatings on titanium with excellent antibacterial activity and biocompatibility are promising candidates for orthopedic and dental implants.

  15. Proliferation, behavior, and cytokine gene expression of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells in response to different titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    An, Na; Schedle, Andreas; Wieland, Marco; Andrukhov, Oleh; Matejka, Michael; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2010-04-01

    Success of dental implantation is initially affected by wound healing of both, hard and soft tissues. Endothelial cells (ECs) are involved as crucial cells in the angiogenesis and inflammation process of wound healing. In the present study, proliferation, mobility, cluster formation, and gene expression of angiogenesis-related molecules of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated on titanium surfaces with different roughnesses: acid-etched (A), coarse-grit-blasted and acid-etched (SLA) surfaces, as well as on hydrophilic modified modA and modSLA surfaces. Cell behaviors were analyzed by proliferation assay and time-lapse microscopy, gene expression was analyzed by real time PCR. Results showed that cell proliferation, mobility, and cluster formation were highest on modA surfaces compared with all other surfaces. HUVECs moved slowly and exhibited seldom cell aggregation on SLA and modSLA surfaces during the whole observing period of 120 h. The gene expressions of the angiogenesis-related factors von Willebrand factor, thrombomodulin, endothelial cell protein C receptor, and adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin were most enhanced on modSLA surfaces. These results suggest that modA surface is optimal for proliferation and angiogenic behavior of ECs. However, modSLA surface seems to promote ECs to express angiogenesis-related factor genes, which play essential roles in controlling inflammation and revascularization of wound healing.

  16. Proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on zirconia and titanium with different surface topography.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tomoki; Sasaki, Hodaka; Honma, Shinya; Furuya, Yoshitaka; Miura, Tadashi; Yajima, Yasutomo; Yoshinari, Masao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (TZP) and commercial pure titanium (CpTi) with different surface topography. Mirror-polished (MS), sandblasted with 150-μm alumina (SB150) and SB150 acid-etched (SB150E) were prepared on TZP and CpTi. Proliferation, osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was evaluated. The scanning electron microscopy showed that micro- and nano-topographies were created on both TZP and CpTi SB150E surfaces. The proliferation ability, ALP activity, expression of Runx2 on the both SB150E specimens was significantly higher than those on the other specimens. These results suggested that creation of micro- and nano-topographies on TZP and CpTi by blast and acid-etching may offer a promising method for enhancing the proliferation and differentiation of hMSCs in clinical application.

  17. Targeting neural stem cells with titanium dioxide nanoparticles coupled to specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Elvira, Gema; Moreno, Berta; Valle, Ignacio Del; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A; Canillas, María; Chinarro, Eva; Jurado, José R; Silva, Augusto

    2012-05-01

    Aiming to characterize the use of biomaterials in cancer therapy, we took advantage of the n-type semiconductor properties, which upon irradiation excite their electrons into the conduction band to induce photoelectrochemical reactions generating oxygen reactive species (ROS). Indeed, photoactivated TiO(2) nanoparticles have been shown to kill in vitro either bacteria or tumor cells in culture following UV irradiation, as a consequence of the ROS levels generated; the killing was highly effective although devoid of specificity. In this report, we have directed the TiO(2) nanoparticles to particular targets by coupling them to the monoclonal antibody (mAb) Nilo1, recognizing a surface antigen in neural stem cells within a cell culture, to explore the possibility of making this process specific. TiO(2) nanoparticles generated with particular rutile/anatase ratios were coupled to Nilo1 antibody and the complexes formed were highly stable. The coupled antibody retained the ability to identify neural stem cells and upon UV irradiation, the TiO(2) nanoparticles were activated, inducing the selective photokilling of the antibody-targeted cells. Thus, these data indicate that antibody-TiO(2) complexes could be used to specifically remove target cell subpopulations, as demonstrated with neural stem cells. The possible applications in cancer therapy are discussed.

  18. Silencing tumor necrosis factor-alpha in vitro from small interfering RNA-decorated titanium nanotube array can facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenlin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Dawei; Zhuo, Mengchuan; Cheng, Jiwei; Xu, Xingping; Xing, Yongming; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are known for their bone bonding ability. However, the osseointegration may be severely disturbed in the inflammation environment. In order to enhance osseointegration of the implant in an inflamed environment, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was used to functionalize titanium surface for gene silencing. The chitosan–tripolyphosphate–hyaluronate complexes were used to formulate nanoparticles (NPs) with siRNA, which were adsorbed directly by the anodized titanium surface. The surface characterization was analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, as well as contact angle measurement. The fluorescence microscope was used to monitor the degradation of the layer. The coculture system was established with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown directly on functionalized titanium surface and RAW264.7 cells (preactivated by lipopolysaccharide) grown upside in a transwell chamber. The transfection and knockdown efficiency of TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells were determined by fluorescence microscope, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cytoskeleton and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were also analyzed. Regular vertical aligned nanotubes (~100 nm diameter and ~300 nm length) were generated after anodization of polished titanium. After loading with NPs, the nanotubes were filled and covered by a layer of amorphous particles. The surface topography changed and wettability decreased after covering with NPs. As expected, a burst degradation of the film was observed, which could provide sufficient NPs in the released supernatant and result in transfection and knockdown effects in RAW264.7 cells. The cytoskeleton arrangement of MSCs was elongated and the osteogenic differentiation was also significantly improved on NPs loading surface. In conclusion, the siRNA decorated titanium implant could simultaneously suppress inflammation and improve

  19. Silencing tumor necrosis factor-alpha in vitro from small interfering RNA-decorated titanium nanotube array can facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenlin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Dawei; Zhuo, Mengchuan; Cheng, Jiwei; Xu, Xingping; Xing, Yongming; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are known for their bone bonding ability. However, the osseointegration may be severely disturbed in the inflammation environment. In order to enhance osseointegration of the implant in an inflamed environment, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was used to functionalize titanium surface for gene silencing. The chitosan-tripolyphosphate-hyaluronate complexes were used to formulate nanoparticles (NPs) with siRNA, which were adsorbed directly by the anodized titanium surface. The surface characterization was analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, as well as contact angle measurement. The fluorescence microscope was used to monitor the degradation of the layer. The coculture system was established with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown directly on functionalized titanium surface and RAW264.7 cells (preactivated by lipopolysaccharide) grown upside in a transwell chamber. The transfection and knockdown efficiency of TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells were determined by fluorescence microscope, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cytoskeleton and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were also analyzed. Regular vertical aligned nanotubes (~100 nm diameter and ~300 nm length) were generated after anodization of polished titanium. After loading with NPs, the nanotubes were filled and covered by a layer of amorphous particles. The surface topography changed and wettability decreased after covering with NPs. As expected, a burst degradation of the film was observed, which could provide sufficient NPs in the released supernatant and result in transfection and knockdown effects in RAW264.7 cells. The cytoskeleton arrangement of MSCs was elongated and the osteogenic differentiation was also significantly improved on NPs loading surface. In conclusion, the siRNA decorated titanium implant could simultaneously suppress inflammation and improve

  20. Combined effect of grain refinement and surface modification of pure titanium on the attachment of mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, A E; Neumann, A; Ng, H P; Lapovok, R; Kasper, C; Lowe, T C; Anumalasetty, V N; Estrin, Y

    2017-02-01

    Surface modification is an important step in production of medical implants. Surface roughening creates additional surface area to enhance the bonding between the implant and the bone. Recent research provided a means to alter the microstructure of titanium by severe plastic deformation (SPD) in order to increase its strength, and thereby reduce the size of the implants (specifically, their diameter). The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of bulk microstructure of commercially pure titanium with coarse-grained (CG) and ultrafine-grained (UFG) bulk structure on the surface state of these materials after surface modification by sand blasting and acid etching (SLA). It was shown that SLA-modified surface characteristics, in particular, roughness, chemistry, and wettability, were affected by prior SPD processing. Additionally, biocompatibility of UFG titanium was examined using osteosarcoma cell line SaOS-2 and primary human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (adMSC) cultures. Enhanced cell viability as well as increased matrix mineralization during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs on the surface of ultrafine-grained titanium was shown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Differentiation and cytokine synthesis of human alveolar osteoblasts compared to osteoblast-like cells (MG63) in response to titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rausch-fan, Xiaohui; Qu, Zhe; Wieland, Marco; Matejka, Michael; Schedle, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different implant surface topographies and chemistries on the expression of differentiation/proliferation markers on MG63 cells and primary human alveolar osteoblasts. Hydrophobic acid-etched (A) and hydrophobic coarse-grit-blasted, acid-etched (SLA) surfaces and hydrophilic acid-etched (modA) and hydrophilic coarse-grit-blasted (modSLA) surfaces were produced. Thereby, modA and modSLA surfaces were rinsed under nitrogen protection and stored in a sealed glass tube containing isotonic NaCl solution at pH 4-6. Tissue culture plates without specimens served as controls. The behavior of MG63 cells and primary human alveolar osteoblasts (AOB) grown on all surfaces was compared through determination of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, cell proliferation ((3)H-thymidin incorporation, MTT colorimetric assay) and expression of osteocalcin (OC), osteoprotegerin (OPG), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta(1)) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), detected with commercial available test kits. Proliferation of MG63 and primary cells was highest on controls, followed by A surfaces, modA and SLA surfaces being almost on the same level and lowest on modSLA surfaces. modSLA surfaces exhibited highest ALP and OC production, followed by SLA, modA and A surfaces. Proliferation and OC production were comparable for MG63 cells and AOB. OPG, TGF-beta(1) and VEGF produced on primary cells showed a slightly different rank order on different surfaces compared to MG63 cells. modSLA still showed the highest production of OPG, TGF-beta(1) and VEGF, but was followed by modA, SLA and A. Statistical significance was checked by ANOVA (p<0.0035). MG63 cells and primary human alveolar osteoblasts showed similar proliferation and differentiation characteristics on different titanium surfaces. Only modA surfaces showed enhanced expression of OPG, TGF-beta(1) and VEGF on MG63 cells compared to primary human alveolar

  2. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B; Dimitrov, Dimitar M; van Staden, Anton D; Oosthuizen, Gert A; Dicks, Leon M T

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research.

  3. ZnO nanoparticle incorporated nanostructured metallic titanium for increased mesenchymal stem cell response and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizabeth, Elmy; Baranwal, Gaurav; Krishnan, Amit G.; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Manitha

    2014-03-01

    Recent trends in titanium implants are towards the development of nanoscale topographies that mimic the nanoscale properties of bone tissue. Although the nanosurface promotes the integration of osteoblast cells, infection related problems can also occur, leading to implant failure. Therefore it is imperative to reduce bacterial adhesion on an implant surface, either with or without the use of drugs/antibacterial agents. Herein, we have investigated two different aspects of Ti surfaces in inhibiting bacterial adhesion and concurrently promoting mammalian cell adhesion. These include (i) the type of nanoscale topography (Titania nanotube (TNT) and Titania nanoleaf (TNL)) and (ii) the presence of an antibacterial agent like zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnOnp) on Ti nanosurfaces. To address this, periodically arranged TNT (80-120 nm) and non-periodically arranged TNL surfaces were generated by the anodization and hydrothermal techniques respectively, and incorporated with ZnOnp of different concentrations (375 μM, 750 μM, 1.125 mM and 1.5 mM). Interestingly, TNL surfaces decreased the adherence of staphylococcus aureus while increasing the adhesion and viability of human osteosarcoma MG63 cell line and human mesenchymal stem cells, even in the absence of ZnOnp. In contrast, TNT surfaces exhibited an increased bacterial and mammalian cell adhesion. The influence of ZnOnp on these surfaces in altering the bacterial and cell adhesion was found to be concentration dependent, with an optimal range of 375-750 μM. Above 750 μM, although bacterial adhesion was reduced, cellular viability was considerably affected. Thus our study helps us to infer that nanoscale topography by itself or its combination with an optimal concentration of antibacterial ZnOnp would provide a differential cell behavior and thereby a desirable biological response, facilitating the long term success of an implant.

  4. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong; Park, Young Min; Choi, Bo-Young; Lee, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3×10(16) ions/cm(2) was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity.

  5. The effect of surface treatments on the adhesion of electrochemically deposited hydroxyapatite coating to titanium and on its interaction with cells and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eliaz, Noam; Ritman-Hertz, Oshrit; Aronov, Daniel; Weinberg, Evgeny; Shenhar, Yotam; Rosenman, Gil; Weinreb, Miron; Ron, Eliora

    2011-07-01

    The effect of different mechanical and chemical pre-treatments on the adhesion strength of hydroxyapatite (HAp) coating on a commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) substrate was studied by means of a standard tensile test followed by microscopic and chemical analysis to determine the locus of fracture. In addition, the effects of either these pre-treatments or post-treatment by low-energy electron irradiation, which allowed tuning the wettability of the surface, on both osteoblast progenitor attachment and S. aureus bacteria attachment were investigated. A dedicated program was developed for unambiguous identification and count of stained cells. A single-phase HAp coating was formed by electrodeposition. A series of surface pre-treatments consisted of grinding down to P1000, etching in HNO₃/HF solution, grit blast, soaking in NaOH and subsequent heat treatment provided the highest adhesion strength to the HAp coating. Osteoblast progenitors derived from rats may be attached preferentially to a hydrophilic surface (post-treatment to θ = 30°), while the bacteria seemed to be less attached to hydrophobic surfaces (post-treatment to θ = 105°). However, the results were not statistically different. The bacteria seemed to be less attached to the smoother, uncoated surfaces.

  6. Effects of calcium ion incorporation on osteoblast gene expression in MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on microstructured titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Woo; Suh, Jo-Young; Chung, Hyun-Ju

    2008-07-01

    The surface characteristics of a calcium ion (Ca)-incorporated titanium (Ti) surface, produced by hydrothermal treatment using an alkaline Ca-containing solution, and its effects on osteoblastic differentiation were investigated. MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells were cultured on machined or grit-blasted Ti surfaces with and without Ca incorporation. The MTT assay was used to determine cell proliferation, and real-time PCR was used for quantitative analysis of osteoblastic gene expression. Hydrothermal treatment with a Ca-containing solution produced a crystalline CaTiO(3) nanostructure of approximately 100 nm in dimension, preserving original micron-scaled surface topographies and microroughness caused by machining, blasting, or blasting and etching treatments. After immersion in Hank's balanced salt solution, considerable apatite formation was observed on all surfaces of the Ca-incorporated samples. Significantly more cell proliferation was found on Ca-incorporated Ti surfaces than on untreated Ti surfaces (p < 0.001). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed notably higher alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin mRNA levels in cells grown on Ca-incorporated blasted surfaces than on other surfaces at an early time point. Thus, Ca incorporation may have a beneficial effect on osseointegration of microstructured Ti implants by accelerating osteoblast proliferation and differentiation during the early healing phase following implantation. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B.; Dimitrov, Dimitar M.; van Staden, Anton D.; Oosthuizen, Gert A.; Dicks, Leon M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research. PMID:26504776

  8. Tuning Mesenchymal Stem Cell Response onto Titanium-Niobium-Hafnium Alloy by Recombinant Fibronectin Fragments.

    PubMed

    Herranz-Diez, C; Mas-Moruno, C; Neubauer, S; Kessler, H; Gil, F J; Pegueroles, M; Manero, J M; Guillem-Marti, J

    2016-02-03

    Since metallic biomaterials used for bone replacement possess low bioactivity, the use of cell adhesive moieties is a common strategy to improve cellular response onto these surfaces. In recent years, the use of recombinant proteins has emerged as an alternative to native proteins and short peptides owing to the fact that they retain the biological potency of native proteins, while improving their stability. In the present study, we investigated the biological effect of two different recombinant fragments of fibronectin, spanning the 8-10th and 12-14th type III repeats, covalently attached to a new TiNbHf alloy using APTES silanization. The fragments were studied separately and mixed at different concentrations and compared to a linear RGD, a cyclic RGD and the full-length fibronectin protein. Cell culture studies using rat mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that low to medium concentrations (30% and 50%) of type III 8-10th fragment mixed with type III 12-14th fragment stimulated cell spreading and proliferation compared to RGD peptides and the fragments separately. On the other hand, type III 12-14th fragment alone or mixed at low volume percentages ≤50% with type III 8-10th fragment increased alkaline phosphatase levels compared to the other molecules. These results are significant for the understanding of the role of fibronectin recombinant fragments in cell responses and thus to design bioactive coatings for biomedical applications.

  9. A quantitative study of exocytosis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles from neural stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Wu, Qiuxia; Sui, Keke; Chen, Xin-Xin; Fang, Jie; Hu, Xuefeng; Wu, Minghong; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely studied and applied in biomedicine and other fields. It is important to know the basic process of interaction between NPs and cells in terms of cellular endocytosis and exocytosis. However, little attention has been paid to the cellular exocytosis of NPs. Herein, using a multi-step cellular subculture method, we ascertain quantitatively the endocytosis and exocytosis of widely used TiO2 NPs using the neural stem cells (NSC) as a cellular model and ICP-AES as an analytic measure. Irrespective of the type and dose of TiO2 NPs, approximately 30% of the total TiO2 NPs entered NSCs after 48 h incubation. In the first 24 h after removing TiO2NPs, from the culture medium, about 35.0%, 34.6% and 41.7% of NP1 (50 nm), NP2 (30 nm) and NTs (nanotubes, 100 nm × 4-6 nm) were released (exocytosed) from cells, respectively. The release decreased over time, and became negligible at 72 h. Exocytosis did not happen during cell division. In addition, our results suggested that both endocytosis and exocytosis of TiO2NPs were energy-dependent processes, and NPs uptake by cells was influenced by serum proteins. Furthermore, we achieved primary dynamic confocal imaging of the exocytosis, allowing tracking of TiO2 NPs from NSCs. These findings may benefit studies on nanotoxicology and nanomedicine of TiO2 NPs.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely studied and applied in biomedicine and other fields. It is important to know the basic process of interaction between NPs and cells in terms of cellular endocytosis and exocytosis. However, little attention has been paid to the cellular exocytosis of NPs. Herein, using a multi-step cellular subculture method, we ascertain quantitatively the endocytosis and exocytosis of widely used TiO2 NPs using the neural stem cells (NSC) as a cellular model and ICP-AES as an analytic measure. Irrespective of the type and dose of TiO2 NPs, approximately 30% of the total TiO2 NPs entered NSCs after 48 h incubation. In the

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Increase Collagen Infiltration and Improve Wound Healing Response to Porous Titanium Percutaneous Implants

    PubMed Central

    Isackson, Dorthyann; Cook, Kevin J.; McGill, Lawrence D.; Bachus, Kent N.

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal downgrowth, commonly associated with long-term percutaneous implants, weakens the skin-implant seal and greatly increases the vulnerability of the site to infection. To improve the skin attachment and early tissue integration with porous metal percutaneous implants, we evaluated the effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) to provide wound healing cues and vascularization to the dermal and epidermal tissues in establishing a barrier with the implant. Two porous metal percutaneous implants, one treated with BMMSCs and one untreated, were placed subdermally on the dorsum of Lewis rats. Implants were evaluated at 0, 3, 7, 28, and 56 days after implantation. Histological analyses evaluated cellular infiltrates, vascularization, quantity and quality of tissue ingrowth, epidermal downgrowth, and fibrous encapsulation. The amount of collagen infiltrating the porous coating was significantly greater for the BMMSC-treated implants at 3 and 28 days post implantation compared to untreated implants. There was an early influx and resolution of cellular inflammatory infiltrates in the treated implants compared to the untreated, though not statistically significant. Vascularization increased over time in both treated and untreated implants, with no statistical significance. Epidermal downgrowth was minimally observed in all implants with or without the BMMSC treatment. Our results suggest that BMMSCs can influence an early and rapid resolution of acute and chronic inflammation in wound healing, and can stimulate early collagen deposition and granulation tissue associated with later stages of wound repair. These findings provide evidence that BMMSCs can stimulate a more rapid and improved barrier between the skin and porous metal percutaneous implant. PMID:22940446

  11. Hydroxyapatite in total hip arthroplasty. Our experience with a plasma spray porous titanium alloy/hydroxyapatite double-coated cementless stem

    PubMed Central

    Castellini, Iacopo; Andreani, Lorenzo; Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Bonicoli, Enrico; Piolanti, Nicola; Risoli, Francesca; Lisanti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Summary Purpose Total hip arthroplasty could fail due to many factors and one of the most common is the aseptic loosening. In order to achieve an effective osseointegration and reduce risk of lossening, the use of cemented implant, contact porous bearing surface and organic coating were developed. Aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological mid-term outcomes of a porous titanium alloy/hydroxyapatite double coating manufactured cementless femoral stem applied with “plasma spray” technique and to demonstrate the possibility to use this stem in different types of femoral canals. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2012, 240 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were performed using a porous titanium alloy/hydroxyapatite double coating manufactured cementless femoral stem. 182 patients were examined: 136 were females (74.7%) and 46 males (25.2%); average age was 72 years old (ranging from 26 to 92 years old). For each patient, Harris Hip Scores (HHS) and Womac Scores were collected. All X-ray images were analyzed in order to demonstrate stem survival rate and subsidence. Results Harris Hip Score was good or excellent in 85% of the cases (average 90%) and mean WOMAC score was 97.5 (ranging from 73.4 to 100). No cases of early/late infection or periprosthetic fracture were noticed, with an excellent implant survival rate (100%) in a mean period of 40 months (ranging from 24 and 84 months). 5 cases presented acute implant dislocation, 2 due to wrong cup positioning in a dysplastic acetabulum and 3 after ground level fall. Dorr classification of femoral geometry was uses and the results were: 51 type A bone, 53 type B bone and 78 type C bone. Stem subsidence over 2 mm was considered as a risk factor of future implant loosening and was evidenced in 3 female patients with type C of Dorr classification. No radiolucencies signs around the proximally coated portion of stem or proximal reabsorption were visible during the radiographic

  12. Effects of Silica and Titanium Oxide Particles on a Human Neural Stem Cell Line: Morphology, Mitochondrial Activity, and Gene Expression of Differentiation Markers

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Hanada, Sanshiro; Inoue, Yuriko; Sato, Keisuke; Hirakuri, Kenji; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Ikeda, Keiichi; Usui, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kim, Seung U.; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Several in vivo studies suggest that nanoparticles (smaller than 100 nm) have the ability to reach the brain tissue. Moreover, some nanoparticles can penetrate into the brains of murine fetuses through the placenta by intravenous administration to pregnant mice. However, it is not clear whether the penetrated nanoparticles affect neurogenesis or brain function. To evaluate its effects on neural stem cells, we assayed a human neural stem cell (hNSCs) line exposed in vitro to three types of silica particles (30 nm, 70 nm, and <44 μm) and two types of titanium oxide particles (80 nm and < 44 μm). Our results show that hNSCs aggregated and exhibited abnormal morphology when exposed to the particles at concentrations ≥ 0.1 mg/mL for 7 days. Moreover, all the particles affected the gene expression of Nestin (stem cell marker) and neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NF-H, neuron marker) at 0.1 mg/mL. In contrast, only 30-nm silica particles at 1.0 mg/mL significantly reduced mitochondrial activity. Notably, 30-nm silica particles exhibited acute membrane permeability at concentrations ≥62.5 μg/mL in 24 h. Although these concentrations are higher than the expected concentrations of nanoparticles in the brain from in vivo experiments in a short period, these thresholds may indicate the potential toxicity of accumulated particles for long-term usage or continuous exposure. PMID:24992594

  13. Effects of silica and titanium oxide particles on a human neural stem cell line: morphology, mitochondrial activity, and gene expression of differentiation markers.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Hanada, Sanshiro; Inoue, Yuriko; Sato, Keisuke; Hirakuri, Kenji; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Ikeda, Keiichi; Usui, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kim, Seung U; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2014-07-02

    Several in vivo studies suggest that nanoparticles (smaller than 100 nm) have the ability to reach the brain tissue. Moreover, some nanoparticles can penetrate into the brains of murine fetuses through the placenta by intravenous administration to pregnant mice. However, it is not clear whether the penetrated nanoparticles affect neurogenesis or brain function. To evaluate its effects on neural stem cells, we assayed a human neural stem cell (hNSCs) line exposed in vitro to three types of silica particles (30 nm, 70 nm, and <44 µm) and two types of titanium oxide particles (80 nm and < 44 µm). Our results show that hNSCs aggregated and exhibited abnormal morphology when exposed to the particles at concentrations = 0.1 mg/mL for 7 days. Moreover, all the particles affected the gene expression of Nestin (stem cell marker) and neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NF-H, neuron marker) at 0.1 mg/mL. In contrast, only 30-nm silica particles at 1.0 mg/mL significantly reduced mitochondrial activity. Notably, 30-nm silica particles exhibited acute membrane permeability at concentrations =62.5 µg/mL in 24 h. Although these concentrations are higher than the expected concentrations of nanoparticles in the brain from in vivo experiments in a short period, these thresholds may indicate the potential toxicity of accumulated particles for long-term usage or continuous exposure.

  14. Excessive distal migration of fiber-mesh coated femoral stems

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The surface texture, localization, and magnitude of the surface material applied to the femoral stem can facilitate bone ingrowth and influence the survival of total hip arthroplasties. Clinical and radiographic studies have shown superior bone ingrowth in proximally porous-coated stems with a diaphyseal grit-blasted surface in comparison to a smooth diaphyseal surface. Surface textures—especially porous surface material—have been suggested to have a sealing effect against migration of polyethylene debris along the implant-bone interface and to reduce the inflammatory response, leading to a prolonged implant survival. Patients and methods Between 2004 and 2006, we conducted a randomized, controlled trial (RCT) involving 50 patients with non-inflammatory arthritis. They received either a distally tapered, extended coated stem or a straight, proximally coated stem. During surgery, tantalum markers were inserted into the greater and lesser trochanter. Implant migration was evaluated at 3, 12, and 24 months postoperatively by radiostereometric analysis. The primary endpoint was stem migration 2 years after surgery. Results All femoral components in both groups showed pronounced distal translation, with the highest rate of translation occurring between 0 and 3 months. After 2 years, the mean distal translation was 2.67 (95% CI: –3.93 to –1.42) mm for the tapered, extended coated stem and 1.80 (–2.45 to –1.15) mm for the straight, proximally coated stem. Half of the tapered, extended coated stems and two-thirds of the straight, proximally coated stems had migrated more than 1 mm. No difference between the 2 stems could be seen with regard to translation or rotation at any time point. After 2 years, 2 hips have been reoperated due to mechanical loosening of the stem. Interpretation An excessive amount of migration of both stem types was seen 2 years postoperatively. It is of vital importance to follow this patient cohort since radiostereometric

  15. Titanium dental implant surfaces obtained by anodic spark deposition - From the past to the future.

    PubMed

    Kaluđerović, Milena R; Schreckenbach, Joachim P; Graf, Hans-Ludwig

    2016-12-01

    Commercial titanium-based dental implants are obtained applying various methods such as machining, acid etching, anodization, plasma spraying, grit blasting or combination techniques yielding materials with smooth or micro-roughened surfaces. Those techniques are used to optimize the surface properties and to maximize biocompatibility and bioactivity with bone tissue. Present review is focused on the material surfaces obtained by anodic spark deposition (ASD). From the early 1980s till present, the results of numerous studies have shown that anodically oxidized surfaces with different dopants express a positive effect on osteoblasts behavior in vitro and osseointegration in vivo. Those surfaces demonstrated a high biocompatibility and rapid osseointegration in clinical application. This paper provides an overview of the preparation of implant surfaces by employing ASD process. Moreover, reviewed are clinically used ASD implant surfaces (Ticer, TiUnite, Osstem, etc.). The electrolyte variations in ASD process and their influence on surface properties are given herein. Using different electrolytes, anode voltages and temperatures, the above fabrication process can yield various surface morphologies from smooth to rough, porous surfaces. Furthermore, ASD enables thickening of oxide layers and enrichment with different dopands from used electrolyte, which hinder release of potentially toxic titanium ions in surrounding tissue. Particularly exciting results were achieved by calcium and phosphorus doping of the oxide layer (Ticer, ZL Microdent; TiUnite, Nobel Biocare Holding AB) which significantly increased the osteocompatibility. Ticer, a dental implant with anodically oxidized surface and the first among similar materials employed in clinical practice, was found to promote fast osteoblast cell differentiation and mineralization processes. Moreover, Ticer accelerate the integration with the bone, increase the bone/implant contact and improve primary and secondary

  16. Surface functionalization of microgrooved titanium with dual growth factor-releasing nanoparticles for synergistic osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suk Won; Lee, Hong Jae; Lee, Jae Won; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Jong-Ho; Lee, Myung Hyun; Lee, Sang Cheon

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that dual release of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) by catechol-functionalized adhesive polymer nanoparticles on microgrooved titanium (Ti) surface enhances in vitro osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The nanoparticles consisted of three distinct domains, surface Ti-adhesive catechol groups, anionic poly(L-aspartic acid) (PAsp) shells, and hydrophobic poly(L-phenylalanine) (PPhe) cores. The immobilization of the adhesive nanoparticles onto microgrooved Ti surface was verified using various surface analytical tools, such as field-emission scanning electron microscopy (Fe-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement. The nanoparticles were immobilized both on the groove bottom surface and the ridge top surface with a similar anchoring density. A fluorescence microscope visualized that BMP-2 and IGF-1 of positive charges were efficiently loaded onto the negatively charged PAsp shells of immobilized nanoparticles. We confirmed the enhanced osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs by presenting the expression results of major osteoblast marker genes and proteins. In addition, overall significant correlations between the experimental results verified the validity of our study. The proposed combined surface of microgrooves and growth factor-releasing nanoparticles can be used as a strong osteogenic promoter on various biomaterial surfaces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of early cell-surface interactions of human mesenchymal stem cells on nanopatterned β-type titanium-niobium alloy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Medda, Rebecca; Helth, Arne; Herre, Patrick; Pohl, Darius; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Perschmann, Nadine; Neubauer, Stefanie; Kessler, Horst; Oswald, Steffen; Eckert, Jürgen; Spatz, Joachim P; Gebert, Annett; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta A

    2014-02-06

    Multi-potent adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow have therapeutic potential for bone diseases and regenerative medicine. However, an intrinsic heterogeneity in their phenotype, which in turn results in various differentiation potentials, makes it difficult to predict the response of these cells. The aim of this study is to investigate initial cell-surface interactions of human MSCs on modified titanium alloys. Gold nanoparticles deposited on β-type Ti-40Nb alloys by block copolymer micelle nanolithography served as nanotopographical cues as well as specific binding sites for the immobilization of thiolated peptides present in several extracellular matrix proteins. MSC heterogeneity persists on polished and nanopatterned Ti-40Nb samples. However, cell heterogeneity and donor variability decreased upon functionalization of the gold nanoparticles with cyclic RGD peptides. In particular, the number of large cells significantly decreased after 24 h owing to the arrangement of cell anchorage sites, rather than peptide specificity. However, the size and number of integrin-mediated adhesion clusters increased in the presence of the integrin-binding peptide (cRGDfK) compared with the control peptide (cRADfK). These results suggest that the use of integrin ligands in defined patterns could improve MSC-material interactions, not only by regulating cell adhesion locally, but also by reducing population heterogeneity.

  18. Fatigue Debonding of the Roughened Stem–Cement Interface: Effects of Surface Roughness and Stem Heating Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Damron, Leatha A.; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Mann, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of cyclic loading on the debond process of a roughened stem– cement interface used in total hip arthroplasty. The specific goals were to assess the effects of two surgeon-controlled variables (stem heating and degree of stem surface roughness) and to determine if an independent finite element-based fracture mechanics model could be used to predict the debond response. A clamped cantilever beam geometry was used to determine the fatigue debond response of the stem– cement interface and was created using an experimental mold that simulated in vivo cementing conditions. A second experiment was performed using a torsion-loading model representative of the stem– cement–bone composite. For both experiments, two stem heating (room temperature and 50°C) and surface roughness conditions (grit blasted: Ra = 2.3 and 5.1 μm) were used. Finally, a finite element model of the torsion experiment with provision for crack growth was developed and compared with the experimental results. Results from both experiments revealed that neither stem preheating nor use of a stem with a greater surface roughness had a marked effect on the fatigue debond response. There was substantial variability in the debond response for all cases; this may be due to microscopic gaps at the interface for all interface conditions. The debond rate from the finite element simulation (10−7.31 m/cycle) had a magnitude similar to the experimental torsion model (10− (6.77 ± 1.25) m/cycle). This suggests that within the context of the experimental conditions studied here that the debond response could be assessed using a linear elastic fracture mechanics-type approach. PMID:16292769

  19. Promotion of osteogenic differentiation of stem cells and increase of bone-bonding ability in vivo using urease-treated titanium coated with calcium phosphate and gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhong-Ming; Qi, Yi-Ying; Du, Shao-Hua; Feng, Gang; Unuma, Hidero; Yan, Wei-Qi

    2013-10-01

    Because of its excellent biocompatibility and low allergenicity, titanium has been widely used for bone replacement and tissue engineering. To produce a desirable composite with enhanced bone response and mechanical strength, in this study bioactive calcium phosphate (CaP) and gelatin composites were coated onto titanium (Ti) via a novel urease technique. The cellular responses to the CaP/gelatin/Ti (CaP/gel/Ti) and bone bonding ability were evaluated with proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on CaP/gel/Ti and CaP/Ti in vitro. The results showed that the optical density values, alkaline phosphatase expression and genes expression of MSCs on CaP/gel/Ti were similar to those on CaP/Ti, yet significantly higher than those on pure Ti (p < 0.05). CaP/gel/Ti and CaP/Ti rods (2 mm in diameter, 10 mm in length) were also implanted into femoral shaft of rabbits and pure Ti rods served as control (n = 10). Histological examination, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements were performed at 4 and 8 weeks after the operation. The histological and SEM observations demonstrated clearly that more new bone formed on the surface of CaP/gel/Ti than in the other two groups at each time point. The CaP/gel/Ti bonded to the surrounding bone directly with no intervening soft tissue layer. An interfacial layer, containing Ti, Ca and P, was found to form at the interface between bone and the implant on all three groups by EDS analysis. However, the content of Ca, P in the surface of CaP/gel/Ti implants was more than in the other two groups at each time point. The CaP/gel/Ti modified by the urease method was not only beneficial for MSCs proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, but also favorable for bone bonding ability on Ti implants in vivo, suggesting that Ti functionalized with CaP and gelatin might have a great potential in clinical joint replacement or dental implants.

  20. Influence of implant surface topography on bone-regenerative potential and mechanical retention in the human maxilla and mandible.

    PubMed

    Wei, Niu; Bin, Shi; Jing, Zhou; Wei, Sun; Yingqiong, Zhao

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the short- and mid-term effects of commercial pure (cp) titanium implant surface topography on osseointegration, bone-regenerative potential and mechanical retention in the human maxilla and mandible. 32 micro-implants with the same geometry but with four different surface treatments were implanted in the maxilla and mandible of eight patients. Each patient received four micro-implants, one of each type. Percentage of bone-to-implant contact analysis and histological evaluation was carried 3, 6 and 12 weeks after implantation. Furthermore, reverse removal torque tests were conducted 3 and 6 weeks after implantation to analyze functional bone attachment. Implant surfaces tested were: machined, grit-blasted, acid-etched, and grit-blasted with acid-etch. One-way ANOVA was performed using the multiple comparison Fisher's test to determine significance of observed differences among test groups. The level of significance was established at 5% (P < 0.05). Mean and standard deviations of the test groups were calculated. Surface roughness had a significant correlation with the evolution of bone regeneration. The surfaces with roughness Ra approximately 4 microim (grit-blasted and grit-blasted with acid-etch), showed rapid tissue colonization compared to machine and acid-etched surfaces. The results of reverse removal torque tests confirmed a significant correlation between surface roughness and functional bone attachment. Grit-blasted and grit-blasted with acid etched surfaces showed higher retention values compared to machine and acid-etched implants. This finding was supported by higher bone-to-implant contact observed for rougher surfaces (grit-blasted and grit-blasted with acid etching).

  1. Oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation treatment enhances the human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells responses to titanium surface for dental implant application.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Hsiung; Li, Yu-Chen; Tsai, Wen-Fa; Ai, Chi-Fong; Huang, Her-Hsiung

    2015-02-01

    The present investigation utilized a novel oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (O-PIII) treatment to create a dense and thin oxide layer on a titanium (Ti) surface for dental implant application. This study evaluated the behavior of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on O-PIII-treated Ti. The O-PIII treatments were performed using different oxygen ion doses (T(L): 1 × 10(16); T(M): 4 × 10(16); T(H): 1 × 10(17) ions/cm(2)). Analysis using an X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and high resolution X-ray diffractometer (HR-XRD) indicated that the O-PIII-treated specimen T(M) had the highest proportion of rutile phase TiO2 component. The O-PIII-treated specimen T(M) had the greatest protein adsorption capability of the test Ti surfaces using XPS analysis and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that hMSCs had the best cell adhesion on the O-PIII-treated specimen T(M), whereas green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled hMSCs experienced the fastest cell migration based on a wound healing assay. Other assays, including MTT assay, Alizarin red S staining and Western blot analysis, demonstrated that the adhered hMSCs exhibited the greatest cell proliferation, mineralization, and differentiation capabilities on the TM specimen. Oxidated Ti (primarily rutile TiO2 ) was produced using a facile and rapid O-PIII treatment procedure, which enhances the biocompatibility of the Ti surface with potential implications for further dental implant application. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Microarc-oxidized titanium surfaces functionalized with microRNA-21-loaded chitosan/hyaluronic acid nanoparticles promote the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongshan; Wu, Guangsheng; Feng, Zhihong; Bai, Shizhu; Dong, Yan; Wu, Guofeng; Zhao, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants have been widely used for the replacement of missing teeth in the clinic, but further improvements are needed to meet the clinical demands for faster and tighter osseointegration. In this study, we fabricated safe and biocompatible chitosan (CS)/hyaluronic acid (HA) nanoparticles to deliver microRNA-21 (miR-21) and thereby accelerate osteogenesis in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs). The CS/HA/miR-21 nanoparticles were cross-linked with 0.2% gel solution onto microarc oxidation (MAO)-treated titanium (Ti) surfaces to fabricate the miR-21-functionalized MAO Ti surface, resulting in the development of a novel coating for reverse transfection. To characterize the CS/HA/miR-21 nanoparticles, their particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, and gel retardation ability were sequentially investigated. Their biological effects, such as cell viability, cytotoxicity, and expression of osteogenic genes by hBMMSCs on the miR-21-functionalized MAO Ti surfaces, were evaluated. Finally, we explored appropriate CS/HA/miR-21 nanoparticles with a CS/HA ratio of 4:1 and N/P ratio 20:1 for transfection, which presented good spherical morphology, an average diameter of 160.4±10.75 nm, and a positive zeta potential. The miR-21-functionalized MAO Ti surfaces demonstrated cell viability, cytotoxicity, and cell spreading comparable to those exhibited by naked MAO Ti surfaces and led to significantly higher expression of osteogenic genes. This novel miR-21-functionalized Ti implant may be used in the clinic to allow more effective and robust osseointegration. PMID:26604744

  3. Titanium 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2014-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth's crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that the metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  4. Fully porous 3D printed titanium femoral stem to reduce stress-shielding following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Arabnejad, Sajad; Johnston, Burnett; Tanzer, Michael; Pasini, Damiano

    2016-09-24

    Current hip replacement femoral implants are made of fully solid materials which all have stiffness considerably higher than that of bone. This mechanical mismatch can cause significant bone resorption secondary to stress shielding, which can lead to serious complications such as peri-prosthetic fracture during or after revision surgery. In this work, a high strength fully porous material with tunable mechanical properties is introduced for use in hip replacement design. The implant macro geometry is based off of a short stem taper-wedge implant compatible with minimally invasive hip replacement surgery. The implant micro-architecture is fine-tuned to locally mimic bone tissue properties which results in minimum bone resorption secondary to stress shielding. We present a systematic approach for the design of a 3D printed fully porous hip implant that encompasses the whole activity spectrum of implant development, from concept generation, multiscale mechanics of porous materials, material architecture tailoring, to additive manufacturing, and performance assessment via in vitro experiments in composite femurs. We show that the fully porous implant with an optimized material micro-structure can reduce the amount of bone loss secondary to stress shielding by 75% compared to a fully solid implant. This result also agrees with those of the in vitro quasi-physiological experimental model and the corresponding finite element model for both the optimized fully porous and fully solid implant. These studies demonstrate the merit and the potential of tuning material architecture to achieve a substantial reduction of bone resorption secondary to stress shielding. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  5. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1995-05-23

    A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  6. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, Rasit; Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  7. Grit-Blast/Silane (GBS) Aluminum Surface Preparation for Structural Adhesive Bonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    average of at least five specimens (one panel) and in most cases , including 200°F, are the average of 20 specimens (four panels). Figure 3.1-1...Table 3.1-2. The results shown are an average of five specimens (one panel) for three of the cases (175°F, 180°F, and 240°F) and an average of 10...hour hydrolysis time had a significantly larger initial crack length, so the test was not as stringent as for the 1-hour case . 18 Table 3.4

  8. STEM?!?!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Jen

    2012-01-01

    The author's son has been an engineer since birth. He never asked "why" as a toddler, it was always "how's it work?" So that he wanted a STEM-based home education was no big surprise. In this article, the author considers what kind of curricula would work best for her complex kid.

  9. STEM?!?!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Jen

    2012-01-01

    The author's son has been an engineer since birth. He never asked "why" as a toddler, it was always "how's it work?" So that he wanted a STEM-based home education was no big surprise. In this article, the author considers what kind of curricula would work best for her complex kid.

  10. Effects of Titanium Surface Microtopography and Simvastatin on Growth and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Estrogen-Deprived Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Arpornmaeklong, Premjit; Pripatnanont, Prisana; Chookiatsiri, Chonticha; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of titanium surface topography and simvastatin on growth and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in estrogen-deprived (ED) cell culture. Human BMSCs were seeded on cell culture plates, smooth-surface titanium (Ti) disks, and sandblasted with large grits and acid etched (SLA)-surface Ti disks; and subsequently cultured in regular (fetal bovine serum [FBS]), ED, and ED-with 100 nM simvastatin (ED-SIM) culture media for 14 to 21 days. Live/dead cell staining, scanning electron microscope examination, and cell viability assay were performed to determine cell attachment, morphology, and growth. Expression levels of osteoblast-associated genes, Runx2 and bone sialoprotein and levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium content, and osteocalcin in culture media were measured to determine osteoblastic differentiation. Expression levels of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were investigated to examine stimulating effects of simvastatin (n = 4 to 5, mean ± SD). In vitro mineralization was verified by calcein staining. Human BMSCs exhibited different attachment and shapes on smooth and SLA titanium surfaces. Estrogen-deprived cell culture decreased cell attachment and growth, particularly on the SLA titanium surface, but cells were able to grow to reach confluence on day 21 in the ED-osteogenic (OS) culture medium. Promoting effects of the SLA titanium surface in ED-OS were significantly decreased. Simvastatin significantly increased osteogenic differentiation of human BMSCs on the SLA titanium surface in the ED-OS medium, and the promoting effects of simvastatin corresponded with the increasing of BMP-2 gene expression on the SLA titanium surface in ED-OS-SIM culture medium. The ED cell culture model provided a well-defined platform for investigating the effects of hormones and growth factors on cells and titanium surface interaction. Titanium, the SLA surface, and simvastatin

  11. Osteogenic properties of hydrophilic and hydrophobic titanium surfaces evaluated with osteoblast-like cells (MG63) in coculture with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Andrukhov, Oleh; Berner, Simon; Matejka, Michael; Wieland, Marco; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui; Schedle, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Osteogenesis on titanium (Ti) surfaces is a complex process involving cell-substrate and cell-cell interaction of osteoblasts and endothelial cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the osteogenic properties of Ti surfaces on osteoblasts in the presence of endothelial cells (ECs). Osteoblast-like cells (MG63 cells) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were grown in cocultures on four kinds of Ti surfaces: acid-etched (A), coarse-grit-blasted and acid-etched (SLA), hydrophilic A (modA) and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA) surfaces. MG63 cells in single cultures served as controls. Cell ratios and cell types in cocultures were determined and isolated using flow cytometry. Cell numbers were obtained by direct cell counting. In MG63 cells, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was determined and protein levels of osteocalcin (OC) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). The mRNA levels of ALP, OC and OPG of sorted MG63 cells were determined with real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). MG63 cells proliferated in the presence of HUVECs, which showed higher cell numbers on Ti surfaces (A, SLA, modSLA) after 72h, and lower cell numbers on Ti surfaces (modA, SLA, modSLA) after 120h in comparison to single cultures. Protein and mRNA levels of ALP and OPG were higher in cocultures than in single cultures, while OC exhibited a lower expression. These three parameters were higher expressed on modA, SLA and modSLA surfaces compared to A surfaces. Cocultures of osteoblasts and endothelial cells represent the most recently developed research model for investigating osteogenesis and angiogenesis which play both a major role in bone healing. This paper investigates for the first time the osteogenic properties of titanium surfaces used for dental implants with a coculture system with osteoblast-like cells and endothelial cells: (1) In cocultures with ECs (HUVECs) osteoblast-like cells (MG63 cells) show enhanced expression

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells after a Whole Body Exposure of CBA/CaJ Mice to Titanium (48Ti) Ions

    PubMed Central

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Tungjai, Montree; Jangiam, Witawat; Honikel, Louise; Gordon, Chris; Lai, Xianyin; Witzmann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid leukemia (ML) is one of the major health concerns from exposure to radiation. However, the risk assessment for developing ML after exposure to space radiation remains uncertain. To reduce the uncertainty in risk prediction for ML, a much increased understanding of space radiation-induced changes in the target cells, i.e., hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), is critically important. We used the label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQMS) proteomic approach to determine the expression of protein in HSPC-derived myeloid colonies obtained at an early time-point (one week) and a late time-point (six months) after an acute whole body exposure of CBA/CaJ mice to a total dose of 0, 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 Gy of heavy-ion titanium (48Ti ions), which are the important component of radiation found in the space environment. Mice exposed to 0 Gy of 48Ti ions served as non-irradiated sham controls. There were five mice per treatment groups at each harvest time. The Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP) was used to assign a probability of a particular protein being in the sample. A proof-of-concept based Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to characterize the functions, pathways, and networks of the identified proteins. Alterations of expression levels of proteins detected in samples collected at one week (wk) post-irradiation reflects acute effects of exposure to 48Ti ions, while those detected in samples collected at six months (mos) post-irradiation represent protein expression profiles involved in the induction of late-occurring damage (normally referred to as genomic instability). Our results obtained by using the IPA analyses indicate a wide array of signaling pathways involved in response to 1 GeV/n 48Ti ions at both harvest times. Our data also demonstrate that the patterns of protein expression profiles are dose and time dependent. The majority of proteins with altered expression levels are involved in cell cycle control, cellular growth and proliferation

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells after a Whole Body Exposure of CBA/CaJ Mice to Titanium ((48)Ti) Ions.

    PubMed

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Tungjai, Montree; Jangiam, Witawat; Honikel, Louise; Gordon, Chris; Lai, Xianyin; Witzmann, Frank

    2015-07-21

    Myeloid leukemia (ML) is one of the major health concerns from exposure to radiation. However, the risk assessment for developing ML after exposure to space radiation remains uncertain. To reduce the uncertainty in risk prediction for ML, a much increased understanding of space radiation-induced changes in the target cells, i.e., hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), is critically important. We used the label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQMS) proteomic approach to determine the expression of protein in HSPC-derived myeloid colonies obtained at an early time-point (one week) and a late time-point (six months) after an acute whole body exposure of CBA/CaJ mice to a total dose of 0, 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 Gy of heavy-ion titanium ((48)Ti ions), which are the important component of radiation found in the space environment. Mice exposed to 0 Gy of (48)Ti ions served as non-irradiated sham controls. There were five mice per treatment groups at each harvest time. The Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP) was used to assign a probability of a particular protein being in the sample. A proof-of-concept based Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to characterize the functions, pathways, and networks of the identified proteins. Alterations of expression levels of proteins detected in samples collected at one week (wk) post-irradiation reflects acute effects of exposure to (48)Ti ions, while those detected in samples collected at six months (mos) post-irradiation represent protein expression profiles involved in the induction of late-occurring damage (normally referred to as genomic instability). Our results obtained by using the IPA analyses indicate a wide array of signaling pathways involved in response to 1 GeV/n (48)Ti ions at both harvest times. Our data also demonstrate that the patterns of protein expression profiles are dose and time dependent. The majority of proteins with altered expression levels are involved in cell cycle control, cellular growth and

  14. Titanium Coating of the Boston Keratoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Salvador-Culla, Borja; Jeong, Kyung Jae; Kolovou, Paraskevi Evi; Chiang, Homer H; Chodosh, James; Dohlman, Claes H; Kohane, Daniel S

    2016-04-01

    We tested the feasibility of using titanium to enhance adhesion of the Boston Keratoprosthesis (B-KPro), ultimately to decrease the risk of implant-associated complications. Cylindrical rods were made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), PMMA coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2) over a layer of polydopamine (PMMATiO2), smooth (Ti) and sandblasted (TiSB) titanium, and titanium treated with oxygen plasma (Tiox and TiSBox). Topography and surface chemistry were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adhesion force between rods and porcine corneas was measured ex vivo. Titanium sleeves, smooth and sandblasted, were inserted around the stem of the B-KPro and implanted in rabbits. Tissue adhesion to the stem was assessed and compared to an unmodified B-Kpro after 1 month. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated successful deposition of TiO2 on polydopamine-coated PMMA. Oxygen plasma treatment did not change the XPS spectra of titanium rods (Ti and TiSB), although it increased their hydrophilicity. The materials did not show cell toxicity. After 14 days of incubation, PMMATiO2, smooth titanium treated with oxygen plasma (Tiox), and sandblasted titanium rods (TiSB, TiSBox) showed significantly higher adhesion forces than PMMA ex vivo. In vivo, the use of a TiSB sleeve around the stem of the B-KPro induced a significant increase in tissue adhesion compared to a Ti sleeve or bare PMMA. Sandblasted titanium sleeves greatly enhanced adherence of the B-KPro to the rabbit cornea. This approach may improve adhesion with the donor cornea in humans as well. This approach may improve adhesion with donor corneas in humans.

  15. Titanium Coating of the Boston Keratoprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Culla, Borja; Jeong, Kyung Jae; Kolovou, Paraskevi Evi; Chiang, Homer H.; Chodosh, James; Dohlman, Claes H.; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the feasibility of using titanium to enhance adhesion of the Boston Keratoprosthesis (B-KPro), ultimately to decrease the risk of implant-associated complications. Methods Cylindrical rods were made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), PMMA coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2) over a layer of polydopamine (PMMATiO2), smooth (Ti) and sandblasted (TiSB) titanium, and titanium treated with oxygen plasma (Tiox and TiSBox). Topography and surface chemistry were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adhesion force between rods and porcine corneas was measured ex vivo. Titanium sleeves, smooth and sandblasted, were inserted around the stem of the B-KPro and implanted in rabbits. Tissue adhesion to the stem was assessed and compared to an unmodified B-Kpro after 1 month. Results X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated successful deposition of TiO2 on polydopamine-coated PMMA. Oxygen plasma treatment did not change the XPS spectra of titanium rods (Ti and TiSB), although it increased their hydrophilicity. The materials did not show cell toxicity. After 14 days of incubation, PMMATiO2, smooth titanium treated with oxygen plasma (Tiox), and sandblasted titanium rods (TiSB, TiSBox) showed significantly higher adhesion forces than PMMA ex vivo. In vivo, the use of a TiSB sleeve around the stem of the B-KPro induced a significant increase in tissue adhesion compared to a Ti sleeve or bare PMMA. Conclusions Sandblasted titanium sleeves greatly enhanced adherence of the B-KPro to the rabbit cornea. This approach may improve adhesion with the donor cornea in humans as well. Translational Relevance This approach may improve adhesion with donor corneas in humans. PMID:27152247

  16. Titanium Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, D. S.; Blair, G. A. S.

    1974-01-01

    The technique of repairing defects of the skull with titanium is described. The skull contour can be accurately reproduced. The technique is simpler than wiring or suturing methods. The material is inert, radiolucent, and rigid. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7 PMID:4834099

  17. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  18. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M; Mazare, A; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Schmuki, P; A Iglič; Mozetič, M

    2015-02-13

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  19. Preparation of titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1985-01-01

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  20. Metal Bonded Titanium Diboride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-03-01

    of specimens made from titanium diboride plus 10 percent titanium and 30 percent zirconium . X 100. 22 6. Microstructures of specimens made from...chromium. X 1000 26 10. Microstructures of specimens made from titanium diboride plus 10 percent titanium and 30 percent zirconium . X 1200 27 11. Gain in...shock resistance and oxidation resistance of titanium diboride but zirconium diboride which is isomorphous with titanium diboride has been reported6

  1. An Assessment of the Biological Fixation of a Retrieved Mayo Femoral Component

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Russell D; Willie, Bettina M; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2003-01-01

    Implant analysis was conducted on a retrieved Mayo femoral prosthesis that has a non-anatomic design with two distinct surfaces intended for osseous fixation. The prosthesis itself has a circumferential grit-blasted region interposed with the porous surfaces and involving the entire proximal stem. In addition, there are pads of mesh porous coating on the anterior, posterior, and medial surfaces proximally. A single, radiographically stable stem retrieved after 18 months secondary to recurrent dislocations was examined for osseous fixation by measurement of trabecular bone into the porous-coated and onto the grit-blasted surfaces of the stem. Results showed 17% ± 7% bone ingrowth into the porous coated areas and 20% ± 16% osseointegration onto the grit-blasted surfaces. These results are similar to percentages of ingrowth seen with more conventional, anatomic design prostheses. PMID:14575260

  2. Initial attachment, subsequent cell proliferation/viability and gene expression of epithelial cells related to attachment and wound healing in response to different titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    An, Na; Rausch-fan, Xiaohui; Wieland, Marco; Matejka, Michael; Andrukhov, Oleh; Schedle, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    A tight seal between the epithelium and the dental implant surface is required to prevent bacterial inflammation and soft tissue recession and therefore to demonstrate a long-term success. Surface hydrophilicity was recently shown to promote osseointegration. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of surface hydrophilicity in combination with surface topography of Ti implant surfaces on the behavior and activation/differentiation of epithelial cells using a set of in vitro experiments mimicking the implant-soft tissue contact. Hydrophobic acid-etched (A) and coarse-grit-blasted, acid-etched (SLA) surfaces and hydrophilic acid-etched (modA) and modSLA surfaces were produced. The behavior of an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line (HSC-2) grown on all surfaces was compared through determination of cell attachment and proliferation/viability (CCK-8 and MTT assay), time-lapse microscopy of fluorescence labeled cells and determination of gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction. Within the surfaces with similar wettability cell spreading and cell movements observed by time-lapse microscopy after one day of incubation were most pronounced on smoother (A and modA) surfaces compared to rougher (SLA and modSLA) surfaces. Within the surfaces with similar roughness the hydrophilic surfaces (modA and modSLA) showed more cell spreading and cell activity compared to the hydrophobic surfaces (A and SLA). The relative gene expressions of cytokeratin14, integrin α6, integrin β4, vinculin, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, TGF-β1, and TGF-β3 were decreased in HSC-2 on all four types of Ti surfaces compared to control surfaces (tissue culture polystyrene; p<0.01) and there was no significant difference of gene expression on the four different implant-surfaces. We have demonstrated that for proliferation and spreading of HSC-2 cells the smoother and hydrophilic surface is optimal (modA). These results suggest that surface hydrophilicity might

  3. Titanium "irons" and titanium "steels"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firstov, S. A.; Tkachenko, S. V.; Kuz'menko, N. N.

    2009-01-01

    Special features of the structure and properties of promising structural alloys based on the Ti-Si system are described. The similarity of the diagrams of phase equilibria of the Fe-Si and Fe-C systems makes it possible to classify the alloys of the Ti-Si system into titanium "steels" and "irons" depending on the silicon content. Results of studies of the effects of alloying, heat treatment, and thermomechanical treatment on the phase and structural transformations and on some properties of alloys based on the Ti-Si system are presented.

  4. Hydriding of Titanium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    hole. The metals used to make these couples with titanium included HY80 steel , 316 stainless steel , five-nines aluminum, 6061 aluminum, and zinc. All...the other surfaces. Titanium Coupled With Other Metals The corrosion potentials of grade 2 titanium galvanically coupled with naval brass, HY80 steel ...2 titanium; naval brass caused titanium to become an anode. At room temperature, HY80 steel and 316 stainless steel couples exhibited corrosion

  5. Ice as an Abrading Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blow, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    Grit-blasting method makes unnecessary to disassemble equipment for cleaning. Stream of small, frozen pellets directed at assembly to be cleaned. Pellets consist of deionized-water ice, carbon dioxide ice, or another substance that does not react chemically with parts to be cleaned and leaves no residue. Method suited to cleaning titanium and parts that touch liquid oxygen.

  6. Ice as an Abrading Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blow, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    Grit-blasting method makes unnecessary to disassemble equipment for cleaning. Stream of small, frozen pellets directed at assembly to be cleaned. Pellets consist of deionized-water ice, carbon dioxide ice, or another substance that does not react chemically with parts to be cleaned and leaves no residue. Method suited to cleaning titanium and parts that touch liquid oxygen.

  7. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-07-04

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  8. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-01-01

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  9. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.

    1988-01-21

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  10. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1992-01-01

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  11. Cytotoxicity of titanium and titanium alloying elements.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Wong, C; Xiong, J; Hodgson, P; Wen, C

    2010-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that titanium and the titanium alloying elements of tantalum, niobium, zirconium, molybdenum, tin, and silicon are biocompatible. However, our research in the development of new titanium alloys for biomedical applications indicated that some titanium alloys containing molybdenum, niobium, and silicon produced by powder metallurgy show a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We hypothesized that the cytotoxicity is linked to the ion release from the metals. To prove this hypothesis, we assessed the cytotoxicity of titanium and titanium alloying elements in both forms of powder and bulk, using osteoblast-like SaOS(2) cells. Results indicated that the metal powders of titanium, niobium, molybdenum, and silicon are cytotoxic, and the bulk metals of silicon and molybdenum also showed cytotoxicity. Meanwhile, we established that the safe ion concentrations (below which the ion concentration is non-toxic) are 8.5, 15.5, 172.0, and 37,000.0 microg/L for molybdenum, titanium, niobium, and silicon, respectively.

  12. Comparing and visualizing titanium implant integration in rat bone using 2D and 3D techniques.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Anna; Sarve, Hamid; Johansson, Carina B

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to compare the osseointegration of grit-blasted implants with and without a hydrogen fluoride treatment in rat tibia and femur, and to visualize bone formation using state-of-the-art 3D visualization techniques. Grit-blasted implants were inserted in femur and tibia of 10 Sprague-Dawley rats (4 implants/rat). Four weeks after insertion, bone implant samples were retrieved. Selected samples were imaged in 3D using Synchrotron Radiation-based μCT (SRμCT). The 3D data was quantified and visualized using two novel visualization techniques, thread fly-through and 2D unfolding. All samples were processed to cut and ground sections and 2D histomorphometrical comparisons of bone implant contact (BIC), bone area (BA), and mirror image area (MI) were performed. BA values were statistically significantly higher for test implants than controls (p < 0.05), but BIC and MI data did not differ significantly. Thus, the results partly indicate improved bone formation at blasted and hydrogen fluoride treated implants, compared to blasted implants. The 3D analysis was a valuable complement to 2D analysis, facilitating improved visualization. However, further studies are required to evaluate aspects of 3D quantitative techniques, with relation to light microscopy that traditionally is used for osseointegration studies.

  13. Titanium sponge on titanium substrate for titanium electrolytic capacitor anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Jun-Wan

    2005-07-01

    Capacitors are energy storage devices capable of supplying electric energy. Volumetric and gravimetric energy storage efficiencies are some of the important criteria for evaluating electrolytic capacitors as energy storage devices. High energy density capacitors can be achieved by anodic growth of a dielectric film on surface enhanced valve-metal. Electrodes with high surface area accessible along with wide and short conduction paths (electrolyte) have advantages as power devices. Surface-enhanced metal substrates can be made by various methods. One method is by oxidation followed by reduction. Oxidation of a metal and reduction of oxide are generally associated with volume changes. During growth of an oxide scale on a metal substrate, the volume expansion of an attached oxide scale can only occur in the thickness direction. During subsequent reduction of the oxide volume shrinkage occurs. It can take place along all directions, in particular in the plane of the oxide scale. This shrinkage leads to pores in the metal layer that is formed by the reduction of the oxide scale. Therefore, a layer of titanium sponge can be obtained by the oxidation plus reduction method. The titanium sponge layer can be anodized in order to grow a thin dielectric film on the surface of the sponge metal. In this way it is made into a capacitor anode. Reduction of titanium oxide scale with magnesium or calcium produces titanium sponge with different morphologies. Magnesium-reduced sponge has a higher degree of porosity than calcium-reduced sponge. The different morphologies of the reduced oxide scale result from different reduction behaviors in the presence of magnesium or calcium. Possible mechanisms are suggested to explain how magnesium and calcium affect the reduction behavior of titanium oxide. Because titanium anodic films tend to have high leakage current, titanium is not used for commercial electrolytic capacitor anodes. Nitrogen and oxygen doping of titanium surface layer enables

  14. Osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect of zinc ion implanted titanium.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guodong; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Yuqin; Meng, Fanhao; Zhu, Hongqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are widely used as orthopedic and dental implants. In this work, zinc (Zn) was implanted into oxalic acid etched titanium using plasma immersion ion implantation technology. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the surface morphology and composition of Zn-implanted titanium. The results indicate that the depth profile of zinc in Zn-implanted titanium resembles a Gaussian distribution, and zinc exists in the form of ZnO at the surface whereas in the form of metallic Zn in the interior. The Zn-implanted titanium can significantly stimulate proliferation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells as well as initial adhesion, spreading activity, ALP activity, collagen secretion and extracellular matrix mineralization of the rat mesenchymal stem cells. The Zn-implanted titanium presents partly antibacterial effect on both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The ability of the Zn-implanted titanium to stimulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation as well as the antibacterial effect on E. coli can be improved by increasing implantation time even to 2 h in this work, indicating that the content of zinc implanted in titanium can easily be controlled within the safe concentration using plasma immersion ion implantation technology. The Zn-implanted titanium with excellent osteogenic activity and partly antibacterial effect can serve as useful candidates for orthopedic and dental implants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanoscale Bonding between Human Bone and Titanium Surfaces: Osseohybridization

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok-Man; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Kim, Seong-Hun; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong

    2015-01-01

    Until now, the chemical bonding between titanium and bone has been examined only through a few mechanical detachment tests. Therefore, in this study, a sandblasted and acid-etched titanium mini-implant was removed from a human patient after 2 months of placement in order to identify the chemical integration mechanism for nanoscale osseointegration of titanium implants. To prepare a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen, the natural state was preserved as much as possible by cryofixation and scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam (SEM-FIB) milling without any chemical treatment. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning TEM (STEM)/electron energy loss spectroscopic analysis (EELS) were used to investigate the chemical composition and structure at the interface between the titanium and bone tissue. HRTEM and EDS data showed evidence of crystalline hydroxyapatite and intermixing of bone with the oxide layer of the implant. The STEM/EELS experiment provided particularly interesting results: carbon existed in polysaccharides, calcium and phosphorus existed as tricalcium phosphate (TCP), and titanium existed as oxidized titanium. In addition, the oxygen energy loss near edge structures (ELNESs) showed a possibility of the presence of CaTiO3. These STEM/EELS results can be explained by structures either with or without a chemical reaction layer. The possible existence of the osseohybridization area and the form of the carbon suggest that reconsideration of the standard definition of osseointegration is necessary. PMID:25667930

  16. Titanium Nitride Cermets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-07-01

    7696i ’-Brewer, L., et al. Thermodynamic and Physical Properties of Nitrides. Carbides, Sulfides, i1licides, and Phosphides, Chemistry and Metallurgy of...12 Referen eCs 0 . ...................... • • • 14 WADC TR 52-155 iv LIST OF TABLES I Properties of Titanium Nitride Bodies...15 II Properties of Titanium Nitride-Nickel Bodies............16 III Properties of Titanium Nitride Cermets with Nickel,..... 17 Cobalt, and

  17. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  18. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-07-15

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O), silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900 C, and generally about 700--800 C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 1 fig.

  19. An Eiganstrain Analysis of Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Ceramic Coatings by Synchrotron Probe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    shot $ laser peening , & other. Measurement of microscopic stresses within each phase due to mismatch stresses and or thermal effects. x3 Ti-[110] γ...1) 1020 Steel (with a Ni bond coat) 2) Titanium (with a Ti bond coat) Varying thickness of micro- and nano- coatings were applied. Substrates...were grit blasted (compressive stresses). Table 1, summarizes the coating samples produced with 1020 steel. Table 2 is similar for the titanium

  20. Sprayable titanium composition

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, Chester E.; Kern, Werner; Vibronek, Robert D.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to an organometallic titanium compound dissolved in a diluent and optionally containing a lower aliphatic alcohol spreading modifier, produces a solution that can be sprayed onto a substrate and cured to form an antireflection titanium oxide coating having a refractive index of from about 2.0 to 2.2.

  1. Titanium aluminide automotive engine valves

    SciTech Connect

    Hartfield-Wuensch, S.E.; Sperling, A.A.; Morrison, R.S.; Dowling, W.E. Jr.; Allison, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The low density and high elevated temperature strength make titanium aluminide alloys an excellent candidate for automotive exhaust valve applications. Lighter weight valve train components allow either improved performance or reduction of valve spring loads which reduce noise and friction, thereby improving fuel economy. The key to successful application of TiAl alloys for automotive engine valves is not optimization of strength and ductility, but rather the development of a low-cost, high-volume manufacturing method. Different manufacturing approaches will be discussed in this paper, along with their advantages and disadvantages. Currently, casting appears to be the lowest-cost alternative that produces adequate material properties and emphasis is being placed on this manufacturing approach. The results of several successful engine tests will also be discussed, including results on a binary TiAl alloy. However, these engine tests have indicated that TiAl alloy valves will require tip protection and stem coating.

  2. Titanium and titanium alloys as dental materials.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, E P; Monaghan, P

    1993-06-01

    Because of light weight, high strength to weight ratio, low modulus of elasticity, and excellent corrosion resistance, titanium and some of its alloys have been important materials for the aerospace industry since the 1950s. Now, with the additional advantages of excellent biocompatibility, good local spot weldability, and easy shaping and finishing by a number of mechanical and electrochemical processes, these materials are finding uses in dental applications, such as implants and restorative castings. Although more research is still needed in areas such as development of optimal casting investments, porcelain veneering systems, device designs, and controlled biological responses, the present and future uses of titanium appear bright for dentistry.

  3. Formation of an ascorbate-apatite composite layer on titanium.

    PubMed

    Ito, Atsuo; Sogo, Yu; Ebihara, Yuko; Onoguchi, Masahiro; Oyane, Ayako; Ichinose, Noboru

    2007-09-01

    An ascorbate-apatite composite layer was successfully formed on NaOH- and heat-treated titanium by coprecipitating L-ascorbic acid phosphate and low-crystalline apatite in a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution at 37 degrees C for 48 h. The supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions used have chemical compositions attainable by mixing infusion fluids officially approved for clinical use. The amount of immobilized L-ascorbic acid phosphate ranged from 1.0 to 2.3 microg mm(-2), which is most likely to be sufficient for the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells on titanium. Since ascorbate is important for the collagen synthesis and subsequent osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells, titanium coated with the ascorbate-apatite composite layer would be useful as a scaffold in bone tissue engineering and as a bone substitute.

  4. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  5. Titanium by design: TRIP titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Jamie

    Motivated by the prospect of lower cost Ti production processes, new directions in Ti alloy design were explored for naval and automotive applications. Building on the experience of the Steel Research Group at Northwestern University, an analogous design process was taken with titanium. As a new project, essential kinetic databases and models were developed for the design process and used to create a prototype design. Diffusion kinetic models were developed to predict the change in phase compositions and microstructure during heat treatment. Combining a mobility database created in this research with a licensed thermodynamic database, ThermoCalc and DICTRA software was used to model kinetic compositional changes in titanium alloys. Experimental diffusion couples were created and compared to DICTRA simulations to refine mobility parameters in the titanium mobility database. The software and database were able to predict homogenization times and the beta→alpha plate thickening kinetics during cooling in the near-alpha Ti5111 alloy. The results of these models were compared to LEAP microanalysis and found to be in reasonable agreement. Powder metallurgy was explored using SPS at GM R&D to reduce the cost of titanium alloys. Fully dense Ti5111 alloys were produced and achieved similar microstructures to wrought Ti5111. High levels of oxygen in these alloys increased the strength while reducing the ductility. Preliminary Ti5111+Y alloys were created, where yttrium additions successfully gettered excess oxygen to create oxides. However, undesirable large oxides formed, indicating more research is needed into the homogeneous distribution of the yttrium powder to create finer oxides. Principles established in steels were used to optimize the beta phase transformation stability for martensite transformation toughening in titanium alloys. The Olson-Cohen kinetic model is calibrated to shear strains in titanium. A frictional work database is established for common alloying

  6. Cuprate superconductors on titanium substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitterbauer, Christina; Gritzner, Gerhard

    2007-09-01

    The applicability of titanium as substrate material for coated conductors was investigated. Titanium metal was rolled to a thickness of 1 mm and mechanically polished. The titanium sheets were oxidized in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. A dense oxide layer was formed. YBCO superconducting layers were applied to the oxidized titanium surface via screen printing from a suspension in acetone-terpineol. The YBCO layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction and by scanning electron microscopy.

  7. STEM, STEM Education, STEMmania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Mark

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces integrative STEM (science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics) education and discusses the importance of the program. The notion of integrative STEM education includes approaches that explore teaching and learning between/among any two or more of the STEM subject areas, and/or between a STEM subject…

  8. Weld-bonded titanium structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Creedon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Structurally stronger titanium articles are produced by a weld-bonding technique comprising fastening at least two plates of titanium together using spotwelding and curing an adhesive interspersed between the spot-weld nuggets. This weld-bonding may be employed to form lap joints or to stiffen titanium metal plates.

  9. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    SciTech Connect

    Gambogi, Joseph; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  10. Mineral of the month: titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    From paint to airplanes, titanium is important in a number of applications. Commercial production comes from titanium-bearing ilmenite, rutile and leucoxene (altered ilmenite). These minerals are used to produce titanium dioxide pigment, as well as an assortment of metal and chemical products.

  11. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation.

  12. Tensile and creep properties of titanium-vanadium, titanium-molybdenum, and titanium-niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tensile and creep properties of experimental beta-titanium alloys were determined. Titanium-vanadium alloys had substantially greater tensile and creep strength than the titanium-niobium and titanium-molybdenum alloys tested. Specific tensile strengths of several titanium-vanadium-aluminum-silicon alloys were equivalent or superior to those of commercial titanium alloys to temperatures of 650 C. The Ti-50V-3Al-1Si alloy had the best balance of tensile strength, creep strength, and metallurgical stability. Its 500 C creep strength was far superior to that of a widely used commercial titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, and almost equivalent to that of newly developed commercial titanium alloys.

  13. Tracing Titanium Escape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-07

    The plot of data from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR (right), amounts to a "smoking gun" of evidence in the mystery of how massive stars explode. The observations indicate that supernovae belonging to a class called Type II or core-collapse blast apart in a lopsided fashion, with the core of the star hurtling in one direction, and the ejected material mostly expanding the other way (see diagram in Figure 1). NuSTAR made the most precise measurements yet of a radioactive element, called titanium-44, in the supernova remnant called 1987A. NuSTAR sees high-energy X-rays, as shown here in the plot ranging from 60 to more than 80 kiloelectron volts. The spectral signature of titanium-44 is apparent as the two tall peaks. The white line shows where one would expect to see these spectral signatures if the titanium were not moving. The fact that the spectral peaks have shifted to lower energies indicates that the titanium has "redshifted," and is moving way from us. This is similar to what happens to a train's whistle as the train leaves the station. The whistle's sound shifts to lower frequencies. NuSTAR's detection of redshifted titanium reveals that the bulk of material ejected in the 1987A supernova is flying way from us at a velocity of 1.6 million miles per hour (2.6 million kilometers per hour). Had the explosion been spherical in nature, the titanium would have been seen flying uniformly in all directions. This is proof that this explosion occurred in an asymmetrical fashion. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19335

  14. Titanium alkoxide compound

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J.

    2007-08-14

    A titanium alkoxide composition is provided, as represented by the chemical formula (OC.sub.6H.sub.5N).sub.2Ti(OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2).sub.2. As prepared, the compound is a crystalline substance with a hexavalent titanium atom bonded to two OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2 groups and two OC.sub.6H.sub.5N groups with a theoretical molecular weight of 480.38, comprising 60.01% C, 5.04% H and 11.66% N.

  15. Development and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Bone Marrow Cells in Porous Permeable Titanium Nickelide Implants In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kokorev, O V; Khodorenko, V N; Radkevich, A A; Dambaev, G Ts; Gunter, V E

    2016-08-01

    We studied the structure of porous permeable titanium nickelide used as the scaffold. In vitro population of the porous scaffold with multipotent mesenchymal stem bone marrow cells on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Stage-by-stage histogenesis of the tissues formed from the bone marrow cells in the titanium nickelide scaffold in vivo is described in detail. Using mesenchymal stem cells, we demonstrated that porous permeable titanium nickelide scaffolds are unique incubators for cell cultures applicable for tissue engineering.

  16. Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  17. Sintering titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press-and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350°C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics, with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  18. Sorting Titanium Welding Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, W. D., Jr.; Brown, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Three types of titanium welding wires identified by their resistance to current flow. Welding-wire tester quickly identifies unknown titaniumalloy wire by touching wire with test probe, and comparing meter response with standard response. Before touching wire, tip of test probe dipped into an electrolyte.

  19. Bioactive macroporous titanium surface layer on titanium substrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, H M; Kokubo, T; Fujibayashi, S; Nishiguchi, S; Nakamura, T

    2000-12-05

    A macroporous titanium surface layer is often formed on titanium and titanium alloy implants for morphological fixation of the implants to bone via bony ingrowth into the porous structure. The surface of titanium metal was recently shown to become highly bioactive by being subjected to 5.0 M-NaOH treatment at 60 degrees C for 24 h and subsequent heat treatment at 600 degrees C for 1 h. In the present study, the NaOH and heat treatments were applied to a macroporous titanium surface layer formed on titanium substrate by a plasma spraying method. The NaOH and heat treatments produced an uniform amorphous sodium titanate layer on the surface of the porous titanium. The sodium titanate induced a bonelike apatite formation in simulated body fluid at an early soaking period, whereby the apatite layer grew uniformly along the surface and cross-sectional macrotextures of the porous titanium. This indicates that the NaOH and heat treatments lead to a bioactive macroporous titanium surface layer on titanium substrate. Such a bioactive macroporous layer on an implant is expected not only to enhance bony ingrowth into the porous structure, but also to provide a chemical integration with bone via apatite formation on its surface in the body.

  20. Titanium nanotubes activate genes related to bone formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pozio, Alfonso; Palmieri, Annalisa; Girardi, Ambra; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium is used worldwide to make osseointegrable devices, thanks to its favorable characteristics as mechanical proprieties and biocompatibility, demonstrated by in vivo studies with animal models and clinical trials over a forty-year period. However, the exact genetic effect of the titanium layer on cells is still not well characterized. Materials and Methods: To investigate how titanium nanotubes stimulate osteoblasts differentiation and proliferation, some osteoblast genes (SP7, RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL, SPP1 and FOSL1) were analyzed by quantitative Real Time RT- PCR. Results: After 15 days, osteoblasts cultivated on titanium naotube showed the up-regulation of bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and SPP1 and the down-regulation of RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, and ALPL. After 30 days of treatment, the bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and RUNX2 were up-regulated while COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL and SPP1 were down-regulated. Conclusions: Our results, demonstrates that titanium nanotubes can lead to osteoblast differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells by the activation of osteoblast related genes SPP1, FOSL1 and RUNX2. PMID:23814577

  1. Titanium Honeycomb Panel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance; Thompson, Randolph C.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-mechanical tests were performed on a titanium honeycomb sandwich panel to experimentally validate the hypersonic wing panel concept and compare test data with analysis. Details of the test article, test fixture development, instrumentation, and test results are presented. After extensive testing to 900 deg. F, non-destructive evaluation of the panel has not detected any significant structural degradation caused by the applied thermal-mechanical loads.

  2. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  3. Titanium fasteners. [for aircraft industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Titanium fasteners are used in large quantities throughout the aircraft industry. Most of this usage is in aluminum structure; where titanium structure exists, titanium fasteners are logically used as well. Titanium fasteners offer potential weight savings to the designer at a cost of approximately $30 per pound of weight saved. Proper and least cost usage must take into consideration type of fastener per application, galvanic couples and installation characteristics of protective coatings, cosmetic appearance, paint adhesion, installation forces and methods available and fatigue performance required.

  4. Change in surface roughness by dynamic shape-memory acrylate networks enhances osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Erin M; Smith, Kathryn; Gall, Ken; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-12-01

    Microscale surface roughness has been shown to enhance osseointegration of titanium implants through increased osteoblast differentiation while osteoblast proliferation remains greater on smooth titanium. Taking advantage of these phenomena, we developed a shape memory (meth)acrylate copolymer with thermomechanical properties that created a time-dependent dynamic surface change from smooth to rough under in vitro cell culture conditions and evaluated the effect of the shape recovery on osteoblast response. Rough topographies were created using soft lithography techniques to mimic those found on clinically-used Ti surfaces (machined smooth; acid-etched; grit-blasted). The surface roughness was then reduced to smooth via compression and shown to fully recover within 24 h in culture conditions. When grown under static conditions, osteoblast number, alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALP), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production were unaffected by polymer surface roughness, but osteocalcin (OCN) was increased on the grit-blasted polymer mimic. Under dynamic conditions, DNA was reduced but OCN and OPG were increased on the compressed grit-blasted polymer at 3 days compared to static surfaces. The present study indicates that responses to polymer surface are sensitive to time-dependent changes in topography. The use of a shape memory polymer with dynamic surface roughness may improve osseointegration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Processing of titanium and titanium alloys by thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Lugscheider, E.; Jokiel, P.

    1994-12-31

    Marine environments are generally known as aggressive corrosion atmospheres. Stainless steel applied as corrosion resistant material is very effective, but it is also an expensive solution since very often only localized areas may need protection. So, protective coatings such as aluminum, zinc, titanium or Cu/Ni alloys, organic paints and epoxies have been used to provide sufficient protection. Especially titanium and titanium alloys offer a high chemical resistance against various corrosive media due to a dense self healing oxide layer. Besides corrosion resistance, high mechanical strength combined with low specific weight are further advantages of titanium alloys. Economical restrictions still hinder titanium to be used as construction material outside of special applications in aircraft and medical technology. Generally most applications only deserve a thin protective coating. Thermal spray processes allow to combine cheap structural materials with a thin layer of high value material. The high affinity of titanium to oxygen has to be taken into account spraying this material. Therefore plasma spraying can be performed in vacuum or in inert atmosphere as well as using gas shrouds in order to shield the molten particles from reacting with the surrounding environment. This paper gives an overview on thermal spraying of titanium and titanium alloys. Coating formation as well as its characterization with regard to corrosion resistance and mechanical strength is examined.

  6. Titanium Optics for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Haag, Thomas W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1999-01-01

    Ion thruster total impulse capability is limited, in part, by accelerator grid sputter erosion. A development effort was initiated to identify a material with a lower accelerator grid volumetric sputter erosion rate than molybdenum, but that could utilize the present NSTAR thruster grid design and fabrication techniques to keep development costs low, and perform as well as molybdenum optics. After comparing the sputter erosion rates of several atomic materials to that of molybdenum at accelerator voltages, titanium was found to offer a 45% reduction in volumetric erosion rates. To ensure that screen grid sputter erosion rates are not higher at discharge chamber potentials, titanium and molybdenum sputter erosion rates were measured at these potentials. Preliminary results showed only a slightly higher volumetric erosion rate for titanium, so that screen grid erosion is insignificant. A number of material, thermal, and mechanical properties were also examined to identify any fabrication, launch environment, and thruster operation issues. Several titanium grid sets were successfully fabricated. A titanium grid set was mounted onto an NSTAR 30 cm engineering model ion thruster and tested to determine optics performance. The titanium optics operated successfully over the entire NSTAR power range of 0.5 to 2.3 kW. Differences in impingement-limited perveances and electron backstreaming limits were found to be due to a larger cold gap for the titanium optics. Discharge losses for titanium grids were lower than those for molybdenum, likely due to a slightly larger titanium screen grid open area fraction. Radial distributions of beam current density with titanium optics were very similar to those with molybdenum optics at all power levels. Temporal electron backstreaming limit measurements showed that titanium optics achieved thermal equilibrium faster than molybdenum optics.

  7. Precision Cleaning Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

    2000-02-02

    Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

  8. Polyisocyanides of titanium.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Redondo, Pilar; Valdés, Haydee; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2009-02-26

    Neutral Ti[CN](n) complexes have been investigated with quantum chemistry techniques. According to our theoretical predictions, these complexes are shown to prefer isocyanide arrangements. Therefore, these compounds are good candidates to be the first polyisocyanides to be characterized. The theoretical calculations predict Ti(NC)(4), a methane-like tetrahedral structure with four isocyanide ligands, as the most stable neutral complex. The fact that the isocyanide ligand is a better pi-donor than the cyanide one seems to be the key factor for the preference for isocyanides in neutral titanium complexes.

  9. Process for stabilization of titanium silicide particulates within titanium aluminide containing metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, L.; Williams, J.C.; Riley, M.A.

    1990-04-10

    This paper describes a method for forming a final composite material comprising titanium silicide particles within a titanium aluminide containing matrix. It comprises: contacting titanium, silicon and aluminum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a reaction between the titanium and silicon to thereby form a first composite comprising titanium silicide particles dispersed within an aluminum matrix; admixing the first composite with titanium and zirconium to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a temperature sufficient to convert at least a portion of the aluminum matrix to titanium aluminide; and recovering a final composite material comprising titanium silicide particles dispersed within a titanium aluminide containing matrix.

  10. Influence of pore size of porous titanium fabricated by vacuum diffusion bonding of titanium meshes on cell penetration and bone ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bei; Song, Wen; Han, Tianxiao; Yan, Jun; Li, Fuping; Zhao, Lingzhou; Kou, Hongchao; Zhang, Yumei

    2016-03-01

    The present work assesses the potential of three-dimensional (3D) porous titanium (pore size of 188-390 μm and porosity of 70%) fabricated by vacuum diffusion bonding of titanium meshes for applications in bone engineering. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were used to investigate the proliferation and differentiation of cells on titanium scaffolds with different pore sizes at day 7, day 14 and day 21 based on DNA contents, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, collagen (COL) secretion and osteogenic gene expressions including ALP, COL-1, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), osteopontin (OPN), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), using smooth solid titanium plate as reference material. The rabbit models with distal femoral condyles defect were used to investigate the bone ingrowth into the porous titanium. All samples were subjected to Micro-CT and histological analysis after 4 and 12 weeks of healing. A one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey post hoc tests was used to analyze the data. It was found that the differentiation stage of cells on the porous titanium delayed compared with the smooth solid titanium plate and Ti 188 was more inclined to promote cell differentiation at the initial stage (day 14) while cell proliferation (day 1, 4, 7, 10, 14 and 21) and bone ingrowth (4 and 12 weeks) were biased to Ti 313 and Ti 390. The study indicates that the hybrid porous implant design which combines the advantages of different pore sizes may be meaningful and promising for bone defect restoration. One of the significant challenges in bone defect restoration is the integration of biomaterials and surrounding bone tissue. Porous titanium may be a promising choice for bone ingrowth and mineralization with appropriate mechanical and biological properties. In this study, based on porous titanium fabricated by vacuum diffusion bonding of titanium meshes, we have evaluated the influence of various pore sizes on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (r

  11. Controlled laser texturing of titanium results in reliable osteointegration.

    PubMed

    Coathup, Melanie J; Blunn, Gordon W; Mirhosseini, Nazanin; Erskine, Karen; Liu, Zhu; Garrod, David R; Li, Lin

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a laser-textured superhydrophilic Ti-6Al-4V surface with unique surface chemistry and topography that substantially promotes osteoblast adhesion in culture. Here we investigate the osteointegration of laser-textured implants in an ovine model. Our hypothesis was that laser-textured implants, without any surface coating (LT), would encourage comparable amounts of bone-implant contact and interfacial strength when compared with widely accepted hydroxyapatite (HA) coated implants. Additionally, we hypothesized that LT would significantly increase bony integration compared with machine-finished (MF) and grit-blasted (GB) implants. Forty-eight tapered transcortical pins were implanted into six sheep. Four experimental groups (LT, HA, MF, and GB) were investigated (n = 12) and implants remained in vivo for 6 weeks. Bone apposition rates, interfacial shear strength, and bone-implant contact (BIC) were quantified. The interfacial strength of LT and HA implants were found to be significantly greater than GB (p = 0.032 and p = 0.004) and MF (p = 0.004 and p = 0.004, respectively), but no significant difference between LT and HA implants was observed. Significantly increased BIC was measured adjacent to HA implants when compared with both LT and GB implant surfaces (p = 0.022 and p = 0.006, respectively). No significant difference was found when LT and GB implants were compared. However, all surface finishes encouraged significantly increased BIC when compared with the MF surface. Maximizing implant fixation to host bone is vital for its long-term success. The production of an LT surface is a simple and cheap manufacturing process and this study demonstrated that laser-textured implants are a very promising technical development that warrants further research. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:820-828, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley

  12. Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Megan M; Warshaw, Erin M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium is notable for its biocompatibility and is used as biologic implant material across surgical specialties, especially in metal-sensitive individuals. However, rare cases of titanium hypersensitivity reactions are reported in the literature. This article discusses the properties and biological behavior of titanium and provides a thorough review of the literature on reported cases, diagnostic techniques, and approach to management of titanium hypersensitivity.

  13. Novel surface modifications of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone hip stem in an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Ichiro; Takao, Masaki; Bandoh, Shunichi; Bertollo, Nicky; Walsh, William R; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2012-01-01

    A carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) is theoretically a suitable material for use in an uncemented hip prosthesis considering it can provide isoelastic environment with the surrounding bone, adequate fatigue strength, and a metal-free radiographic evaluation. To date, the selection of polymer material and optimization of both design and surface finish of the prostheses for osseointegration has not been accomplished. This study examined radiographic and histologic results of an uncemented CFRP stem manufactured from carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR/PEEK) with a roughened surface and a bioactive treatment in an adult ovine model following a 12-month implantation period. A unilateral hemiarthroplasty of the hip was performed using the CFRP stem or a titanium stem as a control. Four cases with the CFRP stem and five cases with titanium stem were evaluated. Bone on-growth fixation was achieved in two cases with the CFRP stem and in all the cases with the titanium stem. The CFRP cases showed minimal stress shielding while three of five cases with the titanium stem demonstrated typical osteopenia associated with stiff metal stems. Bone on-growth to the uncemented CFRP stem was achieved by using the CFR/PEEK for the material and modifying the surface design and the bioactive surface finish. Bone resorption and osteopenia observed with the Ti stems was not found with the CFRP design.

  14. Titanium in 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkler, Ward W.

    1981-04-01

    Much attention is being focused on the availability and use of non-fuel minerals in the United States. Because of the rapid increase in demand since 1978, titanium has been one of the much-publicized metals in this group. Sponge producers are now expanding sponge manufacturing plants to meet this greater demand, and it now appears that there could be a surplus of sponge in 1981. A delay in airplane purchases caused by severe operating losses of the airlines could have a significant effect on mill product shipments in 1981. However, there is no reason to believe that titanium has reached maturity as a structural aerospace or industrial metal. While it is unreasonable to anticipate that demand will continue to grow at the same rate experienced between 1978 and 1980, new greenfield capacity will nevertheless be required in the early 1980s. Two basic issues must be resolved before such ventures become reality: 1) choice of process; and 2) method for financing, either public or private. Both will be the subject of study and debate in 1981.

  15. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen,J; Jablonski, Paul, J

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines<150 {micro}m,<75 {micro}m, and<45 {micro}m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH]<75 {micro}m and<45 {micro}m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  16. Electrorotation of titanium microspheres.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; Ramos, Antonio; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel

    2013-04-01

    Electrorotation (ROT) data for solid titanium micrometer-sized spheres in an electrolyte are presented for three different ionic conductivities, over the frequency range of 10 Hz to 100 kHz. The direction of rotation was found to be opposite to the direction of rotation of the electric field vector (counterfield electrorotation), with a single rotation peak. The maximum rotation rate occurs at a frequency of the order of the reciprocal RC time constant for charging the particle double layer capacitance through the resistor of the electrolyte bulk. A model for the electrical torque acting on a metallic sphere is presented, using a constant phase element impedance to describe the metal/electrolyte interface. The titanium spheres are much denser than the electrolyte and rest on the bottom substrate. Therefore, the electrical and viscous torques near a wall are considered in the analysis. Good agreement is found between the predicted and measured rotational speed as a function of frequency. Theory shows that there is no effect of induced charge electroosmotic flow on the ROT, as observed experimentally.

  17. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  18. Diffusion bonding of titanium-titanium aluminide-alumina sandwich

    SciTech Connect

    Wickman, H.A.; Chin, E.S.C.; Biederman, R.R.

    1995-12-31

    Diffusion bonding of a metallic-intermetallic-ceramic sandwich is of interest for potential armor applications. Low cost titanium, titanium diboride reinforced titanium aluminide (Ti-48at.%Al), and aluminum oxide are diffusion bonded in a vacuum furnace between 1,000 C and 1,400 C. Metallographic examination of the prior bonding interface showed excellent metallurgical coupling between the Ti-48at.%Al composite and the low cost Ti. A series of microstructures representative of phases consistent with a hypothetical Ti-Al-B phase diagram is visible. The alumina-Ti-48at.%Al interfacial bond is achieved through penetration of titanium-aluminum phases into the existing alumina porosity. A detailed microstructural analysis identifying mechanisms of interfacial bonding will be presented for each interfacial zone.

  19. Beta titanium alloys and their role in the titanium industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bania, Paul J.

    1994-07-01

    The class of titanium alloys generically referred to as the beta alloys is arguably the most versatile in the titanium family. Since these alloys offer the highest strength-to-weight ratios and deepest hardenability of all titanium alloys, one might expect them to compete favorably for a variety of aerospace applications. To the contrary, however, except for one very successful application (Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al on the SR-71), the beta alloys have remained a very small segment of the industry. As a perspective on this situation, this article reviews some past and present applications of titanium alloys. It also descibes some unique new alloys and applications that promise to reverse historical trends.

  20. Hemocompatibility of titanium nitride.

    PubMed

    Dion, I; Baquey, C; Candelon, B; Monties, J R

    1992-10-01

    The left ventricular assist device is based on the principle of the Maillard-Wenkel rotative pump. The materials which make up the pump must present particular mechanical, tribological, thermal and chemical properties. Titanium nitride (TiN) because of its surface properties and graphite because of its bulk characteristics have been chosen. The present study evaluated the in vitro hemocompatibility of TiN coating deposited by the chemical vapor deposition process. Protein adsorption, platelet retention and hemolysis tests have been carried out. In spite of some disparities, the TiN behavior towards albumin and fibrinogen is interesting, compared with the one of a reference medical grade elastomer. The platelet retention test gives similar results as those achieved with the same elastomer. The hemolysis percentage is near to zero. TiN shows interesting characteristics, as far as mechanical and tribological problems are concerned, and presents very encouraging blood tolerability properties.

  1. Advanced titanium processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Alan D.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Schrems, Karol K.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Paige, Jack I.; Turner, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    The Albany Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating a means to form useful wrought products by direct and continuous casting of titanium bars using cold-wall induction melting rather than current batch practices such as vacuum arc remelting. Continuous ingots produced by cold-wall induction melting, utilizing a bottomless water-cooled copper crucible, without slag (CaF2) additions had minor defects in the surface such as ''hot tears''. Slag additions as low as 0.5 weight percent were used to improve the surface finish. Therefore, a slag melted experimental Ti-6Al-4V alloy ingot was compared to a commercial Ti-6Al-4V alloy ingot in the areas of physical, chemical, mechanical, and corrosion attributes to address the question, ''Are any detrimental effects caused by slag addition''?

  2. Gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, M.; Inui, H.; Kishida, K.; Matsumuro, M.; Shirai, Y.

    1995-08-01

    Extensive progress and improvements have been made in the science and technology of gamma titanium aluminide alloys within the last decade. In particular, the understanding of their microstructural characteristics and property/microstructure relationships has been substantially deepened. Based on these achievements, various engineering two-phase gamma alloys have been developed and their mechanical and chemical properties have been assessed. Aircraft and automotive industries arc pursuing their introduction for various structural components. At the same time, recent basic studies on the mechanical properties of two-phase gamma alloys, in particular with a controlled lamellar structure have provided a considerable amount of fundamental information on the deformation and fracture mechanisms of the two-phase gamma alloys. The results of such basic studies are incorporated in the recent alloy and microstructure design of two-phase gamma alloys. In this paper, such recent advances in the research and development of the two-phase gamma alloys and industrial involvement are summarized.

  3. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, G W; Davis, J W

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500/sup 0/C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150/sup 0/C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement.

  4. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  5. A "clickable" titanium surface platform.

    PubMed

    Watson, Matthew A; Lyskawa, Joël; Zobrist, Cédric; Fournier, David; Jimenez, Maude; Traisnel, Michel; Gengembre, Léon; Woisel, Patrice

    2010-10-19

    A straightforward functionalization of a titanium surface using "click" chemistry is reported. A "clickable" titanium surface platform was prepared by the immobilization of an azide-functionalized electroactive catechol anchor and was subsequently derivatized with an electroactive or fluorinated probe via the CuAAC (copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition) reaction. The course of the reaction was investigated by contact angle, XPS, and electrochemical measurements.

  6. Slow Speed Machining of Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    MRL-R-833 SLOW SPEED MACHINING OF TITANIUM D.M. Turley Approved for Public Release I -J C) COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA 1981 OCTOBER, 1981 82ോ 20 059...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE MATERIALS RESEARCH LABORATORIES REPORT MRL-R-833 SLOW SPEED MACHINING OF TITANIUM D.M. Turley ABSTRACT Catastrophic-shear type...MRL-R-833 b. Title in isolation: UNCLASSIFIED c. Report Number: MRL-R-833 c. Abstract in isolation: UNCLASSIFIED 3. TITLE: SLOW SPEED MACHINING OF

  7. Low cost titanium--myth or reality

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Paul C.; Hartman, Alan D.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium, and titanium cost has prevented its use in non-aerospace applications including the automotive and heavy vehicle industries.

  8. High porous titanium scaffolds showed higher compatibility than lower porous beta-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds for regulating human osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Makoto; Hayakawa, Tohru; Shima, Takaki; Ametani, Akihiro; Tohnai, Iwai

    2015-04-01

    We compared osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation when using beta-tricalcium phosphate (βTCP) and titanium scaffolds by investigating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoclast progenitor cell activities. hMSCs were cultured for 7, 14, and 21days on titanium scaffolds with 60%, 73%, and 87% porosity and on βTCP scaffolds with 60% and 75% porosity. Human osteoclast progenitor cells were cultured with osteoblast for 14 and 21days on 87% titanium and 75% βTCP scaffolds. Viable cell numbers with 60% and 73% titanium were higher than with 87% titanium and βTCP scaffolds (P<0.05). An 87% titanium scaffold resulted in the highest osteocalcin production with calcification on day 14 (P<0.01) in titanium scaffolds. All titanium scaffolds resulted in higher osteocalcin production on days 7 and 14 compared to βTCP scaffolds (P<0.01). Osteoblasts cultured on 87% titanium scaffolds suppressed osteoclast differentiation on day 7 but enhanced osteoclast differentiation on day 14 compared to 75% βTCP scaffolds (P<0.01). These findings concluded that high porosity titanium scaffolds could enhance progression of hMSC/osteoblast differentiation and regulated osteoclast differentiation cooperating with osteoblast differentiation for calcification as compared with lower porous βTCP.

  9. Interfacial reactions in titanium-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.; Jeng, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A study of the interfacial reaction characteristics of SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide and disordered titanium alloy composites has determined that the matrix alloy compositions affect the microstructure and the distribution of the reaction products, as well as the growth kinetics of the reaction zones. The interfacial reaction products in the ordered titanium aluminide composite are more complicated than those in the disordered titanium-alloy composite. The activation energy of the interfacial reaction in the ordered titanium aluminide composite is also higher than that in the disordered titanium alloy composite. Designing an optimum interface is necessary to enhance the reliability and service life at elevated temperatures. 16 refs.

  10. Cell response of anodized nanotubes on titanium and titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Minagar, Sepideh; Wang, James; Berndt, Christopher C; Ivanova, Elena P; Wen, Cuie

    2013-09-01

    Titanium and titanium alloy implants that have been demonstrated to be more biocompatible than other metallic implant materials, such as Co-Cr alloys and stainless steels, must also be accepted by bone cells, bonding with and growing on them to prevent loosening. Highly ordered nanoporous arrays of titanium dioxide that form on titanium surface by anodic oxidation are receiving increasing research interest due to their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. The response of bone cells to implant materials depends on the topography, physicochemistry, mechanics, and electronics of the implant surface and this influences cell behavior, such as adhesion, proliferation, shape, migration, survival, and differentiation; for example the existing anions on the surface of a titanium implant make it negative and this affects the interaction with negative fibronectin (FN). Although optimal nanosize of reproducible titania nanotubes has not been reported due to different protocols used in studies, cell response was more sensitive to titania nanotubes with nanometer diameter and interspace. By annealing, amorphous TiO2 nanotubes change to a crystalline form and become more hydrophilic, resulting in an encouraging effect on cell behavior. The crystalline size and thickness of the bone-like apatite that forms on the titania nanotubes after implantation are also affected by the diameter and shape. This review describes how changes in nanotube morphologies, such as the tube diameter, the thickness of the nanotube layer, and the crystalline structure, influence the response of cells. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Plasma quench production of titanium from titanium tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    This project, Plasma Quench Production of Titanium from Titanium Tetrachloride, centers on developing a technique for rapidly quenching the high temperature metal species and preventing back reactions with the halide. The quenching technique chosen uses the temperature drop produced in a converging/diverging supersonic nozzle. The rapid quench provided by this nozzle prevents the back reaction of the halide and metal. The nature of the process produces nanosized particles (10 to 100 nm). The powders are collected by cyclone separators, the hydrogen flared, and the acid scrubbed. Aluminum and titanium powders have been produced in the laboratory-scale device at 1 gram per hour. Efforts to date to scale up this process have not been successful.

  12. Titanium diaphragm makes excellent amplitron cathode support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Cathode support structure designed around a titanium diaphragm prevents radial misalignment between the cathode and anode in amplitrons. The titanium exhibits low thermal conductivity, tolerates lateral thermal expansion of the cathode, and is a poor primary and secondary emission medium.

  13. Method for Surface Texturing Titanium Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches a method of producing a textured surface upon an arbitrarily configured titanium or titanium alloy object for the purpose of improving bonding between the object and other materials such as polymer matrix composites and/or human bone for the direct in-growth of orthopaedic implants. The titanium or titanium alloy object is placed in an electrolytic cell having an ultrasonically agitated solution of sodium chloride therein whereby a pattern of uniform "pock mark" like pores or cavities are produced upon the object's surface. The process is very cost effective compared to other methods of producing rough surfaces on titanium and titanium alloy components. The surface textures produced by the present invention are etched directly into the parent metal at discrete sites separated by areas unaffected by the etching process. Bonding materials to such surface textures on titanium or titanium alloy can thus support a shear load even if adhesion of the bonding material is poor.

  14. Titanium pigmentation. An electron probe microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, A.; Touron, P.; Daste, J.; Lassere, J.; Bonafe, J.L.; Viraben, R.

    1985-05-01

    A patient had an unusual pigmentary disease induced by titanium dioxide. The use of a topical cream containing titanium dioxide caused a xanthomalike appearance on the patient's penis. Electron probe microanalysis was valuable in establishing the cause of this balanitis.

  15. The oxidation of titanium silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwick, Thom; Rajan, Krishna

    1990-11-01

    This paper investigates the morphology changes that occur with the oxidation of a ti-tanium silicide—polysilicon system. These changes were studied as a function of poly-silicon doping and silicide formation parameters. Emphasis was placed on transmission electron microscopy studies of the samples by planar and cross sectional techniques. Various surface analysis methods have also been used to characterize the films. This study helps to define the possible use and shortcomings of a self aligned titanium silicide insulator. The results show that varying quality insulators result, dependent largely on the initial conditions of the titanium silicide. After oxidation the Auger and TEM anal-ysis show that in all cases some form of silicon dioxide was created, but typically a considerable amount of titanium oxide was also present. For instance, it was apparent that more titanium oxide formed on the samples RTA’ed for 1 min at 700° C than the 5 min at 800° C and considerably more on the arsenic doped sample than the boron doped. The silicide also had morphology changes as the result of the oxidation. There was a phase change from the C49 to C54 phase for the 1 min at 700° C samples as would be expected at the time and temperature of the oxidation. There also was a sig-nificant amount of agglomeration and epitaxial growth observed. Further work is re-quired to completely characterize these phenomena.

  16. Lightweight Protective Coatings For Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Karl E.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Clark, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight coating developed to protect titanium and titanium aluminide alloys and titanium-matrix composite materials from attack by environment when used at high temperatures. Applied by sol-gel methods, and thickness less than 5 micrometers. Reaction-barrier and self-healing diffusion-barrier layers combine to protect titanium alloy against chemical attack by oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures with very promising results. Can be extended to protection of other environmentally sensitive materials.

  17. Experimental titanium alloys for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Faria, Adriana C L; Rodrigues, Renata C S; Rosa, Adalberto L; Ribeiro, Ricardo F

    2014-12-01

    Although the use of titanium has increased, casting difficulties limit routine use. The purpose of the present study was to compare the mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the experimental titanium alloys titanium-5-zirconium, titanium-5-tantalum, and titanium-5-tantalum-5-zirconium (in wt%) with those of commercially pure titanium. Specimens of titanium alloys and commercially pure titanium were cast by using plasma. Their modulus of elasticity and ultimate tensile strength were determined in a universal testing machine. Biocompatibility was evaluated with SCC9 cells. In periods of 1, 4, 7, 10, and 14 days, cell proliferation was evaluated by the (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) tetrazolium reduction assay, and cell viability was evaluated in the 7-day period. Cell morphology was evaluated at 2, 12, and 24 hours. Modulus of elasticity, ultimate tensile strength, and cell viability were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the Bonferroni test; cell proliferation data were compared by 2-way ANOVA (alloy versus time) and by the Bonferroni test; and the cell morphology data were analyzed by split-plot design. All statistical tests were performed at the 95% confidence level (P<.05). Titanium-5-tantalum presented the lowest modulus of elasticity and ultimate tensile strength, whereas titanium-5-zirconium and titanium-5-tantalum-5-zirconium were statistically similar to commercially pure titanium. Cell proliferation and viability were not affected by any alloy being similar to those observed for commercially pure titanium. No noticeably differences were found in the morphology of cells cultured on any alloy and commercially pure titanium. Experimental alloys, especially titanium-5-zirconium and titanium-5-tantalum-5-zirconium, presented promising mechanical results for future studies and clinical applications. In addition, these alloys, evaluated by cell proliferation, viability, and morphology, were found to be biocompatible in vitro

  18. Lightweight Protective Coatings For Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Karl E.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Clark, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight coating developed to protect titanium and titanium aluminide alloys and titanium-matrix composite materials from attack by environment when used at high temperatures. Applied by sol-gel methods, and thickness less than 5 micrometers. Reaction-barrier and self-healing diffusion-barrier layers combine to protect titanium alloy against chemical attack by oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures with very promising results. Can be extended to protection of other environmentally sensitive materials.

  19. Development of Lightweight Titanium Base Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-15

    program on Development of Lightweight Titanium Base Alloys was to develop new titanium alloys with 10% lower density, 50% higher elastic modulus, and...program. permitted the cvaluation of a low-dc-isity. dislicrsion-strengthcnicd 02 + y titanium aluminide , which has excellent high temperature strength...713e alloy has significantly higher strength than the titanium aluminides . The limited data for ’i-34AI-4Be show it to be very strong above 7(X)°C

  20. Process for reproducibly preparing titanium subhydride

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Richard S.

    1982-01-01

    Titanium subhydride is produced in a reactor by heating a selected amount of finely divided titanium compound at a selected temperature for a selected period of time under dynamic vacuum conditions. Hydrogen is removed substantially uniformly from each powder grain and there is produced a subhydride of substantially uniform titanium-hydrogen composition. Selection of the amount, temperature and time produces a subhydride of selected titanium-hydrogen composition.

  1. Types of Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  2. Yttria Nanoparticle Reinforced Commercially Pure (CP) Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    nanoparticles as well as titanium boride (TiB) reinforcements were produced through gas atomization. After consolidation and extrusion, room temperature...pure FE iron O oxygen Ti titanium TiB titanium boride TYS tensile yield strength UTS ultimate tensile strength wt% weight percent Y2O3

  3. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  4. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  5. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  6. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  8. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  10. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  13. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  14. Titanium matrix composites: Mechanical behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, S.; Nicholas, T.

    1997-12-31

    Because of their unique mix of properties and behavior in high-performance applications, Titanium Matrix Composites are presently the focus of special research and development activity. This new book presents a review of current technology on the mechanical behavior of these materials. Each chapter was prepared specifically for this new book by one or more specialists in this subject. This book is divided into the following chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) Monotonic Response; (3) Micromechanical Theories for Inelastic Fibrous Composite Materials; (4) Interfaces in Metal Matrix Composites; (5) Fatigue Failure Mechanisms in TMCs; (6) Fatigue and Thermomechanical Fatigue Life Prediction; (7) Creep Behavior of Fiber Reinforced Titanium Matrix Composites; (8) Fatigue Crack Growth; (9) Notch Strength of Titanium Matrix Composites; and (10) Micromechanical Analysis and Modeling.

  15. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Belyshev, S. S.; Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Kuznetsov, A. A. Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  16. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  17. Nanotubular topography enhances the bioactivity of titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingyan; Zhang, Xinchun; Yan, Wangxiang; Chen, Zhipei; Shuai, Xintao; Wang, Anxun; Wang, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Surface modification on titanium implants plays an important role in promoting mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) response to enhance osseointegration persistently. In this study, nano-scale TiO2 nanotube topography (TNT), micro-scale sand blasted-acid etched topography (SLA), and hybrid sand blasted-acid etched/nanotube topography (SLA/TNT) were fabricated on the surfaces of titanium implants. Although the initial cell adherence at 60 min among TNT, SLA and TNT/SLA was not different, SLA and SLA/TNT presented to be rougher and suppressed the proliferation of MSC. TNT showed hydrophilic surface and balanced promotion of cellular functions. After being implanted in rabbit femur models, TNT displayed the best osteogenesis inducing ability as well as strong bonding strength to the substrate. These results indicate that nano-scale TNT provides favorable surface topography for improving the clinical performance of endosseous implants compared with micro and hybrid micro/nano surfaces, suggesting a promising and reliable surface modification strategy of titanium implants for clinical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Submerged Arc Welding of Titanium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-30

    AD-AOB5 400 MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE DEPT OF MATERIA -ETC F/G 11/6 SUBMERGED ARC WELDING OF TITANIUM.(U) UCSEP 18 G HUNTER, 6 B KENNEY, M...3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMW-- TITLE (and Subtitle) n or QnQMED Submerged Arc Welding of Tianu Technal epor o. 9? ji’ G./ Huntert’G. KenneybM Ring...nuinbor) Welding , Titanium, Fluxes, Oxygen, Nitrogen ASS40qAfC ,,(AA.K 20. A9 AT(Continue an revereet side It necessay and Identify by block numabor) 0

  19. Thermal Stir Welds in Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonda, Richard W.; Knipling, Keith E.; Pilchak, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Although conventional friction stir welding (FSW) has proven unsuccessful in joining thick sections of alpha and near-alpha titanium alloys, thermal stir welding, a variant of the FSW process in which an external heat source is used to preheat the workpiece, is demonstrated to be able to reliably join 12.3-mm-thick plates of CP titanium. This paper describes the microstructures and textures that develop in these thermal stir welds. The observed microstructure was used to reconstruct the high-temperature microstructure and texture present during the welding process and therefore reveal the genesis of the welding structures.

  20. Effect of whitening toothpaste on titanium and titanium alloy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; Bordin, Angelo Rafael de Vito; Pedrazzi, Vinícius; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2012-01-01

    Dental implants have increased the use of titanium and titanium alloys in prosthetic applications. Whitening toothpastes with peroxides are available for patients with high aesthetic requirements, but the effect of whitening toothpastes on titanium surfaces is not yet known, although titanium is prone to fluoride ion attack. Thus, the aim of the present study was to compare Ti-5Ta alloy to cp Ti after toothbrushing with whitening and conventional toothpastes. Ti-5Ta (%wt) alloy was melted in an arc melting furnace and compared with cp Ti. Disks and toothbrush heads were embedded in PVC rings to be mounted onto a toothbrushing test apparatus. A total of 260,000 cycles were carried out at 250 cycles/minute under a load of 5 N on samples immersed in toothpaste slurries. Surface roughness and Vickers microhardness were evaluated before and after toothbrushing. One sample of each material/toothpaste was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and compared with a sample that had not been submitted to toothbrushing. Surface roughness increased significantly after toothbrushing, but no differences were noted after toothbrushing with different toothpastes. Toothbrushing did not significantly affect sample microhardness. The results suggest that toothpastes that contain and those that do not contain peroxides in their composition have different effects on cp Ti and Ti-5Ta surfaces. Although no significant difference was noted in the microhardness and roughness of the surfaces brushed with different toothpastes, both toothpastes increased roughness after toothbrushing.

  1. Corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks compared to titanium modular necks in a simulator test.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Ulrich; Neumann, Daniel; Frank, Mario

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks with that of titanium alloy modular necks at their junction to titanium-alloy femoral stem. Tests were performed in a dry assembly and two wet assemblies, one contaminated with calf serum and the other contaminated with calf serum and bone particles. Whereas the titanium modular neck tested in the dry assembly showed no signs of corrosion, the titanium modular necks tested in both wet assemblies showed marked depositions and corrosive attacks. By contrast, the tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks showed no traces of corrosion or chemical attack in any of the three assemblies. This study confirms the protective effect of tantalum coating the taper region of cobalt-chromium modular neck components, suggesting that the use of tantalum may reduce the risk of implant failure due to corrosion. © 2014.

  2. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, George T., II; Hansen; Jeffrey S.; Oden; Laurance L.; Turner; Paul C.; Ochs; Thomas L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  3. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, G.T. II; Hansen, J.S.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.; Ochs, T.L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body followed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet. 3 figs.

  4. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, II, George T.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    1998-01-01

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  5. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.T. II; Hansen, J.S.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.; Ochs, T.L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body followed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet. 3 figs.

  6. Research and Development on Titanium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-10-31

    svmym lIfe. Th~e rAnge of cOmposila Ivwstpted in the bin"rtniaum-stiver sistems was extended to 5% snw an M~an~Ajmm loy cntprn 0.1 Is beryllium were...extended to 5,0 per cent silverl and titanium- beryllium alloys containing 0.1 to-1.0 per cent berylliuma were inveitiga~ted. None of~ these alloys had...of: 1. Binary titanium-germanium alloys. 2. Binary titanium-nickel alloys. 3, Binary titanium-silver alloys. 4. Binary titanium- beryllium alloys. 5

  7. Stem cells.

    PubMed

    Behr, Björn; Ko, Sae Hee; Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2010-10-01

    Stem cells are self-renewing cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines and are classified according to their origin and their ability to differentiate. Enormous potential exists in use of stem cells for regenerative medicine. To produce effective stem cell-based treatments for a range of diseases, an improved understanding of stem cell biology and better control over stem cell fate are necessary. In addition, the barriers to clinical translation, such as potential oncologic properties of stem cells, need to be addressed. With renewed government support and continued refinement of current stem cell methodologies, the future of stem cell research is exciting and promises to provide novel reconstructive options for patients and surgeons limited by traditional paradigms.

  8. Synthesis and properties of nanoscale titanium boride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, K. A.; Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the scientific and technological grounds for plasma synthesis of titanium diboride, including thermodynamic and kinetic conditions of boride formation when titanium and titanium dioxide are interacting with products resulting from boron gasification in the nitrogen - hydrogen plasma flow, and two variations of its behavior using the powder mixtures: titanium - boron and titanium dioxide - boron. To study these technology variations, the mathematical models were derived, describing the relation between element contents in the synthesized products of titanium and free boron and basic parameters. The probable mechanism proposed for forming titanium diboride according to a "vapour - melt - crystal" pattern was examined, covering condensation of titanium vapour in the form of aerosol, boriding of nanoscale melt droplets by boron hydrides and crystallization of titanium - boron melt. The comprehensive physical - chemical certification of titanium diboride was carried out, including the study of its crystal structure, phase and chemical composition, dispersion, morphology and particle oxidation. Technological application prospects for use of titanium diboride nanoscale powder as constituent element in the wettable coating for carbon cathodes having excellent physical and mechanical performance and protective properties.

  9. Hydrogen content in titanium and a titanium-zirconium alloy after acid etching.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias J; Walter, Martin S; Lyngstadaas, S Petter; Wintermantel, Erich; Haugen, Håvard J

    2013-04-01

    Dental implant alloys made from titanium and zirconium are known for their high mechanical strength, fracture toughness and corrosion resistance in comparison with commercially pure titanium. The aim of the study was to investigate possible differences in the surface chemistry and/or surface topography of titanium and titanium-zirconium surfaces after sand blasting and acid etching. The two surfaces were compared by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and profilometry. The 1.9 times greater surface hydrogen concentration of titanium zirconium compared to titanium was found to be the major difference between the two materials. Zirconium appeared to enhance hydride formation on titanium alloys when etched in acid. Surface topography revealed significant differences on the micro and nanoscale. Surface roughness was increased significantly (p<0.01) on the titanium-zirconium alloy. High-resolution images showed nanostructures only present on titanium zirconium.

  10. STEM Sell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantic, Zorica

    2007-01-01

    Between 1994 and 2003, employment in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields grew by a remarkable 23 percent, compared with 17 percent in non-STEM fields, according to federal data. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts continued strong growth in STEM job openings through 2014, with emphasis on life sciences, environmental…

  11. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Lorenzo L. Esters, Vice President, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities), and Project Director, MMSI (Minority Male STEM Initiative) addresses STEM initiative report findings at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-07-28

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic of good mechanical workability.

  13. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    An eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.

  14. Cell Attachment Following Instrumentation with Titanium and Plastic Instruments, Diode Laser, and Titanium Brush on Titanium, Titanium-Zirconium, and Zirconia Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lang, Melissa S; Cerutis, D Roselyn; Miyamoto, Takanari; Nunn, Martha E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface characteristics and gingival fibroblast adhesion of disks composed of implant and abutment materials following brief and repeated instrumentation with instruments commonly used in procedures for implant maintenance, stage-two implant surgery, and periimplantitis treatment. One hundred twenty disks (40 titanium, 40 titaniumzirconium, 40 zirconia) were grouped into treatment categories of instrumentation by plastic curette, titanium curette, diode microlaser, rotary titanium brush, and no treatment. Twenty strokes were applied to half of the disks in the plastic and titanium curette treatment categories, while half of the disks received 100 strokes each to simulate implant maintenance occurring on a repetitive basis. Following analysis of the disks by optical laser profilometry, disks were cultured with human gingival fibroblasts. Cell counts were conducted from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Differences in surface roughness across all instruments tested for zirconia disks were negligible, while both titanium disks and titaniumzirconium disks showed large differences in surface roughness across the spectrum of instruments tested. The rotary titanium brush and the titanium curette yielded the greatest overall mean surface roughness, while the plastic curette yielded the lowest mean surface roughness. The greatest mean cell counts for each disk type were as follows: titanium disks with plastic curettes, titanium-zirconium disks with titanium curettes, and zirconia disks with the diode microlaser. Repeated instrumentation did not result in cumulative changes in surface roughness of implant materials made of titanium, titanium-zirconium, or zirconia. Instrumentation with plastic implant curettes on titanium and zirconia surfaces appeared to be more favorable than titanium implant curettes in terms of gingival fibroblast attachment on these surfaces.

  15. Improve the performance of coated cemented hip stem through the advanced composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; Fouda, N

    2015-01-01

    Design of hip joint implant using functionally graded material (FGM) (advanced composite material) has been used before through few researches. It gives great results regarding the stress distribution along the implant and bone interfaces. However, coating of orthopaedic implants has been widely investigated through many researches. The effect of using advanced composite stem material, which mean by functionally graded stem material, in the total hip replacement coated with the most common coated materials has not been studied yet. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of utilizing these two concepts together; FGM and coating, in designing new stem material. It is concluded that the optimal FGM cemented stem is consisting from titanium at the upper stem layers graded to collagen at a lower stem layers. This optimal graded stem coated with hydroxyapatite found to reduce stress shielding by 57% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with hydroxyapatite. However, the optimal functionally graded stem coated with collagen reduced the stress shielding by 51% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with collagen.

  16. Histomorphometric and biomechanical analyses of osseointegration of four different orthodontic mini implant surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Sumit

    Objective: To evaluate the osseointegration potential of four different surfaces of mini-implants. We hypothesized that mini-implants surface roughness alters the intrinsic biomechanical properties of the bone integrated to titanium. Materials and Methods: Mini implants and circular discs were made from alloy Ti6Al4V grade 5. On the basis of surface treatment study was divided into 4 groups: Group 1: Machined: no surface treatment, Group 2: Acid etched: with hydrochloric acid, Group 3: Grit Blasted with alumina and Group 4: Grit blasted +Acid etched. Surface roughness parameters (mean surface roughness: Ra and Quadratic Average roughness: Rq) of the four discs from each group were measured by the optical profilometer. Contact angle measurement of 3 discs from each group was done with a Goniometer. Contact angle of liquids with different hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity were measured. 128 mini implants, differing in surface treatment, were placed into the tibias and femurs of 8 adult male New Zealand white rabbits. Biomechanical properties (Removal torque and hardness) measurements and histomorphometric observations were measured. Results: Ra and Rq of groups were: Machined (1.17+/-0.11, 2.59+/-0.09) Acid etched (1.82+/-0.04, 3.17+/-0.13), Grit blasted (4.83+/-0.23, 7.04+/-0.08), Grit blasted + Acid etched (3.64+/-0.03, 4.95+/-0.04) respectively. Group 4 had significantly (p=0.000) lower Ra and Rq than Group 3. The interaction between the groups and liquid was significant. Group 4 had significantly lower contact angle measurements (40.4°, 26.9°), both for blood and NaCl when compared to other three groups (p≤0.01). Group 4 had significantly higher torque than Group 3 (Tibia: 13.67>9.07N-cm; Femur: 18.21>14.12N-cm), Group 4 (Tibia: 13.67>9.78N-cm; Femur: 18.21>12.87N-cm), and machined (Tibia: 13.67>4.08N-cm; Femur: 18.21>6.49N-cm). SEM analysis reveals significantly more bone implant gap in machined implant surfaces than treated implant surfaces. Bone to implant

  17. Tensile properties of titanium electrolytically charged with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. J.; Otterson, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation were studied for annealed titanium electrolytically charged with hydrogen. The hydrogen was present as a surface hydride layer. These tensile properties were generally lower for uncharged titanium than for titanium with a continuous surface hydride; they were greater for uncharged titanium than for titanium with an assumed discontinuous surface hydride. We suggest that the interface between titanium and titanium hydride is weak. And the hydride does not necessarily impair strength and ductility of annealed titanium. The possibility that oxygen and/or nitrogen can embrittle titanium hydride is discussed.

  18. Effect of plasma nitriding and titanium nitride coating on the corrosion resistance of titanium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianli; Bai, Shizhu; Li, Fang; Li, Dongmei; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Min; Zhang, Qian; Tong, Yu; Zhang, Zichuan; Wang, Guowei; Guo, Tianwen; Ma, Chufan

    2016-09-01

    The passive film on the surface of titanium can be destroyed by immersion in a fluoridated acidic medium. Coating with titanium nitride (TiN) may improve the corrosion resistance of titanium. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of duplex treatment with plasma nitriding and TiN coating on the corrosion resistance of cast titanium. Cast titanium was treated with plasma nitriding and TiN coating. The corrosion resistance of the duplex-treated titanium in fluoride-containing artificial saliva was then investigated through electrochemical and immersion tests. The corroded surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy surface scan analysis. The data were analyzed using ANOVA (α=.05) RESULTS: Duplex treatment generated a dense and uniform TiN film with a thickness of 4.5 μm. Compared with untreated titanium, the duplex-treated titanium displayed higher corrosion potential (Ecorr) values (P<.001) and lower corrosion current density (Icorr) values (P<.001). SEM results showed that the surface of untreated titanium was more heavily corroded than that of duplex-treated titanium. Surface scan analysis of duplex-treated titanium that had been immersed in artificial saliva containing 2 g/L fluoride revealed fluorine on the titanium surface, whereas fluorine was not observed on the surface of untreated titanium after immersion in fluoride-containing artificial saliva. The concentration of titanium ions released from the treated titanium was less than the amount released from untreated titanium (P<.001). Duplex treatment by plasma nitriding and TiN coating significantly improved the corrosion resistance of cast titanium in a fluoride-containing environment. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanoscale Topography on Black Titanium Imparts Multi-biofunctional Properties for Orthopedic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Jafar; Jain, Shubham; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a chlorine based reactive ion etching process to yield randomly oriented anisotropic nanostructures that render the titanium metal surface ‘black’ similar to that of black silicon. The surface appears black due to the nanostructures in contrast to the conventional shiny surface of titanium. The nanostructures were found to kill bacteria on contact by mechanically rupturing the cells as has been observed previously on wings of certain insects. The etching was optimized to yield nanostructures of ≈1 μm height for maximal bactericidal efficiency without compromising cytocompatibility. Within 4 hours of contact with the black titanium surface, 95% ± 5% of E. coli, 98% ± 2% of P. aeruginosa, 92% ± 5% of M. smegmatis and 22% ± 8% of S. aureus cells that had attached were killed. The killing efficiency for the S. aureus increased to 76% ± 4% when the cells were allowed to adhere up to 24 hours. The black titanium supported the attachment and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and augmented osteogenic lineage commitment in vitro. Thus, the bioinspired nanostructures on black titanium impart multi-biofunctional properties toward engineering the next-generation biomaterials for orthopedic implants.

  20. Nanoscale Topography on Black Titanium Imparts Multi-biofunctional Properties for Orthopedic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Jafar; Jain, Shubham; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a chlorine based reactive ion etching process to yield randomly oriented anisotropic nanostructures that render the titanium metal surface ‘black’ similar to that of black silicon. The surface appears black due to the nanostructures in contrast to the conventional shiny surface of titanium. The nanostructures were found to kill bacteria on contact by mechanically rupturing the cells as has been observed previously on wings of certain insects. The etching was optimized to yield nanostructures of ≈1 μm height for maximal bactericidal efficiency without compromising cytocompatibility. Within 4 hours of contact with the black titanium surface, 95% ± 5% of E. coli, 98% ± 2% of P. aeruginosa, 92% ± 5% of M. smegmatis and 22% ± 8% of S. aureus cells that had attached were killed. The killing efficiency for the S. aureus increased to 76% ± 4% when the cells were allowed to adhere up to 24 hours. The black titanium supported the attachment and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and augmented osteogenic lineage commitment in vitro. Thus, the bioinspired nanostructures on black titanium impart multi-biofunctional properties toward engineering the next-generation biomaterials for orthopedic implants. PMID:28112235

  1. Biofunctionalization of titanium with bacitracin immobilization shows potential for anti-bacteria, osteogenesis and reduction of macrophage inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Bin'en; Ao, Haiyong; Zhou, Jianliang; Tang, Tingting; Yue, Bing

    2016-09-01

    Titanium has been widely used in the orthopedic and dental fields, however, the inert nature of Ti makes it unsuitable for application in promoting bone cell growth,osteogenic differentiation and antibacterial ability. The aims of the current study were to investigate the antimicrobial activity and biofunction of the polypeptide antibiotic bacitracin, and obtain a multi-biofunctional titanium implant by covalently-immobilizing titanium with the bacitracin. The results showed that the bacitracin possessed low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to both Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with the non-cytotoxicity concentration up to 500μg/mL to human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs), furthermore, the bacitracin could improve the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. The results of Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that bacitracin had been covalently immobilized on the surface of titanium. Immobilized bacitracin could improve the hydrophilic of immobilized titanium. The results of antimicrobial assay demonstrated that the covalently-immobilized bacitracin also had excellent antimicrobial property, and the bacitracin immobilized titanium could inhibit bacterial adhesion and colonization. The results of cell biology experiments proved that the bacitracin immobilized titanium could improve hBMSCs' adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. We also found that the macrophages were difficult to spread or activate on the surface of bacitracin immobilized titanium, and the secretion of inflammatory factors had been inhibited. In conclusion, the novel bacitracin immobilized titanium has multi-biofunctions including outstanding antibacterial properties, excellent cell biology performance, and restraining inflammation, which has exciting application prospect.

  2. Comparable responses of osteoblast lineage cells to microstructured hydrophilic titanium-zirconium and microstructured hydrophilic titanium.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Ethan M; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L; Berner, Simon; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2017-07-01

    Although titanium (Ti) is commonly used for dental implants, Ti alloy materials are being developed to improve their physical material properties. Studies indicate that osteoblast differentiation and maturation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and normal human osteoblasts (NHOsts) respond to microstructured Ti and titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti6Al4V) surfaces in a similar manner. The goal of this study was to determine whether this is the case for osteoblast lineage cells grown on microstructured TiZr surfaces and whether their response is affected by surface nanotexture and hydrophilicity. Grade 4 Ti and TiZr (13-17% Zr) disks were modified by large grit sand-blasting and acid-etching with storage in saline solution, resulting in a complex microstructured and hydrophilic surface corresponding to the commercially available implants SLActive(®) and Roxolid(®) SLActive(®) (Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland). The subsequent Ti modSLA and TiZr modSLA surfaces were characterized and osteogenic markers were measured. Evaluation of physical parameters revealed that the fabrication method was capable of inducing a microstructured and hydrophilic surface on both the Ti and TiZr disks. Overall, the surfaces were similar, but differences in nanostructure morphology/density and surface chemistry were detected. On Ti modSLA and TiZr modSLA, osteoblastic differentiation and maturation markers were enhanced in both MSCs and NHOsts, while inflammatory markers decreased compared with TCPS. These results indicate a similar positive cell response of MSCs and NHOsts when cultured on Ti modSLA and TiZr modSLA. Both surfaces were hydrophilic, indicating the importance of this property to osteoblast lineage cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Studies of titanium dioxide film growth from titanium tetraisopropoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuan-Min; Bradley, D. C.; Nix, Roger M.

    1993-01-01

    The surface-mediated decomposition of titanium isopropoxide at low pressures has been followed using temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy and reactive scattering measurements. Film growth is initiated at ˜ 450 K, with kinetics controlled by the decomposition of adsorbed intermediates, giving a mixture of acetone, isopropanol and propene as gas-phase by-products. At high temperatures (#62;675 K) the principal by-product is propene and adsorption kinetics may become rate-limiting.

  4. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  5. Antimicrobial titanium/silver PVD coatings on titanium

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Andrea; Glückermann, Susanne K; Thull, Roger; Gbureck, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation and deep infection of endoprostheses is a recurrent complication in implant surgery. Post-operative infections may be overcome by adjusting antimicrobial properties of the implant surface prior to implantation. In this work we described the development of an antimicrobial titanium/silver hard coating via the physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. Methods Coatings with a thickness of approximately 2 μm were deposited on titanium surfaces by simultaneous vaporisation of both metals in an inert argon atmosphere with a silver content of approximately 0.7 – 9% as indicated by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. On these surfaces microorganisms and eukaryotic culture cells were grown. Results The coatings released sufficient silver ions (0.5–2.3 ppb) when immersed in PBS and showed significant antimicrobial potency against Staphylococcus epidermis and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. At the same time, no cytotoxic effects of the coatings on osteoblast and epithelial cells were found. Conclusion Due to similar mechanical performance when compared to pure titanium, the TiAg coatings should be suitable to provide antimicrobial activity on load-bearing implant surfaces. PMID:16556327

  6. Formation of crystalline titanium(IV) phosphates from titanium(III) solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bortun, A.; Jaimez, E.; Llavona, R.; Garcia, J.R.; Rodriguez, J.

    1995-04-01

    Crystalline phases of titanium (IV) phosphate have been obtained from titanium(III) chloride in phosphoric acid solutions. The {alpha}-titanium phosphate synthesis is possible at low temperature (60--80 C). {gamma}-Titanium phosphate is obtained by reflux with very concentrated phosphoric acid in 3--5 hours by oxidation with O{sub 2}. The influence in these reactions of several factors (concentration of reagents, molar ratio P:Ti in the reaction mixture, temperature and reaction) was studied. The {alpha}-titanium phosphate formation takes place in several steps through the sequential formation of amorphous titanium(IV) phosphate, {gamma}-titanium phosphate and/or a semicrystalline titanium(IV) hydroxophosphate, Ti(OH){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}){center_dot}H{sub 2}O.

  7. Developments in Titanium Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froes, F. H.; Eylon, D.; Eichelman, G. E.; Burte, H. M.

    1980-02-01

    The high buy-to-fly ratio associated with many titanium components, combined with forging and machining difficulties, and recent availability problems, has led to a strong drive for near-net titanium shape fabrication. A very promising method of attaining this goal is powder metallurgy. Two major approaches are considered in this article: the "elemental" and "pre-alloyed" powder methods. Shape-making capability and mechanical properties of both technologies are presented. Consideration is given to the cost-effectiveness of the processes and mechanical performance compared to conventional fabrication methods. Design philosophies, modified to include the presence of foreign particles in the compacted article, are discussed. Emerging advances in the technology are presented and future developments forecast.

  8. Free Form Low Cost Fabrication Using Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-29

    nickel-base superalloys . "* The tensile strength as an alloy of titanium can be comparable to that of lower-strength marterisitic stainless and is...better than that of austenitic or ferritic stainless. Alloys can have ultimate strengths comparable to iron base superalloys , such as A286, or cobalt...dependent on composition. Some alloy systems (titanium aluminides ) may have useful strengths above this temperature. "* The cost of titanium, while

  9. Ultrafine-grained titanium for medical implants

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Lowe, Terry C.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Stolyarov, Vladimir V.; Latysh, Vladimir V.; Raab, Georgy J.

    2002-01-01

    We disclose ultrafine-grained titanium. A coarse-grained titanium billet is subjected to multiple extrusions through a preheated equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) die, with billet rotation between subsequent extrusions. The resulting billet is cold processed by cold rolling and/or cold extrusion, with optional annealing. The resulting ultrafine-grained titanium has greatly improved mechanical properties and is used to make medical implants.

  10. Production of titanium from ilmenite: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, R.

    1981-12-01

    The general principles for beneficiation of titanium ores are reviewed and the specific processes used in individual units in various countries are discussed. This is followed by a critical evaluation of various current and potential reduction methods for the production of titanium metal from the processed concentrates. Finally, the report outlines a research program for the development of a commercially viable alternative method for the production of titanium metal.

  11. Titanium Development Program. Volume 5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-05-01

    Metallurgist Mr. Robert Wichser, Chief Research North American Aviation, Inc. Engineer Columbus, Ohio Republic Aviation Corporation Mr. A.R. Mead... Aviation Corporation Attn: V. N. Ferguson, Mfg. Manager Attn: Adolph Kastelowitz, Chief, P.O. Box 6191 Mfg. Engineering Dallas, Texas r .min coa.e, Ln t...Cru Titanium, Inc. Vice Pres. of Manufacturbng Attn: Dr. W. C. Finaly Great Neck, New York Midland, Pennsylvania Temco Aircraft Corporation Republic

  12. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1998-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  13. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  14. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1998-08-04

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag. 1 fig.

  15. Reduction of titanium dioxide to metallic titanium conducted under the autogenic pressure of the reactants.

    PubMed

    Eshed, Michal; Irzh, Alexander; Gedanken, Aharon

    2009-08-03

    We report on a reaction to convert titanium dioxide to titanium. The reduction reaction was done under the autogenic pressure of the reactants at 750 degrees C for 5 h. The MgO, a by-product, was removed by acids to obtain pure metallic titanium.

  16. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1999-10-19

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  17. Fretting behavior of titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fayeulle, S.; Blanchard, P.; Vincent, L. )

    1993-04-01

    Fretting wear tests were performed on three titanium alloys, alpha + beta-Ti-6Al-4V, alpha-Ti-15V-3Al-3Cr-3Sn, and beta-Ti-15V-3Al-3Cr-3Sn, in air. Friction conditions were chosen in order to get gross slip at the interface. The tangential load was recorded during each cycle of the test. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and TEM were used to characterize the superficial surface layers of the specimens after the fretting test. Particle detachment was observed in every case and the friction coefficient was always very high. A hard tribologically transformed structure (TTS) was detected in some areas of the superficial layers. TEM revealed that TTS was formed of ultra fine non-oriented grains of alpha-titanium. No beta phase was detected. The wear debris particles were produced from the transformed areas of the contact zone and were then quickly oxidized in the interface. The formation of the TTS is interpreted in terms of deformation-induced transformation. Role of the TTS on friction and wear behavior of titanium alloys is discussed. 45 refs.

  18. Visible Spectra of Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Nagarajan, R.; Maier, J. P.; Zhuang, X.; Le, A.; Steimle, T. C.

    2011-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO) has been extensively studied spectroscopically due to its astrophysical relevance. TiO is the main opacity source in the atmospheres of cool M-type stars in the visible and near infrared. In view of the high cosmic abundance of Ti and O, titanium dioxide (TiO2) is believed to play an important role in dust formation processes from the gas-phase in circumstellar shells of oxygen-rich stars. The electronic spectra of a cold molecular beam of TiO2 have been investigated using mass-resolved resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. TiO2 was produced by laser ablation of a pure titanium rod in the presence of a supersonic expanding mixture of approximately 5% O2 in either helium or argon. The spectra were recorded in the region 17500 cm-1 to 22500 cm-1 and the bands assigned to the A1B2 ← X1A1 transition. The origin and harmonic vibrational constants for the A1B2 state were determined to be: T000 = 17593(5) cm-1, ω1 = 876(3) cm-1, ω2 = 184(1) cm-1, and ω3 = 316(2) cm-1. Further, the dispersed fluorescence of a few bands were recorded to obtain vibrational parameters for the X1A1 state.

  19. Periprosthetic femoral bone loss in total hip arthroplasty: systematic analysis of the effect of stem design.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Ashleen R; Lau, Nicole; Longjohn, Donald B; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N

    2017-02-21

    Periprosthetic bone loss may lead to major complications in total hip arthroplasty (THA), including loosening, migration, and even fracture. This study analysed the influence of femoral implant designs on periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD) after THA. The results of all previous published studies reporting periprosthetic femoral BMD following THA were compiled. Using these results, we compared percent changes in bone loss as a function of: femoral stem fixation, material, and geometry. The greatest bone loss was in the calcar region (Gruen Zone 7). Overall, cemented stems had more bone loss distally than noncemented stems, while noncemented stems had more proximal bone loss than cemented stems. Within noncemented stems, cobalt-chromium (CoCr) stems had nearly double the proximal bone loss compared to titanium (Ti) alloy stems. Finally, within noncemented titanium alloy group, straight stems had less bone loss than anatomical, tapered, and press-fit designs. The findings from the present study quantified percent changes in periprosthetic BMD as a function of fixation method, alloy, and stem design. While no one stem type was identified as ideal, we now have a clearer understanding of the influence of stem design on load transfer to the surrounding bone.

  20. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.

  1. The effects of hydrogen embrittlement of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Delbert J.

    1989-01-01

    Titanium alloys, by virtue of their attractive strength to density ratio, fatigue, fracture toughness and corrosion resistance are now commonly used in various aerospace and marine applications. The cost, once very expensive, has been reduced, making titanium even more of a competitive material today. Titanium and titanium alloys have a great affinity to several elements. Hydrogen, even in small amounts, can cause embrittlement, which in turn causes a reduction in strength and ductility. The reduction of strength and ductility is the subject of this investigation.

  2. Haemocompatibility of titanium and its alloys.

    PubMed

    Bakir, Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    This review outlines the current understanding of the interactions of titanium and its alloys with blood components, and the ways in which surface modification techniques can be used to alter the surface physicochemical and topographical features that determine blood-material interactions. Surface modification of the spontaneously formed titanium oxide surface layer is a highly attractive means of improving haemocompatibility without forgoing the advantageous mechanical and physical properties of titanium and its alloys. A number of surface modification techniques and treatment processes are discussed in the context of enhancing the haemocompatibility of titanium and its alloys, with a view to optimising the clinical efficacy of blood-contacting devices and materials.

  3. Welded Permanent Fittings for Titanium Hydraulic Tubing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FITTINGS, *HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, RIVETED JOINTS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, PIPES , JET TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT, COLD WORKING, PRESSURE, RUPTURE, ARC WELDING , INERT...GAS WELDING , RADIOGRAPHY, STRESS RELIEVING, SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT, COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT.

  4. Composite thin-foil bandpass filter for EUV astronomy Titanium-antimony-titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinsky, P.; Martin, C.; Kimble, R.; Bowyer, S.; Steele, G.

    1983-01-01

    Thin metallic foils of antimony and titanium have been investigated in an attempt to develop an EUV filter with a bandpass from 350 to 550 A. A composite filter has been developed composed of antimony sandwiched between two titanium foils. The transmissions of sample composite foils and of pure titanium foils from 130 to 1216 A are presented. The absorption coefficients of anatimony and titanium and the effect of titanium oxide on the transmission are derived. The composite filter has been found to be quite stable and mechanically rugged. Among other uses, the filter shows substantial promise for EUV astronomy.

  5. Composite thin-foil bandpass filter for EUV astronomy Titanium-antimony-titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinsky, P.; Martin, C.; Kimble, R.; Bowyer, S.; Steele, G.

    1983-01-01

    Thin metallic foils of antimony and titanium have been investigated in an attempt to develop an EUV filter with a bandpass from 350 to 550 A. A composite filter has been developed composed of antimony sandwiched between two titanium foils. The transmissions of sample composite foils and of pure titanium foils from 130 to 1216 A are presented. The absorption coefficients of anatimony and titanium and the effect of titanium oxide on the transmission are derived. The composite filter has been found to be quite stable and mechanically rugged. Among other uses, the filter shows substantial promise for EUV astronomy.

  6. Tribological evaluation of diamond coating on pure titanium in comparison with plasma nitrided titanium and uncoated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, B.; Loh, N.L.; Fu, Y.; Sun, C.Q.; Hing, P.

    1999-12-01

    Titanium alloys are characterized by poor tribological properties, and the traditional use of titanium alloys has been restricted to nontribological applications. The deposition of a well adherent diamond coating is a promising way to solve this problem. In this study, the tribological properties of diamond-coated titanium were studied using a pin-on-disk tribometer, and the results were compared with those of pure titanium and plasma nitrided titanium. The tribological behavior of pure titanium was characterized by high coefficient of friction and rapid wear of materials. Plasma nitriding improved the wear resistance only under low normal load; however, this hardened layer was not efficient in improving the wear resistance and the friction properties under high normal load. Diamond coating on pure titanium improved the wear resistance of titanium significantly. Surface profilometry measurement indicated that little or no wear of the diamond coating occurred under the test conditions loads. The roughness of the diamond coating was critical because it controlled the amount of abrasive damage on the counterface. Reducing the surface roughness by polishing led to the reductions in both the friction and wear of the counterface.

  7. The prevention of prosthetic infection using a cross-linked albumin coating in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    An, Y H; Bradley, J; Powers, D L; Friedman, R J

    1997-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of a serum protein coating on prosthetic infection in 29 adult male rabbits divided into three groups: control, albumin-coated and uncoated. We used 34 grit-blasted, commercially pure titanium implants. Eleven were coated with cross-linked albumin. All the implants were exposed to a suspension of Staphylococcus epidermidis before implantation. Our findings showed that albumin-coated implants had a much lower infection rate (27%) than the uncoated implants (62%). This may be a useful method of reducing the infection of prostheses.

  8. Enhanced Osseointegration of Hierarchical Micro/Nanotopographic Titanium Fabricated by Microarc Oxidation and Electrochemical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanglong; Cao, Huiliang; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Qiao, Yuqin; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-02-17

    Rapid osseointegration is recognized as a critical factor in determining the success rate of orthopedic and dental implants. Microarc oxidation (MAO) fabricated titanium oxide coatings with a porous topography have been proven to be a potent approach to enhance osteogenic capacity. Now we report two kinds of new hierarchical coatings with similar micromorphologies but different nanotopographies (i.e., MAO and MAO-AK coatings), and both coatings significantly promote cell attachment and osteogenic differentiation through mediating the integrin β1 signaling pathway. In this study, titanium with a unique hierarchical micro/nanomorphology surface was fabricated by a novel duplex coating process, that is, the first a titanium oxide layer was coated by MAO, and then the coating was electrochemically reduced in alkaline solution (MAO-AK). A series of in vitro stem cell differentiation and in vivo osseointegration experiments were carried out to evaluate the osteogenic capacity of the resulting coatings. In vitro, the initial adhesion of the canine bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) seeded on the MAO and MAO-AK coatings was significantly enhanced, and cell proliferation was promoted. In addition, the expression levels of osteogenesis-related genes, osteorix, alkaline phosphates (ALP), osteopontin, and osteocalcin, in the canine BMSCs, were all up-regulated after incubation on these coatings, especially on the MAO-AK coating. Also, the in vitro ALP activity and mineralization capacity of canine BMSC cultured on the MAO-AK group was better than that on the MAO group. Furthermore, 6 weeks after insertion of the titanium implants into canine femurs, both the bone formation speed and the bone-implant contact ratio of the MAO-AK group were significantly higher than those of the MAO group. All these results suggest that this duplex coating process is promising for engineering titanium surfaces to promote osseointegration for dental and orthopedic applications.

  9. STEM Education.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Fang, Michael; Shauman, Kimberlee

    2015-08-01

    Improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, especially for traditionally disadvantaged groups, is widely recognized as pivotal to the U.S.'s long-term economic growth and security. In this article, we review and discuss current research on STEM education in the U.S., drawing on recent research in sociology and related fields. The reviewed literature shows that different social factors affect the two major components of STEM education attainment: (1) attainment of education in general, and (2) attainment of STEM education relative to non-STEM education conditional on educational attainment. Cognitive and social psychological characteristics matter for both major components, as do structural influences at the neighborhood, school, and broader cultural levels. However, while commonly used measures of socioeconomic status (SES) predict the attainment of general education, social psychological factors are more important influences on participation and achievement in STEM versus non-STEM education. Domestically, disparities by family SES, race, and gender persist in STEM education. Internationally, American students lag behind those in some countries with less economic resources. Explanations for group disparities within the U.S. and the mediocre international ranking of US student performance require more research, a task that is best accomplished through interdisciplinary approaches.

  10. STEM Education

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yu; Fang, Michael; Shauman, Kimberlee

    2015-01-01

    Improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, especially for traditionally disadvantaged groups, is widely recognized as pivotal to the U.S.’s long-term economic growth and security. In this article, we review and discuss current research on STEM education in the U.S., drawing on recent research in sociology and related fields. The reviewed literature shows that different social factors affect the two major components of STEM education attainment: (1) attainment of education in general, and (2) attainment of STEM education relative to non-STEM education conditional on educational attainment. Cognitive and social psychological characteristics matter for both major components, as do structural influences at the neighborhood, school, and broader cultural levels. However, while commonly used measures of socioeconomic status (SES) predict the attainment of general education, social psychological factors are more important influences on participation and achievement in STEM versus non-STEM education. Domestically, disparities by family SES, race, and gender persist in STEM education. Internationally, American students lag behind those in some countries with less economic resources. Explanations for group disparities within the U.S. and the mediocre international ranking of US student performance require more research, a task that is best accomplished through interdisciplinary approaches. PMID:26778893

  11. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Christine Keller, right, Director of Research, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities) presents STEM initiative report findings at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Christine Keller, Director of Research, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities) presents STEM initiative report findings at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR.... The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements on § 73.575 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. The color additive titanium dioxide may be...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide may...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide may...

  16. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR.... The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements on § 73.575 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. The color additive titanium dioxide may be...

  17. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1995-01-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99 gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  18. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... consistent with good manufacturing practice. (c) Labeling requirements. The color additive and any mixtures... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  19. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... consistent with good manufacturing practice. (c) Labeling requirements. The color additive and any mixtures... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  20. Titanium Carbide Bipolar Plate for Electrochemical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.; Kosek, John A.

    1998-05-08

    Titanium carbide comprises a corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate for use in an electrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  1. Fungal leaching of titanium from rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Munoz, E. F.

    1971-01-01

    Penicillium simplicissimum is found to solubilize up to 80% of the titanium in granitic rocks but less than 2% of the titanium in basaltic rocks. These findings were made in investigating the interactions of microorganisms with rocks and minerals of the biosphere in studies aimed at developing experiments for the detection of extraterrestrial life.

  2. Titanium carbide bipolar plate for electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.; Kosek, John A.

    2000-07-04

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate is made from titanium carbide for use in an eletrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  3. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  4. Wettability studies of topologically distinct titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Patil-Sen, Yogita; Junkar, Ita; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V; Lorenzetti, Martina; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-05-01

    Biomedical implants made of titanium-based materials are expected to have certain essential features including high bone-to-implant contact and optimum osteointegration, which are often influenced by the surface topography and physicochemical properties of titanium surfaces. The surface structure in the nanoscale regime is presumed to alter/facilitate the protein binding, cell adhesion and proliferation, thereby reducing post-operative complications with increased lifespan of biomedical implants. The novelty of our TiO2 nanostructures lies mainly in the high level control over their morphology and roughness by mere compositional change and optimisation of the experimental parameters. The present work focuses on the wetting behaviour of various nanostructured titanium surfaces towards water. Kinetics of contact area of water droplet on macroscopically flat, nanoporous and nanotubular titanium surface topologies was monitored under similar evaporation conditions. The contact area of the water droplet on hydrophobic titanium planar surface (foil) was found to decrease during evaporation, whereas the contact area of the droplet on hydrophobic nanorough titanium surfaces practically remained unaffected until the complete evaporation. This demonstrates that the surface morphology and roughness at the nanoscale level substantially affect the titanium dioxide surface-water droplet interaction, opposing to previous observations for microscale structured surfaces. The difference in surface topographic nanofeatures of nanostructured titanium surfaces could be correlated not only with the time-dependency of the contact area, but also with time-dependency of the contact angle and electrochemical properties of these surfaces.

  5. Bonding titanium to Rene 41 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pair of intermediate materials joined by electron beam welding method welds titanium to Rene 41 alloy. Bond is necessary for combining into one structure high strength-to-density ratio titanium fan blades and temperature resistant nickel-base alloy turbine-buckets in VTOL aircraft lift-fan rotor.

  6. Mineral resource of the month: titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Titanium is hip - at least when it comes to airplanes and jewelry. Known for its high strength-to weight ratio and its resistance to corrosion, titanium and its alloys can also be found in everything from knee replacements to eyeglass frames to baseball bats to fighter planes.

  7. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1995-01-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99 gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  8. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... additive mixtures for food use made with titanium dioxide may contain only those diluents that are suitable and that are listed in this subpart as safe in color additive mixtures for coloring foods, and the... solution obtained by boiling 10 grams of the titanium dioxide for 15 minutes in 50 milliliters of...

  9. Fungal leaching of titanium from rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Munoz, E. F.

    1971-01-01

    Penicillium simplicissimum is found to solubilize up to 80% of the titanium in granitic rocks but less than 2% of the titanium in basaltic rocks. These findings were made in investigating the interactions of microorganisms with rocks and minerals of the biosphere in studies aimed at developing experiments for the detection of extraterrestrial life.

  10. High-niobium titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.C.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes an aged niobium modified titanium aluminum alloy, the alloy consisting essentially of titanium, aluminum, and niobium in the following atomic ratio: Ti{sub 48-37}Al{sub 46-49}Nb{sub 6-14}, the alloy having been prepared by ingot metallurgy.

  11. [Dental welding titanium and its clinical usage].

    PubMed

    Li, H; Xiao, M; Zhao, Y

    1998-09-01

    Due to its excellent biocompatibility, desirable chemical and mechanical properties, Titanium has been used for implant denture, RPD and FPD, where welding techniques were indispensable. This paper introduces 5 useful modern ways to weld Titanium and their clinical usage. They are: laser, plasma welding, TIG, infraned brazing and Hruska electrowelding.

  12. Spark plasma sintering synthesis of porous nanocrystalline titanium alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Nicula, R; Lüthen, F; Stir, M; Nebe, B; Burkel, E

    2007-11-01

    The reason for the extended use of titanium and its alloys as implant biomaterials stems from their lower elastic modulus, their superior biocompatibility and improved corrosion resistance compared to the more conventional stainless steel and cobalt-based alloys [Niinomi, M., Hattori, T., Niwa, S., 2004. Material characteristics and biocompatibility of low rigidity titanium alloys for biomedical applications. In: Jaszemski, M.J., Trantolo, D.J., Lewandrowski, K.U., Hasirci, V., Altobelli, D.E., Wise, D.L. (Eds.), Biomaterials in Orthopedics. Marcel Dekker Inc., New York, pp. 41-62]. Nanostructured titanium-based biomaterials with tailored porosity are important for cell-adhesion, viability, differentiation and growth. Newer technologies like foaming or low-density core processing were recently used for the surface modification of titanium alloy implant bodies to stimulate bone in-growth and improve osseointegration and cell-adhesion, which in turn play a key role in the acceptance of the implants. We here report preliminary results concerning the synthesis of mesoporous titanium alloy bodies by spark plasma sintering. Nanocrystalline cp Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-Al-V-Cr and Ti-Mn-V-Cr-Al alloy powders were prepared by high-energy wet-milling and sintered to either full-density (cp Ti, Ti-Al-V) or uniform porous (Ti-Al-V-Cr, Ti-Mn-V-Cr-Al) bulk specimens by field-assisted spark plasma sintering (FAST/SPS). Cellular interactions with the porous titanium alloy surfaces were tested with osteoblast-like human MG-63 cells. Cell morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM analysis results were correlated with the alloy chemistry and the topographic features of the surface, namely porosity and roughness.

  13. Titanium oral implants: surface characteristics, interface biology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Palmquist, Anders; Omar, Omar M; Esposito, Marco; Lausmaa, Jukka; Thomsen, Peter

    2010-10-06

    Bone-anchored titanium implants have revolutionized oral healthcare. Surface properties of oral titanium implants play decisive roles for molecular interactions, cellular response and bone regeneration. Nevertheless, the role of specific surface properties, such as chemical and phase composition and nanoscale features, for the biological in vivo performance remains to be established. Partly, this is due to limited transfer of state-of-the-art preparation techniques to complex three-dimensional geometries, analytical tools and access to minute, intact interfacial layers. As judged by the available results of a few randomized clinical trials, there is no evidence that any particular type of oral implant has superior long-term success. Important insights into the recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells, cell-cell communication at the interface and high-resolution imaging of the interface between the surface oxide and the biological host are prerequisites for the understanding of the mechanisms of osseointegration. Strategies for development of the next generation of material surface modifications for compromised tissue are likely to include time and functionally programmed properties, pharmacological modulation and incorporation of cellular components.

  14. Titanium oral implants: surface characteristics, interface biology and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Palmquist, Anders; Omar, Omar M.; Esposito, Marco; Lausmaa, Jukka; Thomsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bone-anchored titanium implants have revolutionized oral healthcare. Surface properties of oral titanium implants play decisive roles for molecular interactions, cellular response and bone regeneration. Nevertheless, the role of specific surface properties, such as chemical and phase composition and nanoscale features, for the biological in vivo performance remains to be established. Partly, this is due to limited transfer of state-of-the-art preparation techniques to complex three-dimensional geometries, analytical tools and access to minute, intact interfacial layers. As judged by the available results of a few randomized clinical trials, there is no evidence that any particular type of oral implant has superior long-term success. Important insights into the recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells, cell–cell communication at the interface and high-resolution imaging of the interface between the surface oxide and the biological host are prerequisites for the understanding of the mechanisms of osseointegration. Strategies for development of the next generation of material surface modifications for compromised tissue are likely to include time and functionally programmed properties, pharmacological modulation and incorporation of cellular components. PMID:20591849

  15. Titanium processing using selective laser sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlan, Nicole Renee

    1999-11-01

    A materials development workstation specifically designed to test high temperature metal and metal-matrix composites for direct selective laser sintering (SLS) was constructed. Using the workstation, a titanium-aluminum alloy was sintered into single layer coupons to demonstrate the feasibility of producing titanium components using direct SLS. A combination of low temperature indirect SLS and colloidal infiltration was used to create "partially-stabilized" zirconia molds for titanium casting. The base material, stabilized zirconia mixed with a copolymer, was laser sintered into the desired mold geometry. The copolymer was pyrolyzed and replaced by a zirconia precursor. The flexural strength and surface roughness of the SLS-produced casting molds were sufficient for titanium casting trials. A laser-scanned human femur was used as the basis for a mold design and technology demonstration. Titanium castings produced from SLS molds exhibited typical as-cast microstructures and an average surface roughness (Ra) of 8 mum.

  16. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-01-01

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials. PMID:28788113

  17. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-06-25

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing-microstructure-property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  18. The present status of dental titanium casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Toru; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Watanabe, Ikuya; Okuno, Osamu; Takada, Yukyo

    1998-09-01

    Experimentation in all aspects of titanium casting at universities and industries throughout the world for the last 20 years has made titanium and titanium-alloy casting nearly feasible for fabricating sound cast dental prostheses, including crowns, inlays, and partial and complete dentures. Titanium casting in dentistry has now almost reached the stage where it can seriously be considered as a new method to compete with dental casting using conventional noble and base-metal alloys. More than anything else, the strength of titanium’s appeal lies in its excellent biocompatibility, coupled with its comparatively low price and abundant supply. Research efforts to overcome some problems associated with this method, including studies on the development of new titanium alloys suitable for dental use, will continue at many research sites internationally.

  19. [After titanium, peek ?].

    PubMed

    Meningaud, J-P; Spahn, F; Donsimoni, J-M

    2012-11-01

    The PEEK-Optima(®), composite mixture of polyetheretherketon and inert materials, is used in orthopedics, spinal surgery and cranio-facial surgery. It could be used in dental implantology because of its biological and mechanical properties. The results of an experimental and finite element study made on basal implant prototypes, on basal implantology show that PEEK, contrary to titanium, has a compound structure that allows to optimize the distribution of masticatory forces around the implant. These results should be confirmed by a clinical study according to research regulation.

  20. Thermodynamic Study of Titanium Oxycarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo; Huang, Kai; Cao, Zhanmin; Zhu, Hongmin

    2012-10-01

    Titanium oxycarbide was synthesized through carbothermic reduction of TiO2 and sintering of TiO and TiC. The combustion enthalpy and specific heat capacity of oxycarbide were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The mixing enthalpy and Gibbs free energy of the reaction 0.5TiO + 0.5TiC = TiC0.5O0.5, consequently, was calculated based on the preceding measured data. The Gibbs free energy obtained was in good agreement with those results obtained by the equilibrium measurements.

  1. Titanium dioxide nanomaterials for photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Zhe; Green, Michael; Just, Michael; Li, Yang Yang; Chen, Xiaobo

    2017-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been long regarded as one of the more promising photocatalysts to remove environmental pollution and to generate hydrogen from water under sunlight irradiation via photocatalysis. TiO2 is environmentally benign and thus is considered a ‘green’ catalyst. In this review we present a short introduction to the physical and electronic properties of TiO2, its photocatalytic mechanisms, and some recent examples of various TiO2 materials used for photocatalysis; these examples include 0, 1, 2, 3D, faceted, defected, composited, and hydrogenated TiO2 materials.

  2. Weld-brazing of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spotwelding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and align the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing; it contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vacuum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  3. Weld-brazing of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spotwelding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and align the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing; it contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vacuum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  4. Characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by powder metallurgy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Kumar, M.; Chandrasekar, P.; Chandramohan, P.; Mohanraj, M.

    2012-11-15

    In this work, a detailed characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by three powder metallurgy techniques, namely, hot isostatic pressing, spark plasma sintering and vacuum sintering, was conducted. Two composites with different volume percents of titanium boride reinforcement were used for the investigation. One was titanium with 20% titanium boride, and the other was titanium with 40% titanium boride (by volume). Characterisation was performed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe micro analysis - energy dispersive spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, image analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The characterisation results confirm the completion of the titanium boride reaction. The results reveal the presence of titanium boride reinforcement in different morphologies such as needle-shaped whiskers, short agglomerated whiskers and fine plates. The paper also discusses how mechanical properties such as microhardness, elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio are influenced by the processing techniques as well as the volume fraction of the titanium boride reinforcement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-TiB composites were processed by HIP, SPS and vacuum sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The completion of Ti-TiB{sub 2} reaction was confirmed by XRD, SEM and EPMA studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hardness and elastic properties of Ti-TiB composites were discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processing techniques were compared with respect to their microstructure.

  5. [Ossiculoplasty with KURZ titanium prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D-Q; Morel, N; Dumas, G; Troussier, J; Lavieille, J-P; Schmerber, S

    2005-09-01

    Report the functional and anatomic results of ossicular reconstruction by titanium prosthesis. Retrospective chart reviews were performed for 111 patients who had undergone titanium ossicular implants between November 1998 and 2002 (61 PORP, 50 TORP). The anatomical and audiometric data were analyzed on average at 3 and 20 months. At 20 months, the improvement of air-bone-gap mean was 12.7 dB with better results at low frequencies. The global success rate was 66% (PORP 77%, TORP 52%). It decreased significantly in the open techniques. Extrusion rate was low (2/111) and the labyrinthization rate was 3.6%. Twenty patients required a surgical revision (18%). In 9 patients, the prosthesis was too short. At long-term follow-up, the gains were stable in 60 patients, improved in 32 patients and worsened in 19 patients. The success rate is higher in the group of the PORP with the closed technique. The stability of the TORP in open technique still remains problematic. In all cases, the risk of extrusion requires a large cartilage graft recovering the plate of the prosthesis. The high rate of luxation (9/111 prosthesis too short) has led us to increase slightly the length of the prosthesis (+1.22 mm mean).

  6. Titanium in Engine Valve Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. E.; Sherman, A. M.; Bapna, M. R.

    1987-03-01

    Titanium alloys offer a unique combination of high strength-to-weight ratio, good corrosion resistance and favorable high temperature mechanical properties. Still, their relatively high cost has discouraged consideration for widespread use in automotive components. Recent demands for increased fuel economy have led to the consideration of these alloys for use as valve train materials where higher costs might be offset by improvements in performance and fuel economy. Lighter weight valve train components permit the use of lower spring loads, thus reducing friction and increasing fuel economy. Camshaft friction measurements made on a typical small displacement engine indicate that a twoto-four percent increase in fuel economy can be achieved. Valve train components are, however, subject to a severe operating environment, including elevated temperatures, sliding wear and high mechanical loads. This paper discusses the details of alloy and heat treatment selection for optimizing valve performance. When properly manufactured, titanium valves have been shown to withstand very stringent durability testing, indicating the technical feasibility of this approach to fuel economy improvement.

  7. In vitro biological outcome of laser application for modification or processing of titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Hindy, Ahmed; Farahmand, Farzam; Tabatabaei, Fahimeh Sadat

    2017-07-01

    There are numerous functions for laser in modern implant dentistry including surface treatment, surface coating, and implant manufacturing. As laser application may potentially improve osseointegration of dental implants, we systematically reviewed the literature for in vitro biological responses to laser-modified or processed titanium dental implants. The literature was searched in PubMed, ISI Web, and Scopus, using keywords "titanium dental implants," "laser," "biocompatibility," and their synonyms. After screening the 136 references obtained, 28 articles met the inclusion criteria. We found that Nd:YAG laser was the most commonly used lasers in the treatment or processing of titanium dental implants. Most of the experiments used cell attachment and cell proliferation to investigate bioresponses of the implants. The most commonly used cells in these assays were osteoblast-like cells. Only one study was conducted in stem cells. These in vitro studies reported higher biocompatibility in laser-modified titanium implants. It seems that laser radiation plays a vital role in cell response to dental implants; however, it is necessary to accomplish more studies using different laser types and parameters on various cells to offer a more conclusive result.

  8. Nano-thick calcium oxide armed titanium: boosts bone cells against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huiliang; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; Jin, Guodong; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Since the use of systemic antibiotics for preventing acute biomaterial-associated infections (BAIs) may build up bacterial resistance and result in huge medical costs and unpredictable mortality, new precaution strategies are required. Here, it demonstrated that titanium armed with a nano-thick calcium oxide layer was effective on averting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in rabbits. The calcium oxide layer was constructed by, firstly, injecting of metallic calcium into titanium via a plasma immersion ion implantation process, and then transforming the outer most surface into oxide by exposing to the atmosphere. Although the calcium oxide armed titanium had a relative low reduction rate (~74%) in growth of MRSA in vitro, it could markedly promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), restore local bone integration against the challenge of MRSA, and decrease the incidence of MRSA infection with a rate of 100% (compared to the titanium control). This study demonstrated for the first time that calcium, as one of the major elements in a human body, could be engineered to avert MRSA infections, which is promising as a safe precaution of disinfection for implantable biomedical devices. PMID:26899567

  9. Nano-thick calcium oxide armed titanium: boosts bone cells against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Huiliang; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; Jin, Guodong; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-02-01

    Since the use of systemic antibiotics for preventing acute biomaterial-associated infections (BAIs) may build up bacterial resistance and result in huge medical costs and unpredictable mortality, new precaution strategies are required. Here, it demonstrated that titanium armed with a nano-thick calcium oxide layer was effective on averting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in rabbits. The calcium oxide layer was constructed by, firstly, injecting of metallic calcium into titanium via a plasma immersion ion implantation process, and then transforming the outer most surface into oxide by exposing to the atmosphere. Although the calcium oxide armed titanium had a relative low reduction rate (~74%) in growth of MRSA in vitro, it could markedly promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), restore local bone integration against the challenge of MRSA, and decrease the incidence of MRSA infection with a rate of 100% (compared to the titanium control). This study demonstrated for the first time that calcium, as one of the major elements in a human body, could be engineered to avert MRSA infections, which is promising as a safe precaution of disinfection for implantable biomedical devices.

  10. Biocompatibility of corrosion-resistant zeolite coatings for titanium alloy biomedical implants.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Rajwant S; Beving, Derek E; Zanello, Laura P; Yan, Yushan

    2009-10-01

    Titanium alloy, Ti6Al4V, is widely used in dental and orthopedic implants. Despite its excellent biocompatibility, Ti6Al4V releases toxic Al and V ions into the surrounding tissue after implantation. In addition, the elastic modulus of Ti6Al4V ( approximately 110GPa) is significantly higher than that of bone (10-40GPa), leading to a modulus mismatch and consequently implant loosening and deosteointegration. Zeolite coatings are proposed to prevent the release of the toxic ions into human tissue and enhance osteointegration by matching the mechanical properties of bone. Zeolite MFI coatings are successfully synthesized on commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V for the first time. The coating shows excellent adhesion by incorporating titanium from the substrate within the zeolite framework. Higher corrosion resistance than the bare titanium alloy is observed in 0.856M NaCl solution at pHs of 7.0 and 1.0. Zeolite coatings eliminate the release of cytotoxic Al and V ions over a 7 day period. Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells show higher adhesion and cell proliferation on the three-dimensional zeolite microstructure surface compared with a two-dimensional glass surface, indicating that the zeolite coatings are highly biocompatible.

  11. Restoring stemness.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Heiner

    2005-12-01

    This essay is focused on a specific line of research toward regenerative therapies that is based on the use of embryonic stem cells but tries to avoid cloning techniques that are the heart of current ethical debates.

  12. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    U.S. Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) addresses the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. Titanium Mesh Nasal Repair without Nasal Lining.

    PubMed

    Zenga, Joseph; Kao, Katherine; Chen, Collin; Gross, Jennifer; Hahn, Samuel; Chi, John J; Branham, Gregory H

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe outcomes for patients who underwent titanium mesh reconstruction of full-thickness nasal defects without internal lining repair. This is a retrospective cohort study. Patients with through-and-through nasal defects were identified at a single academic institution between 2008 and 2016. Nasal reconstruction was performed with either titanium mesh and external skin reconstruction without repair of the intranasal lining or traditional three-layer closure. Five patients underwent titanium mesh reconstruction and 11 underwent traditional three-layer repair. Median follow-up was 11 months (range, 2-66 months). The only significant difference between groups was older age in patients undergoing titanium reconstruction (mean, 81 vs. 63 years; difference of 18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4-32 years). Defect extent including overall size and structures removed was similar between groups (p > 0.05). Paramedian forehead flap was the most common external reconstruction in both groups (100% for titanium mesh and 73% for three-layer closure). Time under anesthesia was significantly shorter for titanium mesh reconstruction (median, 119 vs. 314 minutes; difference of 195; 95% CI, 45-237). Estimated blood loss and length of hospital stay were similar between groups (p > 0.05). Complication rates were substantial although not significantly different, 40 and 36% in titanium and three-layer reconstruction, respectively (p > 0.05). All patients with complications after titanium reconstruction had prior or postoperative radiotherapy. Titanium mesh reconstruction of through-and-through nasal defects can successfully be performed without reconstruction of the intranasal lining, significantly decreasing operative times. This reconstructive technique may not be suitable for patients who undergo radiotherapy.

  14. Titanium Layer Influence on the Strength of a Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.; Grover, Ronald O., Jr.; Bryant, Genine I.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the mechanical response of four hybrid titanium composite laminate (HTCL) systems, each prepared using a graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic polyimide as the adhesive in a unidirectional prepreg. Two of the four HTCL systems were fabricated with the titanium Ti-15-3 alloy, while the other two systems were fabricated with the titanium Timetal Beta-21S alloy. Each HTCL system consisted of either three plies or four plies of the titanium alloy. Systems with only three plies of titanium had plies measuring 10 mils thick, whereas systems consisting of four plies of titanium had plies measuring 5 mils thick. The improvement in mechanical properties achieved by comparing the uniaxial tensile results of static strength at room temperature. Results included stress-strain curves, ultimate strength, strain-to-failure, initial modulus of the HTCL's, and the description of the observed modes of failure.

  15. Biological stability and osteoconductivity in rabbit tibia of pulsed laser deposited hydroxylapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Peraire, C; Arias, J L; Bernal, D; Pou, J; León, B; Arañó, A; Roth, W

    2006-05-01

    A comparative study of the biological stability and the osteoconductivity of hydroxylapatite (HA) coatings produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and plasma spraying (PS) was conducted. Three different implant groups were used: grit-blasted titanium rods coated with HA-PLD (2-microm-thick), grit-blasted titanium rods coated with HA-PS (50-microm-thick), and uncoated. Implantation took place into the proximal tibia of 12 mature New Zealand White rabbits for 24 weeks. Samples were evaluated using descriptive histology and histomorphometry. While HA-PS implants showed considerable instability and reduction in thickness after 24 weeks, but no statistical difference to the titanium group, the HA-PLD group showed a significant higher amount of bone apposition (Scheffé test, p<0.05) than the other two groups, without signs of degradation or dissolution. Remarkably, after 6 months, the almost intact thin pulsed laser deposited coating could be observed by electron microscopy in extended areas. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Titanium 󈨠: Science and Technology. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Emergency Management Agency, 1983) 6. Fisher, R.L., ’An Evaluation of the Titanium Scrap System’, (Report, R& TD Report #689, RMI Company, Unpublished...coating or cathodic protection was applied at that time. The tubes were 60 feet long and the titanium tubes were 1" diameter and 22 BWG (0.028* wall...was retubed with titanium tubes (%" CD - 22 BWG ) in 198S. The root causes of damage and inspection techniques will be discussed later in this paper

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  18. Isothermal deformation of gamma titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Singh, J.P.; Tuval, E.; Weiss, I.

    1996-04-15

    Gamma titanium aluminide has received considerable attention in recent years from the automotive industry as a potential material for making rotating and reciprocating components to produce a quieter and more efficient engine. The objectives of this study were to identify processing routes for the manufacture of automobile valves from gamma titanium aluminide. The issues considered were microstructure and composition of the material, and processing parameters such as deformation rates, temperatures, and total deformation. This paper examines isothermal deformation of gamma titanium aluminide in order to develop a processing window for this type of material.

  19. Oxygen-Barrier Coating for Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Unnam, Jalaiah

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen-barrier coating for titanium developed to provide effective and low-cost means for protecting titanium alloys from oxygen in environment when alloys used in high-temperature mechanical or structural applications. Provides protective surface layer, which reduces extent of surface oxidation of alloy and forms barrier to diffusion of oxygen, limiting contamination of substrate alloy by oxygen. Consists of submicron layer of aluminum deposited on surface of titanium by electron-beam evaporation, with submicron layer of dioxide sputtered onto aluminum to form coat.

  20. Titanium-potassium heat pipe corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1984-07-01

    An experimental study of the susceptibility of wickless titanium/potassium heat pipes to corrosive attack has been conducted in vacuo at 800/sup 0/K for 6511h and at 900/sup 0/K for 4797h without failure or degradation. Some movement of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen was observed in the titanium container tube, but no evidence of attack could be detected in metallographic cross sections of samples taken along the length of the heat pipes. The lack of observable attack of titanium by potassium under these conditions refutes previous reports of Ti-K incompatibility.

  1. Gentamicin-Eluting Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Grown on the Ultrafine-Grained Titanium.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Sima Hashemi; Hadjizadeh, Afra

    2017-01-06

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials is the most appropriate choices for the applications as orthopedic and dental implants. In this regard, ultrafine-grained (UFG) titanium with an enhanced mechanical properties and surface energy has attracted more attention. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes grown on the titanium could enhance bone bonding, cellular response and are good reservoirs for loading drugs and antibacterial agents. This article investigates gentamicin loading into and release from the TiO2 nanotubes, grown on the UFG compared to coarse-grained (CG) titanium substrate surfaces. Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) was employed to produce the UFG structure titanium. TiO2 nanotubes were grown by the anodizing technique on both UFG and CG titanium substrate surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging confirmed TiO2 nanotube growth on the surface. The UV-vis spectroscopy analysis results show that the amount of gentamicin load-release in the anodized UFG titanium sample is higher than that of CG one which can be explained in terms of thicker TiO2 nanotube arrays layer formed on UFG sample. Moreover, the anodized UFG titanium samples released the drug in a longer time than CG (1 day for the UFG titanium vs. 3 h for the CG one). Regarding wettability analysis, anodized UFG titanium sample showed more enhanced hydrophilicity than CG counterpart. Therefore, the significantly smaller grain size of pure titanium provided by the ECAP technique coupled with appropriate subsequent anodization treatment not only offers a good combination of biocompatibility and adequate mechanical properties but also it provides a delayed release condition for gentamicin.

  2. Titanium/titanium nitride temporomandibular joint prosthesis: historical background and a six-year clinical review.

    PubMed

    Bütow, K W; Blackbeard, G A; van der Merwe, A E

    2001-08-01

    The titanium/titanium nitride temporomandibular joint (TTN-TMJ) prosthesis, for the combined replacement of both the joint and the glenoid fossa, was developed in 1992 and introduced clinically in 1994. This joint prosthesis is manufactured from pure titanium and the condylar surfaces, as well as the fossa, are coated with titanium nitride for hardening of the contact surfaces. In two different research projects, the joint were first placed in experimental animals, before they were successfully placed in human subjects. Twenty seven joint prostheses used in human subjects have been analysed for this review.

  3. Synthesis and controllable wettability of micro- and nanostructured titanium phosphate thin films formed on titanium plates.

    PubMed

    Yada, Mitsunori; Inoue, Yuko; Sakamoto, Ayako; Torikai, Toshio; Watari, Takanori

    2014-05-28

    The hydrothermal treatment of a titanium plate in a mixed aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide and aqueous phosphoric acid under different conditions results in the formation of various titanium phosphate thin films. The films have various crystal structures such as Ti2O3(H2PO4)2·2H2O, α-titanium phosphate (Ti(HPO4)2·H2O), π-titanium phosphate (Ti2O(PO4)2·H2O), or low-crystallinity titanium phosphate and different morphologies that have not been previously reported such as nanobelts, microflowers, nanosheets, nanorods, or nanoplates. The present study also suggests the mechanisms behind the formation of these thin films. The crystal structure and morphology of the titanium phosphate thin films depend strongly on the concentration of the aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution, the amount of phosphoric acid, and the reaction temperature. In particular, hydrogen peroxide plays an important role in the formation of the titanium phosphate thin films. Moreover, controllable wettability of the titanium phosphate thin films, including superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity, is reported. Superhydrophobic surfaces with controllable adhesion to water droplets are obtained on π-titanium phosphate nanorod thin films modified with alkylamine molecules. The adhesion force between a water droplet and the thin film depends on the alkyl chain length of the alkylamine and the duration of ultraviolet irradiation utilized for photocatalytic degradation.

  4. Neutron scattering and models: Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.

    1997-07-01

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental titanium were measured from 4.5 {r_arrow} 10.0 MeV in incident energy increments of {approx} 0.5 MeV. At each energy the measurements were made at forty or more scattering angles distributed between {approx} 17 and 160{degree}. Concurrently, differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured for observed excitations of 0.975 {+-} 0.034, 1.497 {+-} 0.033, 2.322 {+-} 0.058, 3.252 {+-} 0.043, 3.700 {+-} 0.093, 4.317 {+-} 0.075 and 4.795 {+-} 0.100 MeV. All of the observed inelastically-scattered neutron groups were composites of contributions from several isotopes and/or levels. The experimental results were used to develop energy-average optical, statistical and coupled-channels models.

  5. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  6. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  7. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  8. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  9. Magnesium ion implantation on a micro/nanostructured titanium surface promotes its bioactivity and osteogenic differentiation function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Wenjie; Xu, Lianyi; Pan, Hongya; Wen, Jin; Wu, Qianju; She, Wenjun; Jiao, Ting; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2014-01-01

    As one of the important ions associated with bone osseointegration, magnesium was incorporated into a micro/nanostructured titanium surface using a magnesium plasma immersion ion-implantation method. Hierarchical hybrid micro/nanostructured titanium surfaces followed by magnesium ion implantation for 30 minutes (Mg30) and hierarchical hybrid micro/nanostructured titanium surfaces followed by magnesium ion implantation for 60 minutes (Mg60) were used as test groups. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and amount of magnesium ions released were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, field-emission transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMMSCs) were used to evaluate cell responses, including proliferation, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation on the surface of the material or in their medium extraction. Greater increases in the spreading and proliferation ability of rBMMSCs were observed on the surfaces of magnesium-implanted micro/nanostructures compared with the control plates. Furthermore, the osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) genes were upregulated on both surfaces and in their medium extractions. The enhanced cell responses were correlated with increasing concentrations of magnesium ions, indicating that the osteoblastic differentiation of rBMMSCs was stimulated through the magnesium ion function. The magnesium ion-implanted micro/nanostructured titanium surfaces could enhance the proliferation, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs, suggesting they have potential application in improving bone-titanium integration.

  10. Magnesium ion implantation on a micro/nanostructured titanium surface promotes its bioactivity and osteogenic differentiation function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Wenjie; Xu, Lianyi; Pan, Hongya; Wen, Jin; Wu, Qianju; She, Wenjun; Jiao, Ting; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2014-01-01

    As one of the important ions associated with bone osseointegration, magnesium was incorporated into a micro/nanostructured titanium surface using a magnesium plasma immersion ion-implantation method. Hierarchical hybrid micro/nanostructured titanium surfaces followed by magnesium ion implantation for 30 minutes (Mg30) and hierarchical hybrid micro/nanostructured titanium surfaces followed by magnesium ion implantation for 60 minutes (Mg60) were used as test groups. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and amount of magnesium ions released were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, field-emission transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMMSCs) were used to evaluate cell responses, including proliferation, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation on the surface of the material or in their medium extraction. Greater increases in the spreading and proliferation ability of rBMMSCs were observed on the surfaces of magnesium-implanted micro/nanostructures compared with the control plates. Furthermore, the osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) genes were upregulated on both surfaces and in their medium extractions. The enhanced cell responses were correlated with increasing concentrations of magnesium ions, indicating that the osteoblastic differentiation of rBMMSCs was stimulated through the magnesium ion function. The magnesium ion-implanted micro/nanostructured titanium surfaces could enhance the proliferation, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs, suggesting they have potential application in improving bone-titanium integration. PMID:24940056

  11. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts...

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. C.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study (1) the basic electrochemical behavior of titanium in acid chloride solutions and (2) the response of the metal to dynamic straining in the same evironment. The aim of this group of experiments was to simulate, as nearly as possible, the actual conditions which exist at the tip of a crack. One of the foremost theories proposed to explain the propagation of stress corrosion cracks is a hydrogen embrittlement theory involving the precipitation of embrittling titanium hydrides inside the metal near the crack tip. An initial survey of the basic electrochemical literature indicated that surface hydrides play a critical role in the electrochemistry of titanium in acid solutions. A comprehensive analysis of the effect of surface films, particularly hydrides, on the electrochemical behavior of titanium in these solution is presented.

  13. Investigation of Conditions of Titanium Carbonization - IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerson, G. A.; Lipkes, Y. M.

    1949-01-01

    In a previous paper, results are presented of accurate investigations of the processes of titanium carbonization and the succeeding titanium carbide decarbonization as related to the phenomenon of the graphitization of soot by heating at a constant temperature in atmospheres of pure hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These tests showed that the processes of titanium carbonization-decarbonization in an atmosphere of pure gases without nitrogen proceed in the same direction as the analogous processes under the conditions of the production furnace. In this case, however, the presence of admixtures of nitrogen changes the quantitative results of the decarbonization process. Thermodynamic computations confirming the results of previous tests conducted at atmospheric pressure and additional tests of titanium carbonization at lowered pressures are presented herein.

  14. Copper/nickel eutectic brazing of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutchera, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Technique joins titanium or one of its alloys to materials, such as iron, nickel or cobalt base material, or to refractory metals. To ensure formation of a satisfactory bond, the temperature, time, environment and pressure must be controlled.

  15. Degreasing of titanium to minimize stress corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, S. R.

    1967-01-01

    Stress corrosion of titanium and its alloys at elevated temperatures is minimized by replacing trichloroethylene with methanol or methyl ethyl ketone as a degreasing agent. Wearing cotton gloves reduces stress corrosion from perspiration before the metal components are processed.

  16. Determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Tetzlaff, J. E.

    1970-01-01

    Quantitative determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride involves dissolution of TiN in 10M hydrofluoric acid containing an oxidant. Released nitrogen is determined as ammonia. Best oxidizers are ferric chloride, potassium iodate, and potassium dichromate.

  17. Nanostructured titanate with different metal ions on the surface of metallic titanium: a facile approach for regulation of rBMSCs fate on titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Ren, Na; Li, Jianhua; Qiu, Jichuan; Sang, Yuanhua; Jiang, Huaidong; Boughton, Robert I; Huang, Ling; Huang, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2014-08-13

    Titanium (Ti) is widely used for load-bearing bio-implants, however, it is bio-inert and exhibits poor osteo-inductive properties. Calcium and magnesium ions are considered to be involved in bone metabolism and play a physiological role in the angiogenesis, growth, and mineralization of bone tissue. In this study, a facile synthesis approach to the in situ construction of a nanostructure enriched with Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) on the surface of titanium foil is proposed by inserting Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) into the interlayers of sodium titanate nanostructures through an ion-substitution process. The characteriz 0.67, and 0.73 nm ation results validate that cations can be inserted into the interlayer regions of the layered nanostructure without any obvious change of morphology. The cation content is positively correlated to the concentration of the solutions employed. The biological assessments indicate that the type and the amount of cations in the titanate nanostructure can alter the bioactivity of titanium implants. Compared with a Na(+) filled titanate nanostructure, the incorporation of divalent ions (Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) ) can effectively enhance protein adsorption, and thus also enhance the adhesion and differentiation ability of rat bone-marrow stem cells (rBMSCs). The Mg(2+) /Ca(2+) -titanate nanostructure is a promising implantable material that will be widely applicable in artificial bones, joints, and dental implants. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Serum titanium levels in individuals undergoing intramedullary femoral nailing with a titanium implant.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Sean; Morgan, Steven J; Grosskreuz, Ruth M; Williams, Allison E; Smith, Wade R

    2008-02-01

    Many patients request nail extraction or question the long-term effects of hardware retention. Systemic titanium degradation products may influence the timing of such decisions. The orthopedic literature provides no data regarding systemic titanium in patients undergoing intramedullary nail fixation with titanium implants. The purpose of this study was to determine the systemic level of serum titanium in patients who had undergone femoral nailing. Patients who underwent antegrade locked femoral nailing utilizing a reamed technique with a titanium implant were eligible to participate. Eight patients were recruited for each of four time points: 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year. Blood samples were collected from each subject. Serum titanium levels were analyzed through inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ELAN DRC II, Perkin Elmer, SCIEX, Inc, Shelton, CT). Test sensitivity was 0.2 microg/L. Normal serum titanium levels are <150 microg/L. Thirty-two patients were enrolled. The study group included 10 women and 22 men with average age of 32 (range 19-63) years. The most common fracture pattern was 32-A3 (n = 12), followed by 32-B2 (n = 9). No patients showed an elevated serum titanium level. Mean titanium levels were 49.38, 58.25, 49.38, and 50.63 microg/L at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months cohorts, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found (p = 0.207). Standard intramedullary nail fixation of femur fractures did not result in elevated levels of serum titanium in the first year after surgery. Differences in serum titanium did not differ significantly across time since implantation.

  19. Initial cytotoxicity of novel titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Koike, M; Lockwood, P E; Wataha, J C; Okabe, T

    2007-11-01

    We assessed the biological response to several novel titanium alloys that have promising physical properties for biomedical applications. Four commercial titanium alloys [Super-TIX(R) 800, Super-TIX(R) 51AF, TIMETAL(R) 21SRx, and Ti-6Al-4V (ASTM grade 5)] and three experimental titanium alloys [Ti-13Cr-3Cu, Ti-1.5Si and Ti-1.5Si-5Cu] were tested. Specimens (n = 6; 5.0 x 5.0 x 3.0 mm(3)) were cast in a centrifugal casting machine using a MgO-based investment and polished to 600 grit, removing 250 mum from each surface. Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti: ASTM grade 2) and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) were used as positive controls. The specimens were cleaned and disinfected, and then each cleaned specimen was placed in direct contact with Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts for 72 h. The cytotoxicity [succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity] of the extracts was assessed using the MTT method. Cytotoxicity of the metals tested was not statistically different compared to the CP Ti and Teflon controls (p > 0.05). These novel titanium alloys pose cytotoxic risks no greater than many other commonly used alloys, including commercially pure titanium. The promising short-term biocompatibility of these Ti alloys is probably due to their excellent corrosion resistance under static conditions, even in biological environments.

  20. Ten-year results after cementless THA with a sandwich-type alumina ceramic bearing.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Soo; Park, Se-Jun; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2010-11-02

    We analyzed the long-term results of a single-surgeon series of 102 cementless total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed using a sandwich-type alumina ceramic bearing. The prostheses involved a porous-coated acetabular socket, a polyethylene-alumina composite liner, a 28-mm alumina head, and a grit-blasted titanium-alloy stem. Mean patient age at the time of THA was 39 years (range, 18-66 years), and 76% of the patients were younger than 50 years. All procedures were performed with use of the same surgical technique and the same implant at a single center. Mean follow-up was 115 months (range, 84-133 months). When failure was defined as revision of either the acetabular or the femoral component for any reason, Kaplan-Meier survival probability at 10 years was 95.3% (95% confidence interval, 89.5%-100%). Mean Harris Hip Score improved from 47 points (range, 16-70 points) preoperatively to 95 points (range, 85-100 points) at final follow-up. No radiographically detectable osteolysis around the acetabular or femoral component was observed in any hip. No patient reported squeaking in the operated hip. During the follow-up period, 3 hips (3%) required revision surgery; 2 underwent acetabular revision because of a ceramic liner fracture and 1 underwent revision for early loosening of the acetabular cup. Ten-year results of cementless THA with a sandwich-type alumina ceramic bearing were encouraging, and no great increase in ceramic failure rate was observed, which contrasts with the findings of previously reported short-term follow-up studies. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Schöllchen, Maximilian; Gauer, Tobias; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants. Zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line-distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. While titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium-zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting.

  2. Effect of gas flow rate on titanium sponge reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiliang; Feng, Gaoping; Wang, Mingdong; Hong, Yanji

    2017-08-01

    This paper expounds the important application of titanium sponge adsorption in inert gas purification, the reaction mechanism of titanium with nitrogen and oxygen was introduced. Explored the relationship between the absorption capacity of sponge titanium on the active gas in air samples and the gas flow rate. The model of sponge titanium for flowing air absorption was established by data analysis. The designed experiment verified the relationship between the titanium processing capacity and the gas collecting device. Finally, the influence of the mass of the sponge titanium on the degassing capacity was studied through experiments.

  3. Oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Rouge, Carl J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites comprises an MCrAlX material. M is a metal selected from nickel, cobalt, and iron. X is an active element selected from Y, Yb, Zr, and Hf.

  4. The effect of stem surface treatment and material on pistoning of ulnar components in linked cemented elbow prostheses.

    PubMed

    Hosein, Yara K; King, Graham J W; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2013-09-01

    The ulnar component of a total elbow replacement can fail by "pistoning." Stem surface treatments have improved stability at the stem-cement interface but with varied success. This study investigated the role of surface treatment and stem substrate material on implant stability under axial loading. Sixty circular stems (diameter, 8 mm) made of cobalt chrome (n = 30) or titanium (n = 30) had different surfaces: smooth, sintered beads, and plasma spray. The surface treatment length was either 10 mm or 20 mm. Stems were potted in bone cement, allowed to cure for 24 hours, and tested in a materials testing machine under a compressive staircase loading protocol. Failure was defined as 2 mm of push-out or completion of the protocol. Two-way analyses of variance compared the effects of surface treatment and substrate material on interface strength and motion. Significant interactions were found between surface treatment and substrate material for both interface strength and motion (P < .05). For titanium, the 20-mm beaded stems had greater interface strength than all other stems (P < .05) and had less motion than the 10-mm plasma-spray and smooth stems (P < .05). For cobalt chrome, the 20-mm beaded stems showed greater interface strength (P < .05) and similar motion (P > .05) to the 20-mm plasma-spray stems (P < .05), which outperformed all other stems (P < .05). Mechanisms of catastrophic failure varied: smooth stems debonded at the stem-cement interface, beaded stems experienced debonding of the beads from the stem, and plasma-spray stems showed loss of frictional force between the surface treatment and cement. Stem surface treatment can enhance ulnar component stability but is dependent on substrate material. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrolysis of Titanium Oxide to Titanium in Molten Cryolite Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bennett Chek Kin

    Cost-effective production of titanium is becoming a challenge being tackled in the metallurgical and sustainability sector and technological advancements are required to effectively separate the metal from its oxide. The existing methods of Ti production are extremely energy intensive and slow. This proof-of-concept study investigated the feasibility of separating and capturing Ti from TiO2 through electrolysis after it has been dissolved in a cryolite bath at 1050°C. XRD and SEM/EDS results verified that TiO 2 is only partially reduced. However, addition of Al assisted in the precipitation of Ti in the form of TiAl and TiAl3. Parameters such as electrolysis time, concentration of TiO2, and electrolysis potential were explored. The experiments that were run for 4h, with TiO2 <15wt% of the total bath gave promising results as there was intermetallic formation without the excessive evaporation of cryolite.

  6. Why STEM?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The International Technology and Engineering Educators Association (ITEEA) defines STEM as a new transdisciplinary subject in schools that integrates the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics into a single course of study. There are three major problems with this definition: There is no consensus in support of the ITEEA…

  7. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Carl Wieman, Associate Director, Office of Science and Technology Policy, The White House, speaks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  8. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Woodrow Whitlow, NASA Associate Administrator, Mission Support Directorate, gives opening remarks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  9. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    J. Keith Motley, Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Boston, and Chair, APLU (Association of Public and Land-grant Universities) Commission on Access, Diversity and Excellence, speaks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  10. STEM Symposium

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-28

    Leland Melvin, Associate Administrator, Office of Education and former astronaut, gives opening remarks at the Symposium on Supporting Underrepresented Minority Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. STEM Thinking!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeve, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) is a term seen almost daily in the news. In 2009, President Obama launched the Educate to Innovate initiative to move American students from the middle to the top of the pack in science and math achievement over the next decade (The White House, n.d.). Learning about the attributes of STEM…

  12. STEM Thinking!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeve, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) is a term seen almost daily in the news. In 2009, President Obama launched the Educate to Innovate initiative to move American students from the middle to the top of the pack in science and math achievement over the next decade (The White House, n.d.). Learning about the attributes of STEM…

  13. Why STEM?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The International Technology and Engineering Educators Association (ITEEA) defines STEM as a new transdisciplinary subject in schools that integrates the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics into a single course of study. There are three major problems with this definition: There is no consensus in support of the ITEEA…

  14. Surface Engineering of Nanostructured Titanium Implants with Bioactive Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-S; Kim, Y-J; Jang, J-H; Park, J-W

    2016-05-01

    Surface nanofeatures and bioactive ion chemical modification are centrally important in current titanium (Ti) oral implants for enhancing osseointegration. However, it is unclear whether the addition of bioactive ions definitively enhances the osteogenic capacity of a nanostructured Ti implant. We systematically investigated the osteogenesis process of human multipotent adipose stem cells triggered by bioactive ions in the nanostructured Ti implant surface. Here, we report that bioactive ion surface modification (calcium [Ca] or strontium [Sr]) and resultant ion release significantly increase osteogenic activity of the nanofeatured Ti surface. We for the first time demonstrate that ion modification actively induces focal adhesion development and expression of critical adhesion–related genes (vinculin, talin, and RHOA) of human multipotent adipose stem cells, resulting in enhanced osteogenic differentiation on the nanofeatured Ti surface. It is also suggested that fibronectin adsorption may have only a weak effect on early cellular events of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) at least in the case of the nanostructured Ti implant surface incorporating Sr. Moreover, results indicate that Sr overrides the effect of Ca and other important surface factors (i.e., surface area and wettability) in the osteogenesis function of various MSCs (derived from human adipose, bone marrow, and murine bone marrow). In addition, surface engineering of nanostructured Ti implants using Sr ions is expected to exert additional beneficial effects on implant bone healing through the proper balancing of the allocation of MSCs between adipogenesis and osteogenesis. This work provides insight into the future surface design of Ti dental implants using surface bioactive ion chemistry and nanotopography.

  15. Calcium and titanium release in simulated body fluid from plasma electrolytically oxidized titanium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Matykina, E; Skeldon, P; Thompson, G E

    2010-01-01

    The release of titanium and calcium species to a simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 degrees C has been investigated for titanium treated by dc plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in three different electrolytes, namely phosphate, silicate and calcium- and phosphorus-containing. The average rate of release of titanium over a 30 day period in immersion tests, determined by solution analysis, was in the range approximately 1.5-2.0 pg cm(-2) s(-1). Calcium was released at an average rate of approximately 11 pg cm(-2) s(-1). The passive current densities, determined from potentiodynamic polarization measurements, suggested titanium losses of a similar order to those determined from immersion tests. However, the possibility of film formation does not allow for discrimination between the metal releases due to electrochemical oxidation of titanium and chemical dissolution of the coating.

  16. NON-MELT PROCESSING OF "LOW-COST", ARMSTRONG TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOY POWDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, William H; Blue, Craig A; Clive, Scorey; Ernst, Bill; McKernan, John; Kiggans, Jim; Rivard, John D; Yu, Dr. Charlie

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade, a considerable effort has been made to develop new methods for producing low cost titanium and titanium powders. The Armstrong process is a new method of producing titanium powder via reducing TiCl4 vapor in molten sodium. The process is scalable, and can be used to produce pre-alloyed powders. Non-melt processing and powder metallurgy approaches are economically viable with the commercially pure powders. In this investigation, several non-melt processing technologies, including vacuum hot pressing, extrusion, roll compaction, and forging techniques, will be evaluated using the Armstrong titanium powders. The metallurgical, chemical, and mechanical properties of the processed titanium samples will be discussed.

  17. The Equilibrium Between Titanium Ions and Titanium Metal in NaCl-KCl Equimolar Molten Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuyu; Song, Jianxun; Hu, Guojing; Zhu, Xiaobo; Hou, Jungang; Jiao, Shuqiang; Zhu, Hongmin

    2013-08-01

    The equilibrium between metallic titanium and titanium ions, 3Ti2+ ⇌ 2Ti3+ + Ti, in NaCl-KCl equimolar molten salt was reevaluated. At a fixed temperature and an initial concentration of titanium chloride, the equilibrium was achieved by adding an excess amount of sponge titanium in assistant with bubbling of argon into the molten salt. The significance of this work is that the accurate concentrations of titanium ions have been obtained based on a reliable approach for taking samples. Furthermore, the equilibrium constant {{K}}_{{C}} = (x_{{{{Ti}}^{{ 3 { + }}} }}^{{eql}} )3 /(x_{{{{Ti}}^{{ 2 { + }}} }}^{{eql}} )2 was calculated through the best-fitting method under the consideration of the TiOCl dissolution. Indeed, the final results have disclosed that the stable value of KC could be achieved based on all modifications.

  18. Development and Evaluation of Titanium Spacesuit Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Richard; Battisti, Brian; Ytuarte, Raymond, Jr.; Schultz, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z-series of spacesuits, designed with the intent of meeting a wide variety of exploration mission objectives, including human exploration of the Martian surface. Incorporating titanium bearings into the Z-series space suit architecture allows us to reduce mass by an estimated 23 lbs per suit system compared to the previously used stainless steel bearing race designs, without compromising suit functionality. There are two obstacles to overcome when using titanium for a bearing race- 1) titanium is flammable when exposed to the oxygen wetted environment inside the space suit and 2) titanium's poor wear properties are often challenging to overcome in tribology applications. In order to evaluate the ignitability of a titanium space suit bearing, a series of tests were conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) that introduced the bearings to an extreme test profile, with multiple failures imbedded into the test bearings. The testing showed no signs of ignition in the most extreme test cases; however, substantial wear of the bearing races was observed. In order to design a bearing that can last an entire exploration mission (approx. 3 years), design parameters for maximum contact stress need to be identified. To identify these design parameters, bearing test rigs were developed that allow for the quick evaluation of various bearing ball loads, ball diameters, lubricants, and surface treatments. This test data will allow designers to minimize the titanium bearing mass for a specific material and lubricant combination and design around a cycle life requirement for an exploration mission. This paper reviews the current research and testing that has been performed on titanium bearing races to evaluate the use of such materials in an enriched oxygen environment and to optimize the bearing assembly mass and tribological properties to accommodate for the high bearing cycle life for an

  19. Pitfalls of femoral titanium elastic nailing.

    PubMed

    Salonen, A; Lahdes-Vasama, T; Mattila, V M; Välipakka, J; Pajulo, O

    2015-06-01

    Despite several potential complications of elastic intramedullary nailing, it is currently the treatment of choice for femoral diaphyseal fractures in school-aged children. This study aimed to critically evaluate the complications of titanium elastic nailing in pediatric femoral shaft fractures. This study evaluated patients with a diaphyseal femoral fracture treated with titanium elastic nailing (TEN) in Tampere University Hospital in Finland. The study group included 32 children with a mean age of 9 years during a 5-year period, from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2007. Data were collected from medical records and x-rays. Mean follow-up time was 42 months. Of 32 patients, 9 (28%) reported a postoperative complication. Complications were associated with nail prominence in five (16%) patients and instability in four (12%) patients. In patients with nail prominence, the titanium elastic nailing-nail ends were unbent and 10-35 mm outside the cortex of the distal femur. The nail prominence caused pain and delayed knee mobilization until the nail was removed after a mean time of 4 months. In patients with fracture instability, the mean titanium elastic nailing-nail/medullary canal diameter ratio was 46% and periosteal callus formation was 5.4 mm at the first control. In those with stable fractures, the values were 66% and 9.2 mm, respectively. Based on this study, two types of pitfalls in a small volume center were found. Titanium elastic nail ends were left unbent and too long. We recommend palpating the nail ends to exclude nail prominence and to verify free movement of the knee after nail cutting and bending. Fracture instability was caused by inserting titanium elastic nailing-nails that were too narrow. To avoid this complication, careful preoperative planning to select the proper-size titanium elastic nailing-nails and intraoperative testing of fracture stability under continuous fluoroscopy after the operation is advised. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2014.

  20. [Comperative study of implant surface characteristics].

    PubMed

    Katona, Bernadett; Daróczi, Lajos; Jenei, Attila; Bakó, József; Hegedus, Csaba

    2013-12-01

    The osseointegration between the implant and its' bone environment is very important. The implants shall meet the following requirements: biocompatibility, rigidity, resistance against corrosion and technical producibility. In our present study surface morphology and material characteristics of different implants (Denti Bone Level, Denti Zirconium C, Bionika CorticaL, Straumann SLA, Straumann SLA Active, Dentsply Ankylos and Biotech Kontact implant) were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The possible surface alterations caused by the manufacturing technology were also investigated. During grit-blasting the implants' surface is blasted with hard ceramic particles (titanium oxide, alumina, calcium phosphate). Properties of blasting material are critical because the osseointegration of dental implants should not be hampered. The physical and chemical features of blasting particles could importantly affect the produced surfaces of implants. Titanium surfaces with micro pits are created after immersion in mixtures of strong acids. On surfaces after dual acid-etching procedures the crosslinking between fibrin and osteogenetic cells could be enhanced therefore bone formation could be directly facilitated on the surface of the implant. Nowadays there are a number of surface modification techniques available. These can be used as a single method or in combination with each other. The effect of the two most commonly used surface modifications (acid-etching and grit-blasting) on different implants are demonstrated in our investigation.

  1. Effect of surface roughness and calcium phosphate coating on the implant/bone response.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, T; Yoshinari, M; Nemoto, K; Wolke, J G; Jansen, J A

    2000-08-01

    The influence of surface roughness and calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coating on the bone response of titanium implants was investigated. Four types of titanium implants, i.e. as-machined, grit blasted, as-machined with Ca-P sputter coating, and grit blasted with Ca-P sputter coating, were prepared. The Ca-P sputter-coating, produced by using the RF magnetron sputter technique, was rapid heat-treated with infrared radiation at 600 degrees C. These implants were inserted into the left and right femoral condyles and the left and right tibial diaphyses of the rabbits. After implantation periods of 2 and 12 weeks, the bone-implant interface was evaluated histologically and histomorphometrically. Histological evaluation revealed no new bone formation around different implant materials after 2 weeks of implantation. After 12 weeks, bone healing was almost completed. For both tibial and femoral implants, Ca-P coated implants always showed a higher amount of bone contact than either of the non-coated implants. On the other hand, surface roughness improved only the response to implants inserted into the tibial diaphysis. On the basis of these findings, we concluded that 1) deposition of a sputtered Ca-P coating on an implant has a beneficial effect on the bone response to this implant during the healing phase, and 2) besides implant surface conditions the bone response is also determined by local implant site conditions.

  2. Antibacterial efficacy of a new gentamicin-coating for cementless prostheses compared to gentamicin-loaded bone cement.

    PubMed

    Neut, Daniëlle; Dijkstra, René J B; Thompson, Jonathan I; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2011-11-01

    Cementless prostheses are increasingly popular but require alternative prophylactic measures than the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cements. Here, we determine the 24-h growth inhibition of gentamicin-releasing coatings from grit-blasted and porous-coated titanium alloys, and compare their antibacterial efficacies and gentamicin release-profiles to those of a commercially available gentamicin-loaded bone cement. Antibacterial efficacy increased with increasing doses of gentamicin in the coating and loading with 1.0 and 0.1 mg gentamicin/cm(2) on both grit-blasted and porous-coated samples yielded comparable efficacy to gentamicin-loaded bone cement. The coating had a higher burst release than bone cement, and also inhibited growth of gentamicin-resistant strains. Antibacterial efficacy of the gentamicin coatings disappeared after 4 days, while gentamicin-loaded bone cement exhibited efficacy over at least 7 days. Shut-down after 4 days of gentamicin-release from coatings is advantageous over the low-dosage tail-release from bone cements, as it minimizing risk of inducing antibiotic-resistant strains. Both gentamicin-loaded cement discs and gentamicin-coated titanium coupons were able to kill gentamicin-sensitive and -resistant bacteria in a simulated prothesis-related interfacial gap. In conclusion, the gentamicin coating provided similar antibacterial properties to those seen by gentamicin-loaded bone cement, implying protection of a prosthesis from being colonized by peri-operatively introduced bacteria in cementless total joint arthroplasty.

  3. Osteoblast adhesion to orthopaedic implant alloys: Effects of cell adhesion molecules and diamond-like carbon coating

    SciTech Connect

    Kornu, R.; Kelly, M.A.; Smith, R.L.; Maloney, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    In total joint arthroplasty, long-term outcomes depend in part on the biocompatibility of implant alloys. This study analyzed effects of surface finish and diamond-like carbon coating on osteoblast cell adhesion to polished titanium-aluminum-vanadium and polished or grit-blasted cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. Osteoblast binding was tested in the presence and absence of the cell adhesion proteins fibronectin, laminin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin and was quantified by measurement of DNA content. Although adherence occurred in serum-free medium, maximal osteoblast binding required serum and was similar for titanium and cobalt alloys at 2 and 12 hours. With the grit-blasted cobalt alloy, cell binding was reduced 48% (p < 0.05) by 24 hours. Coating the alloys with diamond-like carbon did not alter osteoblast adhesion, whereas fibronectin pretreatment increased cell binding 2.6-fold (p < 0.05). In contrast, fibrinogen, vitronectin, and laminin did not enhance cell adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that cell adhesion proteins can modify cell binding to orthopaedic alloys. Although osteoblast binding was not affected by the presence of diamond-like carbon, this coating substance may influence other longer term processes, such as bone formation, and deserves further study. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Importance of the Roughness and Residual Stresses of Dental Implants on Fatigue and Osseointegration Behavior. In Vivo Study in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Eugenio; Monsalve-Guil, Loreto; Jimenez, Alvaro; Ortiz, Iván; Moreno-Muñoz, Jesús; Nuñez-Marquez, Enrique; Pegueroles, Marta; Pérez, Román A; Gil, Francisco Javier

    2016-12-01

    This study focuses on the fatigue behavior and bone-implant attachment for the more usual surfaces of the different CP-titanium dental implants. The implants studied were: as-received (CTR), acid etching (AE), spark-anodization (SA), and with a grit-blasted surface (GB). Residual stresses were determined by means of X-ray diffraction. The fatigue tests were carried out at 37°C on 160 dental implants, and the stress-failure (S-N) curve was determined. The fatigue tests showed that the grit-blasting process improved fatigue life. This is a consequence of the layer of compressive residual stresses that the treatment generates in titanium surfaces. Further, our aim was to assess and compare the short- and midterm bone regenerative potential and mechanical retention of the implants in bone of New Zealand rabbits. The mechanical retention after 4 and 10 weeks of implantation was evaluated with histometric and pull-out tests, respectively, as a measure of the osseointegration of the implants. The results demonstrated that the GB treatment produced microrough that accelerated bone tissue regeneration and increased mechanical retention in the bone bed at short periods of implantation in comparison with all other implants tested. The GB surface produced an improvement in mechanical long-time behavior and improved bone growth. These types of treated implants can have great potential in clinical applications, as evidenced by the outcomes of the current study.

  5. Titanium template for scaphoid reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haefeli, M; Schaefer, D J; Schumacher, R; Müller-Gerbl, M; Honigmann, P

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of a non-united scaphoid with a humpback deformity involves resection of the non-union followed by bone grafting and fixation of the fragments. Intraoperative control of the reconstruction is difficult owing to the complex three-dimensional shape of the scaphoid and the other carpal bones overlying the scaphoid on lateral radiographs. We developed a titanium template that fits exactly to the surfaces of the proximal and distal scaphoid poles to define their position relative to each other after resection of the non-union. The templates were designed on three-dimensional computed tomography reconstructions and manufactured using selective laser melting technology. Ten conserved human wrists were used to simulate the reconstruction. The achieved precision measured as the deviation of the surface of the reconstructed scaphoid from its virtual counterpart was good in five cases (maximal difference 1.5 mm), moderate in one case (maximal difference 3 mm) and inadequate in four cases (difference more than 3 mm). The main problems were attributed to the template design and can be avoided by improved pre-operative planning, as shown in a clinical case. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-10-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system.

  7. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system. PMID:27767103

  8. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  9. Engineering titanium surfaces for improving osteointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiong

    Titanium is one of the most important metallic biomedical materials in clinical applications. One of the key issues for successful application of titanium is the interaction at the interface between the titanium and the bone. The present study focuses on improving the surfaces of titanium to achieve better capability to bond with natural bone (i.e. better osteointegration). The objectives of this work include: (1) Developing microfabrication methods to produce micropatterns on titanium surfaces for promoting osteointegration; (2) Studying the calcium phosphate (Ca-P) formation on the chemical treated titanium surface and elucidating the mechanism of precipitation theoretically; and (3) Evaluating osteoconductivity of engineering titanium surfaces in vitro and in vivo. Through mask electrochemical micromachining (TMEMM), jet electrochemical micromachining (Jet-EMM) and the confined etchant layer technique (CELT) were attempted to produce micropatterns on titanium surfaces. TMEMM has a high etching rate and good reproducibility and was used to produce micro-hole arrays on Ti plates for in vivo testing. The driving force and nucleation rate of Ca-P precipitation in simulated body fluid (SBF) were analyzed based on the classical crystallization theory. SBF supersaturation with respect to HA, OCP and DCPD (dicalcium phosphate) was carefully calculated, considering all the association/dissociation reactions of related ion groups in SBF. The analysis indicates that the nucleation rate of OCP is substantially higher than that of HA, while HA is most thermodynamically stable in SBF. DCPD precipitation is thermodynamically impossible in normal SBF, unless calcium and phosphate ion concentrations of SBF increase. Osteoconduction of Ti6Al4V surfaces under various conditions, including micro-patterned, alkali-treated, micro-patterned plus alkali-treated, and surfaces without any treatment, was evaluated. TMEMM was used to fabricate micro-hole arrays on the titanium alloy

  10. Titanium for condenser and heat exchanger service

    SciTech Connect

    Mountford, J.A. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The use of titanium for heat exchanger service has increased dramatically over the past 20 years and continues to expand into many additional market applications. Its greatest use (as both tubing and tubesheets) is in utility steam condensers where tens of millions of feet are produced annually to service plants throughout the world with the harshest of cooling waters. Many additional utility in-plant heat exchangers use titanium as well, as do industries to include the Navy and marine, offshore oil, petrochemical processing, PTA, LNG, desalination, salt production, refinery, refrigeration and air conditioning, among others. With its virtual immunity to all natural and harsh waters (including seawater, brackish, fresh, chloride laden, etc.) and to MIC, titanium eliminates the corrosion problems and concerns related to cooling waters, the effects of tube cleaning operations necessary to eliminate normal debris and fouling, and stagnant or no flow conditions. This paper will review where and why titanium is used as exemplified in its corrosion immunity ranges and heat transfer comparisons, while providing updates on the development of newer available grades and more recent applications. Where thought to be used only in specific plant areas, titanium can and should be considered for providing uncompromised service to reduce maintenance and eliminate persistent corrosion problems in the many other areas where heat exchangers are required.

  11. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  12. Protective coatings preventing hydrogen desorption from titanium during ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsin, A. E.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Dovganyuk, S. S.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Shutikova, M. I.

    2017-05-01

    Effect of yttria and titanium nitride coatings on features of deuterium desorption from titanium layer is investigated. It is shown that both coatings significantly raise the temperature of maximum of deuterium thermal desorption from titanium under linear heating and prevent desorption under prolonged keeping at the operating temperature of a neutron tube target. However, under irradiation with ions of H2 + O2 plasma the barrier properties of titanium nitride appear to degrade.

  13. Surface characterization of titanium and adsorption of bovine serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, B.; Weng, J.; Yang, B.C.; Chen, J.Y.; Zhao, J.Z.; He, L.; Qi, S.K.; Zhang, X.D

    2002-09-15

    The surface oxide films on titanium were characterized and the relationship between the characterization and the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on titanium was studied. The surface oxide films on titanium were obtained by heat-treatment in different oxidizing atmospheres, such as air and water vapor. The surface roughness, energy, morphology, chemical composition and crystal structure were used to characterize the titanium surfaces. The characterization was performed using a profilometer, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), a sessile drop method, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Percentages of surface hydroxyl groups were determined by XPS analysis for the titanium plates and the densities were measured by a chemical method for titanium powders. After heat-treatment, the titanium surfaces were uniformly roughened and the surface titanium oxide was predominantly rutile TiO{sub 2}. The crystal planes in the rutile films were preferentially orientated in the (110) plane with the highest density of titanium ions. Heat-treatment increased the surface energy and the amount of surface hydroxyl groups on the titanium. The different oxidizing atmospheres resulted in different percentages of oxygen species in the TiO{sub 2}, in the physisorbed water and acidic hydroxyl groups and in the basic hydroxyl groups on the titanium surfaces. The analysis for the adsorption of BSA on titanium confirmed that the surface characterization of titanium has a strong effect on the bioactivity of titanium. The BSA chemically adsorbed onto the titanium surfaces. The adsorption of BSA on the titanium surfaces was positively related with the amounts of their surface hydroxyl groups, including basic hydroxyl groups and acidic hydroxyl groups, and the values of the polar component of the total surface energy.

  14. [Follow-up examinations after removal of titanium plates coated with anodic titanium oxide ceramic].

    PubMed

    Velich, Norbert; Németh, Zsolt; Barabás, József; Szabó, György

    2002-04-01

    Transformation of the titanium metal surface with titanium oxides produced in various ways belongs among the most up-to-date procedures. The authors as pioneers in this field (e.g. Nobel Biocare TiUnite surface), have been utilizing for more than 15 years dental root implants and fixing elements (for mandibular osteosynthesis) coated with titanium oxide ceramics, produced by anodic oxidation and thermal treatment. The aim of this work was to assess the extent to which a titanium oxide ceramic coating influences the fate of plates applied for osteosynthesis within the human body. During a 5-year period (1995-1999), 108 of 1396 titanium oxide ceramic plates had to be removed for various reasons: loosening of the plate [47], osteomyelitis [25], a palpable swelling and tenderness [21] at the request of the patient for psychological reasons (13) or breaking of the plate [2]. When these 108 plates were removed, it was not possible to detect metallosis in even a single case; nor was there any tissue damage that could be attributed to the surface of the plates, whereas the literature data indicate that such damage is relatively frequent in the environment of traditional titanium fixing elements. The present investigation confirms the favourable properties of the titanium oxide ceramic surface.

  15. Removal of titanium plates coated with anodic titanium oxide ceramic: retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Velich, Norbert; Németh, Zsolt; Suba, Csongor; Szabó, György

    2002-09-01

    Transformation of the surface of metallic titanium with titanium oxides prepared in various ways is a modern procedure. For more than 15 years, the authors have been utilizing fixing elements coated with titanium oxide ceramics, prepared by anodic oxidation and thermal treatment, for purposes of jawbone osteosynthesis. The aim of the authors' work was to assess the extent to which the titanium oxide ceramic coating influences the fate of the plates used for osteosynthesis within the human organism, in regard to the possible need for their removal. During a 5-year period, 108 of 1,396 plates coated with anodic titanium oxide had to be removed for various reasons: plate exposure (47), osteomyelitis (25), palpable swelling and tenderness (21), patient request for psychological reasons (13), or fracture of the plate (2). In none of these 108 cases was metallosis observed, which otherwise is reported relatively frequently in the vicinity of traditional titanium fixing elements, nor was any tissue damage connected with the surface of the plates. The results indicate the favorable properties of the titanium oxide ceramic surface.

  16. The influence of stem design on critical squeaking friction with ceramic bearings.

    PubMed

    Fan, Na; Morlock, Michael M; Bishop, Nicholas E; Huber, Gerd; Hoffmann, Norbert; Ciavarella, Michele; Chen, Guang X; Hothan, Arne; Witt, Florian

    2013-10-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic hip joints have been reported to squeak, a phenomenon that may occur in compromised lubrication conditions. One factor related to the incidence of in vivo squeaking is the stem design. However, it has not yet been possible to relate stem design to squeaking in deteriorating lubrication conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine critical friction factors for different stem designs. A hip simulator was used to measure the friction factor of a ceramic bearing with different stem designs and gradually deteriorating lubrication represented by evaporation of a volatile fluid lubricant. The critical squeaking friction factor was measured at the onset of squeaking for each stem. Critical friction was higher for the long cobalt chrome (0.32 ± 0.02) and short titanium stems (0.39 ± 0.02) in comparison with a long titanium stem (0.29 ± 0.02). The onset of squeaking occurred at a friction factor lower than that measured for dry conditions, in which squeaking is usually investigated experimentally. The results suggest that shorter or heavier stems might limit the possibility of squeaking as lubrication deteriorates. The method developed can be used to investigate the influence of design parameters on squeaking probability. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lithium potassium titanium oxide (PMN P-02...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lithium potassium titanium oxide (PMN P-02...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10553 - Potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potassium titanium oxide. 721.10553... Substances § 721.10553 Potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as potassium titanium oxide (PMN P-06-149; CAS No. 12673-69...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lithium potassium titanium oxide (PMN P-02...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lithium potassium titanium oxide (PMN P-02...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10553 - Potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potassium titanium oxide. 721.10553... Substances § 721.10553 Potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as potassium titanium oxide (PMN P-06-149; CAS No. 12673-69...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lithium potassium titanium oxide (PMN P-02...

  4. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    DOEpatents

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  5. Titanium-nitrogen reaction investigated for application to gettering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arntzen, J. D.; Coleman, L. F.; Kyle, M. L.; Pierce, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Titanium is one of several gettering materials available for removing nitrogen from inert gases. The reaction rate of titanium-metal sponge and nitrogen in argon-nitrogen mixtures was studied at 900 degrees C. The rate was found to depend upon the partial pressure of nitrogen in the gas phase. Mathematical relationships simulate titanium systems.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10601 - Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10601 Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... titanium zirconium oxide (PMN P-11-273; CAS No. 1227908-26-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10601 - Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10601 Lanthanum lead titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... titanium zirconium oxide (PMN P-11-273; CAS No. 1227908-26-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-11-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

  9. Biocompatible glass ceramic coatings for titanium alloys (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A.S.; Ludanova, O.V.

    1995-11-01

    Coatings from hydroxylapatite and bioglass for titanium are considered. A review of patents and scientific publications shows that there are prerequisites for creating coatings on titanium alloys that would ensure the biological compatibility of titanium on the basis of known technologies.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10602 - Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10602 Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lead niobium titanium...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10602 - Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10602 Lead niobium titanium zirconium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lead niobium titanium...

  12. Galvanic Corrosion Studies on Titanium and Zirconium Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1954-06-01

    as the arc-melted metal in oxalic acid solutions. However, corrosion rates are generally higher for titanium prepared from powder. Titanium is more...contact. Conclusions: 1. Uncoupled specimens of titanium are resistant to air-aerated solutions of 1 and 9 percent oxalic acid solutions but contact with

  13. New Method For Joining Stainless Steel to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    In new process, edge of stainless-steel sheet is perforated, and joined to titanium by resistance seam welding. Titanium flows into perforations, forming a strong interlocking joint. Process creates a quasi-metallurgical bond between the thin sheets of stainless steel and titanium.

  14. The effect of stem material and surface treatment on the torsional stability at the metal-cement interface of upper limb joint replacement systems.

    PubMed

    Hosein, Yara K; King, Graham J W; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2014-08-01

    Stem surface treatment and material are two design factors that may affect the onset of implant loosening. For upper limb applications, no known in vitro studies have addressed the role of these two factors on cemented implant stability. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the torsional stability of cemented titanium and cobalt chrome stems with varying surface treatments in vitro. Thirty implant stems of circular cross-section (Ø = 8mm) were machined from cobalt chrome (n = 15) and titanium (n = 15). For each type, stems were subdivided into three groups for application of clinically relevant surface treatments: smooth, sintered beads, or plasma spray. Stems were potted in bone cement, allowed 24 h to cure, and placed in a materials testing machine. Stems were tested under cyclic torsion (1-30 Nm), using a staircase loading protocol. Failure was defined as either the first rapid increase in stem rotation without resistance, or attaining a maximum torque of 30 Nm. Implant stems with non-smooth surfaces offered greater resistance to torsion (p < 0.05), with the plasma spray treatment outlasting the beaded and smooth stems (p < 0.05). Titanium offered superior interface strength (p < 0.05) but reduced resistance to motion (p < 0.05) when compared to cobalt chrome. Therefore, these design features should be considered during upper limb implant design.

  15. Titanium carbide nanocrystals in circumstellar environments.

    PubMed

    von Helden, G; Tielens, A G; van Heijnsbergen, D; Duncan, M A; Hony, S; Waters, L B; Meijer, G

    2000-04-14

    Meteorites contain micrometer-sized graphite grains with embedded titanium carbide grains. Although isotopic analysis identifies asymptotic giant branch stars as the birth sites of these grains, there is no direct observational identification of these grains in astronomical sources. We report that infrared wavelength spectra of gas-phase titanium carbide nanocrystals derived in the laboratory show a prominent feature at a wavelength of 20.1 micrometers, which compares well to a similar feature in observed spectra of postasymptotic giant branch stars. It is concluded that titanium carbide forms during a short (approximately 100 years) phase of catastrophic mass loss (>0.001 solar masses per year) in dying, low-mass stars.

  16. Process for preparing titanium nitride powder

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-06-17

    A process for making titanium nitride powder by reaction of titanium phosphates with sodium cyanide. The process of this invention may comprise mixing one or more phosphates of Ti with a cyanide salt in the absence of oxygen and heating to a temperature sufficient to cause reaction to occur. In the preferred embodiment the ratio of cyanide salt to Ti should be at least 2 which results in the major Ti-containing product being TiN rather than sodium titanium phosphate byproducts. The process is an improvement over prior processes since the byproducts are water soluble salts of sodium which can easily be removed from the preferred TiN product by washing. 2 tabs.

  17. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  18. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  19. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-12-02

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 2 figs.

  20. Structure of the welding zone between titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide for explosion welding: I. Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, V. V.; Grinberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Antonova, O. V.; Kozhevnikov, V. E.

    2011-10-01

    The structures of the interfaces and transition zones of bimetallic metal-intermetallide joints produced by explosion welding under various conditions have been studied. The welded materials were commercial-purity titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide of two alloying schemes. The specific features of the structure and substructure of the zones under study are discussed. Wave formation and formation of isolated vortex zones, as well as tracks of particles related to the transfer of particles of one metal into the other one, were observed. A possible scenario of formation of interfaces, depending on the composition of titanium aluminide and welding conditions, is proposed.

  1. Genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Yan, Jian; Li, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs, <100 nm) are increasingly being used in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to the unique properties derived from their small sizes. However, their large surface-area to mass ratio and high redox potential may negatively impact human health and the environment. TiO(2)-NPs can cause inflammation, pulmonary damage, fibrosis, and lung tumors and they are possibly carcinogenic to humans. Because cancer is a disease involving mutation, there are a large number of studies on the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs. In this article, we review the results that have been reported in the literature, with a focus on data generated from the standard genotoxicity assays. The data include genotoxicity results from the Ames test, in vitro and in vivo Comet assay, in vitro and in vivo micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchange assay, mammalian cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene assay, the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay, and the mouse phosphatidylinositol glycan, class A gene assay. Inconsistent results have been found in these assays, with both positive and negative responses being reported. The in vitro systems for assessing the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs have generated a greater number of positive results than the in vivo systems, and tests for DNA and chromosome damage have produced more positive results than the assays measuring gene mutation. Nearly all tests for measuring the mutagenicity of TiO(2)-NPs were negative. The current data indicate that the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs is mediated mainly through the generation of oxidative stress in cells.

  2. Method for the production of strongly adhesive films on titanium and titanium alloys with a metallization process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the spray-application of a strongly adhesive, thick antifriction layer on titanium and titanium alloys is proposed. The titanium/titanium alloy component to be coated is first subjected to cleaning in a pickling bath with reducing additives and sand-blasting, then coated with an intermediate layer of nickel, after which the final layer is applied. The formation of TiNi at the interface ensures strong bonding of the antifriction layer.

  3. Electrospun collagen mimicking the reconstituted extracellular matrix improves osteoblastic differentiation onto titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iafiscol, Michele; Quirici, Nadia; Foltran, Ismaela; Rimondini, Lia

    2013-07-01

    Titanium and its alloys are the current materials to manufacture oral implants because of their excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However the increasing needs of the patients to receive fast and reliable rehabilitation have forced materials scientists to modified the surface of the materials in order to increase the rate of osseointegration and minimize the times for healing. The presence of a reconstituted extracellular matrix (ECM), constituted of proteins and polysaccharides is a key factor for healing and regeneration of the tissues. The nano-fibrous feature of ECM improves cells proliferation and addresses their phenotype. Electrospinning technique is an efficient processing method to manufacture micro- and nano-sized fibrous structures mimicking the ECM. In this work we describe a method to obtain collagen coating made of nano-fibers onto titanium for oral implant manufacturing, using electrospinning. The obtained collagen coatings showed morphology, structure and chemical composition similar to that of ECM. Moreover the stem cells cultured onto titanium samples coated with electrospun collagen showed faster osteoblastic differentiation and more efficient deposition of mineralized matrix in comparison with those onto uncoated substrates. This effect was amplified using osteogenetic media.

  4. Titanium nitride thin films for minimizing multipactoring

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Kimo M.

    1979-01-01

    Applying a thin film coating to the surface of a workpiece, in particular, applying a coating of titanium nitride to a klystron window by means of a crossed-field diode sputtering array. The array is comprised of a cohesive group of numerous small hollow electrically conducting cylinders and is mounted so that the open ends of the cylinders on one side of the group are adjacent a titanium cathode plate. The workpiece is mounted so as to face the open ends of the other side of the group. A magnetic field is applied to the array so as to be coaxial with the cylinders and a potential is applied across the cylinders and the cathode plate, the cylinders as an anode being positive with respect to the cathode plate. The cylinders, the cathode plate and the workpiece are situated in an atmosphere of nitrogen which becomes ionized such as by field emission because of the electric field between the cylinders and cathode plate, thereby establishing an anode-cathode discharge that results in sputtering of the titanium plate. The sputtered titanium coats the workpiece and chemically combines with the nitrogen to form a titanium nitride coating on the workpiece. Gas pressure, gas mixtures, cathode material composition, voltages applied to the cathode and anode, the magnetic field, cathode, anode and workpiece spacing, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to inner diameter) of the anode cylinders, all may be controlled to provide consistent optimum thin film coatings of various compositions and thicknesses. Another facet of the disclosure is the coating of microwave components per se with titanium nitride to reduce multipactoring under operating conditions of the components.

  5. Titanium Isotopes Provide Clues to Lunar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2012-05-01

    The idea that the Moon formed as the result of the giant impact of a Mars-sized impactor with the still-growing Earth explains two central facts about the Earth-Moon system: its total angular momentum (Earth's spin and the Moon's orbital motion), and the sizes of the metallic cores of the Earth (large) and Moon (tiny). This gives cosmochemists some confidence in the hypothesis, but they would greatly appreciate additional compositional tests. One undisputed point is the identical abundance of the three oxygen isotopes in Earth and Moon. Junjun Zhang and colleagues at the University of Chicago (USA) and the University of Bern (Switzerland) have added another isotopic system to the cosmochemical testing tool kit, titanium isotopes. They find that the ratio of titanium-50 to titanium-47 is identical in Earth and Moon to within four parts per million. In contrast, other solar system materials, such as carbonaceous chondrites, vary by considerably more than this-- up to 150 times as much. The identical oxygen and titanium isotopic compositions in Earth and Moon are surprising in light of what we think we know about planet formation and formation of the Moon after a giant impact. The variations in oxygen and titanium isotopes among meteorite types suggest that it is unlikely that the Moon-forming giant impactor would have had the same isotopic composition as the Earth. Simulations show that the Moon ends up constructed mostly (40-75%) from the impactor materials. Thus, the Moon ought to have different isotopic composition than does Earth. The isotopes might have exchanged in the complicated, messy proto-lunar disk (as has been suggested for oxygen isotopes), making them the same. However, Zhang and colleagues suggest that this exchange is unlikely for a refractory element like titanium. Could the impact simulations be greatly overestimating the contributions from the impactor? Was the mixing of building-block materials throughout the inner solar system much less than

  6. Rapidly solidified titanium alloys by melt overflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Thomas A.; Bruce, Thomas J., Jr.; Hackman, Lloyd E.; Brasmer, Susan E.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Baeslack, William A., III

    1989-01-01

    A pilot plant scale furnace was designed and constructed for casting titanium alloy strips. The furnace combines plasma arc skull melting techniques with melt overflow rapid solidification technology. A mathematical model of the melting and casting process was developed. The furnace cast strip of a suitable length and width for use with honeycomb structures. Titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-14Al-21 Nb were successfully cast into strips. The strips were evaluated by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, chemical analysis, and cold rolling.

  7. A Closer Look at a Stronger Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Vineet; Devaraj, Arun

    2016-04-01

    An improved titanium alloy – stronger than any commercial titanium alloy currently on the market – gets its strength from the novel way atoms are arranged to form a special nanostructure. For the first time, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been able to see this alignment and then manipulate it to make it even stronger. Using powerful electron microscopes and a unique atom probe imaging approach at EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE Office of Science User Facility located at PNNL, they were able to peer deep inside the alloy’s nanostructure to see what was happening.

  8. A Closer Look at a Stronger Titanium

    ScienceCinema

    Joshi, Vineet; Devaraj, Arun

    2016-09-02

    An improved titanium alloy – stronger than any commercial titanium alloy currently on the market – gets its strength from the novel way atoms are arranged to form a special nanostructure. For the first time, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been able to see this alignment and then manipulate it to make it even stronger. Using powerful electron microscopes and a unique atom probe imaging approach at EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE Office of Science User Facility located at PNNL, they were able to peer deep inside the alloy’s nanostructure to see what was happening.

  9. Resorbable versus titanium plates for orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Fedorowicz, Z; Nasser, M; Newton, J T; Oliver, R J

    2007-04-18

    Recognition of some of the limitations of titanium plates and screws used for the fixation of bones has led to the development of plates manufactured from bioresorbable materials. Whilst resorbable plates appear to offer clinical advantages over metal plates in orthognathic surgery, concerns remain about the stability of fixation and the length of time required for their degradation and the possibility of foreign body reactions. To compare the effectiveness of bioresorbable fixation systems with titanium systems used during orthognathic surgery. We searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 26th January 2006); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2005, Issue 4); MEDLINE (without filter) (from 1966 to 26th January 2006); and EMBASE (without filter) (from 1980 to 26th January 2006). Randomised controlled trials comparing resorbable versus titanium fixation systems used for orthognathic surgery. Clinical heterogeneity between the included trials precluded pooling of data, and only a descriptive summary is presented. This review included two trials, involving 103 participants, one compared titanium with resorbable plates and screws and the other titanium with resorbable screws, both provided very limited data for the primary outcomes of this review. All patients in one trial suffered mild to moderate postoperative discomfort with no statistically significant difference between the two plating groups at different follow-up times. Mean scores of patient satisfaction were 7.43 to 8.63 (range 0 to 10) with no statistically significant difference between the two groups throughout follow up. Adverse effects reported in one study were two plate exposures in each group occurring between the third and ninth months. Plate exposures occurred mainly in the posterior maxillary region, except for one titanium plate exposure in the mandibular premolar region. Known causes of infection were associated

  10. Thermodynamics of titanium oxides in metallurgical slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpatov, A. V.; Paderin, S. N.

    2015-05-01

    The energy parameters of the model of a pseudoregular ionic solution are estimated for binary oxide phase diagrams in seven systems containing titanium oxide. The obtained parameters are compared to the available theoretical and experimental data on the thermodynamic properties of TiO2 in liquid binary systems. The model of a pseudoregular ionic solution is extended to the liquid eight-component FeO-MnO-CaO-MgO-SiO2-CrO1.5-AlO1.5-TiO2 system, as applied to metallurgical slags containing titanium oxides.

  11. Hybrid Calcium Phosphate Coatings for Titanium Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharapudchenko, E.; Ignatov, V.; Ivanov, V.; Tverdokhlebov, S.

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid multilayer coatings were obtained on titanium substrates by the combination of two methods: the micro-arc oxidation in phosphoric acid solution with the addition of calcium compounds to high supersaturated state and RF magnetron sputtering of the target made of synthetic hydroxyapatite. 16 different groups of coatings were formed on titanium substrates and in vitro studies were conducted in accordance with ISO 23317 in the solution simulating body fluid. The studies using SEM, XRD of the coatings of the samples before and after exposure to SBF were performed. The features of morphology, chemical and phase composition of the studied coatings are shown.

  12. Hydrogen partitioning and transport in titanium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Weon S.

    1993-01-01

    This report gives the final summary of the research work perfomed from March 1, 1990 to August 28, 1993. Brief descriptions of the research findings are given on the surface variation of Ti-14Al-21Nb as a function of temperature under ultrahigh vacuum conditions; titanium aluminides: surface composition effects as a function of temperature; Auger electron intensity variation in oxygen-charged silver; and segregation of sulfur on a titanium surface studied by Auger electron spectroscopy. Each description details one or more of the attached corresponding figures. Published journal documents are provided as appendices to give further detail.

  13. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  14. Titanium reinforced boron-polyimide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. A.; Clayton, K. I.

    1969-01-01

    Processing techniques for boron polyimide prepreg were developed whereby composites could be molded under vacuum bag pressure only. A post-cure cycle was developed which resulted in no loss in room temperature mechanical properties of the composite at any time during up to 16 hours at 650 F. A design utilizing laminated titanium foil was developed to achieve a smooth transition of load from the titanium attachment points into the boron-reinforced body of the structure. The box beam test article was subjected to combined bending and torsional loads while exposed to 650 F. Loads were applied incrementally until failure occurred at 83% design limit load.

  15. Direct dynamic synthesis of nanodispersed phases of titanium oxides upon sputtering of electrodischarge titanium plasma into an air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Gerasimov, D. Yu.; Nikitin, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the possibility of directly synthesizing nanodispersed crystalline phases of titanium dioxides with rutile and anatase structures in a hypervelocity jet of electroerosion plasma generated by a coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator with titanium electrodes are presented. A powder product containing nanosized polymorphic phases of titanium dioxide with a spherical shape of particles has been manufactured.

  16. Titanium hypersensitivity. A hidden threat for dental implant patients?

    PubMed

    Bilhan, Hakan; Bural, Canan; Geckili, Onur

    2013-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used for dental prosthetic devices because of their superior mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, the incidence of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy is still unknown and the discussion about its existence is ongoing. Unexplained implant failures have also forced dental clinicians to investigate the possibility of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy. This review focuses on the potential of dental implant-related titanium hypersensitivity or allergic reactions. It includes an examination of the existing scientific literature and current knowledge. Evidence-based data and studies related to titanium hypersensitivity in dental implant patients are also discussed.

  17. Effects of an AST program on US titanium story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzsimmons, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The singular importance of titanium as the primary structural material for an efficient advanced supersonic transport (AST) is outlined. The advantages of titanium over other metals are shown to apply to future subsonic aircraft as well as for supersonic designs. The cost problem of titanium is addressed and shown to be markedly reduced by the emerging technologies of superplastic forming/diffusion bonding sandwich, hot isostatic pressing of titanium powders, and isothermal forgings if demonstration programs should validate preliminary findings. The impact of a U.S. AST program on the United States titanium supply and demand picture is postulated.

  18. Modular titanium alloy neck adapter failures in hip replacement - failure mode analysis and influence of implant material

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modular neck adapters for hip arthroplasty stems allow the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intraoperatively. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such a modular device due to high loads or surface contamination inside the modular coupling. Unfortunately we have experienced such a failure of implants and now report our clinical experience with the failures in order to advance orthopaedic material research and joint replacement surgery. The failed neck adapters were implanted between August 2004 and November 2006 a total of about 5000 devices. After this period, the titanium neck adapters were replaced by adapters out of cobalt-chromium. Until the end of 2008 in total 1.4% (n = 68) of the implanted titanium alloy neck adapters failed with an average time of 2.0 years (0.7 to 4.0 years) postoperatively. All, but one, patients were male, their average age being 57.4 years (36 to 75 years) and the average weight 102.3 kg (75 to 130 kg). The failures of neck adapters were divided into 66% with small CCD of 130° and 60% with head lengths of L or larger. Assuming an average time to failure of 2.8 years, the cumulative failure rate was calculated with 2.4%. Methods A series of adapter failures of titanium alloy modular neck adapters in combination with a titanium alloy modular short hip stem was investigated. For patients having received this particular implant combination risk factors were identified which were associated with the occurence of implant failure. A Kaplan-Meier survival-failure-analysis was conducted. The retrieved implants were analysed using microscopic and chemical methods. Modes of failure were simulated in biomechanical tests. Comparative tests included modular neck adapters made of titanium alloy and cobalt chrome alloy material. Results Retrieval examinations and biomechanical simulation revealed that primary micromotions initiated fretting within the modular tapered neck connection. A continuous

  19. Modular titanium alloy neck adapter failures in hip replacement--failure mode analysis and influence of implant material.

    PubMed

    Grupp, Thomas M; Weik, Thomas; Bloemer, Wilhelm; Knaebel, Hanns-Peter

    2010-01-04

    Modular neck adapters for hip arthroplasty stems allow the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intraoperatively. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such a modular device due to high loads or surface contamination inside the modular coupling. Unfortunately we have experienced such a failure of implants and now report our clinical experience with the failures in order to advance orthopaedic material research and joint replacement surgery.The failed neck adapters were implanted between August 2004 and November 2006 a total of about 5000 devices. After this period, the titanium neck adapters were replaced by adapters out of cobalt-chromium. Until the end of 2008 in total 1.4% (n = 68) of the implanted titanium alloy neck adapters failed with an average time of 2.0 years (0.7 to 4.0 years) postoperatively. All, but one, patients were male, their average age being 57.4 years (36 to 75 years) and the average weight 102.3 kg (75 to 130 kg). The failures of neck adapters were divided into 66% with small CCD of 130 degrees and 60% with head lengths of L or larger. Assuming an average time to failure of 2.8 years, the cumulative failure rate was calculated with 2.4%. A series of adapter failures of titanium alloy modular neck adapters in combination with a titanium alloy modular short hip stem was investigated. For patients having received this particular implant combination risk factors were identified which were associated with the occurRence of implant failure. A Kaplan-Meier survival-failure-analysis was conducted. The retrieved implants were analysed using microscopic and chemical methods. Modes of failure were simulated in biomechanical tests. Comparative tests included modular neck adapters made of titanium alloy and cobalt chrome alloy material. Retrieval examinations and biomechanical simulation revealed that primary micromotions initiated fretting within the modular tapered neck connection. A continuous abrasion and

  20. Stem Cell Sciences plc.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Sebnem

    2006-09-01

    Stem Cell Sciences' core objective is to develop safe and effective stem cell-based therapies for currently incurable diseases. In order to achieve this goal, Stem Cell Sciences recognizes the need for multiple technologies and a globally integrated stem cell initiative. The key challenges for the successful application of stem cells in the clinic is the need for a reproducible supply of pure, fully characterized stem cells that have been grown in suitable conditions for use in the clinic.

  1. Titanium Metal Powder Production by the Plasma Quench Process

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Cordes; A. Donaldson

    2000-09-01

    The goals of this project included the scale-up of the titanium hydride production process to a production rate of 50 kg/hr at a purity level of 99+%. This goal was to be achieved by incrementally increasing the production capability of a series of reactor systems. This methodic approach was designed to allow Idaho Titanium Technologies to systematically address the engineering issues associated with plasma system performance, and powder collection system design and performance. With quality powder available, actual fabrication with the titanium hydride was to be pursued. Finally, with a successful titanium production system in place, the production of titanium aluminide was to be pursued by the simultaneously injection of titanium and aluminum precursors into the reactor system. Some significant accomplishments of the project are: A unique and revolutionary torch/reactor capable of withstanding temperatures up to 5000 C with high thermal efficiency has been operated. The dissociation of titanium tetrachloride into titanium powder and HC1 has been demonstrated, and a one-megawatt reactor potentially capable of producing 100 pounds per hour has been built, but not yet operated at the powder level. The removal of residual subchlorides and adsorbed HC1 and the sintering of powder to form solid bodies have been demonstrated. The production system has been operated at production rates up to 40 pounds per hour. Subsequent to the end of the project, Idaho Titanium Technologies demonstrated that titanium hydride powder can indeed be sintered into solid titanium metal at 1500 C without sintering aids.

  2. Titanium Oxide: A Bioactive Factor in Osteoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Medina, P; Sundaram, P A; Diffoot-Carlo, N

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are currently accepted as the gold standard in dental applications. Their excellent biocompatibility has been attributed to the inert titanium surface through the formation of a thin native oxide which has been correlated to the excellent corrosion resistance of this material in body fluids. Whether this titanium oxide layer is essential to the outstanding biocompatibility of titanium surfaces in orthopedic biomaterial applications is still a moot point. To study this critical aspect further, human fetal osteoblasts were cultured on thermally oxidized and microarc oxidized (MAO) surfaces and cell differentiation, a key indicator in bone tissue growth, was quantified by measuring the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) using a commercial assay kit. Cell attachment was similar on all the oxidized surfaces although ALP expression was highest on the oxidized titanium alloy surfaces. Untreated titanium alloy surfaces showed a distinctly lower degree of ALP activity. This indicates that titanium oxide clearly upregulates ALP expression in human fetal osteoblasts and may be a key bioactive factor that causes the excellent biocompatibility of titanium alloys. This result may make it imperative to incorporate titanium oxide in all hard tissue applications involving titanium and other alloys.

  3. Titanium Oxide: A Bioactive Factor in Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Medina, P.; Sundaram, P. A.; Diffoot-Carlo, N.

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are currently accepted as the gold standard in dental applications. Their excellent biocompatibility has been attributed to the inert titanium surface through the formation of a thin native oxide which has been correlated to the excellent corrosion resistance of this material in body fluids. Whether this titanium oxide layer is essential to the outstanding biocompatibility of titanium surfaces in orthopedic biomaterial applications is still a moot point. To study this critical aspect further, human fetal osteoblasts were cultured on thermally oxidized and microarc oxidized (MAO) surfaces and cell differentiation, a key indicator in bone tissue growth, was quantified by measuring the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) using a commercial assay kit. Cell attachment was similar on all the oxidized surfaces although ALP expression was highest on the oxidized titanium alloy surfaces. Untreated titanium alloy surfaces showed a distinctly lower degree of ALP activity. This indicates that titanium oxide clearly upregulates ALP expression in human fetal osteoblasts and may be a key bioactive factor that causes the excellent biocompatibility of titanium alloys. This result may make it imperative to incorporate titanium oxide in all hard tissue applications involving titanium and other alloys. PMID:26664360

  4. Effect of titanium preoxidation on wrought pure titanium to ceramic bond strength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-cui; Ye, Jian-tao; Zhang, Yi-ping; Liao, Juan-kun; Li, Bo-hua

    2013-02-01

    The creation of high bond strength between machined computer-manufactured pure titanium and porcelain remains a problem. However, machined titanium does not form the thick titanium oxide film found in cast titanium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different preoxidation treatments on the bond strength of a machined pure titanium ceramic system. Specimens of commercially pure titanium (25 × 3 × 0.5 mm) were divided equally into 6 groups (n=8), which received different preoxidation treatments (3 hour natural oxidation; 600°C, 650°C, 700°C, 750°C, and 800°C for 3 minutes). Bond strengths were evaluated by using a 3-point bend test. The results were analyzed by using 1-way ANOVA and the least significant difference test. Twelve additional specimens of commercially pure titanium (15 × 3 × 0.5 mm) were cut for interface observation and divided equally into 6 groups that received the preoxidation treatments described previously. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrum were used to observe microscopic features of the interface between Ti and ceramic. The bond strength values of the 6 groups ranged from 23.72 ±2.53 MPa to 36.99 ±3.92 MPa, with significant differences (P<.05). The specimen that received 750°C preoxidation had the highest bond strength. The main interface elements of the 6 groups were O, Si, Ti, Sn, Al, Na, and K. Ti showed a sigmoidal diffusion curve in each group, and Si showed a sigmoidal diffusion curve in most groups. Sn was enriched in each group's interface. Preoxidation under vacuum before porcelain firing can effectively improve the bond strength of machined pure titanium-porcelain systems. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure of molten titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, O. L. G.; Skinner, L. B.; Benmore, C. J.; Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.

    2014-09-01

    The x-ray structure factor of molten TiO2 has been measured for the first time, enabled by the use of aerodynamic levitation and laser beam heating, to a temperature of T = 2250(30) K. Ti-O coordination number in the melt is close to nTiO = 5.0(2), with modal Ti-O bond length rTiO = 1.881(5) Å, both values being significantly smaller than for the high temperature stable Rutile crystal structure (nTiO = 6.0, rTiO = 1.959 Å). The structural differences between melt and crystal are qualitatively similar to those for alumina, which is rationalized in terms of the similar field strengths of Ti4+ and Al3+. The diffraction data are used to generate physically and chemically reasonable structural models, which are then compared to the predictions based on various classical molecular dynamics (MD) potentials. New interatomic potentials, suitable for modelling molten TiO2, are introduced, given the inability of existing MD models to reproduce the diffraction data. These new potentials have the additional great advantage of being able to predict the density and thermal expansion of the melt, as well as solid amorphous TiO2, in agreement with published results. This is of critical importance given the strong correlation between density and structural parameters such as nTiO. The large thermal expansion of the melt is associated with weakly temperature dependent structural changes, whereby simulations show that nTiO = 5.85(2) – (3.0(1) x 10-4 )T (K, 2.75 Å cut-off). The TiO2 liquid is structurally analogous to the geophysically relevant high pressure liquid silica system at around 27 GPa. We argue that the predominance of 5-fold polyhedra in the melt implies the existence of as yet undiscovered TiO2 polymorphs, based on lowerthan-octahedral coordination numbers, which are likely to be metastable under ambient conditions. Given the industrial importance of titanium oxides, experimental and computational searches for such polymorphs are well warranted.

  6. Structure of molten titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, O. L. G.; Skinner, L. B.; Benmore, C. J.; Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.

    2014-09-01

    The x-ray structure factor of molten TiO2 has been measured, enabled by the use of aerodynamic levitation and laser beam heating, to a temperature of T=2250(30)K. The Ti-O coordination number in the melt is close to nTiO=5.0(2), with modal Ti-O bond length rTiO=1.881(5)Å, both values being significantly smaller than for the high temperature stable rutile crystal structure (nTiO=6.0,rTiO=1.959Å). The structural differences between melt and crystal are qualitatively similar to those for alumina, which is rationalized in terms of the similar field strengths of Ti4+ and Al3+. The diffraction data are used to generate physically and chemically reasonable structural models, which are then compared to the predictions based on various classical molecular dynamics (MD) potentials. Interatomic potentials, suitable for modeling molten TiO2, are introduced, given the inability of existing MD models to reproduce the diffraction data. These potentials have the additional advantage of being able to predict the density and thermal expansion of the melt, as well as solid amorphous TiO2, in agreement with published results. This is of critical importance given the strong correlation between density and structural parameters such as nTiO. The large thermal expansion of the melt is associated with weakly temperature dependent structural changes, whereby simulations show that nTiO=5.85(2)-[3.0(1)×10-4]T(K ,2.75Åcutoff). The TiO2 liquid is structurally analogous to the geophysically relevant high pressure liquid silica system at around 27 GPa. We argue that the predominance of fivefold polyhedra in the melt implies the existence of as-yet-undiscovered TiO2 polymorphs, based on lower-than-octahedral coordination numbers, which are likely to be metastable under ambient conditions. Given the industrial importance of titanium oxides, experimental and computational searches for such polymorphs are well warranted.

  7. Formation of vortices during explosion welding (titanium-orthorhombic titanium aluminide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, V. V.; Greenberg, B. A.; Antonova, O. V.; Elkina, O. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Patselov, A. M.; Sidorov, I. I.

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of cladding commercially pure titanium by a plate of orthorhombic titanium aluminide has been investigated. The bimetallic joints of orthorhombic titanium aluminide (Ti-30Al-16Nb-1Zr-1Mo) with commercially pure titanium have been obtained by explosion welding. It has been found that the weld joint investigated had a multilayer structure consisting of a zone of continuous deformation observed in both materials, a zone of titanium recrystallization, and a transition zone near the interface. Wave formation and formation of isolated vortex zones have been observed. It has been found that upon explosion welding the bonding of the surfaces is effected via melting and subsequent mixing (in the zone of vortices) and the transfer of particles of one metal into another with the formation of particle tracks (outside the zone of vortices). A possible scenario of the formation of the vortex zone in the melt with a subsequent eutectic decomposition is proposed. The structure of the vortex zones was found to consist of an ultrafine mixture of α and β grains (both phases are disordered) with the grain size changing in the limits of 50-300 nm. The regions of transition from the vortex zone to the region of continuous deformation of the aluminide and to the recrystallized zone of titanium have been investigated.

  8. Polyimide adhesives for titanium and composite bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    Approach results in synthesis of addition polyimide adhesives with exceptional high temperature capabilities that show excellent potential for bonding titanium metal, polyimide/graphite composites, and combinations of these materials. Adhesives compatible with materials used in high performance aircraft and spacecraft structures also prove highly desirable in many other applications involving similar adherents.

  9. Bioactive borate glass coatings for titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Peddi, Laxmikanth; Brow, Richard K; Brown, Roger F

    2008-09-01

    Bioactive borate glass coatings have been developed for titanium and titanium alloys. Glasses from the Na(2)O-CaO-B(2)O(3) system, modified by additions of SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), and P(2)O(5), were characterized and compositions with thermal expansion matches to titanium were identified. Infrared and X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that a hydroxyapatite surface layer forms on the borate glasses after exposure to a simulated body fluid for 2 weeks at 37 degrees C; similar layers form on 45S5 Bioglass((R)) exposed to the same conditions. Assays with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells show the borate glasses exhibit in vitro biocompatibility similar to that of the 45S5 Bioglass((R)). An enameling technique was developed to form adherent borate glass coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy, with adhesive strengths of 36 +/- 2 MPa on polished substrates. The results show these new borate glasses to be promising candidates for forming bioactive coatings on titanium substrates.

  10. Titanium nitride electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Novak, Robert F.; Schmatz, Duane J.; Hunt, Thomas K.

    1987-12-22

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a thin film of titanium nitride as an electrode deposited onto solid electrolyte. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  11. Biocorrosion study of titanium-cobalt alloys.

    PubMed

    Chern Lin, J H; Lo, S J; Ju, C P

    1995-05-01

    The present work provides experimental results of corrosion behaviour in Hank's physiological solution and some other properties of in-house fabricated titanium-cobalt alloys with cobalt ranging from 25-30% in weight. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that, in water-quenched (WQ) alloys, beta-titanium is largely retained, whereas in furnace-cooled (FC) alloys, little beta-titanium is found. Hardness of the alloys increases with increasing cobalt content, ranging from 455 VHN for WQ Ti-25 wt% Co to 525 VHN for WQ Ti-30 wt% Co. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) indicates that melting temperatures of the alloys are lower than that of pure titanium by about 600 degrees C. Potentiodynamic polarization results show that all measured break-down potentials in Hank's solution at 37 degrees C are higher than 800 mV. The breakdown potential for the FC Ti-25 Wt% Co alloy is even as high as nearly 1200 mV.

  12. Coating for prevention of titanium combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, V. G.; Funkhouser, M.; Mcdaniel, P.

    1980-01-01

    A limited number of coating options for titanium gas turbine engine components were explored with the objective of minimizing potential combustion initiation and propagation without adversely affecting component mechanical properties. Objectives were met by two of the coatings, ion-plated platinum plus electroplated copper plus electroplated nickel and ion vapor deposited aluminum.

  13. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  14. Dynamic Characterization of Shape Memory Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V. S.; Imam, M. A.

    2004-07-01

    Evaluation of high strain rate behavior of materials at pre-fracture strains is very important where the materials are considered for ballistic applications. High compression strain rate response of shape memory titanium alloy including a typical titanium alloy are determined using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The conventional SHPB technique has been routinely used for measuring high strain rate properties of high strength materials. A split Hopkinson bar consisting of 10-mm diameter Maraging 350 alloy incident, transmitter, and striker bars was used to determine the compressive response of these alloys. Attempts are underway to use this technique to extract useful information required to design a material for improving its impact resistance. Initial test results performed on these different titanium alloys show an interesting trend with change of composition. Attempts were made to compare the stress-strain data of these alloys with the published data for titanium alloys. Stress-strain data and changes resulting in the microstructure from strain rates in the regime 1800-4000/s are presented.

  15. Lactobacillus assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K.; Jha, Anal K.; Kulkarni, A. R.

    2007-05-01

    An eco-friendly lactobacillus sp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40 60 nm are found.

  16. Roll diffusion bonding of titanium alloy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J.; De Witt, T. E.; Jones, A. G.; Koeller, F.; Muser, C.

    1968-01-01

    Roll diffusion bonding technique is used for fabricating T-stiffened panel assemblies from titanium alloy. The single unit fabrication exhibits excellent strength characteristics under tensile and compressive loads. This program is applied to structures in which weight/strength ratio and integral construction are important considerations.

  17. Diffusion of hydrogen in hafnium and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katlinskii, V. M.; Kotlik, L. L.; Egorova, V. M.; Viktorova, A. M.

    1981-04-01

    We measured the coefficients of diffusion of hydrogen in the hydride phases of hafnium and titanium at 1073 1273°K on the basis of the solutions of Fick's second law for diffusion in a finite cylinder and in a sector of it.

  18. The Creation of Titanium in Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-19

    This diagram illustrates why NASA NuSTAR can see radioactivity in the remains of exploded stars for the first time. The observatory detects high-energy X-ray photons that are released by a radioactive substance called titanium-44.

  19. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR... coloring effect. (2) Authorization and compliance with this use shall not be construed as waiving any...

  20. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR... coloring effect. (2) Authorization and compliance with this use shall not be construed as waiving any...

  1. [Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: occupational exposure limits].

    PubMed

    Swidwińska-Gajewska, Anna Maria; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is produced in Poland as a high production volume chemical (HPVC). It is used mainly as a pigment for paints and coatings, plastics, paper, and also as additives to food and pharmaceuticals. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are increasingly applied in cosmetics, textiles and plastics as the ultraviolet light blocker. This contributes to a growing occupational exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles. Nanoparticles are potentially responsible for the most adverse effects of titanium dioxide. Due to the absence of separate fraction of nanoobjects and appropriate measurement methods the maximum admissible concentrations (MAC) for particles < 100 nm and nano-TiO2 cannot be established. In the world there are 2 proposals of occupational exposure levels for titanium dioxide nanoparticles: 0.3 mg/m3, proposed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and 0.6 mg/m3, proposed by experts of the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). The authors of this article, based on the available data and existing methods for hygiene standards binding in Poland, concluded that the MAC value of 0.3 mg/m3 for nanoparticles TiO2 in the workplace air can be accepted.

  2. Structural analysis of hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium.

    PubMed

    Ducheyne, P; Van Raemdonck, W; Heughebaert, J C; Heughebaert, M

    1986-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite from two sources was electrophoretically deposited onto flat titanium plate material. Depending upon the deposition conditions various changes in the structure of the ceramic were identified. A well-adhering Ti-P compound was present at the interface. Hydroxyapatite oxygenated to various degrees and tetracalcium phosphate were reproducibly formed in the coating.

  3. Stress corrosion crack inhibiting method for titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, T. R.

    1970-01-01

    Addition of oxyanions to liquid solvents in excess of the number of chloride, bromide, or iodide ions present prevents cracking of titanium-aluminum alloys under exposure to aqueous and other solvent environments. The molar concentration of oxyanion is set from 10 to 100 times higher than concentration of halide ions.

  4. UV photofunctionalization promotes nano-biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Makiko; Ikeda, Takayuki; Yamada, Masahiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Lee, Masaichi Chang-Il; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Although biomimetic apatite coating is a promising way to provide titanium with osteoconductivity, the efficiency and quality of deposition is often poor. Most titanium implants have microscale surface morphology, and an addition of nanoscale features while preserving the micromorphology may provide further biological benefit. Here, we examined the effect of ultraviolet (UV) light treatment of titanium, or photofunctionalization, on the efficacy of biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium and its biological capability. Methods and results Micro-roughed titanium disks were prepared by acid-etching with sulfuric acid. Micro-roughened disks with or without photofunctionalization (20-minute exposure to UV light) were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 or 5 days. Photofunctionalized titanium disks were superhydrophilic and did not form surface air bubbles when immersed in SBF, whereas non-photofunctionalized disks were hydrophobic and largely covered with air bubbles during immersion. An apatite-related signal was observed by X-ray diffraction on photofunctionalized titanium after 1 day of SBF immersion, which was equivalent to the one observed after 5 days of immersion of control titanium. Scanning electron microscopy revealed nodular apatite deposition in the valleys and at the inclines of micro-roughened structures without affecting the existing micro-configuration. Micro-roughened titanium and apatite-deposited titanium surfaces had similar roughness values. The attachment, spreading, settling, proliferation, and alkaline phosphate activity of bone marrow-derived osteoblasts were promoted on apatite-coated titanium with photofunctionalization. Conclusion UV-photofunctionalization of titanium enabled faster deposition of nanoscale biomimetic apatite, resulting in the improved biological capability compared to the similarly prepared apatite-deposited titanium without photofunctionalization. Photofunctionalization-assisted biomimetic apatite

  5. Rough titanium alloys regulate osteoblast production of angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L; Gittens, Rolando A; Schneider, Jennifer M; Haithcock, David A; Ullrich, Peter F; Slosar, Paul J; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2013-11-01

    Polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and titanium-aluminum-vanadium (titanium alloy) are used frequently in lumbar spine interbody fusion. Osteoblasts cultured on microstructured titanium generate an environment characterized by increased angiogenic factors and factors that inhibit osteoclast activity mediated by integrin α2β1 signaling. It is not known if this is also true of osteoblasts on titanium alloy or PEEK. The purpose of this study was to determine if osteoblasts generate an environment that supports angiogenesis and reduces osteoclastic activity when grown on smooth titanium alloy, rough titanium alloy, or PEEK. This in vitro study compared angiogenic factor production and integrin gene expression of human osteoblast-like MG63 cells cultured on PEEK or titanium-aluminum-vanadium (titanium alloy). MG63 cells were grown on PEEK, smooth titanium alloy, or rough titanium alloy. Osteogenic microenvironment was characterized by secretion of osteoprotegerin and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), which inhibit osteoclast activity and angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), and angiopoietin-1 (ANG-1). Expression of integrins, transmembrane extracellular matrix recognition proteins, was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Culture on titanium alloy stimulated osteoprotegerin, TGF-β1, VEGF-A, FGF-2, and angiopoietin-1 production, and levels were greater on rough titanium alloy than on smooth titanium alloy. All factors measured were significantly lower on PEEK than on smooth or rough titanium alloy. Culture on titanium alloy stimulated expression of messenger RNA for integrins that recognize Type I collagen in comparison with PEEK. Rough titanium alloy stimulated cells to create an osteogenic-angiogenic microenvironment. The osteogenic-angiogenic responses to titanium alloy were greater than PEEK and greater on rough titanium alloy than on smooth titanium alloy. Surface

  6. In vitro evaluation of a low-modulus mesh canine prosthetic hip stem.

    PubMed

    Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Cansizoglu, Omer; Harrysson, Ola L A; Roe, Simon C

    2010-09-01

    To compare an electron beam melting-processed (EBMP) low-modulus titanium alloy mesh stem with a commercial cobalt-chromium (CC) stem in a canine cadaver model. 9 pairs of cadaver femora. EBMP stems of 3 sizes were placed in randomly chosen sides of femora (left or right) and CC stems in opposite sides. Stem impaction distances were recorded. Five strain gauges were attached to the femoral surface to record transverse tensile (hoop) strains in the femur during axial loading. Constructs were axially loaded 4 times to 800 N and 4 times to 1,600 N in a materials testing machine. Axial stiffness of constructs and bone surface strains were compared between EBMP and CC constructs. Stems were impacted without creating femoral fissures or fractures. Stem impaction distances were larger for EBMP stems than for CC stems. Mean axial stiffness of EBMP constructs was lower than mean axial stiffness of CC constructs. Subsidence did not differ between groups. Bone strains varied among strain gauge positions and were largest at the distal aspect of the stems. At a load of 1,600 N, bones strains were higher in CC constructs than in EBMP constructs for 2 of 4 medial strain gauges. EBMP stems were successfully impacted and stable and led to a focal decrease in bone strain; this may represent an acceptable option for conventional or custom joint replacement.

  7. Biocompatibility Evaluation of Nanosecond Laser Treated Titanium Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Ryo; Mizutani, Masayoshi; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Komotori, Jun

    We developed surface modification technologies for dental implants in this study. The study contributes to shortening the time required for adhesion between alveolar bone and fixtures which consist of dental implants. A Nd:YVO4 nanosecond laser was used to modify the surfaces of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) disks, and their biocompatibility was evaluated cytocompatibility and bioactivity. First, rows of 200 µm spaced rectilinear laser treatments were performed on surfaces of CP Ti disks. Osteoblasts derived from rat mesenchymal stem cells were then cultured on the treated surfaces. Cytocompatibility on the laser treated area was evaluated by observing adhesion behavior of cells on these surfaces. The results indicated that the micro-order structure formed by the laser treatment promoted adhesion of osteoblasts and that traces of laser treatment without microstucture didn't affect the adhesion. Second, surfaces of CP Ti disks were completely covered by traces of laser treatment, which created complex microstructures of titania whose crystal structure is rutile and anatase. This phenomenon allowed the creation of hydroxyapatite on the surface of the disks in 1.5-times simulated body fluid (1.5SBF) while no hydroxyapatite was observed on conventional polished surfaces in the same conditions. This result indicates that bioactivity was enabled on CP Ti by the laser treatment. From these two results, laser treatment for CP Ti surfaces is an effective method for enhancing adhesion of osteoblasts and promoting bioactivity, which are highly appreciated properties for dental implants.

  8. Oxidative nanopatterning of titanium generates mesoporous surfaces with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Variola, Fabio; Zalzal, Sylvia Francis; Leduc, Annie; Barbeau, Jean; Nanci, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous surfaces generated by oxidative nanopatterning have the capacity to selectively regulate cell behavior, but their impact on microorganisms has not yet been explored. The main objective of this study was to test the effects of such surfaces on the adherence of two common bacteria and one yeast strain that are responsible for nosocomial infections in clinical settings and biomedical applications. In addition, because surface characteristics are known to affect bacterial adhesion, we further characterized the physicochemical properties of the mesoporous surfaces. Focused ion beam (FIB) was used to generate ultrathin sections for elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED), and high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. The adherence of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans onto titanium disks with mesoporous and polished surfaces was compared. Disks with the two surfaces side-by-side were also used for direct visual comparison. Qualitative and quantitative results from this study indicate that bacterial adhesion is significantly hindered by the mesoporous surface. In addition, we provide evidence that it alters structural parameters of C. albicans that determine its invasiveness potential, suggesting that microorganisms can sense and respond to the mesoporous surface. Our findings demonstrate the efficiency of a simple chemical oxidative treatment in generating nanotextured surfaces with antimicrobial capacity with potential applications in the implant manufacturing industry and hospital setting.

  9. Oxidative nanopatterning of titanium generates mesoporous surfaces with antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Variola, Fabio; Zalzal, Sylvia Francis; Leduc, Annie; Barbeau, Jean; Nanci, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous surfaces generated by oxidative nanopatterning have the capacity to selectively regulate cell behavior, but their impact on microorganisms has not yet been explored. The main objective of this study was to test the effects of such surfaces on the adherence of two common bacteria and one yeast strain that are responsible for nosocomial infections in clinical settings and biomedical applications. In addition, because surface characteristics are known to affect bacterial adhesion, we further characterized the physicochemical properties of the mesoporous surfaces. Focused ion beam (FIB) was used to generate ultrathin sections for elemental analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED), and high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. The adherence of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans onto titanium disks with mesoporous and polished surfaces was compared. Disks with the two surfaces side-by-side were also used for direct visual comparison. Qualitative and quantitative results from this study indicate that bacterial adhesion is significantly hindered by the mesoporous surface. In addition, we provide evidence that it alters structural parameters of C. albicans that determine its invasiveness potential, suggesting that microorganisms can sense and respond to the mesoporous surface. Our findings demonstrate the efficiency of a simple chemical oxidative treatment in generating nanotextured surfaces with antimicrobial capacity with potential applications in the implant manufacturing industry and hospital setting. PMID:24872694

  10. Interaction of carbon nanotubes coatings with titanium substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraczek-Szczypta, Aneta; Wedel-Grzenda, Alicja; Benko, Aleksandra; Grzonka, Justyna; Mizera, Jaroslaw

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) after chemical surface functionalization on the interaction with a titanium surface. Two kinds of MWCNTs differing in terms of concentration of functional groups were deposited on the Ti surface using the electrophoretic deposition method (EPD). The study has shown the detailed analysis of the physicochemical properties of this form of carbon nanomaterial and received on their base coatings using various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. The adhesion of the MWCNTs coatings to the Ti surface was determined using the shear test method, according to standard ASTM F-1044-05. These results indicated that one type of MWCNTs characterized by a higher concentration of functional groups has better adhesion to the metal surface than the second type. Analysis of the MWCNT-metal interface using Raman spectroscopy and SEM and STEM indicates the presence of phase built of MWCNT and TiO2. This phase could be a type of nanocomposite that affects the improvement of the adhesion of MWCNT to the Ti surface.

  11. Spontaneous Differentiation of Dental Pulp stem cells on Dental polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bherwani, Aneel; Suarato, Giulia; Qin, Sisi; Chang, Chung-Cheh; Akhavan, Aaron; Spiegel, Joseph; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Simon, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    Dental pulp stem cells were plated on two dentally relevant materials i.e. PMMA commonly used for denture and Titanium used for implants. In both cases, we probed for the role of surface interaction and substrate morphology. Different films of PMMA were spun cast directly onto Si wafers; PMMA fibers of different diameters were electro spun onto some of these substrates. Titanium metal was evaporated onto Si surfaces using an electron beam evaporator. In addition, on some surfaces, P4VP nanofibers were spun cast. DPSC were grown in alpha-MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 0.2mM L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, 2mm glutamine and 10mM beta-glycerol phosphate either with or without 10nM dexamethasone. After 21 days samples were examined using confocal microscopy of cells and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX). In the case of Titanium biomineralization was observed independent of dexamethasone, where the deposits were templated along the fibers. Minimal biomineralization was observed on flat Titanium and PMMA samples. Markers of osteogenesis and specific signaling pathways are being evaluated by RT-PCR, which are up regulated on each surface, to understand the fundamental manner in which surfaces interact with cell differentiation.

  12. Bioactive macroporous titanium implants highly interconnected.

    PubMed

    Caparrós, Cristina; Ortiz-Hernandez, Mónica; Molmeneu, Meritxell; Punset, Miguel; Calero, José Antonio; Aparicio, Conrado; Fernández-Fairén, Mariano; Perez, Román; Gil, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-01

    Intervertebral implants should be designed with low load requirements, high friction coefficient and low elastic modulus in order to avoid the stress shielding effect on bone. Furthermore, the presence of a highly interconnected porous structure allows stimulating bone in-growth and enhancing implant-bone fixation. The aim of this study was to obtain bioactive porous titanium implants with highly interconnected pores with a total porosity of approximately 57 %. Porous Titanium implants were produced by powder sintering route using the space holder technique with a binder phase and were then evaluated in an in vivo study. The size of the interconnection diameter between the macropores was about 210 μm in order to guarantee bone in-growth through osteblastic cell penetration. Surface roughness and mechanical properties were analyzed. Stiffness was reduced as a result of the powder sintering technique which allowed the formation of a porous network. Compression and fatigue tests exhibited suitable properties in order to guarantee a proper compromise between mechanical properties and pore interconnectivity. Bioactivity treatment effect in novel sintered porous titanium materials was studied by thermo-chemical treatments and were compared with the same material that had undergone different bioactive treatments. Bioactive thermo-chemical treatment was confirmed by the presence of sodium titanates on the surface of the implants as well as inside the porous network. Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the identified titanate structures would enhance in vivo apatite formation by promoting ion exchange for the apatite formation process. In vivo results demonstrated that the bioactive titanium achieved over 75 % tissue colonization compared to the 40 % value for the untreated titanium.

  13. Machined Titanium Heat-Pipe Wick Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Minnerly, Kenneth G.; Gernert, Nelson J.

    2009-01-01

    Wick structures fabricated by machining of titanium porous material are essential components of lightweight titanium/ water heat pipes of a type now being developed for operation at temperatures up to 530 K in high-radiation environments. In the fabrication of some prior heat pipes, wicks have been made by extruding axial grooves into aluminum unfortunately, titanium cannot be extruded. In the fabrication of some other prior heat pipes, wicks have been made by in-situ sintering of metal powders shaped by the use of forming mandrels that are subsequently removed, but in the specific application that gave rise to the present fabrication method, the required dimensions and shapes of the heat-pipe structures would make it very difficult if not impossible to remove the mandrels due to the length and the small diameter. In the present method, a wick is made from one or more sections that are fabricated separately and assembled outside the tube that constitutes the outer heat pipe wall. The starting wick material is a slab of porous titanium material. This material is machined in its original flat configuration to form axial grooves. In addition, interlocking features are machined at the mating ends of short wick sections that are to be assembled to make a full-length continuous wick structure. Once the sections have been thus assembled, the resulting full-length flat wick structure is rolled into a cylindrical shape and inserted in the heatpipe tube (see figure). This wick-structure fabrication method is not limited to titanium/water heat pipes: It could be extended to other heat pipe materials and working fluids in which the wicks could be made from materials that could be pre-formed into porous slabs.

  14. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Towner, R.R.; Gray, J.M.; Porter, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Ilmenite and rutile are currently the most important titanium-bearing minerals, although anatase may be important in the future. Both ilmenite and rutile occur in hard-rock and placer deposits, but at present all rutile production and about half of the ilmenite production are from placer deposits. Anatase occurs in laterite deposits in Brazil, which at present are largely undeveloped. World ilmenite resources in identified deposits that are economically exploitable (R1E} are sufficient for about 150 years at current production rates, and about two-thirds of these resources are in China, the Soviet Union, and Norway. World rutile R1E resources would last about 80 years at current production rates, and some 54 percent of these resources are in Australia, the United States, and Italy. Combined R1E resources of anatase (which are all in Brazil) and rutile would last 300 years at current rutile production rates. Over 95 percent of the world's mine production of titanium-bearing minerals is used to manufacture titanium dioxide pigment for paint and other products. Most of the remaining 4 to 5 percent of production, which is largely rutile, is used for making titanium metal. Australia and Canada are the largest ilmenite producers, together supplying about half the world total; South Africa, Norway, and the Soviet Union together account for another third. Australia accounts for half the total world rutile production, with Sierra Leone and South Africa together accounting for another third. Australia and Norway are the largest exporters of titanium minerals. Unless major new deposits are discovered and developed in the traditional producing countries, the pattern of world production of both ilmenite and rutile could change substantially by 2020.

  15. Porous titanium bases for osteochondral tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nover, Adam B.; Lee, Stephanie L.; Georgescu, Maria S.; Howard, Daniel R.; Saunders, Reuben A.; Yu, William T.; Klein, Robert W.; Napolitano, Anthony P.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering of osteochondral grafts may offer a cell-based alternative to native allografts, which are in short supply. Previous studies promote the fabrication of grafts consisting of a viable cell-seeded hydrogel integrated atop a porous, bone-like metal. Advantages of the manufacturing process have led to the evaluation of porous titanium as the bone-like base material. Here, porous titanium was shown to support the growth of cartilage to produce native levels of Young’s modulus, using a clinically relevant cell source. Mechanical and biochemical properties were similar or higher for the osteochondral constructs compared to chondral-only controls. Further investigation into the mechanical influence of the base on the composite material suggests that underlying pores may decrease interstitial fluid pressurization and applied strains, which may be overcome by alterations to the base structure. Future studies aim to optimize titanium-based tissue engineered osteochondral constructs to best match the structural architecture and strength of native grafts. Statement of Significance The studies described in this manuscript follow up on previous studies from our lab pertaining to the fabrication of osteochondral grafts that consist of a bone-like porous metal and a chondrocyte-seeded hydrogel. Here, tissue engineered osteochondral grafts were cultured to native stiffness using adult chondrocytes, a clinically relevant cell source, and a porous titanium base, a material currently used in clinical implants. This porous titanium is manufactured via selective laser melting, offering the advantages of precise control over shape, pore size, and orientation. Additionally, this manuscript describes the mechanical influence of the porous base, which may have applicability to porous bases derived from other materials. PMID:26320541

  16. Magnesium-titanium alloys for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Ilona

    Magnesium has been identified as a promising biodegradable implant material because it does not cause systemic toxicity and can reduce stress shielding. However, it corrodes too quickly in the body. Titanium, which is already used ubiquitously for implants, was chosen as the alloying element because of its proven biocompatibility and corrosion resistance in physiological environments. Thus, alloying magnesium with titanium is expected to improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium. Mg-Ti alloys with a titanium content ranging from 5 to 35 at.-% were successfully synthesized by mechanical alloying. Spark plasma sintering was identified as a processing route to consolidate the alloy powders made by ball-milling into bulk material without destroying the alloy structure. This is an important finding as this metastable Mg-Ti alloy can only be heated up to max. 200C° for a limited time without reaching the stable state of separated magnesium and titanium. The superior corrosion behavior of Mg 80-Ti20 alloy in a simulated physiological environment was shown through hydrogen evolution tests, where the corrosion rate was drastically reduced compared to pure magnesium and electrochemical measurements revealed an increased potential and resistance compared to pure magnesium. Cytotoxicity tests on murine pre-osteoblastic cells in vitro confirmed that supernatants made from Mg-Ti alloy were no more cytotoxic than supernatants prepared with pure magnesium. Mg and Mg-Ti alloys can also be used to make novel polymer-metal composites, e.g., with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) to avoid the polymer's detrimental pH drop during degradation and alter its degradation pattern. Thus, Mg-Ti alloys can be fabricated and consolidated while achieving improved corrosion resistance and maintaining cytocompatibility. This work opens up the possibility of using Mg-Ti alloys for fracture fixation implants and other biomedical applications. KEYWORDS: Magnesium, titanium, corrosion

  17. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility.

  18. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility. PMID:27457788

  19. Upgrading Titanium Ore Through Selective Chlorination Using Calcium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jungshin; Okabe, Toru H.

    2013-06-01

    To develop a simple and effective process for upgrading low-grade titanium ore (ilmenite, mainly FeTiO3), a new selective chlorination process based on the use of calcium chloride (CaCl2) as the chlorine source was investigated in this study. Titanium ore and a titanium ore/CaCl2 mixture were placed in two separate crucibles inside a gas-tight quartz tube that was then positioned in a horizontal furnace. In the experiments, the titanium ore in the two crucibles reacted with either HCl produced from CaCl2 or CaCl2 itself at 1100 K (827 °C), leading to the selective removal of the iron present in the titanium ore as iron chlorides [FeCl x (l,g) ( x = 2, 3)]. Various kinds of titanium ores produced in different countries were used as feedstock, and the influence of the particle size and atmosphere on the selective chlorination was investigated. Under certain conditions, titanium dioxide (TiO2) with purity of about 97 pct was directly obtained in a single step from titanium ore containing 51 pct TiO2. Thus, selective chlorination is a feasible method for producing high purity titanium dioxide from low-grade titanium ore.

  20. [Studies on application of pure titanium for cast plate].

    PubMed

    Sakai, M

    1990-06-01

    Pure titanium produced by a commercial pure titanium casting system was studied for use as a cast plate for clinical application. The mechanical properties, elemental analysis, castability, adaptability of pure titanium and adhesion to denture base resin were investigated. The interfacial zone of the pure titanium castings was composed of a layered structure obtained by reaction with phosphate bonded Al2O3/SiO2 investment material. Vicher's hardness at 100 microns thick from the surface was higher than that in the inner part by oxidation. Cast pure titanium showed tensile strength, elongation and hardness close to those of the type III or IV dental gold alloy. The castability of pure titanium was lower than that of Co-Cr alloy and pure titanium castings also had large casting defects. Adaptability between pure titanium cast plate and the working model was satisfactory when reversible hydrocolloid impression material was used with heating-bath treatment in the refractory model. The tensile and compressive shear bonding strength of pure titanium to heat-curing or self-curing resin were similar to that of the Co-Cr alloy, and surface treatment using a solution containing 2-vol% 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane produced a higher bonding strength than non-treatment, MKV treatment and 4-META treatment. These findings suggest that pure titanium castings produced by this system have suitable mechanical properties, adaptability and adhesion to denture base resin, and is available for cast plate in clinical application.

  1. Microstructure and properties of a titanium alloy-orthorhombic titanium aluminide layered composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, R. M.; Valiakhmetov, O. R.; Safiullin, R. V.; Imaev, V. M.; Imaev, R. M.

    2009-03-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of a layered composite material fabricated by solid-state bonding of its components using pressure welding are studied at room and elevated temperatures. The components are made of a high-temperature VT25U titanium alloy and an intermetallic alloy ( O alloy) based on orthorhombic titanium aluminide of the composition Ti-23Al-22.7Nb-1.1V-0.6Zr-0.2Si-0.3C (at %). The study of the microstructure and chemical composition of the composite by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis demonstrates that this method of producing a layered composite provides high-quality poreless bonding of materials of different types. The solid-state bonding zone has an intermediate chemical composition. Mechanical tests demonstrate that the room-temperature strength of the composite is comparable with that of the O alloy and is higher than that of the titanium alloy; as the fraction of the titanium alloy in the composite decreases, this strength increases. The relative elongation of the layered composite is found to be higher than that of the O alloy and lower than that of the titanium alloy. In the temperature range 500-700°C, the strength of the composite material is 25% higher than that of the titanium alloy, and its plasticity is lower than that of the titanium alloy. Our method is shown to be promising for producing layered composite materials that have high mechanical properties over a wide temperature range.

  2. Osteogenic cell sheets reinforced with photofunctionalized micro-thin titanium.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Manabu; Hirota, Makoto; Park, Wonhee; Honda, Masaki J; Tsukimura, Naoki; Isokawa, Keitaro; Ishigami, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2015-05-01

    Cell sheet technology has been used to deliver cells in single-sheet form with an intact extracellular matrix for soft tissue repair and regeneration. Here, we hypothesized that titanium-reinforced cell sheets could be constructed for bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Fifty-µm-thick titanium plates containing apertures were prepared and roughened by acid etching, some of which were photofunctionalized with 12 min of UV light treatment. Cell sheets were prepared by culturing rat calvarial periosteum-derived cells on temperature-responsive culture dishes and attached to titanium plates. Titanium-reinforced osteogenic cell sheet construction was conditional on various technical and material factors: cell sheets needed to be double-sided and sandwich the titanium plate, and the titanium plates needed to be micro thin and contain apertures to allow close apposition of the two cell sheets. Critically, titanium plates needed to be UV-photofunctionalized to ensure adherence and retention of cell sheets. Single-sided cell sheets or double-sided cell sheets on as-made titanium contracted and deformed within 4 days of incubation. Titanium-reinforced cell sheets on photofunctionalized titanium were structurally stable at least up to 14 days, developed the expected osteogenic phenotypes (ALP production and mineralization), and maintained structural integrity without functional degradation. Successful construction of titanium-reinforced osteogenic cell sheets was associated with increased cell attachment, retention, and expression of vinculin, an adhesion protein by photofunctionalization. This study identified the technical and material requirements for constructing titanium-reinforced osteogenic cell sheets. Future in vivo studies are warranted to test these titanium-reinforced cell sheets as stably transplantable, mechanically durable, and shape controllable osteogenic devices.

  3. Novel antioxidant capability of titanium induced by UV light treatment.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takeshi; Ikeda, Takayuki; Tsukimura, Naoki; Ishijima, Manabu; Minamikawa, Hajime; Sugita, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2016-11-01

    The intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a representative form of cellular oxidative stress and plays an important role in triggering adverse cellular events, such as the inflammatory reaction and delayed or compromised differentiation. Osteoblastic reaction to titanium with particular focus on ROS production remains unknown. Ultraviolet (UV) light treatment improves the physicochemical properties of titanium, specifically the induction of super hydrophilicity and removal of hydrocarbon, and eventually enhances its osteoconductivity. We hypothesized that there is a favorable regulatory change of ROS production within osteoblasts in contact with UV-treated titanium. Osteoblasts were cultured on titanium disks with or without UV-pretreatment. The intracellular production of ROS was higher on acid-etch-created rough titanium surfaces than on machine-prepared smooth ones. The ROS production was reduced by 40-50% by UV pretreatment of titanium regardless of the surface roughness. Oxidative DNA damage, as detected by 8-OHdG expression, was alleviated by 50% on UV-treated titanium surfaces. The expression of inflammatory cytokines was consistently lower in osteoblasts cultured on UV-treated titanium. ROS scavenger, glutathione, remained more without being depleted in osteoblasts on UV-treated titanium. Bio-burden test further showed that culturing osteoblasts on UV-treated titanium can significantly reduce the ROS production even with the presence of hydrogen peroxide, an oxidative stress inducer. These data suggest that the intracellular production of ROS and relevant inflammatory reaction, which unavoidably occurs in osteoblasts in contact with titanium, can be significantly reduced by UV pretreatment of titanium, implying a novel antioxidant capability of the particular titanium.

  4. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

    1981-10-27

    A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  5. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, Joseph E.; Sanderson, Stephen N.

    1984-01-01

    A valve stem and lock include a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  6. The Growth Behavior of Titanium Boride Layers in α and β Phase Fields of Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Hu, Lingyun; Shuang, Yajing; Liu, Jianhua; Lai, Yanqing; Jiang, Liangxing; Li, Jie

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the commercially pure titanium was successfully electrochemical borided in a borax-based electrolyte. The process was carried out at a constant cathodic current density of 300 mA cm-2 and at temperatures of 1123 K and 1223 K (850 °C and 950 °C) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5 hours. The growth behavior of titanium boride layers in the α phase field of titanium was compared with that in the β phase field. After boriding, the presence of both the TiB2 top layer and TiB whisker sub-layer was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope. The relationship between the thickness of boride layers and boriding time was found to have a parabolic character in both α and β phase fields of titanium. The TiB whiskers showed ultra-fast growth rate in the β phase field. Its growth rate constant was found to be as high as 3.2002 × 10-13 m2 s-1. Besides, the chemical resistance of the TiB2 layer on the surface of titanium substrate was characterized by immersion tests in molten aluminum.

  7. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A ceramic composition composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to aobut 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness.

  8. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-04-28

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness. No Drawings

  9. Nanoparticle-labeled stem cells: a novel therapeutic vehicle

    PubMed Central

    El-Sadik, Abir O; El-Ansary, Afaf; Sabry, Sherif M

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been described as a general purpose technology. It has already generated a range of inventions and innovations. Development of nanotechnology will provide clinical medicine with a range of new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities such as medical imaging, medical diagnosis, drug delivery, and cancer detection and management. Nanoparticles such as manganese, polystyrene, silica, titanium oxide, gold, silver, carbon, quantum dots, and iron oxide have received enormous attention in the creation of new types of analytical tools for biotechnology and life sciences. Labeling of stem cells with nanoparticles overcame the problems in homing and fixing stem cells to their desired site and guiding extension of stem cells to specific directions. Although the biologic effects of some nanoparticles have already been assessed, information on toxicity and possible mechanisms of various particle types remains inadequate. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the mechanisms of internalization and distribution of nanoparticles inside stem cells, as well as the influence of different types of nanoparticles on stem cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and cytotoxicity, and to assess the role of nanoparticles in tracking the fate of stem cells used in tissue regeneration. PMID:22291483

  10. Advances in gamma titanium aluminides and their manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal; Radhakrishnan, Ramachandran; Wereley, Norman M.

    2012-11-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides display attractive properties for high temperature applications. For over a decade in the 1990s, the attractive properties of titanium aluminides were outweighed by difficulties encountered in processing and machining at room temperature. But advances in manufacturing technologies, deeper understanding of titanium aluminides microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and advances in micro-alloying, has led to the production of gamma titanium aluminide sheets. An in-depth review of key advances in gamma titanium aluminides is presented, including microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and alloy development. Traditional manufacturing techniques such as ingot metallurgy and investment casting are reviewed and advances via powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques are discussed. Finally, manufacturing challenges facing gamma titanium aluminides, as well as avenues to overcome them, are discussed.

  11. Aeronautical Industry Requirements for Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bran, D. T.; Elefterie, C. F.; Ghiban, B.

    2017-06-01

    The project presents the requirements imposed for aviation components made from Titanium based alloys. A significant portion of the aircraft pylons are manufactured from Titanium alloys. Strength, weight, and reliability are the primary factors to consider in aircraft structures. These factors determine the requirements to be met by any material used to construct or repair the aircraft. Many forces and structural stresses act on an aircraft when it is flying and when it is static and this thesis describes environmental factors, conditions of external aggression, mechanical characteristics and loadings that must be satisfied simultaneously by a Ti-based alloy, compared to other classes of aviation alloys (as egg. Inconel super alloys, Aluminum alloys).For this alloy class, the requirements are regarding strength to weight ratio, reliability, corrosion resistance, thermal expansion and so on. These characteristics additionally continue to provide new opportunities for advanced manufacturing methods.

  12. Titanium implants in irradiated dog mandibles

    SciTech Connect

    Schweiger, J.W. )

    1989-08-01

    The use of osseointegrated titanium implants has been a great benefit to selected cancer patients who otherwise would not be able to wear conventional and/or maxillofacial prostheses. Cognizant of the risk of osteoradionecrosis, we used an animal model to seek experimental evidence for successful osseointegration in bone irradiated to tumoricidal levels. Five healthy male beagle dogs received 60 gray to a previously edentulated and healed area of the right hemimandible. The left hemimandible was kept as a nonirradiated control. After 9 months, titanium implants were placed and allowed an additional 5 1/2 months to osseointegrate. At that time, block specimens were obtained, radiographed, photographed, and analyzed histologically. Although statistical significance cannot be attached to the results, osseointegration was achieved in half of the irradiated specimens.

  13. Titanium nanostructural surface processing for improved biocompatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-C.; Lee, S.-Y.; Chen, C.-C.; Shyng, Y.-C.; Ou, K.-L.

    2006-10-23

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing incident x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were conducted to evaluate the effect of titanium hydride on the formation of nanoporous TiO{sub 2} on Ti during anodization. Nano-titanium-hydride was formed cathodically before anodizing and served as a sacrificial nanoprecipitate during anodization. Surface oxidation occurred and a multinanoporous structure formed after cathodic pretreatments followed by anodization treatment. The sacrificial nanoprecipitate is directly dissolved and the Ti transformed to nanoporous TiO{sub 2} by anodization. The formation of sacrificial nanoprecipitates by cathodic pretreatment and of the multinanostructure by anodization is believed to improve biocompatibility, thereby promoting osseointegration.

  14. Fatigue - corrosion of endoprosthesis titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Cornet, A; Muster, D; Jaeger, J H

    1979-01-01

    Commercial total hip prostheses often show certain metallurgical faults (porosities, coarse grains, growth dendrites, carbide networks). In order to investigate more accurately the role played by these different parameters in prostheses failure we performed a large number of systematic corrosion, fatigue and fatigue - corrosion tests on these materials and on commercial total hip prostheses. Ultimate strengthes seem to be reached for cast cobalt alloys, whereas titanium alloys, such as Ta 6 V, present very high fatigue limit under corrosion. Thus, rotative bending fatigue - corrosion tests in biological environment provide values about 50 DaN/mm2. This value, is nevertheless appreciably higher than those obtained with stellites and stainless steel. Titanium alloys, because of their mechanical performances, their weak Young's modulus (11000 DaN/mm2) and their relative lightness (4.5. g/cm3), which are associated with a good biocompatibility, seem very promising for permanent implants realisation.

  15. Possible segregation caused by centrifugal titanium casting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Kanatani, M; Nakano, S; Miyakawa, O; Kobayashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The possibility of the segregation under solidification process using a centrifugal casting machine was investigated using an electron probe microanalyzer with elemental distribution map, line analysis and quantitative analysis. When a very small quantity of platinum was added to local molten titanium during the casting process, macroscopic segregation was observed under conditions of density difference of 0.1 g/cm3 at the most, confirming that the centrifugal force of the casting machine is extremely strong. When a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was cast, however, no macroscopic segregation was observed. The centrifugal force of the casting machine examined in the present study hardly results in the body-force segregation in this titanium alloy.

  16. PEM Anchorage on Titanium Using Catechol Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Hélène; Barrere, Amélie; Schoentstein, Frédérique; Chavanne, Marie-Hélène; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Mora, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Background This study deals with the anchorage of polyelectrolyte films onto titanium surfaces via a cathecol-based linker for biomedical applications. Methodology The following study uses a molecule functionalized with a catechol and a carboxylic acid: 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid. This molecule is anchored to the TiO2 substrate via the catechol while the carboxylic acid reacts with polymers bearing amine groups. By providing a film anchorage of chemisorption type, it makes possible to deposit polyelectrolytes on the surface of titanium. Principal Findings Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements show that the different steps of grafting have been successfully performed. Conclusions This method based on catechol anchorage of polyelectrolytes open a window towards large possibilities of clinical applications. PMID:23226262

  17. Biocorrosion study of titanium-nickel alloys.

    PubMed

    Chern Lin, J H; Lo, S J; Ju, C P

    1996-02-01

    The present study provides results of the corrosion behaviour in Hank's physiological solution and some other properties of three Ti-Ni alloys with 18, 25 and 28.4 wt% Ni, respectively. Results indicate that alpha-titanium and Ti2Ni were the two major phases in all three Ti-Ni alloys. The relative amount of the Ti2Ni phase increased with additional Ni content. Hardness of the Ti-Ni alloys also increased with added nickel content, ranging from 310 to 390 VHN, similar to the hardness of enamel. Melting temperatures of the Ti-Ni alloys were all lower than that of pure titanium by least 600 degrees C. The three Ti-Ni alloys behaved almost identically when potentiodynamically polarized in Hank's solution at 37 degrees C. The critical anodic current densities of the alloys were nearly 30 microA/cm2 and the breakdown potentials were all above 1100 mV (SCE).

  18. Environmental Studies on Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Smialek, James L.; Brady, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Titanium aluminides are attractive alternatives to superalloys in moderate temperature applications (600 to 850 C) by virtue of their high strength-to-density ratio (high specific strength). These alloys are also more ductile than competing intermetallic systems. However, most Ti-based alloys tend to degrade through interstitial embrittlement and rapid oxidation during exposure to elevated temperatures. Therefore, their environmental behavior must be thoroughly investigated before they can be developed further. The goals of titanium aluminide environmental studies at the NASA Lewis Research Center are twofold: characterize the degradation mechanisms for advanced structural alloys and determine what means are available to minimize degradation. The studies to date have covered the alpha 2 (Ti3Al), orthorhombic (Ti2AlNb), and gamma (TiAl) classes of alloys.

  19. Isotope shift measurements in titanium I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azaroual, E. M.; Luc, P.; Vetter, R.

    1992-06-01

    The use of an effusive beam of titanium atoms crossed with a CW single-mode tunable dye laser has allowed the high-resolution, Doppler-free study of the isotope shifts between50Ti,48Ti and46Ti, for seven 3 d 2 4 s 2 a3 F J → 3 d 2 4 s 4 p z 5 D J , visible transitions of Ti I. The measurements show without ambiguity the existence of a non-negligible field shift. Using the values of the nuclear radii of titanium (coming from muonic X-ray measurements), it is possible to determine the respective values of the field and mass shifts.

  20. Titanium oxide antibacterial surfaces in biomedical devices.

    PubMed

    Visai, Livia; De Nardo, Luigi; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Cigada, Alberto; Imbriani, Marcello; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2011-09-01

    Titanium oxide is a heterogeneous catalyst whose efficient photoinduced activity, related to some of its allotropic forms, paved the way for its widespread technological use. Here, we offer a comparative analysis of the use of titanium oxide as coating for materials in biomedical devices. First, we introduce the photoinduced catalytic mechanisms of TiO2 and their action on biological environment and bacteria. Second, we overview the main physical and chemical technologies for structuring suitable TiO2 coatings on biomedical devices. We then present the approaches for in vitro characterization of these surfaces. Finally, we discuss the main aspects of TiO2 photoactivated antimicrobial activity on medical devices and limitations for these types of applications.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of hybrid titanium composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. L.; Progar, D. J.; Johnson, W. S.; St.clair, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the mechanical response of hybrid titanium composite laminates (HTCL) was evaluated at room and elevated temperatures. Also, the use of an elastic-plastic laminate analysis program for predicting the tensile response from constituent properties was verified. The improvement in mechanical properties achieved by the laminates was assessed by comparing the results of static strength and constant amplitude fatigue tests to those for monolithic titanium sheet. Two HTCL were fabricated with different fiber volume fractions, resin layer thicknesses, and resins. One panel was thicker and was more poorly bonded in comparison to other. Consequently, the former had a lower tensile strength, while fewer cracks grew in this panel and at a slower rate. Both panels showed an improvement in fatigue life of almost two orders of magnitude. The model predictions were also in good agreement with the experimental results for both HTCL panels.

  2. Custom-made titanium mandibular reconstruction tray.

    PubMed

    Samman, N; Luk, W K; Chow, T W; Cheung, L K; Tideman, H; Clark, R K

    1999-09-01

    Reconstruction of the mandible after ablative surgery can be achieved by using preformed trays or trays formed from models produced by computer-assisted modelling systems. The former presents difficulty in matching the required facial contour, jaw relationship and condylar position; while the latter is expensive. This paper presents a simple and inexpensive method of fabricating a custom-made titanium bone grafting tray. The dimensions of the patient's mandible are obtained by clinical measurement. Such measurements are used to construct a mandibular replica. The region to be reconstructed is carved to produce the ideal shape and dimensions of an edentulous segment. The tray is made either by casting or by swaging. Twenty-one custom-made titanium bone grafting trays have been fitted in patients with encouraging results. This method of bone grafting tray construction is a simple, inexpensive technique for achieving excellent facial contour and functional reconstruction after mandibulectomy.

  3. Reinforcement of titanium by laser metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampedro, Jesús; Pérez, Irene; Cárcel, Bernabé; Amigó, Vicente; Sánchez, José María

    2010-09-01

    Pure commercial titanium is widely used because of its high corrosion resistance and lower cost compared with other titanium alloys, in particular when there is no high wear requirements. Nevertheless, the wear resistance is poor and surface damage occurs in areas under contact loadings. Laser melting deposition using a high power laser is a suitable technique for manufacturing precise and defect free coatings of a dissimilar material with higher wear and corrosion resistance. In this work a good understanding of laser metal deposition mechanisms allowed to obtain defect free coatings of Ti6Al4V and TiC metal matrix composite (MMC) using a flash lamp pumped Nd:YAG laser of 1 kW. A complete investigation of the process parameters is discussed and resultant wear and corrosion properties are shown. The results show the feasibility to apply the process for manufacturing, improving or repairing high added value components for a wide range of industrial sectors.

  4. Welding of gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An article made of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, cooling the entire article to a welding temperature of from about 1000.degree. F. to about 1400.degree. F., welding a preselected region in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected region so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected region, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the gamma titanium aluminide alloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  5. [Silicate coating of cemented titanium-based shafts in hip prosthetics reduces high aseptic loosening].

    PubMed

    Marx, R; Faramarzi, R; Jungwirth, F; Kleffner, B V; Mumme, T; Weber, M; Wirtz, D C

    2009-01-01

    For cemented hip prostheses, all requirements can be fulfilled by using forged Co/Cr/Mo stems. Co/Cr/Mo alloys, however, are contraindicated for allergy sufferers. For these patients, a cemented prosthesis made of titanium (alloy) would be indicated. Cemented stems from titanium (alloy), depending on the geometry of the prosthesis and its specific surface texture, however, may have loosening rates which are clinically not tolerable. In comparison to Co/Cr/Mo alloys, the greater roughness in conjunction with lesser abrasion resistance of titanium-based alloys leads to high loosening rates caused by abrasion. On the other hand, the greater surface roughness permits good mechanical retention of bone cement to the surface. Good mechanical retention enhances migration behaviour and reduces micromotions. However, there is no stable hydrolytic bond between bone cement and metallic surface; intermediate-term debonding between metal and bone cement is predictable. This debonding results in relative movements, consequently in wear particles which have their origin both from the rough metallic surface and from the PMMA cement. The roughness of the metallic surface operates as emery and with that, a rubbing wear from the PMMA. For the above reasons, a low or moderate roughness is essential for easily abradable implants such as shafts made of titanium (alloy) because low roughness provides a fail-safe running function in case of debonding. Thus, one must allow for inappropriate migration behaviour accompanied by greater micromotions due to insufficient mechanical retention in the case of low roughness. This can be accomplished by a silicate layer coating applied to the metal shaft surface via electrochemical "ECD" or physical vapour deposition "PVD". For analysis, specimens (screws for pull-out, cones for push-out tests) were sand-blasted, so that roughnesses between Ra = 0.8 microm (Rz = 4 microm) and Ra = 2.0 microm (Rz = 9 microm) were generated. The bond strengths observed

  6. Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Studies of Advanced Titanium Aluminides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    titanium aluminide in gas turbine engines would reduce the United States dependence on foreign sources for superalloy constituent elements, and would...ELVTDTEMPERATURE CRACK GROWTH STUDIES OF ADVANCED 1I TITANIUM ALUMINIDES (U) SYSTRAN CORP DAYTON ON VENKATARAMAN SEP 87 AFUAL-TR-87-4t82 F32615-86-C...ELEVATED TEMPERATURE CRACK GROWTH STUDIES OF ADVANCED TITANIUM ALUMINIDES DTIC Dr. Srivathsan Venkataraman e’.- Systran Corporation 4126 Linden Avenue

  7. A single crystalline porphyrinic titanium metal–organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Tian -Fu; Feng, Dawei; Tian, Jian; Wang, Kecheng; Qin, Junsheng; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ying -Pin; Bosch, Mathieu; Zou, Lanfang; Teat, Simon J.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Zhou, Hong -Cai

    2015-04-28

    We successfully assembled the photocatalytic titanium-oxo cluster and photosensitizing porphyrinic linker into a metal–organic framework (MOF), namely PCN-22. A preformed titanium-oxo carboxylate cluster is adopted as the starting material to judiciously control the MOF growth process to afford single crystals. This synthetic method is useful to obtain highly crystalline titanium MOFs, which has been a daunting challenge in this field. Moreover, PCN-22 demonstrated permanent porosity and photocatalytic activities toward alcohol oxidation.

  8. The effect of vacuum annealing on corrosion resistance of titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chikanov, V.N.; Peshkov, V.V.; Kireev, L.S.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of annealing on the corrosion resistance of OT4-1 sheet titanium in 25% HCl under various air pressures and self-evacuating conditions has been investigated. From the kinetic corrosion curves it follows that the least corrosion resistance of titanium is observed after vacuum annealing. Even low residual air pressure in a chamber improves corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance of titanium decreases with vacuum-annealing time.

  9. The Molybdenum titanium Phase Diagram Evaluated from Ab initio Calculations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-07

    between Titanium- Tantalum Alloy and Pure Titanium for Biomedical Applications, Mater. Trans. 48-3 (2007) 380-384. 8 E. B. Taddei, V. A. R. Henriques, C...surgical implant applications", Nov 2013 (originally approved in 2011). 13 L. Kaufman, Coupled thermochemical and phase diagram data for tantalum based...S. Barzilai, C. Toher, S. Curtarolo, O. Levy, Evaluation of the tantalum -titanium phase diagram from

  10. Iron-titanium-mischmetal alloys for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary Dale

    1978-01-01

    A method for the preparation of an iron-titanium-mischmetal alloy which is used for the storage of hydrogen. The alloy is prepared by air-melting an iron charge in a clay-graphite crucible, adding titanium and deoxidizing with mischmetal. The resultant alloy contains less than about 0.1% oxygen and exhibits a capability for hydrogen sorption in less than half the time required by vacuum-melted, iron-titanium alloys.

  11. Titanium in the family automobile: The cost challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froes, F. H.; Friedrich, H.; Kiese, J.; Bergoint, D.

    2004-02-01

    With advances in extraction/fabrication techniques and ever-increasing gasoline prices, the advantage of using lightweight materials such as aluminum, magnesium, and titanium in automobiles continues to increase, particularly for the first two metals. The major drawback for titanium, much more so than the other light metals, is high cost. However, innovative extraction and fabrication approaches are leading to decreased cost. This paper discusses the present status and future potential for titanium use in the family automobile.

  12. Fatigue and Fracture of Titanium Aluminides. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    WRDC-TR-89-4145 Volume II FATIGUE AND FRACTURE OF TITANIUM ALUMINIDES M.L. Gambone V) Allison Gas Turbine Division fl General Motors Corporation RO...77 I1 TITLE (Include Securty Classficaton) Fat igue & Fracture of Titanium Aluminides 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) M.L. Gambone 13& TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME...CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reuerse it neceuar’y and identify by block numberi FIELD GROUP SUB GR. Metal matrix composites, titanium aluminide

  13. A single crystalline porphyrinic titanium metal–organic framework

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Tian -Fu; Feng, Dawei; ...

    2015-04-28

    We successfully assembled the photocatalytic titanium-oxo cluster and photosensitizing porphyrinic linker into a metal–organic framework (MOF), namely PCN-22. A preformed titanium-oxo carboxylate cluster is adopted as the starting material to judiciously control the MOF growth process to afford single crystals. This synthetic method is useful to obtain highly crystalline titanium MOFs, which has been a daunting challenge in this field. Moreover, PCN-22 demonstrated permanent porosity and photocatalytic activities toward alcohol oxidation.

  14. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color..., not more than 0.3 percent. Acid soluble substances, not more than 0.5 percent. TiO2, not less than 99... following: Silicon dioxide, SiO2 and/or aluminum oxide, Al2 O3, as dispersing aids—not more than 2...

  15. Thermal coatings for titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, George R.; Clark, Ronald K.; Robinson, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Titanium aluminides and titanium alloys are candidate materials for use in hot structure and heat-shield components of hypersonic vehicles because of their good strength-to-weight characteristics at elevated temperature. However, in order to utilize their maximum temperature capability, they must be coated to resist oxidation and to have a high total remittance. Also, surface catalysis for recombination of dissociated species in the aerodynamic boundary layer must be minimized. Very thin chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings are attractive candidates for this application because of durability and very light weight. To demonstrate this concept, coatings of boron-silicon and aluminum-boron-silicon compositions were applied to the titanium-aluminides alpha2 (Ti-14Al-21Nb), super-alpha2 (Ti-14Al-23-Nb-2V), and gamma (Ti-33Al-6Nb-1Ta) and to the titanium alloy beta-21S (Ti-15Mo-3Al-3Nb-0.2Si). Coated specimens of each alloy were subjected to a set of simulated hypersonic vehicle environmental tests to determine their properties of oxidation resistance, surface catalysis, radiative emittance, and thermal shock resistance. Surface catalysis results should be viewed as relative performance only of the several coating-alloy combinations tested under the specific environmental conditions of the LaRC Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) arc-plasma-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Tests were also conducted to evaluate the hydrogen transport properties of the coatings and any effects of the coating processing itself on fatigue life of the base alloys. Results are presented for three types of coatings, which are as follows: (1) a single layer boron silicon coating, (2) a single layer aluminum-boron-silicon coating, and (3) a multilayer coating consisting of an aluminum-boron-silicon sublayer with a boron-silicon outer layer.

  16. Powder processing of hybrid titanium neural electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jose Luis, Jr.

    A preliminary investigation into the powder production of a novel hybrid titanium neural electrode for EEG is presented. The rheological behavior of titanium powder suspensions using sodium alginate as a dispersant are examined for optimal slip casting conditions. Electrodes were slip cast and sintered at 950°C for 1 hr, 1000°C for 1, 3, and 6 hrs, and 1050°C for 1 hr. Residual porosities from sintering are characterized using Archimedes' technique and image analysis. The pore network is gel impregnated by submerging the electrodes in electrically conductive gel and placing them in a chamber under vacuum. Gel evaporation of the impregnated electrodes is examined. Electrodes are characterized in the dry and gelled states using impedance spectrometry and compared to a standard silver- silver chloride electrode. Power spectral densities for the sensors in the dry and gelled state are also compared. Residual porosities for the sintered specimens were between 50.59% and 44.81%. Gel evaporation tests show most of the impregnated gel evaporating within 20 min of exposure to atmospheric conditions with prolonged evaporation times for electrodes with higher impregnated gel mass. Impedance measurements of the produced electrodes indicate the low impedance of the hybrid electrodes are due to the increased contact area of the porous electrode. Power spectral densities of the titanium electrode behave similar to a standard silver-silver chloride electrode. Tests suggest the powder processed hybrid titanium electrode's performance is better than current dry contact electrodes and comparable to standard gelled silver-silver chloride electrodes.

  17. The Specific Heat of Titanium Disilicide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    accurate thermodynamic data. We have therefore undertaken the measurement of the specific heat of TiSi2. The titanium disilicide alloy has been...of moles of the reactants. The standard molar enthalpy, Af HO, and the standard molar entropy, So, can be found in tables of thermodynamic properties ...factors. To perform these calculations, the thermodynamic properties of all the reactants and products: standard molar enthalpy, standard molar entropy and

  18. Preparation of titanium oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin

    1992-01-01

    A procedure is disclosed for the reliable production of either particulate or polymeric titanium ceramic membranes by a highly constrained sol-gel procedure. The critical constraints in the procedure include the choice of alkyl alcohol solvent, the amount of water and its rate of addition, the pH of the solution during hydrolysis, and the limit of sintering temperature applied to the resulting gels.

  19. Preparation of titanium oxide ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Xu, Q.

    1992-03-17

    A procedure is disclosed for the reliable production of either particulate or polymeric titanium ceramic membranes by a highly constrained sol-gel procedure. The critical constraints in the procedure include the choice of alkyl alcohol solvent, the amount of water and its rate of addition, the pH of the solution during hydrolysis, and the limit of sintering temperature applied to the resulting gels.

  20. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color... following: Silicon dioxide, SiO2 and/or aluminum oxide, Al2 O3, as dispersing aids—not more than 2 percent..., not more than 0.3 percent. Acid soluble substances, not more than 0.5 percent. TiO2, not less than 99...