Science.gov

Sample records for ground observations potential

  1. Reducing multisensor monthly mean aerosol optical depth uncertainty: 2. Optimal locations for potential ground observation deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Li, Xichen; Carlson, Barbara E.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Dubovik, Oleg; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2017-04-01

    Surface remote sensing of aerosol properties provides "ground truth" for satellite and model validation and is an important component of aerosol observation system. Due to the different characteristics of background aerosol variability, information obtained at different locations usually has different spatial representativeness, implying that the location should be carefully chosen so that its measurement could be extended to a greater area. In this study, we present an objective observation array design technique that automatically determines the optimal locations with the highest spatial representativeness based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) theory. The ensemble is constructed using aerosol optical depth (AOD) products from five satellite sensors. The optimal locations are solved sequentially by minimizing the total analysis error variance, which means that observations at these locations will reduce the background error variance to the largest extent. The location determined by the algorithm is further verified to have larger spatial representativeness than some other arbitrary location. In addition to the existing active Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites, the 40 selected optimal locations are mostly concentrated on regions with both high AOD inhomogeneity and its spatial representativeness, namely, the Sahel, South Africa, East Asia, and North Pacific Islands. These places should be the focuses of establishing future AERONET sites in order to further reduce the uncertainty in the monthly mean AOD. Observations at these locations contribute to approximately 50% of the total background uncertainty reduction.

  2. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  3. Simulation of submillimetre atmospheric spectra for characterising potential ground-based remote sensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Emma C.; Withington, Stafford; Newnham, David A.; Wadhams, Peter; Jones, Anna E.; Clancy, Robin

    2016-11-01

    The submillimetre is an understudied region of the Earth's atmospheric electromagnetic spectrum. Prior technological gaps and relatively high opacity due to the prevalence of rotational water vapour lines at these wavelengths have slowed progress from a ground-based remote sensing perspective; however, emerging superconducting detector technologies in the fields of astronomy offer the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. A site study, with a focus on the polar regions, is performed to assess theoretical feasibility by simulating the downwelling (zenith angle = 0°) clear-sky submillimetre spectrum from 30 mm (10 GHz) to 150 µm (2000 GHz) at six locations under annual mean, summer, winter, daytime, night-time and low-humidity conditions. Vertical profiles of temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified. Signal strengths, centre frequencies, bandwidths, estimated minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures are determined for all cases. HOBr, HBr and HO2 produce brightness temperature peaks in the mK to µK range, whereas the N2O peaks are in the K range. The optimal submillimetre remote sensing lines for the four species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad wavelength range. The techniques presented here provide a framework that can be applied to additional species of interest and taken forward to simulate retrievals and guide the

  4. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Zachery W [Mandan, ND; Zevenbergen, Gary A [Arvada, CO

    2012-04-03

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  5. Simulation of polar atmospheric microwave and sub-millimetre spectra for characterizing potential new ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, David; Turner, Emma; Ford, George; Pumphrey, Hugh; Withington, Stafford

    2016-04-01

    Advanced detector technologies from the fields of astronomy and telecommunications are offering the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. Adoption of these technologies in ground-based passive microwave and sub-millimetre radiometry could allow new measurements of chemical species and winds in the polar middle atmosphere for verifying meteorological data-sets and atmospheric models. A site study to assess the feasibility of new polar observations is performed by simulating the downwelling clear-sky submillimetre spectrum over 10-2000 GHz (30 mm to 150 microns) at two Arctic and two Antarctic locations under different seasonal and diurnal conditions. Vertical profiles for temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis, and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified and minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures estimated. The optimal lines for all species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad frequency range. We also demonstrate the feasibility of measuring horizontal wind profiles above Halley station, Antarctica with time resolution as high as 0.5hr using simulated spectroradiometric observations of Doppler-shifted ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) lines in the 230-250 GHz region. The techniques presented provide a framework that can be applied to the retrieval of additional atmospheric parameters and be taken forward to simulate and guide the design of future microwave and sub

  6. Longitudinal Variations in Equatorial Spread F: The Potential to Address Causal Mechanisms with Distributed Ground- and Space-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, K. M.; Carrano, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    While many space weather events originate with impulsive disturbances on the sun, others, such as equatorial Spread F, result primarily from complex internal interactions in the ionosphere-thermosphere system. There are, thus, reasons to believe that progress towards meaningful physics-based forecasts for such phenomena are achievable without requiring the ability to forecast eruptive solar events. A distributed network of GNSS sensors at low latitudes, such as the LISN network in South America, is capable of monitoring the behavior of the low latitude ionosphere and the occurrence of irregularities associated with equatorial Spread F. Data from this network show that equatorial Spread F occurrence in the American sector is strongly controlled by seasonal factors resulting in relatively low true day-to-day variability. The primary explanation for seasonal control centers on insulating magnetic flux tubes in the F-region via the simultaneous decay of the corresponding E-regions following sunset. These conditions are met most fully when the solar terminator is aligned with the local magnetic declination angle. Isolated measurements in other longitude sectors show great variability, however, suggesting that additional factors contribute to Spread F development in those regions. Identifying these additional factors and the relative importance of their roles in Spread F development is needed to make progress towards forecasting Spread F. While these factors and the phenomena they control are local in nature, their importance was recognized by consideration of large-scale behavior across longitude sectors. Further progress can be made through improved global monitoring and distributed ground- and space-based observations will be critical to this objective. Here we present results from previous GNSS-based studies of equatorial scintillation and potential solutions to the challenges current developments pose to low latitude monitoring. Results demonstrating the power of

  7. Calibration of TOMS Radiances From Ground Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bojkov, B. R.; Kowalewski, M.; Wellemeyer, C.; Labow, G.; Hilsenrath, E.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahmad, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Verification of a stratospheric ozone recovery remains a high priority for environmental research and policy definition. Models predict an ozone recovery at a much lower rate than the measured depletion rate observed to date. Therefore improved precision of the satellite and ground ozone observing systems are required over the long term to verify its recovery. We show that validation of radiances from the ground can be a very effective means for correcting long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements and can be used to cross calibrate all BUV instruments in orbit (TOMS, SBUV/2, GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI, GOME-2, OMPS). This method bypasses the retrieval algorithms used to derive ozone products from both satellite and ground based measurements that are normally used to validate the satellite data. Radiance comparisons employ forward models, but they are inherently more accurate than the retrieval This method employs very accurate comparisons between ground based zenith sicy radiances and satellite nadir radiances and employs two well established capabilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center, 1) the SSBUV calibration facilities and 2) the radiative transfer codes used for the TOMS and SBUV/2 algorithms and their subsequent refinements. The zenith sky observations are made by the SSBUV where its calibration is maintained to a high degree of accuracy and precision. Radiative transfer calculations show that ground based zenith sky and satellite nadir backscatter ultraviolet comparisons can be made very accurately under certain viewing conditions. Initial ground observations taken from Goddard Space Flight Center compared with radiative transfer calculations has indicated the feasibility of this method. The effect of aerosols and varying ozone amounts are considered in the model simulations and the theoretical comparisons. The radiative transfer simulations show that the ground and satellite radiance comparisons can be made with an uncertainty of less than l

  8. Observing Exoplanets with High Dispersion Coronagraphy. I. The Scientific Potential of Current and Next-generation Large Ground and Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Mawet, Dimitri; Ruane, Garreth; Hu, Renyu; Benneke, Björn

    2017-04-01

    Direct imaging of exoplanets presents a formidable technical challenge owing to the small angular separation and high contrast between exoplanets and their host stars. High Dispersion Coronagraphy (HDC) is a pathway to achieve unprecedented sensitivity to Earth-like planets in the habitable zone. Here, we present a framework to simulate HDC observations and data analyses. The goal of these simulations is to perform a detailed analysis of the trade-off between raw star light suppression and spectral resolution for various instrument configurations, target types, and science cases. We predict the performance of an HDC instrument at Keck observatory for characterizing directly imaged gas-giant planets in near-infrared bands. We also simulate HDC observations of an Earth-like planet using next-generation ground-based (TMT) and spaced-base telescopes (HabEx and LUVOIR). We conclude that ground-based ELTs are more suitable for HDC observations of an Earth-like planet than future space-based missions owing to the considerable difference in collecting area. For ground-based telescopes, HDC observations can detect an Earth-like planet in the habitable zone around an M-dwarf star at 10‑4 star light suppression level. Compared to the 10‑7 planet/star contrast, HDC relaxes the star light suppression requirement by a factor of 103. For space-based telescopes, detector noise will be a major limitation at spectral resolutions higher than 104. Considering detector noise and speckle chromatic noise, R = 400 (1600) is the optimal spectral resolutions for HabEx (LUVOIR). The corresponding star light suppression requirement to detect a planet with planet/star contrast = 6.1× {10}-11 is relaxed by a factor of 10 (100) for HabEx (LUVOIR).

  9. Methods for Characterizing Fine Particulate Matter Using Satellite Remote-Sensing Data and Ground Observations: Potential Use for Environmental Public Health Surveillance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Crosson, William L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G.; Qualters, Judith R.; Niskar, Amanda S.; Sinclair, Amber H.; Tolsma, Dennis D.; hide

    2007-01-01

    This study describes and demonstrates different techniques for surfacing daily environmental / hazards data of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) for the purpose of integrating respiratory health and environmental data for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC s) pilot study of Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX)-Atlanta. It described a methodology for estimating ground-level continuous PM2.5 concentrations using B-Spline and inverse distance weighting (IDW) surfacing techniques and leveraging National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data to complement The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground observation data. The study used measurements of ambient PM2.5 from the EPA database for the year 2003 as well as PM2.5 estimates derived from NASA s satellite data. Hazard data have been processed to derive the surrogate exposure PM2.5 estimates. The paper has shown that merging MODIS remote sensing data with surface observations of PM2.5 not only provides a more complete daily representation of PM2.5 than either data set alone would allow, but it also reduces the errors in the PM2.5 estimated surfaces. The results of this paper have shown that the daily IDW PM2.5 surfaces had smaller errors, with respect to observations, than those of the B-Spline surfaces in the year studied. However the IDW mean annual composite surface had more numerical artifacts, which could be due to the interpolating nature of the IDW that assumes that the maxima and minima can occur only at the observation points. Finally, the methods discussed in this paper improve temporal and spatial resolutions and establish a foundation for environmental public health linkage and association studies for which determining the concentrations of an environmental hazard such as PM2.5 with good accuracy levels is critical.

  10. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter

    2011-11-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project. In addition to secondary eclipse observations, the broadband transmission spectrum of the super-Earth GJ1214b is also presented. The transmission spectrum for this low-density planet indicates that it probably has a low-metallicity, hydrogen dominated atmosphere. Finally the results for an ensemble study of the thermal emission properties of hot Jupiters is presented, including the average spectrum for these planets separated based on the level of incident radiation and the activity of their host-stars.

  11. Potential Flow Analysis of Dynamic Ground Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feifel, W. M.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of some flight test data suggests the presence of a 'dynamic ground effect'. The lift of an aircraft approaching the ground depends on the rate of descent and is lower than the aircraft steady state lift at a same height above the ground. Such a lift deficiency under dynamic conditions could have a serious impact on the overall aircraft layout. For example, the increased pitch angle needed to compensate for the temporary loss in lift would reduce the tail strike margin or require an increase in landing gear length. Under HSR2 an effort is under way to clarify the dynamic ground effect issue using a multi-pronged approach. A dynamic ground effect test has been run in the NASA Langley 14x22 ft wind tunnel. Northup-Grumman is conducting time accurate CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) Euler analyses on the National Aerodynamic Simulator facility. Boeing has been using linear potential flow methodology which are thought to provide much needed insight in, physics of this very complex problem. The present report summarizes the results of these potential flow studies.

  12. Challenges and Rewards in Ground-Based Observing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Kevin P.

    2016-05-01

    DKIST will be largest ground-based project in solar physics, and will offer access and data to the whole community. In pursuit of exciting science, many users may have their first encounters with high-resolution, ground-based solar observations. New facilities, space or ground-based, all bring particular signatures in their data. While tools or processed datasets might serve to minimize such non-solar signatures, it is nonetheless important for users to understand the impacts on observation planning, the nature of the corrections applied, and any residual effects on their data.In this talk I will review some of the instrumental and atmospheric signatures that are important for ground-based observing, in particular in planning for the potential capabilities of the DKIST Data Center. These techniques include image warping, local PSF deconvolution, atmospheric dispersion correction, and scattered light removal. I will present examples of data sets afflicted by such problems as well as some of the algorithms used in characterizing and removing these contributions. This will demonstrate how even with the challenges of observing through a turbulent atmosphere, it is possible to achieve dramatic scientific results.

  13. Thunder-induced ground motions: 1. Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ting-L.; Langston, Charles A.

    2009-04-01

    Acoustic pressure from thunder and its induced ground motions were investigated using a small array consisting of five three-component short-period surface seismometers, a three-component borehole seismometer, and five infrasound microphones. We used the array to constrain wave parameters of the incident acoustic and seismic waves. The incident slowness differences between acoustic pressure and ground motions suggest that ground reverberations were first initiated somewhat away from the array. Using slowness inferred from ground motions is preferable to obtain the seismic source parameters. We propose a source equalization procedure for acoustic/seismic deconvolution to generate the time domain transfer function, a procedure similar to that of obtaining teleseismic earthquake receiver functions. The time domain transfer function removes the incident pressure time history from the seismogram. An additional vertical-to-radial ground motion transfer function was used to identify the Rayleigh wave propagation mode of induced seismic waves complementing that found using the particle motions and amplitude variations in the borehole. The initial motions obtained by the time domain transfer functions suggest a low Poisson's ratio for the near-surface layer. The acoustic-to-seismic transfer functions show a consistent reverberation series at frequencies near 5 Hz. This gives an empirical measure of site resonance that depends on the ratio of the layer velocity to layer thickness for earthquake P and S waves. The time domain transfer function approach by transferring a spectral division into the time domain provides an alternative method for studying acoustic-to-seismic coupling.

  14. ESA Earth Observation Ground Segment Evolution Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, J.; Albani, M.; Laur, H.

    2016-12-01

    One of the key elements driving the evolution of EO Ground Segments, in particular in Europe, has been to enable the creation of added value from EO data and products. This requires the ability to constantly adapt and improve the service to a user base expanding far beyond the `traditional' EO user community of remote sensing specialists. Citizen scientists, the general public, media and educational actors form another user group that is expected to grow. Technological advances, Open Data policies, including those implemented by ESA and the EU, as well as an increasing number of satellites in operations (e.g. Copernicus Sentinels) have led to an enormous increase in available data volumes. At the same time, even with modern network and data handling services, fewer users can afford to bulk-download and consider all potentially relevant data and associated knowledge. The "EO Innovation Europe" concept is being implemented in Europe in coordination between the European Commission, ESA and other European Space Agencies, and industry. This concept is encapsulated in the main ideas of "Bringing the User to the Data" and "Connecting the Users" to complement the traditional one-to-one "data delivery" approach of the past. Both ideas are aiming to better "empower the users" and to create a "sustainable system of interconnected EO Exploitation Platforms", with the objective to enable large scale exploitation of European EO data assets for stimulating innovation and to maximize their impact. These interoperable/interconnected platforms are virtual environments in which the users - individually or collaboratively - have access to the required data sources and processing tools, as opposed to downloading and handling the data `at home'. EO-Innovation Europe has been structured around three elements: an enabling element (acting as a back office), a stimulating element and an outreach element (acting as a front office). Within the enabling element, a "mutualisation" of efforts

  15. Observations of a possible ground signature of flux transfer events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Nielsen, E.; Korth, A.; Haldoupis, C.; Hoeg, P.; Hayward, D.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    1985-01-01

    Questions regarding the mechanism by which the large-scale cross-tail electric field and associated convection in the magnetosphere is maintained have not yet been completely answered. According to Dungey (1961), the boundary layer (BL) inside the magnetopause (MP) in which the tailward transport of mass, momentum, and magnetic flux takes place can be produced by reconnection. Observations made with the aid of the ISEE spacecraft show that reconnection can occur both in a quasisteady form and in a more unsteady form known under the name 'flux transfer event' (FTE). The present investigation proposes observation of the ground signature of an FTE. It is pointed out that the STARE radar system has the potential for making observations pertinent to identifying and studying the ionospheric signatures of FTE's. An analysis is conducted of two periods during which the convective boundary (CB) moved into the STARE field of view. The significance of the observations is discussed.

  16. GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION POTENTIAL FROM STORMWATER INFILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior to urbanization, ground water recharge resulted from infiltration of precipitation through pervious surfaces, including grasslands and woods. This infiltration water was relatively uncontaminated. With urbanization, the permeable soil surface area through which recharge by...

  17. GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION POTENTIAL FROM STORMWATER INFILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior to urbanization, ground water recharge resulted from infiltration of precipitation through pervious surfaces, including grasslands and woods. This infiltration water was relatively uncontaminated. With urbanization, the permeable soil surface area through which recharge by...

  18. Correlated Ground-based and IUE Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The value of coordination among different observers particularly, those working in different wavelength regions is highlighted. This coordination is more important among observers of comets than among observers of almost any other class of astronomical object. The basic reason for this is that comets are highly time-variable, often erratically so, and observations of a particular comet usually cannot be repeated. As a result, some uncoordinated observations cannot be interpreted at all while others are susceptible to misinterpretation. Several specific examples of coordinated observations are discussed.

  19. Guide for fabricating and installing shallow ground water observation wells

    Treesearch

    Carolyn C. Bohn

    2001-01-01

    The fabrication and use of three tools to assist in the manual installation of shallow ground water observation wells are described. These tools are easily fabricated at a local machine shop. A method for calibrating pressure transducers is also described.

  20. Challenges and Opportunities for Ground-based Helioseismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    I summarize the current status of ground-based helioseismic observations, in particular the two operational networks GONG and BiSON. I then discuss requirements for continued and future ground-based observations based on key science drivers, finishing with a discussion of SPRING, a proposed future high-spatial-resolution network that would provide helioseismic data and a broad range of synoptic data products.

  1. Ground-based observation of near-Earth asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    An increased ground-based observation program is an essential component of any serious attempt to assess the resource potential of near-Earth asteroids. A vigorous search and characterization program could lead to the discovery and description of about 400 to 500 near-Earth asteroids in the next 20 years. This program, in conjunction with meteorite studies, would provide the data base to ensure that the results of a small number of asteroid-rendezvous and sample-return missions could be extrapolated with confidence into a geological base map of the Aten, Apollo, and Amor asteroids. Ground-based spectral studies of nearly 30 members of the Aten/Apollo/Amor population provide good evidence that this class includes bodies composed of silicates, metal-silicates, and carbonaceous assemblages similar to those found in meteorites. The instruments that are being used or could be used to search for near-Earth asteroids are listed. Techniques useful in characterizing asteroids and the types of information obtainable using these techniques are listed.

  2. Snow Pattern Delineation Using Ground Observations, Remote Sensing, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemstra, C. A.; Wagner, A. M.; Sturm, M.; Deeb, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Regardless of the precipitation received, snow depth patterns tend to repeat on landscapes year after year (Sturm and Wagner, 2010). For example, windswept ridges with sparse vegetation have shallow snow while water tracks and swales are deeper. If snow patterns can be consistently identified, understood, and classified using ground observations, remote sensing, models, or some combination thereof, an untapped potential exists to expand and improve snow assessments and predictions. Pattern detection, repeatability, and efficacy have been demonstrated for images and data from a nested study area located on Alaska's North Slope. As a part of the SnowNet project, well over 200,000 snow depths and hundreds of snow densities have been measured during spring measurement campaigns from 2010-2013. Most of the measurements were collected at the core 1km2 Imnavait Creek watershed (where snow measurements have occurred since the early 1980s), with sparser (but still high volume) data collected from the outer 6km2 and 21km2 areas. Imagery collected for the same areas include snow cover from Landsat (30 m) from 1982-present and fine-resolution commercial imagery (0.5-3 m) from 2002-present. While winter imagery is useful for delineating snow-free ridges and windswept areas, of more value were the 12 mid-melt images which allowed us to identify deeper snowpack areas. We also simulated snow distributions from 2010-2013 using SnowModel, which uses topography, land cover, and meteorological data to realistically simulate snow accumulation and ablation over our domains. The time series of over 200,000 individual observations, over 40 images, and four years of model simulations show striking repeatability in snow depth patterns and among years. The spatial agreements among ground observations, satellite-derived snow cover, and SnowModel are remarkable. Our results show a strong fidelity to patterns appearing in three different snow cover and depth estimate approaches, and suggest the

  3. Ground truth observations for TRMM. [Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiele, Otto W.

    1989-01-01

    Plans to obtain ground truth data for the validation of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) are examined. The experimental rainfall measuring techniques considered for the program are discussed, including optical and Doppler rain gages, satellite beacon attenuation, underwater hydrophones, profilers, microwave attenuation, multiple frequency/polarization radar, and scanning and airborne Doppler radar. The TRMM validation program is considered, noting observations to compare averaged TRMM rainfall data with similar ground truth data and to compare the rainfall and height distribution data from TRMM with instantaneous ground truth data.

  4. Ground truth observations for TRMM. [Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiele, Otto W.

    1989-01-01

    Plans to obtain ground truth data for the validation of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) are examined. The experimental rainfall measuring techniques considered for the program are discussed, including optical and Doppler rain gages, satellite beacon attenuation, underwater hydrophones, profilers, microwave attenuation, multiple frequency/polarization radar, and scanning and airborne Doppler radar. The TRMM validation program is considered, noting observations to compare averaged TRMM rainfall data with similar ground truth data and to compare the rainfall and height distribution data from TRMM with instantaneous ground truth data.

  5. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  6. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  7. Satellite Type Estination from Ground-based Photometric Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Suzuki, J.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The optical photometric observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. At first, we measured in laboratory the surface reflectance of common satellite materials, for example, Multi-layer Insulation (MLI), mono-crystalline silicon cells, and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Next, we calculated visual magnitude of a satellite by simplified shape and albedo. In this calculation model, solar panels have dimensions of 2 by 8 meters, and the bus area is 2 meters squared with measured optical properties described above. Under these conditions, it clarified the brightness can change the range between 3 and 4 magnitudes in one night, but color index changes only from 1 to 2 magnitudes. Finally, we observed the color photometric data of several GEO satellites visible from Japan multiple times in August and September 2014. We obtained that light curves of GEO satellites recorded in the B and V bands (using Johnson filters) by a ground-base optical telescope. As a result, color index changed approximately from 0.5 to 1 magnitude in one night, and the order of magnitude was not changed in all cases. In this paper, we briefly discuss about satellite type estimation using the relation between brightness and color index obtained from the photometric observation.

  8. A ground-based experiment for CMBR anisotropy observations: MITO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Petris, M.; Mainella, G.; Nerozzi, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Garavini, G.; Granata, S.; Guarini, G.; Masi, S.; Melchiorri, B.; Melchiorri, F.; Nobili, S.; Orlando, A.; Palummo, L.; Pisano, G.; Terracina, A.

    1999-07-01

    Ground-based observations at millimeter wavelengths are still competitive with space observatories if inevitable foreground contamination is considered at all stages of data acquisition and analysis. Technical solutions together with carefully chosen cosmological targets and observational strategies are the key points in the development of the MITO experiment.

  9. Cows, ground surface potentials and earth resistivity.

    PubMed

    Polk, C

    2001-01-01

    The "stray voltage" problem on dairy farms is discussed briefly. By reference to published literature it is shown that a "step voltage" (SV), i.e., a potential difference between front and hind hooves of a dairy cow, much less than the often quoted threshold value of 0.5 V, when applied for long periods of time, could possibly affect cow health and milk production. Values as low as approximately 10 mV could conceivably be significant. A measurement program carried out on 19 representative Minnesota dairy farms during the summer of 1997 is described. Nine farms had above average (HP) and 10 below average (LP) milk production. Results show that SV was 4.2 times higher on the LP than HP. However, only three farms had SV greater than 9 mV, and low milk production on these farms could possibly be due to absence of recommended vaccinations rather than high SV. Soil resistivity rho measured in the farm fields was 3.4 times larger on the LP than on HP. The possible origin of SV in relation to electric distribution systems within and to farms is discussed. Relations between SV and rho are analyzed. Conditions are specified under which SV in the barn must be related to rho measured in the field, rather than the rho of the concrete floor of the barn. It is suggested that laboratory research is necessary to establish the significance for cow health and milk production of long term exposure to low SV levels. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Analysis of Simultaneous Hiss and Chorus Ground & In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, P.; Golkowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of the radiation belts is believed to be controlled in large part by two separate but related classes of naturally occurring plasma waves: ELF/VLF chorus and hiss emissions. These waves can be observed both in situ on spacecraft and at ground-based stations. Recent observational and theoretical works suggest that high resolution analysis of the spectral features of both hiss and chorus emissions can provide insight into generation processes and be used to validate existing theories. However, ground observation are limited to the portion of magnetospheric waves that are able to propagate to low altitudes and penetrate through the ionosphere. The whistler mode wave is intrinsically right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) in the magnetosphere, and becomes more linear with increased propagation distance in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. We use wave polarization to differentiate magnetospheric and ionospheric effects in ground based observations. Observations are compared to simulations using the finite difference time domain method to track the effect of propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide on polarization. Ionospheric exit point of the emissions, have been further determined by calculating the angle of arrival, which shows a rotation of exit points along with transition of hiss to chorus emissions. Simultaneous THEMIS spacecraft data have been investigated and show agreement with the observed transitions in our ground based observations. The plasmapause is seen to erode and density structures develop, providing insight into the relationship of chorus and hiss and the plasmapause boundary.

  11. Correlation between nitrate contamination and ground water pollution potential.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shafiul H; Kehew, Alan E; Passero, Richard N

    2003-01-01

    AQUIPRO, a PC-based method, was used to assess aquifer vulnerability using digital water well logs. The AQUIPRO model is a parameter/factor weighting system for rating the pollution potential of an aquifer. This method uses the well depth, as well as the clay and partial clay thickness in a well, to generate pollution potential scores. In this model, aquifer protection increases as the AQUIPRO vulnerability scores increase and ground water pollution potential decreases. Computerized water well records of 2435 domestic wells with partial chemistry data were used to determine the ground water pollution potential of Kalamazoo County, Michigan. Theoretically, low AQUIPRO pollution potential scores should have more frequent occurrences of ground water contamination events than areas with high AQUIPRO scores with similar land-use, well construction, and well densities. The relative AQUIPRO scores were compared with the frequency of occurrences of nitrate-N in ground water wells. The average nitrate-N concentrations within each relative AQUIPRO vulnerability scores category were also compared. The results indicate that domestic wells containing 5 mg/L or more nitrate-N showed a positive correlation between the frequency of occurrences of nitrate-N and relative decrease of AQUIPRO (r2 = 0.99) vulnerability scores. In other words, as the ground water pollution potential increases, the occurrence frequency of nitrate-N also increases. Furthermore, the results show that as the relative AQUIPRO (r2 = 0.96) vulnerability scores decrease, the mean nitrate-N concentrations also increase.

  12. Ground states of stealthy hyperuniform potentials: I. Entropically favored configurations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Stillinger, F H; Torquato, S

    2015-08-01

    Systems of particles interacting with "stealthy" pair potentials have been shown to possess infinitely degenerate disordered hyperuniform classical ground states with novel physical properties. Previous attempts to sample the infinitely degenerate ground states used energy minimization techniques, introducing algorithmic dependence that is artificial in nature. Recently, an ensemble theory of stealthy hyperuniform ground states was formulated to predict the structure and thermodynamics that was shown to be in excellent agreement with corresponding computer simulation results in the canonical ensemble (in the zero-temperature limit). In this paper, we provide details and justifications of the simulation procedure, which involves performing molecular dynamics simulations at sufficiently low temperatures and minimizing the energy of the snapshots for both the high-density disordered regime, where the theory applies, as well as lower densities. We also use numerical simulations to extend our study to the lower-density regime. We report results for the pair correlation functions, structure factors, and Voronoi cell statistics. In the high-density regime, we verify the theoretical ansatz that stealthy disordered ground states behave like "pseudo" disordered equilibrium hard-sphere systems in Fourier space. The pair statistics obey certain exact integral conditions with very high accuracy. These results show that as the density decreases from the high-density limit, the disordered ground states in the canonical ensemble are characterized by an increasing degree of short-range order and eventually the system undergoes a phase transition to crystalline ground states. In the crystalline regime (low densities), there exist aperiodic structures that are part of the ground-state manifold but yet are not entropically favored. We also provide numerical evidence suggesting that different forms of stealthy pair potentials produce the same ground-state ensemble in the zero

  13. 7. BULLET GLASS OBSERVATION WINDOW AT GROUND LEVEL ON WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. BULLET GLASS OBSERVATION WINDOW AT GROUND LEVEL ON WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. Analysis of UV Satellite and Ground Observed data for Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervone, Guido; Manca, Germana; Johnson, Kathleen

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the 280 to 400 nanometers range has been found to be one of the primary cause for skin cancer. The correlation between UV radiation and skin cancer prevention is of global concern. Satellite observations from Nimbus7 (1978-1993), EarthProbe (1996-2004) and OMI/AURA (2004-present) provide long term UV time-series that can be used to study and compute the risk associated with exposure to harmful radiation. Additionally, several ground installations exist to acquire UV radiation data that can be paired with satellite observations. The current work presents the data mining analysis of UV time series from 1978 to present for the Italian region of Sardinia. Satellite observations are paired with ground measurements to provide historical averages of UV radiation, and daily maps of current exposure. A Geographical Information System (GIS) is used to fuse UV data with ground characteristics. The use of GIS is fundamental to calculate the real value of UV on the ground. It is known that the incidence of solar radiation, and consequently of UV, is modified by topography and surface features. Topography plays a important rule, because it is a major factor that determines the spatial variability of insulation and UV being a part of direct insulation. variation in elevation orientation (slope and aspect), and shadow cast by topographical features, determine the UV insulation in a given area or point.

  15. Ground and space observations of medium frequency auroral radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, Matthew C.

    The auroral zone is a rich source of natural radio emissions that can be observed in space and at ground-level. By studying these waves, scientists can gain insight into the plasma processes that generate them and use the near-Earth space environment as a large-scale plasma physics laboratory. This thesis uses both ground-level and in situ observations to study two kinds of natural radio emissions. First, we report observations of a new kind of auroral radio emission. The waves have frequencies ranging from 1.3-2.2 MHz, bandwidths ranging from 90-272 kHz, and durations ranging from 16-355 s. Spectral analysis of the waveform data has revealed that the emission has a complex combination of at least three kinds of fine structures. For model auroral electron distributions, calculations indicate that Langmuir waves could be excited at frequencies consistent with observations. The remainder of the thesis discusses auroral medium frequency (MF) burst, an impulsive, broadband natural radio emission observed at ground-level within a few minutes of local substorm onset. LaBelle [2011] proposed that MF burst originates as Langmuir/Z-mode waves on the topside of the ionosphere that subsequently mode convert to L-mode waves and propagate to ground-level. Using continuous waveform measurements and combined observations with the Sondrestrom Incoherent Scatter Radar, we have performed two tests of this mechanism. The results of these tests are consistent with the mechanism described in LaBelle [2011]. A survey of 8,624 half-orbits of the DEMETER spacecraft has revealed 68 observations of bursty MF waves. We have compared the wave properties of these waves to those of MF burst and have found that although it is uncertain, the balance of the evidence suggests that the bursty MF waves observed with DEMETER are the same phenomenon as the ground-level MF burst. Finally, we have used numerical simulations to model both the fine structure of MF burst and to estimate the attenuation the

  16. Ground-based observations of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snodgrass, C.

    2015-10-01

    I will described the campaign of observations from ground-based (and Earth orbiting) telescopes that supports the Rosetta mission. Rosetta gets closer to the nucleus than any previous mission, and returns wonderfully detailed measurements from the heart of the comet, but at the cost of not seeing the large scale coma and tails. The ground-based campaign fills in the missing part of the picture, studying the comet at #1000km resolution, and following how the overall activity of the comet varies. These data provide context information for Rosetta, so changes in the inner coma seen by the spacecraft can be correlated with the phenomena observable in comets. This not only helps to complete our understanding of the activity of 67P, but also allows us to compare it with other comets that are only observed from the ground, and in that way extend the results of the Rosetta mission to the wider population. The ground-based campaign includes observations with nearly all major facilities world-wide. In 2014 the majority of data came from the ESO VLT, as the comet was still relatively faint and in Southern skies, but as it returns to visibility from Earth in 2015 it will be considerably brighter, approaching its perihelion in August, and at Northern declinations. I will show results from the 2014 campaign, including visible wavelength photometry and spectroscopy, and the latest results from early 2015 observations. I will also describe the varied observations that will be included in the campaign post-perihelion, and how all of these results fit around what we are learning about 67P from Rosetta.

  17. The Yukawa potential: ground state energy and critical screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, James P.; Gerber, Urs; Schubert, Christian; Trejo, Maria A.; Weber, Axel

    2017-08-01

    We study the ground state energy and the critical screening parameter of the Yukawa potential in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. After a short review of the existing literature on these quantities, we apply fifth-order perturbation theory to the calculation of the ground state energy, using the exact solutions of the Coulomb potential together with a cutoff on the principal number summations. We also perform a variational calculation of the ground state energy using a Coulomb-like radial wave function and the exact solution of the corresponding minimization condition. For not too large values of the screening parameter, close agreement is found between the perturbative and variational results. For the critical screening parameter, we devise a novel method that permits us to determine it to 10 digits. This is the most precise calculation of this quantity to date, and allows us to resolve some discrepancies between previous results.

  18. Potential risk of microplastics transportation into ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Esperanza; Gertsen, Hennie; Gooren, Harm; Peters, Piet; Salánki, Tamás; van der Ploeg, Martine; Besseling, Ellen; Koelmans, Albert A.; Geissen, Violette

    2016-04-01

    Microplastics, are plastics particles with a size smaller than 5mm. They are formed by the fragmentation of plastic wastes. They are present in the air, soil and water. But only in aquatic systems (ocean and rivers) are studies over their distribution, and the effect of microplastics on organisms. There is a lack of information of what is the distribution of microplastics in the soil, and in the ground water. This study tries to estimate the potential risk of microplastics transportation into the ground water by the activity of earthworms. Earthworms can produce burrows and/or galleries inside the soil, with the presence of earthworms some ecosystem services are enhanced, as infiltration. In this study we observed after 14 days with 5 treatments (0, 7, 28 and 60% w/w microplastics mixed with Populus nigra litter) and the anecic earthworm Lumbricus terrestris, in microcosms (3 replicas per treatment) that macroplastics are indeed deposit inside earthworms burrows, with 7% microplastics on the surface is possible to find 1.8 g.kg-1 microplastics inside the burrows, with a bioaumentation factor of 0.65. Burrows made by earthworms under 60% microplastics, are significant bigger (p<0.05) than the burrows of those earthworms without microplastics in their soil surface. The amount of litter that is deposit inside the burrows is significant higher (p<0.05) with the presence of microplastics on the surface than without microplastics. The microplastics size distribution is smaller inside the burrows than on the surface, with an abundance of particles under 63 μm.

  19. Comparisons of Satellite Optical Observations with Ground-Based Observations of Lightning, Then and Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, W. H.; Noble, C. M.; Edgar, B. C.; Suszcynsky, D. M.; Light, T. E.

    2001-12-01

    About 20 years ago, the first and third authors presented a paper comparing the optical observations of lightning from the DMSP Piggy Back Experiment (PBE) with ground-based manually determined lightning ground-strike locations. In one case in 1977 there were eleven optical events from one satellite pass over the region of interest for which there were ground-based data available. In general there were few periods of overlap because the area covered by the ground-based research direction-finding systems was limited. Now, the Photo-Diode Detector (PDD) on board the FORTE satellite, a cooperative effort between LANL and Sandia Labs, provides hundreds of optical observations that are correlated with ground-strike location data from the National Lightning Detection Network on every pass over a stormy region of the U.S. Though in some ways it should not be too surprising that there are similarities, since the PDD instrument on the FORTE satellite is very similar to the PBE instrument, it has been very interesting to re-visit the 1977 observations to compare what was seen and what was not seen by the satellite and ground-based systems, then and now. The characteristics of the optical observations for which there were no ground-strike data in 1977 are remarkably similar to those of the events attributed to cloud flashes in the FORTE data sets. We show the power-time histories of the optical observations then and now.

  20. Ground-Based Observing Campaign of Briz-M Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lederer, S. M.; Buckalew, B.; Frith, J.; Cowardin, H. M.; Hickson, P.; Matney, M.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) completed the installation of the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) on Ascension Island. MCAT is a 1.3m optical telescope designed with a fast tracking capability for observing orbital debris at all orbital regimes (Low-Erath orbits to Geosyncronous (GEO) orbits) from a low latitude site. This new asset is dedicated year-round for debris observations, and its location fills a geographical gap in the Ground-based Electro Optical Space Surveillance (GEODSS) network. A commercial off the shelf (COTS) research grade 0.4m telescope (named the Benbrook telescope) will also be installed on Ascension at the end of 2016. This smaller version is controlled by the same master software, designed by Euclid Research, and can be tasked to work independently or in concert with MCAT. Like MCAT, it has a the same suite of filters, a similar field of view, and a fast-tracking Astelco mount, and is also capable of tracking debris at all orbital regimes. These assets are well suited for targeted campagins or surveys of debris. Since 2013, NASA's ODPO has also had extensive access to the 3.8m infrared UKIRT telescope, located on Mauna Kea. At nearly 14,000-ft, this site affords excellent conditions for collecting both photometery and spectroscopy at near-IR (0.9 - 2.5 micrometers SWIR) and thermal-IR (8 - 25 micrometers; LWIR) regimes, ideal for investigating material properties as well as thermal characteristics and sizes of debris. For the purposes of understanding orbital debris, taking data in both survey mode as well as targeting individual objects for more in-depth characterizations are desired. With the recent break-ups of Briz-M rocket bodies, we have collected a suite of data in the optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared of in-tact objects as well as those classified as debris. A break-up at GEO of a Briz-M rocket occurred in January, 2016, well timed for the first remote observing survey-campaign with MCAT. Access to

  1. Compositional Ground Truth of Diviner Lunar Radiometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Thomas, I. R.; Bowles, N. E.; Allen, C. C.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Foote, E. J.; Paige, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Moon affords us a unique opportunity to "ground truth" thermal infrared (i.e. 3 to 25 micron) observations of an airless body. The Moon is the most accessable member of the most abundant class of solar system bodies, which includes Mercury, astroids, and icy satellites. The Apollo samples returned from the Moon are the only extraterrestrial samples with known spatial context. And the Diviner Lunar Radiometer (Diviner) is the first instrument to globally map the spectral thermal emission of an airless body. Here we compare Diviner observations of Apollo sites to compositional and spectral measurements of Apollo lunar soil samples in simulated lunar environment (SLE).

  2. Terrestrial Gamma Flashes Observed from Nearby Thunderstorms at Ground Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Chason, N.; Granger, D.; Guzik, T. G.; Pleshinger, D.; Rodi, J.; Stacy, J. G.; Stewart, M.; Zimmer, N.

    2014-12-01

    The TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA) is an array of NaI scintillators located on the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Since July 2010, TETRA has detected 37 millisecond bursts of gamma rays at energies 50 keV - 2 MeV associated with nearby (< 8 km) thunderstorms. The ability to observe ground-level Terrestrial Gamma Flashes from close to the source allows a unique analysis of the storm cells producing these events. A description of the observations, the results of the analysis, and plans for future measurements will be presented.

  3. Ground-based observations and AD HOC models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ground based observations of B stars in the visible, the infrared, and the radio region are described along with the ad hoc models proposed to interpret them. It is shown that these observations refer essentially to the photosphere and to the regions of the outer atmosphere where the gas is cool and at low velocity. The characteristics of the variability of the continuous and line spectrum are examined in general and in the cases of individual stars. Finally, linear polarization in the B stars is discussed.

  4. How Does Measuring Generate Evidence? The Problem of Observational Grounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Eran

    2016-11-01

    The epistemology of measurement is an area of philosophy that studies the relationships between measurement and knowledge. One of its central aims is to explain how measurement can function as a reliable source of scientific evidence. Key to such explanation is a clear characterization of the dependence of measurement on observation, but such characterization has remained elusive. This article traces the recent historical trajectory of views on the observational grounding of measurement, clarifies the current state of the problem, and proposes new directions for progress. Specifically, I argue in favour of viewing measurement outcomes as the best predictors of observed instrument indications under a given theoretical-statistical model of the measurement process. The evidential efficacy of measurement outcomes is explained by their relatively high epistemic security, rather than by their inferential or structural closeness to observation.

  5. Ground motion observations of the 2014 South Napa earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baltay, Annemarie S.; Boatwright, John

    2015-01-01

    Using the ground‐motion data compiled and reported by ShakeMap (Wald et al., 2000), we examine the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and peak ground velocity (PGV), as well as the pseudospectral acceleration (PSA) at periods of 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 s. At the higher frequencies, especially PGA, data recorded at close distances (within ∼20  km) are very consistent with the GMPEs, implying a stress drop for this event similar to the median for California, that is, 5 MPa (Baltay and Hanks, 2014). At all frequencies, the attenuation with distance is stronger than the GMPEs would predict, which suggests the attenuation in the Napa and San Francisco Bay delta region is stronger than the average attenuation in California. The spatial plot of the ground‐motion residuals is positive to the north, in both Napa and Sonoma Valleys, consistent with increases in amplitude expected from both the directivity and basin effects. More interestingly, perhaps, there is strong ground motion to the south in the along‐strike direction, particularly for PSA at 1.0 s. These strongly positive residuals align with an older, Quaternary fault structure associated with the Franklin or Southampton fault, potentially indicating a fault‐zone‐guided wave.

  6. Satellite Observations For Calibration of Ground Radar Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, M.; Morris, K.

    2011-12-01

    Calibration differences between weather service ground radars is one source of error that can lead to bias in quantitative precipitation estimates. In the U.S., calibration differences among Weather Service Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) radars are know to vary by up to several decibels in reflectivity. Such differences have been shown to cause significant radar-to-radar observation differences, and can lead to significant error in precipitation estimates. The calibration of 21 WSR-88D radars in the southeast U.S. was assessed using methods developed for NASA's Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) Validation Network (VN) prototype. The VN performs geometric matching of Precipitation Radar (PR) data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite to ground radars. The VN geometric matching method averages PR reflectivity (both raw and attenuation corrected) and rain rate, and ground radar (GR) reflectivity at the geometric intersection of the PR rays with the individual GR elevation sweeps. The algorithm thus averages the minimum PR and GR sample volumes needed to ''matchup'' the spatially coincident PR and ground radar data types. This geometric matching method has been demonstrated to out-perform gridding techniques by providing better estimates of GR-to-PR bias. TRMM PR data were used as the calibration reference because analyses of the PR performance estimated the instrument calibration to be stable and accurate to within less than 1dBZ (3-sigma). The calibration accuracy of the 21 WSR-88D radars was assessed for the period of record from August 2006 to July 2011. For purposes of calibration assessments, the data were restricted to PR-GR match-up volumes >750m above the bright band in stratiform rain areas where PR radar attenuation is not at issue. Based on space and ground radar matchups, most WSR-88D radars were found to have a mean PR-GR bias of less than 1 dBZ. Several adjacent WSR-88D sites near or along the Gulf Coast between Louisiana and

  7. Predictions of experimentally observed stochastic ground vibrations induced by blasting.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Srđan; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Trajković, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the blast induced ground motion recorded at the limestone quarry "Suva Vrela" near Kosjerić, which is located in the western part of Serbia. We examine the recorded signals by means of surrogate data methods and a determinism test, in order to determine whether the recorded ground velocity is stochastic or deterministic in nature. Longitudinal, transversal and the vertical ground motion component are analyzed at three monitoring points that are located at different distances from the blasting source. The analysis reveals that the recordings belong to a class of stationary linear stochastic processes with Gaussian inputs, which could be distorted by a monotonic, instantaneous, time-independent nonlinear function. Low determinism factors obtained with the determinism test further confirm the stochastic nature of the recordings. Guided by the outcome of time series analysis, we propose an improved prediction model for the peak particle velocity based on a neural network. We show that, while conventional predictors fail to provide acceptable prediction accuracy, the neural network model with four main blast parameters as input, namely total charge, maximum charge per delay, distance from the blasting source to the measuring point, and hole depth, delivers significantly more accurate predictions that may be applicable on site. We also perform a sensitivity analysis, which reveals that the distance from the blasting source has the strongest influence on the final value of the peak particle velocity. This is in full agreement with previous observations and theory, thus additionally validating our methodology and main conclusions.

  8. Wideband noise observed at ground level in the auroral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Desch, Michael D.

    1991-01-01

    A sideband noise event was detected at ground level from the Andoya Rocket Range in Norway in January 1989. The signals were observed on four commercial communication receivers (tuned to 159, 515, 905, and 1200 kHz), an ionosonde (200-kHz to 3.5-MHz interference-free observations) and a riometer (32.5 MHz). The event, which occurred during a period of magnetic disturbance near magnetic midnight, was the only one observed during nearly 3 weeks of operations. This low frequency-of-occurrence is attributed partly to high local noise levels. The ease with which this event was identified on the ionograms produced by the local ionosonde suggests that routine ionosonde recordings should be inspected in search for such events. Such an effort would enhance existing research directed toward developing techniques for identifying quiet communication channels and help to identify the origin and frequency-of-occurrence of high-latitude wideband noise events.

  9. Wideband noise observed at ground level in the auroral region

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, R.F.; Desch, M.D. )

    1991-08-01

    A sideband noise event was detected at ground level from the Andoya Rocket Range in Norway in January 1989. The signals were observed on four commercial communication receivers (tuned to 159, 515, 905, and 1200 kHz), an ionosonde (200-kHz to 3.5-MHz interference-free observations) and a riometer (32.5 MHz). The event, which occurred during a period of magnetic disturbance near magnetic midnight, was the only one observed during nearly 3 weeks of operations. This low frequency-of-occurrence is attributed partly to high local noise levels. The ease with which this event was identified on the ionograms produced by the local ionosonde suggests that routine ionosonde recordings should be inspected in search for such events. Such an effort would enhance existing research directed toward developing techniques for identifying quiet communication channels and help to identify the origin and frequency-of-occurrence of high-latitude wideband noise events. 20 refs.

  10. Space- and ground-based observations of pulsating aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sarah

    Pulsating aurora is a frequently occurring phenomenon generally believed to occur mainly in the aftermath of a substorm, resulting in widespread auroral luminosity corresponding to a significant transfer of power from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. A handful of theories have been proposed to explain the associated precipitation mechanism, which have been shown to ineffectively explain certain aspects of pulsating aurora. Previous research into pulsating aurora has provided a wealth of observations, yet much remains unknown about this phenomenon and some previous observations are contradictory. The focus of this presentation is the analysis of ground- and space-based measurements of pulsating aurora (primarily THEMIS ASI array, Poker Flat ISR, and Rocket Observations of Pulsating Aurora) to provide information regarding the large-scale spatial and temporal evolution of pulsating aurora events and the relationship to substorms, to determine the altitude extent and precipitating electron distribution corresponding to pulsating aurora, and to understand commonly occurring features within pulsating aurora.

  11. First Observation of Ground State Dineutron Decay: Be16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyrou, A.; Kohley, Z.; Baumann, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Christian, G.; Deyoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Frank, N.; Lunderberg, E.; Mosby, S.; Peters, W. A.; Schiller, A.; Smith, J. K.; Snyder, J.; Strongman, M. J.; Thoennessen, M.; Volya, A.

    2012-03-01

    We report on the first observation of dineutron emission in the decay of Be16. A single-proton knockout reaction from a 53MeV/u B17 beam was used to populate the ground state of Be16. Be16 is bound with respect to the emission of one neutron and unbound to two-neutron emission. The dineutron character of the decay is evidenced by a small emission angle between the two neutrons. The two-neutron separation energy of Be16 was measured to be 1.35(10) MeV, in good agreement with shell model calculations, using standard interactions for this mass region.

  12. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  13. Predictions of Experimentally Observed Stochastic Ground Vibrations Induced by Blasting

    PubMed Central

    Kostić, Srđan; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Trajković, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the blast induced ground motion recorded at the limestone quarry “Suva Vrela” near Kosjerić, which is located in the western part of Serbia. We examine the recorded signals by means of surrogate data methods and a determinism test, in order to determine whether the recorded ground velocity is stochastic or deterministic in nature. Longitudinal, transversal and the vertical ground motion component are analyzed at three monitoring points that are located at different distances from the blasting source. The analysis reveals that the recordings belong to a class of stationary linear stochastic processes with Gaussian inputs, which could be distorted by a monotonic, instantaneous, time-independent nonlinear function. Low determinism factors obtained with the determinism test further confirm the stochastic nature of the recordings. Guided by the outcome of time series analysis, we propose an improved prediction model for the peak particle velocity based on a neural network. We show that, while conventional predictors fail to provide acceptable prediction accuracy, the neural network model with four main blast parameters as input, namely total charge, maximum charge per delay, distance from the blasting source to the measuring point, and hole depth, delivers significantly more accurate predictions that may be applicable on site. We also perform a sensitivity analysis, which reveals that the distance from the blasting source has the strongest influence on the final value of the peak particle velocity. This is in full agreement with previous observations and theory, thus additionally validating our methodology and main conclusions. PMID:24358140

  14. Multisatellite and ground-based observations of transient ULF waves

    SciTech Connect

    Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.; Takahashi, K.; Erlandson, R.E. ); Luehr, H. ); Marklund, G.T.; Block, L.P.; Blomberg, L.G. ); Lepping, R.P. )

    1989-03-01

    A unique alignment of the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) CCE and Viking satellites with respect to the EISCAT Magnetometer Cross has provided an opportunity to study transient ULF pulsations associated with variations in solar wind plasma density observed by the IMP 8 satellite. These observations were acquired during a relatively quiet period on April 24, 1986, during the Polar Region and Outer Magnetosphere International Study (PROMIS) period. An isolated 4-mHz (4-min period) pulsation was detected on the ground which was associated with transverse magnetic field oscillations observed by Viking at a {approximately} 2-R{sub E} altitude above the auroral zone and by CCE at {approximately} 8-R{sub E} in the equatorial plane on nearly the same flux tube. CCE detected a compressional oscillation in the magnetic field with twice the period ({approximately} 10 min) of the transverse waves, and with a waveform nearly identical to an isolated oscillation in the solar wind plasma density measured by IMP 8. The authors conclude that the isolated 10-min oscillation in solar wind plasma density produced magnetic field compression oscillations inside the magnetosphere at the same frequency which also enhanced resonant oscillations at approximately twice the frequency that were already present. The ground magnetic field variations are due to ionospheric Hall currents driven by the electric field of the standing Alfven waves. The time delay between surface and satellite data acquired at different local times supports the conclusion that the periodic solar wind density variation excites a tailward traveling large-scale magnetosphere wave train which excites local field line resonant oscillations. They conclude that these transient magnetic field variations are not associated with magnetic field reconnection or flux transfer events.

  15. Canopy Cover Predictions using Ground Observations and Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, Jennifer L.

    1999-01-01

    Maps of vegetation status are needed at many scales, from the field level to monitor ecosystem condition to the global level to understand the carbon cycle. Status is quantified by such variables as leaf area index, biomass, and fraction of canopy cover. Current methods of predicting vegetation variables use remote sensing data to provide a spatially exhaustive data source. In a study in western Montana, several hundred ground observations made by the US Forest Service on tenth-acre conifer plots were used to develop aspatial regression and geostatistical prediction models. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values from Landsat Thematic Mapper images were used as ancillary data. These models were then used to predict canopy cover at unsampled locations in a 97 square kilometer region on the boundary of the Flathead National Forest and the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Independent data from two dates six years apart were used for validation. Given the assumption that actual canopy cover remained relatively unchanged within this time period, partial validation can be achieved by measuring the correspondence of the two maps. This criterion results in ranking the aspatial regression maps as less accurate than the geostatistically generated maps. The geostatistical approach emphasizes ground measurements more heavily than does aspatid regression. Geostatistical simulations of canopy cover also provide a means of describing uncertainty about the patterns of canopy cover.

  16. MODELING ATMOSPHERIC EMISSION FOR CMB GROUND-BASED OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Errard, J.; Borrill, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Chinone, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Elleflot, T.; Baccigalupi, C.; Fabbian, G.; Boettger, D.; Chapman, S.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Ducout, A.; Feeney, S.; Feng, C.; and others

    2015-08-10

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  17. Stepped leaders observed in ground operations of ADELE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. M.; Kelley, N.; Lowell, A.; Martinez-McKinney, F.; Dwyer, J. R.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Cramer, E. S.; Levine, S.; Cummer, S. A.; Lu, G.; Shao, X.; Ho, C.; Eastvedt, E. M.; Trueblood, J.; Edens, H. E.; Hunyady, S. J.; Winn, W. P.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2010-12-01

    While the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) was designed primarily to study high-energy radiation associated with thunderstorms at aircraft altitude, it can also be used as a mobile ground-based instrument when mounted in a van. ADELE contains scintillation detectors optimized for faint and bright events and a flat-plate antenna measuring dE/dt. In July and August 2010, ADELE was brought to Langmuir Laboratory in New Mexico as a stationary detector and to the Florida peninsula (based at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne) for rapid-response (storm-chasing) operations. In ten days of chasing, stepped-leader x-ray emission was observed from at least four close CG flashes, a much higher rate of success than can be achieved from a stationary detector or array. We will present these four events as well as the results of a study of candidate events of lesser statistical significance. We will also discuss the optimization of lightning-chasing strategies, science goals for future ground campaigns, and what additional instrumentation would be most scientifically beneficial. In the latter category, a proximity sensor (comparing flash and thunder arrival times) and a field mill are particularly important.

  18. Modeling Atmospheric Emission for CMB Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errard, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ducout, A.; Elleflot, T.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Feeney, S.; Gilbert, A.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jeong, O.; Katayama, N.; Kaufman, J.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Leon, D.; Linder, E.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N. J.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Okamura, T.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Puglisi, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K. M.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takakura, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Whitehorn, N.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    2015-08-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  19. Io's volcanic enhancement observed in mid-infrared from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, M.; Miyata, T.; Tang, C. C. C.; Sako, S.; Kamizuka, T.; Nakamura, T.; Asano, K.; Uchiyama, M.; Okada, K.; Yoshii, Y.; Sakanoi, S.; Kasaba, Y.; Okano, S.

    2014-04-01

    We present new ground-based observations of Io's volcanic activity made in 2011 and 2012 using a 1-m telescope, at mid-infrared wavelengths where Io's thermal radiation dominates solar reflected light seen at shorter wavelengths. The emitted power from Daedalus in 2011 was estimated to be ~1013 (W). This level of power has never been observed from Daedalus from previous observations, and is almost as powerful as the lava lake Loki Patera, the most powerful hotspot on Io. However, the angular separation between Loki and Daedalus is only 0.1 arcsec at most. This means most of the ground-based telescopes cannot observe these two hotspots individually at infrared wavelengths. The possibility that the power of Daedalus has been underestimated should be noted. Previous thermal measurements from ground-based observations of Loki might be overestimated, as they may also include the thermal emissions from Daedalus as well. The diffraction limit in the mid-infrared range using a 1-m diameter telescopes is significantly larger than the angular size of Io from the ground. However, this study successfully distinguished a hotspot on Io by focusing on light curves that show Io's radiance as a function of Io's central longitude. The potential of small telescopes with infrared detectors for observing Io's volcanic activity should also be noted.

  20. Uncertainty analysis of atmospheric variations from ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. L.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    In year 2016, total column ozone levels continue to be influenced by the remaining levels of the man-made ozone depleting substances in the atmosphere. Ozone recovery is a much more subtle process as compared to the ozone depletion of the 1980s. The quality of ozone observations is important for understanding and interpreting of the trends.The interannual ozone variability is driven by various natural and climate related forcing. The sampling limitations of the ground-based networks complicates analysis of the state of ozone recovery globally and locally. Therefore, the detection of the recovery rates needs to be addressed with understanding of the measurement uncertainties. Total column ozone variations estimated using Dobson ground-based stations have been challenged by data inhomogeneity in time and by the irregularity of the spatial distribution of stations, as well as by interruptions in observation records. Understanding and measuring the inherent uncertainty in long-terms ozone changes is crucial for the understanding of recovery of ozone layer and effects of climate change on ozone recovery. In this talk we estimate errors resulting from the spatial interpolation of ozone records and construct a long-term zonal means using stochastic partial differential equation (SPDE) framework, an extension of Chang, Gullias and Fioletov (2015). We further present the uncertainty analysis of long-term ozone changes. The generalized additive models (changes associated with well-known proxies) and stochastic volatility models (i.e. unexpected changes or interruptions of the record), including the integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA) approach, will be used for analysis of ozone records. The connection between spatial nonstationarity (non-constant relation with space) and the statistical estimation of volatility uncertainty will be assessed. The robustness of the space-time prediction of total column ozone trends will be addressed.

  1. 5 CFR 2425.6 - Grounds for review; potential dismissal or denial for failure to raise or support grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Grounds for review; potential dismissal... RELATIONS AUTHORITY REVIEW OF ARBITRATION AWARDS § 2425.6 Grounds for review; potential dismissal or denial... over an award relating to: (1) An action based on unacceptable performance covered under 5 U.S.C. 4303...

  2. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  3. Classroom Observation of Potential Special Education Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forness, Steven R.

    The present study is a portion of a larger study dealing with early identification of children with potential learning or behavioral difficulties. Specifically, the purpose of this phase of the project was (1) to refine classroom observation techniques and procedures and (2) to collect classroom observation data on children in regular classes who…

  4. Correlation of satellite lightning observations with ground-based lightning experiments in Florida, Texas and Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, B. C.; Turman, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    Satellite observations of lightning were correlated with ground-based measurements of lightning from data bases obtained at three separate sites. The percentage of ground-based observations of lightning that would be seen by an orbiting satellite was determined.

  5. An approach to space weather studies from ground based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minarovjech, M.; Rušin, V.; Rybanský, M.; Kudela, K.; Kollár, V.

    2004-10-01

    We use daily values of the green corona hole areas, as prepared from the ground-based observations above the E-limb of the Sun and cosmic ray flux observed at Climax and Huancayo/Haleakala, to study a relation between them during a long-term period. A cross-correlation method has been used in the period 1953-2002 (the end of solar cycle 18 to mid-cycle 23). There were found green coronal hole areas that precede the cosmic ray of 200 - 270 days, with the maximum of 230 days (an average of 8 months). The 27-day rotational periodicity is stored around the maximum of correlation coefficients that reached values of 0.78 and 0.72, respectively. This correlation could be used to forecast the level of the cosmic ray daily flux at neutron monitor energies. We try to explain this behavior in a framework of the total coronal mass and its expansion into the heliosphere.

  6. Van der Waals potential and vibrational energy levels of the ground state radon dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Xiaowei; Qian, Shifeng; Hu, Fengfei

    2017-08-01

    In the present paper, the ground state van der Waals potential of the Radon dimer is described by the Tang-Toennies potential model, which requires five essential parameters. Among them, the two dispersion coefficients C6 and C8 are estimated from the well determined dispersion coefficients C6 and C8 of Xe2. C10 is estimated by using the approximation equation that C6C10/C82 has an average value of 1.221 for all the rare gas dimers. With these estimated dispersion coefficients and the well determined well depth De and Re the Born-Mayer parameters A and b are derived. Then the vibrational energy levels of the ground state radon dimer are calculated. 40 vibrational energy levels are observed in the ground state of Rn2 dimer. The last vibrational energy level is bound by only 0.0012 cm-1.

  7. Mycobiota of ground red pepper and their aflatoxigenic potential.

    PubMed

    Ham, Hyeonheui; Kim, Sosoo; Kim, Min-Hee; Lee, Soohyung; Hong, Sung Kee; Ryu, Jae-Gee; Lee, Theresa

    2016-12-01

    To investigate contamination of ground red pepper with fungi and mycotoxin, we obtained 30 ground red pepper samples from 15 manufacturers in the main chili-pepper-producing areas in Korea. Fungal contamination was evaluated by spreading diluted samples on potato dextrose agar plates. The total fungi counts ranged from 0 to 7.3 × 10(3) CFU/g. In the samples, the genus Aspergillus had the highest incidence, while Paecilomyces was isolated most frequently. The next most frequent genera were Rhizopus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Alternaria. Within Aspergillus, A. ruber was predominant, followed by A. niger, A. amstelodami, A. ochraceus, A. terreus, A. versicolor, A. flavus, and A. fumigatus. The samples were analyzed for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, and citrinin by ultra-perfomance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with a fluorescence detector. Ochratoxin A was detected from three samples at 1.03‒2.08 μg/kg, whereas no aflatoxins or citrinin were detected. To test the potential of fungal isolates to produce aflatoxin, we performed a PCR assay that screened for the norB-cypA gene for 64 Aspergillus isolates. As a result, a single 800-bp band was amplified from 10 A. flavus isolates, and one Aspergillus sp. isolate. UPLC analyses confirmed aflatoxin production by nine A. flavus isolates and one Aspergillus sp. isolate, which produced total aflatoxins at 146.88‒909.53 μg/kg. This indicates that continuous monitoring of ground red pepper for toxigenic fungi is necessary to minimize mycotoxin contamination.

  8. Ali Observatory in Tibet: a unique northern site for future CMB ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2015-08-01

    Ground-based CMB observations have been performed at the South Pole and the Atacama desert in Chile. However, a significant fraction of the sky can not be observed from just these two sites. For a full sky coverage from the ground in the future, a northern site for CMB observation, in particular CMB polarization, is required. Besides the long-thought site in Greenland, the high altitude Tibet plateau provides another opportunity. I will describe the Ali Observatory in Tibet, located at N32°19', E80°01', as a potential site for ground-based CMB observations. The new site is located on almost 5100m mountain, near Gar town, where is an excellent site for both infrared and submillimeter observations. Study with the long-term database of ground weather stations and archival satellite data has been performed. The site has enough relative height on the plateau and is accessible by car. The Shiquanhe town is 40 mins away by driving, and a recently opened airport with 40 mins driving, the site also has road excess, electricity, and optical fiber with fast internet. Preliminary measurement of the Precipitable Water Vapor is ~one quarter less than 0.5mm per year and the long term monitoring is under development. In addition, surrounding higher sites are also available and could be further developed if necessary. Ali provides unique northern sky coverage and together with the South Pole and the Atacama desert, future CMB observations will be able to cover the full sky from ground.

  9. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  10. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  11. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  12. Linking Space-Borne and Ground-Based Observations Observed Around Substorm Onset to Magnetospheric Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepko, Larry; Spanswick, Emma; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Donovan, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The combined THEMIS five spacecraft in-situ and ground magnetic and camera arrays have advanced considerably our understanding of the causal relationship between midtail plasma flows, transient ionospheric features, and ground magnetic signatures. In particular, recent work has shown a connection between equatorward moving visible ionospheric transients and substorm onset, in both 6300 nm and white-light emissions. Although both observations detail pre-onset auroral features the interpretations differ substantially. We first provide a brief summary of these observations, highlighting in particular areas where the two observations differ, and suggest reasons for the differences. We then detail how these observations relate to dynamical magnetospheric processes, and show how they constrain models of transient convection. Next, we pull together observations and models of Pi2 generation, substorm current wedge (SCW) initiation and dipolarization to present a self-consistent description of the dynamical processes and communicative pathways that occur just prior to and during substorm expansion onset. Finally, we present a summary of open questions and suggest a roadmap for future work.

  13. WSO-UV ground segment for observation optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basargina, O.; Sachkov, M.; Kazakevich, Y.; Kanev, E.; Sichevskij, S.

    2016-07-01

    The World Space Observatory-Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) is a Russian-Spanish space mission born as a response to the growing up demand for UV facilities by the astronomical community. Main components of the WSO-UV Ground Segment, Mission Control Centre and Science Operation Centre, are being developed by international cooperation In this paper the fundamental components of WSO-UV ground segment are described. Also approaches to optimize observatory scheduling problem are discussed.

  14. Potential Cislunar and Interplanetary Proving Ground Excursion Trajectory Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Melissa L.; Strange, Nathan J.; Burke, Laura M.; MacDonald, Mark A.; McElrath, Timothy P.; Landau, Damon F.; Lantoine, Gregory; Hack, Kurt J.; Lopez, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    NASA has been investigating potential translunar excursion concepts to take place in the 2020s that would be used to test and demonstrate long duration life support and other systems needed for eventual Mars missions in the 2030s. These potential trajectory concepts could be conducted in the proving ground, a region of cislunar and near-Earth interplanetary space where international space agencies could cooperate to develop the technologies needed for interplanetary spaceflight. Enabled by high power Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) technologies, the excursion trajectory concepts studied are grouped into three classes of increasing distance from the Earth and increasing technical difficulty: the first class of excursion trajectory concepts would represent a 90-120 day round trip trajectory with abort to Earth options throughout the entire length, the second class would be a 180-210 day round trip trajectory with periods in which aborts would not be available, and the third would be a 300-400 day round trip trajectory without aborts for most of the length of the trip. This paper provides a top-level summary of the trajectory and mission design of representative example missions of these three classes of excursion trajectory concepts.

  15. OTD Observations of Continental US Ground Flashes Detected by NLDN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Boccippio, Dennis J.

    2007-01-01

    Lightning optical flash parameters (e.g., radiance, area, duration, number of optical groups, and number of optical events) derived from almost 5 yrs of Optical Transient Detector (OTD) data are compared with peak current and multiplicity observations derived from the US National Lightning Detection Networkm (NLDN). Despite the relatively low lightning geolocation accuracy afforded by OTD, a total of 48,870 NLDN cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes were correlated with OTD flashes, or about 10,000 CGs per year. The median values of the above OTD flash parameters for the 48,870 CGs were, respectively: 0.137 J/square meters/sr/micrometers, 313.7 square kilometers, 0.189 s, 4 optical groups per CG, and 8 optical events per CG. Invoking the multiplicity data, the median number of optical groups per stroke was 2.5, and the median number of optical events per stroke was 5.0. Median values of peak current for negative and positive CGs were -21.6 kA and 17.8 kA, respectively, and as expected, the negative CGs had a larger average multiplicity than the positive CGs. A statistical summary is provided for all CGs, for positive and negative CGs, and for CGs from different seasons. Standard two-distribution hypothesis tests were perfonned to intercompare the population means of the various lightning parameters. In particular, and to greater than the 99% confidence level, it was found that positive CGs are on average more radiant, of greater areal extent, and are longer lasting than negative CGs. Rankings from a complete set of hypothesis tests between CGs of different polarities and from different seasons are also provided. Most notably, wintertime positive CGs tend to be more radiant, of greater areal extent, and longer lasting than any other group of CGs (i.e., negative springtime CGs, positive summertime CGs, etc.).

  16. OTD Observations of Continental US Ground Flashes Detected by NLDN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Boccippio, Dennis J.

    2007-01-01

    Lightning optical flash parameters (e.g., radiance, area, duration, number of optical groups, and number of optical events) derived from almost 5 yrs of Optical Transient Detector (OTD) data are compared with peak current and multiplicity observations derived from the US National Lightning Detection Networkm (NLDN). Despite the relatively low lightning geolocation accuracy afforded by OTD, a total of 48,870 NLDN cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes were correlated with OTD flashes, or about 10,000 CGs per year. The median values of the above OTD flash parameters for the 48,870 CGs were, respectively: 0.137 J/square meters/sr/micrometers, 313.7 square kilometers, 0.189 s, 4 optical groups per CG, and 8 optical events per CG. Invoking the multiplicity data, the median number of optical groups per stroke was 2.5, and the median number of optical events per stroke was 5.0. Median values of peak current for negative and positive CGs were -21.6 kA and 17.8 kA, respectively, and as expected, the negative CGs had a larger average multiplicity than the positive CGs. A statistical summary is provided for all CGs, for positive and negative CGs, and for CGs from different seasons. Standard two-distribution hypothesis tests were perfonned to intercompare the population means of the various lightning parameters. In particular, and to greater than the 99% confidence level, it was found that positive CGs are on average more radiant, of greater areal extent, and are longer lasting than negative CGs. Rankings from a complete set of hypothesis tests between CGs of different polarities and from different seasons are also provided. Most notably, wintertime positive CGs tend to be more radiant, of greater areal extent, and longer lasting than any other group of CGs (i.e., negative springtime CGs, positive summertime CGs, etc.).

  17. Estimates of Ground Temperature and Atmospheric Moisture from CERES Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Man Li C.; Schubert, Siegfried; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is developed to retrieve surface ground temperature (Tg) and atmospheric moisture using clear sky fluxes (CSF) from CERES-TRMM observations. In general, the clear sky outgoing long-wave radiation (CLR) is sensitive to upper level moisture (q(sub h)) over wet regions and Tg over dry regions The clear sky window flux from 800 to 1200 /cm (RadWn) is sensitive to low level moisture (q(sub j)) and Tg. Combining these two measurements (CLR and RadWn), Tg and q(sub h) can be estimated over land, while q(sub h) and q(sub t) can be estimated over the oceans. The approach capitalizes on the availability of satellite estimates of CLR and RadWn and other auxiliary satellite data. The basic methodology employs off-line forward radiative transfer calculations to generate synthetic CSF data from two different global 4-dimensional data assimilation products. Simple linear regression is used to relate discrepancies in CSF to discrepancies in Tg, q(sub h) and q(sub t). The slopes of the regression lines define sensitivity parameters that can be exploited to help interpret mismatches between satellite observations and model-based estimates of CSF. For illustration, we analyze the discrepancies in the CSF between an early implementation of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-DAS) and a recent operational version of the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Prediction data assimilation system. In particular, our analysis of synthetic total and window region SCF differences (computed from two different assimilated data sets) shows that simple linear regression employing (Delta)Tg and broad layer (Delta)q(sub l) from 500 hPa to surface and (Delta)q(sub h) from 200 to 500 hPa provides a good approximation to the full radiative transfer calculations, typically explaining more than 90% of the 6-hourly variance in the flux differences. These simple regression relations can be inverted to "retrieve" the errors in the geophysical parameters

  18. Estimates of Ground Temperature and Atmospheric Moisture from CERES Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Man Li C.; Schubert, Siegfried; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is developed to retrieve surface ground temperature (T(sub g)) and atmospheric moisture using clear sky fluxes (CSF) from CERES-TRMM observations. In general, the clear sky outgoing longwave radiation (CLR) is sensitive to upper level moisture (q(sub l)) over wet regions and (T(sub g)) over dry regions The clear sky window flux from 800 to 1200/cm (RadWn) is sensitive to low level moisture (q(sub t)) and T(sub g). Combining these two measurements (CLR and RadWn), Tg and q(sub h) can be estimated over land, while q(sub h) and q(sub l) can be estimated over the oceans. The approach capitalizes on the availability of satellite estimates of CLR and RadWn and other auxiliary satellite data. The basic methodology employs off-line forward radiative transfer calculations to generate synthetic CSF data from two different global 4-dimensional data assimilation products. Simple linear regression is used to relate discrepancies in CSF to discrepancies in T(sub g), q(sub h) and q(sub l). The slopes of the regression lines define sensitivity parameters that can be exploited to help interpret mismatches between satellite observations and model-based estimates of CSF. For illustration, we analyze the discrepancies in the CSF between an early implementation of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-DAS) and a recent operational version of the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Prediction data assimilation system. In particular, our analysis of synthetic total and window region SCF differences (computed from two different assimilated data sets) shows that simple linear regression employing Delta(T(sub g)) and broad layer Delta(q(sub l) from .500 hPa to surface and Delta(q(sub h)) from 200 to .300 hPa provides a good approximation to the full radiative transfer calculations. typically explaining more than 90% of the 6-hourly variance in the flux differences. These simple regression relations can be inverted to "retrieve" the errors in the

  19. The H 2O ++ Ground State Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, P. R.; Bludsky, Ota; Jensen, Per; Wesolowski, S. S.; Van Huis, T. J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Schaefer, H. F.

    1999-12-01

    At the correlation-consistent polarized-valence quadruple-zeta complete active space self-consistent field second-order configuration interaction level of ab initio theory (cc-pVQZ CASSCF-SOCI), we calculated 129 points on the ground electronic state potential energy surface of the water dication H2O++; this calculation includes the energy of X3Σ- OH+ at equilibrium and the energy of the triplet oxygen atom. We determined the parameters in an analytical function that represents this surface out to the (OH+ + H+) and (O + 2H+) dissociation limits, for bending angles from 70 to 180°. There is a metastable minimum in this surface, at an energy of 43 600 cm-1 above the H+ + OH+ dissociation energy, and the geometry at this minimum is linear (D∞h), with an OH bond length of 1.195 Å. On the path to dissociation to H+ + OH+, there is a saddle point at an energy of 530 cm-1 above the minimum, and the geometry at the saddle point is linear (C∞ Kv) with OH bond lengths of 1.121 and 1.489 Å. Using the stabilization method, we calculated the lowest resonance on this surface. Relative to the metastable local minimum on the potential energy surface, the position of the lowest resonance for H2O++, D2O++, and T2O++ is 1977(85), 1473(25), and 1249(10) cm-1, respectively, where the width of each resonance (in cm-1) is given in parentheses.

  20. Identification of Potential Fishing Grounds Using Geospatial Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Fishery resources surveys using actual sampling and data collection methods require extensive ship time and sampling time. Informative data from satellite plays a vital role in fisheries application. Satellite Remote Sensing techniques can be used to detect fish aggregation just like visual fish identification ultimately these techniques can be used to predict the potential fishing zones by measuring the parameters which affect the distribution of fishes. Remote sensing is a time saving technique to locate fishery resources along the coast. Pakistan has a continental shelf area of 50,270 km2 and coastline length of 1,120 km. The total maritime zone of Pakistan is over 30 percent of the land area. Fishery plays an important role in the national economy. The marine fisheries sector is the main component, contributing about 57 percent in terms of production. Fishery is the most important economic activity in the villages and towns along the coast, and in most of the coastal villages and settlements it is the sole source of employment and income generation. Fishing by fishermen is done on the sole basis of repeated experiments and collection of information from other fishermen. Often they are in doubt about the location of potential fishing zones. This leads to waste of time and money, adversely affecting fishermen incomes and over or under-exploitation of fishing zones. The main purpose of this study was to map potential fishing grounds by identifying various environmental parameters which impact fish aggregation along the Pakistan coastline. The primary reason of this study is the fact that the fishing communities of Pakistan's coastal regions are extremely poor and lack knowledge of the modern tools and techniques that may be incorporated to enhance their yield and thus, improve their livelihood. Using geospatial techniques in order to accurately map the potential fishing zones based on sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll -a content, in conjunction with

  1. Differences in the Optical Characteristics of Continental US Ground and Cloud Flashes as Observed from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William

    2007-01-01

    Continental US lightning flashes observed by the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) are categorized according to flash type (ground or cloud flash) using US National Lightning Detection Network (TM) (NLDN) data. The statistics of the ground and cloud flash optical parameters (e.g., radiance, area, duration, number of optical groups, and number of optical events) are inter-compared. On average, the ground flash cloud-top emissions are more radiant, illuminate a larger area, are longer lasting, and have more optical groups and optical events than those cloud-top emissions associated with cloud flashes. Given these differences, it is suggested that the methods of Bayesian Inference could be used to help discriminate between ground and cloud flashes. The ability to discriminate flash type on-orbit is highly desired since such information would help researchers and operational decision makers better assess the intensification, evolutionary state, and severe weather potential of thunderstorms. This work supports risk reduction activities presently underway for the future launch of the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM).

  2. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2007-09-13

    The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

  3. Features of positive ground flashes observed in Kathmandu Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Pitri Bhakta; Sharma, Shriram; Baral, Kedarnath

    2016-07-01

    Lightning vertical electric fields pertinent to the subtropical thunderstorms occurring over the rugged terrain have been measured and recorded at a hilly station Kathmandu, Nepal. In the present work, waveforms of the positive ground flashes have been selected from all the records and were analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that fine structure of electric field signature pertinent to the positive return stroke; have been analyzed and presented from Nepal. One hundred and thirty three (133) of the total of four hundred twenty-five (425) flashes were selected from seven thunderstorm days and analyzed. Of the data recorded for seven days, 133 flashes (31.3%) were positive flashes and 276 flashes (64.9%) were cloud flashes. Majority of the positive ground flashes were found to be single stroke ones, whereas, the average number of strokes per flash is found to be 1.1 with a maximum value of 4. Majority of the positive ground flashes were found either lacking the initial breakdown process and the leader stage or these processes could not be detected. The return strokes are found to be succeeded by large in cloud activity in the continuing current portion of the flash. The average zero-crossing time of the positive return strokes was found to be 60.45 μs with a range of 447.81 μs and the average rise time was found to be 9.44 μs with a range of 42.56 μs.

  4. Results from comparing THEMIS satellite and ground based observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, Stephen; Frey, Harald; Donovan, Eric; Jackel, Brian; Angelopoulos, V.

    The NASA Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) project is intended to investigate the major controversy in substorm science, the uncertainty whether the instability leading to the substorm is initiated near the Earth or in the more distant >20 Re magnetic tail. THEMIS will use the timing of the occurrence of substorm signatures at five satellites and at ground based all-sky imagers and magnetometers to infer the propagation direction. The array of stations consists of 20 all-sky imagers and 30 plus magnetometers deployed in the North American continent from Alaska to Labrador. Each ground based observatory contains a white light imager taking auroral images at a 3 second repetition rate and a magnetometer that records the 3 axis variation of the magnetic field at 2 Hz frequency. During the winter of 2007-08 the THEMIS satellites achieved their intended strategic locations to monitor substorms. For example in the time period between 06 and 09 UT on the 2nd of February 2008 several substorms occurred while the THEMIS satellites P1, P2, P3, P4, and P5 were located in the tail of the magnetosphere at approximately 29.6, 18.5, 11, 11 and 8Re downtail distance (GSM) respectively. The weather was relatively clear permitting the recording of the auroral features while the particle and field measurements were taken. In this paper we will discuss the preliminary results drawn from the data taken during substorms that occur during THEMIS conjunctions.

  5. Review of observations of ground diffusion in space and in time and fractal model of ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2010-09-01

    We present numerous observations of the diffusive motion of the ground and tunnels for scientific instruments and show that if systematic movements are excluded the remaining uncorrelated component of the motion obeys a characteristic fractal law with the displacement variance dY2 scaling with time and spatial intervals T and L as dY2∝TαLγ with both exponents close to 1 (α≈γ≈1). We briefly describe experimental methods of the mesoscopic and microscopic ground motion detection used in measurements at physics research facilities sensitive to ground motion, particularly large high energy elementary particle accelerators. A simple mathematical model of the fractal motion demonstrating the observed scaling law is also presented and discussed. This paper is a subsequent full detail publication to [V. Shiltsev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 238501 (2010)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.238501].

  6. Students as Ground Observers for Satellite Cloud Retrieval Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Lin H.; Costulis, P. Kay; Young, David F.; Rogerson, Tina M.

    2004-01-01

    The Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) Project was initiated in 1997 to obtain student observations of clouds coinciding with the overpass of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on NASA's Earth Observing System satellites. Over the past seven years we have accumulated more than 9,000 cases worldwide where student observations are available within 15 minutes of a CERES observation. This paper reports on comparisons between the student and satellite data as one facet of the validation of the CERES cloud retrievals. Available comparisons include cloud cover, cloud height, cloud layering, and cloud visual opacity. The large volume of comparisons allows some assessment of the impact of surface cover, such as snow and ice, reported by the students. The S'COOL observation database, accessible via the Internet at http://scool.larc.nasa.gov, contains over 32,000 student observations and is growing by over 700 observations each month. Some of these observations may be useful for assessment of other satellite cloud products. In particular, some observing sites have been making hourly observations of clouds during the school day to learn about the diurnal cycle of cloudiness.

  7. Kansas ground-water observation-well network, 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pabst, Marilyn E.

    1983-01-01

    The locations of 1,940 selected wells in 72 counties, which comprised the Kansas groundwater observation-well network 1983, are listed. Water level measurements are made in these wells on a continuous, monthly, quarterly, or annual basis. Data collected from the observation well network are stored in a computer and have been published in various formats. The observation well network provides a continuing program of collection, analysis, and storage of groundwater level data required to define and describe the groundwater resources of Kansas. Accurate groundwater information is the single most important item for management of the State 's groundwater resource and is required for the application of research to the solution of groundwater related problems. The information provided by the observation well network is needed at all management levels to aid in the evaluation and conservation of groundwater. (Lantz-PTT)

  8. Relationship between soft stratum thickness and predominant frequency of ground based on microtremor observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Kenny; Lau, Tze Liang

    2017-07-01

    Despite categorized as low seismicity group, until being affected by distant earthquake ground motion from Sumatra and the recent 2015 Sabah Earthquake, Malaysia has come to realize that seismic hazard in the country is real and has the potential to threaten the public safety and welfare. The major concern in this paper is to study the effect of local site condition, where it could amplify the magnitude of ground vibration at sites. The aim for this study is to correlate the thickness of soft stratum with the predominant frequency of soil. Single point microtremor measurements were carried out at 24 selected points where the site investigation reports are available. Predominant period and frequency at each site are determined by Nakamura's method. The predominant period varies from 0.22 s to 0.98 s. Generally, the predominant period increases when getting closer to the shoreline which has thicker sediments. As far as the thickness of the soft stratum could influence the amplification of seismic wave, the advancement of micotremor observation to predict the thickness of soft stratum (h) from predominant frequency (fr) is of the concern. Thus an empirical relationship h =54.917 fr-1.314 is developed based on the microtremor observation data. The empirical relationship will be benefited in the prediction of thickness of soft stratum based on microtremor observation for seismic design with minimal cost compared to conventional boring method.

  9. Satellite observations of ground water changes in New Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2002 NASA launched the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. GRACE consists of two satellites with a separation of about 200 km.  By accurately measuring the separation between the twin satellites, the differences in the gravity field can be determined. Monthly observ...

  10. Ground and satellite observations of auroral fragmentation into patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, Kazuo; Nishi, Katsuki

    2016-07-01

    We review characteristic auroral fragmentation which is the process by which uniform aurora is broken into several fragments to form auroral patches, based on the all-sky camera observations at Tromsoe, Norway and THEMIS chain in Canada. The auroral fragmentation occurs as finger-like structures developing predominantly in meridional direction with speeds of several tens m/s and scale sizes of several tens kilometers without any shearing motion. These features suggest that pressure-driven instability in the balance between the earthward magnetic-tension force and the tailward pressure gradient force in the magnetosphere is the main driving force of the auroral fragmentation. Thus, these observations indicate that auroral fragmentation associated with pressure-driven instability is a process that creates auroral patches. Auroral fragmentation is seen from midnight to dawn local time and usually appears at the beginning of the substorm recovery phase, near the low latitude boundary of the auroral region. One example of plasma and magnetic field observations by the THEMIS satellite in the conjugate magnetosphere shows diamagnetic anti-phase variations of magnetic and plasma pressures with time scales of several to tens minutes associated with the auroral fragmentation. This observation also supports the idea of pressure-driven instability to cause the auroral fragmentation into patches.

  11. Options for modeling ground water pollution potential by dissolved chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, William A.; Tseng, Peng-Hsiang

    A common characteristic of virtually all forms of non-point source pollutants is that they move downward through the soil under the influence of erratic and generally unsaturated water flow. As a consequence, both soil-water flow and solute-transport properties must be known to model the event on a field or larger scale. The extensive spatial variability of these properties make deterministic modeling unfeasible at this scale, necessitating some form of approximate stochastic approach that extrapolates from limited samples of properties and input parameters. There are a number of options for exercising this strategy, but most of them involve using a local-model representation that is averaged over the spatial domain in a statistical sense, by using a number of discrete one-dimensional simulations in parallel. With this strategy, the important question becomes what type of local model to use, and how complex to make it. This paper explores options for local representation in modeling the water flow regime, ranging from full simulation using the Richards flow equation, to steady flow using only the field-capacity estimate of water content. Simulations of flow and transport to ground water are run on a hypothetical field with variable climatic data and properties generated by geometric scaling theory, using data from 20 sites averaged in parallel to represent field-scale movement to ground water for a conservative and reactive chemical pulse. Although the transient-flow model is necessary to achieve accurate representation of the position of the pulse within the profile, mass loading of ground water was represented quite accurately with a simple flow regime assuming steady-state flow and uniform, water content. The field-capacity estimate was greatly out of agreement with the other methods, however.

  12. "Sniffing" Jupiter's moon Europa through ground-based IR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganini, Lucas; Mumma, Michael J.; Hurford, Terry; Roth, Lorenz; Villanueva, Geronimo Luis

    2016-10-01

    The ability to sample possible plumes from the subsurface ocean in Europa represents a major step in our search for extraterrestrial life. If plumes exist, sampling the effluent material would provide insights into their chemistry and relevant information about the prospect that life could exist, or now exists, within the ocean. Most of the difficulties in detecting plumes come from the less frequent observational coverage of Europa, which contrasts strongly with the frequent Cassini flybys of Enceladus (Spencer & Nimmo 2013). Recent observations have been taken with HST/STIS in 2014/2015, but results have shown no evident confirmation of the 2012 plume detection (Roth et al. 2014, 2015). Future in situ observations (Europa Mission) will provide definitive insights, but not before the spacecraft's arrival in ~2025, thus an interim approach is needed to inform such space mission planning and to complement existing observations at other wavelengths.In 2015, we initiated a strong campaign to build a comprehensive survey of possible plumes on Europa through high-resolution IR spectroscopy with Keck/NIRSPEC. We were awarded 10 nights out of 15 total nights available for Key Strategic Mission Support projects for the 2016A, 2016B, 2017A, and 2017B semesters under NASA time with the Keck Observatory. In 2016A, we observed Europa during 10 half-nights and will continue to do so for another 10 half-nights in 2017A. We target a serendipitous search of gaseous activity from Europa to confirm and constrain the chemical composition of possible Europan plumes that can aid the investigation of physical processes underlying (or on) its surface. Ultimately, we seek to: (1) provide information that can inform planning for NASA's Europa mission, (2) further our current understanding of Europa's gas environment, and (3) complement studies that are currently underway with other facilities (like the Hubble Space Telescope). In this presentation, we will discuss preliminary results

  13. A discussion of the ground-based radio observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, F. J.

    1971-01-01

    It is reasserted that the Gum nebula is not a single nebula but appears to be composed of several different entities. All the surveys of the southern sky in the continuum, recombination line, H I, and OH were considered. The large amount of high frequency radio emission from the small nebula is noted. The outer part of the Gum nebula has not been seen in any radio observations so far. Only the inner part has been observed to date. It is not justifiable to work out any parameters for the whole nebula by taking an average over the whole solid angle subtended by the big nebula. There appears to be a large difference in density between the small nebula and the big one.

  14. Observing Io at high resolution from the ground with LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, A.; de Pater, I.; Kürster, M.; Herbst, T.; Kaltenegger, L.; Skrutskie, M.; Hinz, P.

    2011-10-01

    LINC-NIRVANA (LN) is an imaging Fizeau interferometer, with wavelength coverage from 1.1 to 2.4 microns, scheduled for first light on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in 2014. The classical on-axis AO mode of LN, called LINC mode will provide solar system researchers with 15, or in some cases even 10, milliarcsecond spatial resolution. Several projects are planned for using LINC to observe features on Jupiter's volcanic moon Io.

  15. The use of products from ground-based GNSS observations in meteorological nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terradellas, E.; Téllez, B.

    2010-07-01

    Convective rainfall is often focalized in areas of moisture convergence. A close relationship between precipitation and fast variations of vertically-integrated water vapour (IWV) has been found in numerous cases. Therefore, continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity and its spatial distribution is crucial to the operational forecaster for a proper nowcasting of heavy rainfall events. The microwave signals continuously broadcasted by the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) satellites are influenced by the water vapour as they travel through the atmosphere. Estimates of IWV retrieved from ground-based GNSS observations may, then, constitute a source of information on the horizontal distribution and the time evolution of atmospheric humidity. At the Spanish Meteorological Agency (AEMET), a near-real-time map of IWV estimates retrieved from ground GNSS measurements in the Iberian Peninsula and West Mediterranean region is operationally built and presented to the forecaster. The maps are generated every 15 minutes following a one-dimensional variational assimilation scheme with the previous map as the background state. A case study is presented in order to illustrate some strengths and weaknesses of the product, to assess the potential benefit of using GNSS products in nowcasting and to define the steps to be done in order to make use of the full potential of the method.

  16. Ground-based observations of subionospheric pulse pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David A.; Holden, Daniel N.

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a unique multiple-channel subband system to detect and record broadband electromagnetic transient events in carrier-dominated radio environments. Between May and September of 1994 we used this system to detect and record over six thousand transient radio frequency events in the band from 3 to 30 MHz. Approximately 500 of the events have been characterized as paired bursts of radio noise with individual burst durations of 4 to 10 μs and separations between the bursts of 5 to 160 μs. The paired transients are typically 5 to 40 dB brighter than the background electromagnetic spectrum between carrier signals. We have termed these events subionospheric pulse pairs (SIPPs) and presently have no explanation as to their source. Our observations of SIPPs resemble observations of transionospheric pulse pairs (TIPPs) recorded by the Blackbeard instrument on the ALEXIS satellite; the source of TIPP events is also unknown. Most SIPPs do not exhibit dispersion, implying groundwave (line-of-sight) propagation; but seven of the pairs exhibit dispersion characteristic of ionospheric skywave propagation. For our experimental configuration the maximum line-of-sight observation range for radio propagation extends to 300 km for a source at an altitude of 5 km and 520 km for a source at 15 km. Refraction from the ionosphere may allow HF skywave radiation to propagate around the globe. Information about the times and locations of sources, in conjunction with regional weather maps and computer models of ionospheric propagation, suggests that some SIPP events originate in the vicinity of large-scale thunderstorm complexes.

  17. Ground-Based Observations of Recovery Phase Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    This analysis focuses on spatial and temporal forms occurring after substorm breakup. The observations show irregular shapes and nonuniform drifts with respect to relatively stationary pulsating patches. The pulsating patches occur within a diffuse auroral background as a modulation of the auroral brightness in a localized region. The images analyzed show a decrease in the brightness of the diffuse background in the region of the pulsating patch at the beginning of the 'off' phase of the modulation. Throughout the off phase the brightness of the diffuse aurora gradually increases back to the average intensity. The time constant for this increase is measured as the first step toward determining the physical process.

  18. An Overview of JAXA's Ground-Observation Activities for HAYABUSA Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kazuhisa; Yamamoto, Masa-Yuki; Abe, Shinsuke; Ishihara, Yoshiaki; Iiyama, Ohmi; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Furumoto, Muneyoshi; Takayanagi, Hiroki; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Shoemaker, Michael; Ueda, Masayoshi; Shiba, Yasuo; Suzuki, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    On 2010 June 13, the HAYABUSA asteroid explorer returned to Earth and underwent a super-orbital atmospheric reentry. In order to recover the sample return capsule and to take ground-based measurements, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency organized a ground-observation team and performed optical tracking of the capsule, spectroscopy of the fireball, and measurements of infrasounds and shock waves generated by the fireball. In this article, an overview of the ground-based observation is presented, and an outline of the preliminary results derived from observations is reported.

  19. Solar System data mining for Gaia and ground-based observational support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanga, Paolo; Cellino, Alberto; Delbo, Marco; Hestroffer, Daniel; Mignard, Francois; Mouret, Serge; Thuillot, William

    The Gaia mission will observe between 2.5 and 3x105 Solar System objects. Most of them will be asteroids. As described elsewhere (Cellino et al. 2007, Tanga et al. 2007, Mignard et al. 2008) Gaia will provide a complete dynamical and physical characterisation of these bodies, that has no comparisons with the datasets ever obtained by a single groundor spacebased telescope. In fact, high precision astrometry, flux measurements and spectra will be available in an homogeneous set of data. However, in order to fully exploit the scientific potential of the data, a dedicated processing structure is needed. For this reason, a specific data reduction and analysis pipeline is under development. Some aspects of the implementation require solving interesting challenges in Solar System dynamics, consisting in new and more complex formulations of classic problems. We discuss, in particular, the determination of asteroid masses and the measurement of non-gravitational forces. Also, we show that - in the case of Solar System objects - the high astrometric accuracy of Gaia cannot completely rule out the use of ground-based data for increasing the extent of the final mission products. Well planned and focused preand post-mission observational campaigns could thus greatly help to reach goals situated at the edge (or beyond) the reach of Gaia observations alone. References Cellino, A., Tanga, P., Dell'Oro, A., Hestroffer, D. 2007. Asteroid science with Gaia: Sizes, spin properties, overall shapes and taxonomy. Adv. Space Res. 40 (2), 202-208 Mignard, F.,Cellino, A., Muinonen, K., Tanga, P., Delbo, D., Dell'Oro, A., Granvik, M., Hestroffer, D., Mouret, S., Thuillot, W., Virtanen, J. 2008. The Gaia mission: expected applications to asteroid science. Earth Moon and Planets, in press Tanga, P., Hestroffer, D., Cellino, A., Mignard, F. 2007. Gaia observations of Solar System objects: Impact on dynamics and ground-based observations. Adv. Space Res. 40 (2), 209-214

  20. Analysis of simultaneous Skylab and ground based flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulander, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    HeI and HeII resonance line data from Skylab were reduced, analyzed and compared with HeI D3 line intensities taken simultaneously from the Lockheed Rye Canyon Solar Observatory. Computer codes were developed for the calculation of total He line intensities and line profiles from model flare regions. These codes incorporate simultaneous solution of the line and continuum transport equations as needed together with the statistical equilibrium equations for a 30 level HeI, HeII, HeIII system. The energy level model consists of all terms through principal quantum number four. Interpretation of the observed data in terms of these parametric solutions and with simultaneous solution of the transport equations are discussed.

  1. Hydrogeologic setting and potential for denitrification in ground water, coastal plain of southern Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krantz, David E.; Powars, David S.

    2000-01-01

    The types and distribution of Coastal Plain sediments in the Patuxent River Basin may contribute to relatively low concentrations of nitrate (typically less than 1 milligram per liter) in stream base flow because of the chemical reduction of dissolved nitrate (denitrification) in ground water. Water chemistry data from synoptic stream base-flow surveys in the Patuxent River Basin show higher dissolved nitrate concentrations in the Piedmont than in the Coastal Plain section of the watershed. Stream base flow reflects closely the chemistry of ground water discharging from the surficial (unconfined) aquifer to the stream. Because land use in the sampled subbasins is virtually the same in each section, differences in the physical and geochemical characteristics of the surficial aquifer may explain the observed differences in water chemistry. One possible cause of lower nitrate concentrations in the Coastal Plain is denitrification within marine sediments that contain chemically reduced compounds. During denitrification, the oxygen atoms on the nitrate (N03-) molecule are transferred to a reduced compound and N gas is produced. Organic carbon and ferrous iron (Fe2+), derived from the dissolution of minerals such as pyrite (FeS2) and glauconite (an iron aluminosilicate clay), can act as reducing substrates; these reduced chemical species are common in the marine and estuarine deposits in Southern Maryland. The spatial distribution of geologic units and their lithology (sediment type) has been used to create a map of the potential for denitrification of ground water in the surficial aquifer of the Coastal Plain in Southern Maryland.

  2. Potential effects of the Hawaii geothermal project on ground-water resources on the Island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides data and information on the quantity and quality of ground-water resources in and adjacent to proposed geothermal development areas on the Island of Hawaii Geothermal project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. Data presented for about 31 wells and 8 springs describe the chemical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. On the basis of this information, potential effects of this geothermal development on drawdown of ground-water levels and contamination of ground-water resources are discussed. Significant differences in ground-water levels and in the salinity and temperature of ground water within the study area appear to be related to mixing of waters from different sources and varying degrees of ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. Near Pahoa and to the east, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the relatively modest requirements for fresh water to support geothermal development in that part of the east rift zone would result in minimal effects on ground-water levels in and adjacent to the rift. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying fresh water at rates sufficient to support geothermal operations. Water would have to be transported to such developments from supply systems located outside the rift or farther downrift. Contaminant migration resulting from well accidents could be rapid because of relatively high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of observation wells needs to be continued throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project to enable the early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids.

  3. Preliminary Space VLBI Requirements for Observing Time on Ground Radio Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, David L.; Murphy, David W.; Preston, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An initial estimate has been made of the observing time required on ground radio telescopes by the space VLBI missions Radioastron and VSOP. Typical science programs have been adopted for both missions.

  4. Ground-based Infrared Observations of Water Vapor and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Bitner, M.; Kruger, A.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lefevre, F.; Forget, F.; Atreya, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    Ground-based observations of water vapor and hydrogen peroxide have been obtained in the thermal infrared range, using the TEXES instrument at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, for different times of the seasonal cycle.

  5. The 26 January 2001 M 7.6 Bhuj, India, earthquake: Observed and predicted ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.; Martin, S.; Bilham, R.; Atkinson, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    Although local and regional instrumental recordings of the devastating 26, January 2001, Bhuj earthquake are sparse, the distribution of macroseismic effects can provide important constraints on the mainshock ground motions. We compiled available news accounts describing damage and other effects and interpreted them to obtain modified Mercalli intensities (MMIs) at >200 locations throughout the Indian subcontinent. These values are then used to map the intensity distribution throughout the subcontinent using a simple mathematical interpolation method. Although preliminary, the maps reveal several interesting features. Within the Kachchh region, the most heavily damaged villages are concentrated toward the western edge of the inferred fault, consistent with western directivity. Significant sediment-induced amplification is also suggested at a number of locations around the Gulf of Kachchh to the south of the epicenter. Away from the Kachchh region, intensities were clearly amplified significantly in areas that are along rivers, within deltas, or on coastal alluvium, such as mudflats and salt pans. In addition, we use fault-rupture parameters inferred from teleseismic data to predict shaking intensity at distances of 0-1000 km. We then convert the predicted hard-rock ground-motion parameters to MMI by using a relationship (derived from Internet-based intensity surveys) that assigns MMI based on the average effects in a region. The predicted MMIs are typically lower by 1-3 units than those estimated from news accounts, although they do predict near-field ground motions of approximately 80%g and potentially damaging ground motions on hard-rock sites to distances of approximately 300 km. For the most part, this discrepancy is consistent with the expected effect of sediment response, but it could also reflect other factors, such as unusually high building vulnerability in the Bhuj region and a tendency for media accounts to focus on the most dramatic damage, rather than

  6. Anomalously high potentials observed on ISEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C.; Krinsky, I. S.; Torbert, R. B.; Olsen, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the two electric field experiments and from the plasma composition experiment on ISEE-1 show that the spacecraft charged to close to -70 V in sunlight at about 0700 UT on March 17, 1978. Data from the electron spectrometer experiment show that there was a potential barrier of some -10 to -20 V about the spacecraft during this event. The potential barrier was effective in turning back emitted photoelectrons to the spacecraft. Potential barriers can be formed because of differential charging on the spacecraft or because of the presence of space charge. The stringent electrostatic cleanliness specifications imposed on ISEE make the presence of differential charging unlikely, if these precautions were effective. Modeling of this event is required to determine if the barrier was produced by the presence of space charge.

  7. 14 CFR 121.561 - Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. 121.561 Section 121.561... meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. (a) Whenever he...

  8. 14 CFR 121.561 - Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. 121.561 Section 121.561... meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. (a) Whenever he...

  9. 14 CFR 121.561 - Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. 121.561 Section 121.561... meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. (a) Whenever he...

  10. 14 CFR 121.561 - Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. 121.561 Section 121.561... meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. (a) Whenever he...

  11. 14 CFR 121.561 - Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. 121.561 Section 121.561... meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. (a) Whenever he...

  12. A Ground-based validation of GOSAT-observed atmospheric CO2 in Inner-Mongolian grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, X.; Lei, L.; Kawasaki, M.; Oohasi, M.; Zeng, Z.

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is a long-lived greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to global warming. Long-term and continuous measurements of atmospheric CO2 to investigate its global distribution and concentration variations are important for accurately understanding its potential climatic effects. Satellite measurements from space can offer atmospheric CO2 data for climate change research. For that, ground-based measurements are required for validation and improving the precision of satellite-measured CO2. We implemented observation experiment of CO2 column densities in the Xilinguole grasslands in Inner Mongolia, China, using a ground-based measurement system, which mainly consists of an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA), a sun tracker and a notebook controller. Measurements from our ground-based system were analyzed and compared with those from the Greenhouse gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT). The ground-based measurements had an average value of 389.46 ppm, which was 2.4 ppm larger than from GOSAT, with a standard deviation of 3.4 ppm. This result is slightly larger than the difference between GOSAT and the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). This study highlights the usefulness of the ground-based OSA measurement system for analyzing atmospheric CO2 column densities, which is expected to supplement the current TCCON network.

  13. Predicting Ground Fire Ignition Potential in Aspen Communities

    Treesearch

    S. G. Otway; E. W. Bork; K. R. Anderson; M. E. Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Fire is one of the key disturbances affecting aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forest ecosystems within western Canadian wildlands, including Elk Island National Park. Prescribed fire use is a tool available to modify aspen forests, yet clearly understanding its potential impact is necessary to successfully manage this disturbance.

  14. Potential Enhancement of Ground Penetrating Surveys with Dispersion Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. A.; Ghent, R. R.; Boivin, A.

    2016-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a nondestructive measurement technique that utilizes the transmission or reflection of electromagnetic waves to locate targets buried under Earth or artificial materials. GPR is now widely used in mining, civil engineering archaeology and hydrology. One basic premise of surface GPR is that subsurface features will return reflections which are replicas of the transmitted signal. However, phase velocities of electromagnetic waves in real materials vary with frequency. This effect becomes more noticeable in GPR frequency range with increasing moisture content. Dispersion leads to difficulty in interpreting the received signals because the reflected signals are distorted. However, the effects of dispersion on the signals may provide an opportunity to more fully characterize materials under test than is possible using traditional reflection-mode GPR techniques. In this work we present 3D-FDTD numerical modeling results using gprMax to systematically characterize the effect of dispersion on GPR signals. In addition to numerical results, we assess the feasibility of applying our results to terrestrial geophysical scenarios by measuring the dielectric permittivities of a selection of natural materials, including samples from a massive sulphide mine. Our goal is to establish a parameter space that systematically characterize the effect of each parameter in the common dispersion models (Debye, Lorentz and Drude) on GPR signals. We begin the experiment by drying the samples completely and then adding water into the samples in 5 wt % increments. We measure the broadband relative permittivity and loss tangent using a coaxial transmission line for each state from 300 kHz to 8.5 GHz. The results provide a database for future GPR signal interpretation.

  15. Potential effects of the Hawaii Geothermal Project on ground-water resources on the island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Colvard, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    In 1990, the State of Hawaii proposed the Hawaii Geothermal Project for the development of as much as 500 MW of electric power from the geothermal system in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano. This report uses data from 31 wells and 8 springs to describe the properties of the ground-water system in and adjacent to the East Rift Zone. Potential effects of this project on ground-water resources are also discussed. Data show differences in ground-water chemistry and heads within the study area that appear to be related to mixing of waters of different origins and ground-water impoundment by volcanic dikes. East of Pahoa, the ground-water system within the rift is highly transmissive and receives abundant recharge from precipitation; therefore, the pumping of freshwater to support geothermal development in that part of the rift zone would have a minimal effect on ground-water levels. To the southwest of Pahoa, dike impoundment reduces the transmissivity of the ground-water system to such an extent that wells might not be capable of supplying sufficient fresh water to support geothermal operations. Contamination of ground-water resources by accidental release of geothermal fluids into shallow aquifers is possible because of corrosive conditions in the geothermal wells, potential well blowouts, and high ground-water velocities in parts of the region. Hydrologic monitoring of water level, temperature, and chemistry in observation wells should continue throughout development of geothermal resources for the Hawaii Geothermal Project for early detection of leakage and migration of geothermal fluids within the groundwater system.

  16. Statistical retrieval of thin liquid cloud microphysical properties using ground-based infrared and microwave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marke, Tobias; Ebell, Kerstin; Löhnert, Ulrich; Turner, David D.

    2016-12-01

    In this article, liquid water cloud microphysical properties are retrieved by a combination of microwave and infrared ground-based observations. Clouds containing liquid water are frequently occurring in most climate regimes and play a significant role in terms of interaction with radiation. Small perturbations in the amount of liquid water contained in the cloud can cause large variations in the radiative fluxes. This effect is enhanced for thin clouds (liquid water path, LWP <100 g/m2), which makes accurate retrieval information of the cloud properties crucial. Due to large relative errors in retrieving low LWP values from observations in the microwave domain and a high sensitivity for infrared methods when the LWP is low, a synergistic retrieval based on a neural network approach is built to estimate both LWP and cloud effective radius (reff). These statistical retrievals can be applied without high computational demand but imply constraints like prior information on cloud phase and cloud layering. The neural network retrievals are able to retrieve LWP and reff for thin clouds with a mean relative error of 9% and 17%, respectively. This is demonstrated using synthetic observations of a microwave radiometer (MWR) and a spectrally highly resolved infrared interferometer. The accuracy and robustness of the synergistic retrievals is confirmed by a low bias in a radiative closure study for the downwelling shortwave flux, even for marginally invalid scenes. Also, broadband infrared radiance observations, in combination with the MWR, have the potential to retrieve LWP with a higher accuracy than a MWR-only retrieval.

  17. Satellite Cloud Data Validation through MAGIC Ground Observation and the S'COOL Project: Scientific Benefits grounded in Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.; Lewis, P. M.; Rogerson, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Students' Cloud Observation On-Line (S'COOL) Project was launched in 1997 as the Formal Education and Public Outreach arm of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Mission. ROVER, the Citizen Scientist area of S'COOL, started in 2007 and allows participants to make 'roving' observations from any location as opposed to a fixed, registered classroom. The S'COOL Project aids the CERES Mission in trying to answer the research question: 'What is the Effect of Clouds on the Earth's Climate'. Participants from all 50 states, most U.S. Territories, and 63 countries have reported more than 100,500 observations to the S'COOL Project over the past 16 years. The Project is supported by an intuitive website that provides curriculum support and guidance through the observation steps; 1) Request satellite overpass schedule, 2) Observe clouds, and 3) Report cloud observations. The S'COOL Website also hosts a robust database housing all participants' observations as well as the matching satellite data. While the S'COOL observation parameters are based on the data collected by 5 satellite missions, ground observations provide a unique perspective to data validation. Specifically, low to mid level clouds can be obscured by overcast high-level clouds, or difficult to observe from a satellite's perspective due to surface cover or albedo. In these cases, ground observations play an important role in filling the data gaps and providing a better, global picture of our atmosphere and clouds. S'COOL participants, operating within the boundary layer, have an advantage when observing low-level clouds that affect the area we live in, regional weather patterns, and climate change. S'COOL's long-term data set provides a valuable resource to the scientific community in improving the "poorly characterized and poorly represented [clouds] in climate and weather prediction models'. The MAGIC Team contacted S'COOL in early 2012 about making cloud observations as part of the MAGIC

  18. Predicted Attenuation Relation and Observed Ground Motion of Gorkha Nepal Earthquake of 25 April 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. P.; Ahmad, R.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of recent observed ground motion parameters of recent Gorkha Nepal earthquake of 25 April 2015 (Mw 7.8) with the predicted ground motion parameters using exitsing attenuation relation of the Himalayan region will be presented. The recent earthquake took about 8000 lives and destroyed thousands of poor quality of buildings and the earthquake was felt by millions of people living in Nepal, China, India, Bangladesh, and Bhutan. The knowledge of ground parameters are very important in developing seismic code of seismic prone regions like Himalaya for better design of buildings. The ground parameters recorded in recent earthquake event and aftershocks are compared with attenuation relations for the Himalayan region, the predicted ground motion parameters show good correlation with the observed ground parameters. The results will be of great use to Civil engineers in updating existing building codes in the Himlayan and surrounding regions and also for the evaluation of seismic hazards. The results clearly show that the attenuation relation developed for the Himalayan region should be only used, other attenuation relations based on other regions fail to provide good estimate of observed ground motion parameters.

  19. The Earth Observing System (EOS) Ground System: Leveraging an Existing Operational Ground System Infrastructure to Support New Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardison, David; Medina, Johnny; Dell, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The Earth Observer System (EOS) was officially established in 1990 and went operational in December 1999 with the launch of its flagship spacecraft Terra. Aqua followed in 2002 and Aura in 2004. All three spacecraft are still operational and producing valuable scientific data. While all are beyond their original design lifetime, they are expected to remain viable well into the 2020s. The EOS Ground System is a multi-mission system based at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that supports science and spacecraft operations for these three missions. Over its operational lifetime to date, the EOS Ground System has evolved as needed to accommodate mission requirements. With an eye towards the future, several updates are currently being deployed. Subsystem interconnects are being upgraded to reduce data latency and improve system performance. End-of-life hardware and operating systems are being replaced to mitigate security concerns and eliminate vendor support gaps. Subsystem hardware is being consolidated through the migration to Virtual Machine based platforms. While mission operations autonomy was not a design goal of the original system concept, there is an active effort to apply state-of-the-art products from the Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) to facilitate automation where possible within the existing heritage architecture. This presentation will provide background information on the EOS ground system architecture and evolution, discuss latest improvements, and conclude with the results of a recent effort that investigated how the current system could accommodate a proposed new earth science mission.

  20. Potential New Lidar Observations for Cloud Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, Dave; Hu, Yong; Narir, Amin; Cai, Xia

    2015-01-01

    The response of clouds to global warming represents a major uncertainty in estimating climate sensitivity. These uncertainties have been tracked to shallow marine clouds in the tropics and subtropics. CALIOP observations have already been used extensively to evaluate model predictions of shallow cloud fraction and top height (Leahy et al. 2013; Nam et al 2012). Tools are needed to probe the lowest levels of the troposphere. The large footprint of satellite lidars gives large multiple scattering from clouds which presents new possibilities for cloud retrievals to constrain model predictions.

  1. Self potential observations during DNAPL dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Kulessa, B.; Russell, C.; Kalin, R.; Ferguson, A.; Graber, J.

    2006-05-01

    Dense non aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are a major environmental problem and are considered to be long term heavy contaminant sources in the subsurface. Accurate monitoring of DNAPL breakdown is required to monitor remediation efforts. We aim to evaluate the efficiency of geophysical methods to monitor DNAPL remediation. Toward this goal we performed self potential (SP) measurements on laboratory columns packed with DNAPL contaminated sand undergoing (a) biodegradation, and (b) abiotic DNAPL dissolution. Geochemical monitoring showed higher concentration of dissolved DNAPL byproducts in the abiotic columns; the use of HgCl2 as a biocide probably increased the rates of DNAPL dissolution in the abiotic columns. The concentration of DNAPL byproducts is significantly lower in the biotic columns due to microbial activity since DNAPL degrading bacteria within the column consume the breakdown products. SP responses are significantly higher (~ 90 mV) in the abiotic columns; in the microbial active columns SP values remain steady with a value ~ 10 mV. High SP signals (up to 110 mV) are associated with DNAPL byproduct concentration gradients within the abiotic columns and exhibit a temporal behavior that mimics total organic carbon concentrations. Although microbial activity in organic rich contaminated areas has been associated with strong negative SP anomalies our results show that positive SP anomalies can also be generated in contaminated areas in the absence of any microbial activity. We discuss a possible SP source mechanism and the implications in geophysical monitoring of DNAPL remedial processes.

  2. Photovoltaic central station step and touch potential considerations in grounding system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engmann, G.

    1983-01-01

    The probability of hazardous step and touch potentials is an important consideration in central station grounding system design. Steam turbine generating station grounding system design is based on accepted industry practices and there is extensive in-service experience with these grounding systems. A photovoltaic (PV) central station is a relatively new concept and there is limited experience with PV station grounding systems. The operation and physical configuration of a PV central station is very different from a steam electric station. A PV station bears some similarity to a substation and the PV station step and touch potentials might be addressed as they are in substation design. However, the PV central station is a generating station and it is appropriate to examine the effect that the differences and similarities of the two types of generating stations have on step and touch potential considerations.

  3. First ground-based FTIR-observations of methane in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, A. K.; Warneke, T.; Frankenberg, C.; Bergamaschi, P.; Gerbig, C.; Notholt, J.; Buchwitz, M.; Schneising, O.; Schrems, O.

    2010-02-01

    Total column concentrations and volume mixing ratio profiles of methane have been retrieved from ground-based solar absorption FTIR spectra in the near-infrared recorded in Paramaribo (Suriname). The methane FTIR observations are compared with TM5 model simulations and satellite observations from SCIAMACHY, and represent the first validation of SCIAMACHY retrievals in the tropics using ground-based remote sensing techniques. Apart from local biomass burning features, our methane FTIR observations agree well with the SCIAMACHY retrievals and TM5 model simulations.

  4. First ground-based FTIR observations of methane in the inner tropics over several years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, A. K.; Warneke, T.; Frankenberg, C.; Bergamaschi, P.; Gerbig, C.; Notholt, J.; Buchwitz, M.; Schneising, O.; Schrems, O.

    2010-08-01

    Total column concentrations of methane have been retrieved from ground-based solar absorption FTIR spectra in the near-infrared recorded in Paramaribo (Suriname). The methane FTIR observations are compared with TM5 model simulations and satellite observations from SCIAMACHY, and represent the first validation of SCIAMACHY retrievals in the inner tropics using ground-based remote sensing techniques. Apart from local biomass burning features, our methane FTIR observations agree well with TM5 model simulations. The comparison of the direct measured CH4/CO2 ratios by FTIR and satellite reveals that the satellite can hardly detect methane emissions of tropical biomass burning due to the used retrieval method.

  5. Fuel models and fire potential from satellite and surface observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burgan, R.E.; Klaver, R.W.; Klarer, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    A national 1-km resolution fire danger fuel model map was derived through use of previously mapped land cover classes and ecoregions, and extensive ground sample data, then refined through review by fire managers familiar with various portions of the U.S. The fuel model map will be used in the next generation fire danger rating system for the U.S., but it also made possible immediate development of a satellite and ground based fire potential index map. The inputs and algorithm of the fire potential index are presented, along with a case study of the correlation between the fire potential index and fire occurrence in California and Nevada. Application of the fire potential index in the Mediterranean ecosystems of Spain, Chile, and Mexico will be tested.

  6. Decadal Challenges in Ground-Based Observations for Solar and Space Physics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Ground-based observations of the sun and near-Earth space have long provided the fundamental information needed to achieve a better understanding of the coupled Sun-Earth system and the processes responsible for solar activity and its effects on Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and atmosphere. Observations based on both active and passive radio wave and optical techniques provide measurements throughout Earth's atmosphere, geospace, the heliosphere, and the Sun. Although the number of observing instruments, the capabilities of the instruments, and the variety of ground-based assets continue to open new frontiers and enable scientific discoveries, gaps still exist, not only in terms of the spatial coverage of the measurements, but also in the properties of the system that are observed and the cadence and frequency of the observations. Fortunately, new technologies have provided the tools by which these challenges can be overcome. This is an opportune time to develop an integrated strategy for development, deployment, operation, and data analysis of ground-based assets. These include, for example, advanced networking technologies, crowd-sourced data acquisition, and multi-use observational platforms. Ground-based observations can also be optimized through the development of smart sensors, that operate at low power and are easily deployable, reconfigurable, and remotely operable. Furthermore, the data from ground-based observations will be collected, archived, and disseminated in ways that will enable effective and productive data mining, image and pattern recognition, cross-correlation among diverse data sets, and broadly-based collaborative research. These capabilities are especially important as we attempt to understand the system aspects of the solar-terrestrial environment. The next decade will undoubtedly see new understanding and discoveries resulting from improved and expanded ground-based instruments, as well as in their strategic deployment and operation.

  7. Battery Performance of ADEOS (Advanced Earth Observing Satellite) and Ground Simulation Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Kuwajima, S.; Kusawake, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) is developed with the aim of establishment of platform technology for future spacecraft and inter-orbit communication technology for the transmission of earth observation data. ADEOS uses 5 batteries, consists of two packs. This paper describes, using graphs and tables, the ground simulation tests and results that are carried to determine the performance of the ADEOS batteries.

  8. Multipoint Observations of a Global Pi2 Event in Space and on the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Baker, J. B.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Hartinger, M.; Frissell, N. A.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Bursty Bulk Flows (BBFs) associated with mesoscale magnetotail transients have been reported to generate Pi2 pulsations observed in the inner magnetosphere, ionosphere, and on the ground. In this case study, we present simultaneous space and ground-based observations of Pi2 pulsations which occurred at a substorm onset on 25 September 2014. The expansion phase initiated at around 06:04 UT when the THEMIS probe D located inside the plasmasphere detected Pi2 pulsations in the electric and magnetic fields. Cross spectrum analysis shows the azimuthal electric field and compressional magnetic field oscillated nearly in quadrature, highly suggestive of a radially trapped standing fast-mode wave. Simultaneous Pi2 observations from several low-latitude ground magnetometers (some on the dayside) further illustrate the global nature of these pulsations. One latitudinal magnetometer chain on the nightside observed phase reversal in the H component of Pi2 pulsations when crossing the footprint of the plasmapause. Similar pulsation signatures were observed by three mid-latitude SuperDARN High Frequency (HF) radars, both poleward and equatorward of the plasmapause footprint latitude. Taken together, these observations are consistent with a Plasmaspheric Virtual Resonance (PVR) being the source of the observed Pi2 pulsations both in space and on the ground. Pulsed tailward plasma flows observed by the THEMIS probe E at the nightside geosynchronous orbit indicate that the compressional energy generating the PVR was from the BBFs braking against the magnetospheric dipolar region.

  9. An Efficient Optical Observation Ground Network is the Fundamental basis for any Space Based Debris Observation Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibin, L.; Chiarini, M.; Annoni, G.; Milani, A.; Bernardi, F.; Dimare, L.; Valsecchi, G.; Rossi, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Salinari, P.

    2013-08-01

    A matter which is strongly debated in the SSA Community, concerns the observation of Space Debris from Space [1]. This topic has been preliminary studied by our Team for LEO, MEO and GEO orbital belts, allowing to remark a fundamental concept, residing in the fact that to be suitable to provide a functionality unavailable from ground in a cost to performance perspective, any Space Based System must operate in tight collaboration with an efficient Optical Ground Observation Network. In this work an analysis of the different functionalities which can be implemented with this approach for every orbital belt is illustrated, remarking the different achievable targets in terms of population size as a function of the observed orbits. Further, a preliminary definition of the most interesting missions scenarios, together with considerations and assessments on the observation strategy and P/L characteristics are presented.

  10. An assessment of the performance of global rainfall estimates without ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, Christian; Crow, Wade; Brocca, Luca

    2017-09-01

    Satellite-based rainfall estimates over land have great potential for a wide range of applications, but their validation is challenging due to the scarcity of ground-based observations of rainfall in many areas of the planet. Recent studies have suggested the use of triple collocation (TC) to characterize uncertainties associated with rainfall estimates by using three collocated rainfall products. However, TC requires the simultaneous availability of three products with mutually uncorrelated errors, a requirement which is difficult to satisfy with current global precipitation data sets. In this study, a recently developed method for rainfall estimation from soil moisture observations, SM2RAIN, is demonstrated to facilitate the accurate application of TC within triplets containing two state-of-the-art satellite rainfall estimates and a reanalysis product. The validity of different TC assumptions are indirectly tested via a high-quality ground rainfall product over the contiguous United States (CONUS), showing that SM2RAIN can provide a truly independent source of rainfall accumulation information which uniquely satisfies the assumptions underlying TC. On this basis, TC is applied with SM2RAIN on a global scale in an optimal configuration to calculate, for the first time, reliable global correlations (vs. an unknown truth) of the aforementioned products without using a ground benchmark data set. The analysis is carried out during the period 2007-2012 using daily rainfall accumulation products obtained at 1° × 1° spatial resolution. Results convey the relatively high performance of the satellite rainfall estimates in eastern North and South America, southern Africa, southern and eastern Asia, eastern Australia, and southern Europe, as well as complementary performances between the reanalysis product and SM2RAIN, with the first performing reasonably well in the Northern Hemisphere and the second providing very good performance in the Southern Hemisphere. The

  11. The potential of THEMIS satellite and ground-based measurements for data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Phan, T.; Eastwood, J. P.; Runov, A.; Frey, H. U.

    2009-12-01

    Launched on February 17, 2007 on a DELTA II rocket, NASA's Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission is a Medium-class Explorer project and the first space mission to study the sequence of magnetospheric events that trigger gigantic auroral displays in the polar regions using a macro-scale constellation of spacecraft. THEMIS is composed of a space segment of 5 identical probes equipped with particle and field instruments and a ground segment of about 20 Ground-Based Observatories with all-sky cameras and magnetometers. During its nominal mission THEMIS has observed over 20 substorm events, measured radial profiles of high energy particles through the radiation belts year-round, and provided numerous multi-point measurements across the magnetopause and bow shock with upstream monitoring. THEMIS data as well as the methods developed to simultaneously detect magnetospheric processes or structures are ideal for the development of software tools to efficiently extract data. We will present the potential of the THEMIS data to catalog magnetospheric events, define search patterns for event detection as well standardized interfaces with models.

  12. Entry Dispersion Analysis for the HAYABUSA Spacecraft using Ground-Based Optical Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Yagi, Masafumi; Tholen, David J.

    2011-10-01

    The HAYABUSA asteroid explorer successfully released its sample capsule to Australia on 2010 June 13. Since the Earth reentry phase of sample return was critical, many backup plans for predicting the landing location were prepared. This paper considers the reentry dispersion using ground-based optical observation as a backup observation for radiometric observation. Several scenarios were calculated and compared for the reentry phase of HAYABUSA to evaluate the navigation accuracy of the ground-based observation. The optical observation doesn't require any active reaction from a spacecraft, and thus these results show that optical observations could be a steady backup strategy even if a spacecraft had some trouble. We also evaluated the landing dispersion of HAYABUSA only with optical observation.

  13. The advances in airglow study and observation by the ground-based airglow observation network over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiyao; Li, Qinzeng; Yuan, Wei; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Weijun; Sun, Longchang

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based airglow observation networks over China used to study airglow have been established, which contains 15 stations. Some new results were obtained using the networks. For OH airglow observations, firstly, an unusual outbreak of Concentric Gravity Wave (CGW) events were observed by the first no-gap network nearly every night during the first half of August 2013. Combination of the ground imager network with satellites provides multilevel observations of the CGWs from the troposphere to the mesopause region. Secondly, three-year OH airglow images (2012-2014) from Qujing (25.6°N, 103.7°E) were used to study how orographic features of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) affect the geographical distributions of gravity wave (GW) sources. We find the orographic forcings have a significant impact on the gravity wave propagation features. Thirdly, ground-based observations of the OH (9-4, 8-3, 6-2, 5-1, 3-0) band airglow over Xinglong (40°2N, 117°4E) in northern China from 2012 to 2014 are used to calculate rotational temperatures. By comparing the ground-based OH rotational temperature with SABER's observations, five Einstein coefficient datasets are evaluated. We find rotational temperatures determined using any of the available Einstein coefficient datasets have systematic errors. We have obtained a set of optimal Einstein coefficients ratios for rotational temperature derivation using three years data from ground-based OH spectra and SABER temperatures. For the OI 630.0 nm airglow observations, we used three-year (2011-2013) observations of thermospheric winds (at 250 km) by Fabry-Perot interferometers at Xinglong to study the climatology of atmospheric planetary wave-type oscillations (PWTOs) with periods of 4-19 days. We found these PWTOs occur more frequently in the months from May to October. They are consistent with the summertime preference of middle-latitude ionospheric electron density oscillations noted in other studies. By using an all-sky airglow imager

  14. TETRA observation of gamma-rays at ground level associated with nearby thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringuette, Rebecca; Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Granger, Douglas; Guzik, T. Gregory; Stewart, Michael; Wefel, John P.

    2013-12-01

    gamma-ray flashes (TGFs)—very short, intense bursts of electrons, positrons, and energetic photons originating from terrestrial thunderstorms—have been detected with satellite instruments. TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA), an array of NaI(Tl) scintillators at Louisiana State University, has now been used to detect similar bursts of 50 keV to over 2 MeV gamma-rays at ground level. After 2.6 years of observation, 24 events with durations 0.02-4.2 ms have been detected associated with nearby lightning, three of them coincident events observed by detectors separated by ~1000 m. Nine of the events occurred within 6 ms and 5 km of negative polarity cloud-to-ground lightning strokes with measured currents in excess of 20 kA. The events reported here constitute the first catalog of TGFs observed at ground level in close proximity to the acceleration site.

  15. Bridging the gap between ground-based and space-based observations of the night airglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadfoot, A. L.; Bellaire, Paul J.

    1999-08-01

    Data sets from most satellite experiments focus on global dynamics by integrating daily conditions over long periods, rather than local dynamics over short timescales. Reports from the ground-based 1993 airborne lidar and observations of the Hawaiian airglow/airborne noctilucent cloud campaigns (ALOHA/ANLC-93), with their high temporal and spatial resolution, have described the dynamic nature of the night airglow, or nightglow. Recognizing this dynamic activity, we note that space-based observations currently made from satellites will only poorly complement ground-based observations. Space-based observations that can be correlated to observations over a ground-based site are possible for only a few minutes per day. Ground-based observations can be complemented by space-based observations only by experiments operating in snapshot mode and using a high-performance instrumentation during the limited flight time over a ground station. The only space platform currently capable of supporting such experimentation is the space shuttle, or Space Transportation System (STS). In the future, appropriate payloads should be planned and deployed on the International Space Station to take advantage of its similar capabilities. The night airglow layer at the Earth's limb was monitored by the Arizona Airglow Experiment (GLO) from the space shuttle Endeavour throughout its 12-day STS 69 mission in September 1995. When the nightglow was observed from above, the O2 atmospheric band system was conspicuous. Patches of enhanced emission 2500-5000 km in lateral extent were observed. Intensity changes by a factor of 4 were common. Similar activity has been reported in data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) remote sensing experiments high-resolution Doppler imager (HRDI) and wind imaging inferometer (WINDII). The O2(0,0) band emission cannot be observed from the ground because the intervening O2 atmosphere overhead is optically thick to this emission. However, the O2

  16. Ground-based observations of uranus and neptune using CCD instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.A.

    1985-07-01

    The author verifies that with the help of charge-coupled devices (CCD) great progress is being made in ground-based astronomical observations, including the study of the remote giant planets Uranus and Neptune. In reading the CCD the top row of pixels (potential wells) is moved into the sequential (shift) reading register; after this each row (line) of pixels moves its electrons upward (in each column) until the bottom row is cleared. This process is repeated for each row until the device is interrogated sequentially. The use of CCD detectors for purposes of image acquisition and spectroscopy has already found wide popularity at astronomical observatories, and soon it will spread to space research. The first known attempts to use CCD to obtain astronomical images was made by the author and his colleagues in April 1976. The result was the first observations of structure on the dark disk of Uranus. In general, the more refined the mathematical provision, the more information can be extracted from the images or spectra.

  17. Ground measurements and satellite observations of soil moisture over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Velde, R.; Su, Z.; Wen, J.; Yang, K.; Ma, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The importance of the Tibetan Plateau for the atmospheric circulation and the development of large-scale weather systems over the Asian continent has been widely acknowledged. Due to its wide extent and high elevation, the Plateau plays a critical role in directing moist air from the eastern Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal towards central China. Heat and moisture sources from the Plateau affect the flow of moist air from the ocean and seas creating a so-called "air pump" that influences the onset and maintenance of the Asian monsoon. In a changing climate, global warming will also change the partitioning of radiation into sensible and latent heat over the Plateau and, thus, the Tibetan air pump. A key land surface state controlling interactions between the land surface and atmosphere is soil moisture. Being highly variable in both space and time, it is not feasible to base large-scale soil moisture monitoring programmes on in-situ measurements alone. Hence, estimates derived from satellite observations can complement ground measuring networks by providing insight into spatial soil moisture distributions across large scales. In this study, we report on the development of large-scale ground measuring soil moisture/temperature networks across the Tibetan Plateau and their application in validating soil moisture retrieved from both active and passive microwave observations. An Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) data set consisting of 150 scenes collected in the period from April 2005 to September 2007 is used as a demonstration of high resolution (100 m) soil moisture mapping over the central part of the Tibetan Plateau. Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) passive microwave observations from 1987 to 2008 are utilized to derive long-term soil moisture trends across the entire Tibetan Plateau. The soil moisture estimates from both ASAR and SSM/I are in agreement with our in-situ measurements. This study highlights the complementary information that can be

  18. 14 CFR 135.67 - Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. 135.67 Section 135.67... navigation aids. Whenever a pilot encounters a potentially hazardous meteorological condition or...

  19. 14 CFR 135.67 - Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. 135.67 Section 135.67... navigation aids. Whenever a pilot encounters a potentially hazardous meteorological condition or...

  20. 14 CFR 135.67 - Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. 135.67 Section 135.67... navigation aids. Whenever a pilot encounters a potentially hazardous meteorological condition or...

  1. 14 CFR 135.67 - Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. 135.67 Section 135.67... navigation aids. Whenever a pilot encounters a potentially hazardous meteorological condition or...

  2. 14 CFR 135.67 - Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting potentially hazardous meteorological conditions and irregularities of ground facilities or navigation aids. 135.67 Section 135.67... navigation aids. Whenever a pilot encounters a potentially hazardous meteorological condition or...

  3. Existence of ground state solutions to Dirac equations with vanishing potentials at infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Giovany M.; Pimenta, Marcos T. O.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we study the existence of ground-state solutions of Dirac equations with potentials which are allowed to vanish at infinity. The approach is based on minimization of the energy functional over a generalized Nehari set. Some conditions on the potentials are given in order to overcome the lack of compactness.

  4. Kilometric radio waves generated along auroral field lines observed by ground facilities - A theoretical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Wu, C. S.; Yoon, Peter H.

    1991-01-01

    A theory of generation of radio waves observed by ground-based facilities in the frequency range 150-700 kHz is discussed. This work is a continuation of an earlier discussion (Wu et al., 1989) in which it was proposed that the trapped electrons along the auroral field lines can lead to a cyclotron instability which amplifies the whistler waves observed at ground level. The objective of the present study is to investigate the propagation effect on the wave amplification and to examine whether the proposed mechanism is indeed viable.

  5. Kilometric radio waves generated along auroral field lines observed by ground facilities - A theoretical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Wu, C. S.; Yoon, Peter H.

    1991-01-01

    A theory of generation of radio waves observed by ground-based facilities in the frequency range 150-700 kHz is discussed. This work is a continuation of an earlier discussion (Wu et al., 1989) in which it was proposed that the trapped electrons along the auroral field lines can lead to a cyclotron instability which amplifies the whistler waves observed at ground level. The objective of the present study is to investigate the propagation effect on the wave amplification and to examine whether the proposed mechanism is indeed viable.

  6. The use of products from ground-based GNSS observations in meteorological nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terradellas, E.; Callado, A.; Pascual, R.; Téllez, B.

    2009-09-01

    Heavy rainfall is often focalized in areas of moisture convergence. A close relationship between precipitation and fast variations of vertically-integrated water vapour (IWV) has been found in numerous cases. Furthermore, a latency of several tens of minutes of the precipitation relative to a rapid increase of the water vapour contents appears to be a common truth. Therefore, continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity and its spatial distribution is crucial to the operational forecaster for a proper nowcasting of heavy rainfall events. Radiosonde releases yield measurements of atmospheric humidity, but they are very sparse and present a limited time resolution of 6 to 12 hours. The microwave signals continuously broadcasted by the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites are influenced by the water vapour as they travel through the atmosphere to ground-based receivers. The total zenith delay (ZTD) of these signals, a by-product of the geodetic processing, is already operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models and has positive impact on the prediction of precipitation events, as it has been reported after the analysis of parallel runs. Estimates of IWV retrieved from ground-based GNSS observations may also constitute a source of information on the horizontal distribution and the time evolution of atmospheric humidity that can be presented to the forecaster. Several advantages can be attributed to the ground-based GNSS as a meteorological observing system. First, receiving networks can be built and maintained at a relatively low cost, which it can, additionally, be shared among different users. Second, the quality of the processed observations is insensitive to the weather conditions and, third, the temporal resolution of its products is very high. On the other hand, the current latency of the data disposal, ranging between one and two hours, is acceptable for the NWP community, but appears to be excessive for nowcasting

  7. Potential of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for analyzing the quality of unroasted and ground coffee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Tiago Varão; Hubinger, Silviane Zanni; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira; Ferreira, Ednaldo José; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Coffee is an important commodity and a very popular beverage around the world. Its economic value as well as beverage quality are strongly dependent of the quality of beans. The presence of defective beans in coffee blends has caused a negative impact on the beverage Global Quality (GQ) assessed by cupping tests. The main defective beans observed in the productive chain has been those Blacks, Greens and Sours (BGS). Chemical composition of BGS has a damaging impact on beverage GQ. That is why analytical tools are needed for monitoring and controlling the GQ in coffee agro-industry. Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) has been successfully applied for assessment of coffee quality. Another potential technique for direct, clean and fast measurement of coffee GQ is Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Elements and diatomic molecules commonly present in organic compounds (structure) can be assessed by using LIBS. In this article is reported an evaluation of LIBS for the main interferents of GQ (BGS defects). Results confirm the great potential of LIBS for discriminating good beans from those with BGS defects by using emission lines of C, CN, C2 and N. Most importantly, some emission lines presented strong linear correlation (r > 0.9) with NIRS absorption bands assigned to proteins, lipids, sugar and carboxylic acids, suggesting LIBS potential to estimate these compounds in unroasted and ground coffee samples.

  8. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Ochoa, Héctor; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W), located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW) in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio) and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness) properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable) LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  9. Software for inference of dynamic ground strains and rotations and their errors from short baseline array observations of ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudich, Paul; Fletcher, Jon B.

    2009-01-01

    In two previous articles we presented a formulation for inferring the strains and rotations of the ground beneath a seismic array having a finite footprint. In this article we derive expressions for the error covariance matrices of the inferred strains and rotations, and we present software for the calculation of ground strains, rotations, and their variances from short baseline array ground-motion data.

  10. Software for inference of dynamic ground strains and rotations and their errors from short baseline array observations of ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudich, P.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2009-01-01

    In two previous articles we presented a formulation for inferring the strains and rotations of the ground beneath a seismic array having a finite footprint. In this article we derive expressions for the error covariance matrices of the inferred strains and rotations, and we present software for the calculation of ground strains, rotations, and their variances from short baseline array ground-motion data.

  11. Linkage between Grounding Line Dynamics and Geological Observations in the Weddell Sea Sector of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huybers, K. M.; Roe, G.; Conway, H.; Balco, G.; Todd, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Surface-exposure dating is a potentially a powerful technique to constrain Antarctic ice-sheet thinning from the Last Glacial Maximum to its present state. Erratics recently collected near the grounding line of the Foundation Ice Stream in Antarctica's Weddell Sea sector detail thickness maxima and exposure rates along local nunatak elevation transects. These points in space and time constrain the local thickness and rate of thinning—however, what can they tell us about the history of the elevation profile of the interior ice stream? The elevation profile of the interior ice is strongly controlled by the position of the grounding line, which in turn depends on sea level, accumulation, and the ice stream/shelf's physical characteristics. We use to an idealized flowline model to assess the relative importance of factors used to model ice stream thickness profiles. We divide these factors into two general categories: model physics, and environmental factors. Model physics includes choices about the ice rheology, the sliding law, and the calculated flux at the grounding line, where the ice transitions from grounded stream to floating shelf. Environmental factors include climate, basal topography, sliding parameterization, sea level, ice softness, and lateral shelf stresses. In our simplified model, we ignore the potentially important effects of isostatic rebound and the gravitational pull of the ice on ocean water. Preliminary findings indicate that the position of the grounding line controls the elevation at the exposure sites; and that sub-glacial and sub-marine basal topography, together with the assumed form of the grounding-line flux, dominates the grounding-line sensitivity to change. This suggests that the surface elevation predominantly reflects regional-scale ice sheet behavior rather than the climate local to the ice-stream catchment.

  12. Analytic Perturbation Method for Estimating Ground Flash Fraction from Satellite Lightning Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Solakiewicz, Richard

    2013-01-01

    An analytic perturbation method is introduced for estimating the lightning ground flash fraction in a set of N lightning flashes observed by a satellite lightning mapper. The value of N is large, typically in the thousands, and the observations consist of the maximum optical group area produced by each flash. The method is tested using simulated observations that are based on Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) data. National Lightning Detection NetworkTM (NLDN) data is used to determine the flash-type (ground or cloud) of the satellite-observed flashes, and provides the ground flash fraction truth for the simulation runs. It is found that the mean ground flash fraction retrieval errors are below 0.04 across the full range 0-1 under certain simulation conditions. In general, it is demonstrated that the retrieval errors depend on many factors (i.e., the number, N, of satellite observations, the magnitude of random and systematic measurement errors, and the number of samples used to form certain climate distributions employed in the model).

  13. Potential Persistence of Ground Ice at Gale Crater, Mars Constrained Using Curiosity Rover REMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Sletten, R. S.; Hallet, B.; Mischna, M. A.; Vasavada, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow ground ice in the equatorial region on Mars would be quickly lost to sublimation under current Martian climate conditions; however, it may persist at depth since its suggested formation during the most recent high obliquity of 32º approximately 500 ka ago when ice is believed to have been stable here. Ground-based measurements by Curiosity Rover's Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) enable a detailed study of the processes that determine the rate of sublimation and the subsurface transport of heat and water vapor at Gale Crater. This study is prompted by an analogous investigation in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica where ground ice is currently unstable but has persisted ~0.5 m below the surface for over 1 Ma. A heat and vapor diffusion model is developed to understand the ground thermal regime and the persistence of potential ground ice in the equatorial region of Mars using the first year of data collected by Curiosity. Based on the derived thermal properties of dry regolith, including thermal inertia values ranging from 300 to 450 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2, diurnal and annual temperature variations propagate to depths of 0.05 m and 1.3 m, respectively. The modeled rate of water-vapor escape from the ground ice to the atmosphere corresponds to a sublimation rate of ~350 m Ma-1 for ice at the ground surface; however, the sublimation rates increasingly deceases with depth as overlying dry regolith thickens. We explore whether interstitial ground ice that formed at Gale Crater ~500 ka ago during the last high obliquity period could currently exist at shallow depths. While this study does not account for the effects of replenishing processes, adsorption, diffusion-advection, and climate change influenced by obliquity, it highlights the potential persistence of ground ice and implications for future missions on Mars.

  14. Do aerosols impact ground observation of total cloud cover over the North China Plain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Xia, Xiangao; Wang, Pucai; Fei, Ye

    2015-04-01

    Ground observation of the total cloud cover (TCC) showed a significant downward trend during the past half century over the North China Plain (NCP). The objective of this paper is to examine whether aerosols have impacted the surface observations of TCC by human observers. TCC observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua (TCCgrd) were firstly compared with ground observations (TCCsat) at 201 synoptic stations over the NCP. Results showed that both data sets were in good agreement. The correlation coefficient between TCCgrd and TCCsatranged from 0.80 in winter to 0.90 in summer. The relationship between TCCsat - TCCgrdand visibility was then analyzed, which showed no significant correlation. Finally, long-term trends of TCCgrd and visibility were not correlated. These results indicated that aerosols likely did not impact the long-term trend of TCCgrdover the NCP.

  15. Do aerosols impact ground observation of total cloud cover over the North China Plain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Xia, X.; Wang, P.; Fei, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Ground observation of the total cloud cover (TCC) showed a significant downward trend during the past half century over the North China Plain (NCP). The objective of this paper is to examine whether aerosols have impacted the surface observations of TCC by human observers. TCC observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua (TCCsat) were firstly compared with ground observations (TCCgrd) at 201 synoptic stations over the NCP. Results showed that both data sets were in good agreement. The correlation coefficient between TCCgrd and TCCsat ranged from 0.80 in winter to 0.90 in summer. The relationship between TCCsat-TCCgrd and visibility was then analyzed, which showed no significant correlation. Finally, long-term trends of TCCgrd and visibility were not correlated. These results indicated that aerosols likely did not impact the long-term trend of TCCgrd over the NCP.

  16. Scope of Jovian lightning observation by ground-based and spacecraft instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Nakajima, K.

    2009-12-01

    It is suggested by recent observational and theoretical studies that the thunderstorms, i.e., strong moist convective clouds in Jupiter’s atmosphere are very important not only as an essential ingredient of meteorology of Jupiter but also as a potentially very useful “probe” of the water abundance of the deep atmosphere, which is crucial to constrain the behavior of volatiles in early solar system. We would propose the lightning observation with properly designed optical device onboard Jovian system orbiter and with the ground-based telescope. Based on detailed analysis of cloud motions by Galileo orbiter, Gierasch et al. proposed that the thunderstorms can produce the small scale eddies and ultimately drive the belt/zone structure. Moreover, the belt zone structure helps the development of thunderstorms in the belt region in accordance with observation; the belt/zone structure and thunderstorms may be in a symbiotic relation. This framework is a refined version of shallow origin theory, but, although it is a very fantastic idea, quantitative verification remains to be done. Most recent numerical modeling by our group calculated all three types of cloud, i.e., H2O, NH3, and, NH4SH. One of the most important findings is the existence of distinct, quasi-periodic temporal variation of the convective cloud activity; explosion of cloud activity extending all over the computational domain occurs separated by quiet period of order of 10 days. Another surprising finding is that the period of the active/break cycle is roughly proportional to the amount of condensable component in the sub-cloud layer. This strong correspondence between the deep volatile abundance and temporal variability of cloud convection implies a new method to probe the deep atmosphere. We believe JGO with other optical equipments especially for atmospheric spectral imaging is the ideal platform for the lightning detector. Comparing quantitative lightning activity with ambient cloud motion and

  17. Itokawa: The power of ground-based mid-infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas G.; Sekiguchi, T.; Kaasalainen, M.; Abe, M.; Hasegawa, S.

    2007-05-01

    Pre-encounter ground-based N- and Q-band thermal observations of NEA Itokawa led to a size prediction of 520(±50) x 270(±30) x 230(±20) m, corresponding to an effective diameter of 318 m (Müller et al. 2005, A&A 443). This is in almost perfect agreement with the final in-situ results (Deff=(535x294x209)? = 320 m; Demura et al. 2006, Science 312). The corresponding radar value (Ostro et al. 2005, DPS 37, #15.19), based on the same shape model (Kaasalainen et al. 2005, ASP Conf. Series), was about 20% too high (Deff = (594x320x288)?= 379 m). The very simple mid-infrared observations revealed a surface which is dominated by bare rocks rather than a thick regolith layer. This prediction was nicely confirmed by the Hayabusa mission (e.g., Fujiwara et al. 2006; Saito et al. 2006, Science 312). The ground-based measurements covered three different phase angles which enabled us to determine the thermal properties with unprecedented accuracy and in excellent agreement with the results from the touch-down measurements (Okada et al., 2006, LPS XXXVII; Yano et al. 2006, Science 312). These thermal values are also key ingredients for Yarkovsky and YORP calculations (e.g., Vokrouhlický et al. 2004, A&A 414; Vokrouhlický et al. 2005, Icarus 173). We present a direct comparison between the predictions of our thermophysical model work and the corresponding Hayabusa results. In addition to the above mentioned properties, our data allowed us to derive the surface albedo and to estimate the total mass. We believe that with our well-tested and calibrated techniques (Lagerros 1996/97/98, A&A; Müller & Lagerros 1998/2002, A&A) we have tools at hand to distinguish between monolithic, regolith-covered and rubble pile near-Earth objects by only using remote thermal observations. This project also emphasizes the high and so far not yet fully exploited potential of thermophysical modeling techniques for the NEA/NEO exploration.

  18. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  19. Observation of earthquake ground motion due to aftershocks of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake in damaged areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Chimoto, Kosuke; Miyake, Hiroe; Tsuno, Seiji; Yamada, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    We have conducted observation of earthquake ground motion due to aftershocks of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake at 26 temporary stations in damaged areas of Kumamoto city, Mashiki town, Nishihara village and Minami-Aso village (partly in Aso city) in Kumamoto prefecture, Japan. Continuous recordings of ground acceleration were acquired in a period of about 1 month after the occurrence of the main shock on April 16, 2016. This preliminary analysis of the observed records clearly indicates strong effects of local geological condition in the heavily damaged districts in Mashiki town and Nishihara village. Spectral ratios of the ground motions at the stations in the severely damaged districts to those at the reference sites are characterized by large amplitudes at periods of 0.5-1 s. Peak ground velocities and seismic intensities are also large at the sites. Seismic intensities at the stations in the damaged districts are larger by an intensity of one at the maximum than those at the stations with the minor damage. The ground motions at the stations in Kumamoto city are rich in later phases with long duration suggesting basin effects. However, site amplification effects could not clearly be identified at the stations in the Minami-Aso area from the results in the conventional spectral ratio approach.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Estimating the Radiative Forcing of Carbonaceous Aerosols over California based on Satellite and Ground Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yangyang; Bahadur, R.; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-10-04

    Carbonaceous aerosols have the potential to impact climate both through directly absorbing incoming solar radiation, and by indirectly affecting the cloud layer. To quantify this impact recent modeling studies have made great efforts to simulate both the spatial and temporal distribution of carbonaceous aerosols and their associated radiative forcing. This study makes the first observationally constrained assessment of the direct radiative forcing of carbonaceous aerosols at a regional scale over California. By exploiting multiple observations (including ground sites and satellites), we constructed the distribution of aerosol optical depths and aerosol absorption optical depths over California for a ten-year period (2000-2010). The total solar absorption was then partitioned into contributions from elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and dust aerosols using a newly developed scheme. Aerosol absorption optical depth due to carbonaceous aerosols (EC and OC) at 440 nm is 50%-200% larger than natural dust, with EC contributing the bulk (70%-90%). Observationally constrained EC absorption agrees reasonably well with estimates from regional transport models, but the model underestimates the OC AAOD by at least 50%. We estimate that the TOA warming from carbonaceous aerosols is 0.7 W/m2 and the TOA forcing due to OC is close to zero. The atmospheric heating of carbonaceous aerosols is 2.2-2.9 W/m2, of which EC contributed about 80-90%. The atmospheric heating due to OC is estimated to be 0.1 to 0.4 W/m2, larger than model simulations. The surface brightening due to EC reduction over the last two decades is estimated to be 1.5-3.5 W/m2.

  1. Potential effects of climate change on ground water in Lansing, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croley, T.E.; Luukkonen, C.L.

    2003-01-01

    Computer simulations involving general circulation models, a hydrologic modeling system, and a ground water flow model indicate potential impacts of selected climate change projections on ground water levels in the Lansing, Michigan, area. General circulation models developed by the Canadian Climate Centre and the Hadley Centre generated meteorology estimates for 1961 through 1990 (as a reference condition) and for the 20 years centered on 2030 (as a changed climate condition). Using these meteorology estimates, the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory's hydrologic modeling system produced corresponding period streamflow simulations. Ground water recharge was estimated from the streamflow simulations and from variables derived from the general circulation models. The U.S. Geological Survey developed a numerical ground water flow model of the Saginaw and glacial aquifers in the Tri-County region surrounding Lansing, Michigan. Model simulations, using the ground water recharge estimates, indicate changes in ground water levels. Within the Lansing area, simulated ground water levels in the Saginaw aquifer declined under the Canadian predictions and increased under the Hadley.

  2. Relation of electrochemical potentials and iron content to ground-water flow patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Back, William; Barnes, Ivan

    1965-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop means of measuring oxidation potentials in aquifer systems and to use the measured values in interpreting the behavior of iron in ground water. Anne Arundel County, Md., was selected as the area of study because of the wide range of concentration of iron-nearly zero to about 35 ppm-in the ground water and the rather complete information on the geology and hydrology. The regional geology consists of coastal plain sediments ranging in age from Early Cretaceous through the Recent. Most of the pH and oxidation-potential measurements were made in nonmarine Cretaceous deposits, only a few in the marine Eocene. Iron-bearing minerals in the area are primarily hematite or limonite and glauconite with a small amount of pyrite. Equipment was developed that permits the measurement of oxidation potentials by use of saturated calomel and platinum electrodes in ground-water samples uncontaminated by oxygen of the atmosphere. Measured Eh values range from about +700 mv to -40 mv. Approximately 2 to 3 hours are required to measure a stable or nearly stable oxidation potential. The mineralogy and organic content of the deposits and the ground-water flow pattern are the primary controls on the oxidation potential and pH of the water. A correlation exists between the oxidation potential and the concentration of iron in ground water; the higher concentrations occur in waters with the lowest values of Eh. The concentration of iron in the water tested shows little correlation with the pH of the water. The highest oxidation potentials were measured in water produced from shallow wells and those wells in recharge areas. The lowest potentials were measured farthest downgradient in water associated with gray and green sediments. The Eh values measured in the field are between values predicted from the solubility of Fe(OH)2(c) and values predicted from the solubility of hematite.

  3. Space Borne and Ground-Based Observations of Transient Processes Occurring Around Substorm Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepko, L.; Spanswick, E.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.

    2010-01-01

    The combined THEMIS five spacecraft in-situ and ground magnetic and visible camera arrays have advanced considerably our understanding of the causal relationship between midtail plasma flows, transient ionospheric features, and ground magnetic signatures. In particular recent work has shown a connection between equatorward moving visible ionospheric transients and substorm onset, in both white-light and 6300 nm emissions. These observations, together with THEMIS in-situ measurements of bulk flows, provides strict constraints on the sequence of events leading to substorm auroral onset.We first provide a brief summary of these observations, highlighting in particular areas where the two observations differ, and suggest reasons for the differences. Next, by combining the observed correlation of flow and Pi2 waveform with a unified model of global Pi2 generation and substorm current wedge initiation we present a self-consistent description of the dynamical processes and communicative pathways that occur just prior to and during substorm expansion onset.

  4. Methodological tools for the collection and analysis of participant observation data using grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Heleena; Kaunonen, Marja; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2014-11-01

    To give clarity to the analysis of participant observation in nursing when implementing the grounded theory method. Participant observation (PO) is a method of collecting data that reveals the reality of daily life in a specific context. In grounded theory, interviews are the primary method of collecting data but PO gives a distinctive insight, revealing what people are really doing, instead of what they say they are doing. However, more focus is needed on the analysis of PO. An observational study carried out to gain awareness of nursing care and its electronic documentation in four acute care wards in hospitals in Finland. Discussion of using the grounded theory method and PO as a data collection tool. The following methodological tools are discussed: an observational protocol, jotting of notes, microanalysis, the use of questioning, constant comparison, and writing and illustrating. Each tool has specific significance in collecting and analysing data, working in constant interaction. Grounded theory and participant observation supplied rich data and revealed the complexity of the daily reality of acute care. In this study, the methodological tools provided a base for the study at the research sites and outside. The process as a whole was challenging. It was time-consuming and it required rigorous and simultaneous data collection and analysis, including reflective writing. Using these methodological tools helped the researcher stay focused from data collection and analysis to building theory. Using PO as a data collection method in qualitative nursing research provides insights. It is not commonly discussed in nursing research and therefore this study can provide insight, which cannot be seen or revealed by using other data collection methods. Therefore, this paper can produce a useful tool for those who intend to use PO and grounded theory in their nursing research.

  5. Grounding a natural background level for fluoride in a potentially contaminated crystalline aquifer in south India.

    PubMed

    Sajil Kumar, P J

    2017-09-27

    Fluoride contamination is one of the most alarming issues for those countries that depend on groundwater drinking water supply. A careful examination of the hydrogeochemical conditions and routine monitoring of fluoride level are therefore quintessential. Estimation of natural background level (NBL) of fluoride becomes significant information for assessing the current and future contamination episodes. Vellore District in Tamil Nadu is a hard rock terrain known for its F-rich groundwater. In this study, we attempted to form a benchmark for fluoride using hydrochemical pre-selection (based on TDS and NO3) and cumulative probability plots (CPP). Principle components analysis is (PCA) applied to evaluate the corresponding factor grouping of the total of 68 samples, which is later mapped using geostatistical tool in ArcGIS. From the CPP, we derived the NBL of F as 0.75 mg/L. This value is compared with the observed concentration in each sample and they were spatially plotted based on the NBL. Resultant plot suggests that W-NW part of the study area has exceeded and E-EW regions are below the NBL of F. Spatial variation of the factor scores also supported this observation. Grounding an NBL and extending it to other parts of the potential contaminated aquifers are highly recommended for better understanding and management of the water supply systems.

  6. Aerosol plume observations by the ground-based lidar, sunphotometer, and satellite: cases analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yonghua; Gan, Chuen-meei; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Sam

    2009-09-01

    Smoke and dust aerosol plumes are observed by the ground-based multi-wavelength elastic-Raman lidar, sunphotometer and space-borne lidar CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization). Lidar-derived multi-wavelength aerosol extinction profiles and column lidar ratios are constrained by the independently measured optical depths. The aloft smoke plume layers from Idaho/Montana forest fires were measured at 2~8 km altitude by the ground lidar on Aug. 14~15, 2007. High aerosol optical depths (AOD) are shown with the value of 0.6~0.8 at wavelength 500 nm and Angstrom exponent of 1.8. The CALIOP observations generally show consistent plume height distribution with the ground lidar, but partly misclassify these smoke plumes as clouds. The forest fire sources and intra-continental smoke transport are clearly illustrated by CALIOP and MODIS satellite imageries. For the moderate dust-like plumes on April 18, 2008, they were observed at the altitude of 2~6 km. Aerosol optical depths vary from 0.2 to 0.4 at wavelength 500 nm with Angstrom exponent <1.0 in the plume-layer. Ground-lidar and CALIOP retrievals show the good agreement in dust-like layer heights, extinction profiles and aerosol species classification.

  7. Searches for volcanic or crustal gas in the recent Martian atmosphere by ground-based observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Hiromu; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Aoki, Shohei; Murata, Isao; Okano, Shoichi; Maezawa, Hiroyuki; Sagawa, Hideo; Kasai, Yasuko

    It is clear that volcanism had occurred throughout much of history of Mars [Neukum and Hiller, 1981; Neukum et al., 2004]. The release of gases into the atmosphere, due to volcanism, may have had significant climatic effects, and resulting in the abundance and widespread distribution of sulfates on the surface as detected by recent lander missions [Levine and Summers, 2008]. While the effect of atmospheric sulfur dioxide (SO2), which is one of several greenhouse gases for the terrestrial case, on early Martian climate is still quite speculative, it seems clear that SO2 could have played a significant role in episodic warming of Mars [Halevy et al., 2007]. Christensen et al. [2003] suggested that there is no active volcanism or hot spots on the current Mars. However, with geological data from Mars Express, Neukum et al. [2004] indicated that the latest active volcanism continued until the recent age (2 to 100 million years old). It suggests that the volcanoes can potentially be still active today. Furthermore, the evidence for recent groundwater seepage comes from the image taken by Mars Global Surveyor [MOC2-1619, NASA/JPL/MSSS]. Weak seepage from the surface is also possible. In this study, we focus on a sensitive search for Martian sulfur oxide with the high-resolution spectroscopy by ground-based submillimeter observation using ASTE telescope. We observed northern winter of Mars on 26 December 2007 (Ls = 8.1o ) in 346 GHz range with 1 hour integration. We get the upper limit of the SO2 mixing ratio, 2 ppb. This is mostly equivalent to the value observed in northern summer (Ls = 205o ) [Krasnopolsky, 2005]. We concluded that the crustal or volcanic gas produced into the atmosphere is tenuous in northern winter [Nakagawa et al., 2009]. More precise and continuous measurements of minor constituents are necessary for evaluation of their effects on evolution of the Martian atmosphere. The laser heterodyne spectroscopy is the most sensitive and highest resolution

  8. Ground-based Observations of the Total CO2 Column: Method, Validation, and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wennberg, P. O.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Toon, G. C.; Griffith, D.; Deutscher, N.; Connor, B. J.; Sherlock, V.; Randerson, J. T.; Notholt, J.; Blumenstock, T.; Sussmann, R.

    2007-12-01

    We describe the development of a ground-based network for measurement of the total CO2 column (Total Carbon Column Observing Network - TCCON). These data are derived from analysis of near-IR solar spectra obtained with high spectral resolution using FTIR spectrometers. Observations are currently made at seven globally-distributed sites, and planned at several others. They have been evaluated against aircraft in situ profiles in Park Falls, Wisconsin, Darwin, Australia, and Los Angeles, California. We show how these observations constrain the strength of exchange of carbon between the surface and the atmosphere. Implications for current and future CO2 observations from space are described.

  9. Observation-well network for collection of ground-water level data in Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolow, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    Aquifers--water-bearing deposits of sand and gravel, glacial till, and fractured bedrock--provide an extensive and readily accessible ground-water supply in Massachusetts. Ground water affects our everyday lives, not just in terms of how much water is available, but also in terms of the position of ground-water levels in relation to land surface. Knowledge of ground-water levels is needed by Federal, State, and local agencies to help plan, manage, and protect ground-water supplies, and by private construction companies for site planning and evaluation. A primary part of the mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Water Resources Division, is the systematic collection of ground-water, surface-water, and water-quality data. These data are needed to manage and protect the nation's water resources. The Massachusetts-Rhode Island District of the USGS, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management (DEM), Office of Water Resources, and county and town environmental agencies, has maintained a network of observation wells throughout the Commonwealth since the mid 1930's. The purpose of this network is to monitor seasonal and long-term changes in groundwater storage in different lithologic, topographic, and geographic settings. These data are analyzed to provide a monthly index of ground-water conditions to aid in water-resources management and planning, and to define long-term changes in water levels resulting from manmade stresses (such as pumping and construction-site drainage) and natural stresses (such as floods and droughts).

  10. (21) Lutetia spectrophotometry from Rosetta-OSIRIS images and comparison to ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrin, S.; La Forgia, F.; Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Massironi, M.; Ferri, F.; da Deppo, V.; Barbieri, C.; Sierks, H.; Osiris Team

    2012-06-01

    Here we present some preliminary results on surface variegation found on (21) Lutetia from ROSETTA-OSIRIS images acquired on 2010-07-10. The spectrophotometry obtained by means of the two cameras NAC and WAC (Narrow and Wide Angle Cameras) is consistent with ground based observations, and does not show surface diversity above the data error bars. The blue and UV images (shortward 500 nm) may, however, indicate a variegation of the optical properties of the asteroid surface on the Baetica region (Sierks et al., 2011). We also speculate on the contribution due to different illumination and to different ground properties (composition or, more probably, grain size diversity). In particular a correlation with geologic units independently defined by Massironi et al. (2012) is evident, suggesting that the variegation of the ground optical properties is likely to be real.

  11. Observations of high ground flash densities of positive lightning in summertime thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect

    Stolzenburg, M.

    1994-08-01

    Observations of summertime thunderstorms indicate that positive polarity cloud-to-ground lightning activity can occur with rates as high as 67 flashes in 5 min and spatial densities up to 0.60 flashes per square kilometer per hour. All ground flashes in a storm may be positive for substantial periods. Using data from a nationwide network of magnetic direction finders, 24 storms with high ground flash densities of positive lightning were found on 11 days in June and July 1989 in the Great Plains of the United States. The periods of high-density positive lightning persisted an average of 4 h, longer than the lifetime of a typical single thunderstorm cell. In most cases, they occurred at or near the beginning of the storms` cloud-to-ground lightning activity. Supporting data suggest that the production of high rate and high percentage of positive ground flashes may be associated with exceptionally tall storms that exhibit a stage of early, rapid increase in radar echo-top height and produce large hail.

  12. Evolution of Stratocumulus Over Land: Comparison of Ground and Aircraft Observations with Numerical Weather Prediction Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Simon R.; Abel, Steven J.; Boutle, Ian A.; Marenco, Franco

    2014-07-01

    Forecasting of low cloud continues to challenge numerical weather prediction. With this in mind, surface and airborne observations were made over East Anglia, UK, during March 2011 to investigate stratus and stratocumulus advecting from the sea over land. Four surface sites were deployed at various distances inland aligned approximately along the flow. In situ data include cloud-droplet measurements from an aircraft operating off the coast and a tethered balloon 100 km inland. Comparisons of thermodynamic and cloud properties are made with Met Office operational model simulations at horizontal resolutions of 4 and 1.5 km. The clouds contained droplet concentrations up to 600 cm^{-3} within polluted outflow off Europe. These measurements were compared to three different model schemes for predicting droplet concentration: two of them perform well at low to moderate concentrations but asymptote to 375 cm^{-3} . Microwave radiometers at the ground sites retrieved liquid water paths that reduced with distance inland and were generally below 200 g m^{-2} . The modelled water path performs well upstream but more erratically far inland. Comparisons of thermodynamic profiles are made within both Lagrangian and Eulerian frameworks and show the model predicted changes in equivalent potential temperature generally within 1 K, with occasional errors of 2 K or more. The modelled cloud-top temperatures were in good agreement with the observations down to - 7° C, but the magnitude of the temperature inversion, although good at times, was too small by on average 1.6 K. The different simulations produced different cloud-top water contents due to a combination of resolution and scientific upgrades to the model, but they generally underestimate the amount of cloud water. Major changes, such as the mesoscale temporary cloud breaks on 2 March 2011 and the complete clearance on 4 March, were seemingly predicted by the model for the correct reasons.

  13. Snow Never Falls on Satellite Radiometers: A Compelling Alternative to Ground Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkelman, L. M.; Lapo, K. E.; Cristea, N. C.; Lundquist, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Snowmelt is an important source of surface water for ecosystems, river flow, drinking water, and production of hydroelectric power. Thus accurate modeling of snow accumulation and melt is needed to improve our understanding of the impact of climate change on mountain snowpack and for use in water resource forecasting and management decisions. One of the largest potential sources of uncertainty in modeling mountain snow is the net radiative flux. This is because while net irradiance makes up the majority of the surface energy balance, it is one of the most difficult forcings to measure at remote mountain locations. Here we investigate the use of irradiances derived from satellite measurements in the place of surface observations. NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) SYN satellite product provides longwave and shortwave irradiances at the ground on three-hourly temporal and one degree spatial resolution.Although the low resolution of these data is a drawback, their availability over the entire globe for the full period of March 2000 through December 2010 (and beyond, as processing continues) makes them an attractive option for use in modeling. We first assessed the accuracy of the SYN downwelling solar and longwave fluxes by comparison to measurements at NOAA's Surface Radiation Network (SURFRAD) reference stations and at remote mountain stations. The performance of several snow models of varying complexity when using SYN irradiances as forcing data was then evaluated. Simulated snow water equivalent and runoff from cases using SYN data fell in the range of those from simulations forced with irradiances from higher quality surface observations or more highly-regarded empirical methods. We therefore judge the SYN irradiances to be suitable for use in snowmelt modeling and preferable to in situ measurements of questionable quality.

  14. Ground states of stealthy hyperuniform potentials. II. Stacked-slider phases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Stillinger, F H; Torquato, S

    2015-08-01

    Stealthy potentials, a family of long-range isotropic pair potentials, produce infinitely degenerate disordered ground states at high densities and crystalline ground states at low densities in d-dimensional Euclidean space R^{d}. In the previous paper in this series, we numerically studied the entropically favored ground states in the canonical ensemble in the zero-temperature limit across the first three Euclidean space dimensions. In this paper, we investigate using both numerical and theoretical techniques metastable stacked-slider phases, which are part of the ground-state manifold of stealthy potentials at densities in which crystal ground states are favored entropically. Our numerical results enable us to devise analytical models of this phase in two, three, and higher dimensions. Utilizing this model, we estimated the size of the feasible region in configuration space of the stacked-slider phase, finding it to be smaller than that of crystal structures in the infinite-system-size limit, which is consistent with our recent previous work. In two dimensions, we also determine exact expressions for the pair correlation function and structure factor of the analytical model of stacked-slider phases and analyze the connectedness of the ground-state manifold of stealthy potentials in this density regime. We demonstrate that stacked-slider phases are distinguishable states of matter; they are nonperiodic, statistically anisotropic structures that possess long-range orientational order but have zero shear modulus. We outline some possible future avenues of research to elucidate our understanding of this unusual phase of matter.

  15. Thunderstorms and ground-based radio noise as observed by radio astronomy Explorer 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. A.; Herman, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) data were analyzed to determine the frequency dependence of HF terrestrial radio noise power. RAE observations of individual thunderstorms, mid-ocean areas, and specific geographic regions for which concommitant ground based measurements are available indicate that noise power is a monotonically decreasing function of frequency which conforms to expectations over the geographic locations and time periods investigated. In all cases investigated, active thunderstorm regions emit slightly higher power as contrasted to RAE observations of the region during meteorologically quiet periods. Noise levels are some 15 db higher than predicted values over mid-ocean, while in locations where ground based measurements are available a maximum deviation of 5 db occurs. Worldwide contour mapping of the noise power at 6000 km for five individual months and four observing frequencies, examples of which are given, indicate high noise levels over continental land masses with corresponding lower levels over ocean regions.

  16. A theory of electron cyclotron waves generated along auroral field lines observed by ground facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Yoon, Peter H.; Freund, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    A generation mechanism for radio waves in the frequency range 150 - 700 kHz observed by ground facilities is suggested in terms of an electromagnetic electron cyclotron instability driven by auroral electrons. The excited waves can propagate downward along the ambient magnetic field lines and are thus observable with ground facilities. The trapped auroral electrons are supposed to play an important role in the generation process, because they give rise to a thermal anisotropy which consequently leads to the instability. The present work is a natural extension of the theory proposed earlier by Wu et al. (1983) which was discussed in a different context but may be used to explain the observed waves originated at low altitudes. This paper presents a possible wave generation mechanism valid in the entire auroral field-line region of interest.

  17. Evaluating the Accuracy of Plasmasphere Data Assimilation from Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Lichtenberger, J.; Friedel, R. H.; Clilverd, M.; Heilig, B.; Vellante, M.; Raita, T.; Rodger, C. J.; Reda, J.; Collier, A.; Holzworth, R. H.; Ober, D. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.

    2013-05-01

    VLF and magnetometer observations can be used to remotely sense the plasmasphere. VLF whistler waves can be used to measure the electron density and magnetic Field Line Resonance (FLR) measurements can be used to measure the mass density. In principle it is then possible to remotely map the plasmasphere with a network of ground-based stations which are also less expensive and more permanent than satellites. The PLASMON project, funded by the EU FP-7 program, is in the process of doing just this. A large number of ground-based observations will be input into a data assimilative framework which models the plasmasphere structure and dynamics. The data assimilation framework combines the Ensemble Kalman Filter with the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model. Here we simulate the observations from these networks, with appropriate uncertainties, and use them to drive the data assimilation framework to recover the plasmaspheric configuration. We will discuss the level of accuracy that can be achieved.

  18. Evaluating the Accuracy of Plasmasphere Data Assimilation from Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Lichtenberger, J.; Duffy, J.; Friedel, R. H.; Clilverd, M.; Heilig, B.; Vallante, M.; Manninen, J. K.; Rodger, C. J.; Collier, A.; Reda, J.; Holzworth, R. H.; Ober, D. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    VLF and magnetometer observations can be used to remotely sense the plasmasphere. VLF whistler waves can be used to measure the electron density and magnetic Field Line Resonance (FLR) measurements can be used to measure the mass density. In principle it is then possible to remotely map the plasmasphere with a network of ground-based stations which are also less expensive and more permanent than satellites. The PLASMON project, funded by the EU FP-7 program, is in the process of doing just this. A large number of ground-based observations will be input into a data assimilative framework which models the plasmasphere structure and dynamics. The data assimilation framework combines the Ensemble Kalman Filter with the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model. Here we simulate the observations from these networks, with appropriate uncertainties, and use them to drive the data assimilation framework to recover the plasmaspheric configuration. We will discuss the level of accuracy that can be achieved.

  19. Simultaneous space and ground-based observations of a plasmaspheric virtual resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Baker, J. B. H.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Hartinger, M. D.; Frissell, N. A.; Liu, Jiang

    2017-04-01

    We present simultaneous space and ground-based observations of Pi2 pulsations which occurred during a substorm on 25 September 2014. The timeline for this event starts at ˜06:04 UT when the THEMIS probe D located inside the plasmasphere detected Pi2 pulsations in the electric and magnetic fields. Cross-spectral analysis shows the azimuthal electric field and compressional magnetic field oscillated nearly in quadrature, highly suggestive of a standing fast-mode wave. Simultaneous Pi2 observations from dayside and nightside ground magnetometers at low latitudes indicate a global wave mode. A latitudinal magnetometer chain on the nightside observed a phase reversal in the H component of the Pi2 pulsations when crossing the footprint of the plasmapause, estimated from THEMIS spacecraft measurements. Spectral analysis of data from ground magnetometers in this latitudinal chain showed fundamental and second harmonic spectral peaks in their H and D components. Similar pulsation signatures at comparable harmonic frequencies were observed by three midlatitude SuperDARN HF radars, both poleward and equatorward of the plasmapause ionospheric footprint. Finally, the longitudinal polarization pattern and azimuthal phase propagation of midlatitude Pi2 pulsations are consistent with previous observations of a plasmaspheric virtual resonance being excited by a longitudinally localized source near midnight.

  20. Measurement of energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activities by a sounding balloon and ground observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, T.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activity is observed at various places, such as the ground, high mountain areas, and artificial satellites. In order to investigate the radiation source and its energy distribution, we measured energetic radiation by a sounding balloon, and the ground observation. On the measurement inside/above the thundercloud, we conducted a sounding observation using a radiosonde mounted two GM tubes (for gamma-rays, and for beta/gamma-rays), in addition to meteorological instruments. The balloon passed through a region of strong echoes in a thundercloud shown by radar image, at which time an increase in counting rate of the GM tube about 2 orders of magnitude occurred at the altitude from 5 km to 7.5 km. Furthermore, the counting rate of two GM tubes indicated the tendency different depending on movement of a balloon. This result suggests that the ratio for the gamma-rays (energetic photons) of the beta-rays (energetic electrons) varies according to the place in the thundercloud. Furthermore, we carried out a ground observation of the energetic gamma rays during winter thunderstorm at a coastal area facing the Sea of Japan. Two types of the energetic radiation have been observed at this time. We report the outline of these measurements and analysis in the session of the AGU meeting.

  1. Constellation design for earth observation based on the characteristics of the satellite ground track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Wang, Maocai; Dai, Guangming; Song, Zhiming

    2017-04-01

    This paper responds to the increasing need for Earth observation missions and deals with the design of Repeating Sun-Synchronous Constellations (RSSCs) which takes into consideration of constellations composed of one or more orbital planes. Based on the mature design approach of Repeating Sun-synchronous orbits, a novel technique to design RSSCs is presented, which takes the second gravitational zonal harmonic into consideration. In order to obtain regular cycles of observation of the Earth by a single satellite, the orbital relationships have to be satisfied firstly are illustrated. Then, by making full analyses of the characteristics of the satellite ground track, orbital parameters are properly calculated to make other satellites pass on the same or different ground track of the single satellite. Last, single-plane or multi-plane constellations are used to improve the repetitions of the observation and the ground resolution. RSSCs allow observing the same region once at the same local time in a solar day and several times at the different local time in a solar day. Therefore, this kind of constellations meets all requirements for the remote sensing applications, which need to observe the same region under the same or different visible conditions. Through various case studies, the calculation technique is successfully demonstrated.

  2. Observation of greenhouse gases from ground-based telescope "Subaru" and "TAO"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Imasu, R.; Miyata, T.

    2009-12-01

    Long-term observation of greenhouse gases is very important to understand temporal variations of greenhouse gases. This January, Japanese satellite, GOSAT (greenhouse gases observing satellite) was launched and its operational observation has started. For supporting satellite observations, validation data such as obtained by ground-based observations are very important. However, there is no observation site in South America. In this study, I propose new data analysis procedure for the observation of greenhouse gases using a ground-based astronomical telescope, which is placed in South America. The purpose of this study is to measure the vertical distribution and temporal variation of greenhouse gases such as methane and ozone from infrared spectrum data measured by an astronomical telescope on the ground. Although solar radiation is generally used to measure greenhouse gases, we use stellar radiation in order to measure the gases even in the night. The method developed in this study can be applicable for analysis of the data observed at world wide astronomical observatories. Institute of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo has conducted an international project, TAO (University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory) Project. In this project they are constructing a very big size telescope (diameter of the main mirror is 6m) at the observation site in Chile, South America. We are going to measure greenhouse gases using the telescope. However, as it is still under construction, we use the data from another Japanese telescope, “Subaru” in Hawaii. Subaru telescope, which has 7 instruments, is located at the top of Mauna Kea, Hawaii. In this study, we use mid-infrared grating spectrometer, called COMICS. This instrument provides spectroscopic capabilities from 7.5-13.5 um, which include absorption bands methane and ozone. To analyze these greenhouse gases, we developed a new method using two stars which have different zenith angles observed in a short interval. I will present

  3. Ground motion observations of the South Napa earthquake (M6.0 August 24, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltay, A.

    2014-12-01

    The South Napa earthquake generated peak ground motions in excess of 50%g and 50 cm/s in Napa Valley and also along strike to the south, and was recorded at 17 stations within 20 km rupture distance (Rrup) of the finite fault plane, 115 stations within 50 km, and 246 within 100 km. We compare the densely recorded ground motions to existing ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) to understand both the spatial distribution of ground-motion amplitudes and also the relative excitation and attenuation terms from the earthquake. Using the ground-motion data as reported by ShakeMap, we examine the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and velocity, as well as the pseudo-spectral acceleration (PSA) at 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 seconds, adjusted empirically to a single site condition of 760 m/s. Overall, the ground motions on the north-south components are larger than those on the east-west, consistent with both the generally north-south strike of the fault and the rupture directivity. At the higher frequencies (PGA and PSA of 0.3 s), the close data are very consistent with the GMPEs, implying a median stress drop near 5 MPa. For the longer period data, the GMPEs underpredict the data at close stations. At all frequencies, the distance attenuation seems to be stronger than the GMPEs would predict, which could either be a station coverage bias, given that most of the stations are to the south of the epicenter, or may indicate that the attenuation structure in the Napa and delta region is stronger than the average attenuation in California, on which the GMPEs were built. The spatial plot of the ground motion residuals is positive to the north, in both Napa and Sonoma Valley, consistent with both the directivity and basin effect. More interestingly, perhaps, is that there is strong ground motion to the south, as well, in the along-strike direction, particularly for PSA at 1.0s. These strongly positive residuals align along an older, Quaternary fault structure associated with the Franklin

  4. Prevalence and Characterization of Salmonella in Bovine Lymph Nodes Potentially Destined for Use in Ground Beef

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A potential source of pathogenic bacteria in ground beef is the lymphatic system, specifically the lymph nodes. There are several reports of bacteria isolated from the lymph nodes of cattle at slaughter; however, most of the studies have dealt with mesenteric lymph nodes that are not normally incor...

  5. Monitoring greenhouse gas emissions in Australian landscapes: Comparing ground based mobile surveying data to GOSAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, S.; Iverach, C.; Kelly, B. F. J.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is threatening the health and stability of the natural world and human society. Such concerns were emphasized at COP21 conference in Paris 2015 which highlighted the global need to improve our knowledge of sources of greenhouse gas and to develop methods to mitigate the effects of their emissions. Ongoing spatial and temporal measurements of greenhouse gases at both point and regional scales is important for clarification of climate change mechanisms and accounting. The Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is designed to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from orbit. As existing ground monitoring stations are limited and still unevenly distributed, satellite observations provide important frequent, spatially extensive, but low resolution observations. Recent developments in portable laser based greenhouse gas measurement systems have enabled the rapid measurement of greenhouse gases in ppb at the ground surface. This study was conducted to map major sources of CO2 and CH4 in the eastern states of Australia at the landscape scale and to compare the results to GOSAT observations. During April 2016 we conducted a regional CH4 and CO2 mobile survey, using an LGR greenhouse gas analyzer. Measurements were made along a 4000 KM circuit through major cities, country towns, dry sclerophyll forests, coastal wetlands, coal mining regions, coal seam gas developments, dryland farming and irrigated agricultural landscapes. The ground-based survey data were then compared with the data (L2) from GOSAT. Ground-based mobile surveys showed that there are clear statistical differences in the ground level atmospheric concentration of CH4 and CO2 associated with all major changes in land use. These changes extend for kilometers, and cover one or more GOSAT pixels. In the coal mining districts the ground-level atmospheric concentration of CH4 exceeded 2 ppm for over 40 km, yet this was not discernable in the retrieved data (L2

  6. Variational calculation of 4He tetramer ground and excited states using a realistic pair potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiyama, E.; Kamimura, M.

    2012-02-01

    We calculated the 4He trimer and tetramer ground and excited states with the LM2M2 potential using our Gaussian expansion method for ab initio variational calculations of few-body systems. The method has been extensively used for a variety of three-, four-, and five-body systems in nuclear physics and exotic atomic and molecular physics. The trimer (tetramer) wave function is expanded in terms of symmetric three- (four-) body Gaussian basis functions, ranging from very compact to very diffuse, without assumption of any pair correlation function. The calculated results for the trimer ground and excited states are in excellent agreement with values reported in the literature. The binding energies of the tetramer ground and excited states are obtained as 558.98 and 127.33 mK (0.93 mK below the trimer ground state), respectively. We found that precisely the same shape of the short-range correlation (rij≲4 Å) in the dimer appears in the ground and excited states of the trimer and tetramer. The overlap function between the trimer excited state and the dimer ground state and that between the tetramer excited state and the trimer ground state are almost proportional to the dimer wave function in the asymptotic region (up to ˜1000 Å). Also, the pair correlation functions of trimer and tetramer excited states are almost proportional to the squared dimer wave function. We then propose a model which predicts the binding energy of the first excited state of 4HeN (N≥3) measured from the 4HeN-1 ground state to be nearly (N)/(2(N-1))B2 where B2 is the dimer binding energy.

  7. Uncertainties in Instantaneous Rainfall Rate Estimates: Satellite vs. Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitai, E.; Huffman, G. J.; Goodrich, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution precipitation intensities are significant in many fields. For example, hydrological applications such as flood forecasting, runoff accommodation, erosion prediction, and urban hydrological studies depend on an accurate representation of the rainfall that does not infiltrate the soil, which is controlled by the rain intensities. Changes in the rain rate pdf over long periods are important for climate studies. Are our estimates accurate enough to detect such changes? While most evaluation studies are focusing on the accuracy of rainfall accumulation estimates, evaluation of instantaneous rainfall intensity estimates is relatively rare. Can a speceborne radar help in assessing ground-based radar estimates of precipitation intensities or is it the other way around? In this presentation we will provide some insight on the relative accuracy of instantaneous precipitation intensity fields from satellite and ground-based observations. We will examine satellite products such as those from the TRMM Precipitation Radar and those from several passive microwave imagers and sounders by comparing them with advanced high-resolution ground-based products taken at overpass time (snapshot comparisons). The ground based instantaneous rain rate fields are based on in situ measurements (i.e., the USDA/ARS Walnut Gulch dense rain gauge network), remote sensing observations (i.e., the NOAA/NSSL NMQ/Q2 radar-only national mosaic), and multi-sensor products (i.e., high-resolution gauge adjusted radar national mosaics, which we have developed by applying a gauge correction on the Q2 products).

  8. Extended field observations of cirrus clouds using a ground-based cloud observing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of synoptic-scale dynamics associated with a middle and upper tropospheric cloud event that occurred on 26 November 1991 is examined. The case under consideration occurred during the FIRE CIRRUS-II Intensive Field Observing Period held in Coffeyville, KS during Nov. and Dec., 1991. Using data from the wind profiler demonstration network and a temporally and spatially augmented radiosonde array, emphasis is given to explaining the evolution of the kinematically-derived ageostrophic vertical circulations and correlating the circulation with the forcing of an extensively sampled cloud field. This is facilitated by decomposing the horizontal divergence into its component parts through a natural coordinate representation of the flow. Ageostrophic vertical circulations are inferred and compared to the circulation forcing arising from geostrophic confluence and shearing deformation derived from the Sawyer-Eliassen Equation. It is found that a thermodynamically indirect vertical circulation existed in association with a jet streak exit region. The circulation was displaced to the cyclonic side of the jet axis due to the orientation of the jet exit between a deepening diffluent trough and building ridge. The cloud line formed in the ascending branch of the vertical circulation with the most concentrated cloud development occurring in conjunction with the maximum large-scale vertical motion. The relationship between the large scale dynamics and the parameterization of middle and upper tropospheric clouds in large-scale models is discussed and an example of ice water contents derived from a parameterization forced by the diagnosed vertical motions and observed water vapor contents is presented.

  9. Report on the ground-based observation campaign of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehin, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Rosetta gets closer to the nucleus than any previous mission, and returns wonderfully detailed measurements from the heart of the comet, but at the cost of not seeing the large scale coma and tails. The ground-based campaign fills in the missing part of the picture, studying the comet at about 1000 km resolution, and following how the overall activity of the comet varies. These data provide context information for Rosetta, so changes in the inner coma seen by the spacecraft can be correlated with the phenomena observable in comets. This will not only help to complete our understanding of the activity of 67P, but also to allow us to compare it with other comets that are only observed from the ground.The ground-based campaign includes observations with nearly all major facilities world-wide. In 2014 the majority of data came from the ESO VLT, as the comet was still relatively faint and in Southern skies, but as it returns to visibility from Earth in 2015 it is considerably brighter, approaching its perihelion in August, and at Northern declinations. I will present results from the 2014 campaign, including visible wavelength photometry and spectroscopy, and the latest results from 2015 observations.

  10. Ground-level observation of a terrestrial gamma ray flash initiated by a triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, B. M.; Uman, M. A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Jordan, D. M.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Caicedo, J. A.; Carvalho, F. L.; Wilkes, R. A.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Gamerota, W. R.; Pilkey, J. T.; Ngin, T. K.; Moore, R. C.; Rassoul, H. K.; Cummer, S. A.; Grove, J. E.; Nag, A.; Betten, D. P.; Bozarth, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on a terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) that occurred on 15 August 2014 coincident with an altitude-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) in North Central Florida. The TGF was observed by a ground-level network of gamma ray, close electric field, distant magnetic field, Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), optical, and radar measurements. Simultaneous gamma ray and LMA data indicate that the upward positive leader of the triggered lightning flash induced relativistic runaway electron avalanches when the leader tip was at about 3.5 km altitude, resulting in the observed TGF. Channel luminosity and electric field data show that there was an initial continuous current (ICC) pulse in the lightning channel to ground during the time of the TGF. Modeling of the observed ICC pulse electric fields measured at close range (100-200 m) indicates that the ICC pulse current had both a slow and fast component (full widths at half maximum of 235 μs and 59 μs) and that the fast component was more or less coincident with the TGF, suggesting a physical association between the relativistic runaway electron avalanches and the ICC pulse observed at ground. Our ICC pulse model reproduces moderately well the measured close electric fields at the ICLRT as well as three independent magnetic field measurements made about 250 km away. Radar and LMA data suggest that there was negative charge near the region in which the TGF was initiated.

  11. Synchronized observations by using the STEREO and the largest ground-based decametre radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.; Mann, G.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Kaiser, M. L.; Briand, C.; Zarka, P.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Koval, A. A.; Mel'nik, V. N.; Mukha, D. V.; Panchenko, M.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the approach to simultaneous (synchronous) solar observations of radio emission by using the STEREO-WAVES instruments (frequency range 0.125-16 MHz) and the largest ground-based low-frequency radio telescope. We illustrate it by the UTR-2 radio telescope implementation (10-30 MHz). The antenna system of the radio telescope is a T-shape-like array of broadband dipoles and is located near the village Grakovo in the Kharkiv region (Ukraine). The third observation point on the ground in addition to two space-based ones improves the space-mission performance capabilities for the determination of radio-emission source directivity. The observational results from the high sensitivity antenna UTR-2 are particularly useful for analysis of STEREO data in the condition of weak event appearances during solar activity minima. In order to improve the accuracy of flux density measurements, we also provide simultaneous observations with a large part of the UTR-2 radio telescope array and its single dipole close to the STEREO-WAVES antennas in sensitivity. This concept has been studied by comparing the STEREO data with ground-based records from 2007-2011 and shown to be effective. The capabilities will be useful in the implementation of new instruments (LOFAR, LWA, MWA, etc.) and during the future Solar Orbiter mission.

  12. Ground squirrel shooting and potential lead exposure in breeding avian scavengers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Wagner, Mason T.

    2016-01-01

    Recreational ground squirrel shooting is a popular activity throughout the western United States and serves as a tool for managing ground squirrel populations in agricultural regions. Belding’s ground squirrels (Spermophilus beldingi) are routinely shot in California, Nevada, and Oregon across habitats that overlap with breeding avian scavengers. Ground squirrels shot with lead (Pb)-based bullets may pose a risk to avian scavengers if they consume carcasses containing Pb fragments. To assess the potential risk to breeding avian scavengers we developed a model to estimate the number, mass, and distribution of Pb fragments in shot ground squirrels using radiographic images. Eighty percent of shot carcasses contained detectible Pb fragments with an average of 38.6 mg of Pb fragments. Seven percent of all carcasses contained Pb fragment masses exceeding a lethal dose for a model raptor nestling (e.g. American kestrel Falco sparverius). Bullet type did not influence the number of fragments in shot ground squirrels, but did influence the mass of fragments retained. Belding’s ground squirrels shot with .17 Super Mag and unknown ammunition types contained over 28 and 17 times more mass of Pb fragments than those shot with .22 solid and .22 hollow point bullets, respectively. Ground squirrel body mass was positively correlated with both the number and mass of Pb fragments in carcasses, increasing on average by 76% and 56% respectively across the range of carcass masses. Although the mass of Pb retained in ground squirrel carcasses was small relative to the original bullet mass, avian scavenger nestlings that frequently consume shot ground squirrels may be at risk for Pb-induced effects (e.g., physiology, growth, or survival). Using modeling efforts we found that if nestling golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and Swainson’s hawks (B. swainsoni) consumed shot ground squirrels proportionately to the nestling’s mass, energy needs

  13. Ground Squirrel Shooting and Potential Lead Exposure in Breeding Avian Scavengers

    PubMed Central

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Wagner, Mason T.

    2016-01-01

    Recreational ground squirrel shooting is a popular activity throughout the western United States and serves as a tool for managing ground squirrel populations in agricultural regions. Belding’s ground squirrels (Spermophilus beldingi) are routinely shot in California, Nevada, and Oregon across habitats that overlap with breeding avian scavengers. Ground squirrels shot with lead (Pb)-based bullets may pose a risk to avian scavengers if they consume carcasses containing Pb fragments. To assess the potential risk to breeding avian scavengers we developed a model to estimate the number, mass, and distribution of Pb fragments in shot ground squirrels using radiographic images. Eighty percent of shot carcasses contained detectible Pb fragments with an average of 38.6 mg of Pb fragments. Seven percent of all carcasses contained Pb fragment masses exceeding a lethal dose for a model raptor nestling (e.g. American kestrel Falco sparverius). Bullet type did not influence the number of fragments in shot ground squirrels, but did influence the mass of fragments retained. Belding’s ground squirrels shot with .17 Super Mag and unknown ammunition types contained over 28 and 17 times more mass of Pb fragments than those shot with .22 solid and .22 hollow point bullets, respectively. Ground squirrel body mass was positively correlated with both the number and mass of Pb fragments in carcasses, increasing on average by 76% and 56% respectively across the range of carcass masses. Although the mass of Pb retained in ground squirrel carcasses was small relative to the original bullet mass, avian scavenger nestlings that frequently consume shot ground squirrels may be at risk for Pb-induced effects (e.g., physiology, growth, or survival). Using modeling efforts we found that if nestling golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and Swainson’s hawks (B. swainsoni) consumed shot ground squirrels proportionately to the nestling’s mass, energy needs

  14. Ground Squirrel Shooting and Potential Lead Exposure in Breeding Avian Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Wagner, Mason T

    2016-01-01

    Recreational ground squirrel shooting is a popular activity throughout the western United States and serves as a tool for managing ground squirrel populations in agricultural regions. Belding's ground squirrels (Spermophilus beldingi) are routinely shot in California, Nevada, and Oregon across habitats that overlap with breeding avian scavengers. Ground squirrels shot with lead (Pb)-based bullets may pose a risk to avian scavengers if they consume carcasses containing Pb fragments. To assess the potential risk to breeding avian scavengers we developed a model to estimate the number, mass, and distribution of Pb fragments in shot ground squirrels using radiographic images. Eighty percent of shot carcasses contained detectible Pb fragments with an average of 38.6 mg of Pb fragments. Seven percent of all carcasses contained Pb fragment masses exceeding a lethal dose for a model raptor nestling (e.g. American kestrel Falco sparverius). Bullet type did not influence the number of fragments in shot ground squirrels, but did influence the mass of fragments retained. Belding's ground squirrels shot with .17 Super Mag and unknown ammunition types contained over 28 and 17 times more mass of Pb fragments than those shot with .22 solid and .22 hollow point bullets, respectively. Ground squirrel body mass was positively correlated with both the number and mass of Pb fragments in carcasses, increasing on average by 76% and 56% respectively across the range of carcass masses. Although the mass of Pb retained in ground squirrel carcasses was small relative to the original bullet mass, avian scavenger nestlings that frequently consume shot ground squirrels may be at risk for Pb-induced effects (e.g., physiology, growth, or survival). Using modeling efforts we found that if nestling golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and Swainson's hawks (B. swainsoni) consumed shot ground squirrels proportionately to the nestling's mass, energy needs, and diet

  15. A discussion of differences in preparation, performance and postreflections in participant observations within two grounded theory approaches.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Lindhardt, Tove; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2016-05-10

    This paper presents a discussion of the differences in using participant observation as a data collection method by comparing the classic grounded theory methodology of Barney Glaser with the constructivist grounded theory methodology by Kathy Charmaz. Participant observations allow nursing researchers to experience activities and interactions directly in situ. However, using participant observations as a data collection method can be done in many ways, depending on the chosen grounded theory methodology, and may produce different results. This discussion shows that how the differences between using participant observations in classic and constructivist grounded theory can be considerable and that grounded theory researchers should adhere to the method descriptions of performing participant observations according to the selected grounded theory methodology to enhance the quality of research.

  16. Ground-level observations of a new type of auroral radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, M.; Labelle, J. W.; Kim, A.

    2012-12-01

    The auroral zone is the source of many kinds of plasma waves that can be observed on the ground. Previously, four kinds of auroral radio waves have been observed at ground-level from 100 kHz - 5000 kHz: auroral hiss (100 kHz - 1MHz), auroral roar (~2800 kHz, ~4200 kHz, and ~5600 kHz), auroral medium frequency burst (1.5 - 4.5 MHz) and auroral kilometric radiation (~300 kHz - 600 kHz). We report the first observations of a new auroral radio emission observed at ground-level. Continuous waveform data taken at South Pole Station in 2011 and 2012 yielded multiple observations of these waves. They occur from 1300 kHz - 1850 kHz and have a bandwidth of a few hundred kiloHertz. The waves occurred within a few hours of local magnetic midnight and were observed for under ten minutes. Spectral analysis of the waveform data revealed that the emission has at least three distinct kinds of fine structures: a broad, banded structure, short-lived, narrowband structures that resemble the so-called "HF-chirps" observed on rockets, and striated features that occur predominantly at the lower frequency boundary of the emission. Given their restricted frequency range, we propose that the waves are generated at or near the upper hybrid frequency when the electron plasma frequency is less than the electron gyrofrequency. Resonant energy calculations performed under this scenario indicate that waves on the upper-hybrid surface could resonate with keV auroral electrons, and previous satellite observations and growth rate calculations by Benson and Wong [1987] show that waves in this frequency range could be generated via the cyclotron maser instability.

  17. Nonlinear Site Response Due to Large Ground Acceleration: Observation and Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, S.; Furumura, T.; Sasatani, T.

    2009-12-01

    We studied nonlinear site response due to large ground acceleration during the 2003 off-Miyagi Earthquake (Mw7.0) in Japan by means of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio analysis of S-wave motion. The results were then confirmed by finite-difference method (FDM) simulation of nonlinear seismic wave propagation. A nonlinear site response is often observed at soft sediment sites, and even at hard bedrock sites which are covered by thin soil layers. Nonlinear site response can be induced by strong ground motion whose peak ground acceleration (PGA) exceeds about 100 cm/s/s, and seriously affects the amplification of high frequency ground motion and PGA. Noguchi and Sasatani (2008) developed an efficient technique for quantitative evaluation of nonlinear site response using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio of S-wave (S-H/V) derived from strong ground motion records, based on Wen et al. (2006). We applied this technique to perform a detailed analysis of the properties of nonlinear site response based on a large amount of data recorded at 132 K-NET and KiK-net strong motion stations in Northern Japan during the off-Miyagi Earthquake. We succeeded in demonstrating a relationship between ground motion level, nonlinear site response and surface soil characteristics. For example, the seismic data recorded at KiK-net IWTH26 showed obvious characteristics of nonlinear site response when the PGA exceeded 100 cm/s/s. As the ground motion level increased, the dominant peak of S-H/V shifted to lower frequency, the high frequency level of S-H/V dropped, and PGA amplification decreased. On the other hand, the records at MYGH03 seemed not to be affected by nonlinear site response even for high ground motion levels in which PGA exceeds 800 cm/s/s. The characteristics of such nonlinear site amplification can be modeled by evaluating Murnaghan constants (e.g. McCall, 1994), which are the third-order elastic constants. In order to explain the observed characteristics of

  18. Modelling Ground Based X- and Ku-Band Observations of Tundra Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasurak, A.; King, J. M.; Kelly, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    As part of a radar-based remote sensing field experiment in Churchill, Manitoba ground based Ku- and X-band scatterometers were deployed to observe changing tundra snowpack conditions from November 2010 to March 2011. The research is part of the validation effort for the Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory (CoReH2O) mission, a candidate in the European Space Agency's Earth Explorer program. This paper focuses on the local validation of the semi-empirical radiative transfer (sRT) model proposed for use in snow property retrievals as part of the CoReH2O mission. In this validation experiment, sRT was executed in the forward mode, simulating backscatter to assess the ability of the model. This is a necessary precursor to any inversion attempt. Two experiments are considered, both conducted in a hummocky tundra environment with shallow snow cover. In both cases, scatterometer observations were acquired over a field of view of approximately 10 by 20 meters. In the first experiment, radar observations were made of a snow field and then repeated after the snow had been removed. A ground-based scanning LiDAR system was used to characterize the spatial variability of snow depth through measurements of the snow and ground surface. Snow properties were determined in the field of view from two snow pits, 12 density core measurements, and Magnaprobe snow depth measurements. In the second experiment, a site was non-destructively observed from November through March, with snow properties measured out-of-scene, to characterize the snow evolution response. The model results from sRT fit the form of the observations from the two scatterometer field experiments but do not capture the backscatter magnitude. A constant offset for the season of 5 dB for X-band co- and cross-polarization response was required to match observations, in addition to a 3 dB X- and Ku-band co-polarization offset after the 6th of December. To explain these offsets, it is recognized that the two

  19. GroundBIRD: observations of CMB polarization with fast scan modulation and MKIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Shugo; Choi, Jihoon; Damayanthi, Thushara; Hattori, Makoto; Hazumi, Masashi; Ishitsuka, Hikaru; Kiuchi, Kenji; Koyano, Ryo; Kutsuma, Hiroki; Lee, Kyungmin; Mima, Satoru; Minowa, Makoto; Nagai, Makoto; Nagasaki, Taketo; Otani, Chiko; Sekimoto, Yutaro; Semoto, Munehisa; Suzuki, Jun'ya; Taino, Tohru; Tajima, Osamu; Tomita, Nozomu; Won, Eunil; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Polarized patterns in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation contains rich knowledge for early stage of the universe. In particular their odd-parity patterns at large angular scale (> 1°), primordial B-modes, are smoking-gun evidence for the cosmic inflation. The GroundBIRD experiment aims to detect these B-modes with a ground-based apparatus that includes several novel devices: a high-speed rotational scan system, cold optics, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). We plan to start observations in the Canary Islands in 2017. In this paper, we present the status of the development of our instruments. We established an environment that allows operation of our MKIDs in an optical configuration, in which the MKIDs observe radiations from the outside of the telescope aperture. We have also constructed MKID prototypes, and we are testing them in the optical configuration.

  20. Coupling of ground biosensor networks for water monitoring with satellite observations in assessing Leptospirosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouloudis, A. N.; Rickerby, D. G.

    2012-12-01

    mapping is reliant on the identification of location where such networks could be of use. Systematic monitoring from satellite images are utilized for increasing the potential areas of application, for assessing the geographical representativeness on the measurements of the sensors and proposing the methodology on assessing the environmental conditions that are associated with outbreaks of leptospirosis. Unfortunately, several combined deployments of earth observations with ground sensors are required before for the understanding of the connections between hydrology and the human health. Ultimately this will lead to the establishment of early warning system that might investigate the effectiveness of key control measures, including vaccine (when they will become available) and affront the water decontamination, and animal control issues.

  1. DEMETER observations of bursty MF emissions and their relation to ground-level auroral MF burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, M. C.; LaBelle, J.; Parrot, M.

    2014-12-01

    A survey of medium frequency (MF) electric field data from selected orbits of the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquakes (DEMETER) spacecraft reveals 68 examples of a new type of bursty MF emissions occurring at high latitudes associated with auroral phenomena. These resemble auroral MF burst, a natural radio emission observed at ground level near local substorm onsets. Similar to MF burst, the bursty MF waves observed by DEMETER have broadband, impulsive frequency structure covering 1.5-3.0 MHz, amplitudes of 50-100 μV/m, an overall occurrence rate of ˜0.76% with higher occurrence during active times, and strong correlation with auroral hiss. The magnetic local time distribution of the MF waves observed by DEMETER shows peak occurrence rate near 18 MLT, somewhat earlier than the equivalent peak in the occurrence rate of ground level MF burst, though propagation effects and differences in the latitudes sampled by the two techniques may explain this discrepancy. Analysis of solar wind and SuperMAG data suggests that while the bursty MF waves observed by DEMETER are associated with enhanced auroral activity, their coincidence with substorm onset may not be as exact as that of ground level MF burst. One conjunction occurs in which MF burst is observed at Churchill, Manitoba, within 8 min of MF emissions detected by DEMETER on field lines approximately 1000 km southeast of Churchill. These observations may plausibly be associated with the same auroral event detected by ground level magnetometers at several Canadian observatories. Although it is uncertain, the balance of the evidence suggests that the bursty MF waves observed with DEMETER are the same phenomenon as the ground level MF burst. Hence, theories of MF burst generation in the ionosphere, such as beam-generated Langmuir waves excited over a range of altitudes or strong Langmuir turbulence generating a range of frequencies within a narrow altitude range, need to be revisited to

  2. Comparison of Ground-Based 3-Dimensional Lightning Mapping Observation with Satellite-Based LIS Observations in Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Hamlin, Timothy; Boccippio, Dennis J.; Goodman, Steven J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1999-01-01

    3-dimensional lightning mapping observations were obtained in central Oklahoma during June 1998, using New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). The results have been compared with observations of the discharges from space obtained by NASA's Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. Excellent spatial and temporal correlations were obtained between the two sets of observations. All discharges seen by LIS were mapped by the LMA. Most of the detected optical events were associated with lightning channels that extended into the upper part of the storm. Cloud-to-ground discharges that were confined to mid- and lower-altitudes tended to be detected by LIS at the time of late-stage return strokes. Extensive illumination tended to occur in impulsive bursts toward the end or part way through intracloud discharges and appeared to be produced by energetic K-changes that typically occur at these times.

  3. Comparison of Ground-Based 3-Dimensional Lightning Mapping Observation with Satellite-Based LIS Observations in Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Hamlin, Timothy; Boccippio, Dennis J.; Goodman, Steven J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1999-01-01

    3-dimensional lightning mapping observations were obtained in central Oklahoma during June 1998, using New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). The results have been compared with observations of the discharges from space obtained by NASA's Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. Excellent spatial and temporal correlations were obtained between the two sets of observations. All discharges seen by LIS were mapped by the LMA. Most of the detected optical events were associated with lightning channels that extended into the upper part of the storm. Cloud-to-ground discharges that were confined to mid- and lower-altitudes tended to be detected by LIS at the time of late-stage return strokes. Extensive illumination tended to occur in impulsive bursts toward the end or part way through intracloud discharges and appeared to be produced by energetic K-changes that typically occur at these times.

  4. Development of a ground-based automatic camera network for NLC observations: first steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S.; Pertsev, N.; Romejko, V.

    Noctilucent clouds NLC are the highest clouds in the Earth s atmosphere observing around the mesopause at 80-90 km altitudes They can be seen in night during summer time from May until September These night clouds are comprised of small ice particles that provide a sunlight scatter and thus NLC are readily seen against the dark twilight arc The basic physics of the NLC formation is well understood at present However questions concerning secular trends in NLC characteristics relationship between NLC and solar activity as well as global change effects differences in the NLC statistical behavior between different observational sites and many others are still unanswered In particular there is not sufficient information on NLC distribution around the globe and what their characteristic scales are A little knowledge is obtained with model simulations and with NLC observations from space However there are certain natural limitations to observing NLC from space as well as such observations are of a low spatial resolution several hundreds km On the other hand all available ground-based NLC observations are not correlated are conducted by different techniques and therefore there are a few chances to get a comprehensive representation of the NLC distribution above the Earth s surface That is why there is a need to develop a ground-based network for NLC observations using standard digital cameras These cameras are intended to be combined in a common network controlled by a standard program and should work continuously from May until September It is desired to

  5. Weighting observations in the context of calibrating ground-water models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, M.C.; Tiedeman, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates four issues related to weighting observations in the context of ground-water models calibrated with nonlinear regression: (1) terminology, (2) determining values for the weighting, (3) measurement and model errors, and (4) the effect weighting can have on the accuracy of calibrated models and measures of uncertainty. It is shown that the confusing aspects of weighting can be managed, and are not a practical barrier to using regression methods.

  6. Proving Ground Potential Mission and Flight Test Objectives and Near Term Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. Marshall; Craig, Douglas A.; Lopez, Pedro Jr.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is developing a Pioneering Space Strategy to expand human and robotic presence further into the solar system, not just to explore and visit, but to stay. NASA's strategy is designed to meet technical and non-technical challenges, leverage current and near-term activities, and lead to a future where humans can work, learn, operate, and thrive safely in space for an extended, and eventually indefinite, period of time. An important aspect of this strategy is the implementation of proving ground activities needed to ensure confidence in both Mars systems and deep space operations prior to embarking on the journey to the Mars. As part of the proving ground development, NASA is assessing potential mission concepts that could validate the required capabilities needed to expand human presence into the solar system. The first step identified in the proving ground is to establish human presence in the cis-lunar vicinity to enable development and testing of systems and operations required to land humans on Mars and to reach other deep space destinations. These capabilities may also be leveraged to support potential commercial and international objectives for Lunar Surface missions. This paper will discuss a series of potential proving ground mission and flight test objectives that support NASA's journey to Mars and can be leveraged for commercial and international goals. The paper will discuss how early missions will begin to satisfy these objectives, including extensibility and applicability to Mars. The initial capability provided by the launch vehicle will be described as well as planned upgrades required to support longer and more complex missions. Potential architectures and mission concepts will be examined as options to satisfy proving ground objectives. In addition, these architectures will be assessed on commercial and international participation opportunities and on how well they develop capabilities and operations applicable to Mars vicinity missions.

  7. Cross Calibration of TOMS, SBUV/2 and Sciamachy Radiances from Ground Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsenrath, Ernest; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Bhartia, Pawan K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Verification of a stratospheric ozone recovery remains a high priority for environmental research and policy definition. Models predict an ozone recovery at a much lower rate than the measured depletion rate observed to date. Therefore improved precision of the satellite and ground ozone observing systems are required over the long term to verify recovery. We have shown that validation of radiances is the most effective means for correcting absolute accuracy and long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements. This method by-passes the algorithms used for both satellite and ground based measurements which are normally used to validate and correct the satellite data. Validation of radiances will also improve all higher level data products derived from the satellite observations. Backscatter algorithms suffer from several errors such as unrepresentative a-priori data and air mass factor corrections. Radiance comparisons employ forward models but are inherently more accurate and than inverse (retrieval) algorithms. A new method for satellite validation is planned which will compliment measurements from the existing ground-based networks. This method will employ very accurate comparisons between ground based zenith sky radiances and satellite nadir radiances. These comparisons will rely heavily on the experience derived from the Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) program which provided a reference standard of radiance measurements for SBUV/2, TOMS, and GOME. This new measurement program, called "Skyrad", employs two well established capabilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center, 1) the SSBUV calibration facilities and 2) the radiative transfer codes used for the TOMS and SBUV/2 algorithms and their subsequent refinements. Radiative transfer calculations show that ground based zenith sky and satellite nadir backscatter ultraviolet comparisons can be made very accurately under certain viewing conditions. The Skyrad instruments (SSBUV, Brewer spectrophotometers, and

  8. Cross Calibration of TOMS, SBUV/2 and Sciamachy Radiances from Ground Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsenrath, Ernest; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Bhartia, Pawan K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Verification of a stratospheric ozone recovery remains a high priority for environmental research and policy definition. Models predict an ozone recovery at a much lower rate than the measured depletion rate observed to date. Therefore improved precision of the satellite and ground ozone observing systems are required over the long term to verify recovery. We have shown that validation of radiances is the most effective means for correcting absolute accuracy and long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements. This method by-passes the algorithms used for both satellite and ground based measurements which are normally used to validate and correct the satellite data. Validation of radiances will also improve all higher level data products derived from the satellite observations. Backscatter algorithms suffer from several errors such as unrepresentative a-priori data and air mass factor corrections. Radiance comparisons employ forward models but are inherently more accurate and than inverse (retrieval) algorithms. A new method for satellite validation is planned which will compliment measurements from the existing ground-based networks. This method will employ very accurate comparisons between ground based zenith sky radiances and satellite nadir radiances. These comparisons will rely heavily on the experience derived from the Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) program which provided a reference standard of radiance measurements for SBUV/2, TOMS, and GOME. This new measurement program, called "Skyrad", employs two well established capabilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center, 1) the SSBUV calibration facilities and 2) the radiative transfer codes used for the TOMS and SBUV/2 algorithms and their subsequent refinements. Radiative transfer calculations show that ground based zenith sky and satellite nadir backscatter ultraviolet comparisons can be made very accurately under certain viewing conditions. The Skyrad instruments (SSBUV, Brewer spectrophotometers, and

  9. The benzene-argon ground-state intermolecular potential energy surface revisited.

    PubMed

    Capelo, Silvia Bouzón; Fernández, Berta; Koch, Henrik; Felker, Peter M

    2009-04-30

    The benzene-Ar ground-state S(0) intermolecular potential energy surface is evaluated using the coupled cluster singles and doubles model including connected triple corrections and the augmented correlation consistent polarized valence triple-zeta basis set extended with a set of 3s3p2d1f1g midbond functions. The surface is characterized by absolute minima of -390.1 cm(-1) where the argon atom is located on the benzene C(6) axis at distances of +/-3.536 A, and has a general shape close to the available ground-state S(0) and the first singlet S(1) and triplet T(1) excited-state surfaces. Using the potential, the intermolecular level structure of the complex is evaluated. The new intermolecular potential energy surface gives very accurate results and improves those previously available.

  10. Recent changes in stratospheric aerosol budget from ground-based and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaykin, Sergey; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Portafaix, Thierry; Begue, Nelson; Vernier, Jean-Paul; DeLand, Matthew; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Leblanc, Thierry

    2017-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosol budget plays an important role in climate variability and ozone chemistry. Observations of stratospheric aerosol by ground-based lidars represent a particular value as they ensure the continuity and coherence of stratospheric aerosol record. Ground-based lidars remain indispensable for complementing and validating satellite instruments and for filling gaps between satellite missions. On the other hand, geophysical interpretation of local observations is complicated without the knowledge of global distribution of stratospheric aerosol, which calls for a combined analysis of ground-based and space-borne observations. The present study aims at characterizing global and regional variability of stratospheric aerosol over the last 5 years using various sets of observations. We use the data provided by three lidars operated within NDACC (Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) at Haute-Provence, (44° N), Mauna Loa (21° N) and Maido (21° S) sites together with quasi-global-coverage aerosol measurements by CALIOP and OMPS satellite instruments. The local and space-borne measurements are shown to be in good agreement allowing for their synergetic use. Since the late 2012 stratospheric aerosol remained at background levels throughout the globe. Eruptions of Kelud volcano at 4° S in February 2014 and Calbuco volcano at 41° S in April 2015 resulted in a remarkable enhancement of stratospheric AOD at a wide latitude range. We explore meridional dispersion and lifetime of volcanic plumes in consideration of global atmospheric circulation. A focus is made on the poleward transport of volcanic aerosol and its detection at the mid-latitude Haute-Provence observatory. We show that the moderate eruptions in the Southern hemisphere leave a measurable imprint on the Northern mid-latitude aerosol loading. Having identified the volcanically-perturbed periods from local and global observations we examine the evolution of non-volcanic (background

  11. Self-potential signals associated with preferential ground water flow pathways in a buried paleo-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Cary, L.; Fan, Q.; Finizola, A.; Trolard, F.

    2005-04-01

    The flow of ground water in a buried permeable paleo-channel can be observed at the ground surface through its self-potential signature. We apply this method to delineate the Saint-Ferréol paleo-channel of the Rhone River located in Camargue, in the South East of France. Negative potentials, ~-30 mV (reference taken outside the paleo-channel), are associated with ground water flow in this major sand-filled channel (500 m wide). Electrical resistivity is primarily controls by the salinity of the pore water. Electrical resistivity tomography and in situ sampling show the salinity of the water inside the paleo-channel is ten times smaller by comparison with the pore water of the surrounding sediments. Combining electrical resistivity surveys, self-potential data, and a minimum of drilling information, a 3-D reconstruction of the architecture of the paleo-channel is obtained showing the usefulness of this methodology for geomorphological reconstructions in this type of coastal environment.

  12. TETRA observation of gamma-rays at ground level associated with nearby thunderstorms

    PubMed Central

    Ringuette, Rebecca; Case, Gary L; Cherry, Michael L; Granger, Douglas; Guzik, T Gregory; Stewart, Michael; Wefel, John P

    2013-01-01

    [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs)—very short, intense bursts of electrons, positrons, and energetic photons originating from terrestrial thunderstorms—have been detected with satellite instruments. TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA), an array of NaI(Tl) scintillators at Louisiana State University, has now been used to detect similar bursts of 50 keV to over 2 MeV gamma-rays at ground level. After 2.6 years of observation, 24 events with durations 0.02–4.2 ms have been detected associated with nearby lightning, three of them coincident events observed by detectors separated by ∼1000 m. Nine of the events occurred within 6 ms and 5 km of negative polarity cloud-to-ground lightning strokes with measured currents in excess of 20 kA. The events reported here constitute the first catalog of TGFs observed at ground level in close proximity to the acceleration site. PMID:26167428

  13. Morningside Pi2 Pulsation Observed in Space and on the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamry, Essam

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we examined a morningside Pi2 pulsation, with a non-substorm signature, that occurred in very quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp = 0) at 05:38 UT on December 8, 2012, using data obtained by Van Allen Probes A and B (VAP-A and VAP-B, respectively) and at a ground station. Using 1 sec resolution vector magnetic field data, we measured the X-component of the pulsation from the Abu Simbel ground station (L = 1.07, LT = UT +2 hr, where LT represents local time) in Egypt. At the time of the Pi2 event, Abu Simbel and VAP-A (L = 3.3) were in the morning sector (07:38 LT and 07:59 MLT, respectively, where MLT represents magnetic local time), and VAP-B was in the postmidnight sector (04:18 MLT and L = 5.7). VAP-A and VAP-B observed oscillations in the compressional magnetic field component (Bz), which were in close agreement with the X-component measurements of the Pi2 pulsation that were made at Abu Simbel. The oscillations observed by the satellites and on the ground were in phase. Thus, we concluded that the observed morningside Pi2 pulsation was caused by the cavity resonance mode rather than by ionospheric current systems.

  14. TETRA observation of gamma-rays at ground level associated with nearby thunderstorms.

    PubMed

    Ringuette, Rebecca; Case, Gary L; Cherry, Michael L; Granger, Douglas; Guzik, T Gregory; Stewart, Michael; Wefel, John P

    2013-12-01

    [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs)-very short, intense bursts of electrons, positrons, and energetic photons originating from terrestrial thunderstorms-have been detected with satellite instruments. TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA), an array of NaI(Tl) scintillators at Louisiana State University, has now been used to detect similar bursts of 50 keV to over 2 MeV gamma-rays at ground level. After 2.6 years of observation, 24 events with durations 0.02-4.2 ms have been detected associated with nearby lightning, three of them coincident events observed by detectors separated by ∼1000 m. Nine of the events occurred within 6 ms and 5 km of negative polarity cloud-to-ground lightning strokes with measured currents in excess of 20 kA. The events reported here constitute the first catalog of TGFs observed at ground level in close proximity to the acceleration site.

  15. Magnetospheric Response to Interplanetary Field Enhancements: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Peter; Russell, Christopher; Lai, Hairong

    2014-05-01

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth's magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth's field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth's magnetopause. These ground stations spread across many

  16. Ground-based observations of the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines of the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães Fabíola, P.; Gonzalez, Walter; Echer, Ezequiel; Souza-Echer, Mariza P.; Lopes, Rosaly; Morgenthaler, Jeffrey P.; Rathbun, Julie

    2017-10-01

    The Io Plasma Torus (IPT) is a doughnut-shaped structure of charged particles, composed mainly of sulfur and oxygen ions. The main source of the IPT is the moon Io, the most volcanically active object in the Solar System. Io is the innermost of the Galilean moons of Jupiter, the main source of the magnetospheric plasma and responsible for injecting nearly 1 ton/s of ions into Jupiter's magnetosphere. In this work ground-based observations of the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines are observed, obtained at the MacMath-Pierce Solar Telescope. The results shown here were obtained in late 1997 and occurred shortly after a period of important eruptions observed by the Galileo mission (1996-2003). Several outbursts were observed and periods of intense volcanic activity are important to correlate with periods of brightness enhancements observed at the IPT. The time of response between an eruption and enhancement at IPT is still not well understood.

  17. Ground-water potential of the glacial deposits near Logansport, Cass County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillies, Daniel C.

    1981-01-01

    The glacial deposits underlying a 260-square-mile area near Logansport, Indiana, range in thickness from 0 to 300 feet and consist of three semiconfined sand and gravel aquifer units separated and overlain by three semiconfining till units. The ground-water development potential of the two uppermost aquifers , whose thicknesses average about 20 feet each, is limited to domestic usage. However, a sand and gravel aquifer (0 to 120 feet in thickness) filling the bottom of the buried, preglacial Teays Valley probably has considerable development potential. Maximum and average transmissivities of the aquifer are about 38 ,000 and 13,000 square feet per day, respectively. The natural ground-water-flow system has not been significantly altered by development. Model simulation of the present system demonstrates that most of the water flowing through the glacial deposits originates within the study area as infiltrating precipitation and discharges locally into the major streams. Results of simulation of a withdrawal of 10 million gallons per day from the lower sand and gravel aquifer indicate an absence of hydrologic constraints to development of the quantities of ground water simulated in the model. However, model simulations of water-level declines of as much as 35 feet in the lower aquifer and 20 feet in the upper aquifer indicate that interference with the operation of domestic wells is likely. Model results also indicate that ground-water development similar to that simulated may cause streamflow to be reduced by only a small percentage. 

  18. Grounded or submerged bulk carrier: the potential for leaching of coal trace elements to seawater.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Steven Andrew; Planner, John

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates the potential for leaching of coal trace elements to seawater from a grounded bulk carrier. The coal type and ecological scenario was based on the grounding of the "Shen Neng" (April 2010) at Douglas Shoal located within the Great Barrier Reef (Queensland, Australia). The area is of high ecological value and the Queensland Water Quality Guidelines (2009) provided threshold limits to interpret potential impacts. Coal contains many trace elements that are of major and moderate concern to human health and the environment although many of these concerns are only realised when coal is combusted. However, "unburnt" coal contains trace elements that may be leached to natural waterways and few studies have investigated the potential ecological impact of such an occurrence. For example, coal maritime transport has increased by almost 35% over the last five reported years (Jaffrennou et al., 2007) and as a result there is an increased inherent risk of bulk carrier accidents. Upon grounding or becoming submerged, coal within a bulk carrier may become saturated with seawater and potentially leach trace elements to the environment and impact on water quality and ecological resilience. The worst case scenario is the breakup of a bulk carrier and dispersal of cargo to the seafloor.

  19. The hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel as a model organism for potential cold storage of platelets

    PubMed Central

    Richters, Karl E.; Melin, Travis E.; Liu, Zhi-jian; Hordyk, Peter J.; Benrud, Ryan R.; Geiser, Lauren R.; Cash, Steve E.; Simon Shelley, C.; Howard, David R.; Ereth, Mark H.; Sola-Visner, Martha C.

    2012-01-01

    Hibernating mammals have developed many physiological adaptations to extreme environments. During hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) must suppress hemostasis to survive prolonged body temperatures of 4–8°C and 3–5 heartbeats per minute without forming lethal clots. Upon arousal in the spring, these ground squirrels must be able to quickly restore normal clotting activity to avoid bleeding. Here we show that ground squirrel platelets stored in vivo at 4–8°C were released back into the blood within 2 h of arousal in the spring with a body temperature of 37°C but were not rapidly cleared from circulation. These released platelets were capable of forming stable clots and remained in circulation for at least 2 days before newly synthesized platelets were detected. Transfusion of autologous platelets stored at 4°C or 37°C showed the same clearance rates in ground squirrels, whereas rat platelets stored in the cold had a 140-fold increase in clearance rate. Our results demonstrate that ground squirrel platelets appear to be resistant to the platelet cold storage lesions observed in other mammals, allowing prolonged storage in cold stasis and preventing rapid clearance upon spring arousal. Elucidating these adaptations could lead to the development of methods to store human platelets in the cold, extending their shelf life. PMID:22492817

  20. The hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel as a model organism for potential cold storage of platelets.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Scott T; Richters, Karl E; Melin, Travis E; Liu, Zhi-jian; Hordyk, Peter J; Benrud, Ryan R; Geiser, Lauren R; Cash, Steve E; Simon Shelley, C; Howard, David R; Ereth, Mark H; Sola-Visner, Martha C

    2012-05-15

    Hibernating mammals have developed many physiological adaptations to extreme environments. During hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) must suppress hemostasis to survive prolonged body temperatures of 4-8°C and 3-5 heartbeats per minute without forming lethal clots. Upon arousal in the spring, these ground squirrels must be able to quickly restore normal clotting activity to avoid bleeding. Here we show that ground squirrel platelets stored in vivo at 4-8°C were released back into the blood within 2 h of arousal in the spring with a body temperature of 37°C but were not rapidly cleared from circulation. These released platelets were capable of forming stable clots and remained in circulation for at least 2 days before newly synthesized platelets were detected. Transfusion of autologous platelets stored at 4°C or 37°C showed the same clearance rates in ground squirrels, whereas rat platelets stored in the cold had a 140-fold increase in clearance rate. Our results demonstrate that ground squirrel platelets appear to be resistant to the platelet cold storage lesions observed in other mammals, allowing prolonged storage in cold stasis and preventing rapid clearance upon spring arousal. Elucidating these adaptations could lead to the development of methods to store human platelets in the cold, extending their shelf life.

  1. Precipitation observations from high frequency spaceborne polarimetric synthetic aperture radar and ground-based radar: Theory and model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Jason P.

    Global weather monitoring is a very useful tool to better understand the Earth's hydrological cycle and provide critical information for emergency and warning systems in severe cases. Developed countries have installed numerous ground-based radars for this purpose, but they obviously are not global in extent. To address this issue, the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) was launched in 1997 and has been quite successful. The follow-on Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will replace TRMM once it is launched. However, a single precipitation radar satellite is still limited, so it would be beneficial if additional existing satellite platforms can be used for meteorological purposes. Within the past few years, several X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites have been launched and more are planned. While the primary SAR application is surface monitoring, and they are heralded as "all weather'' systems, strong precipitation induces propagation and backscatter effects in the data. Thus, there exists a potential for weather monitoring using this technology. The process of extracting meteorological parameters from radar measurements is essentially an inversion problem that has been extensively studied for radars designed to estimate these parameters. Before attempting to solve the inverse problem for SAR data, however, the forward problem must be addressed to gain knowledge on exactly how precipitation impacts SAR imagery. This is accomplished by simulating storms in SAR data starting from real measurements of a storm by ground-based polarimetric radar. In addition, real storm observations by current SAR platforms are also quantitatively analyzed by comparison to theoretical results using simultaneous acquisitions by ground radars even in single polarization. For storm simulation, a novel approach is presented here using neural networks to accommodate the oscillations present when the particle scattering requires the Mie solution, i

  2. A Bayesian observer replicates convexity context effects in figure-ground perception.

    PubMed

    Goldreich, Daniel; Peterson, Mary A

    2012-01-01

    Peterson and Salvagio (2008) demonstrated convexity context effects in figure-ground perception. Subjects shown displays consisting of unfamiliar alternating convex and concave regions identified the convex regions as foreground objects progressively more frequently as the number of regions increased; this occurred only when the concave regions were homogeneously colored. The origins of these effects have been unclear. Here, we present a two-free-parameter Bayesian observer that replicates convexity context effects. The Bayesian observer incorporates two plausible expectations regarding three-dimensional scenes: (1) objects tend to be convex rather than concave, and (2) backgrounds tend (more than foreground objects) to be homogeneously colored. The Bayesian observer estimates the probability that a depicted scene is three-dimensional, and that the convex regions are figures. It responds stochastically by sampling from its posterior distributions. Like human observers, the Bayesian observer shows convexity context effects only for images with homogeneously colored concave regions. With optimal parameter settings, it performs similarly to the average human subject on the four display types tested. We propose that object convexity and background color homogeneity are environmental regularities exploited by human visual perception; vision achieves figure-ground perception by interpreting ambiguous images in light of these and other expected regularities in natural scenes.

  3. GROUND-BASED TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPER-EARTH 55 Cnc e

    SciTech Connect

    De Mooij, E. J. W.; López-Morales, M.; Karjalainen, R.; Hrudkova, M.; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-12-20

    We report the first ground-based detections of the shallow transit of the super-Earth exoplanet 55 Cnc e using a 2 m class telescope. Using differential spectrophotometry, we observed one transit in 2013 and another in 2014, with average spectral resolutions of ∼700 and ∼250, spanning the Johnson BVR photometric bands. We find a white light planet-to-star radius ratio of 0.0190{sub −0.0027}{sup +0.0023} from the 2013 observations and 0.0200{sub −0.0018}{sup +0.0017} from the 2014 observations. The two data sets combined result in a radius ratio of 0.0198{sub −0.0014}{sup +0.0013}. These values are all in agreement with previous space-based results. Scintillation noise in the data prevents us from placing strong constraints on the presence of an extended hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Nevertheless, our detections of 55 Cnc e in transit demonstrate that moderate-sized telescopes on the ground will be capable of routine follow-up observations of super-Earth candidates discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite around bright stars. We expect it also will be possible to place constraints on the atmospheric characteristics of those planets by devising observational strategies to minimize scintillation noise.

  4. Validation of SCIAMACHY and TOMS UV Radiances Using Ground and Space Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Bhartia, P. K.; Bojkov, B. R.; Kowalewski, M.; Labow, G.; Ahmad, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Verification of a stratospheric ozone recovery remains a high priority for environmental research and policy definition. Models predict an ozone recovery at a much lower rate than the measured depletion rate observed to date. Therefore improved precision of the satellite and ground ozone observing systems are required over the long term to verify its recovery. We show that validation of satellite radiances from space and from the ground can be a very effective means for correcting long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements and can be used to cross calibrate all B W instruments in orbit (TOMS, SBW/2, GOME, SCIAMACHY, OM, GOME-2, OMPS). This method bypasses the retrieval algorithms used for both satellite and ground based measurements that are normally used to validate and correct the satellite data. Radiance comparisons employ forward models and are inherently more accurate than inverse (retrieval) algorithms. This approach however requires well calibrated instruments and an accurate radiative transfer model that accounts for aerosols. TOMS and SCIAMACHY calibrations are checked to demonstrate this method and to demonstrate applicability for long term trends.

  5. Ground and satellite EMIC wave observations in conjunction with BARREL electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C.; Lessard, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Millan, R. M.; Halford, A.; Horne, R. B.; Singer, H. J.; Green, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ground-based and satellite observations of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves are presented in conjunction with electron precipitation detected by high altitude balloons from the Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign. On 17 Jan 2013, a high density solar wind compressed the magnetosphere and four satellites (GOES 13 & 15, Van Allen Probes A & B) as well as several ground stations (Dawson City, Canada and Halley, Antarctica) detected simultaneous EMIC waves across the night sector for about 2.5 hours during the compression (0130 - 0400 UT). The satellites and ground stations cover approximately 10 hours of magnetic local time and four L-shells, suggesting the generation region(s) covers the same extended area. At the strongest point of the compression (around 0300 UT with proton density 50 n/cc, flow pressure 20 nPa, SYM/H 50 nT) BARREL balloon 1G, which magnetically mapped close to GOES 13, detected relativistic electron precipitation concurrently with enhanced EMIC wave activity on GOES 13, which may show a direct observation of EMIC waves scattering relativistic electrons.

  6. Building the Column: Ground-Up Integration of Multi-Sensor Precipitation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingo, S. M.; Marks, D. A.; Wolff, D. B.; Petersen, W. A.

    2016-12-01

    As part of NASA Wallops Flight Facility's GPM Ground-Validation work, the Precipitation Research Facility maintains and operates a suite of ground-based instrumentation comprised of a wide spectrum (S- to W-band) of scanning and vertically pointing radars and multiple types of disdrometers and rain gauges. Presently, routine data collection occurs at locations across the coastal Virginia/Maryland region, and the majority of these platforms were also deployed in each of the GPM field campaigns (HyMEx, GCPEx, MC3E, IFloodS, IPHEx, and OLYMPEX). To enable more efficient statistical, cross-platform, and ground-validation studies, a system for integrating these multi-sensor precipitation measurements throughout the atmospheric column, including space-based GPM GMI and DPR observations, has been developed. Within any set column grid area (user defines the grid center location, horizontal and vertical spacing and total extent), coincident observations are extracted from native data formats and placed into the column framework. After data from all available platforms is set into the column grid, a new data product is written in NetCDF format, affording versatility and portability. These column data files also include original details on each platform's operating parameters obtained from the native data (eg: exact location, scanning sequence, timestamps, etc) as attributes. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of the column building framework and touch on research avenues utilizing the new data product.

  7. Combined Characterisation of GOME and TOMS Total Ozone Using Ground-Based Observations from the NDSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, J.-C.; VanRoozendael, M.; Simon, P. C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Goutail, F.; Andersen, S. B.; Arlander, D. W.; BuiVan, N. A.; Claude, H.; deLaNoee, J.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Several years of total ozone measured from space by the ERS-2 GOME, the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), and the ADEOS TOMS, are compared with high-quality ground-based observations associated with the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), over an extended latitude range and a variety of geophysical conditions. The comparisons with each spaceborne sensor are combined altogether for investigating their respective solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence, dispersion, and difference of sensitivity. The space- and ground-based data are found to agree within a few percent on average. However, the analysis highlights for both Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and TOMS several sources of discrepancies, including a dependence on the SZA at high latitudes and internal inconsistencies.

  8. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval from ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, F.; Hendrick, F.; Goutail, F.; Fayt, C.; Merlaud, A.; Pinardi, G.; Hermans, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column densities (VCDs) from ground-based zenith-sky (ZS) measurements of scattered sunlight. The method is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) analysis of ZS radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low NO2 absorption, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total measured slant column based on stratospheric VCDs measured at sunrise and sunset, and simulation of the rapid NO2 diurnal variation, (4) the retrieval of tropospheric VCDs by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors (AMFs). These steps are fully characterized and recommendations are given for each of them. The retrieval algorithm is applied on a ZS dataset acquired with a Multi-AXis (MAX-) DOAS instrument during the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E, sea level) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) held from the 10 June to the 21 July 2009 in the Netherlands. A median value of 7.9 × 1015 molec cm-2 is found for the retrieved tropospheric NO2 VCDs, with maxima up to 6.0 × 1016 molec cm-2. The error budget assessment indicates that the overall error σTVCD on the column values is less than 28%. In case of low tropospheric contribution, σTVCD is estimated to be around 39% and is dominated by uncertainties in the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum. For strong tropospheric pollution events, σTVCD drops to approximately 22% with the largest uncertainties on the determination of the stratospheric NO2 abundance and tropospheric AMFs. The tropospheric VCD amounts derived from ZS observations are compared to VCDs retrieved from off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to

  9. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval from ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, F.; Hendrick, F.; Goutail, F.; Fayt, C.; Merlaud, A.; Pinardi, G.; Hermans, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column densities (VCDs) from ground-based zenith-sky (ZS) measurements of scattered sunlight. The method is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) analysis of ZS radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low NO2 absorption, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total measured slant column based on stratospheric VCDs measured at sunrise and sunset, and simulation of the rapid NO2 diurnal variation, (4) the retrieval of tropospheric VCDs by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors (AMFs). These steps are fully characterized and recommendations are given for each of them. The retrieval algorithm is applied on a ZS data set acquired with a multi-axis (MAX-) DOAS instrument during the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E, sea level) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) held from 10 June to 21 July 2009 in the Netherlands. A median value of 7.9 × 1015 molec cm-2 is found for the retrieved tropospheric NO2 VCDs, with maxima up to 6.0 × 1016 molec cm-2. The error budget assessment indicates that the overall error σTVCD on the column values is less than 28%. In the case of low tropospheric contribution, σTVCD is estimated to be around 39% and is dominated by uncertainties in the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum. For strong tropospheric pollution events, σTVCD drops to approximately 22% with the largest uncertainties on the determination of the stratospheric NO2 abundance and tropospheric AMFs. The tropospheric VCD amounts derived from ZS observations are compared to VCDs retrieved from off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to data

  10. Multidisciplinary Approach for Earthquake Atmospheric Precursors Validation by Joint Satellite and Ground Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzounov, D. P.; Pulinets, S. A.; Hattori, K.; Liu, J. G.; Parrot, M.; Kafatos, M.; Yang, T. F.; Jhuang, H.; Taylor, P.; Ohyama, K.; Kon, S.

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that there were electromagnetic (EM) effects in the atmosphere/ionosphere caused by some strong earthquakes. Several major earthquakes are accompanied by an intensification of the vertical transport of charged aerosols in the lower atmosphere. These processes lead to the generation of external electric currents in specific regions of the atmosphere and the modifications, by DC electric fields, in the ionosphere-atmosphere electric circuit. Our methodology of integrated satellite terrestrial framework (ISTF) is based on the use of multi-sensor data and a cross-correlation between ground and satellite observations to record any atmospheric thermal anomalies and ionospheric perturbations associated with these activities. We record thermal infrared data from the Aqua, GOES, POES satellites and DEMETER provides space plasma variations related to the growth of the DC electric field. Simultaneously we continuously monitor ground-based multi-parameter GPS/TEC, ion concentration, radon, and magnetic field array data. We integrate these joint observations into the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (LAIC) model. The significance of this combined satellite and ground-based analysis is that it permits us to generate hindcasts of historical seismicity in Japan, Taiwan (2003-2009) and recent catastrophic events in Italy (M6.3, 2009), Haiti (M7.0, 2010) and Chile (M8.8, 2010). This joint analysis of ground and satellite data during the time of major earthquakes has shown the presence of persistent anomalies in the atmosphere over regions of maximum stress (along plate boundaries), and are not of meteorological origin, since they are stationary over the same region. Our approach provides the framework for a multidisciplinary validation of earthquake precursors and we are looking forward to validating this approach over high seismicity regions.

  11. Validating Dust Storm Model Using Satellite Aerosol Retrievals and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YU, M.; Benedict, K. K.; Huang, Q.; Gui, Z.; XIA, J.; Chen, S.

    2013-12-01

    Dust storm is a meteorological phenomenon with high dust concentration and strong striking force affecting transportation and causing disease. Considering the negative impacts of dust storm, the accuracy of dust storm forecasting is critical for, especially, responding to the emergencies. However, it is challenge to validating the forecasting limited by availability of observation data. The complexity is partially caused by the inconsistency in spatial and temporal resolutions between model simulation and field observation. In addition, the accuracy and reliability of observation data are not guaranteed. Therefore, in order to complement observation data in terms of temporal resolution and enhance the accuracy of observation data, validation methods should be based on data assimilation between satellite and ground-based observations. The dust storm simulation and forecasting model, NMM-dust, coupling Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) and Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) meteorological module, produces higher resolution results for weather forecasting and enabling executability in parallel mode on distributed systems. So far, NMM-dust has been validated in the southwestern US only by comparison with measurement from AIRNOW data and with barely acceptable results. Observation data used for validation includes MODIS and SeaWiFS Deep Blue aerosol products, and ground-based observations from EPA-AQS. Results from comparisons between satellite data and model output show similar dust distribution patterns. Besides, the temporal resolution of satellite data is improved by using both MODIS and SeaWiFS. Quantitative analysis including time-series analysis and diagnose analysis are also examined to investigate the stability and consistency of the model.

  12. Comparison of Thermal Structure Results from Venus Express and Ground Based Observations since Vira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    An international team was formed in 2013 through the International Space Studies Institute (Bern, Switzerland) to compare recent results of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure from spacecraft and ground based observations made since the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) was developed (Kliore et al., 1985, Keating et al., 1985). Five experiments on European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter mission have yielded results on the atmospheric structure during is operational life (April 2006 - November 2014). Three of these were from occultation methods: at near infrared wavelengths from solar occultations, (SOIR, 70 - 170 km), at ultraviolet wavelengths from stellar occultations (SPICAV, 90-140 km), and occultation of the VEx-Earth radio signal (VeRa, 40-90 km). In-situ drag measurements from three different techniques (accelerometry, torque, and radio tracking, 130 - 200 km) were also obtained using the spacecraft itself while passive infrared remote sensing was used by the VIRTIS experiment (70 - 120 km). The only new data in the -40-70 km altitude range are from radio occultation, as no new profiles of the deep atmosphere have been obtained since the VeGa 2 lander measurements in 1985 (not included in VIRA). Some selected ground based results available to the team were also considered by team in the inter comparisons. The temperature structure in the lower thermosphere from disk resolved ground based observations (except for one ground based investigation), is generally consistent with the Venus Express results. These experiments sampled at different periods, at different locations and at different local times and have different vertical and horizontal resolution and coverage. The data were therefore binned in latitude and local time bins and compared, ignoring temporal variations over the life time of the Venus Express mission and assumed north-south symmetry. Alternating warm and cooler layers are present in the 120-160 altitude range in results

  13. Understanding the Longitudinal Variability of Equatorial Electrodynamics using integrated Ground- and Space-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M.; Zesta, E.

    2015-12-01

    The currently funded African Meridian B-Field Education and Research (AMBER) magnetometer array comprises more than thirteen magnetometers stationed globally in the vicinity of geomagnetic equator. One of the main objectives of AMBER network is to understand the longitudinal variability of equatorial electrodynamics as function of local time, magnetic activity, and season. While providing complete meridian observation in the region and filling the largest land-based gap in global magnetometer coverage, the AMBER array addresses two fundamental areas of space physics: first, the processes governing electrodynamics of the equatorial ionosphere as a function of latitude (or L-shell), local time, longitude, magnetic activity, and season, and second, ULF pulsation strength at low/mid-latitude regions and its connection with equatorial electrojet and density fluctuation. The global AMBER network can also be used to augment observations from space-based instruments, such us the triplet SWARM mission and the upcoming ICON missions. Thus, in coordination with space-based and other ground-based observations, the AMBER magnetometer network provides a great opportunity to understand the electrodynamics that governs equatorial ionosphere motions. In this paper we present the longitudinal variability of the equatorial electrodynamics using the combination of instruments onboard SWARM and C/NOFS satellites and ground-based AMBER network. Both ground- and pace-based observations show stronger dayside and evening sector equatorial electrodynamics in the American and Asian sectors compared to the African sector. On the other hand, the African sector is home to stronger and year-round ionospheric bubbles/irregularities compared to the American and Asian sectors. This raises the question if the evening sector equatorial electrodynamics (vertical drift), which is believed to be the main cause for the enhancement of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth rate, is stronger in the

  14. Ground and Satellite Observations of ULF Waves Artificially Produced by HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Labenski, J.; Shroff, H.; Doxas, I.; Papadopoulos, D.; Milikh, G.; Parrot, M.

    2008-12-01

    Modulated ionospheric heating at ULF frequencies using the HAARP heater was performed from April 28 to May 3, 2008 (http://www.haarp.alaska.edu). Simultaneous ground-based ULF measurements were made locally at Gakona, AK and at Lake Ozette, WA that is 2000 km away. The ground-based results showed that ULF amplitudes measured at Gakona are mostly proportional to the electrojet strength above HAARP, indicating electrojet modulation to be the source of the local ULF waves. However, the timing of ULF events recorded at Lake Ozette did not correlated with the electrojet strength at Gakona, indicating that modulation of F region pressure is the more likely source for distant ULF waves. These observations are consistent with the theoretical understanding that ULF waves generated by current modulation are shear Alfven waves propagating along the magnetic field line, thus at high latitude their observations are limited to the vicinity of the heated spot. On the other hand, propagation of ULF waves at significant lateral distances requires generation of magnetosonic waves since they are the only mode that propagates isotropically and can thus couple efficiently in the Alfvenic duct. In addition to ground-based observations, the DEMETER satellite also provided space measurements of the heating effects during its passes over HAARP. The DEMETER results showed direct detection of HAARP ULF waves at 0.1 Hz. Moreover, density dips were observed every time HAARP was operated at CW mode, which provides clear evidence of duct formation by direct HF heating at F peak. Details of these results will be presented at the meeting. We would like to acknowledge the support provided by the HAARP facility during our ULF experiments.

  15. Ground Truthing Orbital Clay Mineral Observations with the APXS Onboard Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, C.; Gellert, R.; VanBommel, S.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. S.; Yen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring approximately 22 km diameter Endeavour crater since 2011. Its rim segments predate the Hesperian-age Burns formation and expose Noachian-age material, which is associated with orbital Fe3+-Mg-rich clay mineral observations [1,2]. Moving to an orders of magnitude smaller instrumental field of view on the ground, the clay minerals were challenging to pinpoint on the basis of geochemical data because they appear to be the result of near-isochemical weathering of the local bedrock [3,4]. However, the APXS revealed a more complex mineral story as fracture fills and so-called red zones appear to contain more Al-rich clay minerals [5,6], which had not been observed from orbit. These observations are important to constrain clay mineral formation processes. More detail will be added as Opportunity is heading into her 10th extended mission, during which she will investigate Noachian bedrock that predates Endeavour crater, study sedimentary rocks inside Endeavour crater, and explore a fluid-carved gully. ESA's ExoMars rover will land on Noachian-age Oxia Planum where abundant Fe3+-Mg-rich clay minerals have been observed from orbit, but the story will undoubtedly become more complex once seen from the ground.

  16. Calculated ground state potential surface and excitation energies for the copper trimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.; Laskowski, B. C.

    1986-01-01

    In the context of their relevance to catalysis and to materials science problems, transition metals and transition metal (TM) compounds are currently of considerable interest, and studies have been conducted of the copper trimer, Cu3. The present investigation is concerned with a study of the ground state surface and several groups of excited states in order to improve the understanding of the spectroscopy of Cu3. Differences of the current study from previous investigations are related to an employment of larger basis sets and a more extensive electron correlation. This was done with the objective to obtain a more accurate definition of the ground state surface. Features of the bonding in the copper dimer are considered to obtain a basis for an understanding of the copper trimer. Attention is given to calculational details, the ground state surface, and calculated vertical excitation energies. The results of SCF/SDCI calculations are reported for portions of the ground surface, for two groups of excited states, and for the ionization potential of Cu3.

  17. Artificial recharge of ground water: Status and potential in the contiguous United States

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hare, M.; Fairchild, D.; Hajali, P.; Canter, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    Needs and requirements for ground water enhancement and nationwide geological locations where this could be accomplished by artificial recharge are the focus of this reference. This book provides a summary of the status and potential for artificial recharge in the contiguous United States. The focus is on artificial recharge for enhancing groundwater availability for agricultural uses, but not limited to this purpose. Chapters include technical descriptions of both direct and indirect artificial recharge methods, site selection and evaluation criteria for artificial recharge projects, case studies of projects and methodologies for determining the potential of geographic areas for artificial recharge.

  18. Coordinated Ground-Based Observations and the New Horizons Fly-by of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot; Young, Leslie; Parker, Joel; Binzel, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft is scheduled to make its closest approach to Pluto on July 14, 2015. NH carries seven scientific instruments, including separate UV and Visible-IR spectrographs, a long-focal-length imager, two plasma-sensing instruments and a dust counter. There are three arenas in particular in which ground-based observations should augment the NH instrument suite in synergistic ways: IR spectra at wavelengths longer than 2.5 µm (i.e., longer than the NH Ralph spectrograph), stellar occultation observations near the time of the fly-by, and thermal surface maps and atmospheric CO abundances based on ALMA observations - we discuss the first two of these. IR spectra in the 3 - 5 µm range cover the CH4 absorption band near 3.3 µm. This band can be an important constraint on the state and areal extent of nitrogen frost on Pluto's surface. If this band depth is close to zero (as was observed by Olkin et al. 2007), it limits the area of nitrogen frost, which is bright at that wavelength. Combined with the NH observations of nitrogen frost at 2.15 µm, the ground-based spectra will determine how much nitrogen frost is diluted with methane, which is a basic constraint on the seasonal cycle of sublimation and condensation that takes place on Pluto (and similar objects like Triton and Eris). There is a fortuitous stellar occultation by Pluto on 29-JUN-2015, only two weeks before the NH closest approach. The occulted star will be the brightest ever observed in a Pluto event, about 2 magnitudes brighter than Pluto itself. The track of the event is predicted to cover parts of Australia and New Zealand. Thanks to HST and ground based campaigns to find a TNO target reachable by NH, the position of the shadow path will be known at the +/-100 km level, allowing SOFIA and mobile ground-based observers to reliably cover the central flash region. Ground-based & SOFIA observations in visible and IR wavelengths will characterize the haze opacity and vertical

  19. Building bridges to observational perspectives: a grounded theory of therapy processes in psychosis.

    PubMed

    Dilks, Sarah; Tasker, Fiona; Wren, Bernadette

    2008-06-01

    This study set out to explore therapy processes in psychosis with an initial focus on reflexivity and how this might be expressed in therapy conversations. Leiman's (2000) definition of reflexivity was used as a starting-point for an exploratory investigation of the use of language as reflective activity. Grounded theory was chosen as an appropriate methodology to distil an explanatory account across the qualitative data collected. Six psychologist-client pairs supplied three tapes of therapy sessions spread out across the course of therapy. Each participant was separately interviewed on two occasions to ascertain their views of therapy and of the emerging grounded theory. A grounded theory was developed conceptualizing the processes and activities in psychological therapy in psychosis. Building bridges to observational perspectives summarizes the core process in psychological therapy in psychosis. Therapy in psychosis is understood as intimately linking the social and internal world in a dialogical process aimed at enhancing the client's functioning in the social world rather than at specifically developing the private mental experience of reflexivity or mentalizing.

  20. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  1. Ground state and orbital stability for the NLS equation on a general starlike graph with potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciapuoti, Claudio; Finco, Domenico; Noja, Diego

    2017-08-01

    We consider a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) posed on a graph (or network) composed of a generic compact part to which a finite number of half-lines are attached. We call this structure a starlike graph. At the vertices of the graph interactions of δ-type can be present and an overall external potential is admitted. Under general assumptions on the potential, we prove that the NLS is globally well-posed in the energy domain. We are interested in minimizing the energy of the system on the manifold of constant mass (L 2-norm). When existing, the minimizer is called ground state and it is the profile of an orbitally stable standing wave for the NLS evolution. We prove that a ground state exists for sufficiently small masses whenever the quadratic part of the energy admits a simple isolated eigenvalue at the bottom of the spectrum (the linear ground state). This is a wide generalization of a result previously obtained for a star-graph with a single vertex. The main part of the proof is devoted to prove the concentration compactness principle for starlike structures; this is non trivial due to the lack of translation invariance of the domain. Then we show that a minimizing, bounded, H 1 sequence for the constrained NLS energy with external linear potentials is in fact convergent if its mass is small enough. Moreover we show that the ground state bifurcates from the vanishing solution at the bottom of the linear spectrum. Examples are provided with a discussion of the hypotheses on the linear part.

  2. The dynamics of the plasmasphere boundary layer as determined by ground magnetometers, satellite observations, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Yizengaw, E.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Carranza-fulmer, T. L.; Moldwin, M.; Mann, I. R.; Chi, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    The plasmasphere boundary layer (PBL) separates the cold and dense plasmaspheric plasma from the more tenuous and hot plasma sheet plasma and organizes the spatial distribution of ULF and VLF waves that can contribute to acceleration or loss processes of radiation belt particles through wave-particle interactions. The PBL has been traditionally determined by in situ observations and can be given by empirical models. Recent work has shown that a mid-latitude chain of well-spaced ground magnetometers can also determine the PBL location. Spectral properties, like the cross-phase reversal in the standard field-line resonance (FLR) determination between two stations closely aligned in latitude, have been shown to indicate the presence of a sharp PBL. We merge data from many ground magnetometer pairs from the SAMBA (South American Meridional B-field Array), McMAC (Mid continent Magnetoseismic Chain), and CARISMA (Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity) chains to provide the best available spatial coverage in L values spanning the plasmasphere and PBL, for a range of dynamic states (L=1.6 to greater than 5). The PBL location is identified as the L value of the station pair for which a reverse phase difference is observed in the standard FLR determination. We compare the FLR determined PBL with the trough boundary determined by GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) analysis and with model PBL. Initial results demonstrate that the PBL as identified by the reverse phase differences is in general agreement with TEC identifications and reasonable agreement with models. Reverse Phase Differences are regularly observed at the L range of 2.7 to 3.7 and are highly correlated with Dst and Kp, as determined by daily correlations. We further examine the more detailed time sequence of the PBL dynamics by focusing on key periods around storms preceded by quiet periods, and by using the full L range of the ground magnetometer pairs.

  3. Geocenter variations derived from a combined processing of LEO- and ground-based GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Männel, Benjamin; Rothacher, Markus

    2017-08-01

    GNSS observations provided by the global tracking network of the International GNSS Service (IGS, Dow et al. in J Geod 83(3):191-198, 2009) play an important role in the realization of a unique terrestrial reference frame that is accurate enough to allow a detailed monitoring of the Earth's system. Combining these ground-based data with GPS observations tracked by high-quality dual-frequency receivers on-board low earth orbiters (LEOs) is a promising way to further improve the realization of the terrestrial reference frame and the estimation of geocenter coordinates, GPS satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters. To assess the scope of the improvement on the geocenter coordinates, we processed a network of 53 globally distributed and stable IGS stations together with four LEOs (GRACE-A, GRACE-B, OSTM/Jason-2 and GOCE) over a time interval of 3 years (2010-2012). To ensure fully consistent solutions, the zero-difference phase observations of the ground stations and LEOs were processed in a common least-squares adjustment, estimating all the relevant parameters such as GPS and LEO orbits, station coordinates, Earth rotation parameters and geocenter motion. We present the significant impact of the individual LEO and a combination of all four LEOs on the geocenter coordinates. The formal errors are reduced by around 20% due to the inclusion of one LEO into the ground-only solution, while in a solution with four LEOs LEO-specific characteristics are significantly reduced. We compare the derived geocenter coordinates w.r.t. LAGEOS results and external solutions based on GPS and SLR data. We found good agreement in the amplitudes of all components; however, the phases in x- and z-direction do not agree well.

  4. [Observation and Analysis of Ground Daylight Spectra of China's Different Light Climate Partitions].

    PubMed

    Liang, Shu-ying; Yang, Chun-yu

    2015-12-01

    The territory of China is vast, so the daylight climates of different regions are not the same. In order to expand theutilization scope and improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy and daylight resources, this article observed and analyzed the ground daylight spectra of China's different light climate partitions. Using a portable spectrum scanner, this article did a tracking observation of ground direct daylight spectra in the period of 380-780 nm visible spectrum of different solar elevation angles during one day in seven representative cities of china's different light climate partitions. The seven representative cities included Kunming, Xining, Beijing, Shenzhen, Nanjing, Nanchang and Chongqing. According to the observation results, this article analyzed the daylight spectrum changing law, compared the daylight spectrum curves of different light climate partitions cities, and summarized the influence factors of daylight spectral radiation intensity. The Analysis of the ground direct daylight spectra showed that the daylight spectral radiation intensity of different solar elevation angles during one day of china's different light climate partitions cities was different, but the distribution and trend of daylight power spectra were basically the same which generally was first increased and then decreased. The maximum peak of spectral power distribution curve appeared at about 475 nm, and there were a steep rise between 380-475 nm and a smooth decline between 475-700 nm while repeatedly big ups and downs appearing after 700 nm. The distribution and trend of daylight power spectra of china's different light climate partitions cities were basically the same, and there was no obvious difference between the daylight spectral power distribution curves and the different light climate partitions. The daylight spectral radiation intensity was closely related to the solar elevation angle and solar surface condition.

  5. Interferometric evidence for the observation of ground backscatter originating behind the CUTLASS coherent HF radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Jones, T. B.; Robinson, T. R.; Thomas, E. C.; Yeoman, T. K.

    1997-01-01

    Interferometric techniques allow the SuperDARN coherent HF radars to determine the elevation angles of returned backscatter, giving information on the altitude of the scatter volume, in the case of ionospheric backscatter, or the reflection altitude, in the case of ground backscatter. Assumptions have to be made in the determination of elevation angles, including the direction of arrival, or azimuth, of the returned signals, usually taken to be the forward look-direction (north) of the radars, specified by the phasing of the antenna arrays. It is shown that this assumption is not always valid in the case of ground backscatter, and that significant returns can be detected from the backward look-direction of the radars. The response of the interferometer to backscatter from behind the radar is modelled and compared with observations. It is found that ground backscatter from a field-of-view that is the mirror image of the forward-looking field-of-view is a common feature of the observations, and this interpretation successfully explains several anomalies in the received backscatter. Acknowledgements. The authors are grateful to Prof. D. J. Southwood (Imperial College, London), J. C. Samson (University of Alberta, Edmonton), L. J. Lanzerotti (AT&T Bell Laboratories), A. Wolfe (New York City Technical College) and to Dr. M. Vellante (University of LÁquila) for helpful discussions. They also thank Dr. A. Meloni (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica, Roma) who made available geomagnetic field observations from LÁquila Geomagnetic Observatory. This research activity at LÁquila is supported by MURST (40% and 60% contracts) and by GIFCO/CNR. Topical Editor K.-H. Glaßmeier thanks C. Waters and S. Fujita for their help in evaluating this paper.-> Correspondence to :P. Francia->

  6. Geocenter variations derived from a combined processing of LEO- and ground-based GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Männel, Benjamin; Rothacher, Markus

    2017-01-01

    GNSS observations provided by the global tracking network of the International GNSS Service (IGS, Dow et al. in J Geod 83(3):191-198, 2009) play an important role in the realization of a unique terrestrial reference frame that is accurate enough to allow a detailed monitoring of the Earth's system. Combining these ground-based data with GPS observations tracked by high-quality dual-frequency receivers on-board low earth orbiters (LEOs) is a promising way to further improve the realization of the terrestrial reference frame and the estimation of geocenter coordinates, GPS satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters. To assess the scope of the improvement on the geocenter coordinates, we processed a network of 53 globally distributed and stable IGS stations together with four LEOs (GRACE-A, GRACE-B, OSTM/Jason-2 and GOCE) over a time interval of 3 years (2010-2012). To ensure fully consistent solutions, the zero-difference phase observations of the ground stations and LEOs were processed in a common least-squares adjustment, estimating all the relevant parameters such as GPS and LEO orbits, station coordinates, Earth rotation parameters and geocenter motion. We present the significant impact of the individual LEO and a combination of all four LEOs on the geocenter coordinates. The formal errors are reduced by around 20% due to the inclusion of one LEO into the ground-only solution, while in a solution with four LEOs LEO-specific characteristics are significantly reduced. We compare the derived geocenter coordinates w.r.t. LAGEOS results and external solutions based on GPS and SLR data. We found good agreement in the amplitudes of all components; however, the phases in x- and z-direction do not agree well.

  7. The Relation Between Ground Acceleration and Earthquake Source Parameters: Theory and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lior, Itzhak; Ziv, Alon

    2017-04-01

    A simple relation between the root-mean-square of the ground acceleration and earthquake spectral (or source) parameters is introduced: 2 ----f20---- Arms = (2π )Ω0 √--( πκf0-)2, πκT 1 + 1.50.25 where Ω0 is the low frequency displacement spectral plateau, f0 is the corner frequency, κ is an attenuation parameter, and T is the data interval. This result uses the omega-squared model for far-field radiation, and accounts for site-specific attenuation. The main advantage of the new relation with respect to that of Hanks' (Hanks, 1979) is that it relaxes the simplifying assumption that the spectral corner frequency is much smaller than the maximum corner frequency resulting from attenuation, and that the spectrum may be approximated as being perfectly flat between the two frequencies. The newly proposed relation is tested using a composite dataset of earthquake records from Japan, California, Mexico and Taiwan. Excellent agreement is found between observed and predicted ground acceleration for any combination of corner frequencies. Thus, use of the above relation enables the extrapolation of ground motion prediction equation inferred from the frequent small magnitude earthquakes to the rare large magnitudes. This capacity is extremely useful near slow-slip plate boundaries, where the seismic moment release rates are low. Reference Hanks, T. C. (1979). b values and ω-γ seismic source models: implications for tectonic stress variations along active crustal fault zones and the estimation of high-frequency strong ground motion, J. Geophys. Res. 84, 2235-2241.

  8. Ground-based observations of time variability in multiple active volcanoes on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, Julie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2010-10-01

    Since before the beginning of the Galileo spacecraft's Jupiter orbital tour, we have observed Io from the ground using NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). We obtained images of Io in reflected sunlight and in-eclipse at 2.3, 3.5, and 4.8 μm. In addition, we have measured the 3.5 μm brightness of an eclipsed Io as it is occulted by Jupiter. These lightcurves enable us to measure the brightness and one-dimensional location of active volcanoes on the surface. During the Galileo era, two volcanoes were observed to be regularly active: Loki and either Kanehekili and/or Janus. At least 12 other active volcanoes were observed for shorter periods of time, including one distinguishable in images that include reflected sunlight. These data can be used to compare volcano types and test volcano eruption models, such as the lava lake model for Loki.

  9. Wideband noise observed at ground-level in the auroral region

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, R.F.; Desch, M.D.

    1990-05-03

    A wideband noise event was detected at ground level from the Andoya Rocket Range in Norway in January 1989. The signals were observed using 4 commercial communication receivers (tuned to 159, 515, 905 and 1200 kHz), an ionosonde (200 kHz to 3.5 MHz interference-free observations) and a riometer (32.5 MHz). The event, which occurred during a period of magnetic disturbance near magnetic midnight, was the only one observed during nearly 3 weeks of operations. This low frequency-of-occurrence is attributed partly to high local noise levels. The ease with which this event was identified on the ionograms produced by the local ionosonde suggests that routine ionosonde recordings should be inspected in search for such events. Such an effort would enhance existing research directed toward developing techniques for identifying quiet communication channels and help to identify the origin and frequency-of-occurrence of high latitude wideband noise events.

  10. First Ground-based Observation of Transient Luminous Events over Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnadih, Ogechukwu; Kosch, Michael; Martinez, Peter

    2016-07-01

    We present the first ground-based observations in southern Africa of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) in the summer of 2015/16 over convective thunderstorms. For the months of December to February, South Africa has one of the highest lightning stroke rates in the world. This was part of the AfriSprite campaign initiated by the South African National Space Agency. These observations show a variety of fine structures such as tree-like shaped, carrot, angel and jellyfish-shaped sprites. The South African Weather Service array of VLF receivers is used to locate and quantify the magnitude and polarity of the lightning strikes associated with TLEs. We plan to make bi-static as well as multi-wavelength observations in future.

  11. Estimation of volcanic ash emissions through assimilating satellite data and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Sha; Lin, Hai Xiang; Heemink, Arnold; Segers, Arjo; Fu, Guangliang

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we reconstruct the vertical profile of volcanic ash emissions by assimilating satellite data and ground-based observations using a modified trajectory-based 4D-Var (Trj4DVar) approach. In our previous work, we found that the lack of vertical resolution in satellite ash column data can result in a poor estimation of the injection layer where the ash is emitted into the atmosphere. The injection layer is crucial for the forecast of volcanic ash clouds. To improve estimation, Trj4DVar was implemented, and it has shown increased performance in twin experiments using synthetic observations. However, there are some cases with real satellite data where Trj4DVar has difficulty in obtaining an accurate estimation of the injection layer. To remedy this, we propose a modification of Trj4DVar, test it with synthetic twin experiments, and evaluate real data performance. The results show that the modified Trj4DVar is able to accurately estimate the injection height (location of the maximal emission rate) by incorporating the plume height (top of the ash plume) and mass eruption rate data obtained from ground-based observations near the source into the assimilation system. This will produce more accurate emission estimations and more reliable forecasts of volcanic ash clouds. Also provided are two strategies on the preprocessing and proper use of satellite data.

  12. Ground-based and spacecraft observations of lightning activity on Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, V.; Mylostna, C.; Konovalenko, A.; Zarka, P.; Fischer, G.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Litvinenko, G.; Rucker, H.; Sidorchuk, M.; Ryabov, B.; Vavriv, D.; Ryabov, V.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Fabrice, C.; Pallier, L.; Schneider, J.; Kozhyn, R.; Vinogradov, V.; Mukha, D.; Weber, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2012-02-01

    In late 2007, Saturn electrostatic discharges (SED) were simultaneously observed at the radio telescope UTR-2 and with the Cassini spacecraft. Observations at UTR-2 were performed with a multichannel receiver in the frequency range 12-33 MHz, and those performed on Cassini-with a swept frequency receiver that is part of the RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Science) instrument in the frequency band 1.8-16 MHz. We got a very good coincidence between data of UTR-2 and Cassini. It is shown for the first time that ground-based radio astronomy lets us detect Saturn's lightning with a high degree of reliability despite terrestrial interferences. This is the necessary basis for further detailed study of the temporal and spectral characteristics of the SEDs with ground based radio telescopes. Based on six observation sessions, several parameters of SEDs were determined, in particularly a correlation of 0.77±0.15 between the average intensity of storms and the e-folding time.

  13. A Program of Ground-Based Astronomy to Complement Einstein Observations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    Astronomy D T I C i CO-,,, Uv I,. WA TOPE: -. Gary A. Cbanan Assistant Professor of Phy.3[cs i t0V.l.., 1982 %30𔃼 0 ii CONTENTS Page A. REPORT DOCUMENTATION...block number) A total of eight ground-based astronomical observing programs were carried out in pursuit of a multiwavelength approach to a number of...astro- physical problems. Synthesis of these results with existing X-ray data led to considerable progress on problems of the emission mechanisms and

  14. Earthquake and hurricane coupling is ascertained by ground-based laser interferometer and satellite observing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrov, M. N.; Volkov, V. A.; Golovachev, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    The most destructive disasters such as the strongest earthquakes and the most powerful tropical cyclones can be treated as tightly coupled geophysical phenomena in their origin. Results of comparison of geophysical field variations and seismic activity of the Earth have evidently shown the correlation between lithosphere-atmosphere interactive disturbances, tropical cyclonic activity in the World Ocean, and seismic processes in the solid Earth. The ground-based laser interferometer techniques being supplemented by satellite observational systems can be considered as promising methods for common earthquake and hurricane monitoring and prediction.

  15. Planet Sensitivity from Combined Ground- and Space-based Microlensing Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew; Beichman, Charles; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B. Scott; Henderson, Calen B.; Penny, Matthew; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Yee, Jennifer C.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration; Abe, F.; Barry, R. K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Ohnishi, K.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Rattenbury, N.; Wakiyama, Y.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Maoz, D.; Kaspi, S.; Friedmann, M.; The Wise Group

    2015-12-01

    To move one step forward toward a Galactic distribution of planets, we present the first planet sensitivity analysis for microlensing events with simultaneous observations from space and the ground. We present this analysis for two such events, OGLE-2014-BLG-0939 and OGLE-2014-BLG-0124, which both show substantial planet sensitivity even though neither of them reached high magnification. This suggests that an ensemble of low to moderate magnification events can also yield significant planet sensitivity, and therefore probability, for detecting planets. The implications of our results to the ongoing and future space-based microlensing experiments to measure the Galactic distribution of planets are discussed.

  16. Comparing satellite- to ground-based automated and manual cloud coverage observations - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, A.; Lockhoff, M.; Schrempf, M.; Tohsing, K.; Liley, B.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2015-05-01

    In this case study we compare cloud fractional cover measured by radiometers on polar satellites (AVHRR) and on one geostationary satellite (SEVIRI) to ground-based manual (SYNOP) and automated observations by a cloud camera (Hemispherical Sky Imager, HSI). These observations took place in Hannover, Germany, and in Lauder, New Zealand, over time frames of 3 and 2 months, respectively. Daily mean comparisons between satellite derivations and the ground-based HSI found the deviation to be 6 ± 14% for AVHRR and 8 ± 16% for SEVIRI, which can be considered satisfactory. AVHRR's instantaneous differences are smaller (2 ± 22%) than instantaneous SEVIRI cloud fraction estimates (8 ± 29%) when compared to HSI due to resolution and scenery effect issues. All spaceborne observations show a very good skill in detecting completely overcast skies (cloud cover ≥ 6 oktas) with probabilities between 92 and 94% and false alarm rates between 21 and 29% for AVHRR and SEVIRI in Hannover, Germany. In the case of a clear sky (cloud cover lower than 3 oktas) we find good skill with detection probabilities between 72 and 76%. We find poor skill, however, whenever broken clouds occur (probability of detection is 32% for AVHRR and 12% for SEVIRI in Hannover, Germany). In order to better understand these discrepancies we analyze the influence of algorithm features on the satellite-based data. We find that the differences between SEVIRI and HSI cloud fractional cover (CFC) decrease (from a bias of 8 to almost 0%) with decreasing number of spatially averaged pixels and decreasing index which determines the cloud coverage in each "cloud-contaminated" pixel of the binary map. We conclude that window size and index need to be adjusted in order to improve instantaneous SEVIRI and AVHRR estimates. Due to its automated operation and its spatial, temporal and spectral resolution, we recommend as well that more automated ground-based instruments in the form of cloud cameras should be installed

  17. Cloud-Base-Height Estimation from Paired Ground-Based Hemispherical Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Long, Charles N.; Christy, Jason E.

    2005-08-01

    The Total Sky Imager (TSI) and Hemispheric Sky Imager (HSI) each have a hemispherical field-of-view (FOV) and many TSIs are now deployed. Currently, these instruments have been used routinely to provide a time series of the fractional sky cover only. In this study, we examine the possible retrieval of cloud base height (CBH) from TSI surface observations. This paper presents a validation analysis of a new retrieval using both a model-output inverse problem and independent, ground-based Micropulse Lidar data. The obtained results suggest that, at least for single layer cloud fields, moderately accurate (within ~0.35 km) CBH retrieval is possible.

  18. Observations of coupled seismicity and ground deformation at El Hierro Island (2011-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    New insights into the magma storage and evolution at oceanic island volcanoes are now being achieved using remotely sensed space geodetic techniques, namely satellite radar interferometry. Differential radar interferometry is a technique tracking, at high spatial resolution, changes in the travel-time (distance) from the satellites to the ground surface, having wide applications in Earth sciences. Volcanic activity usually is accompanied by surface ground deformation. In many instances, modelling of surface deformation has the great advantage to estimate the magma volume change, a particularly interesting parameter prior to eruptions. Jointly interpreted with petrology, degassing and seismicity, it helps to understand the crustal magmatic systems as a whole. Current (and near-future) radar satellite missions will reduce the revisit time over global sub-aerial volcanoes to a sub-weekly basis, which will increase the potential for its operational use. Time series and filtering processing techniques of such streaming data would allow to track subsurface magma migration with high precision, and frequently update over vast areas (volcanic arcs, large caldera systems, etc.). As an example for the future potential monitoring scenario, we analyze multiple satellite radar data over El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) to measure and model surface ground deformation. El Hierro has been active for more than 3 years (2011 to 2014). Initial phases of the unrest culminated in a submarine eruption (late 2011 - early 2012). However, after the submarine eruption ended, its magmatic system still active and affected by pseudo-regular energetic seismic swarms, accompanied by surface deformation without resumed eruptions. Such example is a great opportunity to understand the crustal magmatic systems in low magma supply-rate oceanic island volcanoes. This new approach to measure surface deformation processes is yielding an ever richer level of information from volcanology to

  19. Methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite: Comparison to ground-based TCCON data and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Robert; Boesch, Hartmut; Cogan, Austin; Fraser, Annemarie; Feng, Liang; Palmer, Paul I.; Messerschmidt, Janina; Deutscher, Nicholas; Griffith, David W. T.; Notholt, Justus; Wennberg, Paul O.; Wunch, Debra

    2011-08-01

    We report new short-wave infrared (SWIR) column retrievals of atmospheric methane (XCH4) from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) and compare observed spatial and temporal variations with correlative ground-based measurements from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and with the global 3-D GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model. GOSAT XCH4 retrievals are compared with daily TCCON observations at six sites between April 2009 and July 2010 (Bialystok, Park Falls, Lamont, Orleans, Darwin and Wollongong). GOSAT reproduces the site-dependent seasonal cycles as observed by TCCON with correlations typically between 0.5 and 0.7 with an estimated single-sounding precision between 0.4-0.8%. We find a latitudinal-dependent difference between the XCH4 retrievals from GOSAT and TCCON which ranges from 17.9 ppb at the most northerly site (Bialystok) to -14.6 ppb at the site with the lowest latitude (Darwin). We estimate that the mean smoothing error difference included in the GOSAT to TCCON comparisons can account for 15.7 to 17.4 ppb for the northerly sites and for 1.1 ppb at the lowest latitude site. The GOSAT XCH4 retrievals agree well with the GEOS-Chem model on annual (August 2009 - July 2010) and monthly timescales, capturing over 80% of the zonal variability. Differences between model and observed XCH4 are found over key source regions such as Southeast Asia and central Africa which will be further investigated using a formal inverse model analysis.

  20. Common ground on surgical abortion?--engaging Peter Singer on the moral status of potential persons.

    PubMed

    Camosy, Charles C

    2008-12-01

    The debate over surgical abortion is certainly one of the most divisive in ethical discourse and for many it seems interminable. However, this paper argues that a primary reason for this is confusion with regard to what issues are actually under dispute. When looking at an entrenched and articulate figure on one side of the debate, Peter Singer, and comparing his views with those of his opponents, one finds that the disputed issue is actually quite a narrow one: the moral status of potential persons. Finding this common ground clears the conceptual space for a fruitful argument: the thesis of which is that most, including Singer, who argue that potential persons do not have full personal moral status fail to make the necessary distinction between natural potential (which confers moral status) and practical potential (which admittedly does not).

  1. Ground-based Observations of Io In Support of The New Horizons Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, Julie A.; Spencer, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system and has been observed from ground-based telescopes for more than two decades. The frequency of observations increases dramatically when spacecraft are observing Io in order to complement the data returned by the spacecraft. The New Horizons spacecraft flew by Jupiter on February 28th, 2007 and observed Io with visible (0.4-1.0 microns) and near-infrared (1.2-2.5 microns) instruments. We observed Io from the Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii in order to complement the data being taken by New Horizons. Our observations were at longer wavelengths than New Horizons with some overlap (2.2, 3.5, and 4.8 microns). We were also able to observe Io over a longer period of time (August 2006 through June 2007) to put the New Horizons data into a broader temporal context. During nine partial nights we observed Io in eclipse (to avoid reflected sunlight) and during Jupiter occultations (to isolate individual volcanoes). From these observations, we were able to observe active volcanoes on the Jupiter facing hemisphere and measure the brightness of the largest volcano, Loki. We found that Loki was very faint during this entire period, though temporal variations were seen at other volcanoes. During seven partial nights, we observed Io's sunlit disk at 3.5 microns at a variety of longitudes for good coverage of volcanic activity at all longitudes. We took a series of short exposures and added together those with the best seeing in order to improve the spatial resolution. During five of the observations, starting on January 18th 2007, the volcano Tvashtar was visible, showing that the major eruption detected by New Horizons was active for over a month before the flyby. We will deconvolve these images in order to determine the brightness of Tvashtar (at 3.5 microns) between mid-January and early March.

  2. Urea for SCR-based NOx Control Systems and Potential Impacts to Ground Water Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, D.

    2002-01-03

    One of the key challenges facing manufacturers of diesel engines for light- and heavy-duty vehicles is the development of technologies for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides, In this regard, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems represent control technology that can potentially achieve the NOx removal efficiencies required to meet new U.S. EPA standards. SCR systems rely on a bleed stream of urea solution into exhaust gases prior to catalytic reduction. While urea's role in this emission control technology is beneficial, in that it supports reduced NOx emissions, it can also be an environmental threat to ground water quality. This would occur if it is accidentally released to soils because once in that environmental medium, urea is subsequently converted to nitrate--which is regulated under the U.S. EPA's primary drinking water standards. Unfortunately, nitrate contamination of ground waters is already a significant problem across the U.S. Historically, the primary sources of nitrate in ground waters have been septic tanks and fertilizer applications. The basic concern over nitrate contamination is the potential health effects associated with drinking water containing elevated levels of nitrate. Specifically, consumption of nitrate-contaminated water can cause a blood disorder in infants known as methemoglobinemia.

  3. Modeling analysis of ground water recharge potential on alluvial fans using limited data.

    PubMed

    Munévar, A; Mariño, M A

    1999-01-01

    A modeling approach is developed to evaluate the potential for artificial recharge on alluvial fans in the Salinas Valley, California, using limited data of soil texture, soil hydraulic properties, and interwell stratigraphy. Promising areas for surface recharge are identified and mapped on a broad-scale using soil surveys, geologic investigations, permeability tests, and seasonal ground water response to rainfall and runoff. Two-dimensional representations of the vadose zone at selected sites are then constructed from drillers'logs and soil material types are estimated. Next, hydraulic properties are assigned to each soil material type by comparing them to laboratory-tested cores of similar soils taken from one site. Finally, water flow through the vadose zone is modeled in two dimensions at seven sites using a transient, finite-difference, variably saturated flow model. Average infiltration rates range from 0.84 to 1.54 cm/hr and recharge efficiency, the percentage of infiltrated water that reaches the water table, varies from 51% to 79%. Infiltration rates and recharge efficiency are found to be relatively insensitive to recharge basin ponding depth due to the thickness of the vadose zones modeled (31 to 84 m). The impact of artificial recharge on the Salinas Valley ground water basin is investigated by simulating the regional ground water response to surface spreading and streamflow augmentation with a recently calibrated, finite-element, ground water-surface water model for the basin. It was determined that a combined approach of surface recharge and streamflow augmentation significantly reduces the state of ground water overdraft and, to a lesser extent, reduces the rate of sea water intrusion.

  4. Locating potential biosignatures on Europa from surface geology observations.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Patricio H; Greeley, Ronald; Neuer, Susanne; Irwin, Louis; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the astrobiological potential of the major classes of geologic units on Europa with respect to possible biosignatures preservation on the basis of surface geology observations. These observations are independent of any formational model and therefore provide an objective, though preliminary, evaluation. The assessment criteria include high mobility of material, surface concentration of non-ice components, relative youth, textural roughness, and environmental stability. Our review determined that, as feature classes, low-albedo smooth plains, smooth bands, and chaos hold the highest potential, primarily because of their relative young age, the emplacement of low-viscosity material, and indications of material exchange with the subsurface. Some lineaments and impact craters may be promising sites for closer study despite the comparatively lower astrobiological potential of their classes. This assessment will be expanded by multidisciplinary examination of the potential for habitability of specific features.

  5. Geometric Positioning for Satellite Imagery without Ground Control Points by Exploiting Repeated Observation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhenling; Wu, Xiaoliang; Yan, Li; Xu, Zhenliang

    2017-01-01

    With the development of space technology and the performance of remote sensors, high-resolution satellites are continuously launched by countries around the world. Due to high efficiency, large coverage and not being limited by the spatial regulation, satellite imagery becomes one of the important means to acquire geospatial information. This paper explores geometric processing using satellite imagery without ground control points (GCPs). The outcome of spatial triangulation is introduced for geo-positioning as repeated observation. Results from combining block adjustment with non-oriented new images indicate the feasibility of geometric positioning with the repeated observation. GCPs are a must when high accuracy is demanded in conventional block adjustment; the accuracy of direct georeferencing with repeated observation without GCPs is superior to conventional forward intersection and even approximate to conventional block adjustment with GCPs. The conclusion is drawn that taking the existing oriented imagery as repeated observation enhances the effective utilization of previous spatial triangulation achievement, which makes the breakthrough for repeated observation to improve accuracy by increasing the base-height ratio and redundant observation. Georeferencing tests using data from multiple sensors and platforms with the repeated observation will be carried out in the follow-up research. PMID:28134779

  6. Geometric Positioning for Satellite Imagery without Ground Control Points by Exploiting Repeated Observation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenling; Wu, Xiaoliang; Yan, Li; Xu, Zhenliang

    2017-01-26

    With the development of space technology and the performance of remote sensors, high-resolution satellites are continuously launched by countries around the world. Due to high efficiency, large coverage and not being limited by the spatial regulation, satellite imagery becomes one of the important means to acquire geospatial information. This paper explores geometric processing using satellite imagery without ground control points (GCPs). The outcome of spatial triangulation is introduced for geo-positioning as repeated observation. Results from combining block adjustment with non-oriented new images indicate the feasibility of geometric positioning with the repeated observation. GCPs are a must when high accuracy is demanded in conventional block adjustment; the accuracy of direct georeferencing with repeated observation without GCPs is superior to conventional forward intersection and even approximate to conventional block adjustment with GCPs. The conclusion is drawn that taking the existing oriented imagery as repeated observation enhances the effective utilization of previous spatial triangulation achievement, which makes the breakthrough for repeated observation to improve accuracy by increasing the base-height ratio and redundant observation. Georeferencing tests using data from multiple sensors and platforms with the repeated observation will be carried out in the follow-up research.

  7. Ground-based Observation System Development for the Moon Hyper-spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Huang, Yu; Wang, Shurong; Li, Zhanfeng; Zhang, Zihui; Hu, Xiuqing; Zhang, Peng

    2017-05-01

    The Moon provides a suitable radiance source for on-orbit calibration of space-borne optical instruments. A ground-based observation system dedicated to the hyper-spectral radiometry of the Moon has been developed for improving and validating the current lunar model. The observation instrument using a dispersive imaging spectrometer is particularly designed for high-accuracy observations of the lunar radiance. The simulation and analysis of the push-broom mechanism is made in detail for lunar observations, and the automated tracking and scanning is well accomplished in different observational condition. A three-month series of hyper-spectral imaging experiments of the Moon have been performed in the wavelength range from 400 to 1000 nm near Lijiang Observatory (Yunnan, China) at phase angles -83°-87°. Preliminary results and data comparison are presented, and it shows the instrument performance and lunar observation capability of this system are well validated. Beyond previous measurements, this observation system provides the entire lunar disk images of continuous spectral coverage by adopting the push-broom mode with special scanning scheme and leads to the further research of lunar photometric model.

  8. Definition and archiving of ground-based observations in support of space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Europlanet Wg3&5

    This science case was developed by the WG3&5 to induce and optimize the follow- up of space missions or to monitor a probe entry, in order to provide support in the case of failure, and help achieve science objectives. The space mission data need to be complemented by ground-based and space-borne observations that can help interpret the space mission return. Such coordinated observations were performed at the time of the Huygens descent in Titan's atmosphere and led to a JGR special issue publication (2006, in press). We should gather and archive all such observations to support space missions already existing or to come. For this we would need to get the space mission data from Cassini-Huygens (both images and spectra), Venus Express, Mars Express and future missions (to Europa and Mercury for instance) and complete them with ground-based observations (spectra, images, radio data, radar,...) of Titan, Venus, Mars, Europa, Mercury with the HST, ISO, etc, as well as amateur observations, if possible, taken from 1990 on. This applies to cometary, moon and planet surfaces/subsurfaces composition- structure. This would help among other with the target selections (comets, moons) and landing sites for SMART-1 (on the Moon). There are specific needs for stereoscopic images of the Moon and other objects. Our study will assist in optimizing the Rosetta mission return. For Mercury we need to observe from the ground at the time of the Bepi-Colombo mission to cross-calibrate the mission data. There are many examples of success from this additional input, as for instance with Cassini-Huygens (DWE- Channel C), Galileo, etc. For Titan there is a requirement for RADAR measurements of the whole surface during the extended Cassini mission. Also, assist with the interpretation of high-resolution DISR images in terms of surface activity and surface-atmosphere interactions This involves in some cases techniques possible only from the Earth such as the VLBI 1 radio-tracking of a space

  9. Ground-coupled airwaves at Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, and their potential for eruption monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Cassandra M.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Thompson, Glenn

    2016-07-01

    An abnormally high number of explosion quakes were noted during the monitoring effort for the 2007 eruption of Pavlof Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. In this study, we manually cataloged the explosion quakes from their characteristic ground-coupled airwaves. This study investigates how the ground-coupled airwaves might be used in a monitoring or analysis effort by estimating energy release and gas mass release. Over 3 × 104 quakes were recorded. The energy release from the explosions is approximated to be 3 × 1011 J, and the total gas mass (assuming 100 % water) released was 450 t. The tracking of explosion quakes has the potential to estimate relative eruption intensity as a function of time and is thus a useful component of a seismic monitoring program.

  10. The early ELF signals of the gigantic jets captured by the Taiwan ground observation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. B. C.; Huang, P. H.; Su, H. T.; Hsu, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    The in-cloud ignition process of gigantic jets and blue jets receives attentions and discussions in the past years. The polarity and the position of their breakdown were proposed by Krehbiel et al. [2008] but no concrete observational evidence to support it directly. ELF spectrogram is a good tool to explore the electric activities, but traditional spectrograms are generated by a Fourier transform which obtain the frequency information through an integration operation. However the integration greatly limits the lowest frequency revealed by spectrogram and buries the important transient features. In this study, we applied a new but widely-used method, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), to explore the spectrogram. Instead of the integration, HHT obtains the frequency information by differentiating on the phase angle, and become a powerful tool to reveal the fast frequency variation associated with transient luminous events. More than 100 transient luminous events including 25 gigantic jets observed by Taiwan ground optical observation network were analyzed. The results indicate that approximately 70% of gigantic jets can identify a rapid frequency variation in the interval of 300-600 milliseconds before main surge discharge, and this early feature can not find a clear corresponding amplitude variation in its sferic. Since this early signal can not be identified from the traditional Fourier spectrogram, but clear in-cloud lightning was registered correspondingly by the ground optical observation. In contrast to gigantic jets, this feature of early frequency change can be seen only in less than 30% of sprites and elves. These observational evidences are able to provide new constraints on the early discharge process of gigantic jets in clouds.

  11. Dynamic Electron Correlation Effects on the Ground State Potential Energy Surface of a Retinal Chromophore Model.

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Huntress, Mark; Schapiro, Igor; Lindh, Roland; Granovsky, Alexander A; Angeli, Celestino; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-11-13

    The ground state potential energy surface of the retinal chromophore of visual pigments (e.g., bovine rhodopsin) features a low-lying conical intersection surrounded by regions with variable charge-transfer and diradical electronic structures. This implies that dynamic electron correlation may have a large effect on the shape of the force fields driving its reactivity. To investigate this effect, we focus on mapping the potential energy for three paths located along the ground state CASSCF potential energy surface of the penta-2,4-dieniminium cation taken as a minimal model of the retinal chromophore. The first path spans the bond length alternation coordinate and intercepts a conical intersection point. The other two are minimum energy paths along two distinct but kinetically competitive thermal isomerization coordinates. We show that the effect of introducing the missing dynamic electron correlation variationally (with MRCISD) and perturbatively (with the CASPT2, NEVPT2, and XMCQDPT2 methods) leads, invariably, to a stabilization of the regions with charge transfer character and to a significant reshaping of the reference CASSCF potential energy surface and suggesting a change in the dominating isomerization mechanism. The possible impact of such a correction on the photoisomerization of the retinal chromophore is discussed.

  12. Ground-nesting marine birds and potential for human disturbance in Glacier Bay National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arimitsu, M.L.; Romano, Marc D.; Piatt, J.F.; Piatt, J.F.; Gende, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve contains a diverse assemblage of marine birds that use the area for nesting, foraging and molting. The abundance and diversity of marine bird species in Glacier Bay is unmatched in the region, due in part to the geomorphic and successional characteristics that result in a wide array of habitat types (Robards and others, 2003). The opportunity for proactive management of these species is unique in Glacier Bay National Park because much of the suitable marine bird nesting habitat occurs in areas designated as wilderness. Ground-nesting marine birds are vulnerable to human disturbance wherever visitors can access nest sites during the breeding season. Human disturbance of nest sites can be significant because intense parental care is required for egg and hatchling survival, and repeated disturbance can result in reduced productivity (Leseberg and others, 2000). Temporary nest desertion by breeding birds in disturbed areas can lead to increased predation on eggs and hatchlings by conspecifics or other predators (Bolduc and Guillemette, 2003). Human disturbance of ground-nesting birds may also affect incubation time and adult foraging success, which in turn can alter breeding success (Verhulst and others, 2001). Furthermore, human activity can potentially cause colony failure when disturbance prevents the initiation of nesting (Hatch, 2002). There is management concern about the susceptibility of breeding birds to disturbance from human activities, but little historical data has been collected on the distribution of ground-nesting marine birds in Glacier Bay. This report summarizes results obtained during two years of a three-year study to determine the distribution of ground-nesting marine birds in Glacier Bay, and the potential for human disturbance of those nesting birds.

  13. The Potential Energy Surface for the Electronic Ground State of H 2Se Derived from Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, P.; Kozin, I. N.

    1993-07-01

    The present paper reports a determination of the potential energy surface for the electronic ground state of the hydrogen selenide molecule through a direct least-squares fitting to experimental data using the MORBID (Morse oscillator rigid bender internal dynamics) approach developed by P. Jensen [ J. Mol. Spectrosc.128, 478-501 (1988); J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 284, 1315-1340 (1988)]. We have fitted a selection of 303 rotation-vibration energy spacings of H 280Se, D 280Se, and HD 80Se involving J ≤ 5 with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.0975 cm -1 for the rotational energy spacings and 0.268 cm -1 for the vibrational spacings. In the fitting, 14 parameters were varied. On the basis of the fitted potential surface we have studied the cluster effect in the vibrational ground state of H 2Se, i.e., the formation of nearly degenerate, four-member groups of rotational energy levels [see I. N. Kozin, S. Klee, P. Jensen, O. L. Polyansky, and I. M. Pavlichenkov. J. Mol. Spectrosc., 158, 409-422 (1993), and references therein]. The cluster formation becomes more pronounced with increasing J. For example, four-fold clusters formed in the vibrational ground state of H 280Se at J = 40 are degenerate to within a few MHz. Our predictions of the D 280Se energy spectrum show that for this molecule, the cluster formation is displaced towards higher J values than arc found for H 280Se. In the vibrational ground state, the qualitative deviation from the usual rigid rotor picture starts at J = 12 for H 280Se and at J = 18 for D 280Se, in full agreement with predictions from semiclassical theory. An interpretation of the cluster eigenstates is discussed.

  14. Urban flood modelling combining top-view LiDAR data with ground-view SfM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesuk, Vorawit; Vojinovic, Zoran; Mynett, Arthur E.; Abdullah, Ahmad F.

    2015-01-01

    small urban feature. Overall, the new multi-view approach of combining top-view LiDAR data with ground-view SfM observations shows a good potential for creating an accurate digital terrain map which can be then used as an input for a numerical urban flood model.

  15. Observations of vertical ground accelerations exceeding gravity during the 1997 Umbria-Marche (central Italy) earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchon, M.; Gaffet, S.; Cornou, C.; Dietrich, M.; Glot, J.P.; Courboulex, F.; Caserta, A.; Cultrera, G.; Marra, F.; Guiguet, R.

    We found extensive evidence that the vertical ground accelerations produced during the largest shock (M = 6.0) of the 1997 Umbria-Marche earthquake sequence exceeded 1g in two areas close to the heavily-damaged villages of Annifo and Colle Croce. This evidence comes from the striking observation of thousands of freshly fractured and broken rocks and stones in these areas. Some of the broken stones lie isolated on soft detritic soil while others had been previously piled up, probably a long time agoto clear the fields for farming. The freshness of the cuts and fractures and the consistency of the observations for thousands of rocks and stones in these areas indicate that these rocks were thrown upwards during the earthquake, with breakage occurring at the time of impact. Ground motion calculations consistent with the static deformation inferred from GPS and interferometry data, show that the broken stones and rocks are found in the zone where the strongest shaking took place during the earthquake and that most of the shaking there was vertical.

  16. A biophysical process based approach for estimating net primary production using satellite and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    An approach is presented for calculating interannual variation of net primary production (C) of terrestrial plant communities at regional scale using satellite and ground measurements. C has been calculated as the difference of gross photosynthesis (A g) and respiration (R), recognizing that different biophysical factors exert major control on these two processes. A g has been expressed as the product of radiation use efficiency for gross photosynthesis by an unstressed canopy and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation, which is then adjusted for stresses due to soil water shortage and temperature away from optimum. R has been calculated as the sum of growth and maintenance components (respectively, R g and R m. The R m has been determined from nitrogen content of plant tissue per unit ground area, while R g has been obtained as a fraction of the difference of A g and R m. Model parameters have not been determined by matching the calculated fluxes against observations at any location. Results are presented for cultivated and temperate deciduous forest areas over North America for five consecutive years (1986-1990) and compared with observations.

  17. Ground-satellite conjugate observations of low-latitude travelling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moral, A. C.; Shiokawa, K.; Suzuki, S.; Liu, H.; Otsuka, Y.; Yatini, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Equatorial travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are studied by using three CHAMP satellite overpasses on ground-based 630-nm airglow images. The airglow images are obtained from Kototabang (KTB), Indonesia (geographic coordinates: 0.2S, 100.3E, geomagnetic latitude: 10.6S). From 7-year data from October 2002 to October 2009, April 30, 2006 (event 1), September 28, 2006 (event 2) and April 12, 2004 (event 3) are the only TID events found in both ground and satellite measurements. They show southward-moving structures in 630-nm airglow images. The events 1 and 2 are single pulse with horizontal scales of 500-1000 km and event 3 show three wave fronts with horizontal scale sizes of 500-700 km. For events 1 and 3, the neutral density in CHAMP shows out-of-phase variations with the airglow intensity, while event 2 is in-phase. For event 1, the relation between electron density and airglow intensity is out of phase, while relationships of event 2 and 3 are unclear. These unclear relationships suggest that ionospheric plasma variation is not the cause of the TIDs. In the case if gravity waves in the thermosphere is the source of the observed TIDs, in-phase and out-of-phase relationships of neutral density and airglow intensity can be explained by different vertical wavelengths of the gravity wave. We estimate possible vertical wavelengths for those events using observed wave parameters and modeled neutral winds.

  18. The case for 6-component ground motion observations in planetary seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Rakshit; van Driel, Martin; Donner, Stefanie; Nunn, Ceri; Wassermann, Joachim; Igel, Heiner

    2017-04-01

    The imminent INSIGHT mission will place a single seismic station on Mars to learn more about the structure of the Martian interior. Due to cost and difficulty, only single stations are currently feasible for planetary missions. We show that future single station missions should also measure rotational ground motions, in addition to the classic 3 components of translational motion. The joint, collocated, 6 component (6C) observations offer access to additional information that can otherwise only be obtained through seismic array measurements or are associated with large uncertainties. An example is the access to local phase velocity information from measurements of amplitude ratios of translations and rotations. When surface waves are available, this implies (in principle) that 1D velocity models can be estimated from Love wave dispersion curves. In addition, rotational ground motion observations can distinguish between Love and Rayleigh waves as well as S and P type motions. Wave propagation directions can be estimated by maximizing (or minimizing) coherence between translational and rotational motions. In combination with velocity-depth estimates, locations of seismic sources can be determined from a single station with little or no prior knowledge of the velocity structure. We demonstrate these points with both theoretical and real data examples using the vertical component of motion from ring laser recordings at Wettzell and all components of motion from the ROMY ring near Munich. Finally, we present the current state of technology concerning portable rotation sensors and discuss the relevance to planetary seismology.

  19. An Intense Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash Observed at Ground Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, J. E.; Phlips, B. F.; Wulf, E. A.; Hutcheson, A. L.; Mitchell, L. J.; Woolf, R. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Schaal, M.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D.; Hare, B.; Rassoul, H.; Bozarth, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report on an intense gamma-ray flash observed at ground level in August 2014 at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, Camp Blanding, Florida, that occurred 13 ms after the initiation of the first stroke of an altitude-triggered lightning discharge. The measurements were made with an array of 78 plastic, liquid, and fast inorganic scintillators for robust spectroscopy of high-rate transients. The gamma-ray spectrum, time-intensity profile, and luminosity at the putative source altitude are consistent with those of a Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF). The fluence of >100 keV gamma rays at ground level in the ~200 μs flash was in excess of 10 photons / cm2, an order of magnitude brighter than typical TGFs observed from low-Earth orbit. The proximity of the TGF to our large scintillator array allows these to be the most detailed gamma-ray measurements ever made of a TGF. Work at NRL was sponsored by the Chief of Naval Research.

  20. Evaluations of cirrus contamination and screening in ground aerosol observations using collocated lidar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hansell, Richard A.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Liu, Gin-Rong; Campbell, James R.; Liew, Soo Chin; Barnes, John E.

    2012-08-01

    Cirrus clouds, particularly subvisual high thin cirrus with low optical thickness, are difficult to screen in operational aerosol retrieval algorithms. Collocated aerosol and cirrus observations from ground measurements, such as the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET), provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to systematically examine the susceptibility of operational aerosol products to cirrus contamination. Quality assured aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements were also tested against the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) vertical feature mask (VFM) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) thin cirrus screening parameters for the purpose of evaluating cirrus contamination. Key results of this study include: (1) quantitative evaluations of data uncertainties in AERONET AOT retrievals are conducted; although AERONET cirrus screening schemes are successful in removing most cirrus contamination, strong residuals displaying strong spatial and seasonal variability still exist, particularly over thin cirrus prevalent regions during cirrus peak seasons; (2) challenges in matching up different data for analysis are highlighted and corresponding solutions proposed; and (3) estimates of the relative contributions from cirrus contamination to aerosol retrievals are discussed. The results are valuable for better understanding and further improving ground aerosol measurements that are critical for aerosol-related climate research.

  1. Ground- and Space-Based Observations of Ionospheric Irregularities over Nigeria during Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Yizengaw, E.; Doherty, P. H.; Bridgwood, C. T.; Adeniyi, J. O.; Amaeshi, L. L.; Pedersen, T. R.; Groves, K. M.; Roddy, P. A.; Caton, R. G.

    2009-12-01

    Ionospheric irregularities and plasma turbulence can cause scintillation in the amplitude and phase of trans-ionospheric radio waves employed by satellite navigation and communication systems, leading to a degradation of system performance. Due to the relatively sparse distribution of ground-based ionospheric monitoring instruments in Africa, the climatology and morphology of ionospheric irregularities over Africa have not been adequately characterized. Boston College, Air Force Research Laboratory, and the Universities of Ilorin and Lagos in Nigeria have collaborated to operate two high-rate GPS receivers capable of monitoring both Total Electron Content (TEC) and scintillation intensity. We use GPS measurements collected from 2007-2009 to 1) identify ionospheric irregularities and quantify their spatial extent, 2) estimate the zonal drift velocity by cross-correlating TEC measurements between pairs of GPS satellites, 3) relate ionospheric irregularities to the occurrence of weak scintillation at the GPS L1 frequency, 4) characterize the strength of amplitude and phase scintillations in terms of their power spectral densities, and 5) use phase screen theory to predict the intensity of scintillation that would be observed by ionospheric monitoring sensors operating at lower frequencies. Measurements of plasma density and zonal drift from the C/NOFS satellite during passes over Nigeria are used to corroborate and complement these ground-based GPS observations.

  2. Ground-satellite conjugate observations of low-latitude travelling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceren Moral, Aysegul; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Suzuki, Shin; Liu, Huixin; Yatini, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are studied by using three CHAMP satellite overpasses on ground-based 630-nm airglow images. The airglow images are obtained from Kototabang (KTB), Indonesia (geographic coordinates: 0.2S, 100.3E, geomagnetic latitude: 10.6S). From 7-year data from October 2002 to October 2009, April 30, 2006 (event 1), September 28, 2006 (event 2) and April 12, 2004 (event 3) are the only TID events found in both ground and satellite measurements. They show southward-moving structures in 630-nm airglow images. The events 1 and 2 are single pulse with horizontal scales of ~500-1000 km and event 3 show three wave fronts with horizontal scale sizes of 500-700 km. For events 1 and 3, the neutral density in CHAMP shows out-of-phase variations with the airglow intensity, while event 2 is in-phase. For event 1, the relation between electron density and airglow intensity is out of phase, while relationships of event 2 and 3 are unclear. These unclear relationships suggest that ionospheric plasma variation is not the cause of the TIDs. In the case if gravity waves in the thermosphere is the source of the observed TIDs, in-phase and out-of-phase relationships of neutral density and airglow intensity can be explained by different vertical wavelengths of the gravity wave. We estimate possible vertical wavelengths for those events using observed wave parameters and modeled neutral winds.

  3. Simulation of ground-water flow and potential land subsidence, upper Santa Cruz Basin, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Benedict, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical ground-water flow model of the upper Santa Cruz basin in Pinal, Pima, and Santa Cruz Counties was developed to evaluate predevelopment conditions in 1940, ground-water withdrawals for 1940-86, and potential water-level declines and land subsidence for 1987-2024. Simulations of steady-state ground-water conditions indicate 12,900 acre-feet of ground-water inflow, 15,260 acre-feet of outflow, 53,000 acre-feet of pre- development pumpage, 29,840 acre-feet of mountain- front recharge, and 34,020 acre-feet of streamflow infiltration in 1940. Simulations of transient ground-water conditions indicate a total of 6.6 million acre-feet of net pumpage and 3.4 million acre-feet of water removed from aquifer storage for 1941-86. A difference of 1.2 million acre-feet between estimated and net pumpage is attributed to increased recharge from irrigation return flow, mine return flow, and infiltration of sewage effluent. Estimated natural recharge represents 40 percent of pumpage for 1966-86 and averaged 63,860 acre-feet per year for 1940-57 and 76,250 acre-feet per year for 1958-86. The increase in recharge after 1958 was coincident with above- average winter streamflow in the Santa Cruz River for 1959-86. Increased recharge after 1958 and decreased pumpage after 1975 contributed to decreased water-level declines or to recoveries after 1977 in wells near the Santa Cruz River and its tributaries. The results of projection simu- lations indicate that a maximum potential subsi- dence for 1987-2024 ranges from 1.2 feet for an inelastic specific storage of .0001 ft to 12 feet for an inelastic specific storage of .0015 ft. The simulations were made on the basis of pumpage and recharge rates from 1986 and by using a preconso- lidation-stress threshold of 100 feet. A permanent reduction in acquitard storage can range from 1 to 12 percent of the potential loss of 3.9 million acre-feet in aquifer-system storage for 1987-2024.

  4. Simultaneous ground- and space-based observations of the plasmaspheric plume and reconnection.

    PubMed

    Walsh, B M; Foster, J C; Erickson, P J; Sibeck, D G

    2014-03-07

    Magnetic reconnection is the primary process through which energy couples from the solar wind into Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere. Conditions both in the incident solar wind and in the magnetosphere are important in determining the efficiency of this energy transfer. In particular, the cold, dense plasmaspheric plume can substantially impact the coupling in the dayside reconnection region. Using ground-based total electron content (TEC) maps and measurements from the THEMIS spacecraft, we investigated simultaneous ionosphere and magnetosphere observations of the plasmaspheric plume and its involvement in an unsteady magnetic reconnection process. The observations show the full circulation pattern of the plasmaspheric plume and validate the connection between signatures of variability in the dense plume and reconnection at the magnetopause as measured in situ and through TEC measurements in the ionosphere.

  5. Coordinated observations of chemical releases from the ground and from aircraft at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romick, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    The ground observations of the Na-Li trail released from a Nike-Apache rocket obtained by the Geophysical Institute are discussed. By using the nominal trajectory for a 60 pound payload and the particular rocket, a best fit trajectory was determined based on the Ester Dome photographic data, launch time and earth-sun geometrical shadow height. From these calculations, the height of obvious features along the trail were determined and their velocity estimated. A clockwise rotation of the velocity vector with increasing height was observed. Velocities deduced at various altitudes were then compared to meter radar data also obtained during this period. The comparisons of these two neutral wind measurements techniques are satisfactory.

  6. Noctilucent clouds: modern ground-based photographic observations by a digital camera network.

    PubMed

    Dubietis, Audrius; Dalin, Peter; Balčiūnas, Ričardas; Černis, Kazimieras; Pertsev, Nikolay; Sukhodoev, Vladimir; Perminov, Vladimir; Zalcik, Mark; Zadorozhny, Alexander; Connors, Martin; Schofield, Ian; McEwan, Tom; McEachran, Iain; Frandsen, Soeren; Hansen, Ole; Andersen, Holger; Grønne, Jesper; Melnikov, Dmitry; Manevich, Alexander; Romejko, Vitaly

    2011-10-01

    Noctilucent, or "night-shining," clouds (NLCs) are a spectacular optical nighttime phenomenon that is very often neglected in the context of atmospheric optics. This paper gives a brief overview of current understanding of NLCs by providing a simple physical picture of their formation, relevant observational characteristics, and scientific challenges of NLC research. Modern ground-based photographic NLC observations, carried out in the framework of automated digital camera networks around the globe, are outlined. In particular, the obtained results refer to studies of single quasi-stationary waves in the NLC field. These waves exhibit specific propagation properties--high localization, robustness, and long lifetime--that are the essential requisites of solitary waves.

  7. Simultaneous observations of optical lightning from space and LF band lightning waveforms from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Mitsuteru; Ushio, Tomoo; Morimoto, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Suzuki, Makoto; Ishida, Ryohei; Sakamoto, Yuji; Wu, Ting; Kawasaki, Zen

    2017-01-01

    Observations of optical lightning data with a photometer (PH4) at wavelengths of 599-900 nm on the International Space Station were conducted simultaneously with observations of low-frequency (LF) electromagnetic waves with a ground-based LF lightning locating system. The relationship between the PH4 light curve and electromagnetic waveforms in the LF band was examined for 11 lightning events. The PH4 sensor detected a small optical change even for weak light emitted from lightning discharges in clouds, including preliminary breakdown. Particularly, return strokes, including subsequent return strokes, showed a clear relationship between radiated LF waves and optical waveforms. For negative return strokes, we found a clear correlation between the absolute optical intensity and peak current. The slope of the regression line is 9.7 × 10-8 kA W-1 with an intercept of 9.9 kA.

  8. Mid-infrared observations of Io’s volcanism from the ground in 2011 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, M.; Miyata, T.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Sako, S.; Kamizuka, T.; Nakamura, T.; Asano, T.; Uchiyama, M.; Okada, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshii, Y.; Kagitani, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Kasaba, Y.; Okano, S.

    2014-07-01

    We report the latest volcanic activity on Io based on our ground-based observations made in 2011 and 2012 using just a 1-m telescope, at 8.9 μm where Io’s thermal radiation dominates solar reflected light seen at shorter wavelengths. A particular result from these observations is that the power we detected from a bright hotspot at the longitude of 282±18°, perhaps Daedalus Patera, was ∼1013 (W) which is comparable to that of Loki Patera, the most powerful volcanic hotspot on Io. We conclude this hotspot is one of the most powerful volcanic hotspots on Io, but its activation is not as frequent as Loki Patera.

  9. Noctilucent clouds observed from the ground: sensitivity to mesospheric parameters and long-term time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertsev, Nikolay; Dalin, Peter; Perminov, Vladimir; Romejko, Vitaly; Dubietis, Audrius; Balčiunas, Ričardas; Černis, Kazimieras; Zalcik, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Long-term systematic observations of noctilucent clouds in the regions of Moscow (Russia), Vilnius (Lithuania), and La Ronge (Canada) are considered. Variables, describing the seasonal activity of noctilucent clouds, are discussed. It is shown that there are no statistically significant trends within time intervals of several recent decades. This result is compared to other known findings on trends in mesospheric clouds. Based on the data of the modern ground-based noctilucent cloud observing network in the northern hemisphere and simultaneous satellite data on mesospheric temperature and humidity, we estimate sensitivity of noctilucent clouds to the relative humidity of the upper mesosphere. Such an approach allows us to discuss possible changes of the upper-mesospheric relative humidity, which are consistent with a zero secular trend in noctilucent cloud activity.

  10. High-speed video observations of positive ground flashes produced by intracloud lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saba, Marcelo M. F.; Campos, Leandro Z. S.; Krider, E. Philip; Pinto, Osmar

    2009-06-01

    High-speed video recordings of two lightning flashes confirm that positive cloud-to-ground (CG) strokes can be produced by extensive horizontal intracloud (IC) discharges within and near the cloud base. These recordings constitute the first observations of CG leaders emanating from IC discharges of either polarity. In one case, the discharge began with a negative leader that propagated horizontally, went upward and produced an IC discharge. After the beginning of the IC discharge, a positive leader emanated from the lowest portion of the IC discharge, and initiated a positive return stroke. In the other case, the IC discharge began with a positive leader and then initiated a downward-propagating positive leader that contained recoil processes and produced a bright return stroke followed by a long continuing luminosity. These observations help to understand the complex genesis of positive CG flashes, why IC lightning commonly precedes them and why extensive horizontal channels are often involved.

  11. Simultaneous Ground- and Space-Based Observations of the Plasmaspheric Plume and Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the primary process through which energy couples from the solar wind into Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere. Conditions both in the incident solar wind and in the magnetosphere are important in determining the efficiency of this energy transfer. In particular, the cold, dense plasmaspheric plume can substantially impact the coupling in the dayside reconnection region. Using ground-based total electron content (TEC) maps and measurements from the THEMIS spacecraft, we investigated simultaneous ionosphere and magnetosphere observations of the plasmaspheric plume and its involvement in an unsteady magnetic reconnection process. The observations show the full circulation pattern of the plasmaspheric plume and validate the connection between signatures of variability in the dense plume and reconnection at the magnetopause as measured in situ and through TEC measurements in the ionosphere.

  12. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Miyoski, Y; Sakaguchi, K; Shiokawa, K; Evans, D S; Albert, Jay; Connors, M

    2008-01-01

    We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  13. A new methodology for monitoring wood fluxes in rivers using a ground camera: Potential and limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benacchio, Véronique; Piégay, Hervé; Buffin-Bélanger, Thomas; Vaudor, Lise

    2017-02-01

    Ground imagery, which produces large amounts of valuable data at high frequencies, is increasingly used by fluvial geomorphologists to survey and understand processes. While such technology provides immense quantities of information, it can be challenging to analyze and requires automatization and associated development of new methodologies. This paper presents a new approach to automate the processing of image analysis to monitor wood delivery from the upstream Rhône River (France). The Génissiat dam is used as an observation window; all pieces of wood coming from the catchment are trapped here, hence a wood raft accumulates over time. In 2011, we installed an Axis 211W camera to acquire oblique images of the reservoir every 10 min with the goal of automatically detecting a wood raft area, in order to transform it to wood weight (t) and flux (t/d). The methodology we developed is based on random forest classification to detect the wood raft surface over time, which provided a good classification rate of 97.2%. Based on 14 mechanical wood extractions that included weight of wood removed each time, conducted during the survey period, we established a relationship between wood weight and wood raft surface area observed just before the extraction (R2 = 0.93). We found that using such techniques to continuously monitor wood flux is difficult because the raft undergoes very significant changes through time in terms of density, with a very high interday and intraday variability. Misclassifications caused by changes in weather conditions can be mitigated as well as errors from variation in pixel resolution (owing to camera position or window size), but a set of effects on raft density and mobility must still be explored (e.g., dam operation effects, wind on the reservoir surface). At this stage, only peak flow contribution to wood delivery can be well calculated, but determining an accurate, continuous series of wood flux is not possible. Several recommendations are

  14. Determination of Gravitational Potential at Ground Using Optical-Atomic Clocks on Board Satellites and on Ground Stations and Relevant Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2017-07-01

    The general relativity theory provides a potential way to directly determine the gravitational potential (GP) difference by comparing the running rate or vibration frequencies of two optical-atomic clocks located at two stations. Recently we proposed an approach referred to as satellite frequency signal transmission based on the Doppler canceling technique or tri-frequency combination technique to determine the GP difference between a satellite and a ground site via exchanging microwave signals. Here, as an extension of our previous study, we aim to formulate determination of GP at ground stations and establish simulation experiments in different cases, including determining the GP at a ground station via one or more satellites and determining the GP difference between two ground stations via one or more satellites. Concerning each case we made simulating experiments, and results show that the precision of the GP at a ground station and that of the GP difference between two stations, determined via one satellite, are, respectively, about 0.383 and 0.454 m2/s2, assuming the clocks with inaccuracy of about 1× 10^{-18} (s/s) level are available. If more satellites equipped with ultra-high-precise clocks are available, the precision of the determined GP (difference) at ground stations can be further improved.

  15. Geocenter Coordinates from a Combined Processing of LEO and Ground-based GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Männel, Benjamin; Rothacher, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The GPS observations provided by the global IGS (International GNSS Service) tracking network play an important role for the realization of a unique terrestrial reference frame that is accurate enough to allow the monitoring of the Earth's system. Combining these ground-based data with GPS observations tracked by high-quality dual-frequency receivers on-board Low Earth Orbiters (LEO) might help to further improve the realization of the terrestrial reference frame and the estimation of the geocenter coordinates, GPS satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters (ERP). To assess the scope of improvement, we processed a network of 50 globally distributed and stable IGS-stations together with four LEOs (GRACE-A, GRACE-B, OSTM/Jason-2 and GOCE) over a time interval of three years (2010-2012). To ensure fully consistent solutions the zero-difference phase observations of the ground stations and LEOs were processed in a common least-square adjustment, estimating GPS orbits, LEO orbits, station coordinates, ERPs, site-specific tropospheric delays, satellite and receiver clocks and ambiguities. We present the significant impact of the individual LEOs and a combination of all four LEOs on geocenter coordinates derived by using a translational approach (also called network shift approach). In addition, we present geocenter coordinates derived from the same set of GPS observations by using a unified approach. This approach combines the translational and the degree-one approach by estimating translations and surface deformations simultaneously. Based on comparisons against each other and against geocenter time series derived by other techniques the effect of the selected approach is assessed.

  16. Investigating energetic electron precipitation through combining ground-based and balloon observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; McCarthy, Michael; Millan, Robyn; Blum, Lauren W.; Cobbett, Neil; Brundell, James B.; Danskin, Donald; Halford, Alexa J.

    2017-01-01

    A detailed comparison is undertaken of the energetic electron spectra and fluxes of two precipitation events that were observed in 18/19 January 2013. A novel but powerful technique of combining simultaneous ground-based subionospheric radio wave data and riometer absorption measurements with X-ray fluxes from a Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation-belt Electron Losses (BARREL) balloon is used for the first time as an example of the analysis procedure. The two precipitation events are observed by all three instruments, and the relative timing is used to provide information/insight into the spatial extent and evolution of the precipitation regions. The two regions were found to be moving westward with drift periods of 5-11 h and with longitudinal dimensions of 20° and 70° (1.5-3.5 h of magnetic local time). The electron precipitation spectra during the events can be best represented by a peaked energy spectrum, with the peak in flux occurring at 1-1.2 MeV. This suggests that the radiation belt loss mechanism occurring is an energy-selective process, rather than one that precipitates the ambient trapped population. The motion, size, and energy spectra of the patches are consistent with electromagnetic ion cyclotron-induced electron precipitation driven by injected 10-100 keV protons. Radio wave modeling calculations applying the balloon-based fluxes were used for the first time and successfully reproduced the ground-based subionospheric radio wave and riometer observations, thus finding strong agreement between the observations and the BARREL measurements.

  17. Seasonal and Temporal Changes on Jupiter and Saturn: A Review of Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Orton, G. S.; Fisher, B. M.; Fletcher, L. N.; Miller, A. S.

    2010-10-01

    We report on the seasonal and temporal changes observed on Jupiter and Saturn, based on near- and mid-infrared data acquired from several observatories (NASA/InfraRed Telescope Facility, NAOJ/Subaru, ESO/Very Large Telescope) and provide compelling rationale for a coordinated network of large telescopes for continued ground-based observations. Jupiter has been experiencing an era of atmospheric global upheaval since 2005, the observed atmospheric changes being manifestations of changes in local meteorology and latent physical parameters of the system, and occur on various timescales and latitudes. The discrete storms in Jupiter's atmosphere have undergone significant changes over the past decade. The merger of the three white ovals into Oval BA and its subsequent color change in 2006 appear to be correlated to periodic interactions with the Great Red Spot (GRS). Subsequent episodes of GRS-Oval BA interactions in 2006 and 2008 and the upcoming interaction in 2010 provide snapshots of changes in the local meteorology. We identify relationships between latent physical variables of the spatially and temporally changing systems in terms of cloud opacities, aerosol distribution and thermal fields. Ground-based near- and mid-infrared observations of Saturn from 1995 - 2009, covering half a Saturnian year, provide a rich data set to model seasonal changes in Saturn's atmosphere from autumnal equinox (1995) to vernal equinox (2009). Since 1995, as Saturn's south pole received increasing solar insolation, its albedo exhibits an increase in reflectivity at mid-latitudes in the southern hemisphere, decreasing towards the equator, anti-correlated with the thermal field. Similar to equatorial oscillations of temperatures on Earth and Jupiter, Saturn displays stratospheric temperature oscillations, with a period of half a Saturnian year, suggesting the influence of seasonal forcing. We anticipate development of similar phenomena in the next few years, as Saturn approaches

  18. Satellite Based Soil Moisture Product Validation Using NOAA-CREST Ground and L-Band Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Campo, C.; Temimi, M.; Lakhankar, T.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture content is among most important physical parameters in hydrology, climate, and environmental studies. Many microwave-based satellite observations have been utilized to estimate this parameter. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is one of many remotely sensors that collects daily information of land surface soil moisture. However, many factors such as ancillary data and vegetation scattering can affect the signal and the estimation. Therefore, this information needs to be validated against some "ground-truth" observations. NOAA - Cooperative Remote Sensing and Technology (CREST) center at the City University of New York has a site located at Millbrook, NY with several insitu soil moisture probes and an L-Band radiometer similar to Soil Moisture Passive and Active (SMAP) one. This site is among SMAP Cal/Val sites. Soil moisture information was measured at seven different locations from 2012 to 2015. Hydra probes are used to measure six of these locations. This study utilizes the observations from insitu data and the L-Band radiometer close to ground (at 3 meters height) to validate and to compare soil moisture estimates from AMSR2. Analysis of the measurements and AMSR2 indicated a weak correlation with the hydra probes and a moderate correlation with Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS probes). Several differences including the differences between pixel size and point measurements can cause these discrepancies. Some interpolation techniques are used to expand point measurements from 6 locations to AMSR2 footprint. Finally, the effect of penetration depth in microwave signal and inconsistencies with other ancillary data such as skin temperature is investigated to provide a better understanding in the analysis. The results show that the retrieval algorithm of AMSR2 is appropriate under certain circumstances. This validation algorithm and similar study will be conducted for SMAP mission. Keywords: Remote Sensing, Soil

  19. Land-Ocean Difference of the Warm Rain Formation Process in Satellite Observations, Ground-Based Observations, and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Stephens, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the difference in the warm rain formation process between over land and over ocean using a combination of CloudSat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations. Previous studies (Nakajima et al. 2010; Suzuki et al. 2010) have devised a novel methodology for combining the CloudSat and MODIS satellite observations to investigate the microphysical processes. The statistics constructed with the methodology, referred to as the Contoured Frequency by Optical Depth Diagram (CFODD), provides a lifecycle view of warm clouds. Following the previous studies, we conduct detailed analyses of CFODD with a particular focus on comparisons between land and ocean. Our result shows that the coalescence process starts faster in the oceanic warm clouds than continental warm clouds. Also, oceanic clouds tend to produce more drizzle than continental clouds. Moreover, it is found that the difference between oceanic and continental cloud-to-precipitation process can be explained by different environmental conditions. For example, the cloud-to-precipitation processes in continental clouds are more similar to those in oceanic clouds over unstable environments than those over stable environments. Furthermore, ground-based measurement data obtained from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data and a cloud model simulation are analyzed to test how vertical velocity affects the warm rain formation process. Our result suggests that although the intensities of convective updrafts in warm clouds have been paid less attention, intensities of convective updrafts play a critical role in the warm rain formation process.

  20. Asteroid masses with Gaia from ground and space-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantsov, Anatoliy; Hestroffer, Daniel; Thuillot, William; Bancelin, David

    2013-04-01

    Determination of masses of large asteroids is one of the expected scientific outputs from the future Gaia astrometric space mission. With the exception of binary asteroids or fly-by with a space probe, the error in mass determination depends on the size of perturbation effect produced on the motion of small asteroids. Considering the 5 years nominal duration of the Gaia mission, there will be mutual close encounters between asteroids occurring either close to the beginning or to the end of the mission. So that the maximum of deflection angle pertained to the perturbation maxima will not be observed directly by Gaia. Since astrometric data of the perturbed body before and after the encounter are mandatory to derive a perturber mass, the precision of mass determinations based solely on the Gaia observations will deteriorate in such cases. The possible way out consists in acquiring ground-based observations of high astrometric precision in time either before or after the Gaia operations, as it was suggested in [1]. By adding such data, it is expected to increase the number of derived asteroids masses [2]. This paper updates earlier predictions of encounters of large asteroids with smaller ones, e.g. [3], in terms of newly discovered asteroids and available ground-based observations. The method used consists in the computation of the offsets in right ascension and declination between the unperturbed and perturbed solutions fitted to the available observations for each small (perturbed) asteroid. For the purpose of decreasing CPU time, a special filter was applied based on the solution of the two-body problem and systematical search for close encounters, e.g. less than 0.1 A.U., of all known asteroids with the large (perturber) ones. The obtained list of asteroids-candidates was used as the input file for the mentioned above accurate calculations. Such a procedure was used for a few asteroids in [2]. The maximum visible offset corresponds to the dates when the

  1. System-level view of geospace dynamics: Challenges for high-latitude ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, research programs including GEM, CEDAR, GEMSIS, GO Canada, and others are focusing on how geospace works as a system. Coupling sits at the heart of system level dynamics. In all cases, coupling is accomplished via fundamental processes such as reconnection and plasma waves, and can be between regions, energy ranges, species, scales, and energy reservoirs. Three views of geospace are required to attack system level questions. First, we must observe the fundamental processes that accomplish the coupling. This "observatory view" requires in situ measurements by satellite-borne instruments or remote sensing from powerful well-instrumented ground-based observatories organized around, for example, Incoherent Scatter Radars. Second, we need to see how this coupling is controlled and what it accomplishes. This demands quantitative observations of the system elements that are being coupled. This "multi-scale view" is accomplished by networks of ground-based instruments, and by global imaging from space. Third, if we take geospace as a whole, the system is too complicated, so at the top level we need time series of simple quantities such as indices that capture important aspects of the system level dynamics. This requires a "key parameter view" that is typically provided through indices such as AE and DsT. With the launch of MMS, and ongoing missions such as THEMIS, Cluster, Swarm, RBSP, and ePOP, we are entering a-once-in-a-lifetime epoch with a remarkable fleet of satellites probing processes at key regions throughout geospace, so the observatory view is secure. With a few exceptions, our key parameter view provides what we need. The multi-scale view, however, is compromised by space/time scales that are important but under-sampled, combined extent of coverage and resolution that falls short of what we need, and inadequate conjugate observations. In this talk, I present an overview of what we need for taking system level research to its next level, and how

  2. Central role of the observable electric potential in transport equations.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J; Compañ, V; López, M L

    2001-07-01

    Nonequilibrium systems are usually studied in the framework of transport equations that involve the true electric potential (TEP), a nonobservable variable. Nevertheless another electric potential, the observable electric potential (OEP), may be defined to construct a useful set of transport equations. In this paper several basic characteristics of the OEP are deduced and emphasized: (i) the OEP distribution depends on thermodynamic state of the solution, (ii) the observable equations have a reference value for all other transport equations, (iii) the bridge that connects the OEP with a certain TEP is usually defined by the ion activity coefficient, (iv) the electric charge density is a nonobservable variable, and (v) the OEP formulation constitutes a natural model for studying the fluxes in membrane systems.

  3. NOVEL OBSERVATIONS AND POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS USING DIGITAL INFRARED IRIS IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Daniel K.; Lukic, Ana; Yang, Yongyi; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Wilensky, Jacob T.; Wernick, Miles N.

    2017-01-01

    Digital infrared (IR) iris photography using a modified digital camera system was carried out on about 300 subjects seen during routine clinical care and research at one facility. Since this image database offered opportunity to gain new insight into the potential utility of IR iris imaging, it was surveyed for unique image patterns. Then, a selection of photos was compiled that would illustrate the spectrum of this imaging experience. Potentially informative image patterns were observed in subjects with cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, Posner-Schlossman syndrome, iridociliary cysts, long anterior lens zonules, nevi, oculocutaneous albinism, pigment dispersion syndrome, pseudophakia, suspected vascular anomaly, and trauma. Image patterns were often unanticipated regardless of pre-existing information and suggest that IR iris imaging may have numerous potential clinical and research applications, some of which may still not be recognized. These observations suggest further development and study of this technology. PMID:19320317

  4. Identifying potential ground movement as a landslide mitigation approach using resistivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzati, F. N.; Laksmana, Z. S.; Marcelina, B.; Hutabarat, S. S.; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Landslide is defined as a form of ground movement in which land mass suddenly fails downward on a slope as aresult of gravitational pull. One of the mitigative approaches into investigating landslide is to identify a potential slip zone usingresistivity method. In this study, the array chosen to acquire the resistivity data was Wenner array as it provides a robust resolution in mapping lateral resistivity variations. This method will generate a contour map portraying thedistribution of resistivity values of the subsurface. Beforehand, a 2-dimensional forward modeling was conducted to acquire anexpected ideal result of possible potential slip zone. Landslides itself are affiliated with a low resistivity zone that is locatedbetween two high resistivity zones. This study is conducted in a ground slump in Jalan Citra Green, Northern Bandung which is comprised of mostly unconsolidated soil. By applying a least-square inversion to the resistivity data obtained, resistivity values of 10-200 Ωm is attained. Based on the inversion result, a low resistivity zone of 10-20 Ωm is identified spanning from the surface to approximately 10 meters deep. In conclusion, furtherinvestigations are needed to determine whether the low resistivity zone is associated with potential slip zone as our datais limited to a single line

  5. The dispersed fluorescence spectrum of NaAr - Ground and excited state potential curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tellinghuisen, J.; Ragone, A.; Kim, M. S.; Auerbach, D. J.; Smalley, R. E.; Wharton, L.; Levy, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Potential curves for the ground state and the first excited state of NaAr were determined. The van der Waals molecule NaAr was prepared by supersonic free jet expansion of a mixture of sodium, argon, and helium. The electronic transition from the ground state to the first excited state A2pi was excited by a tunable dye laser and the resulting fluorescence was studied. The dispersed fluorescence spectra show discrete and diffuse features, corresponding to transitions from excited vibrational levels of the A state to bound and unbound levels of the x state. The characteristic reflection structure in the bound-free spectra permits an unambiguous assignment of the vibrational numbering in the A state, and this assignment together with previously measured spectroscopic constants are used to calculate the potential curve of the A state. The discrete structure in the fluorescence spectra is used to determine the potential curve of the x state in the well region, and the repulsive part of the X curve is then deduced through trial-and-error simulation of the bound-free spectra.

  6. Evoked potential, cardiac, blink, and respiration measures of pilot workload in air-to-ground missions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, G F; Fullenkamp, P; Davis, I

    1994-02-01

    Brain evoked potentials were successfully recorded from F-4 pilots during air-to-ground training missions. They were recorded during two flight segments. During one the pilot was flying, and during the other, the weapon systems officer was flying the aircraft. The P2 component of the brain-evoked potential evidenced reduced amplitude during the pilot-flying segment, while the N1 component was reduced during both flight tasks compared to ground-based tasks. These data indicate that the P2 amplitude is sensitive to the level of pilot workload. These results were further substantiated using simultaneously recorded physiological data and subjective workload measures. For example, cardiac inter-beat intervals decreased during flight segments relative to those recorded when performing a tracking task, and further reduced for the pilot-flying vs. the weapon systems officer-flying segment. Eye blink measures were sensitive to the visual demands of the various tasks. These data show that evoked potentials can be recorded during flight, and that, together with cardiac and eye blink data, they provide a composite picture of operator state.

  7. Addressing sub-scan variability of tundra snow properties in ground-based Ku- and X-band scatterometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. M.; Kasurak, A.; Kelly, R. E.; Duguay, C. R.; Derksen, C.; Rutter, N.; Sandells, M.; Watts, T.

    2012-12-01

    During the winter of 2010-2011 ground-based Ku- (17.2 GHz) and X-band (9.6 GHz) scatterometers were deployed near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada to evaluate the potential for dual-frequency observation of tundra snow properties. Field-based scatterometer observations when combined with in-situ snowpack properties and physically based models, provide the means necessary to develop and evaluate local scale property retrievals. To form meaningful analysis of the observed physical interaction space, potential sources of bias and error in the observed backscatter must be identified and quantified. This paper explores variation in observed Ku- and X-band backscatter in relation to the physical complexities of shallow tundra snow whose properties evolve at scales smaller than the observing instrument. The University of Waterloo scatterometer (UW-Scat) integrates observations over wide azimuth sweeps, several meters in length, to minimize errors resulting from radar fade and poor signal-to-noise ratios. Under ideal conditions, an assumption is made that the observed snow target is homogeneous. Despite an often-outward appearance of homogeneity, topographic elements of the Canadian open tundra produce significant local scale variability in snow properties, including snow water equivalent (SWE). Snow at open tundra sites observed during this campaign was found to vary by as much as 20 cm in depth and 40 mm in SWE within the scatterometer field of view. Previous studies suggest that changes in snow properties on this order will produce significant variation in backscatter, potentially introducing bias into products used for analysis. To assess the influence of sub-scan variability, extensive snow surveys were completed within the scatterometer field of view immediately after each scan at 32 sites. A standardized sampling protocol captured a grid of geo-located measurements, characterizing the horizontal variability of bulk properties including depth, density, and SWE. Based upon

  8. Ground state and resonant states of helium in exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Arijit; Ho, Y. K.

    2009-05-01

    We have investigated the ground state and a resonance state of normal helium atom in exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential (ECSCP) with screening parameterλ: V(r),,,1r,^-λr(λr) (in a.u.), where r denotes the inter-particle distance. Within the framework of Ritz's variational principle and making use of a highly correlated wave function, we have determined the ground state energies and wave functions of the helium atom for different values of the screening parameterλ. Furthermore, we have shown that the ground state energy of helium for a particular value of λ does converge with increasing number of terms in the wave function. In addition, using the stabilization method, we have investigated the doubly excited 2s^2 ^1S^e resonance state in helium with ECSCP. Resonance energy and width for various λ values are calculated. Our present work will play a useful role in the investigations of atomic structures in quantum plasmas [1]. [1]. P.K. Shukla and B. Eliasson, Phys. Lett. A 372, 2899 (2008).

  9. Prevalence and characterization of Salmonella in bovine lymph nodes potentially destined for use in ground beef.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Terrance M; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Guerini, Michael N; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Wells, James E; Shackelford, Steven D; Wheeler, Tommy L; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2008-08-01

    A potential source of pathogenic bacteria in ground beef is the lymphatic system, specifically the lymph nodes. Bacteria have been isolated from the lymph nodes of cattle at slaughter; however, most studies have dealt with mesenteric lymph nodes, which are not normally incorporated into ground beef. The objective of the current study was to determine the prevalence and multidrug-resistance status of Salmonella in bovine lymph nodes associated with lean and fat trimmings that might be utilized in ground beef production. Bovine lymph nodes (n = 1,140) were collected from commercial beef processing plants. Half of the lymph nodes sampled were obtained from cull cow and bull processing plants, and the remainder were obtained from fed beef processing plants. Lymph nodes located in chuck and flank adipose tissue were collected for this study. Salmonella prevalence in the lymph node samples was low, with an overall prevalence of 1.6% and a 95% confidence interval of 0.85 to 2.3%. Lymph nodes from cull cattle carcasses had a higher prevalence of Salmonella than did those from fed cattle carcasses. Lymph nodes from the flanks of cow and bull carcasses had the highest prevalence at 3.86%, whereas lymph nodes from the chuck region of fed cattle carcasses had the lowest prevalence at 0.35%. Three of the 18 Salmonella-positive lymph node samples contained multidrug-resistant Salmonella, and all 3 samples were from cull cattle.

  10. Ground-water flow and the potential effects of remediation at Graces Quarters, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tenbus, F.J.; Fleck, W.B.

    1996-01-01

    Ground water in the east-central part of Graces Quarters, a former open-air chemical-agent test facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds. The U.S. Geological Survey's finite- difference model was used to help understand ground-water flow and simulate the effects of alternative remedial actions to clean up the ground water. Scenarios to simulate unstressed conditions and three extraction well con- figurations were used to compare alternative remedial actions on the contaminant plume. The scenarios indicate that contaminants could migrate from their present location to wetland areas within 10 years under unstressed conditions. Pumping 7 gal/min (gallons per minute) from one well upgradient of the plume will not result in containment or removal of the highest contaminant concentrations. Pumping 7 gal/min from three wells along the central axis of the plume should result in containment and removal of dissolved contami- nants, as should pumping 7 gal/min from three wells at the leading edge of the plume while injecting 7 gal/min back into an upgradient well.

  11. Ground beetle assemblages across a habitat gradient in a stream watershed during 16 years of observation.

    PubMed

    Skłodowski, J

    2016-12-01

    Most studies on riverine ground beetle assemblages last 1-2 years, and studies on carabids from lowland stream ecosystems are rare. In 1999, a 16-year study was launched to gain insight into the structure and diversity of carabid assemblages in a cross-section of four habitats located beside a 5 m wide stream: Meadow (wet meadow), Clumps (meadow scattered with birch and willow clumps farther from the river), Birch (birch stand), and Pine (pine stand located the farthest from the stream). The total number of 14, 216 individuals representing 118 carabid species were collected. Eleven functional carabid groups have been analysed. Principal response curve analysis showed significant differences existing during the whole study period among carabid assemblages from the four habitats. Generalised Linear Mixed Models analysis revealed a dependence of Chao2 estimator performance on temperature and ground water level, whereas life traits of carabids depended solely on the latter factor, affecting species composition (i.e., proportions of autumn and spring breeders, large and small zoophages, hemizoophages, forest, generalists and open area species, wingless species, hygrophilous, mesophilous and xerophilous species). The lower the ground water level, the higher was the proportion of late-successional species. Both Chao2 value and the proportion of late-successional species were growing with the increasing distance from the stream, peaking in the Pine habitat. Early-successional fauna dominated in streamside assemblages. IndVal analysis identified 1-9 characteristic species for each habitat type, mostly non-recurrent during the study period. Thus, species composition of riverine carabid assemblages should be studied for longer periods than 1-2 years to avoid accidental observations.

  12. Broadband Ground Motion Observation and Simulation for the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, H.; Chimoto, K.; Yamanaka, H.; Tsuno, S.; Korenaga, M.; Yamada, N.; Matsushima, T.; Miyakawa, K.

    2016-12-01

    During the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, strong motion data were widely recorded by the permanent dense triggered strong motion network of K-NET/KiK-net and seismic intensity meters installed by local government and JMA. Seismic intensities close to the MMI 9-10 are recorded twice at the Mashiki town, and once at the Nishihara village and KiK-net Mashiki (KMMH16 ground surface). Near-fault records indicate extreme ground motion exceeding 400 cm/s in 5% pSv at a period of 1 s for the Mashiki town and 3-4 s for the Nishihara village. Fault parallel velocity components are larger between the Mashiki town and the Nishihara village, on the other hand, fault normal velocity components are larger inside the caldera of the Aso volcano. The former indicates rupture passed through along-strike stations, and the latter stations located at the forward rupture direction (e.g., Miyatake, 1999). In addition to the permanent observation, temporary continuous strong motion stations were installed just after the earthquake in the Kumamoto city, Mashiki town, Nishihara village, Minami-Aso village, and Aso town, (e.g., Chimoto et al., 2016; Tsuno et al., 2016; Yamanaka et al. 2016). This study performs to estimate strong motion generation areas for the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence using the empirical Green's function method, then to simulate broadband ground motions for both the permanent and temporary strong motion stations. Currently the target period range is between 0.1 s to 5-10 s due to the signal-to-noise ratio of element earthquakes used for the empirical Green's functions. We also care fault dimension parameters N within 4 to 10 to avoid spectral sags and artificial periodicity. The simulated seismic intensities as well as fault normal and parallel velocity components will be discussed.

  13. Cassini CIRS and Ground-Based Observations of Ephemeral Thermal Waves in Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn; Fletcher, Leigh; Flasar, F. Michael; Achterberg, Richard K.; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma

    One of the goals of the Cassini CIRS experiment was to detect and characterize zonally variable temperature waves in Saturn's atmosphere. Such waves are commonplace in Jupiter, particu-larly at mid-latitudes, and they were also detected in Saturn's atmosphere in 2003 and 2004 from ground-based mid-infrared observations that are sensitive to temperatures in Saturn's tro-posphere and stratosphere. However, from ground-based observations immediately preceding the Cassini arrival at Saturn in 2005 and in Cassini CIRS observations from 2005 through 2006, no such waves were detectable in either the troposphere or stratosphere. Finally such waves were detected: first in the stratosphere in 2006 and then in the troposphere in 2008, although tropospheric waves were difficult to detect in 2009. Throughout 2004-2009, amplitudes of these waves are generally higher in the southern hemisphere than in the north. Most of the power in these waves is in wavenumbers 8-10, and they are contiguous in longitude, but there are also some instances of limited wavetrains. For 2008, when waves were apparent in both troposphere and stratosphere, they were longitudinally coincident, although stratospheric waves were spread over a wider latitude range than in the troposphere. The time variability of the wave amplitudes is clearly varying on much shorter time scales than the Saturn's seasonal variability, which is on the order of decades. Similarly, there is no apparent relationship between the behavior of these waves and Saturn's low-latitude semi-annual oscillations (Orton et al. 2008 Nature 453, 196; Fouchet et al. 2008 Nature 453, 200).

  14. THE 2011 JUNE 23 STELLAR OCCULTATION BY PLUTO: AIRBORNE AND GROUND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Person, M. J.; Bosh, A. S.; Levine, S. E.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Zangari, A. M.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Sallum, S.; Dunham, E. W.; Collins, P.; Bida, T.; Bright, L.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Pandey, S.; Amrhein, D.; Tholen, D. J.; Taylor, B.; Wolf, J.; Pfueller, E.; Meyer, A.; and others

    2013-10-01

    On 2011 June 23, stellar occultations by both Pluto (this work) and Charon (future analysis) were observed from numerous ground stations as well as the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This first airborne occultation observation since 1995 with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory resulted in the best occultation chords recorded for the event, in three visible wavelength bands. The data obtained from SOFIA are combined with chords obtained from the ground at the IRTF, the U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station, and Leeward Community College to give the detailed state of the Pluto-Charon system at the time of the event with a focus on Pluto's atmosphere. The data show a return to the distinct upper and lower atmospheric regions with a knee or kink in the light curve separating them as was observed in 1988, rather than the smoothly transitioning bowl-shaped light curves of recent years. The upper atmosphere is analyzed by fitting a model to all of the light curves, resulting in a half-light radius of 1288 {+-} 1 km. The lower atmosphere is analyzed using two different methods to provide results under the differing assumptions of particulate haze and a strong thermal gradient as causes for the lower atmospheric diminution of flux. These results are compared with those from past occultations to provide a picture of Pluto's evolving atmosphere. Regardless of which lower atmospheric structure is assumed, results indicate that this part of the atmosphere evolves on short timescales with results changing the light curve structures between 1988 and 2006, and then reverting these changes in 2011 though at significantly higher pressures. Throughout these changes, the upper atmosphere remains remarkably stable in structure, again except for the overall pressure changes. No evidence of onset of atmospheric collapse predicted by frost migration models is seen, and the atmosphere appears to be remaining at a stable pressure level, suggesting it should

  15. Pluto’s Atmosphere from the 23 June 2011 Stellar Occultation: Airborne and Ground Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, Michael J.; Bosh, A. S.; Levine, S. E.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Zangari, A. M.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Dunham, E. W.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Pandey, S.; Armhein, D.; Sallum, S.; Tholen, D. J.; Collins, P.; Bida, T.; Taylor, B.; Wolf, J.; Meyer, A.; Pfueller, E.; Wiedermann, M.; Roesser, H.; Lucas, R.; Kakkala, M.; Ciotti, J.; Plunkett, S.; Hiraoka, N.; Best, W.; Pilger, E. L.; Miceli, M.; Springmann, A.; Hicks, M.; Thackeray, B.; Emery, J.; Rapoport, S.; Ritchie, I.

    2012-10-01

    The double stellar occultation by Pluto and Charon of 2011 June 23 was observed from numerous ground stations as well as the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This first airborne occultation observation since 1995 resulted in the best occultation chords recorded for the event, in three optical wavelength bands. The data obtained from SOFIA were combined with chords obtained from the ground at the IRTF (including a full spectral light curve), the USNO--Flagstaff Station, and Leeward Community College to give a detailed profile of Pluto’s atmosphere. The data show a return to the distinct upper and lower atmospheric regions with a knee, or kink in the light curves separating them as was observed in 1988 (Millis et al. 1993), rather than the smoothly transitioning bowl-shaped light curves of recent years (Elliot et al. 2007). We analyze the upper atmosphere by fitting a model to all of the light curves obtained, resulting in a half-light radius of 1288 ± 1 km. We analyze the lower atmosphere with two different methods to provide results under the separate assumptions of particulate haze and a strong thermal gradient. Results indicate that the lower atmosphere evolves on short seasonal timescales, changing between 1988 and 2006, and then returning to approximately the 1988 state in 2011, though at significantly higher pressures. Throughout these changes, the upper atmosphere remains remarkably stable in structure, again excepting the overall pressure changes. No evidence of the onset of atmospheric collapse predicted by frost migration models is yet seen, and the atmosphere appears to be remaining at a stable pressure level. This work was supported in part by NASA Planetary Astronomy grants to MIT (NNX10AB27G) and Williams College (NNX08AO50G, NNH11ZDA001N), as well as grants from USRA (#8500-98-003) and Ames Research (#NAS2-97-01) to Lowell Observatory.

  16. The 2011 June 23 Stellar Occultation by Pluto: Airborne and Ground Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, M. J.; Dunham, E. W.; Bosh, A. S.; Levine, S. E.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Zangari, A. M.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Babcock, B. A.; Pandey, S.; Amrhein, D.; Sallum, S.; Tholen, D. J.; Collins, P.; Bida, T.; Taylor, B.; Bright, L.; Wolf, J.; Meyer, A.; Pfueller, E.; Wiedemann, M.; Roeser, H.-P.; Lucas, R.; Kakkala, M.; Ciotti, J.; Plunkett, S.; Hiraoka, N.; Best, W.; Pilger, E. J.; Micheli, M.; Springmann, A.; Hicks, M.; Thackeray, B.; Emery, J. P.; Tilleman, T.; Harris, H.; Sheppard, S.; Rapoport, S.; Ritchie, I.; Pearson, M.; Mattingly, A.; Brimacombe, J.; Gault, D.; Jones, R.; Nolthenius, R.; Broughton, J.; Barry, T.

    2013-10-01

    On 2011 June 23, stellar occultations by both Pluto (this work) and Charon (future analysis) were observed from numerous ground stations as well as the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This first airborne occultation observation since 1995 with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory resulted in the best occultation chords recorded for the event, in three visible wavelength bands. The data obtained from SOFIA are combined with chords obtained from the ground at the IRTF, the U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station, and Leeward Community College to give the detailed state of the Pluto-Charon system at the time of the event with a focus on Pluto's atmosphere. The data show a return to the distinct upper and lower atmospheric regions with a knee or kink in the light curve separating them as was observed in 1988, rather than the smoothly transitioning bowl-shaped light curves of recent years. The upper atmosphere is analyzed by fitting a model to all of the light curves, resulting in a half-light radius of 1288 ± 1 km. The lower atmosphere is analyzed using two different methods to provide results under the differing assumptions of particulate haze and a strong thermal gradient as causes for the lower atmospheric diminution of flux. These results are compared with those from past occultations to provide a picture of Pluto's evolving atmosphere. Regardless of which lower atmospheric structure is assumed, results indicate that this part of the atmosphere evolves on short timescales with results changing the light curve structures between 1988 and 2006, and then reverting these changes in 2011 though at significantly higher pressures. Throughout these changes, the upper atmosphere remains remarkably stable in structure, again except for the overall pressure changes. No evidence of onset of atmospheric collapse predicted by frost migration models is seen, and the atmosphere appears to be remaining at a stable pressure level, suggesting it should persist

  17. Diurnal and seasonal behavior of the Hokkaido East SuperDARN ground backscatter: simulation and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinats, Alexey V.; Nishitani, Nozomu; Ponomarenko, Pavlo; Ratovsky, Konstantin G.

    2016-02-01

    We studied regular diurnal and seasonal behaviors of ground backscatter propagation characteristics corresponding to the Hokkaido East Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) (43.53° N, 143.61° E). Firstly, we simulated key propagation characteristics using a high frequency (HF) calculation technique based on the waveguide approach and International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)-2012 model as background ionosphere. The minimum slant range, skip distance, corresponding elevation angle, and true reflection height were considered in this study. The behaviors of these characteristics were well explained by diurnal and seasonal variations in the critical frequency and maximum height of corresponding ionosphere layer in HF reflection point. We estimated the accuracy of the standard SuperDARN mapping technique and proposed a means for its improvement. Secondly, we constructed an algorithm for mass data processing and extracted diurnal dependencies of the minimum slant range, corresponding elevation angle, and effective reflection height from the Hokkaido East SuperDARN dataset for a period from 2007 to 2014. The algorithm uses the simulated characteristics for distinguishing regular ground backscatter echoes propagating in the E and F2 HF channels. Observed monthly mean and simulated values of the characteristics were compared, and the result showed that the accuracy of IRI-2012 significantly depends on solar activity level and orientation of HF propagation path. In general, the difference between observed and simulated values decreased with increases in solar activity and azimuth. We also analyzed the occurrence of echoes originating behind the radar and found that they most frequently appear in winter and equinoxes before sunrise in beam #0 and after sunset in beam #15. The probability of their observation for a specific local time could reach up to 35 %.

  18. Observation of coastal fogs using a suite of ground based remote sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J. I.; Yum, S. S.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Cho, C. H.; Oh, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    Fog is the cloud of which the base is at the earth surface. Because of severely reduced visibility when fog is present, on-road traffics, maritime transport and aircraft operations are often hampered by fog occurrence. Therefore, accurate prediction of fog has been of high priority in traffic safety. The first step towards the accurate prediction of fog would be to detect the fog formation and monitor the evolution of fog in a continuous manner so that we can better characterize the fog formation mechanism. However, observing the evolution of fog has been difficult due to its nature of local meteorological scale and the lack of proper measurement of such scale. In situ measurements can provide us the most accurate data, but these measurements are limited to a very small spatial coverage. Satellite remote sensing can cover a wider spatial scale but detailed structure cannot be detected, In contrast, ground based remote sensing has advantages in spatial and temporal coverages. Here we present the data measured using a suite of ground based remote sensing instruments at the National Center for Intensive Observation of severe weather (NCIO), located at a southern coastal rural town of Boseong, Korea (34.76 ̊ N, 127.16 ̊ E), which include a scanning Ka-band cloud radar, wind profiler, microwave radiometer, ceilometer and lidar. Analysis of these data will be complemented by the basic meteorological (temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction) data measured at 11 different altitudes on a 300m meteorological observation tower installed at NCIO. With the sea to the south, the hilly topographical setting to the north, and the ragged coastal line in between, fog formation mechanisms in this region are expected to be very complex. Our eventual goal is to obtain an insight on the formation mechanisms of the coastal fogs in this region through the analysis of these comprehensive dataset. Some preliminary results from this effort will be presented at the

  19. Electrophysiological Potentials Reveal Cortical Mechanisms for Mental Imagery, Mental Simulation, and Grounded (Embodied) Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Schendan, Haline E.; Ganis, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Grounded cognition theory proposes that cognition, including meaning, is grounded in sensorimotor processing. The mechanism for grounding cognition is mental simulation, which is a type of mental imagery that re-enacts modal processing. To reveal top-down, cortical mechanisms for mental simulation of shape, event-related potentials were recorded to face and object pictures preceded by mental imagery. Mental imagery of the identical face or object picture (congruous condition) facilitated not only categorical perception (VPP/N170) but also later visual knowledge [N3(00) complex] and linguistic knowledge (N400) for faces more than objects, and strategic semantic analysis (late positive complex) between 200 and 700 ms. The later effects resembled semantic congruity effects with pictures. Mental imagery also facilitated category decisions, as a P3 peaked earlier for congruous than incongruous (other category) pictures, resembling the case when identical pictures repeat immediately. Thus mental imagery mimics semantic congruity and immediate repetition priming processes with pictures. Perception control results showed the opposite for faces and were in the same direction for objects: Perceptual repetition adapts (and so impairs) processing of perceived faces from categorical perception onward, but primes processing of objects during categorical perception, visual knowledge processes, and strategic semantic analysis. For both imagery and perception, differences between faces and objects support domain-specificity and indicate that cognition is grounded in modal processing. Altogether, this direct neural evidence reveals that top-down processes of mental imagery sustain an imagistic representation that mimics perception well enough to prime subsequent perception and cognition. Findings also suggest that automatic mental simulation of the visual shape of faces and objects operates between 200 and 400 ms, and strategic mental simulation operates between 400 and 700

  20. Electrophysiological potentials reveal cortical mechanisms for mental imagery, mental simulation, and grounded (embodied) cognition.

    PubMed

    Schendan, Haline E; Ganis, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Grounded cognition theory proposes that cognition, including meaning, is grounded in sensorimotor processing. The mechanism for grounding cognition is mental simulation, which is a type of mental imagery that re-enacts modal processing. To reveal top-down, cortical mechanisms for mental simulation of shape, event-related potentials were recorded to face and object pictures preceded by mental imagery. Mental imagery of the identical face or object picture (congruous condition) facilitated not only categorical perception (VPP/N170) but also later visual knowledge [N3(00) complex] and linguistic knowledge (N400) for faces more than objects, and strategic semantic analysis (late positive complex) between 200 and 700 ms. The later effects resembled semantic congruity effects with pictures. Mental imagery also facilitated category decisions, as a P3 peaked earlier for congruous than incongruous (other category) pictures, resembling the case when identical pictures repeat immediately. Thus mental imagery mimics semantic congruity and immediate repetition priming processes with pictures. Perception control results showed the opposite for faces and were in the same direction for objects: Perceptual repetition adapts (and so impairs) processing of perceived faces from categorical perception onward, but primes processing of objects during categorical perception, visual knowledge processes, and strategic semantic analysis. For both imagery and perception, differences between faces and objects support domain-specificity and indicate that cognition is grounded in modal processing. Altogether, this direct neural evidence reveals that top-down processes of mental imagery sustain an imagistic representation that mimics perception well enough to prime subsequent perception and cognition. Findings also suggest that automatic mental simulation of the visual shape of faces and objects operates between 200 and 400 ms, and strategic mental simulation operates between 400 and 700 ms.

  1. Global Fine Particulate Matter Concentrations and Trends Inferred from Satellite Observations, Modeling, and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Randall; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Boys, Brian; Philip, Sajeev; Lee, Colin; Snider, Graydon; Weagle, Crystal

    2014-05-01

    Outdoor fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is a leading environmentally-related cause of premature mortality worldwide. However, ground-level PM2.5 monitors remain sparse in many regions of the world. Satellite remote sensing from MODIS, MISR, and SeaWiFS yields a powerful global data source to address this issue. Global modeling (GEOS-Chem) plays a critical role in relating these observations to ground-level concentrations. The resultant satellite-based estimates of PM2.5 indicate dramatic variation around the world, with implications for global public health. A new ground-based aerosol network (SPARTAN) offers valuable measurements to understand the relationship between satellite observations of aerosol optical depth and ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. This talk will highlight recent advances in combining satellite remote sensing, global modeling, and ground-based measurements to improve understanding of global population exposure to outdoor fine particulate matter.

  2. The potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors to detect generic deviations from general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narikawa, Tatsuya; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the potential of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO, Virgo, and KAGRA to detect generic deviations of gravitational waveforms from the predictions of general relativity. We use the parameterized post-Einsteinian formalism to characterize the deviations, and assess what magnitude of deviations are detectable by using an approximate decision scheme based on Bayesian statistics. We find that there exist detectable regions of the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters for different binary masses from the observation of a single gravitational wave event. The regions are not excluded by currently existing binary pulsar observations for the parameterized post-Einsteinian parameters at higher post-Newtonian order. We also find that neglect of orbital eccentricity or tidal deformation effects do not cause a significant bias on the detectable region of generic deviations from general relativity.

  3. Ground-based observation of emission lines from the corona of a red-dwarf star.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J H; Wichmann, R

    2001-08-02

    All 'solar-like' stars are surrounded by coronae, which contain magnetically confined plasma at temperatures above 106 K. (Until now, only the Sun's corona could be observed in the optical-as a shimmering envelope during a total solar eclipse.) As the underlying stellar 'surfaces'-the photospheres-are much cooler, some non-radiative process must be responsible for heating the coronae. The heating mechanism is generally thought to be magnetic in origin, but is not yet understood even for the case of the Sun. Ultraviolet emission lines first led to the discovery of the enormous temperature of the Sun's corona, but thermal emission from the coronae of other stars has hitherto been detectable only from space, at X-ray wavelengths. Here we report the detection of emission from highly ionized iron (Fe XIII at 3,388.1 A) in the corona of the red-dwarf star CN Leonis, using a ground-based telescope. The X-ray flux inferred from our data is consistent with previously measured X-ray fluxes, and the non-thermal line width of 18.4 km s-1 indicates great similarities between solar and stellar coronal heating mechanisms. The accessibility and spectral resolution (45,000) of the ground-based instrument are much better than those of X-ray satellites, so a new window to the study of stellar coronae has been opened.

  4. Evaluations of Thin Cirrus Contamination and Screening in Ground Aerosol Observations Using Collocated Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hansell, Richard A.; Berkoff, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Cirrus clouds, particularly sub visual high thin cirrus with low optical thickness, are difficult to be screened in operational aerosol retrieval algorithms. Collocated aerosol and cirrus observations from ground measurements, such as the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET), provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to examine the susceptibility of operational aerosol products to thin cirrus contamination. Quality assured aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements were also tested against the CALIPSO vertical feature mask (VFM) and the MODIS-derived thin cirrus screening parameters for the purpose of evaluating thin cirrus contamination. Key results of this study include: (1) Quantitative evaluations of data uncertainties in AERONET AOT retrievals are conducted. Although AERONET cirrus screening schemes are successful in removing most cirrus contamination, strong residuals displaying strong spatial and seasonal variability still exist, particularly over thin cirrus prevalent regions during cirrus peak seasons, (2) Challenges in matching up different data for analysis are highlighted and corresponding solutions proposed, and (3) Estimation of the relative contributions from cirrus contamination to aerosol retrievals are discussed. The results are valuable for better understanding and further improving ground aerosol measurements that are critical for aerosol-related climate research.

  5. Education and Public Outreach for MSFC's Ground-based Observations in Support of the HESSI Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M.; Hagyard, M. J.; Newton, E.

    1999-05-01

    A primary focus of NASA is the advancement of science and the communication of these advances to a number of audiences, both within the science research community and outside it. The upcoming High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission and the MSFC ground-based observing program, provide an excellent opportunity to communicate our knowledge of the Sun, its cycle of activity, the role of magnetic fields in that activity, and its effect on our planet. In addition to ground-based support of the HESSI mission, MSFC's Solar Observatory, located in North Alabama, will involve students and the local education community in its day-to-day operations, an experience which is more immediate, personal, and challenging than their everyday educational experience. Further, by taking advantage of the Internet, our program can reach beyond the immediate community. By joining with Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, Georgia, we will leverage their almost 30 years' experience in science program delivery in diverse situations to a distance learning opportunity which can encompass the entire Southeast and beyond. This poster will outline our education and public outreach plans in support of the HESSI mission in which we will target middle and high school students and their teachers.

  6. Education and Public Outreach for MSFC's Ground-Based Observations in Support of the HESSI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Hagyard, Mona J.; Newton, Elizabeth K.

    1999-01-01

    A primary focus of NASA is the advancement of science and the communication of these advances to a number of audiences, both within the science research community and outside it. The upcoming High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission and the MSFC ground-based observing program, provide an excellent opportunity to communicate our knowledge of the Sun, its cycle of activity, the role of magnetic fields in that activity, and its effect on our planet. In addition to ground-based support of the HESSI mission, MSFC's Solar Observatory, located in North Alabama, will involve students and the local education community in its day-to-day operations, an experience which is more immediate, personal, and challenging than their everyday educational experience. Further, by taking advantage of the Internet, our program can reach beyond the immediate community. By joining with Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, Georgia, we will leverage their almost 30 years'experience in science program delivery in diverse situations to a distance learning opportunity which can encompass the entire Southeast and beyond. This poster will outline our education and public outreach plans in support of the HESSI mission in which we will target middle and high school students and their teachers.

  7. Ground-based very high energy gamma ray astronomy: Observational highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turver, K. E.

    1986-01-01

    It is now more than 20 years since the first ground based gamma ray experiments involving atmospheric Cerenkov radiation were undertaken. The present highlights in observational ground-based very high energy (VHE) gamma ray astronomy and the optimism about an interesting future for the field follow progress in these areas: (1) the detection at increased levels of confidence of an enlarged number of sources so that at present claims were made for the detection, at the 4 to 5 sd level of significance, of 8 point sources; (2) the replication of the claimed detections with, for the first time, confirmation of the nature and detail of the emission; and (3) the extension of gamma ray astronomy to the ultra high energy (UHE) domain. The pattern, if any, to emerge from the list of sources claimed so far is that X-ray binary sources appear to be copious emitters of gamma rays over at least 4 decades of energy. These X-ray sources which behave as VHE and UHE gamma ray emitters are examined.

  8. Precise Ground-In-the-Loop Orbit Control for Low Earth Observation Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbinger, C.; D'Amico, S.; Eineder, M.

    The growing interest in earth observation missions equipped with space-borne optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors drives the accuracy requirements with respect to orbit determination and control. Especially SAR interferometry with its capability to resolve the velocity of on-ground objects (e.g. for traffic monitoring, ocean currents and glacier monitoring) and to determine highly precise digital elevation models is of significant interest for scientific applications. These goals may be achieved using along-track and repeat-pass interferometry with a satellite formation, based on the precise orbit control of one satellite with respect to the osculating trajectory of the second satellite. Such a control concept will be realized by the German TerraSAR-X mission, with an expected launch in 2006, using a virtual formation, where a single satellite will be controlled in a tight manner with respect to a predefined osculating reference trajectory. This is very challenging, since common orbit disturbances, like for close twin formations, do not cancel out in this scenario. The predefined trajectory in the TerraSAR-X case could also be the orbit of a second satellite. The paper describes the generation of such a virtual reference orbit, discusses the ground-in-the-loop control concept and presents results from a long-term simulation.

  9. Education and Public Outreach for MSFC's Ground-Based Observations in Support of the HESSI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Hagyard, Mona J.; Newton, Elizabeth K.

    1999-01-01

    A primary focus of NASA is the advancement of science and the communication of these advances to a number of audiences, both within the science research community and outside it. The upcoming High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission and the MSFC ground-based observing program, provide an excellent opportunity to communicate our knowledge of the Sun, its cycle of activity, the role of magnetic fields in that activity, and its effect on our planet. In addition to ground-based support of the HESSI mission, MSFC's Solar Observatory, located in North Alabama, will involve students and the local education community in its day-to-day operations, an experience which is more immediate, personal, and challenging than their everyday educational experience. Further, by taking advantage of the Internet, our program can reach beyond the immediate community. By joining with Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, Georgia, we will leverage their almost 30 years'experience in science program delivery in diverse situations to a distance learning opportunity which can encompass the entire Southeast and beyond. This poster will outline our education and public outreach plans in support of the HESSI mission in which we will target middle and high school students and their teachers.

  10. Model vs. design sensitivity to the ground-truth problem of rainfall observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Chulsang; Ha, Eunho; Shin, Sha-Chul

    In this study three multi-dimensional rainfall models, the Waymire-Gupta-Rodriguez-Iturbe multi-dimensional rainfall model (WGR model) [Water Resour. Res. 20 (10) (1984) 1453], the noise forced diffusive rainfall model (NFD model) [J. Atmos. Ocean Technol. 6 (1989) 985] and the Yoo-Valdes-North model (YVN model) [Water Resour. Res. 32 (7) (1996) 2175], are compared with their applications to the ground-truth problem to capture the sensor bias using multiple raingauges. All the model parameters used are those estimated tuned to the GATE by Valdes et al. [J. Geophys. Res. (Atmos.) 95 (D3) (1990) 2101], North and Nakamoto [J. Atmos. Ocean Technol. 6 (1989) 985] and Yoo et al. [Water Resour. Res. 32 (7) (1996) 2175], respectively, and the root mean square errors (RMSEs) for each model are estimated to compare. The difference among models can be seen easily from the comparison of their spectra, which, in turn, affects the RMSEs for the ground-truth problem. Two conclusions could be deduced from the results of the study: (1) The rainfall model is the more crucial factor for the ground-truth problem than the ground-truth design. That is, the design factors, such as the number of raingauges, the size of the field of view (FOV), and the distance between the first and the last raingauges, were found to be much less sensitive to the RMSEs than the model itself. For example, the RMSEs estimated for a model could be more than twice of another model's, which could result in more than four times of satellite observations required to capture the sensor bias. However, twice the number of raingauges, twice the size of the FOV, or twice the length between the first and the last raingauges resulted in less than 20% difference of the RMSEs. (2) The model sensitivity is much higher than the parameter sensitivity to the RMSEs. For example, just about 25% difference of the RMSEs could be expected even when applying the NFD model parameters 100% bigger or smaller. Considering that the

  11. Assimilation of humidity and temperature observations retrieved from ground-based microwave radiometers into a convective-scale NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caumont, Olivier; Vincendon, Béatrice; Cimini, Domenico; Löhnert, Ulrich; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Bleisch, René; Buffa, Franco; Enrico Ferrario, Massimo; Haefele, Alexander; Huet, Thierry; Madonna, Fabio; Pace, Giandomenico

    2016-04-01

    Temperature and humidity retrievals from an international network of ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) have been collected to assess the potential of their assimilation into a convective-scale Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) system. Thirteen stations over a domain encompassing the western Mediterranean basin were considered for a time period of forty-one days in autumn, when heavy-precipitation events most often plague this area. Prior to their assimilation, MWR data were compared to very-short-term forecasts. Observation-minus-background statistics revealed some biases, but standard deviations were comparable to that obtained with radiosondes. The MWR data were then assimilated in a three-dimensional variational (3DVar) data assimilation system through the use of a rapid update cycle. A set of sensitivity experiments allowed assessing extensively the impact of the assimilation of temperature and humidity profiles, both separately and jointly. The respective benefit of MWR data and radiosonde data on analyses and forecasts was also investigated.

  12. Observation of γ vibrations and alignments built on non-ground-state configurations in 156Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majola, S. N. T.; Hartley, D. J.; Riedinger, L. L.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Allmond, J. M.; Beausang, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Cooper, N.; Curien, D.; Gall, B. J. P.; Garrett, P. E.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Kondev, F. G.; Kulp, W. D.; Lauritsen, T.; McCutchan, E. A.; Miller, D.; Piot, J.; Redon, N.; Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Werner, V.; Wang, X.; Wood, J. L.; Yu, C.-H.; Zhu, S.

    2015-03-01

    The exact nature of the lowest Kπ=2+ rotational bands in all deformed nuclei remains obscure. Traditionally they are assumed to be collective vibrations of the nuclear shape in the γ degree of freedom perpendicular to the nuclear symmetry axis. Very few such γ bands have been traced past the usual backbending rotational alignments of high-j nucleons. We have investigated the structure of positive-parity bands in the N =90 nucleus 156Dy , using the 148Nd(12C,4 n ) 156Dy reaction at 65 MeV, observing the resulting γ-ray transitions with the Gammasphere array. The even- and odd-spin members of the Kπ=2+ γ band are observed up to 32+ and 31+, respectively. This rotational band faithfully tracks the ground-state configuration to the highest spins. The members of a possible γ vibration built on the aligned yrast S band are observed up to spins 28+ and 27+. An even-spin positive-parity band, observed up to spin 24+, is a candidate for an aligned S band built on the seniority-zero configuration of the 02+ state at 676 keV. The crossing of this band with the 02+ band is at ℏ ωc=0.28 (1 ) MeV and is consistent with the configuration of the 02+ band not producing any blocking of the monopole pairing.

  13. Pulsating aurora observed on the ground and in-situ by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, M.; Cohen, I. J.; Denton, R. E.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Bounds, S. R.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Kurth, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Early observations and theory related to pulsating aurora suggested that the electrons that drive this aurora originate from the equatorial region of the magnetosphere and that a likely process that can scatter these electrons would involve chorus waves. Recent satellite observations during pulsating auroral events have provided important "firsts", including evidence of strong correlations between pulsating auroral patches and in-situ lower-band chorus (THEMIS), as well as correlations with energetic electron precipitation in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit (GOES). These results provide important information regarding particle dynamics, leading to a question about how the chorus might be driven. We present observations of the Van Allen Probes in conjunction with a pulsating aurora event, as confirmed by observations on the ground. The in-situ data again show the presence of lower-band chorus. However, magnetic and electric field data also show that the wave bursts coincide with an apparent poloidal field-line resonance, begging the question of whether the resonance might be responsible for driving the VLF waves.

  14. Characterization of Activity at Loki from Galileo and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, R. R.; Lopes, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    While Loki is the most active volcanic center on Io, major questions remain concerning the nature of that activity. Rathbun et al. showed that the activity was semi-periodic, and suggested it was due to a resurfacing wave which swept across a lava lake as the crust cooled and become unstable. However in 2001 new observations showed that an intermediate level, less periodic mode of activity had apparently begun. Galileo-NIMS observations of Loki clearly show that the highest temperatures are found near the edge of the patera, consistent with disruption of a lava lake at the margins. NIMS observations also show gradients in temperature across the patera which, when modeled in terms of lava cooling models, are generally consistent with ages expected for the resurfacing wave but may also be consistent with spreading flows. We present a further analysis of NIMS data from I24 and I32 which help define the nature of the temperature variations present in Loki patera, along with Galileo-SSI images from the G1-I32 flybys which show albedo changes apparently correlated with the "periodic" activity measured from ground-based observations.

  15. Coordinated Observations of Prominences with SUMER/CDS and Ground Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiik, J. E.; Schmieder, B.; Kucera, T.; Poland, A.

    An international campaign for the observation of prominences and filaments was successfully accomplished between June 3 and 9 1996. Several ground observatories took part in the campaign which included the space observatories SOHO and Yohkoh. The main objective of this campaign was to study the dynamics of prominences and the prominence-corona interface, the formation of filaments and the fine structures at different temperatures. We will reported on two Joint Observing Programmes of SUMER and CDS aboard SOHO (JOP 12 and JOP 17), which have been achieved. Finally we will present as an exemple a prominence observed on May 1, 1996 during the tests of the programme JOP 12. This prominence was associated with a CME (observed with LASCO). Very active parts with Dopplershifs up to +/- 36kms(-1) were measured in the SUMER spectra of the prominence, indicating the presence of twisted ropes during the eruption. Mean electron densities have spatial and temporal dispersion of one order of magnitude (10(9) - 10(10) cm(-3) ).

  16. Ground-based observations of MF/HF radio noise in the auroral zone

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherwax, A.T.; LaBelle, J.; Trimpi, M.L.; Brittain, R.; Treumann, R.A.

    1994-02-01

    Broadband noise enhancements in the frequency range of {approximately} 1.4-4.8 MHz have been observed with a ground-based receiver located at Two Rivers, Alaska (near Fairbanks). During the 5-month period from November 1991 to March 1992, eight broadband noise enhancements were recorded. A correlation is observed between the radio noise enhancements and magnetic activity recorded with the magnetometer in College, Alaska (45 km away). Initial examination of college ionosonde data also suggest that sporadic E is associated with the termination of some of the events. The enhancements are characterized by a low-frequency cutoff at {approximately} 1.4 MHz and a decrease in intensity near {approximately} 2.8 MHz, which roughly correspond to 1 and 2 times the ionospheric electron cyclotron frequency, respectively. Although some discrete man-made signals are observed to be enhanced during the events, the bulk of the broadband enhancements may be composed of natural signals. If natural, the observed spectral shape is consistent with calculations of synchrotron radiation combined with cyclotron absorption; in this case, these signals would be diagnostic of the hardness of the auroral electron energy spectrum. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Characterization of Activity at Loki from Galileo and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, R. R.; Lopes, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    While Loki is the most active volcanic center on Io, major questions remain concerning the nature of that activity. Rathbun et al. showed that the activity was semi-periodic, and suggested it was due to a resurfacing wave which swept across a lava lake as the crust cooled and become unstable. However in 2001 new observations showed that an intermediate level, less periodic mode of activity had apparently begun. Galileo-NIMS observations of Loki clearly show that the highest temperatures are found near the edge of the patera, consistent with disruption of a lava lake at the margins. NIMS observations also show gradients in temperature across the patera which, when modeled in terms of lava cooling models, are generally consistent with ages expected for the resurfacing wave but may also be consistent with spreading flows. We present a further analysis of NIMS data from I24 and I32 which help define the nature of the temperature variations present in Loki patera, along with Galileo-SSI images from the G1-I32 flybys which show albedo changes apparently correlated with the "periodic" activity measured from ground-based observations.

  18. THEMIS Ground-based magnetometer arrays and their education and public outreach potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, N. G.; Peticolas, L.; Larson, M.; Odenwald, S.; Russell, C. T.; Mende, S.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2004-05-01

    The THEMIS ground-based magnetometer array is unique in that 12 of the 20 magnetometers will be located at high schools and tribal colleges in the Northern United States as part of the THEMIS Education and Public Outreach plan. These magnetometers will help to teach students and teachers around the country about ground-based arrays, auroral physics, and space physics in general. This large ground-based array, together with an extensive THEMIS all-sky camera array in Canada and Alaska, will be used to determine the onset of substorms when the five THEMIS satellites are conjugate to these stations in the magnetotail. Because the twelve magnetometers that will be housed in schools are research-grade magnetometers, teachers and students will be able to learn about substorms using the same data which scientists will use. With the partnership of the Space Grant Consortium network, the Lawrence Hall of Science's Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) teacher network, and the OSS Broker Facilitators, we are currently selecting schools and teachers that meet a very particular set of criteria both from the science and the education point-of-view. A competition in each of the states is being held to find the school best suited to teach about and house the magnetometer. We will give the results of the schools selected to participate in the THEMIS ground-based magnetometer array and education and public outreach program. We will also discuss education materials being developed to facilitate how the data will be used in the schools. In addition, through the Student Observation Network (S.O.N.) of the Sun Earth Education Forum, we will become part of a national network of classrooms who are willing to learn more and predict space weather. We will also present a brief overview of our THEMIS education and public outreach programs' Informal Education and Teacher Professional Development.

  19. Explaining transgression in respiratory rate observation methods in the emergency department: A classic grounded theory analysis.

    PubMed

    Flenady, Tracy; Dwyer, Trudy; Applegarth, Judith

    2017-06-13

    Abnormal respiratory rates are one of the first indicators of clinical deterioration in emergency department(ED) patients. Despite the importance of respiratory rate observations, this vital sign is often inaccurately recorded on ED observation charts, compromising patient safety. Concurrently, there is a paucity of research reporting why this phenomenon occurs. To develop a substantive theory explaining ED registered nurses' reasoning when they miss or misreport respiratory rate observations. This research project employed a classic grounded theory analysis of qualitative data. Seventy-nine registered nurses currently working in EDs within Australia. Data collected included detailed responses from individual interviews and open-ended responses from an online questionnaire. Classic grounded theory (CGT) research methods were utilised, therefore coding was central to the abstraction of data and its reintegration as theory. Constant comparison synonymous with CGT methods were employed to code data. This approach facilitated the identification of the main concern of the participants and aided in the generation of theory explaining how the participants processed this issue. The main concern identified is that ED registered nurses do not believe that collecting an accurate respiratory rate for ALL patients at EVERY round of observations is a requirement, and yet organizational requirements often dictate that a value for the respiratory rate be included each time vital signs are collected. The theory 'Rationalising Transgression', explains how participants continually resolve this problem. The study found that despite feeling professionally conflicted, nurses often erroneously record respiratory rate observations, and then rationalise this behaviour by employing strategies that adjust the significance of the organisational requirement. These strategies include; Compensating, when nurses believe they are compensating for errant behaviour by enhancing the patient's outcome

  20. Eight-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Takashima, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Boersma, K. F.; Gast, L.; Wittrock, F.; Brunner, D.; Zhou, Y.; van Roozendael, M.

    2011-01-01

    We attempt for the first time to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 quantities from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations. The components retrieved are the aerosol extinction coefficients at two wavelengths, 357 and 476 nm and NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios. A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm, version 1 (JM1), is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N, 4.93° E), in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). Of the retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest-layer data (mean values at altitudes 0-1 km), where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, we find reasonable overall agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) and in situ observations performed at the 3 and 200 m height levels of the tall tower in Cabauw. Plumes of enhanced HCHO and SO2 were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, and an improvement in their emission strengths is suggested for better agreement between CHIMERE simulations and MAX-DOAS observations. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal spatial representativeness of MAX-DOAS observations is about 3-15 km (depending mainly on aerosol extinction), comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of current UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for the evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and can play an important role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  1. Eight-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Takashima, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Boersma, K. F.; Gast, L.; Wittrock, F.; Brunner, D.; Zhou, Y.; van Roozendael, M.

    2011-06-01

    We attempt for the first time to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 quantities from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations. The components retrieved are the aerosol extinction coefficients at two wavelengths, 357 and 476 nm, and NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios. A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm, version 1 (JM1), is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N, 4.93° E), in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). Of the retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest-layer data (mean values at altitudes 0-1 km), where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, we find reasonable overall agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) and in situ observations performed near the surface (2-3 m) and at the 200-m height level of the tall tower in Cabauw. Plumes of enhanced HCHO and SO2 were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, and an improvement in their emission strengths is suggested for better agreement between CHIMERE simulations and MAX-DOAS observations. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal spatial representativeness of MAX-DOAS observations is about 3-15 km (depending mainly on aerosol extinction), comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of current UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for the evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and can play an important role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  2. Assessment of nitrification potential in ground water using short term, single-well injection experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Baumgartner, L.K.; Miller, D.N.; Repert, D.A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrification was measured within a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, using a series of single-well injection tests. The aquifer contained a wastewater-derived contaminant plume, the core of which was anoxic and contained ammonium. The study was conducted near the downgradient end of the ammonium zone, which was characterized by inversely trending vertical gradients of oxygen (270 to 0 μM) and ammonium (19 to 625 μM) and appeared to be a potentially active zone for nitrification. The tests were conducted by injecting a tracer solution (ambient ground water + added constituents) into selected locations within the gradients using multilevel samplers. After injection, the tracers moved by natural ground water flow and were sampled with time from the injection port. Rates of nitrification were determined from changes in nitrate and nitrite concentration relative to bromide. Initial tests were conducted with 15N-enriched ammonium; subsequent tests examined the effect of adding ammonium, nitrite, or oxygen above background concentrations and of adding difluoromethane, a nitrification inhibitor. In situ net nitrate production exceeded net nitrite production by 3- to 6- fold and production rates of both decreased in the presence of difluoromethane. Nitrification rates were 0.02–0.28 μmol (L aquifer)−1 h−1 with in situ oxygen concentrations and up to 0.81 μmol (L aquifer)−1 h−1 with non-limiting substrate concentrations. Geochemical considerations indicate that the rates derived from single-well injection tests yielded overestimates of in situ rates, possibly because the injections promoted small-scale mixing within a transport-limited reaction zone. Nonetheless, these tests were useful for characterizing ground water nitrification in situ and for comparing potential rates of activity when the tracer cloud included non-limiting ammonium and oxygen concentrations.

  3. Potential mineralization of four herbicides in a ground water--fed wetland area.

    PubMed

    Larsen, L; Jørgensen, C; Aamand, J

    2001-01-01

    Herbicides may leach from agricultural fields into ground water feeding adjacent wetlands. However, only little is known of the fate of herbicides in wetland areas. The purpose of the study was to examine the potential of a riparian fen to mineralize herbides that could leach from an adjacent catchment area. Slurries were prepared from sediment and ground water collected from different parts of a wetland representing different redox conditions. The slurries were amended with O2, NO3-, SO4(2-), and CO2, or CO2 alone as electron acceptors to simulate the in situ conditions and their ability to mineralize the herbides mecoprop, metsulfuron-methyl, isoproturon and atrazine. In addition, the abundance of bacteria able to utilize O2, NO3-, SO4(2-) + CO2, and CO2 as electron acceptors was investigated along with the O2-reducing and methanogenic potential of the sediment. The recalcitrance to bacterial degradation depended on both the type of herbicide and the redox conditions pertaining. Mecoprop was the most readily degraded herbicide, with 36% of [ring-U-14C]mecoprop being mineralized to 14CO2 under aerobic conditions after 473 d. In comparison, approximately 29% of [phenyl-U-14C]metsulfuron-methyl and 16% of [ring-U-14C]isoproturon mineralized in aerobic slurries during the same period. Surprisingly, 8 to 13% of mecoprop also mineralized under anaerobic conditions. Neither metsulfuron-methyl nor isoproturon were mineralized under anaerobic conditions and atrazine was not mineralized under any of the redox conditions examined. The present study is the first to report mineralization of meco-prop in ground water in a wetland area, and the first to report mineralization of a phenoxyalcanoic acid herbicide under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  4. Comparison of Forest and Tundra Ecosystems Npp with Remote Sensing and Ground Observation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Yuliya; Ovchinnikova, Nataly; Kryazhimskiy, Fedor; Maklakov, Kirill

    2012-07-01

    In this study we compared two models for NPP estimate: an estimate based on satellite data and an estimate based on biomass calculation for tundra in the Yamal Peninsula and for forest ecosystems at the West Sayan Mountains. Ground NPP estimates were done for the same study areas which made it possible to identify the most significant parameters, specific to each model, that affect the estimates. The main difficulty in NPP-related studies is that current NPP values in an ecosystem cannot be determined exactly. Estimates, however, are feasible, and they can be made using a variety of methods. Thus, it seems important to see the ways in which these methods are different from each other and to find out how close the resulting values are. If these are dissimilar, the parameters used to make NPP estimates should be compared in order to identify the stage that can give rise to defects and errors, and to under- and overestimates. In this study we estimated NPP using the following two approaches: NPP calculation based on ground-truth measurements, such as calculation of plant phytomass on the studied area based on morphometric measurements (height, stem diameter, crown volume, etc.) and variations in this phytomass over a certain time period. NPP calculation based on satellite remote sensing data, using the data of satellite spectral channels and the data on underlying terrain. In this study we used MODIS/TERRA 8-day composite images, namely MOD09A1 and MOD11A2, with the spatial resolution 500 m and 1 km, respectively, obtained from EOS Data Gateway. Different models evaluate NPP using different physical values, with dissimilar temporal and spatial distributions. The NPP values evaluated by two models differ inherently. We used both of the models: GLO-PEM end MODIS-NPP. The study area is situated in the south of the Krasnoyarskii Krai, at the West Sayan Mountains, where the Institute of Forest SB RAS has been conducting observations since 1960. In this area altitudinal

  5. Ground deformation model for Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) from TEGETEIDE GNSS stations observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, A.; Carmona, J.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Pérez-Peña, A.; Ortiz, R.; Berrocoso, M.

    2009-04-01

    TEGETEIDE GNSS network is composed of seven benchmarks distributed over Tenerife Island, two of them are permanent stations. The whole network has been observed periodically from 2005 at least twice a year. Processed data using Bernese 5.0 software indicates different vector displacement pattern, as in magnitude as in direction, which expected from the African plate movement, suggesting the activity of other geodynamic process in the Island. The TEGETEIDE ground deformation model suggest the action not only the tectonics, but also the volcanic activity in an island where during 2004 a reawakening of the Teide volcano was detected. In this sense, the use of precise space-geodetic techniques to study the present-day dynamics of Tenerife is essential for a better knowledge and forecasting of the volcanic evolution during periods of crises, in an island of one million inhabitants and 5 million tourists a year.

  6. Visual observations of historical lake trout spawning grounds in western Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nester, Robert T.; Poe, Thomas P.

    1987-01-01

    Direct underwater video observations were made of the bottom substrates at 12 spawning grounds formerly used by lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in western Lake Huron to evaluate their present suitability for successful reproduction by lake trout. Nine locations examined north of Saginaw Bay in the northwestern end of the lake are thought to provide the best spawning habitat. The substrate at these sites consisted of angular rough cobble and rubble with relatively deep interstitial spaces (a?Y 0.5 m), small amounts of fine sediments, and little or no periphytic growth. Conditions at the three other sampling locations south of Saginaw Bay seemed much less suitable for successful reproduction based on the reduced area of high-quality substrate, shallow interstitial spaces, high infiltration of fine sediments, and greater periphytic growth.

  7. Earth's albedo variations 1998-2014 as measured from ground-based earthshine observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palle, E.; Goode, P. R.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Shumko, A.; Gonzalez-Merino, B.; Lombilla, C. Martinez; Jimenez-Ibarra, F.; Shumko, S.; Sanroma, E.; Hulist, A.; Miles-Paez, P.; Murgas, F.; Nowak, G.; Koonin, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Earth's albedo is a fundamental climate parameter for understanding the radiation budget of the atmosphere. It has been traditionally measured not only from space platforms but also from the ground for 16 years from Big Bear Solar Observatory by observing the Moon. The photometric ratio of the dark (earthshine) to the bright (moonshine) sides of the Moon is used to determine nightly anomalies in the terrestrial albedo, with the aim of quantifying sustained monthly, annual, and/or decadal changes. We find two modest decadal scale cycles in the albedo, but with no significant net change over the 16 years of accumulated data. Within the evolution of the two cycles, we find periods of sustained annual increases, followed by comparable sustained decreases in albedo. The evolution of the earthshine albedo is in remarkable agreement with that from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instruments, although each method measures different slices of the Earth's Bond albedo.

  8. Follow-up observations of Planck cold clumps with ground-based telescopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie

    2015-08-01

    Stars form in dense regions within molecular clouds, called pre-stellar cores (PSCs), which provide information on the initial conditions in the process of star formation. The low dust temperature (<14 K) of Planck cold clumps/cores makes them likely to be pre-stellar objects or at the very initial stage of protostellar collapse. We are conducting a legacy survey of Planck cold clumps with the JCMT, the TRAO 14-m, the KVN and TianMa 65-m telescopes. We aim to statistically study the initial conditions of star formation and cloud evolution in various kinds of environments. We have conducted some pilot observations with ground-based telescopes (JCMT, IRAM, PMO 14m, APEX, Mopra, Effelsberg 100 m, CSO and SMA). I will discuss the progress and the plans of this internationally collaborating project.

  9. Research on a UAV path planning method for ground observation based on threat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Fan, Xing; Xia, Xuezhi; Lin, Linshu

    2008-12-01

    The path planning method is one of the main research directions in current UAV(unmanned aerial vehicle) technologies. In this paper we perform analyses on the adversarial environment which may be broken through during the UAV mission for ground observation, and carry out the grade classification according to the threat level. On the basis of genetic algorithm, the encoding method of dimension reduction and direct quantization is used to combine the threat value of each leg with the flight distance, so as to construct the fitness evaluation function based on the threat amount and design the algorithm. This method is proven to be able to converge effectively and quickly via the simulation experiments, which meet the threat restriction and applicability of UAV in route planning.

  10. Comparison of land surface temperatures derived from satellite observations with ground truth during FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugita, M.; Brutsaert, W.

    1993-01-01

    Surface temperatures of the FIFE (First ISLSCP Field Experiment) experimental area derived from thermal infrared radiances recorded from different satellite platforms at different scales were compared with reference observations by means of infrared thermometers at ground stations distributed over the area. FIFE was conducted during late spring, summer and fall over an area of 15 km by 15 km in a hilly tall-grass prairie region in northeastern Kansas. The data available for this purpose were produced by AVHRR and TOVS instruments aboard NOAA-9 and NOAA-10, the TM instrument aboard Landsat-5, and VISSR instrument aboard GOES-7. The scales covered by these instruments span a wide range, namely between hundreds of meters (Landsat TM) and hundreds of kilometers (TOVS). The data are analyzed both with and without the application of an atmospheric correction.

  11. Studies of the dayside boundary layer processes based on ground observations in the Svalbard area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, A.; Holtet, J. A.; Sandholt, P. E.

    1994-01-01

    Based on extensive, diagnostic ground observations in the Svalbard area (mainly at Ny Alesund at 76 deg lambda) together with simultaneous, coordinated measurements from east Greenland, the EISCAT radars as well as DMSP satellite recordings, structures and dynamics of the dayside cleft and polar cap region have been obtained. This is an important prerequisite to the understanding of the physics of dayside boundary layers processes. Several papers have been published, many lectures given and a NATO Advanced Workshop related to this program arranged. Possible generation mechanisms of dayside cusp/cleft auroras including magnetic merging, external pressure pulses, Kelvin-Helmholtz-instabilities, and dynamo processes by intruding plasma elements are discussed. Characteristics of boundary layer process and their ionospheric effects are a major objective of these studies. The Fast Explorer project as well as the new EISCAT radar at Svalbard will give new dimension to our studies of temporal/spatial structures of dayside auroral processes.

  12. Comparison of land surface temperatures derived from satellite observations with ground truth during FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugita, M.; Brutsaert, W.

    1993-01-01

    Surface temperatures of the FIFE (First ISLSCP Field Experiment) experimental area derived from thermal infrared radiances recorded from different satellite platforms at different scales were compared with reference observations by means of infrared thermometers at ground stations distributed over the area. FIFE was conducted during late spring, summer and fall over an area of 15 km by 15 km in a hilly tall-grass prairie region in northeastern Kansas. The data available for this purpose were produced by AVHRR and TOVS instruments aboard NOAA-9 and NOAA-10, the TM instrument aboard Landsat-5, and VISSR instrument aboard GOES-7. The scales covered by these instruments span a wide range, namely between hundreds of meters (Landsat TM) and hundreds of kilometers (TOVS). The data are analyzed both with and without the application of an atmospheric correction.

  13. SVIRCO data for Ground-Level Enhancements observed during solar cycle 23 (*)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storini, Marisa

    S.V.I.R.CO. (Studio Variazioni Intensita' Raggi COsmici) Observatory and TPL (Terrestrial Physics Laboratory) Unit of IFSI-Roma performs measurements of the nucleonic component of cosmic rays since May 1997 at the Physics Department of Roma Tre University. Recorded 5-min data with a standard neutron monitor were carefully checked and the international files for the analysis of Ground-Level Enhancements (GLEs) were prepared for the complete solar cycle 23. Data refer to sixteen GLEs observed by the world-wide cosmic-ray network from November 6, 1997 to December 12, 2006. A summary of the obtained results is here presented. (*) This work is a contribution to the European NMDB Project and it was supported by ASI contract I/015/07/0

  14. Crevice Repassivation Potentials for Alloy 22 in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Evans, K J; Ilevbare, G O

    2006-11-08

    The resistance of Alloy 22 (N06022) to localized corrosion, mainly crevice corrosion, has been extensively investigated in the last few years. However, the behavior of Alloy 22 in concentrated aqueous solutions that may simulate concentrated ground waters was not fully understood. Systematic electrochemical tests using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization as well as the Tsujikawa-Hisamatsu electrochemical method were performed to determine the crevice corrosion susceptibility of Alloy 22 in simulated concentrated water (SCW), simulated acidified water (SAW) and basic saturated water (BSW). Results show that Alloy 22 is immune to crevice corrosion in SCW and SAW but may suffer crevice corrosion initiation in BSW. Results also show that in a naturally aerated environment, the corrosion potential would never reach the critical potential for crevice corrosion initiation.

  15. Coincident Observation of Lightning using Spaceborne Spectrophotometer and Ground-Level Electromagnetic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adachi, Toru; Cohen, Morris; Li, Jingbo; Cummer, Steve; Blakeslee, Richard; Marshall, THomas; Stolzenberg, Maribeth; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Su, Han-Tzong; hide

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims at assessing a possible new way to reveal the properties of lightning flash, using spectrophotometric data obtained by FORMOSAT-2/ISUAL which is the first spaceborne multicolor lightning detector. The ISUAL data was analyzed in conjunction with ground ]based electromagnetic data obtained by Duke magnetic field sensors, NLDN, North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) electric field antennas. We first classified the observed events into cloud ]to ]ground (CG) and intra ]cloud (IC) lightning based on the Duke and NLDN measurements and analyzed ISUAL data to clarify their optical characteristics. It was found that the ISUAL optical waveform of CG lightning was strongly correlated with the current moment waveform, suggesting that it is possible to evaluate the electrical properties of lightning from satellite optical measurement to some extent. The ISUAL data also indicated that the color of CG lightning turned to red at the time of return stroke while the color of IC pulses remained unchanged. Furthermore, in one CG event which was simultaneously detected by ISUAL and LMA, the observed optical emissions slowly turned red as the altitude of optical source gradually decreased. All of these results indicate that the color of lightning flash depends on the source altitude and suggest that spaceborne optical measurement could be a new tool to discriminate CG and IC lightning. In the presentation, we will also show results on the comparison between the ISUAL and KSC electric field data to clarify characteristics of each lightning process such as preliminary breakdown, return stroke, and subsequent upward illumination.

  16. Development of hybrid fog detection algorithm (FDA) using satellite and ground observation data for nighttime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So-Hyeong; Han, Ji-Hae; Suh, Myoung-Seok

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we developed a hybrid fog detection algorithm (FDA) using AHI/Himawari-8 satellite and ground observation data for nighttime. In order to detect fog at nighttime, Dual Channel Difference (DCD) method based on the emissivity difference between SWIR and IR1 is most widely used. DCD is good at discriminating fog from other things (middle/high clouds, clear sea and land). However, it is difficult to distinguish fog from low clouds. In order to separate the low clouds from the pixels that satisfy the thresholds of fog in the DCD test, we conducted supplementary tests such as normalized local standard derivation (NLSD) of BT11 and the difference of fog top temperature (BT11) and air temperature (Ta) from NWP data (SST from OSTIA data). These tests are based on the larger homogeneity of fog top than low cloud tops and the similarity of fog top temperature and Ta (SST). Threshold values for the three tests were optimized through ROC analysis for the selected fog cases. In addition, considering the spatial continuity of fog, post-processing was performed to detect the missed pixels, in particular, at edge of fog or sub-pixel size fog. The final fog detection results are presented by fog probability (0 100 %). Validation was conducted by comparing fog detection probability with the ground observed visibility data from KMA. The validation results showed that POD and FAR are ranged from 0.70 0.94 and 0.45 0.72, respectively. The quantitative validation and visual inspection indicate that current FDA has a tendency to over-detect the fog. So, more works which reducing the FAR is needed. In the future, we will also validate sea fog using CALIPSO data.

  17. Coincident observation of lightning using spaceborne spectrophotometer and ground-level electromagnetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, T.; Cohen, M.; Lu, G.; Cummer, S. A.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Marshall, T.; Stolzenburg, M.; Karunarathne, S.; Hsu, R.; Su, H.; Chen, A. B.; Takahashi, Y.; Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.

    2012-12-01

    The present study aims at assessing a new way to reveal properties of lightning flash, using the spectrophotometric data obtained by FORMOSAT-2/ISUAL which is the first spaceborne multicolor lightning detector. The ISUAL data was analyzed in conjunction with ground-based electromagnetic data obtained by Duke magnetic field sensors, NLDN, North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), and University of Mississippi (UM) electric field change antennas operated around Kennedy Space Center. We first classified the observed events into cloud-to-ground (CG) and intra-cloud (IC) lightning based on the Duke and NLDN measurements and analyzed ISUAL data to clarify their optical characteristics. It was found that the ISUAL optical waveform of CG lightning was strongly correlated with the current moment waveform, suggesting that it is possible to evaluate the electrical properties of lightning from satellite optical measurement to some extent. The ISUAL data also indicated that the color of CG lightning turned to red at the time of return stroke while the color of IC pulses remained unchanged. Furthermore, in one CG event which was simultaneously detected by ISUAL and LMA, the observed optical emissions slowly turned red as the altitude of optical source gradually decreased. All of these results indicate that the color of lightning flash depends on the source altitude and suggest that spaceborne optical measurement could be a new tool to discriminate CG and IC lightning. In the presentation, we will also show results on the comparison between the ISUAL and UM electric field change data to clarify characteristics of each lightning process such as preliminary breakdown and return stroke.

  18. Evaluation of satellite soil moisture products over Norway using ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesfeller, A.; Lahoz, W. A.; Jeu, R. A. M. de; Dorigo, W.; Haugen, L. E.; Svendby, T. M.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we evaluate satellite soil moisture products from the advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over Norway using ground-based observations from the Norwegian water resources and energy directorate. The ASCAT data are produced using the change detection approach of Wagner et al. (1999), and the AMSR-E data are produced using the VUA-NASA algorithm (Owe et al., 2001, 2008). Although satellite and ground-based soil moisture data for Norway have been available for several years, hitherto, such an evaluation has not been performed. This is partly because satellite measurements of soil moisture over Norway are complicated owing to the presence of snow, ice, water bodies, orography, rocks, and a very high coastline-to-area ratio. This work extends the European areas over which satellite soil moisture is validated to the Nordic regions. Owing to the challenging conditions for soil moisture measurements over Norway, the work described in this paper provides a stringent test of the capabilities of satellite sensors to measure soil moisture remotely. We show that the satellite and in situ data agree well, with averaged correlation (R) values of 0.72 and 0.68 for ASCAT descending and ascending data vs in situ data, and 0.64 and 0.52 for AMSR-E descending and ascending data vs in situ data for the summer/autumn season (1 June-15 October), over a period of 3 years (2009-2011). This level of agreement indicates that, generally, the ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture products over Norway have high quality, and would be useful for various applications, including land surface monitoring, weather forecasting, hydrological modelling, and climate studies. The increasing emphasis on coupled approaches to study the earth system, including the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, will benefit from the availability of validated and improved soil moisture satellite datasets, including those

  19. Sounding rocket/ground-based observation campaign to study Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Saito, A.; Otsuka, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Abe, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ishisaka, K.; Saito, S.; Larsen, M.; Pfaff, R. F.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    An observation campaign is under preparation. It is to launch sounding rockets S-520-27 and S-310-42 from Uchinoura Space Center of JAXA while ground-based instruments measure waves in the ionosphere. It is scheduled in July/August 2013. The main purpose of the experiment is to reveal generation mechanism of Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance (MSTID). The MSTID is the ionospheric wave with 1-2 hour periodicity, 100-200 km horizontal wavelength, and southwestward propagation. It is enhanced in the summer nighttime of the mid-latitude ionosphere. The MSTID is not only a simple atmospheric-wave modulation of the ionosphere, but shows similarity to characteristics of the Perkins instability. A problem is that growth rate of the Perkins instability is too small to explain the phenomena. We now hypothesize a generation mechanism that electromagnetic coupling of the F- and E-regions help rapid growth of the MSTID especially at its initial stage. In the observation campaign, we will use the sounding rocket S-520-27 for in-situ measurement of ionospheric parameters, i.e., electron density and electric fields. Wind velocity measurements in both F- and E-regions are very important as well. For the F-region winds, we will conduct Lithium-release experiment under the full-moon condition. This is a big technical challenge. Another rocket S-310-42 will be used for the E-region wind measurement with the TMA release. On the ground, we will use GEONET (Japanese vast GPS receiver network) to monitor horizontal distribution of GPS-TEC on the realtime bases. In the presentation we will show MSTID characteristics and the proposed generation mechanism, and discuss plan and current status of the project.

  20. Ground-based Observations and Atmospheric Modelling of Energetic Electron Precipitation Effects on Antarctic Mesospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, D.; Clilverd, M. A.; Horne, R. B.; Rodger, C. J.; Seppälä, A.; Verronen, P. T.; Andersson, M. E.; Marsh, D. R.; Hendrickx, K.; Megner, L. S.; Kovacs, T.; Feng, W.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the seasonal and diurnal abundances of nitric oxide (NO) and ozone in the Antarctic middle atmosphere during March 2013 to July 2014 is investigated. Geomagnetic storm activity during this period, close to solar maximum, was driven primarily by impulsive coronal mass ejections. Near-continuous ground-based atmospheric measurements have been made by a passive millimetre-wave radiometer deployed at Halley station (75°37'S, 26°14'W, L = 4.6), Antarctica. This location is directly under the region of radiation-belt EEP, at the extremity of magnetospheric substorm-driven EEP, and deep within the polar vortex during Austral winter. Superposed epoch analyses of the ground based data, together with NO observations made by the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) onboard the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite, show enhanced mesospheric NO following moderate geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤ -50 nT). Measurements by co-located 30 MHz riometers indicate simultaneous increases in ionisation at 75-90 km directly above Halley when Kp index ≥ 4. Direct NO production by EEP in the upper mesosphere, versus downward transport of NO from the lower thermosphere, is evaluated using a new version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model incorporating the full Sodankylä Ion Neutral Chemistry Model (WACCM SIC). Model ionization rates are derived from the Polar orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) second generation Space Environment Monitor (SEM 2) Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector instrument (MEPED). The model data are compared with observations to quantify the impact of EEP on stratospheric and mesospheric odd nitrogen (NOx), odd hydrogen (HOx), and ozone.

  1. Empirical relationships between instrumental ground motions and observed intensities for two great Chilean subduction zone earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilia, M. G.; Baker, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    We determine empirical relationships between instrumental peak ground motions and observed intensities for two great Chilean subduction earthquakes: the 2010 Mw8.8 Maule earthquake and the 2014 Mw8.2 Iquique earthquake. Both occurred immediately offshore on the primary plate boundary interface between the Nazca and South America plates. They are among the largest earthquakes to be instrumentally recorded; the 2010 Maule event is the second largest earthquake to produce strong motion recordings. Ground motion to intensity conversion equations (GMICEs) are used to reconstruct the distribution of shaking for historical earthquakes by using intensities estimated from contemporary accounts. Most great (M>8) earthquakes, like these, occur within subduction zones, yet few GMICEs exist for subduction earthquakes. It is unclear whether GMICEs developed for active crustal regions, such as California, can be scaled up to the large M of subduction zone events, or if new data sets must be analyzed to develop separate subduction GMICEs. To address this question, we pair instrumental peak ground motions, both acceleration (PGA) and velocity (PGV), with intensities derived from onsite surveys of earthquake damage made in the weeks after the events and internet-derived felt reports. We fit a linear predictive equation between the geometric mean of the maximum PGA or PGV of the two horizontal components and intensity, using linear least squares. We use a weighting scheme to express the uncertainty of the pairings based on a station's proximity to the nearest intensity observation. The intensity data derived from the onsite surveys is a complete, high-quality investigation of the earthquake damage. We perform the computations using both the survey data and community decimal intensities (CDI) calculated from felt reports volunteered by citizens (USGS "Did You Feel It", DYFI) and compare the results. We compare the GMICEs we developed to the most widely used GMICEs from California and

  2. The 8-component retrievals from ground-based MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Takashima, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Boersma, F.; Gast, L.; Wittrock, F.; van Roozendael, M.

    2010-12-01

    We first attempt to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information on 8 components from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations. Components retrieved are aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) at two wavelengths 357 and 476 nm, NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios (VMRs). A Japanese MAX-DOAS profile retrieval algorithm version 1 (JM1) is applied to observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97N, 4.93E) in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). Of retrieved profiles, we focus here on the lowest layer data (mean values at altitudes 0-1 km), where the sensitivity is usually highest owing to the longest light path. In support of the capability of the multi-component retrievals, overall we find reasonable agreement with independent data sets, including a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) and in situ observations performed at 3- and 200-m height levels of a tower placed in Cabauw. Enhanced HCHO and SO2 plumes were likely affected by biogenic and ship emissions, respectively, but an improvement in their emission strengths was suggested for better agreement. Analysis of air mass factors indicates that the horizontal representativeness of MAX-DOAS observation is about 3-15 km, comparable to or better than the spatial resolution of relevant UV-visible satellite observations and model calculations. These demonstrate that MAX-DOAS provides multi-component data useful for evaluation of satellite observations and model calculations and plays a role in bridging different data sets having different spatial resolutions.

  3. Observing the inflation potential. [in models of cosmological inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Kolb, Edward W.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Lidsey, James E.

    1993-01-01

    We show how observations of the density perturbation (scalar) spectrum and the gravitational wave (tensor) spectrum allow a reconstruction of the potential responsible for cosmological inflation. A complete functional reconstruction or a perturbative approximation about a single scale are possible; the suitability of each approach depends on the data available. Consistency equations between the scalar and tensor spectra are derived, which provide a powerful signal of inflation.

  4. The Effect of Pulsar Timing Noise and Glitches on Timing Analysis for Ground Based Telescopes Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; de Jager, O. C.; Contreras, J. L.; de los Reyes, R.; Fonseca, V.; López, M.; Lucarelli, F.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    Pulsed emission from a number of gamma-ray pulsars is expected to be detectable with next generation ground-based gamma-ray telescopes such as MAGIC and possibly H.E.S.S. within a few hours of observations. The sensitivity is however not sufficient to enable a detection within a few seconds as reached by radio surveys. In some cases we may be fortunate to do a period search given a few hours' data, but if the signal is marginal, the correct period parameters must be known to allow a folding of the gamma-ray arrival times. The residual phases are then sub jected to a test for uniformity from which the significance of a signal can be assessed. If contemporary radio parameters are not available, we have to extrap olate archival radio parameters to the observation time in question. Such an extrap olation must then be accurate enough to avoid significant pulse smearing. The pulsar ephemerides from the archival data of HartRAO and Princeton (b etween 1989 and 1998) provide an excellent opportunity to study the accuracy of extrap olations of such ephemerides to the present moment, if an appropriate time shift is intro duced. The aim of this study is to investigate the smear in the gamma-ray pulse profile during a single night of observations.

  5. Using Aoristic Analysis to Link Remote and Ground-Level Phenological Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henebry, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Phenology is about observing events in time and space. With the advent of publically accessible geospatial datastreams and easy to use mapping software, specifying where an event occurs is much less of a challenge than it was just two decades ago. In contrast, specifying when an event occurs remains a nontrivial function of a population of organismal responses, sampling interval, compositing period, and reporting precision. I explore how aoristic analysis can be used to analyzing spatiotemporal events for which the location is known to acceptable levels of precision but for which temporal coordinates are poorly specified or only partially bounded. Aoristic analysis was developed in the late 1990s in the field of quantitative criminology to leverage temporally imprecise geospatial data of crime reports. Here I demonstrate how aoristic analysis can be used to link remotely sensed observations of land surface phenology to ground-level observations of organismal phenophase transitions. Explicit representation of the windows of temporal uncertainty with aoristic weights enables cross-validation exercises and forecasting efforts to avoid false precision.

  6. Observation of methane in this decade by ground-based FTIR Spectrometer over Poker Flat, ALASKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y.; Kagawa, A.; Jones, N. B.; Murayama, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Tropospheric CH4 is an important greenhouse gas as second largest radiative forcing in the troposphere with a long lifetime of ~10 years (Rinsland et. al., 2005). Poker Flat is a suitable location to detect CH4 abnormally due to Siberian/Alaskan biomass burning (Kasai et. al., 2005), volcano, and an anthropogenical emissions such as gas leakage from pipe-lines. We have been observed troposheric CH4 over 10 years between 2000-2010 by using ground-based spectroscopic infrared solar absorption remote sensing measurement over Poker Flat, ALASKA (65.11N, 147.42W, 0.61km). CH4 vertical profiles were obtained by using SFIT2 ver.3.9 which incorporates Rodgers’ formulation of the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM) with an iterative Newton scheme (Rodgers, 2000). Frequency region of the CH4 is used 2600-2900 cm-1 region with the resolution 0.036cm-1. Seasonal and annual variation of the tropospheric CH4 in this decades was obtained. Increasing trend of tropospheric CH4 was observed. Several enhancement and depletion events were also observed.

  7. Multi-instrument observations of midlatitude summer nighttime anomaly from satellite and ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Thampi, Smitha V.; Liu, Huixin; Lin, Charles

    "Midlatitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly (MSNA)" is a phenomenon that the nighttime elec-tron densities exceed the daytime values on almost all days in summer over latitudes of 33-34N of more. We recently found the MSNA over the northeast Asian region from multi-instrument observations. The observations include the tomography analysis based on the chain of digital beacon receivers at Shionomisaki (33.45N, 135.8E), Shigaraki (34.85N, 136.1E), and Fukui (36.06N,136E), the ionosonde network over Japan (especially data from Wakkanai (45.4N, 141.7E)), ground-based GPS TEC observations using the GEONET. Also from satellites, CHAMP in situ electron density measurements, and Formosat3/COSMIC (F3/C) occultation measurements are useful to confirm the presence of MSNA over this region. In the presen-tation we show detailed features of the MSNA based on these multi-instrument, and discuss importance of the neutral atmosphere as a driver of the phenomenon.

  8. Characterization of absorbing aerosol types using ground and satellites based observations over an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibi, Samina; Alam, Khan; Chishtie, Farrukh; Bibi, Humera

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, for the first time, an effort has been made to seasonally characterize the absorbing aerosols into different types using ground and satellite based observations. For this purpose, optical properties of aerosol retrieved from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were utilized over Karachi for the period 2012 to 2014. Firstly, OMI AODabs was validated with AERONET AODabs and found to have a high degree of correlation. Then, based on this validation, characterization was conducted by analyzing aerosol Fine Mode Fraction (FMF), Angstrom Exponent (AE), Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Aerosol Index (AI) and their mutual correlation, to identify the absorbing aerosol types and also to examine the variability in seasonal distribution. The absorbing aerosols were characterized into Mostly Black Carbon (BC), Mostly Dust and Mixed BC & Dust. The results revealed that Mostly BC aerosols contributed dominantly during winter and postmonsoon whereas, Mostly Dust were dominant during summer and premonsoon. These types of absorbing aerosol were also confirmed with MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) observations.

  9. Retrieval of ammonia from ground-based FTIR measurements and its use for validation of satellite observations by IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammers, Enrico; Palm, Mathias; Warneke, Thorsten; Van Damme, Martin; Smale, Daniel; Vigouroux, Corinne; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Notholt, Justus; Willem Erisman, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric Ammonia (NH3) has a major impact on human health and ecosystem services and plays a major role in the formation of aerosols [Erisman et al.,2013; Paulot and Jacob 2014]. NH3 concentrations are highly variable in space and time with overall short lifetime due to deposition and aerosol formation. The global atmospheric budget of nitrogen and in turn NH3 is still uncertain which asks for more ground-based and satellite observations around the world. Recent papers have described the possibility to measure NH3 with satellite infrared sounders which open up the way for calculations of global and regional nitrogen budgets [Clarisse et al 2009,Van Damme et al 2014a]. Validation of the satellite observations is essential to determine the uncertainty in the signal and its potential use. So far available surface layer observations of atmospheric NH3 concentrations have been used for comparisons with total columns retrieved from satellite observations [Van Damme 2014b]. We developed a retrieval for NH3 column density concentrations (molecules NH3/cm2) by fitting a set of spectral windows to ground-based solar absorption Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements with the spectral fitting program SFIT4 [Hase et al., 2004]. The retrieval is then applied to FTIR measurements from a set of spectrometer sites from the Network for detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) to retrieve NH3 columns for the sites located in Bremen, Germany; Lauder, New Zealand; Jungfraujoch, Switzerland; and the island of Reunion, France. Using eight years (2005-2013) of retrieved NH3 columns clear seasonal cycles are observed for each of the stations. Maximum concentrations can be related to NH3 emission sources, specific for the regions. A comparison between the retrieved NH3 columns and observations from the recent IASI- NH3 product [Van Damme et al, 2014a] using strict spatial and temporal criteria for the selection of observations showed a good correlation (R=0.82; slope=0

  10. Mars Aeolian Features and Processes Observed Concurrently From Orbit and the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, R.; Arvidson, R.; Cabrol, N.; Christensen, P.; de Souza, P.; Geissler, P.; Goetz, W.; Landis, G.; Lemmon, M.; Malin, M.; McEwen, A.; Neukum, G.; Pendleton Hoffer, M.; Squyres, S.; Sullivan, R.; Waller, D.; Williams, D.

    2008-12-01

    The last four years have provided the opportunity to study Mars through the concurrent operation of orbiters and rovers to observe processes related to active winds. Data have been obtained on the characteristics of active sand and dust at the MER sites for comparisons with features and active processes seen from orbit. Combined with modeling, results give new insight into surface modification by windblown material. For example, the operation area of Spirit seen from orbit is criss-crossed with dark linear features thought to be tracks left by dust devils (DD). The rover traversed one track and obtained Microscopic Imager data showing that sand grains within the track are relatively clear of dust, while those outside the track are partly mantled with dust. Subsequent observations show that as active DD cross the plains (entraining dust into the atmosphere) they leave behind low-albedo tracks, which are later gradually obscured by settling of dust. The rate of deposition can be calculated from the solar panel output and appears to be continuous, proportional to optical depth τ, minus a constant. Dust removal from the panels is in discrete episodes. Observations of terrain and the atmosphere were made from the ground and from orbit: 1) before the dust devil "season" (τ = 0.578), 2) during active dust devil formation (τ = 0.918), 3) after active dust devil formation, but during active dust clouds (τ = 2.061), and 4) after clearing of dust from the atmosphere (τ = 0.487). Results were compared with temperatures derived from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer for the relevant seasons. Results suggest that spring heating of the surface enhances DD formation, but as atmospheric dust-loading progresses, active DD "shut-off," possibly because atmospheric conditions become thermally stable. In addition to dust activity, movement of coarser grains (i.e., "sand") has also been observed. For example, MOC, HiRISE, THEMIS, and HRSC images from orbit show abundant bedforms

  11. Evaluation of atmospheric dust prediction models using ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terradellas, Enric; María Baldasano, José; Cuevas, Emilio; Basart, Sara; Huneeus, Nicolás; Camino, Carlos; Dundar, Cinhan; Benincasa, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    An important step in numerical prediction of mineral dust is the model evaluation aimed to assess its performance to forecast the atmospheric dust content and to lead to new directions in model development and improvement. The first problem to address the evaluation is the scarcity of ground-based routine observations intended for dust monitoring. An alternative option would be the use of satellite products. They have the advantage of a large spatial coverage and a regular availability. However, they do have numerous drawbacks that make the quantitative retrievals of aerosol-related variables difficult and imprecise. This work presents the use of different ground-based observing systems for the evaluation of dust models in the Regional Center for Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (SDS-WAS). The dust optical depth at 550 nm forecast by different models is regularly compared with the AERONET measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) for 40 selected stations. Photometric measurements are a powerful tool for remote sensing of the atmosphere allowing retrieval of aerosol properties, such as AOD. This variable integrates the contribution of different aerosol types, but may be complemented with spectral information that enables hypotheses about the nature of the particles. Comparison is restricted to cases with low Ångström exponent values in order to ensure that coarse mineral dust is the dominant aerosol type. Additionally to column dust load, it is important to evaluate dust surface concentration and dust vertical profiles. Air quality monitoring stations are the main source of data for the evaluation of surface concentration. However they are concentrated in populated and industrialized areas around the Mediterranean. In the present contribution, results of different models are compared with observations of PM10 from the Turkish air quality network for

  12. Fine spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emission observed by ground-based radio telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radio emission in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of a complicated interaction between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying the free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from few MHz up to 40 MHz. This emission is generated via cyclotron maser mechanism in sources located along Jovian magnetic field lines. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAMexhibits different complex spectral structures. We present the observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN- 2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. This telescope is one of the largest low frequency telescopes in Europe equipped with high performance digital radio spectrometers. The antenna array of URAN-2 consists of 512 crossed dipoles with an effective area of 28 000m2 and beam pattern size of 3.5 x 7 deg. (at 25 MHz). The instrument enables continuous observations of the Jovian radio during long period of times. Jovian DAM was observed continuously since Sep. 2012 (depending on Jupiter visibility) with relatively high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100ms) in the broad frequency range (8-32MHz). We have detected a big amount of the fine spectral structures in the dynamic spectra of DAM such as trains of S-bursts, quasi-continuous narrowband emission, narrow-band splitting events and zebra stripe-like patterns. We analyzed mainly the fine structures associated with non-Io controlled DAM. We discuss how the observed narrowband structures which most probably are related to the propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jupiter's ionosphere can be used to study the plasma parameters in the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  13. GIANT GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT OF RELATIVISTIC SOLAR PROTONS ON 2005 JANUARY 20. I. SPACESHIP EARTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, J. W.; Clem, J.; Evenson, P.; Pyle, R.; Saiz, A.; Ruffolo, D. E-mail: clem@bartol.udel.edu E-mail: pyle@bartol.udel.edu E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th

    2013-07-10

    A ground level enhancement (GLE) is a solar event that accelerates ions (mostly protons) to GeV range energies in such great numbers that ground-based detectors, such as neutron monitors, observe their showers in Earth's atmosphere above the Galactic cosmic ray background. GLEs are of practical interest because an enhanced relativistic ion flux poses a hazard to astronauts, air crews, and aircraft electronics, and provides the earliest direct indication of an impending space radiation storm. The giant GLE of 2005 January 20 was the second largest on record (and largest since 1956), with up to 4200% count rate enhancement at sea level. We analyzed data from the Spaceship Earth network, supplemented to comprise 13 polar neutron monitor stations with distinct asymptotic viewing directions and Polar Bare neutron counters at South Pole, to determine the time evolution of the relativistic proton density, energy spectrum, and three-dimensional directional distribution. We identify two energy-dispersive peaks, indicating two solar injections. The relativistic solar protons were initially strongly beamed, with a peak maximum-to-minimum anisotropy ratio over 1000:1. The directional distribution is characterized by an axis of symmetry, determined independently for each minute of data, whose angle from the magnetic field slowly varied from about 60 Degree-Sign to low values and then rose to about 90 Degree-Sign . The extremely high relativistic proton flux from certain directions allowed 10 s tracking of count rates, revealing fluctuations of period {approx}> 2 minutes with up to 50% fractional changes, which we attribute to fluctuations in the axis of symmetry.

  14. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    DOE PAGES

    Pettersen, Claire; Bennartz, Ralf; Kulie, Mark S.; ...

    2016-04-15

    Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive data sets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliment past and existing global satellite observations. Our paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high-frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland, from 2010 to 2013. Furthermore, data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m-2 ormore » less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high-frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. Then, this measured ice signature was compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single-scattering properties for several ice habits. Furthermore, initial model results compare well against the 4 years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.« less

  15. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersen, Claire; Bennartz, Ralf; Kulie, Mark S.; Merrelli, Aronne J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.

    2016-04-15

    Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive data sets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliment past and existing global satellite observations. Our paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high-frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland, from 2010 to 2013. Furthermore, data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m-2 or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high-frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. Then, this measured ice signature was compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single-scattering properties for several ice habits. Furthermore, initial model results compare well against the 4 years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.

  16. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Claire; Bennartz, Ralf; Kulie, Mark S.; Merrelli, Aronne J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.

    2016-04-01

    Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive data sets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliment past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high-frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland, from 2010 to 2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m-2 or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high-frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. This measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single-scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the 4 years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.

  17. Sensitivity of aerosol retrieval to geometrical configuration of ground-based sun/sky-radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, B.; Dubovik, O.; Toledano, C.; Berjon, A.; Cachorro, V. E.; Lapyonok, T.; Goloub, P.

    2013-03-01

    A sensitivity study of the aerosol optical properties retrieval to the geometrical configuration of the ground-based sky radiometer observations is carried out through the inversion tests. Specifically, the study is focused on the principal plane and almucantar observation, since these geometries are employed in Aeronet (AErosol RObotic NETwork). The following effects has been analyzed with simulated data for both geometries: sensitivity of the retrieval to variability of the observed scattering angle range, uncertainties in the assumptions of the aerosol vertical distribution and surface reflectance, possible instrument pointing errors and the effects of the finite field of view. The synthetic observations of radiometer in the tests were calculated using a previous climatology data of retrieved aerosol over three Aeronet sites: Mongu (Zambia) for biomass burning aerosol, Goddard Space Flight Center (Maryland-USA) for urban aerosol and Solar Village (Saudi Arabia) for desert dust aerosol. The results show that almucantar retrievals, in general, are more reliable than principal plane retrievals in presence of the analyzed error sources. This fact partially can be explained by to practical advantages of almucantar geometry: the symmetry between its left and right branches that helps to eliminate some observational uncertainties and the constant value of optical mass constant during the measurements that makes almucantar observations nearly independent on vertical variability of aerosol. Nevertheless, almucantar retrievals present instabilities at high sun observations due to the reduction of the scattering angle range coverage resulting in decrease of information content. The last part of the study is devoted to identification of possible differences between the aerosol retrieval results obtained from real Aeronet data using both geometries. In particular, we have compared Aeronet retrievals at three different key sites: Mongu (biomass burning), Beijing (urban) and

  18. Determination of gravitational potential and the orthometric height of Mt. Everest using clocks onboard satellite and on ground: preliminary simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Shen, W.; Zhang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Based on our proposed approach (Shen et al 2015) for determining the gravitational potential using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station, here we provide preliminary simulations results. Two precise clocks (oscillators) are equipped onboard a satellite and at a ground station, respectively. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver receives this signal with frequency fb. After receiving this signal, towards the ground station the satellite oscillator emits two signals which have the frequencies fb and fc, respectively. By a combination of these three frequencies based on Doppler cancelation system, the gravitational potential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined. Concerning a datum station and a station at Mt. Everest, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite, and consequrently determine the orthometric height of Mt. Everest. In the simulations, we use 9000 observations (a length of about 2hrs observations), and results show that most offset values are in the order of 0.1 m (in equivalent height). The mean value of the differences is -0.008 m, and standard deviation is around 0.3 m. Since atomic clocks with stability around 10E-18 have been generated, the proposed approach is prospective in the near future. This study is supported by National 973 Project China (grant No. 2013CB733301 and 2013CB733305) and NSFC (grant Nos. 41174011, 41210006, 41429401).

  19. Spectroscopic determination of ground and excited state vibrational potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laane, Jaan

    Far-infrared spectra, mid-infrared combination band spectra, Raman spectra, and dispersed fluorescence spectra of non-rigid molecules can be used to determine the energies of many of the quantum states of conformationally important vibrations such as out-of-plane ring modes, internal rotations, and molecular inversions in their ground electronic states. Similarly, the fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules, together with electronic absorption spectra, provide the information for determining the vibronic energy levels of electronic excited states. One- or two-dimensional potential energy functions, which govern the conformational changes along the vibrational coordinates, can be determined from these types of data for selected molecules. From these functions the molecular structures, the relative energies between different conformations, the barriers to molecular interconversions, and the forces responsible for the structures can be ascertained. This review describes the experimental and theoretical methodology for carrying out the potential energy determinations and presents a summary of work that has been carried out for both electronic ground and excited states. The results for the out-of-plane ring motions of four-, five-, and six-membered rings will be presented, and results for several molecules with unusual properties will be cited. Potential energy functions for the carbonyl wagging and ring modes for several cyclic ketones in their S1(n,pi*) states will also be discussed. Potential energy surfaces for the three internal rotations, including the one governing the photoisomerization process, will be examined for trans-stilbene in both its S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states. For the bicyclic molecules in the indan family, the two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for the highly interacting ring-puckering and ring-flapping motions in both the S0 and S1(pi,pi*) states have also been determined using all of the spectroscopic methods mentioned above

  20. Rosetta in context: Ground-based observations of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snodgrass, C.

    2014-04-01

    collaboration with the large and enthusiastic community of amateur comet observers, especially in 2015 when the comet is brighter (see also talks in the proamsessions at EPSC). The comet has been recovered (in late February 2014), with early indications from VLT photometry suggesting that activity had indeed already started beyond 4 AU from the Sun, as predicted[1]. Its activity level, as measured by the dust brightness, will be followed all year and used to make further predictions about the future activity. The comet is observable until November 2014 using large telescopes (primarily in the Southern hemisphere), and is getting brighter as it approaches the Sun. In addition to photometric observations, visible wavelength spectroscopy will be attempted during 2014, to constrain gas emissions. Polarimetric observations and high resolution imaging with the HST are also proposed. A wide range of observational techniques and wavelength ranges will be covered by the campaign in 2015 as the comet reaches perihelion. I will present an update on the ground-based observation campaign in support of the Rosetta mission, the current status of various observation programmes at the time of the EPSC conference, and results on the 2014 activity of the comet, for comparison with early Rosetta results. I will also discuss how well the 2014 observations match with our earlier predictions, and make an assessment of how active the comet appears to be relative to previous orbits. I will also describe what further observations are planned in 2015, and how these will support the primary 'escort' phase of the mission.

  1. Observations and stochastic modelling of strong ground motions for the 2011 October 23 Mw 7.1 Van, Turkey, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinci, Aybige; Antonioli, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    The 2011 October 23 Van earthquake occurred at 13:41 local time in Eastern Turkey with an epicentre at 43.36oE, 38.76oN (Kandilli Observatory Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI)), 16 km north-northeast of the city of Van, killing around 604 people and leaving thousands homeless. This work presents an overview of the main features of the seismic ground shaking during the Van earthquake. We analyse the ground motion characteristics of the mainshock in terms of peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV) and spectral accelerations (SA, 5 per cent of critical damping). In order to understand the characteristics of the ground motions induced by the mainshock, we also study the site response of the strong motion stations that recorded the seismic sequence. The lack of seismic recordings in this area imposes major constraints on the computation of reliable seismic hazard estimates for sites in this part of the country. Towards this aim, we have used a stochastic method to generate high frequency ground motion synthetics for the Mw 7.1 Van 2011 earthquake. The source mechanism of the Van event and regional wave propagation parameters are constrained from the available and previous studies. The selected model parameters are then validated against recordings. We also computed the residuals for the ground motion parameters in terms of PGA and PGV at each station and the model parameter bias by averaging the residuals over all the stations. The attenuation of the simulated ground motion parameters is compared with recent global and regional ground motion prediction equations. Finally, since it has been debated whether the earthquake of November 9 was an aftershock of the October 23 earthquake, we examine whether static variation of Coulomb stress could contribute to the observed aftershock triggering during the 2011 Van Lake sequence. Comparison with empirical ground motion prediction illustrated that the observed PGA data decay faster than the global

  2. Towards retrieving critical relative humidity from ground-based remote sensing observations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Weverberg, Kwinten; Boutle, Ian; Morcrette, Cyril J.; Newsom, Rob K.

    2016-08-22

    Nearly all parameterisations of large-scale cloud require the specification of the critical relative humidity (RHcrit). This is the gridbox-mean relative humidity at which the subgrid fluctuations in temperature and water vapour become so large that part of a subsaturated gridbox becomes saturated and cloud starts to form. Until recently, the lack of high-resolution observations of temperature and moisture variability has hindered a reasonable estimate of the RHcrit from observations. However, with the advent of ground-based measurements from Raman lidar, it becomes possible to obtain long records of temperature and moisture (co-)variances with sub-minute sample rates. Lidar observations are inherently noisy and any analysis of higher-order moments will be very dependent on the ability to quantify and remove this noise. We present an exporatory study aimed at understanding whether current noise levels of lidar-retrieved temperature and water vapour are sufficient to obtain a reasonable estimate of the RHcrit. We show that vertical profiles of RHcrit can be derived for a gridbox length of up to about 30 km (120) with an uncertainty of about 4 % (2 %). RHcrit tends to be smallest near the scale height and seems to be fairly insensitive to the horizontal grid spacing at the scales investigated here (30 - 120 km). However, larger sensitivity was found to the vertical grid spacing. As the grid spacing decreases from 400 to 100 m, RHcrit is observed to increase by about 6 %, which is more than the uncertainty in the RHcrit retrievals.

  3. Conjugate Observations of Optical Aurora with POLAR Satellite and Ground Based Imagers in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. H.; Frey, H.; Vo, H.; Geller, S. P.; Doolittle, J. H.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Operation of the ultraviolet imager on the POLAR satellite permits the observation of Aurora Borealis in daylight during northern summer. With optical imagers in the Automatic Geophysical Observatories (AGO-s) large regions of the oval of Aurora Australis can be observed simultaneously during the southern winter polar night. This opportunity permits conducting a systematic study of the properties of auroras on opposite ends of the same field line. It is expected that simultaneously observed conjugate auroras occurring on closed field lines should be similar to each other in appearance because of the close connection between the two hemispheres through particle scattering and mirroring processes. On open or greatly distorted field lines there is no a priori expectation of similarity between conjugate auroras. To investigate the influence of different IMF conditions on auroral behavior we have examined conjugate data for periods of southward IMF. Sudden brightening and subsequent poleward expansions are observed to occur simultaneously in both hemispheres. The POLAR data show that sudden brightening are initiated at various local time regions. When the local time of this region is in the field of view of the AGO station network then corresponding brightening is also found to occur in the southern hemisphere. Large features such as substorm induced westward propagation and resulting auroral brightening seem to occur simultaneously on conjugate hemispheres. The widely different view scales make it difficult to make unique identification of individual auroral forms in the POLAR and in the ground based data but in a general sense the data is consistent with conjugate behavior.

  4. Conjugate Observations of Optical Aurora with POLAR Satellite and Ground Based Imagers in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. H.; Frey, H.; Vo, H.; Geller, S. P.; Doolittle, J. H.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Operation of the ultraviolet imager on the POLAR satellite permits the observation of Aurora Borealis in daylight during northern summer. With optical imagers in the Automatic Geophysical Observatories (AGO-s) large regions of the oval of Aurora Australis can be observed simultaneously during the southern winter polar night. This opportunity permits conducting a systematic study of the properties of auroras on opposite ends of the same field line. It is expected that simultaneously observed conjugate auroras occurring on closed field lines should be similar to each other in appearance because of the close connection between the two hemispheres through particle scattering and mirroring processes. On open or greatly distorted field lines there is no a priori expectation of similarity between conjugate auroras. To investigate the influence of different IMF conditions on auroral behavior we have examined conjugate data for periods of southward IMF. Sudden brightening and subsequent poleward expansions are observed to occur simultaneously in both hemispheres. The POLAR data show that sudden brightening are initiated at various local time regions. When the local time of this region is in the field of view of the AGO station network then corresponding brightening is also found to occur in the southern hemisphere. Large features such as substorm induced westward propagation and resulting auroral brightening seem to occur simultaneously on conjugate hemispheres. The widely different view scales make it difficult to make unique identification of individual auroral forms in the POLAR and in the ground based data but in a general sense the data is consistent with conjugate behavior.

  5. HiRISE observations of new impact craters exposing Martian ground ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.; Mellon, Michael T.; Kennedy, Megan R.; Daubar, Ingrid J.; Saper, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Twenty small new impact craters or clusters have been observed to excavate bright material inferred to be ice at mid-latitudes and high latitudes on Mars. In the northern hemisphere, the craters are widely distributed geographically and occur at latitudes as low as 39°N. Stability modeling suggests that this ice distribution requires a long-term average atmospheric water vapor content around 25 precipitable micrometers, more than double the present value, which is consistent with the expected effect of recent orbital variations. Alternatively, near-surface humidity could be higher than expected for current column abundances if water vapor is not well mixed with atmospheric CO2, or the vapor pressure at the ice table could be lower due to salts. Ice in and around the craters remains visibly bright for months to years, indicating that it is clean ice rather than ice-cemented regolith. Although some clean ice may be produced by the impact process, it is likely that the original ground ice was excess ice (exceeding dry soil pore space) in many cases. Observations of the craters suggest small-scale heterogeneities in this excess ice. The origin of such ice is uncertain. Ice lens formation by migration of thin films of liquid is most consistent with local heterogeneity in ice content and common surface boulders, but in some cases, nearby thermokarst landforms suggest large amounts of excess ice that may be best explained by a degraded ice sheet.

  6. Observation of the bottomonium ground state in the decay Upsilon(3S)-->gammaetab.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Schott, G; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Bertsche, K; Cai, Y; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Decker, F J; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ecklund, S; Erickson, R; Field, R C; Fisher, A; Fox, J; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Iverson, R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Kulikov, A; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Novokhatski, A; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Rivetta, C; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Seeman, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Van Winkle, D; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wienands, U; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wittmer, W; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yan, Y; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Yocky, G; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2008-08-15

    We report the results of a search for the bottomonium ground state etab(1S) in the photon energy spectrum with a sample of (109+/-1) million of Upsilon(3S) recorded at the Upsilon(3S) energy with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Egamma=921.2(-2.8)+2.1(stat)+/-2.4(syst) MeV with a significance of 10 standard deviations. We interpret the observed peak as being due to monochromatic photons from the radiative transition Upsilon(3S)-->gammaetab(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an etab(1S) mass of 9388.9(-2.3)+3.1(stat)+/-2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The hyperfine Upsilon(1S)-etab(1S) mass splitting is 71.4(-3.1)+2.3(stat)+/-2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for this radiative Upsilon(3S) decay is estimated to be [4.8+/-0.5(stat)+/-1.2(syst)]x10(-4).

  7. High spectral resolution ground-based observations of Venus in the 450- to 1250 kayser region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunde, V. G.; Hanel, R. A.; Herath, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    Ground-based observations of Venus were made with a 5-cm drive Michelson interferometer during December 1970 and December 1973. The thermal emission spectrum of the central portion of the apparent disk was recorded from 450-1250 kaysers with an apodized spectral resolution of 0.25 kaysers. All statistically significant sharp line-absorption features in the spectrum have been identified with gaseous CO2. Comparison between the observed spectrum and a synthetic spectrum computed from a model atmosphere, assuming gaseous CO2 and a sulfuric acid haze as opacity sources, indicates good agreement. A broad diffuse absorption feature associated with the sulfuric acid haze is evident in the 870- to 930 kayser region. With the exception of the rotational lines of the 927 kayser CO2 band, the above feature appears as a continuum down to 0.25 kayser resolution. In the 750- to 1250 kayser range, the spectrum exhibits moderate thermal contrast with maximum brightness temperatures of 234-238 K occurring near 825 kaysers. These temperatures are in general agreement with previous measurements.

  8. Observation of the Bottomonium Ground State in the Decay Y(3S) to ynb

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2008-07-11

    The authors report the results of a search for the bottomonium ground state {eta}{sub b}(1S) in the photon energy spectrum with a sample of (109 {+-} 1) million of {Upsilon}(3S) recorded at the {Upsilon}(3S) recorded at the {Upsilon}(3S) energy with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. They observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at E{sub {gamma}} = 921.2{sub -2.8}{sup +2.1}(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst) MeV with a significance of 10 standard deviations. They interpret the observed peak as being due to monochromatic photons from the radiative transition {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma} {eta}{sub b}(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9388.9{sub -2.3}{sup +3.1}(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The hyperfine {Upsilon}(1S)-{eta}{sub b}(1S) mass splitting is 71.4{sub -3.1}{sup +2.3}(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for this radiative {Upsilon}(3S) decay is estimated to be (4.8 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.2(syst)) x 10{sup -4}.

  9. Tragaldabas: a muon ground-based detector for the study of the solar activity; first observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Blanco, Juan

    2016-04-01

    A new RPC-based cosmic ray detector, TRAGALDABAS (acronym of "TRAsGo for the AnaLysis of the nuclear matter Decay, the Atmosphere, the earth's B-field And the Solar activity") has been installed at the Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (N:42°52'34",W:8°33'37"). The detector, in its present layout, consists of three 1.8 m2 planes of three 1mm-gap glass RPCs. Each plane is readout with 120 pads with grounded guard electrodes between them to minimize the crosstalk noise. The main performances of the detectors are: an arrival time resolution of about ~300 ps, a tracking angular resolution below 3°, a detection efficiency close to 1, and a solid angle acceptance of ~5 srad. TRAGALDABAS will be able to monitor the cosmic ray low energy component strongly modulated by solar activity by mean the observation of secondary muons from the interaction between cosmic rays and atmospheric molecules. Its cadence and its angular resolution will allow to study in detail, small variations in cosmic ray anisotropy. These variations can be a key parameter to understand the effect of solar disturbances on the propagation of cosmic ray in the inner heliosphere and, maybe, provide a new tool for space weather analysis. In this work first TRAGALDABAS observations of solar events are shown

  10. ULF cusp pulsations: Diurnal variations and interplanetary magnetic field correlations with ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect

    McHarg, M.G.; Olson, J.V.; Newell, P.T.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper the authors establish the Pc 5 magnetic pulsation signatures of the cusp and boundary regions for the high-latitude dayside cusp region. These signatures were determined by comparing spectrograms of the magnetic pulsations with optical observations of particle precipitation regions observed at the cusp. The ULF pulsations have a diurnal variation, and a cusp discriminant is proposed using a particular narrow-band feature in the pulsation spectrograms. The statistical distribution of this pattern over a 253-day period resembles the statistical cusp description using particle precipitation data from the Defense Meterological Satellite Program (DMSP). The distribution of the ground-based cusp discriminant is found to peak 1 hour earlier than the DMSP cusp distribution. This offset is due to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) being predominantly negative B{sub y} for the period when the data were collected. The authors find the diurnal variations so repeatable that only three main categories have statistically different IMF distributions. The identification of the signatures in the magnetic spectrograms of the boundary regions and central cusp allows the spectrogram to be used as a {open_quotes}time line{close_quotes} that shows when the station passed under different regions of the dayside oval. 36 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Low Earth orbit satellite-to-ground optical scintillation: comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Yura, Harold T; Kozlowski, David A

    2011-07-01

    Scintillation measurements of a 1064 nm laser at a 5 kHz sampling rate were made by an optical ground station at the European Space Agency observatory in Tenerife, Spain while tracking a low Earth orbit satellite during the spring and summer of 2010. The scintillation index (SI), the variance of irradiance normalized to the square of the mean, and power spectra measurements were compared to theoretical predictions based on the Kolmogorov spectrum, the Maui3 nighttime turbulence profile, weak scintillation finite-beam wave theory, included receiver, and source aperture averaging with no free-fitting parameters. Good agreement was obtained, not only for the magnitude of the observed fluctuations, but also for the corresponding elevation angle dependence and shape of the power spectra. Little variation was seen for the SI between daytime and nighttime links. For all elevation angles, ascending and descending, the observed scintillation over extensive regions of the atmosphere is consistent with log-normal statistics. Additionally, it appears from the results presented here that the nighttime turbulence profile for the atmosphere above the observatory in Tenerife is similar to that above Haleakala in Maui, Hawaii.

  12. Convective cloud fields in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic: Satellite and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esau, I. N.; Chernokulsky, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Convective cloudiness in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic is considered as an atmospheric spatially self-organized convective field. Convective cloud development is usually studied as a local process reflecting the convective instability of the turbulent planetary boundary layer over a heated surface. The convective cloudiness has a different dynamical structure in high latitudes. Cloud development follows cold-air outbreaks into the areas with a relatively warm surface. As a result, the physical and morphological characteristics of clouds, such as the type of convective cloud, and their geographical localization are interrelated. It has been shown that marginal sea ice and coastal zones are the most frequently occupied by Cu hum, Cu med convective clouds, which are organized in convective rolls. Simultaneously, the open water marine areas are occupied by Cu cong, Cb, which are organized in convective cells. An intercomparison of cloud statistics using satellite data ISCCP and ground-based observations has revealed an inconsistency in the cloudiness trends in these data sources: convective cloudiness decreases in ISCCP data and increases in the groundbased observation data. In general, according to the stated hypothesis, the retreat of the sea-ice boundary may lead to an increase in the amount of convective clouds.

  13. HiRISE observations of new impact craters exposing Martian ground ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.; Mellon, Michael T.; Kennedy, Megan R.; Daubar, Ingrid J.; Saper, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Twenty small new impact craters or clusters have been observed to excavate bright material inferred to be ice at mid and high latitudes on Mars. In the northern hemisphere, the craters are widely distributed geographically and occur at latitudes as low as 39°N. Stability modeling suggests that this ice distribution requires a long-term average atmospheric water vapor content around 25 precipitable microns, more than double the present value, which is consistent with the expected effect of recent orbital variations. Alternatively, near-surface humidity could be higher than expected for current column abundances if water vapor is not well-mixed with atmospheric CO2, or the vapor pressure at the ice table could be lower due to salts. Ice in and around the craters remains visibly bright for months to years, indicating that it is clean ice rather than ice-cemented regolith. Although some clean ice may be produced by the impact process, it is likely that the original ground ice was excess ice (exceeding dry soil pore space) in many cases. Observations of the craters suggest small-scale heterogeneities in this excess ice. The origin of such ice is uncertain. Ice lens formation by migration of thin films of liquid is most consistent with local heterogeneity in ice content and common surface boulders, but in some cases nearby thermokarst landforms suggest large amounts of excess ice that may be best explained by a degraded ice sheet.

  14. PSC and volcanic aerosol routine observations in Antarctica by UV-visible ground-based spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkissian, A.; Pommereau, J. P.; Goutail, F.

    1994-01-01

    Polar statospheric clouds (PSC) and stratospheric aerosol can be observed by ground-based UV-visible spectrometry by looking at the variation of the color of the sky during twilight. A radiative transfer model shows that reddenings are caused by high altitude (22-28 km) thin layers of scatterers, while low altitude (12-20 km) thick ones result in blueings. The color index method applied on 4 years of observations at Dumont d'Urville (67 deg S), from 1988 to 1991, shows that probably because the station is located at the edge of the vortex, dense PSC are uncommon. More unexpected is the existence of a systematic seasonal variation of the color of the twilight sky - bluer at spring - which reveals the formation of a dense scattering layer at or just above the tropopause at the end of the winter. Large scattering layers are reported above the station in 1991, first in August around 12-14 km, later in September at 22-24 km. They are attributed to volcanic aerosol from Mt Hudson and Mt Pinatubo respectively, which erupted in 1991. Inspection of the data shows that the lowest entered rapidly into the polar vortex but not the highest which remained outside, demonstrating that the vortex was isolated at 22-26 km.

  15. The Palomar kernel-phase experiment: testing kernel phase interferometry for ground-based astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Benjamin; Tuthill, Peter; Hinkley, Sasha; Ireland, Michael J.; Greenbaum, Alexandra; Latyshev, Alexey; Monnier, John D.; Martinache, Frantz

    2016-01-01

    At present, the principal limitation on the resolution and contrast of astronomical imaging instruments comes from aberrations in the optical path, which may be imposed by the Earth's turbulent atmosphere or by variations in the alignment and shape of the telescope optics. These errors can be corrected physically, with active and adaptive optics, and in post-processing of the resulting image. A recently developed adaptive optics post-processing technique, called kernel-phase interferometry, uses linear combinations of phases that are self-calibrating with respect to small errors, with the goal of constructing observables that are robust against the residual optical aberrations in otherwise well-corrected imaging systems. Here, we present a direct comparison between kernel phase and the more established competing techniques, aperture masking interferometry, point spread function (PSF) fitting and bispectral analysis. We resolve the α Ophiuchi binary system near periastron, using the Palomar 200-Inch Telescope. This is the first case in which kernel phase has been used with a full aperture to resolve a system close to the diffraction limit with ground-based extreme adaptive optics observations. Excellent agreement in astrometric quantities is found between kernel phase and masking, and kernel phase significantly outperforms PSF fitting and bispectral analysis, demonstrating its viability as an alternative to conventional non-redundant masking under appropriate conditions.

  16. Antarctic Ground-based Observations During Selected THEMIS Satellite Event Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherwax, A. T.; Lessard, M.; Lanzerotti, L.; Mende, S.; Frey, H.; Inan, U.; Spasojevic, M.; Engebretson, M.; Posch, J.; Petit, N.; Clauer, R.; Labelle, J.; Ridley, A.; Rosenberg, T.; Detrick, D.

    2007-12-01

    In Antarctica, the Polar Experiment Network for Geospace Upper-atmosphere Investigations (PENGUIn) team operates a suite of optical and radio wave imagers, magnetometers, riometers, and ELF-HF receivers at South Pole and McMurdo stations, as well as from the Automated Geophysical Observatories (AGOs) on the Antarctic polar plateau. These stations span locations from the auroral zone to deep in the polar cap. Employing data from this array, ground-based observations during several THEMIS satellite event studies will be discussed. These include: a flux transfer event (FTE) on May 20, 2007; a solar wind shock propagation on June 21; a hot flow anomaly on July 4; high latitude optical events on August 8th and 10th; and substorm events on March 23rd and 24th. Of particular interest is the FTE event where the magnetometer Z-component appears to have the signature of a line current passing overhead at South Pole and a sharp cutoff of 2-4 kHz VLF signals is also observed at the time the current moved overhead. Cosmic noise absorption and 630 nm optical signals also began about the time the currents moved overhead, and then tracked the H-component of the magnetometer. The enhanced optical signal was coincident with increased ionosphere currents as shown by the H-component. In this presentation, a southern hemisphere contextual description of this event, and the others listed above, will be presented.

  17. Luminous Infrared Galaxies Observed from the Ground and Space in the 2020s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Hanae; Armus, L.; Packham, C.; Dickinson, M.

    2014-07-01

    The dust-penetrating power of infrared observations will allow us to reveal the physical and chemical properties in and around the dust enshrouded nuclei of galaxies. While current near-infrared spectroscopic observations with 8-10m class telescopes can access to z=1-3 regime, they are still very challenging and limited to luminous targets. For z=0 objects, these telescopes can resolve HII regions, but we still do not fully understand the properties of more extreme star formation environments (e.g., rich in gas), which are more prevalent at higher redshifts. Near- and mid-infrared TMT instruments (e.g., two of the first light instruments IRIS and IRMS, and a planned mid-infrared instrument MICHI) will exploit TMT's unprecedented high spatial resolution to constrain the physical processes in individual dusty, intense star-forming regions of local galaxies as well as obtain resolved spectra for z=2-3 star-forming galaxies. During the era of 2020, JWST and SPICA are also expected to be commissioned. The high sensitivity of these space-based infrared observatories will facilitate investigations of the properties of dusty galaxies at even higher redshifts (z > 3). Only with the combination of ground- and space-observatories, we will be able to obtain a complete picture of star formation and AGN activity to explore the evolution of LIRGs which dominate the peak of the galaxy growth in the universe.

  18. Potential use of ground-based sensor technologies for weed detection.

    PubMed

    Peteinatos, Gerassimos G; Weis, Martin; Andújar, Dionisio; Rueda Ayala, Victor; Gerhards, Roland

    2014-02-01

    Site-specific weed management is the part of precision agriculture (PA) that tries to effectively control weed infestations with the least economical and environmental burdens. This can be achieved with the aid of ground-based or near-range sensors in combination with decision rules and precise application technologies. Near-range sensor technologies, developed for mounting on a vehicle, have been emerging for PA applications during the last three decades. These technologies focus on identifying plants and measuring their physiological status with the aid of their spectral and morphological characteristics. Cameras, spectrometers, fluorometers and distance sensors are the most prominent sensors for PA applications. The objective of this article is to describe-ground based sensors that have the potential to be used for weed detection and measurement of weed infestation level. An overview of current sensor systems is presented, describing their concepts, results that have been achieved, already utilized commercial systems and problems that persist. A perspective for the development of these sensors is given.

  19. Determination of chlorophyll photosynthetic potential in vegetation using ground-based and satellite methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botvich, Irina; Alexander, Sidko; Pisman, Tamara; Shevyrnogov, Anatoly

    An integrated study of the vegetation in the south of Krasnoyarsk Territory was carried out on the basis of ground-based and satellite remote measurements. The research objects were agricultural crops (wheat, oats) during the vegetation period. The satellite calculations were based on the data having high (Landsat 7 ETM+) and medium spatial resolution (Terra-Modis). Both kinds of data were used to calculate the chlorophyll photosynthetic potential (CPSP) as the area of the triangle made up by the reflection values in the green, red and near infrared spectrum regions. The connection was determined between the ground-based and satellite measurements of CPSP. Having analyzed the remote field and satellite measurements of the brightness spectral ratios of agricultural crops during vegetation, we showed the possibility of estimation of structural changes in the near infrared spectrum region. A lack or excess of water in plants causes structural changes in their phytoelements, which affects their reflectance. We showed the possibility of assessing morpho-physiological changes and species composition of crops. We determined the correlation between the spectral reflectance in various crops with chlorophyll content in plants and biomass changes.

  20. Assessing the Leakage Potential of CO2 into Ground Water Resources at SACROC, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, P. H.; Pawar, R. J.; Han, W. S.; McPherson, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we apply CO2-PENS to characterize the long-term CO2 storage performance at SACROC, specifically with respect to potential impacts on ground water resources located above the CO2 injection depth. CO2-PENS is a hybrid process/system model composed of a library of process level modules linked together to allow simulations to span a range of spatial and temporal scales. SACROC is the oldest CO2-EOR operation in the Permian Basin and has been operational for over 35 years. We describe how CO2-PENS is used to couple CO2 migration at three different scales; from a reservoir module, through a borehole leakage module, and into an aquifer impact module. Both the reservoir module and wellbore leakage module are based on abstractions of the underlying physics of multiphase fluid flow, using reductions in complexity to allow fast Monte-Carlo simulation while capturing the behavior of these processes. Finally, we show how results from CO2-PENS can be used to delineate areas that are susceptible to ground water impacts from CO2 leakage and discuss how this information can be used in risk analysis.

  1. Decomposition of Pyruvic Acid on the Ground-State Potential Energy Surface.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gabriel

    2016-01-21

    A potential energy surface is reported for isomerization and decomposition of gas-phase pyruvic acid (CH3C(O)C(O)OH) in its ground electronic state. Consistent with previous works, the lowest energy pathway for pyruvic acid decomposition is identified as decarboxylation to produce hydroxymethylcarbene (CH3COH), with overall barrier of 43 kcal mol(-1). This study discovers that pyruvic acid can also isomerize to the α-lactone form with a barrier of only 36 kcal mol(-1), from which CO elimination can occur at 49 kcal mol(-1) above pyruvic acid. An additional novel channel is identified for the tautomerisation of pyruvic acid to the enol form, via a double H-shift mechanism. The barrier for this process is 51 kcal mol(-1), which is around 20 kcal mol(-1) lower than the barrier for conventional keto-enol tautomerization via a 1,3-H shift transition state. Rate coefficients are calculated for pyruvic acid decomposition through RRKM theory/master equation simulations at 800-2000 K and 1 atm, showing good agreement with the available experimental data. The dissociation of vibrationally excited pyruvic acid produced through photoexcitation and subsequent internal conversion to the ground state is also modeled under tropospheric conditions and is seen to produce appreciable quantities of CO (∼1-4%) in addition to CH3COH via the dominant CO2 loss channel.

  2. Temporal and spatial variations of pulsating auroras obtained from ground-based observations at Poker Flat Research Range: Initial result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, T.; Sakanoi, T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Kataoka, R.; Katoh, Y.; Asamura, K.; Sato, M.; Okano, S.

    2011-12-01

    Pulsating Aurora(PA) is characterized by the periodically changing emission amplitudes with the rectangular pulses of a few seconds to a few tens of seconds [e.g., Oguti et al., 1981; Yamamoto, 1988]. PAs tend to appear in the recovery phase of substorm between postmidnight and dawn sector. The horizontal size of PAs are known to be 10-200 km, based on the optical observations. Recently, some ground-satellite coordinated observations suggested the generation mechanisms of PAs as a result of pitch angle scatterings due to whistler mode chorus waves and/or the electron cyclotron harmonics[Nishimura et al., 2010; Liang et al., 2010]. Time-varying field aligned potential was also suggested by Sato et al. [2004]. The dominant mechanisms and the origin of the periodicity remain unclear. Ground-based all-sky observations have been made for a long time, although they were not enough for a quantitative discussion about small-scale characteristics of PAs such as the shapes and dynamics due to their limited spatial resolutions. The fast temporal variations of intensity known as quasi-3Hz modulations, which was reported by a number of rocket/satellite observations about precipitating electrons[e.g., Sandahl et al., 1980], has been hardly discussed in detail using the ground instruments because of the limited temporal resolutions and sensitivities. We have carried out ground-based observations using a suit of instruments, consisting of an EMCCD camera, an all-sky video camera, a photometer, and a search coil magnetometer covering the frequency range of ELF-VLF. We installed the instruments at Poker Flat Research Range between November 2010 and March 2011. Our EMCCD camera has narrow field of view corresponding to 100km × 100km at altitude of 110 km and high sampling rate up to 100 frames per second. An initial analysis result of event on March 4th 2011 around 1100UT revealed two important features of PAs in small scale. One is PAs in the FOV can be categorized into three

  3. Sub-Seasonal Variability of Tropical Rainfall Observed by TRMM and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Brenda; Rutledge, Steven; Lang, Timothy; Cifelli, Robert; Nesbitt, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Studies of tropical precipitation characteristics from the TRMM-LBA and NAME field campaigns using ground-based polarimetric S-band data have revealed significant differences in microphysical processes occurring in the various meteorological regimes sampled in those projects. In TRMM-LMA (January-February 1999 in Brazil; a TRMM ground validation experiment), variability is driven by prevailing low-level winds. During periods of low-level easterlies, deeper and more intense convection is observed, while during periods of low-level westerlies, weaker convection embedded in widespread stratiform precipitation is common. In the NAME region (North American Monsoon Experiment, summer 2004 along the west coast of Mexico), strong terrain variability drives differences in precipitation, with larger drops and larger ice mass aloft associated with convection occurring over the coastal plain compared to convection over the higher terrain of the Sierra Madre Occidental, or adjacent coastal waters. Comparisons with the TRMM precipitation radar (PR) indicate that such sub-seasonal variability in these two regions are not well characterized by the TRMM PR reflectivity and rainfall statistics. TRMM PR reflectivity profiles in the LBA region are somewhat lower than S-Pol values, particularly in the more intense easterly regime convection. In NAME, mean reflectivities are even more divergent, with TRMM profiles below those of S-Pol. In both regions, the TRMM PR does not capture rain rates above 80 mm hr-1 despite much higher rain rates estimated from the S-Pol polarimetric data, and rain rates are generally lower for a given reflectivity from TRMM PR compared to S-Pol. These differences between TRMM PR and S-Pol may arise from the inability of Z-R relationships to capture the full variability of microphysical conditions or may highlight problems with TRMM retrievals over land. In addition to the TRMM-LBA and NAME regions, analysis of sub-seasonal precipitation variability and

  4. Chemical Characterization of Potentially Prebiotic Oligosaccharides in Brewed Coffee and Spent Coffee Grounds.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Freeman, Samara; Corey, Mark; German, J Bruce; Barile, Daniela

    2017-04-05

    Oligosaccharides are indigestible carbohydrates widely present in mammalian milk and in some plants. Milk oligosaccharides are associated with positive health outcomes; however, oligosaccharides in coffee have not been extensively studied. We investigated the oligosaccharides and their monomeric composition in dark roasted coffee beans, brewed coffee, and spent coffee grounds. Oligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization ranging from 3 to 15, and their constituent monosaccharides, were characterized and quantified. The oligosaccharides identified were mainly hexoses (potentially galacto-oligosaccharides and manno-oligosaccharides) containing a heterogeneous mixture of glucose, arabinose, xylose, and rhamnose. The diversity of oligosaccharides composition found in these coffee samples suggests that they could have selective prebiotic activity toward specific bacterial strains able to deconstruct the glycosidic bonds and utilize them as a carbon source.

  5. Degenerate ground states and nonunique potentials: Breakdown and restoration of density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, K.; Ullrich, C. A.; Vignale, G.

    2007-07-15

    The Hohenberg-Kohn (HK) theorem is one of the most fundamental theorems of quantum mechanics, and constitutes the basis for the very successful density-functional approach to inhomogeneous interacting many-particle systems. Here we show that in formulations of density-functional theory (DFT) that employ more than one density variable, applied to systems with a degenerate ground state, there is a subtle loophole in the HK theorem, as all mappings between densities, wave functions, and potentials can break down. Two weaker theorems which we prove here, the joint-degeneracy theorem and the internal-energy theorem, restore the internal, total, and exchange-correlation energy functionals to the extent needed in applications of DFT to atoms, molecules, and solids. The joint-degeneracy theorem constrains the nature of possible degeneracies in general many-body systems.

  6. Full-dimensional analytical ab initio potential energy surface of the ground state of HOI.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira-Filho, Antonio G S; Aoto, Yuri A; Ornellas, Fernando R

    2011-07-28

    Extensive ab initio calculations using a complete active space second-order perturbation theory wavefunction, including scalar and spin-orbit relativistic effects with a quadruple-zeta quality basis set were used to construct an analytical potential energy surface (PES) of the ground state of the [H, O, I] system. A total of 5344 points were fit to a three-dimensional function of the internuclear distances, with a global root-mean-square error of 1.26 kcal mol(-1). The resulting PES describes accurately the main features of this system: the HOI and HIO isomers, the transition state between them, and all dissociation asymptotes. After a small adjustment, using a scaling factor on the internal coordinates of HOI, the frequencies calculated in this work agree with the experimental data available within 10 cm(-1).

  7. Full-dimensional analytical ab initio potential energy surface of the ground state of HOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira-Filho, Antonio G. S.; Aoto, Yuri A.; Ornellas, Fernando R.

    2011-07-01

    Extensive ab initio calculations using a complete active space second-order perturbation theory wavefunction, including scalar and spin-orbit relativistic effects with a quadruple-zeta quality basis set were used to construct an analytical potential energy surface (PES) of the ground state of the [H, O, I] system. A total of 5344 points were fit to a three-dimensional function of the internuclear distances, with a global root-mean-square error of 1.26 kcal mol-1. The resulting PES describes accurately the main features of this system: the HOI and HIO isomers, the transition state between them, and all dissociation asymptotes. After a small adjustment, using a scaling factor on the internal coordinates of HOI, the frequencies calculated in this work agree with the experimental data available within 10 cm-1.

  8. Effects on motor unit potentiation and ground reaction force from treadmill exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Reid P.

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyze the characteristics of motor unit potentiation (MUP) and ground reaction force (GRF) in treadmill exercise at the inclines of 0, 5.5 and 11 percent with conjuctive speeds of 7.5, 6, and 5 mph respectively. These speeds and corresponding inclines were set to provide equivalent physiological workloads at 12.5 METS. EMG recordings were taken from the rectus femoris and gastrocnemius of the right leg from 5 subjects. Simultaneous GRF recordings were obtained from a Delmar Avionic treadmill rigged with load cells. Measures for MUP and GRF were taken over a period containing 10 strides at steady pace. It was concluded that the gastrocnemius was more evident in EMG activity in all speed/incline settings over the rectus femoris, and that inclines from 5.5 to 11 percent produced greater GRF's over 0 percent. Recommendations for future studies was made.

  9. Error and Uncertainty Quantification in Precipitation Retrievals from GPM/DPR Using Ground-based Dual-Polarization Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Chandrasekar V.; Chen*, Haonan; Petersen, Walter

    2017-04-01

    The active Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and passive radiometer onboard Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory extend the observation range attained by Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) from tropical to most of the globe [1]. Through improved measurements of precipitation, the GPM mission is helping to advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle, as well as climate changes. Ground Validation (GV) is an indispensable part of the GPM satellite mission. In the pre-launch era, several international validation experiments had already generated a substantial dataset that could be used to develop and test the pre-launch GPM algorithms. After launch, more ground validation field campaigns were conducted to further evaluate GPM precipitation data products as well as the sensitivities of retrieval algorithms. Among various validation equipment, ground based dual-polarization radar has shown great advantages to conduct precipitation estimation over a wide area in a relatively short time span. Therefore, radar is always a key component in all the validation field experiments. In addition, the radar polarization diversity has great potential to characterize precipitation microphysics through the identification of raindrop size distribution and different hydrometeor types [2]. Currently, all the radar sites comprising the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88DP) network are operating in dual-polarization mode. However, most of the operational radar based precipitation products are produced at coarse resolution typically on 1 km by 1 km spatial grids, focusing on precipitation accumulations at temporal scales of 1-h, 3-h, 6-h, 12-h, and/or 24-h (daily). Their capability for instantaneous GPM product validation is severely limited due to the spatial and temporal mismatching between observations from the ground and space. This paper first presents the rationale and

  10. Ground-based RGB imaging to determine the leaf water potential of potato plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaluk, Robert F.

    The determination of plant water status from leaf water potential (Psi L) data obtained by conventional methods is impractical for meeting real time irrigation monitoring requirements. This research, undertaken first, in a greenhouse and then in the field, examined the use of artificial neural network (ANN) modeling of RGB (red green blue) images, captured by a ground-based, five mega pixel digital camera, to predict the leaf water potential of potato (Solanum tuberosum L). The greenhouse study examined cv. Russet Burbank, while the field study examined cv. Sangre. The protocol was similar in both studies: (1) images were acquired over different soil nitrate (N) and volumetric water content levels, (2) images were radiometrically calibrated, (3) green foliage was classified and extracted from the images, and (4) image transformations, and vegetation indices were calculated and transformed using principal components analysis (PCA). The findings from both studies were similar: (1) the R and G bands were more important than the B image band in the classification of green leaf pigment, (2) soil N showed an inverse linear relationship against leaf reflectance in the G image band, (3) the ANN model input neuron weights with more separation between soil N and PsiL were more important than other input neurons in predicting PsiL, and (4) the measured and predicted PsiL validation datasets were normally distributed with equal variances and means that were not significantly different. Based on these research findings, the ground-based digital camera proved to be an adequate sensor for image acquisition and a practical tool for acquiring data for predicting the PsiL of potato plants. Keywords: nitrogen, IHS transformation, chromaticity transformation, principal components, vegetation indices, remote sensing, artificial neural network, digital camera.

  11. Geomorphological Evidence for Pervasive Ground Ice on Ceres from Dawn Observations of Craters and Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. E.; Chilton, H.; Hughson, K.; Scully, J. E. C.; Russell, C. T.; Sizemore, H. G.; Nathues, A.; Platz, T.; Bland, M. T.; Schenk, P.; Hiesinger, H.; Jaumann, R.; Byrne, S.; Schorghofer, N.; Ammannito, E.; Marchi, S.; O'Brien, D. P.; Sykes, M. V.; Le Corre, L.; Capria, M. T.; Reddy, V.; Raymond, C. A.; Mest, S. C.; Feldman, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Five decades of observations of Ceres' albedo, surface composition, shape and density suggest that Ceres is comprised of both silicates and tens of percent of ice. Historical suggestions of surficial hydrated silicates and evidence for water emission, coupled with its bulk density of ~2100 kg/m3 and Dawn observations of young craters containing high albedo spots support this conclusion. We report geomorphological evidence from survey data demonstrating that evaporative and fluid-flow processes within silicate-ice mixtures are prevalent on Ceres, and indicate that its surface materials contain significant water ice. Here we highlight three classes of features that possess strong evidence for ground ice. First, ubiquitous scalloped and "breached" craters are characterized by mass wasting and by the recession of crater walls in asymmetric patterns; these appear analogous to scalloped terrain on Mars and protalus lobes formed by mass wasting in terrestrial glaciated regions. The degradation of crater walls appears to be responsible for the nearly complete removal of some craters, particularly at low latitudes. Second, several high latitude, high elevation craters feature lobed flows that emanate from cirque-shaped head walls and bear strikingly similar morphology to terrestrial rock glaciers. These similarities include lobate toes and indications of furrows and ridges consistent with ice-cored or ice-cemented material. Other lobed flows persist at the base of crater walls and mass wasting features. Many flow features evidently terminate at ramparts. Third, there are frequent irregular domes, peaks and mounds within crater floors that depart from traditional crater central peaks or peak complexes. In some cases the irregular domes show evidence for high albedo or activity, and thus given other evidence for ice, these could be due to local melt and extrusion via hydrologic gradients, forming domes similar to pingos. The global distribution of these classes of features

  12. Ground and satellite observations of multiple sun-aligned auroral arcs on the duskside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, K.; Maggiolo, R.; Zhang, Y.; Fear, R. C.; Fontaine, D.; Cumnock, J. A.; Kullen, A.; Milan, S. E.; Kozlovsky, A.; Echim, M.; Shiokawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    Sun-aligned auroral arcs (SAAs) are one of the outstanding phenomena in the high-latitude region during periods of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Smaller scale SAAs tend to occur either in the duskside or dawnside of the polar cap and are known to drift in the dawn-dusk direction depending on the sign of the IMF By. Studies of SAAs are of particular importance because they represent dynamical characteristics of their source plasma in the magnetosphere, for example in the interaction region between the solar wind and magnetosphere or in the boundary between the plasma sheet and tail lobe. To date, however, very little has been known about the spatial structure and/or temporal evolution of the magnetospheric counterpart of SAAs. In order to gain more comprehensive understanding of the field-aligned plasma transport in the vicinity of SAAs, we have investigated an event of SAAs on November 10, 2005, during which multiple SAAs were detected by a ground-based all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, Canada. During this interval, several SAAs were detached from the duskside oval and moved poleward. The large-scale structure of these arcs was visualized by space-based imagers of TIMED/GUVI and DMSP/SSUSI. In addition to these optical observations, we employ the Cluster satellites to reveal the high-altitude particle signature corresponding to the small-scale SAAs. The ionospheric footprints of the 4 Cluster satellites encountered the SAAs sequentially and observed well correlated enhancements of electron fluxes at weak energies (< 1 keV). The Cluster satellites also detected signatures of upflowing beams of ions and electrons in the vicinity of the SAAs. This implies that these ions and electrons were accelerated upward by a quasi-stationary electric field existing in the vicinity of the SAAs and constitute a current system in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system. Ionospheric convection measurement from one of the SuperDARN radars shows an indication that

  13. The volatile composition of comet 103P/Hartley 2 from ground-based radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, Adeline; Milam, S. N.; Remijan, A. J.; Chuang, Y.; Kuan, Y.; Coulson, I. M.; Villanueva, G.; Charnley, S. B.; Cordiner, M. M.

    2013-10-01

    103P/Hartley 2 (103P) is a Jupiter-family comet which has a short orbital period (6.5 years) and perihelion at 1.06 AU. 103P was discovered on 4 June 1984 by Malcolm Hartley at the Siding Spring Observatory and has been frequently observed over the 20 years following its discovery, both by ground-based and space telescopes. Observation from 1991 and 1997 indicated a maximum water production rate of 3 x 10^28 molecules/s. 103P passed perihelion on 28 October 2010 at q = 1.059 AU. It made an exceptional close approach to the Earth just before perihelion on 21 October 2010 at Δ = 0.12 AU. On UT 2010 November 4.58, the comet was visited by NASA’s EPOXI spacecraft with a flyby at 700 km. As part of an ongoing investigation to establish the contribution of the natal molecular cloud from which the solar system was formed to primitive materials and comets, we have been conducting observations toward the comet 103P to determine taxonomy and cosmogonic quantities, such as the ortho:para ratio and isotope ratios. Here we report detections of HCN, H2CO, CS, and OH and upper limits on HNC and DCN toward comet 103P, using the Arizona Radio Observatory Kitt Peak 12m (12m) and submillimeter telescopes (SMT), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) and the Greenbank Telescope (GBT). From these data physical parameters such as temperature, column densities, and production rates have been determined toward comet 103P. The ortho:para ratio has been derived from H2CO. We used the JCMT data to compute the D/H ratio from DCN and HCN. Here we present our analysis and discuss the origin of volatiles in cometary material.

  14. Testing the inversion of asteroids' Gaia photometry combined with ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana-Ros, T.; Bartczak, P.; Michałowski, T.; Tanga, P.; Cellino, A.

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the reliability of the genetic algorithm which will be used to invert the photometric measurements of asteroids collected by the European Space Agency Gaia mission. To do that, we performed several sets of simulations for 10 000 asteroids having different spin axis orientations, rotational periods and shapes. The observational epochs used for each simulation were extracted from the Gaia mission simulator developed at the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, while the brightness was generated using a Z-buffer standard graphic method. We also explored the influence on the inversion results of contaminating the data set with Gaussian noise with different σ values. The research enabled us to determine a correlation between the reliability of the inversion method and the asteroid's pole latitude. In particular, the results are biased for asteroids having quasi-spherical shapes and low pole latitudes. This effect is caused by the low light-curve amplitude observed under such circumstances, as the periodic signal can be lost in the photometric random noise when both values are comparable, causing the inversion to fail. Such bias might be taken into account when analysing the inversion results, not to mislead it with physical effects such as non-gravitational forces. Finally, we studied what impact on the inversion results has combining a full light curve and Gaia photometry collected simultaneously. Using this procedure we have shown that it is possible to reduce the number of wrong solutions for asteroids having less than 50 data points. The latter will be of special importance for planning ground-based observations of asteroids aiming to enhance the scientific impact of Gaia on Solar system science.

  15. Quantifying the effect of riming on snowfall using ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseev, Dmitri; von Lerber, Annakaisa; Tiira, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based observations of ice particle size distribution and ensemble mean density are used to quantify the effect of riming on snowfall. The rime mass fraction is derived from these measurements by following the approach that is used in a single ice-phase category microphysical scheme proposed for the use in numerical weather prediction models. One of the characteristics of the proposed scheme is that the prefactor of a power law relation that links mass and size of ice particles is determined by the rime mass fraction, while the exponent does not change. To derive the rime mass fraction, a mass-dimensional relation representative of unrimed snow is also determined. To check the validity of the proposed retrieval method, the derived rime mass fraction is converted to the effective liquid water path that is compared to microwave radiometer observations. Since dual-polarization radar observations are often used to detect riming, the impact of riming on dual-polarization radar variables is studied for differential reflectivity measurements. It is shown that the relation between rime mass fraction and differential reflectivity is ambiguous, other factors such as change in median volume diameter need also be considered. Given the current interest on sensitivity of precipitation to aerosol pollution, which could inhibit riming, the importance of riming for surface snow accumulation is investigated. It is found that riming is responsible for 5% to 40% of snowfall mass. The study is based on data collected at the University of Helsinki field station in Hyytiälä during U.S. Department of Energy Biogenic Aerosols Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign and the winter 2014/2015. In total 22 winter storms were analyzed, and detailed analysis of two events is presented to illustrate the study.

  16. Validation of NH3 satellite observations by ground-based FTIR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammers, Enrico; Palm, Mathias; Van Damme, Martin; Shephard, Mark; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Capps, Shannon; Clarisse, Lieven; Coheur, Pierre; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-04-01

    Global emissions of reactive nitrogen have been increasing to an unprecedented level due to human activities and are estimated to be a factor four larger than pre-industrial levels. Concentration levels of NOx are declining, but ammonia (NH3) levels are increasing around the globe. While NH3 at its current concentrations poses significant threats to the environment and human health, relatively little is known about the total budget and global distribution. Surface observations are sparse and mainly available for north-western Europe, the United States and China and are limited by the high costs and poor temporal and spatial resolution. Since the lifetime of atmospheric NH3 is short, on the order of hours to a few days, due to efficient deposition and fast conversion to particulate matter, the existing surface measurements are not sufficient to estimate global concentrations. Advanced space-based IR-sounders such as the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) enable global observations of atmospheric NH3 that help overcome some of the limitations of surface observations. However, the satellite NH3 retrievals are complex requiring extensive validation. Presently there have only been a few dedicated satellite NH3 validation campaigns performed with limited spatial, vertical or temporal coverage. Recently a retrieval methodology was developed for ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) instruments to obtain vertical concentration profiles of NH3. Here we show the applicability of retrieved columns from nine globally distributed stations with a range of NH3 pollution levels to validate satellite NH3 products.

  17. Heart rate and leukocytes after air and ground transportation in artificially ventilated neonates: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Grosek, Stefan; Mlakar, Gorazd; Vidmar, Ivan; Ihan, Alojz; Primozic, Janez

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of interhospital air and ground transportation of artificially ventilated neonates on heart rate and peripheral blood leukocyte counts. Prospective, observational study. Level III multidisciplinary Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Fifty-eight near-term artificially ventilated transported neonates between May 2006 and April 2007. Day-helicopter, day- and night-ground transportation. Heart rate at retrieval, on admission to the ICU and 1 h later, and peripheral blood leukocyte counts on admission and 1 d later were compared. Fifteen neonates were transported by helicopter during the daytime (D-HEL), 20 by daytime ground and 23 by nighttime ground transportation (D-GROUND, N-GROUND). No differences in delivery mode, birth weight, gestational age, gender, primary diagnoses for transportation, response time and duration of transportation were found between the groups. Similarly, no differences in pH, pCO(2), blood pressure and skin temperature at retrieval and on admission to the ICU were found between the three groups. The mean heart rate at retrieval did not differ significantly, while on arrival in the ICU and 1 h later the D-GROUND group of patients showed a significantly higher mean heart rate compared to the D-HEL and N-GROUND groups. Moreover, leukocyte counts on arrival in the ICU showed significantly higher leukocyte counts in the D-GROUND group of patients compared to the D-HEL group of patients. These results demonstrate that there is an association between daytime ground transportation and higher heart rate and peripheral blood leukocytes.

  18. Space borne GPM dual-frequency radar simulation from high resolution ground radar observations.

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C. R.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2004-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is dedicated to improving the understanding of the global water cycle by measuring and mapping precipitation throughout the globe. The core GPM satellite will incorporate two separate precipitation radars: one operating at Ku-band (13.6 GHz) and the other at Ka band (35.6 GHz). Each radar beam will be steered such that they both point to the same location in the atmosphere. The main purpose of the dual-frequency radar system is to resolve the DSD in precipitation as well as discriminate between rain and ice. With the two beams collocated on the same precipitation volume, new algorithms are being developed to reliably es timate attenuation and rain rate. Any algorithm is based on models of precipitation. In addition, the GPM system assumes collocated beams and matched resolu tion volumes. Electromagnetic and microphysical models have been developed based on ground-based dual-frequency radar data at S-band to simulate Ku- and Ka-band results for comparison with the new GPM algorithms. This paper evaluates the dual-frequency inversion algorithm with synthesized S-band and known perfect data and presents results. Results show the expected performance of the new dual-precipitation radar algorithms with the potential for guiding algorithm and system improvements.

  19. Monitoring geospace disturbances through coordinated space-borne and ground-based magnetometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios

    2014-05-01

    Recently automated methods of deriving the characteristics of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves in the magnetosphere have been developed (Balasis et al., 2012, 2013), which can be effectively applied to the huge datasets from the new ESA Swarm mission, in order to retrieve, on an operational basis, new information about the near-Earth electromagnetic environment. Processing Swarm measurements with these methods will help to elucidate the processes influencing the generation and propagation of ULF waves, which in turn play a crucial role in magnetospheric dynamics. Moreover, a useful platform based on a combination of wavelet transforms and artificial neural networks has been developed to monitor the wave evolution from the outer boundaries of Earth's magnetosphere through the topside ionosphere down to the surface. Data from a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite (CHAMP) and two magnetospheric missions (Cluster and Geotail) along with three ground-based magnetic networks (CARISMA, GIMA and IMAGE), during the Halloween 2003 magnetic superstorm when the Cluster and CHAMP spacecraft were in good local time (LT) conjunction, are used to demonstrate the potential of the analysis technique in studying wave evolution in detail.

  20. A new accurate ground-state potential energy surface of ethylene and predictions for rotational and vibrational energy levels.

    PubMed

    Delahaye, Thibault; Nikitin, Andrei; Rey, Michaël; Szalay, Péter G; Tyuterev, Vladimir G

    2014-09-14

    In this paper we report a new ground state potential energy surface for ethylene (ethene) C2H4 obtained from extended ab initio calculations. The coupled-cluster approach with the perturbative inclusion of the connected triple excitations CCSD(T) and correlation consistent polarized valence basis set cc-pVQZ was employed for computations of electronic ground state energies. The fit of the surface included 82,542 nuclear configurations using sixth order expansion in curvilinear symmetry-adapted coordinates involving 2236 parameters. A good convergence for variationally computed vibrational levels of the C2H4 molecule was obtained with a RMS(Obs.-Calc.) deviation of 2.7 cm(-1) for fundamental bands centers and 5.9 cm(-1) for vibrational bands up to 7800 cm(-1). Large scale vibrational and rotational calculations for (12)C2H4, (13)C2H4, and (12)C2D4 isotopologues were performed using this new surface. Energy levels for J = 20 up to 6000 cm(-1) are in a good agreement with observations. This represents a considerable improvement with respect to available global predictions of vibrational levels of (13)C2H4 and (12)C2D4 and rovibrational levels of (12)C2H4.

  1. Use of Ground Imagery to Study Wood Raft and Ice Dynamics in Fluvial Systems: Potential and Challenges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benacchio, V.; Piegay, H.; Buffin-Belanger, T. K.; Vaudor, L.; Michel, K.

    2014-12-01

    Automatic cameras allow acquisition of large amounts of information at high resolution in both temporal and spatial dimensions, with a roughly close range. Recently, ground cameras have been used to study the morphological evolution of fluvial environments (e.g. bank erosion, bar mobility, braided pattern changes) or to quantify components of fluvial dynamics (e.g. flow velocity, wood transport or river ice development). As the amount of information increases, automation of the data processing becomes essential, but many challenges arise to improve features detection, taking into account light contrasts, shadow and reflection, or to calculate surfaces and volumes from image orthorectification. This study illustrates the high potential of ground cameras to observe and quantify rapid, stochastic or complex events in fluvial systems and the numerous challenges we have to face. In order to automatically monitor such key fluvial processes, two ground cameras were installed. The first one was placed on the Genissiat dam (Rhône River, France) focusing on the reservoir where pieces of wood are trapped, creating a large raft. The objective is to survey wood raft area over time as a surrogate of the basin wood production. The second camera was installed along the St Jean River (Gaspesia, Québec) focusing on a pool section. The objective here is to characterize the evolution of ice cover, in terms of growing rate and ice types. The snowy environment is particularly challenging because of brightness or fairly homogeneous radiometric conditions amongst ice types. In both cases, remote sensing technics, especially feature based classification are used. Radiometric and texture indexes are used to discriminate both wood and water and ice types.

  2. A semiempirical study of the optimized ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of retinal and its protonated Schiff base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parusel, A. B.; Pohorille, A.

    2001-01-01

    The electronic ground and first excited states of retinal and its Schiff base are optimized for the first time using the semiempirical AM1 Hamiltonian. The barrier for rotation about the C(11)-C(12) double bond is characterized by variation of both the twist angle delta(C(10)-C(11)-C(12)-C(13)) and the bond length d(C(11)-C(12)). The potential energy surface is obtained by varying these two parameters. The calculated ground state rotational barrier is equal to 15.6 kcal/mol for retinal and 20.5 kcal/mol for its Schiff base. The all-trans conformation is more stable by 3.7 kcal/mol than the 11-cis geometry. For the first excited state, S(1,) the 90 degrees twisted geometry represents a saddle point for retinal with the rotational barrier of 14.6 kcal/mol. In contrast, this conformation is an energy minimum for the Schiff base. It can be easily reached at room temperature from the planar minima since it is separated from them by a barrier of only 0.6 kcal/mol. The 90 degrees minimum conformation is more stable than the all-trans by 8.6 kcal/mol. We are thus able to present a reaction path on the S(1) surface of the retinal Schiff base with an almost barrier-less geometrical relaxation into a twisted minimum geometry, as observed experimentally. The character of the ground and first excited singlet states underscores the need for the inclusion of double excitations in the calculations.

  3. A semiempirical study of the optimized ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of retinal and its protonated Schiff base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parusel, A. B.; Pohorille, A.

    2001-01-01

    The electronic ground and first excited states of retinal and its Schiff base are optimized for the first time using the semiempirical AM1 Hamiltonian. The barrier for rotation about the C(11)-C(12) double bond is characterized by variation of both the twist angle delta(C(10)-C(11)-C(12)-C(13)) and the bond length d(C(11)-C(12)). The potential energy surface is obtained by varying these two parameters. The calculated ground state rotational barrier is equal to 15.6 kcal/mol for retinal and 20.5 kcal/mol for its Schiff base. The all-trans conformation is more stable by 3.7 kcal/mol than the 11-cis geometry. For the first excited state, S(1,) the 90 degrees twisted geometry represents a saddle point for retinal with the rotational barrier of 14.6 kcal/mol. In contrast, this conformation is an energy minimum for the Schiff base. It can be easily reached at room temperature from the planar minima since it is separated from them by a barrier of only 0.6 kcal/mol. The 90 degrees minimum conformation is more stable than the all-trans by 8.6 kcal/mol. We are thus able to present a reaction path on the S(1) surface of the retinal Schiff base with an almost barrier-less geometrical relaxation into a twisted minimum geometry, as observed experimentally. The character of the ground and first excited singlet states underscores the need for the inclusion of double excitations in the calculations.

  4. The Potential of Small Space Telescopes for Exoplanet Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, E.

    2010-01-01

    The imaging of faint exoplanets near bright stars requires the development of very high contrast detection techniques, including both precise wavefront control and deep starlight rejection. A system-level proof-of-principle experiment carried out at at the Palomar Observatory has recently demonstrated that exoplanets can be detected very near stars even with a fairly small (1.5 m diameter) telescope aperture, such as someday might be used by a first space-based exoplanet imaging mission. Using fine-scale wavefront correction across this small aperture, together with fine pointing and focus control, pre- and post-detection speckle reduction, and a vector vortex coronagraph, it has been possible to achieve extremely good starlight rejection within a small number of diffractions beams of the stellar position. This performance has recently allowed the imaging of the three HR8799 planets and the HD32297 disk, thus providing a first system-level validation of the steps needed to achieve high-contrast observations at very small angles. These results thus serve to highlight the potential of small space telescopes aiming at high-contrast exoplanet observations. Specifically, a small-angle coronagraph enables the use of smaller telescopes, thus potentially reducing mission cost significantly.

  5. Using Apollo sites and soils to compositionally ground truth Diviner Lunar Radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Song, E.; Thomas, I. R.; Bowles, N. E.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Foote, E. J.; Paige, D. A.; Allen, C.

    2012-12-01

    Apollo landing sites and returned soils afford us a unique opportunity to "ground truth" Diviner Lunar Radiometer compositional observations, which are the first global, high resolution, thermal infrared measurements of an airless body. The Moon is the most accessible member of the most abundant class of solar system objects, which includes Mercury, asteroids, and icy satellites. And the Apollo samples returned from the Moon are the only extraterrestrial samples with known spatial context. Here we compare Diviner observations of Apollo landing sites and compositional and spectral laboratory measurements of returned Apollo soils. Diviner, onboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, has three spectral channels near 8 μm that were designed to characterize the mid-infrared emissivity maximum known as the Christiansen feature (CF), a well-studied indicator of silicate mineralogy. It has been observed that thermal infrared spectra measured in simulated lunar environment (SLE) are significantly altered from spectra measured under terrestrial or martian conditions, with enhanced CF contrast and shifted CF position relative to other spectral features. Therefore only thermal emission experiments conducted in SLE are directly comparable to Diviner data. With known compositions, Apollo landing sites and soils are important calibration points for the Diviner dataset, which includes all six Apollo sites at approximately 200 m spatial resolution. Differences in measured CFs caused by composition and space weathering are apparent in Diviner data. Analyses of Diviner observations and SLE measurements for a range of Apollo soils show good agreement, while comparisons to thermal reflectance measurements under ambient conditions do not agree well, which underscores the need for SLE measurements and validates our measurement technique. Diviner observations of Apollo landing sites are also correlated with geochemical measurements of Apollo soils from the Lunar Sample Compendium. In

  6. Using Apollo Sites and Soils to Compositionally Ground Truth Diviner Lunar Radiometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Lucey, P. G.; Song, E.; Thomas, I R.; Bowles, N. E.; DonaldsonHanna, K. L.; Allen, C.; Foote, E. J.; Paige, D .A.

    2012-01-01

    Apollo landing sites and returned soils afford us a unique opportunity to "ground truth" Diviner Lunar Radiometer compositional observations, which are the first global, high resolution , thermal infrared measurements of an airless body. The Moon is the most accessible member of the most abundant class of solar system objects, which includes Mercury, asteroids, and icy satellites. And the Apollo samples returned from the Moon are the only extraterrestrial samples with known spatial context. Here we compare Diviner observations of Apollo landing sites and compositional and spectral laboratory measurements of returned Apollo soils. Diviner, onboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, has three spectral channels near 8 micron that were designed to characterize the mid-infrared emissivity maximum known as the Christiansen feature (CF), a well-studied indicator of silicate mineralogy. It has been observed that thermal infrared spectra measured in simulated lunar environment (SLE) are significantly altered from spectra measured under terrestrial or martian conditions, with enhanced CF contrast and shifted CF position relative to other spectral features. Therefore only thermal emission experiments conducted in SLE are directly comparable to Diviner data. With known compositions, Apollo landing sites and soils are important calibration points for the Diviner dataset, which includes all six Apollo sites at approximately 200 m spatial resolution. Differences in measured CFs caused by composition and space weathering are apparent in Diviner data. Analyses of Diviner observations and SLE measurements for a range of Apollo soils show good agreement, while comparisons to thermal reflectance measurements under ambient conditions do not agree well, which underscores the need for SLE measurements and validates our measurement technique. Diviner observations of Apollo landing sites are also correlated with geochemical measurements of Apollo soils from the Lunar Sample Compendium

  7. Lidar-Based Estimates of Above-Ground Biomass in the Continental US and Mexico Using Ground, Airborne, and Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Ross; Margolis, Hank; Montesano, Paul; Sun, Guoqing; Cook, Bruce; Corp, Larry; Andersen, Hans-Erik; DeJong, Ben; Pellat, Fernando Paz; Fickel, Thaddeus; hide

    2016-01-01

    Existing national forest inventory plots, an airborne lidar scanning (ALS) system, and a space profiling lidar system (ICESat-GLAS) are used to generate circa 2005 estimates of total aboveground dry biomass (AGB) in forest strata, by state, in the continental United States (CONUS) and Mexico. The airborne lidar is used to link ground observations of AGB to space lidar measurements. Two sets of models are generated, the first relating ground estimates of AGB to airborne laser scanning (ALS) measurements and the second set relating ALS estimates of AGB (generated using the first model set) to GLAS measurements. GLAS then, is used as a sampling tool within a hybrid estimation framework to generate stratum-, state-, and national-level AGB estimates. A two-phase variance estimator is employed to quantify GLAS sampling variability and, additively, ALS-GLAS model variability in this current, three-phase (ground-ALS-space lidar) study. The model variance component characterizes the variability of the regression coefficients used to predict ALS-based estimates of biomass as a function of GLAS measurements. Three different types of predictive models are considered in CONUS to determine which produced biomass totals closest to ground-based national forest inventory estimates - (1) linear (LIN), (2) linear-no-intercept (LNI), and (3) log-linear. For CONUS at the national level, the GLAS LNI model estimate (23.95 +/- 0.45 Gt AGB), agreed most closely with the US national forest inventory ground estimate, 24.17 +/- 0.06 Gt, i.e., within 1%. The national biomass total based on linear ground-ALS and ALS-GLAS models (25.87 +/- 0.49 Gt) overestimated the national ground-based estimate by 7.5%. The comparable log-linear model result (63.29 +/-1.36 Gt) overestimated ground results by 261%. All three national biomass GLAS estimates, LIN, LNI, and log-linear, are based on 241,718 pulses collected on 230 orbits. The US national forest inventory (ground) estimates are based on 119

  8. Lidar-Based Estimates of Above-Ground Biomass in the Continental US and Mexico Using Ground, Airborne, and Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Ross; Margolis, Hank; Montesano, Paul; Sun, Guoqing; Cook, Bruce; Corp, Larry; Andersen, Hans-Erik; DeJong, Ben; Pellat, Fernando Paz; Fickel, Thaddeus; Kauffman, Jobriath; Prisley, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Existing national forest inventory plots, an airborne lidar scanning (ALS) system, and a space profiling lidar system (ICESat-GLAS) are used to generate circa 2005 estimates of total aboveground dry biomass (AGB) in forest strata, by state, in the continental United States (CONUS) and Mexico. The airborne lidar is used to link ground observations of AGB to space lidar measurements. Two sets of models are generated, the first relating ground estimates of AGB to airborne laser scanning (ALS) measurements and the second set relating ALS estimates of AGB (generated using the first model set) to GLAS measurements. GLAS then, is used as a sampling tool within a hybrid estimation framework to generate stratum-, state-, and national-level AGB estimates. A two-phase variance estimator is employed to quantify GLAS sampling variability and, additively, ALS-GLAS model variability in this current, three-phase (ground-ALS-space lidar) study. The model variance component characterizes the variability of the regression coefficients used to predict ALS-based estimates of biomass as a function of GLAS measurements. Three different types of predictive models are considered in CONUS to determine which produced biomass totals closest to ground-based national forest inventory estimates - (1) linear (LIN), (2) linear-no-intercept (LNI), and (3) log-linear. For CONUS at the national level, the GLAS LNI model estimate (23.95 +/- 0.45 Gt AGB), agreed most closely with the US national forest inventory ground estimate, 24.17 +/- 0.06 Gt, i.e., within 1%. The national biomass total based on linear ground-ALS and ALS-GLAS models (25.87 +/- 0.49 Gt) overestimated the national ground-based estimate by 7.5%. The comparable log-linear model result (63.29 +/-1.36 Gt) overestimated ground results by 261%. All three national biomass GLAS estimates, LIN, LNI, and log-linear, are based on 241,718 pulses collected on 230 orbits. The US national forest inventory (ground) estimates are based on 119

  9. Continuous ground-based aerosol Lidar observation during seasonal pollution events at Wuxi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Man Sing; Qin, Kai; Lian, Hong; Campbell, James R.; Lee, Kwon Ho; Sheng, Shijie

    2017-04-01

    Haze pollution has long been a significant research topic and challenge in China, with adverse effects on air quality, agricultural production, as well as human health. In coupling with ground-based Lidar measurements, air quality observation, meteorological data, and backward trajectories model, two typical haze events at Wuxi, China are analyzed respectively, depicting summer and winter scenarios. Results indicate that the winter haze pollution is a compound pollution process mainly affected by calm winds that induce pollution accumulation near the surface. In the summer case, with the exception of influence from PM2.5 concentrations, ozone is the main pollutant and regional transport is also a significant influencing factor. Both events are marked by enhanced PM2.5 concentrations, driven by anthropogenic emissions of pollutants such as vehicle exhaust and factory fumes. Meteorological factors such as wind speed/direction and relative humidity are also contributed. These results indicate how the vertical profile offered by routine regional Lidar monitoring helps aid in understanding local variability and trends, which may be adapted for developing abatement strategies that improve air quality.

  10. Correcting atmospheric effects in thermal ground observations for hyperspectral emissivity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Joris; Buitrago, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of Land surface temperature is of crucial importance in energy balance studies and environmental modeling. Accurate retrieval of land surface temperature (LST) demands detailed knowledge of the land surface emissivity. Measured radiation by remote sensing sensors to land surface temperature can only be performed using a-priori knowledge of the emissivity. Uncertainties in the retrieval of this emissivity can cause huge errors in LST estimations. The retrieval of emissivity (and LST) is per definition an underdetermined inversion, as only one observation is made while two variables are to be estimated. Several researches have therefore been performed on measuring emissivity, such as the normalized emissivity method, the temperature-emissivity separation (TES) using the minimum and maximum difference of emissivity and the use of vegetation indices. In each of these approaches atmospherically corrected radiance measurements by remote sensing sensors are correlated to ground measurements. Usually these ground measurements are performed with the ground equivalent of the remote sensing sensors; the CIMEL 312-2 has the same spectral bands as ASTER. This way parameterizations acquired this way are only usable for specific sensors and need to be redone for newer sensors. Recently hyperspectral thermal radiometers, such as the MIDAC, have been developed that can solve this problem. By using hyperspectral observations of emissivity, together with sensor simulators, ground measurements of different satellite sensor can be simulated. This facilitates the production of validation data for the different TES algorithms. However before such measurements can be performed extra steps of processing need to be performed. Atmospheric correction becomes more important in hyperspectral observations than for broadband observations, as energy levels measured per band is lower. As such the atmosphere has a relative larger contribution if bandwidths become smaller. The goal of this

  11. Global observation of the ionospheric electronic response to solar events using ground and LEO GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pajares, M.; Juan, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Solé, J. G.

    1998-09-01

    We present in this work the temporal evolution of the three-dimensional electron density at global scale during two ionospheric storms (October 18-19, 1995, and January 10, 1997) computed using only actual Global Positioning System data. The tomographic model is solved by means of a Kalman filtering with a filter updating time of 1 hour in a Sun-fixed reference frame, and with a resolution of 10×10 deg in latitude/local time and 100 km in height including also a protonospheric component (eight layers). The data set contains the data from the International GPS Service IGS (with more than 100 ground GPS stations worldwide distributed) and the GPS/MET low orbiting GPS receiver (both positive and negative elevation observations are used). This means for each storm 1,000,000 of delays, 400 occultations and 3000 unknowns per batch. The International Reference Ionosphere and data coming from the ionosonde of the Ebre observatory are used to show the reliability of the results.

  12. Ground-based Optical Observations of Geophysical Phenomena: Aurora Borealis and Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, Marilia

    2010-10-01

    Advances in low-light level imaging technology have enabled significant improvements in the ground based study of geophysical phenomena. In this talk we focus on two such phenomena that occur in the Earth's ionosphere: aurorae and meteors. Imaging the aurora which is created by the interplay of the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere, provides a tool for remote sensing physical processes that are otherwise very difficult to study. By quantifying the intensities, scale sizes and lifetimes of auroral structures, we can gain significant insight into the physics behind the generation of the aurora and the interaction of the magnetosphere with the solar wind. Additionally, the combination of imaging with radars provides complimentary data and therefore more information than either method on its own. Meteor observations are a perfect example of this because the radar can accurately determine only the line-of-sight component of velocity, while imaging provides the direction of motion, the perpendicular velocity and brightness (a proxy for mass), therefore enabling a much more accurate determination of the full velocity vector and mass.

  13. Ground Radar Polarimetric Observations of High-Frequency Earth-Space Communication Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolen, Steve; Chandrasekar, V.; Benjamin, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Strategic roadmaps for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (REDS) enterprise support near-term high-frequency communication systems that provide moderate to high data rates with dependable service. Near-earth and human planetary exploration will baseline Ka-Band, but may ultimately require the use of even higher frequencies. Increased commercial demand on low-frequency earth-space bands has also led to increased interest in the use of higher frequencies in regions like K u - and K,- band. Data is taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR), which operates at 13.8 GHz, and the true radar reflectivity profile is determined along the PR beam via low-frequency ground based polarimetric observations. The specific differential phase (Kdp) is measured along the beam and a theoretical model is used to determine the expected specific attenuation (k). This technique, called the k-Kdp method, uses a Fuzzy-Logic model to determine the hydrometeor type along the PR beam from which the appropriate k-Kdp relationship is used to determine k and, ultimately, the total path-integrated attenuation (PIA) on PR measurements. Measurements from PR and the NCAR S-POL radar were made during the TEFLUN-B experiment that took place near Melbourne, FL in 1998, and the TRMM-LBA campaign near Ji-Parana, Brazil in 1999.

  14. Observations of ground-state OH in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, K. J.; Whiteoak, J. B.

    1997-11-01

    We have carried out a series of observations of the 1665- and 1667-MHz transitions of the 2Pi3/2, J = 3/2 OH ground state towards six selected H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (IRAS 05011-6815 and MRC 0510-689, 0513-694B, 0539-691, 0540-696B, 0540-697A) using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The study has provided the first accurate positions for known 1665- and 1667-MHz OH masers as well as detecting several new masers. The regions all contain H2O or CH3OH masers but OH masers were detected in only four. The 1.6-GHz continuum emission was also imaged to investigate its spatial relationship to the associated OH maser. Although some masers are close to compact continuum components, in other cases they are near the continuum distribution boundaries and perhaps have been created as a result of the H II region interacting with the surrounding interstellar medium.

  15. Ground-Based Observations of Saturn's North Polar Spot and Hexagon.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lavega, A; Lecacheux, J; Colas, F; Laques, P

    1993-04-16

    Ground-based observations of two conspicuous features near the north pole of Saturn, the polar vortex and the hexagonal wave structure, were made from July 1990 to October 1991, 10 years after their discovery. During this period the polar spot drifted in longitude, relative to system III, by -0.0353 degrees per day on average. Superimposed on this mean motion, the spot also underwent short-term rapid excursions in longitude of up to approximately 14 degrees at rates of up to approximately 1 degrees per day. The spot also exhibited irregular variations in its latitude location. A combination of these data together with those obtained by Voyager 1 and 2 in 1980 and 1981 shows that the spot drifted -0.0577 degrees per day for the 11-year interval from 1980 to 1991. The large lifetime of both features indicates that they are insensitive to the strong variations in the seasonal heating of the cloud layers in the upper polar atmosphere.

  16. OGLE-2015-BLG-0196: Ground-based Gravitational Microlens Parallax Confirmed by Space-based Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Zhu, Wei; and; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; The OGLE Collaboration; Yee, J. C.; Beichman, C.; Calchi Novati, S.; Carey, S.; Bryden, C.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, Calen B.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; The Spitzer Microlensing Team

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the binary gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0196. The event lasted for almost a year, and the light curve exhibited significant deviations from the lensing model based on the rectilinear lens-source relative motion, enabling us to measure the microlens parallax. The ground-based microlens parallax is confirmed by the data obtained from space-based microlens observations using the Spitzer telescope. By additionally measuring the angular Einstein radius from the analysis of the resolved caustic crossing, the physical parameters of the lens are determined up to the twofold degeneracy, u0 < 0 and u0 > 0, solutions caused by the well-known “ecliptic” degeneracy. It is found that the binary lens is composed of two M dwarf stars with similar masses, M1 = 0.38 ± 0.04 M⊙ (0.50 ± 0.05 M⊙) and M2 = 0.38 ± 0.04 M⊙ (0.55 ± 0.06 M⊙), and the distance to the lens is DL = 2.77 ± 0.23 kpc (3.30 ± 0.29 kpc). Here the physical parameters outside and inside the parentheses are for the u0 < 0 and u0 > 0 solutions, respectively.

  17. Comparison Of Dawn, Hubble Space Telescope, And Ground-based Observations Of Vesta: What We Learned So Far?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Vishnu; Li, J.; Le Corre, L.; Russell, C. T.; Scully, J. E. C.; Becker, K. J.; Park, R.; Gaskell, R.; Gaffey, M. J.; Nathues, A.

    2012-10-01

    NASA’s Dawn spacecraft observations of asteroid Vesta have revealed a surface that shows highest diversity in albedo, color and composition than any asteroid visited by a spacecraft so far. Ground-based and HST observations of Vesta showed hemispherical and rotational variations attributed to igneous and impact processes that have shaped Vesta’s surface since its formation. Here we compare interpretation of Vesta’s rotation period, pole position, albedo, topography, color and compositional properties from ground-based telescopes, HST and Dawn. Our goal is to provide ground truth for prior observations and help identify the limits of ground/HST-based studies of asteroids. We also present HST and Dawn albedo and color maps of Vesta in the Claudia (used by the Dawn team) and IAU (similar to Thomas et al. 1997) coordinate systems. These maps should help observers orient themselves and identify compositional and albedo features from prior studies. We have linked several albedo features identified on HST maps to morphological features on Vesta using Dawn Framing Camera data. Rotational spectral variations observed from ground-based studies are also consistent with those observed by Dawn. While past interpretation of some of these features was tenuous, they were reasonable for the limitations set by the data and our knowledge of Vesta and HED meteorites at that time. Our analysis shows ground-based and HST observations are critical for our understanding of small bodies and provide valuable support ongoing and future spacecraft missions. This research was supported by NASA Dawn Participating Scientist Program Grant NNX10AR22G-DAVPS, and NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Grant NNX07AP73G.

  18. Ground-Water Quality and Potential Effects of Individual Sewage Disposal System Effluent on Ground-Water Quality in Park County, Colorado, 2001-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Lisa D.; Ortiz, Roderick F.

    2007-01-01

    In 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Park County, Colorado, began a study to evaluate ground-water quality in the various aquifers in Park County that supply water to domestic wells. The focus of this study was to identify and describe the principal natural and human factors that affect ground-water quality. In addition, the potential effects of individual sewage disposal system (ISDS) effluent on ground-water quality were evaluated. Ground-water samples were collected from domestic water-supply wells from July 2001 through October 2004 in the alluvial, crystalline-rock, sedimentary-rock, and volcanic-rock aquifers to assess general ground-water quality and effects of ISDS's on ground-water quality throughout Park County. Samples were analyzed for physical properties, major ions, nutrients, bacteria, and boron; and selected samples also were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon, human-related (wastewater) compounds, trace elements, radionuclides, and age-dating constituents (tritium and chlorofluorocarbons). Drinking-water quality is adequate for domestic use throughout Park County with a few exceptions. Only about 3 percent of wells had concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, and (or) uranium that exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency national, primary drinking-water standards. These primary drinking-water standards were exceeded only in wells completed in the crystalline-rock aquifers in eastern Park County. Escherichia coli bacteria were detected in one well near Guffey, and total coliform bacteria were detected in about 11 percent of wells sampled throughout the county. The highest total coliform concentrations were measured southeast of the city of Jefferson and west of Tarryall Reservoir. Secondary drinking-water standards were exceeded more frequently. About 19 percent of wells had concentrations of one or more constituents (pH, chloride, fluoride, sulfate, and dissolved solids) that exceeded secondary drinking-water standards

  19. Dust forecast over North Africa: verification with satellite and ground based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Aditi; Kumar, Sumit; George, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Arid regions of North Africa are considered as one of the major dust source. Present study focuses on the forecast of aerosol optical depth (AOD) of dust over different regions of North Africa. NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM) produces dust AOD forecasts at different wavelengths with lead time upto 240 hr, based on 00UTC initial conditions. Model forecast of dust AOD at 550 nm up to 72 hr forecast, based on different initial conditions are verified against satellite and ground based observations of total AOD during May-June 2014 with the assumption that except dust, presence of all other aerosols type are negligible. Location specific and geographical distribution of dust AOD forecast is verified against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station observations of total and coarse mode AOD. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dark target and deep blue merged level 3 total aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) retrieved dust AOD at 532 nm are also used for verification. CALIOP dust AOD was obtained by vertical integration of aerosol extinction coefficient at 532 nm from the aerosol profile level 2 products. It is found that at all the selected AERONET stations, the trend in dust AODs is well predicted by NCUM up to three days advance. Good correlation, with consistently low bias (~ +/-0.06) and RMSE (~ 0.2) values, is found between model forecasts and point measurements of AERONET, except over one location Cinzana (Mali). Model forecast consistently overestimated the dust AOD compared to CALIOP dust AOD, with a bias of 0.25 and RMSE of 0.40.

  20. Jovian thundercloud observation with Jovian orbiter and ground-based telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yukihiro; Nakajima, Kensuke; Takeuchi, Satoru; Sato, Mitsuteru; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Makoto; Yair, Yoav; Fischer, Georg; Aplin, Karen

    The latest observational and theoretical studies suggest that thunderstorms in Jupiter's at-mosphere are very important subject not only for understanding of meteorology, which may determine the large scale structures such as belt/zone and big ovals, but also for probing the water abundance of the deep atmosphere, which is crucial to constrain the behavior of volatiles in early solar system. Here we suggest a very simple high-speed imager on board Jovian orbiter, Optical Lightning Detector, OLD, optimized for detecting optical emissions from lightning dis-charge in Jupiter. OLD consists of radiation-tolerant CMOS sensors and two H Balmer Alpha line (656.3nm) filters. In normal sampling mode the frame intervals is 29ms with a full frame format of 512x512 pixels and in high-speed sampling mode the interval could be reduced down to 0.1ms by concentrating a limited area of 30x30 pixels. Weight, size and power consump-tion are about 1kg, 16x7x5.5 cm (sensor) and 16x12x4 cm (circuit), and 4W, respectively, though they can be reduced according to the spacecraft resources and required environmental tolerance. Also we plan to investigate the optical flashes using a ground-based middle-sized telescope, which will be built by Hokkaido University, with narrow-band high speed imaging unit using an EM-CCD camera. Observational strategy with these optical lightning detectors and spectral imagers, which enables us to estimate the horizontal motion and altitude of clouds, will be introduced.

  1. Polarization analysis of VLF/ELF chorus waves observed at two ground stations at subauroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez C., C.; Shiokawa, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Ozaki, M.; Schofield, I.; Connors, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Chorus waves are naturally occurring and very intense electromagnetic whistler-mode wave emissions, generated near the geomagnetic equator and propagating through the geomagnetic field lines to the ionosphere. They are believed to be of a major contribution to the acceleration and loss of radiation belt particles (Omura et al., 2007, Inan et al., 1982). The spatial and temporal variations of the acceleration region of radiation belt electrons might be directly linked to the spatial and temporal variations of Very Low Frequency/Extremely Low Frequency (VLF/ELF) ionospheric exit point. Hence this research will focus on studying VLF/ELF chorus characteristics at frequencies of 0.003-30kHz with the objective of locating their ionospheric exit point. During February 17 - 25, 2012, the VLF-CHAIN campaign observed VLF/ELF emissions at subauroral latitudes using two loop antennas at Athabasca (MLAT=61.31, L=4.3) and Fort Vermillion (MLAT=64.51, L=5.4), Canada. Since the end of this campaign, continuous measurements of VLF/ELF waves with a sampling rate of 100 kHz, have been made at Athabasca. We have developed a polarization and spectral analysis method that has been successfully tested with an artificial wave with known polarization parameters. We intend to apply this process to raw data from both ground stations. The objective is to study the temporal variations of polarization parameters for several types of chorus wave emissions observed during the VLF-CHAIN campaign, such as, quasi-periodic emissions, falling-tone and rising-tone chorus, as well as bursty-patch emissions.

  2. Progress on Analysis of Ground-based Observations of the Ring Plane Crossings of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Dunn, D. E.; Hammel, H. B.; Showalter, M. R.; Gibbard, S. G.; Matthews, K.; van Dam, M.; Sromovsky, L.; Fry, P.; Stam, D.; Hartung, M.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2008-09-01

    In 2007, the rings of Uranus appeared edge-on as seen from Earth for the first time since their 1977 discovery. Three ring plane crossings (RPX) occurred over a 9.5 months period: 3 May 2007, 16 August 2007, and 20 February 2008. The Sun crossed the ring plane on 7 December 2007 (equinox). We will present RPX observations at 2.2 micrometers obtained with the 10-m Keck, 8-m VLT and 5-m Palomar telescopes. This period includes the RPX on August 16, and observations of the dark (unlit) face of the rings (May-August; December) and the lit side under small ring inclination angles (August-September). Our first ground-based image of the dark side of the rings of Uranus revealed a system that differs radically from what has been seen before. We saw a cloud of faint dust permeating the ring system. The dust showed no correlation with the well-known narrow rings, and also showed almost no correlation with the embedded dust rings imaged by Voyager. The distribution of dust within the Uranian ring system appears to have changed significantly since the 1986 Voyager flyby; in particular the zeta ring moved outwards by a few 1000 km since the Voyager era (if it is the same ring as seen by Voyager). These first results were confirmed by the newer data. Dunn et al (2002, Icarus 160, 132-160) developed a model to simulate Saturn's radio emission scattered off Saturn's ring particles. We adapted this model to simulate the Sun's (infrared) light scattered off the rings of Uranus. We will use this model to simulate the time evolution of the main rings during the ring plane crossings. Such simulations enable us to extract information on the individual rings and dust sheets in the system, under small ring inclination angles. We will present first results from this endeavour.

  3. Sensitivity of aerosol retrieval to geometrical configuration of ground-based sun/sky radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, B.; Dubovik, O.; Toledano, C.; Berjon, A.; Cachorro, V. E.; Lapyonok, T.; Litvinov, P.; Goloub, P.

    2014-01-01

    A sensitivity study of aerosol retrievals to the geometrical configuration of the ground-based sky radiometer observations is carried out through inversion tests. Specifically, this study is focused on principal plane and almucantar observations, since these geometries are employed in AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork). The following effects have been analyzed with simulated data for both geometries: sensitivity of the retrieval to variability of the observed scattering angle range, uncertainties in the assumptions of the aerosol vertical distribution, surface reflectance, possible instrument pointing errors, and the effects of the finite field of view. The synthetic observations of radiometer in the tests were calculated using a previous climatology data set of retrieved aerosol properties over three AERONET sites: Mongu (Zambia) for biomass burning aerosol, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC; Maryland, USA) for urban aerosol and Solar Village (Saudi Arabia) for desert dust aerosol. The results show that almucantar retrievals, in general, are more reliable than principal plane retrievals in presence of the analyzed error sources. This fact partially can be explained by practical advantages of the almucantar geometry: the symmetry between its left and right branches that helps to eliminate some observational uncertainties and the constant value of optical mass during the measurements, that make almucantar observations nearly independent of the vertical variability of aerosol. Nevertheless, almucantar retrievals present instabilities at high sun elevations due to the reduction of the scattering angle range coverage, resulting in decrease of information content. It is in such conditions that principal plane retrievals show a better stability, as shown by the simulation analysis of the three different aerosol models. The last part of the study is devoted to the identification of possible differences between the aerosol retrieval results obtained from real AERONET data

  4. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval based on ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, Frederik; Hendrick, Francois; Goutail, Florence; Fayt, Caroline; Merlaud, Alexis; Pinardi, Gaia; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the most important chemically active trace gases in the troposphere. Listed as primary pollutant, it is also a key precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone, aerosols, and acid rain, and can contribute locally to radiative forcing. The long-term monitoring of this species is therefore of great relevance. Here we present a new method to retrieve tropospheric NO2 vertical column amounts from ground-based zenith-sky measurements of scattered sunlight. It is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the DOAS analysis of zenith radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low tropospheric NO2 content, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total slant column using stratospheric vertical columns measured at twilight and simulated stratospheric NO2 diurnal variation, (4) estimation of the tropospheric vertical columns by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors. The retrieval algorithm is tested on a 2 month dataset acquired from June to July 2009 by the BIRA MAX-DOAS instrument in the framework of the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI). The tropospheric vertical column amounts derived from zenith-sky observations are compared to the vertical columns retrieved from the off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to data of a co-located SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales) spectrometer operated by LATMOS. First results show a good agreement between the different data sets with correlation coefficients and slopes close to or larger than 0.85. We observe that the main error sources arise from the uncertainties in the determination of the residual NO2 amount in the reference spectrum, the stratospheric NO2 abundance and

  5. Double many-body expansion potential energy surface for ground state HSO2.

    PubMed

    Ballester, M Y; Varandas, A J C

    2005-06-07

    A global potential energy surface is reported for the ground electronic state of HSO2 by using the double many-body expansion (DMBE) method. It employs realistic DMBE functions previously reported from accurate ab initio calculations (in some cases, fine tuned to spectroscopic data) for the triatomic fragments, and four-body energy terms that were modelled by fitting novel ab initio FVCAS/AVTZ calculations for the tetratomic system. In some cases, FVCAS/AVDZ energies have been employed after being scaled to FVCAS/AVTZ ones. To assess the role of the dynamical correlation, exploratory single-point Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation calculations have also been conducted at one stationary point. All reported calculations are compared with previous ab initio results for the title system. The potential energy surface predicts HOSO to be the most stable configuration, in good agreement with other theoretical data available in the literature. In turn, the HSO2 isomer with H bonded to S is described as a local minimum, which is stable with respect to the H + SO2 dissociation asymptote.

  6. Overlap statistics of shallow boundary layer clouds: comparing ground-based observations with large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, Emiliano; Corbetta, Gabriele; Heus, Thijs; Neggers, Roel; Crewell, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    As large-scale models for weather and climate have coarse spatial resolutions, they cannot resolve clouds within a vertical grid column and thus rely on parameterizations, leading to uncertainty in the representation of clouds and the way they overlap in the vertical. The uncertainty in the cloud overlap parameterizations remains a significant source of error in the Earth's radiation budget in general circulation models (GCMs). Most studies concerning cloud overlap mainly focused on either large ensemble of cloud types or deep convective cloud fields. Cumuliform boundary layer cloud fields have been less researched despite the fact that their irregularity in shape and in spatial distribution at subgrid scales can impact the cloud overlap significantly. In this study, high-resolution ground-based measurements are used to assess the realism of fine-scale numerical simulations of shallow cumulus cloud fields. The overlap statistics of cumuli as produced by i) local large-eddy simulations (LES) as well as ii) the big-domain ICON at cloud resolving resolutions are confronted with CloudNet datasets at the Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE). Cloud fraction masks are derived for five different cases during the April-August 2013 period, using gridded time-height datasets at various temporal and vertical resolutions. The overlap ratio (R), i.e. the ratio between cloud fraction by volume and by area, is studied as a function of the vertical resolution. Good agreement is found between R derived from observations and simulations. Simulated and observed decorrelation lengths are smaller (< 300 m) than previously reported (> 1 km). A similar diurnal variation in the overlap efficiency is found in observations and simulations. The inefficient overlap we found at sub-grid vertical scales has the potential of significantly affecting the vertical transfer of radiation, yet few GCMs take such overlap at small, unresolved scales into account. A better understanding of the

  7. MAD-4-MITO, a multi array of detectors for ground-based mm/submm SZ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamagna, L.; de Petris, M.; Melchiorri, F.; Battistelli, E.; de Grazia, M.; Luzzi, G.; Orlando, A.; Savini, G.

    2002-05-01

    The last few years have seen a large development of mm technology and ultra-sensitive detectors devoted to microwave astronomy and as