Science.gov

Sample records for ground vehicle operators

  1. Ground Transportation for Polar Operations - 16 Wheel Low-Ground- Pressure Vehicle (LGPB-16)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    MTIIimN/«TAIUItlin MOB CONTENTS AVAIL - INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Page , 1 , 1 DESIGN Concept 3 Prototype Design 4 INITIAL TEST 5 MAMMOTH ...Table 4. Table 5. LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Continued Page Operation of vehicle over undisturbed snow In Mammoth 19 Maneuvering vehicle through use of...calculated ground pressures would be reduced by about 50%. Prior to the first snow test at Mammoth , California, this vehicle was equipped with a

  2. Ground Vehicle Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-20

    Ground Vehicle Robotics Jim Parker Associate Director, Ground Vehicle Robotics UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...DATE 20 AUG 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED 09-05-2013 to 15-08-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics 5a...Willing to take Risk on technology -User Evaluated -Contested Environments -Operational Data Applied Robotics for Installation & Base Ops -Low Risk

  3. NASA's Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles--Effective Space Operations Through Efficient Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Christopher E.; Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Lyles, Gary M.; Onken, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) is charting a renewed course for lunar exploration, with the fielding of a new human-rated space transportation system to replace the venerable Space Shuttle, which will be retired after it completes its missions of building the International Space Station (ISS) and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Powering the future of space-based scientific exploration will be the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, which will transport the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to orbit where it will rendezvous with the Altair Lunar Lander, which will be delivered by the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle (fig. 1). This configuration will empower rekindled investigation of Earth's natural satellite in the not too distant future. This new exploration infrastructure, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), will allow astronauts to leave low-Earth orbit (LEO) for extended lunar missions and preparation for the first long-distance journeys to Mars. All space-based operations - to LEO and beyond - are controlled from Earth. NASA's philosophy is to deliver safe, reliable, and cost-effective architecture solutions to sustain this multi-billion-dollar program across several decades. Leveraging SO years of lessons learned, NASA is partnering with private industry and academia, while building on proven hardware experience. This paper outlines a few ways that the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is working with the Constellation Program and its project offices to streamline ground operations concepts by designing for operability, which reduces lifecycle costs and promotes sustainable space exploration.

  4. Modified Universal Design Survey: Enhancing Operability of Launch Vehicle Ground Crew Worksites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Operability is a driving requirement for next generation space launch vehicles. Launch site ground operations include numerous operator tasks to prepare the vehicle for launch or to perform preflight maintenance. Ensuring that components requiring operator interaction at the launch site are designed for optimal human use is a high priority for operability. To promote operability, a Design Quality Evaluation Survey based on Universal Design framework was developed to support Human Factors Engineering (HFE) evaluation for NASA s launch vehicles. Universal Design per se is not a priority for launch vehicle processing however; applying principles of Universal Design will increase the probability of an error free and efficient design which promotes operability. The Design Quality Evaluation Survey incorporates and tailors the seven Universal Design Principles and adds new measures for Safety and Efficiency. Adapting an approach proven to measure Universal Design Performance in Product, each principle is associated with multiple performance measures which are rated with the degree to which the statement is true. The Design Quality Evaluation Survey was employed for several launch vehicle ground processing worksite analyses. The tool was found to be most useful for comparative judgments as opposed to an assessment of a single design option. It provided a useful piece of additional data when assessing possible operator interfaces or worksites for operability.

  5. NASA's Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles -- Effective Space Operations Through Efficient Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Singer, Christopher E.; Onken, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) plans to return to the Moon by 2020, with the development of a new human-rated space transportation system to replace the Space Shuttle, which is due for retirement in 2010 after it completes its missions of building the International Space Station and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Powering the future of space-based scientific exploration will be the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, which will transport the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to orbit where it will rendezvous with the Lunar Lander. which will be delivered by the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle. This new transportation infrastructure, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), will allow astronauts to leave low-Earth orbit for extended lunar exploration and preparation for the first footprint on Mars. All space-based operations begin and are controlled from Earth. NASA's philosophy is to deliver safe, reliable, and cost-effective solutions to sustain a multi-billion-dollar program across several decades. Leveraging 50 years of lessons learned, NASA is partnering with private industry, while building on proven hardware experience. This paper will discuss how the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is working with the Ares Projects Office to streamline ground operations concepts and reduce costs. Currently, NASA's budget is around $17 billion, which is less than 1 percent of the U.S. Federal budget. Of this amount, NASA invests approximately $4.5 billion each year in Space Shuttle operations, regardless of whether the spacecraft is flying or not. The affordability requirement is for the Ares I to reduce this expense by 50 percent, in order to allow NASA to invest more in space-based scientific operations. Focusing on this metric, the Engineering Directorate provides several solutions-oriented approaches, including Lean/Six Sigma practices and streamlined hardware testing and integration, such as assembling major hardware

  6. Ground and Range Operations for a Heavy-Lift Vehicle: Preliminary Thoughts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabelo, Luis; Zhu, Yanshen; Compton, Jeppie; Bardina, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the ground and range operations for a Shuttle derived Heavy-Lift Vehicle being launched from the Kennedy Space Center on the Eastern range. Comparisons will be made between the Shuttle and a heavy lift configuration (SLS-ETF MPCV April 2011) by contrasting their subsystems. The analysis will also describe a simulation configuration with the potential to be utilized for heavy lift vehicle processing/range simulation modeling and the development of decision-making systems utilized by the range. In addition, a simple simulation model is used to provide the required critical thinking foundations for this preliminary analysis.

  7. TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-30

    TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics Mr. Jim Parker, Associate Director Dr. Greg Hudas, Chief Engineer UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A (OPSEC...TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jim Parker; Greg Hudas 5d. PROJECT...Provide Transition-Ready, Cost-Effective, and Innovative Robotics and Control System Solutions for Manned, Optionally-Manned, and Unmanned Ground Vehicles

  8. LWIR passive perception system for stealthy unmanned ground vehicle night operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daren; Rankin, Arturo; Huertas, Andres; Nash, Jeremy; Ahuja, Gaurav; Matthies, Larry

    2016-05-01

    Resupplying forward-deployed units in rugged terrain in the presence of hostile forces creates a high threat to manned air and ground vehicles. An autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) capable of navigating stealthily at night in off-road and on-road terrain could significantly increase the safety and success rate of such resupply missions for warfighters. Passive night-time perception of terrain and obstacle features is a vital requirement for such missions. As part of the ONR 30 Autonomy Team, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a passive, low-cost night-time perception system under the ONR Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Applied Research program. Using a stereo pair of forward looking LWIR uncooled microbolometer cameras, the perception system generates disparity maps using a local window-based stereo correlator to achieve real-time performance while maintaining low power consumption. To overcome the lower signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution of LWIR thermal imaging technologies, a series of pre-filters were applied to the input images to increase the image contrast and stereo correlator enhancements were applied to increase the disparity density. To overcome false positives generated by mixed pixels, noisy disparities from repeated textures, and uncertainty in far range measurements, a series of consistency, multi-resolution, and temporal based post-filters were employed to improve the fidelity of the output range measurements. The stereo processing leverages multi-core processors and runs under the Robot Operating System (ROS). The night-time passive perception system was tested and evaluated on fully autonomous testbed ground vehicles at SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) and Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California. This paper describes the challenges, techniques, and experimental results of developing a passive, low-cost perception system for night-time autonomous navigation.

  9. NASA Planning for Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Orion Ground Processing Team was originally formed by the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Constellation (Cx) Project Office's Orion Division to define, refine and mature pre-launch and post-landing ground operations for the Orion human spacecraft. The multidisciplined KSC Orion team consisted of KSC civil servant, SAIC, Productivity Apex, Inc. and Boeing-CAPPS engineers, project managers and safety engineers, as well as engineers from Constellation's Orion Project and Lockheed Martin Orion Prime contractor. The team evaluated the Orion design configurations as the spacecraft concept matured between Systems Design Review (SDR), Systems Requirement Review (SRR) and Preliminary Design Review (PDR). The team functionally decomposed prelaunch and post-landing steps at three levels' of detail, or tiers, beginning with functional flow block diagrams (FFBDs). The third tier FFBDs were used to build logic networks and nominal timelines. Orion ground support equipment (GSE) was identified and mapped to each step. This information was subsequently used in developing lower level operations steps in a Ground Operations Planning Document PDR product. Subject matter experts for each spacecraft and GSE subsystem were used to define 5th - 95th percentile processing times for each FFBD step, using the Delphi Method. Discrete event simulations used this information and the logic network to provide processing timeline confidence intervals for launch rate assessments. The team also used the capabilities of the KSC Visualization Lab, the FFBDs and knowledge of the spacecraft, GSE and facilities to build visualizations of Orion pre-launch and postlanding processing at KSC. Visualizations were a powerful tool for communicating planned operations within the KSC community (i.e., Ground Systems design team), and externally to the Orion Project, Lockheed Martin spacecraft designers and other Constellation Program stakeholders during the SRR to PDR timeframe. Other operations planning

  10. Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-14

    Mr. Jim Parker Associate Director Ground Vehicle Robotics Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release Report Documentation Page...Briefing 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2012 to 01-08-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Robotics Presentation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT Provide Transition-Ready, Cost-Effective, and Innovative Robotics and Control System Solutions for Manned, Optionally-Manned, and Unmanned

  11. Visiting Vehicle Ground Trajectory Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamm, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Visiting Vehicle Group needed a targeting tool for vehicles that rendezvous with the ISS. The Visiting Vehicle Ground Trajectory targeting tool provides the ability to perform both realtime and planning operations for the Visiting Vehicle Group. This tool provides a highly reconfigurable base, which allows the Visiting Vehicle Group to perform their work. The application is composed of a telemetry processing function, a relative motion function, a targeting function, a vector view, and 2D/3D world map type graphics. The software tool provides the ability to plan a rendezvous trajectory for vehicles that visit the ISS. It models these relative trajectories using planned and realtime data from the vehicle. The tool monitors ongoing rendezvous trajectory relative motion, and ensures visiting vehicles stay within agreed corridors. The software provides the ability to update or re-plan a rendezvous to support contingency operations. Adding new parameters and incorporating them into the system was previously not available on-the-fly. If an unanticipated capability wasn't discovered until the vehicle was flying, there was no way to update things.

  12. Wide and narrow dual image guidance system for ground vehicle on fast focusing and stereo matching operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2011-10-01

    We have developed the wide and narrow dual image guidance system for ground vehicle on fast focusing and stereo matching operation. The fast focusing catches the distance information of outside world. The stereo matching operation on the focused two wide images finds the characteristic position to detect the fine distance information through the fast focusing using the narrow images due to the camera with the long focal length. Our fast focusing algorithm works precisely on the differential image such as the Daubechies wavelet transformed high pass image, the Roberts image, Prewitt image, Sobel image and the Laplacian image. After the stereo matching operation on the focused wide images, the two cameras serves the narrow image focusing operation. This procedure establishes the reliability of the detection of the object and gives the fine image information of the object. The pointing operation of the long focal length camera of the narrow image uses the related pixel address information due to the stereo matching and the 2 axes gimbal equipment of the precise resolution. We experimented the detection of the object by stereo matching and ranging the fine distance by narrow image focusing. The experiment gives the appropriate detection and fine pointing of the narrow image focusing to meet the guidance capability of the ground vehicle.

  13. 14 CFR 139.329 - Pedestrians and ground vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pedestrians and ground vehicles. 139.329... OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.329 Pedestrians and ground vehicles. In a manner authorized by the... pedestrians and ground vehicles necessary for airport operations; (b) Establish and implement procedures...

  14. 14 CFR 139.329 - Pedestrians and ground vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pedestrians and ground vehicles. 139.329... OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.329 Pedestrians and ground vehicles. In a manner authorized by the... pedestrians and ground vehicles necessary for airport operations; (b) Establish and implement procedures...

  15. 14 CFR 139.329 - Pedestrians and ground vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pedestrians and ground vehicles. 139.329... OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.329 Pedestrians and ground vehicles. In a manner authorized by the... pedestrians and ground vehicles necessary for airport operations; (b) Establish and implement procedures...

  16. Army Ground Vehicle Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-25

    IV (> 75 bhp ) compliant COTS engines and directly integrate into current and new heavy-duty vehicles. • Combat vehicle: permanent armor...propulsion system volume [ bhp /ft3] — Air filtration requirements, thermal management system, transmission, engine, ducting requirements, final drives...transmission 40 ft3;  engine 31 ft3;  air filtration 31 ft3 o Bradley FIV: Cummins VTA903 has SHRR of 0.6 BHP / BHP vs. today’s COTS > 0.85

  17. UAVs for the Operational Commander: Don’t Ground MAV (Manned Aerial Vehicles)!

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-04

    start, taxi, launch, recover and park aircraft on the deck. 78 Studies highlight many gesture recognition difficulties associated with dynamic...American Helicopter Society, 2007). 78 --. CV NATOPS Manual. (Lakehurst, NJ: Naval Air Systems Command, 2007). 79 Venetsky, Larry. Gesture Recognition for...Venetsky, Larry, Mark Husni and Mark Yager. Gesture Recognition for UCAV-N Flight Deck Operations. Problem Definition Final Report. Lakehurst, NJ

  18. Investigating the Usefulness of Operator Aids for Autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicles Performing Reconnaissance Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    obstacle are represented with red dots and the areas shaded with pink are unknown due to an obstructed view from the UGV...related to the robotic asset. To accomplish all of these tasks, an operator’s cognitive resources are sure to be taxed (Mitchell, 2008). Operator...dots and the areas shaded with pink are unknown due to an obstructed view from the UGV. The WMI display has two screens showing different views of

  19. Development and evaluation of the Stingray, an amphibious maritime interdiction operations unmanned ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Castelli, Robin

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps conduct thousands of Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIOs) every year around the globe. Navy Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure (VBSS) teams regularly board suspect ships and perform search operations, often in hostile environments. There is a need for a small tactical robot that can be deployed ahead of the team to provide enhanced situational awareness in these boarding, breaching, and clearing operations. In 2011, the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific conducted user evaluations on a number of small throwable robots and sensors, verified the requirements, and developed the key performance parameters (KPPs) for an MIO robot. Macro USA Corporation was then tasked to design and develop two prototype systems, each consisting of one control/display unit and two small amphibious Stingray robots. Technical challenges included the combination paddle wheel/shock-absorbing wheel, the tradeoff between impact resistance, size, and buoyancy, and achieving adequate traction on wet surfaces. This paper describes the technical design of these robots and the results of subsequent user evaluations by VBSS teams.

  20. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    GOAL, is a test engineer oriented language designed to be used to standardize procedure terminology and as the test programming language to be used for ground checkout operations in a space vehicle launch environment. The material presented concerning GOAL includes: (1) a historical review, (2) development objectives and requirements, (3) language scope and format, and (4) language capabilities.

  1. Analyzing Vehicle Operator Deviations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    related to vehicle operator deviations ( VODs ). VODs occur when a vehicle enters the airport movement area without ATC approval. We developed a VOD ...prediction model to help understand the human factors causes associated with different types of VODs . We then examined the validity of the model, using...the data that we needed was missing due to incomplete reporting of the human factors associated with a given VOD . To aid in the development of a

  2. Ground Processing Affordability for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, John; Scott, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles and most of their payloads spend the majority of their time on the ground. The cost of ground operations is very high. So, why so often is so little attention given to ground processing during development? The current global space industry and economic environment are driving more need for efficiencies to save time and money. Affordability and sustainability are more important now than ever. We can not continue to treat space vehicles as mere science projects. More RLV's (Reusable Launch Vehicles) are being developed for the gains of reusability which are not available for ELV's (Expendable Launch Vehicles). More human-rated vehicles are being developed, with the retirement of the Space Shuttles, and for a new global space race, yet these cost more than the many unmanned vehicles of today. We can learn many lessons on affordability from RLV's. DFO (Design for Operations) considers ground operations during design, development, and manufacturing-before the first flight. This is often minimized for space vehicles, but is very important. Vehicles are designed for launch and mission operations. You will not be able to do it again if it is too slow or costly to get there. Many times, technology changes faster than space products such that what is launched includes outdated features, thus reducing competitiveness. Ground operations must be considered for the full product Lifecycle, from concept to retirement. Once manufactured, launch vehicles along with their payloads and launch systems require a long path of processing before launch. Initial assembly and testing always discover problems to address. A solid integration program is essential to minimize these impacts, as was seen in the Constellation Ares I-X test rocket. For RLV's, landing/recovery and post-flight turnaround activities are performed. Multi-use vehicles require reconfiguration. MRO (Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul) must be well-planned--- even for the unplanned problems. Defect limits and

  3. Ground Vehicle Power and Mobility (GVPM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-15

    distribution is unlimited. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated...information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports ...1. REPORT DATE APR 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Power & Mobility (GVPM) 5a. CONTRACT

  4. Ground Vehicle Power and Mobility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-17

    foreign oil – Alternative sources sought – wind, solar , bio-mass, waste to energy • Operational issues – Battery usage & limitations – energy & power...Inefficient management/ distribution of power – Demand for soldier- wearable power • Increased emphasis on system power metrics (KPPs, low consumption...Full Vehicle Environmental Test Cell – Ambient temperature control to 160°F – Solar load simulation – Wind speeds up to 20mph in eight possible

  5. Ground vehicle control at NIST: From teleoperation to autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Karl N.; Juberts, Maris; Legowik, Steven A.; Nashman, Marilyn; Schneiderman, Henry; Scott, Harry A.; Szabo, Sandor

    1994-01-01

    NIST is applying their Real-time Control System (RCS) methodology for control of ground vehicles for both the U.S. Army Researh Lab, as part of the DOD's Unmanned Ground Vehicles program, and for the Department of Transportation's Intelligent Vehicle/Highway Systems (IVHS) program. The actuated vehicle, a military HMMWV, has motors for steering, brake, throttle, etc. and sensors for the dashboard gauges. For military operations, the vehicle has two modes of operation: a teleoperation mode--where an operator remotely controls the vehicle over an RF communications network; and a semi-autonomous mode called retro-traverse--where the control system uses an inertial navigation system to steer the vehicle along a prerecorded path. For the IVHS work, intelligent vision processing elements replace the human teleoperator to achieve autonomous, visually guided road following.

  6. Ground Vehicle Power and Mobility Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-30

    1 Ground Vehicle Power and Mobility Overview 30 May 07 Jennifer Hitchcock - Associate Director of Ground Vehicle Power and Mobility Report ... REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ground Vehicle Power and Mobility Overview 30 May 07 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...SBCT, PM FTS, PM FCS (BCT) Non-primary Power System Technology OPOC APU Rotary Engine APU SOFC APU Non-propulsion Load Analysis*(CA)-Congressional

  7. Status of Training Vehicles for U.S. Ground Forces Deploying in Support of Operation Iraqi Freedom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-06

    Buffalo (or Mine Protection Clearance Vehicle), Cougar, Husky, and Meerkat vehicles. For example, the Buffalos are considered counter-improvised...Equipment Types/Models Wheeled Vehicles M998 M1025* M1026* M1097 M1114* M1151* Buffalo* Husky* Meerkat * Cougar* Crew-Served Weapons M249

  8. Sensor deployment on unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhart, Grant R.; Witus, Gary

    2007-10-01

    TARDEC has been developing payloads for small robots as part of its unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) development programs. These platforms typically weigh less than 100 lbs and are used for various physical security and force protection applications. This paper will address a number of technical issues including platform mobility, payload positioning, sensor configuration and operational tradeoffs. TARDEC has developed a number of robots with different mobility mechanisms including track, wheel and hybrid track/wheel running gear configurations. An extensive discussion will focus upon omni-directional vehicle (ODV) platforms with enhanced intrinsic mobility for positioning sensor payloads. This paper also discusses tradeoffs between intrinsic platform mobility and articulated arm complexity for end point positioning of modular sensor packages.

  9. TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics: Vehicle Dynamic Characterization and Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    PROPULSE ( Hybrid Diesel- Electric System with Export Power), Command Zone (integrated vehicle control and diagnostic system), and TerraMax (Unmanned...subassemblies that would be common on ground vehicles. Powertrain Systems: Gas Powered, Diesel, Turbo Diesel, Gas Turbine, Hybrid : Gas- Electric ...Diesel- Electric , Series, Parallel. Power Distribution: RWD, FWD, AWD, open diff, LSD, Torsen diff, differential braking (traction control), drive by

  10. The ground vehicle manager's associate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Gary R.; Burnard, Robert H.; Bewley, William L.; Bullock, Bruce L.

    1994-01-01

    An overview of MAX, a software framework for manager's associate systems, is presented. MAX is used to develop and execute a problem-solving strategy for the task planning of semi-autonomous agents with the assistance of human performance. This paper describes the use of MAX in the supervisory management of robotic vehicles as they explore a planetary surface.

  11. An unmanned ground vehicle for landmine remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Steven R.; Guilberto, Jose; Ogg, Wade; Wedeward, Kevin; Bruder, Stephen; El-Osery, Aly

    2004-09-01

    Anti-tank (AT) landmines slow down and endanger military advances and present sizeable humanitarian problems. The remediation of these mines by direct human intervention is both dangerous and costly. The Intelligent Systems & Robotics Group (ISRG) at New Mexico Tech has provided a partial solution to this problem by developing an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) to remediate these mines without endangering human lives. This paper presents an overview of the design and operation of this UGV. Current results and future work are also described herein. To initiate the remediation process the UGV is given the GPS coordinates of previously detected landmines. Once the UGV autonomously navigates to an acceptable proximity of the landmine, a remote operator acquires control over a wireless network link using a joystick on a base station. Utilizing two cameras mounted on the UGV, the operator is able to accurately position the UGV directly over the landmine. The UGV houses a self-contained drill system equipped with its own processing resources, sensors, and actuators. The drill system deploys a neutralizing device over the landmine to neutralize it. One such device, developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), employs incendiary materials to melt through the container of the landmine and slowly burn the explosive material, thereby safely and remotely disabling the landmine.

  12. 40 CFR 1066.415 - Vehicle operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vehicle operation. 1066.415 Section... VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Preparing Vehicles and Running an Exhaust Emission Test § 1066.415 Vehicle operation. This section describes how to test a conventionally configured vehicle (vehicles...

  13. Operator interface for vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bissontz, Jay E

    2015-03-10

    A control interface for drivetrain braking provided by a regenerative brake and a non-regenerative brake is implemented using a combination of switches and graphic interface elements. The control interface comprises a control system for allocating drivetrain braking effort between the regenerative brake and the non-regenerative brake, a first operator actuated control for enabling operation of the drivetrain braking, and a second operator actuated control for selecting a target braking effort for drivetrain braking. A graphic display displays to an operator the selected target braking effort and can be used to further display actual braking effort achieved by drivetrain braking.

  14. Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing in Support of Launch Vehicle Loads and Controls Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Bruce R.; Davis, Susan R.; Salyer, Blaine H.; Tuma, Margaret L.

    2008-01-01

    All structural systems possess a basic set of physical characteristics unique to that system. These unique physical characteristics include items such as mass distribution and damping. When specified, they allow engineers to understand and predict how a structural system behaves under given loading conditions and different methods of control. These physical properties of launch vehicles may be predicted by analysis or measured by certain types of tests. Generally, these properties are predicted by analysis during the design phase of a launch vehicle and then verified by testing before the vehicle becomes operational. A ground vibration test (GVT) is intended to measure by test the fundamental dynamic characteristics of launch vehicles during various phases of flight. During the series of tests, properties such as natural frequencies, mode shapes, and transfer functions are measured directly. These data will then be used to calibrate loads and control systems analysis models for verifying analyses of the launch vehicle. NASA manned launch vehicles have undergone ground vibration testing leading to the development of successful launch vehicles. A GVT was not performed on the inaugural launch of the unmanned Delta III which was lost during launch. Subsequent analyses indicated had a GVT been performed, it would have identified instability issues avoiding loss of the vehicle. This discussion will address GVT planning, set-up, execution and analyses, for the Saturn and Shuttle programs, and will also focus on the current and on-going planning for the Ares I and V Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Test (IVGVT).

  15. Frameworks and middleware for umanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broten, Greg S.; Monckton, Simon P.

    2005-05-01

    Modern unmanned vehicles (UV) are complex systems. The current generation of UVs have extensive capabilities allowing the UV to sense its environment, create an internal representation of the environment, navigate within this environment by commanding movement and accomplish this in real-time. This proliferation of UV capabilities has resulted in large and complex software systems that are often distributed across multiple processors. Such systems have a reputation for convoluted implementations that result in software that is difficult to understand, expand, debug and repair. In order for a UV to operate successfully this issue of complex distributed software systems must be mastered. The computing science field views a modular, component based design as the best approach for implementing complex distributed software systems. Methodologies and toolkits such as frameworks and middleware have been developed to enable and simplify the implementation of distributed software systems. DRDC and other research institutions are developing UVs frameworks using CORBA middleware. A CORBA interface enables location transparency, thus it does not matter whether the component is locally or remotely located. The UV autonomy framework developed at DRDC is based upon the Miro framework which was originally developed for soccer playing robots. The Miro framework implements many key features and methods required by autonomous systems and Miro's basis in CORBA allows it to be easily modified and extended to support the unique requirements of military UVs. DRDC has modified and extended Miro so that it now supports autonomous unmanned ground vehicles. The process of implementing these changes substantiated the advantages of frameworks and middleware since Miro proved to be highly flexible and easy to extend.

  16. Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-05-01

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation is this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one electric or hybrid van and four electric cars during the first two years of this five year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort stationwagons.

  17. Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation is this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort stationwagons.

  18. Adaptive nonlinear control for autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, William S.

    We present the background and motivation for ground vehicle autonomy, and focus on uses for space-exploration. Using a simple design example of an autonomous ground vehicle we derive the equations of motion. After providing the mathematical background for nonlinear systems and control we present two common methods for exactly linearizing nonlinear systems, feedback linearization and backstepping. We use these in combination with three adaptive control methods: model reference adaptive control, adaptive sliding mode control, and extremum-seeking model reference adaptive control. We show the performances of each combination through several simulation results. We then consider disturbances in the system, and design nonlinear disturbance observers for both single-input-single-output and multi-input-multi-output systems. Finally, we show the performance of these observers with simulation results.

  19. Space Operations for a New Era of Exploration Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2005, Ares has made substantial progress on designing, developing, and testing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and has continued its in-depth studies of the Ares V cargo launch vehicles. The combined Ares I/Ares V architecture was designed to reduce the complexity and labor intensity of ground operations for America s next journeys beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO). The Ares Projects goal is to instill operability as part of the vehicles requirements development, design, and operations. Since completing the Preliminary Design Review in 2008, work has continued to push the Ares I beyond the concept phase and into full vehicle development, while tackling fresh engineering challenges and performing pathfinding activities related to vehicle manufacturing and ground operations.

  20. Mission aware energy saving strategies for Army ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattathreya, Macam S.

    on, gear is on neutral position, the vehicle is stationary, and the alternator powers the systems. The proposed energy saving strategy for silent surveillance mission minimizes unnecessary battery discharges by controlling the power states of systems according to the mission needs and available battery capacity. Initial experiments show that the proposed approach saves 3% energy when compared with the baseline strategy for one scenario and 1.8% for the second scenario. The proposed energy saving strategy for normal surveillance mission operates the engine at fuel-efficient speeds to meet vehicle demand and to save fuel. The experiment and simulation uses a computerized vehicle model and a test bench to validate the approach. In comparison to vehicles with fixed high-idle engine speed increments, experiments show that the proposed strategy saves fuel energy in the range of 0-4.9% for the tested power demand range of 44-69 kW. It is hoped to implement the proposed strategies on a real Army ground vehicle to start realizing the energy savings.

  1. EUSO Operations: Flight and Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, O.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Gugliotta, G.; Pimenta, M.; Tua, P.; EUSO Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    The EUSO operations concept is described. Both the on-board and onground systems play an important role on operations. Since no permanent contact with the payload is provided, a considerable autonomy of the on-board system is required. The fulfilment of the scientific goals of the mission and the safety of the instrument require the definition of different operational modes and procedures. On-board, scientific and housekeeping data are collected and sent to ground, and control of the instrument subsystems is performed, based on on-board autonomous procedures and on telecommands sent from ground. On ground, telemetry is received, processed, monitored and archived. Telecommands are prepared for uplink, according to a defined mission activity planning.

  2. Operator Informational Needs for Multiple Autonomous Small Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Fan, Henry; Cross, Charles D.; Hempley, Lucas E.; Cichella, Venanzio; Puig-Navarro, Javier; Mehdi, Syed Bilal

    2015-01-01

    With the anticipated explosion of small unmanned aerial vehicles, it is highly likely that operators will be controlling fleets of autonomous vehicles. To fulfill the promise of autonomy, vehicle operators will not be concerned with manual control of the vehicle; instead, they will deal with the overall mission. Furthermore, the one operator to many vehicles is becoming a constant meme with various industries including package delivery, search and rescue, and utility companies. In order for an operator to concurrently control several vehicles, his station must look and behave very differently than the current ground control station instantiations. Furthermore, the vehicle will have to be much more autonomous, especially during non-normal operations, in order to accommodate the knowledge deficit or the information overload of the operator in charge of several vehicles. The expected usage increase of small drones requires presenting the operational information generated by a fleet of heterogeneous autonomous agents to an operator. NASA Langley Research Center's Autonomy Incubator has brought together researchers in various disciplines including controls, trajectory planning, systems engineering, and human factors to develop an integrated system to study autonomy issues. The initial human factors effort is focusing on mission displays that would give an operator the overall status of all autonomous agents involved in the current mission. This paper will discuss the specifics of the mission displays for operators controlling several vehicles.

  3. XMM Future Operational Ground Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, T.; Kirsch, M.; Schmidt, F.; Pfeil, N.; Vasconcellos, A.; Martin, J.

    2014-07-01

    XMM-Newton has been operating for 14 years which have been characterised by an extraordinary scientific return leading to it being considered as one of the most important scientific missions operated by ESA. XMM-Newton has outlived its original operating lifetime and this has led to a new array of technical challenges which new software and operating strategies have greatly mitigated and have enabled XMM-Newton to continue to perform optimally. XMM-Newton relies on reaction wheels and thrusters to manoeuvre consuming on -board fuel and limiting XMM-Newtons operating life. As a result a new operating concept for the reaction wheels has been devised and reduces the fuel consumption by approximately 50% potentially allowing XMM-Newton to operate until 2028. This extension leads to a new set of challenges; firstly, a change in the orbital inclination causes XMM-Newtons ground station Kourou to develop a gap in coverage around perigee for a period of 5 years from mid-2014 and secondly, XMM-Newtons second prime ground station, Perth, is to be decommissioned at the end of 2015 due to regulation governing civil spectrum usage. This paper illustrates how these issues are resoled from a ground segment perspective and when implemented will ensure XMM-Newtons continuance into the next decade.

  4. X-43A Vehicle During Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-43A Hypersonic Experimental Vehicle, or 'Hyper-X' is seen here undergoing ground testing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in December 1999. The X-43A was developed to research a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet propulsion system at speeds from Mach 7 up to Mach 10 (7 to 10 times the speed of sound, which varies with temperature and altitude). Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only

  5. X-43A Vehicle During Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photo shows a close-up, rear view of the X-43A Hypersonic Experimental Vehicle, or 'Hyper-X' undergoing ground testing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California in December 1999. The X-43A was developed to research a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet propulsion system at speeds from Mach 7 up to Mach 10 (7 to 10 times the speed of sound, which varies with temperature and altitude). Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology

  6. X-43A Vehicle During Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-43A Hypersonic Experimental Vehicle, or 'Hyper-X' is seen here undergoing ground testing at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The X-43A was developed to research a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet propulsion system at speeds from Mach 7 up to Mach 10 (7 to 10 times the speed of sound, which varies with temperature and altitude). Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By

  7. Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing in Support of NASA Launch Vehicle Loads and Controls Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Davis, Susan R.; Askins, Bruce R.; Salyer, Blaine H.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ares Projects Office (APO) is continuing to make progress toward the final design of the Ares I crew launch vehicle and Ares V cargo launch vehicle. Ares I and V will form the space launch capabilities necessary to fulfill NASA's exploration strategy of sending human beings to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. As with all new space vehicles there will be a number of tests to ensure the design can be Human Rated. One of these is the Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Test (IVGVT) that will be measuring responses of the Ares I as a system. All structural systems possess a basic set of physical characteristics unique to that system. These unique characteristics include items such as mass distribution, frequency and damping. When specified, they allow engineers to understand and predict how a structural system like the Ares I launch vehicle behaves under given loading conditions. These physical properties of launch vehicles may be predicted by analysis or measured through certain types of tests. Generally, these properties are predicted by analysis during the design phase of a launch vehicle and then verified through testing before the vehicle is Human Rated. The IVGVT is intended to measure by test the fundamental dynamic characteristics of Ares I during various phases of operational/flight. This testing includes excitations of the vehicle in lateral, longitudinal, and torsional directions at vehicle configurations representing different trajectory points. During the series of tests, properties such as natural frequencies, mode shapes, and transfer functions are measured directly. These data will then be used to calibrate loads and Guidance, Navigation, and Controls (GN&C) analysis models for verifying analyses of Ares I. NASA launch vehicles from Saturn to Shuttle have undergone Ground Vibration Tests (GVTs) leading to successful launch vehicles. A GVT was not performed on the unmanned Delta III. This vehicle was

  8. Achieving integrated convoys: cargo unmanned ground vehicle development and experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zych, Noah; Silver, David; Stager, David; Green, Colin; Pilarski, Thomas; Fischer, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    The Cargo UGV project was initiated in 2010 with the aim of developing and experimenting with advanced autonomous vehicles capable of being integrated unobtrusively into manned logistics convoys. The intent was to validate two hypotheses in complex, operationally representative environments: first, that unmanned tactical wheeled vehicles provide a force protection advantage by creating standoff distance to warfighters during ambushes or improvised explosive device attacks; and second, that these UGVs serve as force multipliers by enabling a single operator to control multiple unmanned assets. To assess whether current state-of-the-art autonomous vehicle technology was sufficiently capable to permit resupply missions to be executed with decreased risk and reduced manpower, and to assess the effect of UGVs on customary convoy tactics, the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory and the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise sponsored Oshkosh Defense and the National Robotics Engineering Center to equip two standard Marine Corps cargo trucks for autonomous operation. This paper details the system architecture, hardware implementation, and software modules developed to meet the vehicle control, perception, and planner requirements compelled by this application. Additionally, the design of a custom human machine interface and an accompanying training program are described, as is the creation of a realistic convoy simulation environment for rapid system development. Finally, results are conveyed from a warfighter experiment in which the effectiveness of the training program for novice operators was assessed, and the impact of the UGVs on convoy operations was observed in a variety of scenarios via direct comparison to a fully manned convoy.

  9. Hedonic Price Indices for Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    following: • M4 Command and Control Vehicle (C2V) • Stryker family (8 variants) • M992A2 FAASV • Armored Security Vehicle (ASV) • Family of Heavy...M9 ACE) 22 Wheeled combat vehicle (WCV, e.g., Stryker Mobile Gun System) 36 Wheeled support vehicle (WSV, e.g. Stryker Medevac vehicle) 41 TOTAL...data points. Some family assignments, such as those for the Stryker reconnaissance vehicles (which were classified as support vehicles), may be open

  10. A survey of unmanned ground vehicles with applications to agricultural and environmental sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadies, Stephanie; Lefcourt, Alan; Gadsden, S. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Unmanned ground vehicles have been utilized in the last few decades in an effort to increase the efficiency of agriculture, in particular, by reducing labor needs. Unmanned vehicles have been used for a variety of purposes including: soil sampling, irrigation management, precision spraying, mechanical weeding, and crop harvesting. In this paper, unmanned ground vehicles, implemented by researchers or commercial operations, are characterized through a comparison to other vehicles used in agriculture, namely airplanes and UAVs. An overview of different trade-offs of configurations, control schemes, and data collection technologies is provided. Emphasis is given to the use of unmanned ground vehicles in food crops, and includes a discussion of environmental impacts and economics. Factors considered regarding the future trends and potential issues of unmanned ground vehicles include development, management and performance. Also included is a strategy to demonstrate to farmers the safety and profitability of implementing the technology.

  11. Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing of Manned Spacecraft: Historical Precedent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Paul R.; Tuma, Margaret L.; Askins, Bruce R.

    2008-01-01

    For the first time in nearly 30 years, NASA is developing a new manned space flight launch system. The Ares I will carry crew and cargo to not only the International Space Station, but onward for the future exploration of the Moon and Mars. The Ares I control system and structural designs use complex computer models for their development. An Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Test (IVGVT) will validate the efficacy of these computer models. The IVGVT will reduce the technical risk of unexpected conditions that could place the vehicle or crew in jeopardy. The Ares Project Office's Flight and Integrated Test Office commissioned a study to determine how historical programs, such as Saturn and Space Shuttle, validated the structural dynamics of an integrated flight vehicle. The study methodology was to examine the historical record and seek out members of the engineering community who recall the development of historic manned launch vehicles. These records and interviews provided insight into the best practices and lessons learned from these historic development programs. The information that was gathered allowed the creation of timelines of the historic development programs. The timelines trace the programs from the development of test articles through test preparation, test operations, and test data reduction efforts. These timelines also demonstrate how the historical tests fit within their overall vehicle development programs. Finally, the study was able to quantify approximate staffing levels during historic development programs. Using this study, the Flight and Integrated Test Office was able to evaluate the Ares I Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Test schedule and workforce budgets in light of the historical precedents to determine if the test had schedule or cost risks associated with it.

  12. Launch and Landing Effects Ground Operations (LLEGO) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    LLEGO is a model for understanding recurring launch and landing operations costs at Kennedy Space Center for human space flight. Launch and landing operations are often referred to as ground processing, or ground operations. Currently, this function is specific to the ground operations for the Space Shuttle Space Transportation System within the Space Shuttle Program. The Constellation system to follow the Space Shuttle consists of the crewed Orion spacecraft atop an Ares I launch vehicle and the uncrewed Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The Constellation flight and ground systems build upon many elements of the existing Shuttle flight and ground hardware, as well as upon existing organizations and processes. In turn, the LLEGO model builds upon past ground operations research, modeling, data, and experience in estimating for future programs. Rather than to simply provide estimates, the LLEGO model s main purpose is to improve expenses by relating complex relationships among functions (ground operations contractor, subcontractors, civil service technical, center management, operations, etc.) to tangible drivers. Drivers include flight system complexity and reliability, as well as operations and supply chain management processes and technology. Together these factors define the operability and potential improvements for any future system, from the most direct to the least direct expenses.

  13. The Effect of Predicted Vehicle Displacement on Ground Crew Task Performance and Hardware Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, Laura Ashley; Reynolds, David W.

    2011-01-01

    NASA continues to explore new launch vehicle concepts that will carry astronauts to low- Earth orbit to replace the soon-to-be retired Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle. A tall vertically stacked launch vehicle (> or =300 ft) is exposed to the natural environment while positioned on the launch pad. Varying directional winds and vortex shedding cause the vehicle to sway in an oscillating motion. Ground crews working high on the tower and inside the vehicle during launch preparations will be subjected to this motion while conducting critical closeout tasks such as mating fluid and electrical connectors and carrying heavy objects. NASA has not experienced performing these tasks in such environments since the Saturn V, which was serviced from a movable (but rigid) service structure; commercial launchers are likewise attended by a service structure that moves away from the vehicle for launch. There is concern that vehicle displacement may hinder ground crew operations, impact the ground system designs, and ultimately affect launch availability. The vehicle sway assessment objective is to replicate predicted frequencies and displacements of these tall vehicles, examine typical ground crew tasks, and provide insight into potential vehicle design considerations and ground crew performance guidelines. This paper outlines the methodology, configurations, and motion testing performed while conducting the vehicle displacement assessment that will be used as a Technical Memorandum for future vertically stacked vehicle designs.

  14. The 13 th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition: intelligent ground vehicles created by intelligent teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.

    2005-10-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of three, unmanned systems, student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) in the 1990s. The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics, and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned system. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip ground vehicles of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 13 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from over 50 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the three-day competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participant feedback is presented.

  15. The 19th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition: student built autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.

    2012-01-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of four, unmanned systems, student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned system. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip ground vehicles of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 19 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from almost 80 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the four-day competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participation is presented.

  16. The 18th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition: trends and influences for intelligent ground vehicle control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.; Frederick, Philip; Smuda, William

    2011-01-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of four, unmanned systems, student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned system. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip ground vehicles of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 18 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from over 75 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the four-day competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participation is presented.

  17. Remote imagery for unmanned ground vehicles (RIUGV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Philip A.; Kania, Robert; Theisen, Bernard; Ward, Derek; Benz, Ursula; Baylot, Alex; Willis, John; Yamauchi, Harold

    2005-05-01

    The combination of high-resolution multi-spectral satellite imagery and advanced COTS object-oriented image processing software provides for an automated terrain feature extraction and classification capability. This information, along with elevation data, infrared imagery, a vehicle mobility model and various meta-data (local weather reports, Zobler Soil map, etc...), is fed into automated path planning software to provide a stand-alone ability to generate rapidly updateable dynamic mobility maps for Manned or Unmanned Ground Vehicles (MGVs or UGVs). These polygon based mobility maps can reside on an individual platform or a tactical network. When new information is available, change files are generated and ingested into existing mobility maps based on user selected criteria. Bandwidth concerns are mitigated by the use of shape files for the representation of the data (e.g. each object in the scene is represented by a shape file and thus can be transmitted individually). User input (desired level of stealth, required time of arrival, etc...) determines the priority in which objects are tagged for updates. This technology was tested at Fort Knox, Kentucky October 11th-15th 2004. Satellite imagery was acquired in a near-real-time fashion for the selected test site. Portions of the resulting geo-rectified image were compared with surveyed range locations to assess the accuracy of the approach. The derived UGV Path Plans were ingested into a Stryker UGV and the routes were autonomously traversed. This paper will detail the feasibility of this approach based of the results of this testing.

  18. Application of parallelized software architecture to an autonomous ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Rahul; Wright, Adam; Shin, Young Ho; Momin, Orko; Petkovsek, Steven; Wortman, Paul; Gautam, Prasanna; Norton, Adam

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents improvements made to Q, an autonomous ground vehicle designed to participate in the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). For the 2010 IGVC, Q was upgraded with a new parallelized software architecture and a new vision processor. Improvements were made to the power system reducing the number of batteries required for operation from six to one. In previous years, a single state machine was used to execute the bulk of processing activities including sensor interfacing, data processing, path planning, navigation algorithms and motor control. This inefficient approach led to poor software performance and made it difficult to maintain or modify. For IGVC 2010, the team implemented a modular parallel architecture using the National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW programming language. The new architecture divides all the necessary tasks - motor control, navigation, sensor data collection, etc. into well-organized components that execute in parallel, providing considerable flexibility and facilitating efficient use of processing power. Computer vision is used to detect white lines on the ground and determine their location relative to the robot. With the new vision processor and some optimization of the image processing algorithm used last year, two frames can be acquired and processed in 70ms. With all these improvements, Q placed 2nd in the autonomous challenge.

  19. The Army’s Ground Combat Vehicle Program and Alternatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Current and Upgraded Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle Notional Ground Combat Vehicle Israeli Namer Armored Personnel Carrier German Puma ...19Option 1: Purchase the Israeli Namer APC 21 Option 2: Upgrade the Bradley IFV 26 Option 3: Purchase the German Puma IFV 28 Option 4: Cancel the GCV Program...2008 German Puma IFV 35 to 47 6 6.9 2011 2013 dollars) (Millions of Unit Costb Existing Vehicles Vehicles Requiring Development Into Service Year of

  20. Transportation vehicle energy intensities. A joint DOT/NASA reference paper. [energy consumption of air and ground vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascy, A. C.; Paullin, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    A compilation of data on the energy consumption of air and ground vehicles is presented. The ratio BTU/ASM, British Thermal Units/Available Seat Mile, is used to express vehicle energy intensiveness, and related to the energy consumed directly in producing seat-mile or ton-mile productivity. Data is presented on passenger and freight vehicles which are in current use or which are about to enter service, and advanced vehicles which may be operational in the 1980's and beyond. For the advanced vehicles, an estimate is given of the date of initial operational service, and the performance characteristics. Other key considerations in interpreting energy intensiveness for a given mode are discussed, such as: load factors, operations, overhead energy consumption, and energy investments in new structure and equipment.

  1. Improving Air-Ground Operations on the Complex Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    camera systems , Ground/Vehicle Laser Locator Designator (G/VLLD) and Long Range Advanced Scout Surveillance Systems (LRAS3), and radar systems that...meet the requirements of the future Joint Force, the Army must develop an organic capability to coordinate and execute air-ground operations. The...attack solutions in order to defeat an elusive enemy and minimize collateral damage. In order to meet the requirements of the future Joint Force, the Army

  2. Use of cooperative unmanned air and ground vehicles for detection and disposal of mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawodny MacArthur, Erica; MacArthur, Donald; Crane, Carl

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this research is to extend the sensing capabilities of a multi-vehicle ground system by incorporating the environmental perception abilities of unmanned aerial vehicles. The aerial vehicle used in this research is a Miniature Aircraft Gas Xcell RC helicopter. It is outfitted with a sensor payload containing stereo vision cameras, GPS, and a digital compass. Geo- referenced images are gathered using the above sensors that are used in this research to create a map of the operating region. The ground vehicle used in this research is an automated Suzuki Mini-Quad ATV. It has the following onboard sensors: single-vision camera, laser range device, digital compass, GPS, and an encoder. The ground vehicle uses the above sensors and the map provided by the helicopter to traverse the region, locate, and isolate simulated land mines. The base station consists of a laptop that provides a communication link between the aerial and ground vehicle systems. It also provides the operator with system operation information and statistics. All communication between the vehicles and the base station is performed using JAUS (Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems) messages. The JAUS architecture is employed as a means to organize inter-vehicle and intra-vehicle communication and system component hierarchy. The purpose of JAUS is to provide interoperability between various unmanned systems and subsystems for both military and commercial applications. JAUS seeks to achieve this through the development of functionally cohesive building blocks called components whose interface messages are clearly defined. The JAUS architecture allows for a layered control strategy which has specific message sets for each layer of control. Implementation of the JAUS architecture allows for ease of software development for a multi- vehicle system. This experiment demonstrates how an air-ground vehicle system can be used to cooperatively locate and dispose of simulated mines.

  3. Ground Vibration Testing Options for Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Alan; Smith, Robert K.; Goggin, David; Newsom, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    New NASA launch vehicles will require development of robust systems in a fiscally-constrained environment. NASA, Department of Defense (DoD), and commercial space companies routinely conduct ground vibration tests as an essential part of math model validation and launch vehicle certification. Although ground vibration testing must be a part of the integrated test planning process, more affordable approaches must also be considered. A study evaluated several ground vibration test options for the NASA Constellation Program flight test vehicles, Orion-1 and Orion-2, which concluded that more affordable ground vibration test options are available. The motivation for ground vibration testing is supported by historical examples from NASA and DoD. The approach used in the present study employed surveys of ground vibration test subject-matter experts that provided data to qualitatively rank six test options. Twenty-five experts from NASA, DoD, and industry provided scoring and comments for this study. The current study determined that both element-level modal tests and integrated vehicle modal tests have technical merits. Both have been successful in validating structural dynamic math models of launch vehicles. However, element-level testing has less overall cost and schedule risk as compared to integrated vehicle testing. Future NASA launch vehicle development programs should anticipate that some structural dynamics testing will be necessary. Analysis alone will be inadequate to certify a crew-capable launch vehicle. At a minimum, component and element structural dynamic tests are recommended for new vehicle elements. Three viable structural dynamic test options were identified. Modal testing of the new vehicle elements and an integrated vehicle test on the mobile launcher provided the optimal trade between technical, cost, and schedule.

  4. NASA Mission Operations Directorate Preparations for the COTS Visiting Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Sarah A.; Peek, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle looming, a series of new spacecraft is under development to assist in providing for the growing logistical needs of the International Space Station (ISS). Two of these vehicles are being built under a NASA initiative known as the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program. These visiting vehicles ; Space X s Dragon and Orbital Science Corporation s Cygnus , are to be domestically produced in the United States and designed to add to the capabilities of the Russian Progress and Soyuz workhorses, the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) and the Japanese H-2 Transfer Vehicle (HTV). Most of what is known about the COTS program has focused on the work of Orbital and SpaceX in designing, building, and testing their respective launch and cargo vehicles. However, there is also a team within the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at NASA s Johnson Space Center working with their operational counterparts in these companies to provide operational safety oversight and mission assurance via the development of operational scenarios and products needed for these missions. Ensuring that the operational aspect is addressed for the initial demonstration flights of these vehicles is the topic of this paper. Integrating Dragon and Cygnus into the ISS operational environment has posed a unique challenge to NASA and their partner companies. This is due in part to the short time span of the COTS program, as measured from initial contract award until first launch, as well as other factors that will be explored in the text. Operational scenarios and products developed for each COTS vehicle will be discussed based on the following categories: timelines, on-orbit checkout, ground documentation, crew procedures, software updates and training materials. Also addressed is an outline of the commonalities associated with the operations for each vehicle. It is the intent of the authors to provide their audience with a better

  5. Landmark-Based Navigation of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Australian Government Department of Defence Defence Science and Technology Organisation Landmark-based Navigation of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle...for estimating the position and orientation of a ground vehicle in an environment with landmarks. From the geometric relationships, we derive a set... of linear equations with a quadratic constraint, which forms the basis for our optimisation problem. We also extend the problem to associating two

  6. Launch Vehicle Production and Operations Cost Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Neeley, James R.; Blackburn, Ruby F.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, launch vehicle cost has been evaluated based on $/Kg to orbit. This metric is calculated based on assumptions not typically met by a specific mission. These assumptions include the specified orbit whether Low Earth Orbit (LEO), Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), or both. The metric also assumes the payload utilizes the full lift mass of the launch vehicle, which is rarely true even with secondary payloads.1,2,3 Other approaches for cost metrics have been evaluated including unit cost of the launch vehicle and an approach to consider the full program production and operations costs.4 Unit cost considers the variable cost of the vehicle and the definition of variable costs are discussed. The full program production and operation costs include both the variable costs and the manufacturing base. This metric also distinguishes operations costs from production costs, including pre-flight operational testing. Operations costs also consider the costs of flight operations, including control center operation and maintenance. Each of these 3 cost metrics show different sensitivities to various aspects of launch vehicle cost drivers. The comparison of these metrics provides the strengths and weaknesses of each yielding an assessment useful for cost metric selection for launch vehicle programs.

  7. The IXV Ground Segment design, implementation and operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci di Scarfizzi, Giovanni; Bellomo, Alessandro; Musso, Ivano; Bussi, Diego; Rabaioli, Massimo; Santoro, Gianfranco; Billig, Gerhard; Gallego Sanz, José María

    2016-07-01

    The Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) is an ESA re-entry demonstrator that performed, on the 11th February of 2015, a successful re-entry demonstration mission. The project objectives were the design, development, manufacturing and on ground and in flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re-entry system. For the IXV mission a dedicated Ground Segment was provided. The main subsystems of the IXV Ground Segment were: IXV Mission Control Center (MCC), from where monitoring of the vehicle was performed, as well as support during pre-launch and recovery phases; IXV Ground Stations, used to cover IXV mission by receiving spacecraft telemetry and forwarding it toward the MCC; the IXV Communication Network, deployed to support the operations of the IXV mission by interconnecting all remote sites with MCC, supporting data, voice and video exchange. This paper describes the concept, architecture, development, implementation and operations of the ESA Intermediate Experimental Vehicle (IXV) Ground Segment and outlines the main operations and lessons learned during the preparation and successful execution of the IXV Mission.

  8. New vision system and navigation algorithm for an autonomous ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tann, Hokchhay; Shakya, Bicky; Merchen, Alex C.; Williams, Benjamin C.; Khanal, Abhishek; Zhao, Jiajia; Ahlgren, David J.

    2013-12-01

    Improvements were made to the intelligence algorithms of an autonomously operating ground vehicle, Q, which competed in the 2013 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). The IGVC required the vehicle to first navigate between two white lines on a grassy obstacle course, then pass through eight GPS waypoints, and pass through a final obstacle field. Modifications to Q included a new vision system with a more effective image processing algorithm for white line extraction. The path-planning algorithm adopted the vision system, creating smoother, more reliable navigation. With these improvements, Q successfully completed the basic autonomous navigation challenge, finishing tenth out of over 50 teams.

  9. Intelligence algorithms for autonomous navigation in a ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovsek, Steve; Shakya, Rahul; Shin, Young Ho; Gautam, Prasanna; Norton, Adam; Ahlgren, David J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper will discuss the approach to autonomous navigation used by "Q," an unmanned ground vehicle designed by the Trinity College Robot Study Team to participate in the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). For the 2011 competition, Q's intelligence was upgraded in several different areas, resulting in a more robust decision-making process and a more reliable system. In 2010-2011, the software of Q was modified to operate in a modular parallel manner, with all subtasks (including motor control, data acquisition from sensors, image processing, and intelligence) running simultaneously in separate software processes using the National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW programming language. This eliminated processor bottlenecks and increased flexibility in the software architecture. Though overall throughput was increased, the long runtime of the image processing process (150 ms) reduced the precision of Q's realtime decisions. Q had slow reaction times to obstacles detected only by its cameras, such as white lines, and was limited to slow speeds on the course. To address this issue, the image processing software was simplified and also pipelined to increase the image processing throughput and minimize the robot's reaction times. The vision software was also modified to detect differences in the texture of the ground, so that specific surfaces (such as ramps and sand pits) could be identified. While previous iterations of Q failed to detect white lines that were not on a grassy surface, this new software allowed Q to dynamically alter its image processing state so that appropriate thresholds could be applied to detect white lines in changing conditions. In order to maintain an acceptable target heading, a path history algorithm was used to deal with local obstacle fields and GPS waypoints were added to provide a global target heading. These modifications resulted in Q placing 5th in the autonomous challenge and 4th in the navigation challenge at IGVC.

  10. Infrared stereo calibration for unmanned ground vehicle navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harguess, Josh; Strange, Shawn

    2014-06-01

    The problem of calibrating two color cameras as a stereo pair has been heavily researched and many off-the-shelf software packages, such as Robot Operating System and OpenCV, include calibration routines that work in most cases. However, the problem of calibrating two infrared (IR) cameras for the purposes of sensor fusion and point could generation is relatively new and many challenges exist. We present a comparison of color camera and IR camera stereo calibration using data from an unmanned ground vehicle. There are two main challenges in IR stereo calibration; the calibration board (material, design, etc.) and the accuracy of calibration pattern detection. We present our analysis of these challenges along with our IR stereo calibration methodology. Finally, we present our results both visually and analytically with computed reprojection errors.

  11. Sensor fusion for intelligent behavior on small unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, G.; Ahuja, G.; Sights, B.; Pacis, E. B.; Everett, H. R.

    2007-04-01

    Sensors commonly mounted on small unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) include visible light and thermal cameras, scanning LIDAR, and ranging sonar. Sensor data from these sensors is vital to emerging autonomous robotic behaviors. However, sensor data from any given sensor can become noisy or erroneous under a range of conditions, reducing the reliability of autonomous operations. We seek to increase this reliability through data fusion. Data fusion includes characterizing the strengths and weaknesses of each sensor modality and combining their data in a way such that the result of the data fusion provides more accurate data than any single sensor. We describe data fusion efforts applied to two autonomous behaviors: leader-follower and human presence detection. The behaviors are implemented and tested in a variety of realistic conditions.

  12. Objectives and Progress on Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing for the Ares Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Asloms. Brice R.

    2009-01-01

    As NASA begins design and development of the Ares launch vehicles to replace the Space Shuttle and explore beyond low Earth orbit, Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing (IVGVT) will be a vital component of ensuring that those vehicles can perform the missions assigned to them. A ground vibration test (GVT) is intended to measure by test the fundamental dynamic characteristics of launch vehicles during various phases of flight. During the series of tests, properties such as natural frequencies, mode shapes, and transfer functions are measured directly. This data is then used to calibrate loads and control systems analysis models for verifying analyses of the launch vehicle. The Ares Flight & Integrated Test Office (FITO) will be conducting IVGVT for the Ares I crew launch vehicle at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from 2011 to 2012 using the venerable Test Stand (TS) 4550, which supported similar tests for the Saturn V and Space Shuttle vehicle stacks.

  13. Aerodynamic braking of high speed ground transportation vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marte, J. E.; Marko, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    The drag effectiveness of aerodynamic brakes arranged in series on a train-like vehicle was investigated. Fixed- and moving-model testing techniques were used in order to determine the importance of proper vehicle-ground interference simulation. Fixed-model tests were carried out on a sting-mounted model: alone; with a fixed ground plane; and in proximity to an image model. Moving-model tests were conducted in a vertical slide-wire facility with and without a ground plane. Results from investigations of one brake configuration are presented which show the effect of the number of brakes in the set and of spacing between brakes.

  14. Vehicle Test Facilities at Aberdeen Proving Ground

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-06

    which affects wheeled vehicles mainly be splash. Course 2 is laid out in a loop of moderately irregular terrain. The native soil includes Sassafras ...loamu, a silty loam with 17.3 percent clay content, and Sassafras silt loam, a silty loam with less than 15 percent clay. Surfaces range from smooth to

  15. Enabler operator station. [lunar surface vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Andrea; Keitzman, John; King, Shirlyn; Stover, Rae; Wegner, Torsten

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design an onboard operator station for the conceptual Lunar Work Vehicle (LWV). This LWV would be used in the colonization of a lunar outpost. The details that follow, however, are for an earth-bound model. Several recommendations are made in the appendix as to the changes needed in material selection for the lunar environment. The operator station is designed dimensionally correct for an astronaut wearing the current space shuttle EVA suit (which includes life support). The proposed operator station will support and restrain an astronaut as well as provide protection from the hazards of vehicle rollover. The threat of suit puncture is eliminated by rounding all corners and edges. A step-plate, located at the front of the vehicle, provides excellent ease of entry and exit. The operator station weight requirements are met by making efficient use of grid members, semi-rigid members and woven fabrics.

  16. Behaviour recognition of ground vehicle using airborne monitoring of unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyondong; Kim, Seungkeun; Shin, Hyo-Sang; Tsourdos, Antonios; White, Brian A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a behaviour recognition methodology for ground vehicles moving within road traffic using unmanned aerial vehicles in order to identify suspicious or abnormal behaviour. With the target information acquired by unmanned aerial vehicles and estimated by filtering techniques, ground vehicle behaviour is first classified into representative driving modes, and then a string pattern matching theory is applied to detect suspicious behaviours in the driving mode history. Furthermore, a fuzzy decision-making process is developed to systematically exploit all available information obtained from a complex environment and confirm the characteristic of behaviour, while considering spatiotemporal environment factors as well as several aspects of behaviours. To verify the feasibility and benefits of the proposed approach, numerical simulations on moving ground vehicles are performed using realistic car trajectory data from an off-the-shelf traffic simulation software.

  17. Applying Unmanned Ground Vehicle Technologies To Unmanned Surface Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    gate FPGA , dual RS232 ports, and general purpose I/O are also resident on the package which make it well suited to applications in robotics...significant portion of the payload bay on the man portable vehicle and is quite densely packed. Components which generate large amounts of heat during...outputs: 5VDC, 3.3VDC @ 1.5A • 16 Analog Inputs • 4 Analog Outputs • 2 PWM outputs (variable) • 2 Additional RS232 Serial Port • 2 TTL Level

  18. Estimating Hedonic Price Indices for Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    2015 9 Alternative Formulation: The “ Pure Price” Model  Assume that each vehicle model is characterized by  An initial unit price  An initial quality... pure price model gives stable and credible estimates, but requires one iffy assumption  That unobservable quality growth is roughly constant by...Fill the 1994–95 gap; extend beyond 2011  Bootstrap to reduce the variance of the pure price model estimates as well  Explore models with no lot

  19. Analysis of Vehicle-Based Security Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jason M; Paul, Nate R

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications promises to increase roadway safety by providing each vehicle with 360 degree situational awareness of other vehicles in proximity, and by complementing onboard sensors such as radar or camera in detecting imminent crash scenarios. In the United States, approximately three hundred million automobiles could participate in a fully deployed V2V system if Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) device use becomes mandatory. The system s reliance on continuous communication, however, provides a potential means for unscrupulous persons to transmit false data in an attempt to cause crashes, create traffic congestion, or simply render the system useless. V2V communications must be highly scalable while retaining robust security and privacy preserving features to meet the intra-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication requirements for a growing vehicle population. Oakridge National Research Laboratory is investigating a Vehicle-Based Security System (VBSS) to provide security and privacy for a fully deployed V2V and V2I system. In the VBSS an On-board Unit (OBU) generates short-term certificates and signs Basic Safety Messages (BSM) to preserve privacy and enhance security. This work outlines a potential VBSS structure and its operational concepts; it examines how a vehicle-based system might feasibly provide security and privacy, highlights remaining challenges, and explores potential mitigations to address those challenges. Certificate management alternatives that attempt to meet V2V security and privacy requirements have been examined previously by the research community including privacy-preserving group certificates, shared certificates, and functional encryption. Due to real-world operational constraints, adopting one of these approaches for VBSS V2V communication is difficult. Timely misbehavior detection and revocation are still open problems for any V2V system. We explore the alternative approaches that may be

  20. Army Ground Vehicles and Current/Future Emission Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-23

    EPA Heavy-Duty Diesel Emission Standards • Emission Control Technology Discussion • Fuels and Lubricants Discussion • Current Army Ground Vehicle Engine ...bhp) compliant COTS engines and directly integrate into current and new heavy-duty vehicles. peter.schihl@us.army.mil Dist A. Approved for public...approximately three years depending on engine rated power peter.schihl@us.army.mil Dist A. Approved for public release Potential Impacts to DoD

  1. Path planning strategies for autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Kevin Kent

    Several key issues involved with the planning and executing of optimally generated paths for autonomous vehicles are addressed. Two new path planning algorithms are developed, and examined, which effectively minimize replanning as unmapped hazards are encountered. The individual algorithms are compared via extensive simulation. The search strategy results are implemented and tested using the University of Colorado's autonomous vehicle test-bed, RoboCar, and results show the advantages of solving the single-destination all-paths problem for autonomous vehicle path planning. Both path planners implement a graph search methodology incorporating dynamic programming that solves the single-destination shortest-paths problem. Algorithm 1, termed DP for dynamic programming, searches a state space where each state represents a potential vehicle location in a breadth-first fashion expanding from the goal to all potential start locations in the state space. Algorithm 2, termed DP*, couples the heuristic search power of the well-known A* search procedure (Nilsson-80) with the dynamic programming principle applied to graph searching to efficiently make use of overlapping subproblems. DP* is the primary research contribution of the work contained within this thesis. The advantage of solving the single-destination shortest-paths problem is that the entire terrain map is solved in terms of reaching a specified goal. Therefore, if the robot is diverted from the pre-planned path, an alternative path is already computed. The search algorithms are extended to include a probabilistic approach using empirical loss functions to incorporate terrain map uncertainties into the path considering terrain planning process. The results show the importance of considering terrain uncertainty. If the map representation ignores uncertainty by marking any area with less than perfect confidence as unpassable or assigns it the worst case rating, then the paths are longer than intuitively necessary. A

  2. Collaborative tactical behaviors for autonomous ground and air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albus, James; Barbera, Anthony; Scott, Harry; Balakirsky, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    Tactical behaviors for autonomous ground and air vehicles are an area of high interest to the Army. They are critical for the inclusion of robots in the Future Combat System (FCS). Tactical behaviors can be defined at multiple levels: at the Company, Platoon, Section, and Vehicle echelons. They are currently being defined by the Army for the FCS Unit of Action. At all of these echelons, unmanned ground vehicles, unmanned air vehicles, and unattended ground sensors must collaborate with each other and with manned systems. Research being conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and sponsored by the Army Research Lab is focused on defining the Four Dimensional Real-time Controls System (4D/RCS) reference model architecture for intelligent systems and developing a software engineering methodology for system design, integration, test and evaluation. This methodology generates detailed design requirements for perception, knowledge representation, decision making, and behavior generation processes that enable complex military tactics to be planned and executed by unmanned ground and air vehicles working in collaboration with manned systems.

  3. Intelligent resources for satellite ground control operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a cooperative approach to the design of intelligent automation and describes the Mission Operations Cooperative Assistant for NASA Goddard flight operations. The cooperative problem solving approach is being explored currently in the context of providing support for human operator teams and also in the definition of future advanced automation in ground control systems.

  4. International Assessment of Unmanned Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    development of recon- figurable locomotion schemes, which, in essence, combine features of wheeled and pedal methods . Significant activities in this...data formats and methods of communi- cation among computing nodes. I-2 Figure I-1. Key Elements of Ground Robotics Technology demonstrated in U.S...or more methods for extracting features from images and one or more methods for matching features with models using a control structure (i.e., the

  5. Requirement for a standard language for test and ground operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medlock, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The basic requirements for a standard test and checkout language applicable to all phases of the space shuttle test and ground operations are determined. The general characteristics outlined here represent the integration of selected ideas and concepts from operational elements within Kennedy Space Center (KSC) that represent diverse disciplines associated with space vehicle testing and launching operations. Special reference is made to two studies conducted in this area for KSC as authorized by the Advanced Development Element of the Office of Manned Space Flight (MSF). Information contained in reports from these studies have contributed significantly to the final selection of language features depicted in this technical report.

  6. 14 CFR 139.329 - Pedestrians and ground vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... following: (1) Two-way radio communications between each pedestrian or vehicle and the tower; (2) An escort with two-way radio communications with the tower accompanying any pedestrian or vehicle without a radio... signs, signals, or guards, when it is not operationally practical to have two-way radio...

  7. 14 CFR 139.329 - Pedestrians and ground vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... by all persons; (c) When an air traffic control tower is in operation, ensure that each pedestrian...-way radio communications between each pedestrian or vehicle and the tower; (2) An escort with two-way radio communications with the tower accompanying any pedestrian or vehicle without a radio; or...

  8. Atmospheric statistics for aerospace vehicle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, O. E.; Batts, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    Statistical analysis of atmospheric variables was performed for the Shuttle Transportation System (STS) design trade studies and the establishment of launch commit criteria. Atmospheric constraint statistics have been developed for the NASP test flight, the Advanced Launch System, and the National Launch System. The concepts and analysis techniques discussed in the paper are applicable to the design and operations of any future aerospace vehicle.

  9. Foundations for learning and adaptation in a multi-degree-of-freedom unmanned ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, Michael R.; Bailey, Richard

    2004-04-01

    The real-time coordination and control of a many motion degrees of freedom (dof) unmanned ground vehicle under dynamic conditions in a complex environment is nearly impossible for a human operator to accomplish. Needed are adaptive on-board mechanisms to quickly complete sensor-effector loops to maintain balance and leverage. This paper contains a description of our approach to the control problem for a small unmanned ground vehicle with six dof in the three spatial dimensions. Vehicle control is based upon seven fixed action patterns that exercise all of the motion dof of which the vehicle is capable, and five basic reactive behaviors that protect the vehicle during operation. The reactive behaviors demonstrate short-term adaptations. The learning processes for long-term adaptations of the vehicle control functions that we are implementing are composed of classical and operant conditionings of novel responses to information available from distance sensors (vision and audition) built upon the pre-defined fixed action patterns. The fixed action patterns are in turn modulated by the pre-defined low-level reactive behaviors that, as unconditioned responses, continuously serve to maintain the viability of the robot during the activations of the fixed action patterns, and of the higher-order (conditioned) behaviors. The sensors of the internal environment that govern the low-level reactive behaviors also serve as the criteria for operant conditioning, and satisfy the requirement for basic behavioral motivation.

  10. 32 CFR 935.139 - Motor vehicle operator qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motor vehicle operator qualifications. 935.139... AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.139 Motor vehicle operator qualifications. (a) No person may operate a privately owned motor vehicle on Wake Island unless he has an...

  11. 32 CFR 935.139 - Motor vehicle operator qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motor vehicle operator qualifications. 935.139... AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.139 Motor vehicle operator qualifications. (a) No person may operate a privately owned motor vehicle on Wake Island unless he has an...

  12. Autonomy for SOHO Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Netreba, Nick; Ginn, Don; Mandutianu, Sanda; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The SOLAR and HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY (SOHO) project [SOHO Web Page] is being carried out by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a cooperative effort between the two agencies in the framework of the Solar Terrestrial Science Program (STSP) comprising SOHO and other missions. SOHO was launched on December 2, 1995. The SOHO spacecraft was built in Europe by an industry team led by Matra, and instruments were provided by European and American scientists. There are nine European Principal Investigators (PI's) and three American ones. Large engineering teams and more than 200 co-investigators from many institutions support the PI's in the development of the instruments and in the preparation of their operations and data analysis. NASA is responsible for the launch and mission operations. Large radio dishes around the world, which form NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), are used to track the spacecraft beyond the Earths orbit. Mission control is based at Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. The agent group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in collaboration with JPL, is currently involved with the design and development of an agent-based system to provide intelligent interactions with the control center personnel for SOHO. The basic approach that is being taken is to develop a sub-community of agents for each major subsystem of SOHO and to integrate these sub-communities into an overall SOHO community. Agents in all sub-communities will be capable of advanced understanding (deep reasoning) of the associated spacecraft subsystem.

  13. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  14. Remote Vision Systems for Teleoperated Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    Information Operations end Reports. 1215J1elterson Davis Highway. Suite 1204. Arlington. VA 22202-4302. and to the Offce of Management and Budget...Paperworkr Reductlo Proyect (0704-0188). Washingtont. DC 20503._____________________ I AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave bAW4V 2 REPORT DATE 3 REPORT TYPE AND DATES...and scannable panel displays require further development. 6.0 ACKNOWLEDEMENTS. The authors acknowledge NOSC UGV Program Manager , Thomas W. Hughes, for

  15. Space imaging infrared optical guidance for autonomous ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2008-08-01

    We have developed the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle based on the uncooled infrared camera and focusing technique to detect the objects to be evaded and to set the drive path. For this purpose we made servomotor drive system to control the focus function of the infrared camera lens. To determine the best focus position we use the auto focus image processing of Daubechies wavelet transform technique with 4 terms. From the determined best focus position we transformed it to the distance of the object. We made the aluminum frame ground vehicle to mount the auto focus infrared unit. Its size is 900mm long and 800mm wide. This vehicle mounted Ackerman front steering system and the rear motor drive system. To confirm the guidance ability of the Space Imaging Infrared Optical Guidance for Autonomous Ground Vehicle we had the experiments for the detection ability of the infrared auto focus unit to the actual car on the road and the roadside wall. As a result the auto focus image processing based on the Daubechies wavelet transform technique detects the best focus image clearly and give the depth of the object from the infrared camera unit.

  16. Venus Express ground segment and mission operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warhaut, Manfred; Accomazzo, Andrea

    2005-11-01

    ESOC was responsible for developing the ground-segment facilities for both the Rosetta and Mars Express interplanetary mission. The high degree of commonality between those spacecraft and Venus Express, the twin spacecraft of Mars Express, has allowed large-scale re-use of ground-segment elements and the replication of the operations concepts for those spacecraft, resulting in significant cost and risk reductions.

  17. Improved obstacle avoidance and navigation for an autonomous ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Binod; Cho, Hyunsu; Williams, Benjamin C.; Tann, Hokchhay; Shakya, Bicky; Bharam, Vishal; Ahlgren, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents improvements made to the intelligence algorithms employed on Q, an autonomous ground vehicle, for the 2014 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). In 2012, the IGVC committee combined the formerly separate autonomous and navigation challenges into a single AUT-NAV challenge. In this new challenge, the vehicle is required to navigate through a grassy obstacle course and stay within the course boundaries (a lane of two white painted lines) that guide it toward a given GPS waypoint. Once the vehicle reaches this waypoint, it enters an open course where it is required to navigate to another GPS waypoint while avoiding obstacles. After reaching the final waypoint, the vehicle is required to traverse another obstacle course before completing the run. Q uses modular parallel software architecture in which image processing, navigation, and sensor control algorithms run concurrently. A tuned navigation algorithm allows Q to smoothly maneuver through obstacle fields. For the 2014 competition, most revisions occurred in the vision system, which detects white lines and informs the navigation component. Barrel obstacles of various colors presented a new challenge for image processing: the previous color plane extraction algorithm would not suffice. To overcome this difficulty, laser range sensor data were overlaid on visual data. Q also participates in the Joint Architecture for Unmanned Systems (JAUS) challenge at IGVC. For 2014, significant updates were implemented: the JAUS component accepted a greater variety of messages and showed better compliance to the JAUS technical standard. With these improvements, Q secured second place in the JAUS competition.

  18. Unmanned Ground Vehicle Perception Using Thermal Infrared Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Arturo; Huertas, Andres; Matthies, Larry; Bajracharya, Max; Assad, Christopher; Brennan, Shane; Bellut, Paolo; Sherwin, Gary

    2011-01-01

    TIR cameras can be used for day/night Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) autonomous navigation when stealth is required. The quality of uncooled TIR cameras has significantly improved over the last decade, making them a viable option at low speed Limiting factors for stereo ranging with uncooled LWIR cameras are image blur and low texture scenes TIR perception capabilities JPL has explored includes: (1) single and dual band TIR terrain classification (2) obstacle detection (pedestrian, vehicle, tree trunks, ditches, and water) (3) perception thru obscurants

  19. Braking, Wheeled Vehicles. Test Operations Procedure (TOP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-20

    are as follows: a. Micrometer calipers (inside, outside, and dial types). b. Surface finish gauges. c. Torque wrench. d. Brake shoe...is imminent. 11. Front Disc Brakes Procedure: Step 1: Visually inspect and measure rotors, calipers , and pads. Equipment needed...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 2-2-608 Braking , Wheeled Vehicles 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  20. Tactical Unmanned Ground Vehicle Related Research References (BTA Study)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    for the road " and enhancing safety of operation. LESSONS LEARNED: In the case of imaging sensors, stabilization is essential for maintaining the...cover to prevent operators from inadvertently activating an improper function while direct driving. Overall System Safety /Hazard Analysis should be...interactive simulation technique can realistically measure visual performance on tasks associated with off- road vehicle teleoperatiot. The simulation technique

  1. Unmanned ground vehicles and EO-IR sensors for border patrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Robert A.

    2007-04-01

    Unmanned ground vehicle technology with integrated EO-IR Sensors and payloads play a key role in border surveillance and security. In recent years, unmanned ground vehicle such as iRobot's PackBot have been a critical tool in providing situational awareness to combat terrorist operations around the world. There is increased recognition of the importance of unmanned ground vehicles with sensor suites as a force multiplication for the infantry and special forces units in future combat or reconnaissance missions and perimeter and border security and first responders. They function as the "eyes, ears, and hands" of the unit and can be remotely deployed without placing the observer's unit in harm's way in risky environments. Evolving unmanned ground vehicle technology produces significantly lighter, more maneuverable, greater endurance UGVs with improved EO, IR and other sensors for reconnaissance, surveillance and situational awareness. They dramatically reduce the risk for soldiers in MOUT operations, relay evidence of booby traps, hidden enemy, and other dangers in caves, tunnels, buildings, vehicles and other areas where the soldier(s) may be at risk. They have expanded mobility in debris fields, stairs, and rugged terrain with IR and visible video and audio links. New sensor technology enables new tactics to be developed and tethers allow secure operation. These UGVs are extremely rugged withstanding the harshest military use. They have high reliability as demonstrated in operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. They are easy to operate with a short set-up time and battery change out time of less than one minute.

  2. Ensuring Safe Exploration: Ares Launch Vehicle Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, M. L.; Chenevert, D. J.

    2009-01-01

    Ground vibration testing has been an integral tool for developing new launch vehicles throughout the space age. Several launch vehicles have been lost due to problems that would have been detected by early vibration testing, including Ariane 5, Delta III, and Falcon 1. NASA will leverage experience and testing hardware developed during the Saturn and Shuttle programs to perform ground vibration testing (GVT) on the Ares I crew launch vehicle and Ares V cargo launch vehicle stacks. NASA performed dynamic vehicle testing (DVT) for Saturn and mated vehicle ground vibration testing (MVGVT) for Shuttle at the Dynamic Test Stand (Test Stand 4550) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, and is now modifying that facility to support Ares I integrated vehicle ground vibration testing (IVGVT) beginning in 2012. The Ares IVGVT schedule shows most of its work being completed between 2010 and 2014. Integrated 2nd Stage Ares IVGVT will begin in 2012 and IVGVT of the entire Ares launch stack will begin in 2013. The IVGVT data is needed for the human-rated Orion launch vehicle's Design Certification Review (DCR) in early 2015. During the Apollo program, GVT detected several serious design concerns, which NASA was able to address before Saturn V flew, eliminating costly failures and potential losses of mission or crew. During the late 1970s, Test Stand 4550 was modified to support the four-body structure of the Space Shuttle. Vibration testing confirmed that the vehicle's mode shapes and frequencies were better than analytical models suggested, however, the testing also identified challenges with the rate gyro assemblies, which could have created flight instability and possibly resulted in loss of the vehicle. Today, NASA has begun modifying Test Stand 4550 to accommodate Ares I, including removing platforms needed for Shuttle testing and upgrading the dynamic test facilities to characterize the mode shapes and resonant frequencies of the vehicle. The IVGVT

  3. Lessons Learned for Improving Spacecraft Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Michael A.; Stambolian, Damon B.; Henderson, Gena M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has a unique history in processing the Space Shuttle fleet for launches. Some of this experience has been captured in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). This tool provides a convenient way for design engineers to review lessons from the past to prevent problems from reoccurring and incorporate positive lessons in new designs. At the Kennedy Space Center, the LLIS is being used to design ground support equipment for the next generation of launch and crewed vehicles. This paper describes the LLIS process and offers some examples.

  4. Operational benefits from the terminal configured vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. P.; Schmitz, R. A.; Clark, L. V.

    1979-01-01

    The NASA Terminal Configured Vehicle is a flying laboratory used to conduct research and development on improved airborne systems (including avionics) and operational flight procedures, with particular emphasis on utilization in the terminal area environment. The objectives of this technology development activity, focused on conventional transport aircraft, are to develop and demonstrate improvements which can lead to increased airport and runway capacity, increased air traffic controller productivity, energy efficient terminal area operations, reduced weather minima with safety, and reduced community noise by use of appropriate procedures. This paper discusses some early results of this activity in addition to defining present efforts and future research plans.

  5. Unmanned Ground Vehicle Perception Using Thermal Infrared Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Arturo; Huertas, Andres; Matthies, Larry; Bajracharya, Max; Assad, Christopher; Brennan, Shane; Bellutta, Paolo; Sherwin, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform off-road autonomous navigation at any time of day or night is a requirement for some unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) programs. Because there are times when it is desirable for military UGVs to operate without emitting strong, detectable electromagnetic signals, a passive only terrain perception mode of operation is also often a requirement. Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras can be used to provide day and night passive terrain perception. TIR cameras have a detector sensitive to either mid-wave infrared (MWIR) radiation (3-5?m) or long-wave infrared (LWIR) radiation (8-12?m). With the recent emergence of high-quality uncooled LWIR cameras, TIR cameras have become viable passive perception options for some UGV programs. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has used a stereo pair of TIR cameras under several UGV programs to perform stereo ranging, terrain mapping, tree-trunk detection, pedestrian detection, negative obstacle detection, and water detection based on object reflections. In addition, we have evaluated stereo range data at a variety of UGV speeds, evaluated dual-band TIR classification of soil, vegetation, and rock terrain types, analyzed 24 hour water and 12 hour mud TIR imagery, and analyzed TIR imagery for hazard detection through smoke. Since TIR cameras do not currently provide the resolution available from megapixel color cameras, a UGV's daytime safe speed is often reduced when using TIR instead of color cameras. In this paper, we summarize the UGV terrain perception work JPL has performed with TIR cameras over the last decade and describe a calibration target developed by General Dynamics Robotic Systems (GDRS) for TIR cameras and other sensors.

  6. Aircraft and Ground Vehicle Winter Runway Friction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Some background information is given together with the scope and objectives of a 5-year, Joint Winter Runway Friction Measurement Program between the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA), Transport Canada (TC), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The primary objective of this effort is to perform instrumented aircraft and ground vehicle tests aimed at identifying a common number that all the different ground vehicle devices would report. This number, denoted the International Runway Friction Index (IRFI), will be related to all types of aircraft stopping performance. The range of test equipment, the test sites, test results and accomplishments, the extent of the substantial friction database compiled, and future test plans will be described. Several related studies have also been implemented including the effects of contaminant type on aircraft impingement drag, and the effectiveness of various runway and aircraft de-icing chemical types, and application rates.

  7. Infrared Stereo Calibration for Unmanned Ground Vehicle Navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    work, we had limited resources available for heating, illuminating and otherwise building a calibration board from new materials from scratch. Instead...ground vehicle. There are two main challenges in IR stereo calibration; the calibration board ( material , design, etc.) and the accuracy of calibration...become an important research topic in UGV navigation. However, to build three-dimensional (3D) representations of the scene, a pair of stereo cameras

  8. Comparison of Performance Effectiveness of Linear Control Algorithms Developed for a Simplified Ground Vehicle Suspension System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Comparison of Performance Effectiveness of Linear Control Algorithms Developed for a Simplified Ground Vehicle Suspension System by Ross... Linear Control Algorithms Developed for a Simplified Ground Vehicle Suspension System Ross Brown Motile Robotics, Inc, research contractor at U.S... Linear Control Algorithms Developed for a Simplified Ground Vehicle Suspension System 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  9. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 3: Data bank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The GOAL (Ground Operations Aerospace Language) test programming language was developed for use in ground checkout operations in a space vehicle launch environment. To insure compatibility with a maximum number of applications, a systematic and error-free method of referencing command/response (analog and digital) hardware measurements is a principle feature of the language. Central to the concept of requiring the test language to be independent of launch complex equipment and terminology is that of addressing measurements via symbolic names that have meaning directly in the hardware units being tested. To form the link from test program through test system interfaces to the units being tested the concept of a data bank has been introduced. The data bank is actually a large cross-reference table that provides pertinent hardware data such as interface unit addresses, data bus routings, or any other system values required to locate and access measurements.

  10. Commonality of Ground Systems in Launch Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Shawn M.

    2008-01-01

    NASA is examining the utility of requiring a certain degree of commonality in both flight and ground systems in the Constellation Program. While the benefits of commonality seem obvious in terms of minimizing upfront development and long-term operations and maintenance costs, success in real, large-scale engineering systems used to support launch operations is relatively unknown. A broad literature review conducted for this paper did not yield a single paper specifically addressing the application of commonality for ground systems at any launch site in the United States or abroad. This paper provides a broad overview of the ground systems, captures historical and current application of commonality at the launch site, and offers suggestions for additional research to further develop commonality approaches.

  11. Skid steer fuel cell powered unmanned ground vehicle (Burro)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldrum, Jay S.; Green, Christopher A.

    2008-04-01

    The use of alternative energy technology for vehicle propulsion and auxiliary power is becoming more important. Work is being performed at Michigan Technological University's Keweenaw Research Center on an Army Research Laboratory cooperative agreement to develop two unmanned ground vehicles for military applications. A wide range of alternative energy technologies were investigated. Hydrogen-powered proton exchange membrane fuel cells were identified as the most appropriate alternative energy source. This is due to some development and commercialization which makes the technology "drop-in plug-in" for immediate use. We have previously presented research work on a small unmanned ground vehicle demonstration platform where the fuel cell is the only power source. We now present research work on the integration of a fuel cell onto a larger skid steer platform. The dual-power capability of this vehicle can provide a modest level of propulsion in "engine-off mode" and may also be used to power directed energy devices which have applications in countermine and similar threat technologies.

  12. Covert non-line-of-sight communication links for small unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgett, Sherrie J.; McMinn, James R.

    2001-09-01

    The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM), Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), in support of the Unmanned Ground Vehicles/Systems Joint Project Office (UGV/S JPO), has developed, tested and demonstrated the feasibility of use of expendable, thin-buffered, fiber optic cable for tele-operation of unmanned ground systems. Complete Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS), high bandwidth, expendable, fiber optic cable payout systems have been designed, leveraging other Army programs, and integrated on several ground vehicles. A number of tests have been conducted to prove the viability of fiber optics for UGV datalink applications. These successful tests led to the initiation of the development of miniature fiber optic dispensers for small UGVs. Based on the outcome of the Engineer Urban Robot Concept Experimentation Program (URBOT CEP) conducted at Ft. Leonard Wood, MO in 1999 that focused on the feasibility, capability, efficiencies and operational effectiveness of small robots for reconnaissance of bunkers, subterranean sewers and tunnels, and Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT), a design concept was formulated for small robot tethered communications. Miniature fiber optic dispensers have now been fabricated and tested. This paper will present a brief history of the technology transfer and development associated with fiber optic datalinks for unmanned ground vehicles and will focus on the recent research and development of miniaturized deployment systems for small robot applications.

  13. Space Operations for a New Era of Exploration Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Stephen A.; Vanhooser, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program is depending on the Ares Projects to deliver the crew and cargo launch capabilities needed to send human explorers to the Moon and beyond. Ares I and V will provide the core space launch capabilities needed to continue providing crew and cargo access to the International Space Station (ISS), and to build upon the U.S. history of human space exploration. Since 2005, Ares has made substantial progress on designing, developing, and testing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and has continued its in-depth studies of the Ares V cargo launch vehicles. The combined Ares I/Ares V architecture has been designed to reduce the complexity and labor intensity of ground operations for America's next journeys beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO). A deliberate effort is being made to ensure a high level of system operability to significantly increase safety and system availability as well as reduce recurring costs for this new launch vehicle. The Ares Projects goal is to instill operability as part of the vehicles requirements development, design, and operations. This simplicity will come from using simpler, proven engine designs, as in the case of the J-2X upper stage engine and RS-68 engine; improving existing hardware, as in the case of the Shuttle-heritage 5-segment solid rocket motor; and using common propulsion and instrument unit elements between Ares I and Ares V. Furthermore, lessons learned while developing Ares I will be applied directly to Ares V operations. In 2009, the Ares Projects plan to conduct the first flight test of Ares I, designated Ares I-X. Ares I-X preparations have already prompted changes to the vehicle stacking and launch infrastructure at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), including removing Shuttle-specific fixtures from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to accommodate Ares I-style stacking operations, new firing room computers and infrastructure in the VAB Launch Control Center, and new lightning protection system towers at Launch

  14. Preliminary study of ground handling characteristics of Buoyant Quad Rotor (BQR) vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browning, R. G. E.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of mooring concepts appropriate for heavy lift buoyant quad rotor (BQR) vehicles was performed. A review of the evolution of ground handling systems and procedures for all airship types is presented to ensure that appropriate consideration is given to past experiences. Two buoyant quad rotor designs are identified and described. An analysis of wind loads on a moored airship and the effects of these loads on vehicle design is provided. Four mooring concepts are assessed with respect to the airship design, wind loads and mooring site considerations. Basing requirements and applicability of expeditionary mooring at various operational scenarios are addressed.

  15. 10 CFR 490.306 - Vehicle operation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vehicle operation requirements. 490.306 Section 490.306 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.306 Vehicle operation requirements. The alternative...

  16. 10 CFR 490.306 - Vehicle operation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vehicle operation requirements. 490.306 Section 490.306 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.306 Vehicle operation requirements. The alternative...

  17. 10 CFR 490.306 - Vehicle operation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vehicle operation requirements. 490.306 Section 490.306 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.306 Vehicle operation requirements. The alternative...

  18. 10 CFR 490.306 - Vehicle operation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vehicle operation requirements. 490.306 Section 490.306 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.306 Vehicle operation requirements. The alternative...

  19. Distributed operating system for NASA ground stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, John F.

    1987-01-01

    NASA ground stations are characterized by ever changing support requirements, so application software is developed and modified on a continuing basis. A distributed operating system was designed to optimize the generation and maintenance of those applications. Unusual features include automatic program generation from detailed design graphs, on-line software modification in the testing phase, and the incorporation of a relational database within a real-time, distributed system.

  20. Space vehicle field unit and ground station system

    DOEpatents

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Delapp, Jerry; Proicou, Michael; Seitz, Daniel; Michel, John; Enemark, Donald

    2016-10-25

    A field unit and ground station may use commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components and share a common architecture, where differences in functionality are governed by software. The field units and ground stations may be easy to deploy, relatively inexpensive, and be relatively easy to operate. A novel file system may be used where datagrams of a file may be stored across multiple drives and/or devices. The datagrams may be received out of order and reassembled at the receiving device.

  1. Investigating the Usefulness of Soldier Aids for Autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Investigating the Usefulness of Soldier Aids for Autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Part 2 by A William Evans III, Susan G Hill, Brian Wood...Ground, MD 21005-5425 ARL-TR-7240 March 2015 Investigating the Usefulness of Soldier Aids for Autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Part...AND SUBTITLE Investigating the Usefulness of Soldier Aids for Autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicles, Part 2 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  2. Definition of technology development missions for early space stations orbit transfer vehicle serving. Phase 2, task 1: Space station support of operational OTV servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Representative space based orbital transfer vehicles (OTV), ground based vehicle turnaround assessment, functional operational requirements and facilities, mission turnaround operations, a comparison of ground based versus space based tasks, activation of servicing facilities prior to IOC, fleet operations requirements, maintenance facilities, OTV servicing facilities, space station support requirements, and packaging for delivery are discussed.

  3. Remote control of a small unmanned ground vehicle (SUGV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimie, Nicolae; Zorila, Alexandru; Nan, Alexandru; Schiopu, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Developing robot technology has gained an increasing dynamics. Small unmanned ground vehicle - SUGV has gained a place in the robotics field. This paper describes the possibility of remote control of the SUGV using a fuzzy algorithm. This designed algorithm specifically for controlling of a semi-autonomous mobile robot for research, observation, and surveillance. The device can provide 360-degree panoramic images using an image system which includes a hyperboloid mirror and a CCD camera, designed for this specific purpose. Both components, fuzzy algorithm and image system were implemented, tested in the laboratory condition and outdoor on a mobile robot for research, observation, and surveillance.

  4. Operations Assessment of Launch Vehicle Architectures using Activity Based Cost Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Torres, Alex J.; McCleskey, Carey

    2000-01-01

    The growing emphasis on affordability for space transportation systems requires the assessment of new space vehicles for all life cycle activities, from design and development, through manufacturing and operations. This paper addresses the operational assessment of launch vehicles, focusing on modeling the ground support requirements of a vehicle architecture, and estimating the resulting costs and flight rate. This paper proposes the use of Activity Based Costing (ABC) modeling for this assessment. The model uses expert knowledge to determine the activities, the activity times and the activity costs based on vehicle design characteristics. The approach provides several advantages to current approaches to vehicle architecture assessment including easier validation and allowing vehicle designers to understand the cost and cycle time drivers.

  5. Man-vehicle systems research facility: Design and operating characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Man-Vehicle Systems Research Facility (MVSRF) provides the capability of simulating aircraft (two with full crews), en route and terminal air traffic control and aircrew interactions, and advanced cockpit (1995) display representative of future generations of aircraft, all within the full mission context. The characteristics of this facility derive from research, addressing critical human factors issues that pertain to: (1) information requirements for the utilization and integration of advanced electronic display systems, (2) the interaction and distribution of responsibilities between aircrews and ground controllers, and (3) the automation of aircrew functions. This research has emphasized the need for high fidelity in simulations and for the capability to conduct full mission simulations of relevant aircraft operations. This report briefly describes the MVSRF design and operating characteristics.

  6. Kennedy Space Center Orion Processing Team Planning for Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Topics in this presentation are: Constellation Ares I/Orion/Ground Ops Elements Orion Ground Operations Flow Orion Operations Planning Process and Toolset Overview, including: 1 Orion Concept of Operations by Phase 2 Ops Analysis Capabilities Overview 3 Operations Planning Evolution 4 Functional Flow Block Diagrams 5 Operations Timeline Development 6 Discrete Event Simulation (DES) Modeling 7 Ground Operations Planning Document Database (GOPDb) Using Operations Planning Tools for Operability Improvements includes: 1 Kaizen/Lean Events 2 Mockups 3 Human Factors Analysis

  7. The 16th annual intelligent ground vehicle competition: intelligent students creating intelligent vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.

    2009-01-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of three, unmanned systems, student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) in the 1990s. The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned system. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip ground vehicles of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 16 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from nearly 70 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the four-day competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participation is presented.

  8. Air cushion vehicles for arctic operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleser, J.; Lavis, D. R.

    1986-09-01

    Attention is given to the results of the NAVSEA FY85 Surface Ship Concept Formulation Design Study for an initial operational capability year-2000 air cushion vehicle (ACV) suitable for logistics and general search/rescue duties in the Arctic. Two designs were developed during the study; the first utilized an ACV design synthesis math model while the second evolved as a derivative of an existing U.S. production craft. Both are regarded as feasible from an engineering and naval architectural standpoint. Results of performance and cost trade-off studies suggest that, for an Arctic ACV, gas turbines are the preferred power plant choice and an aluminum alloy is the preferred hull structural material choice. The most appropriate skirt height is approximately 12 ft.

  9. Applications of triggered lightning to space vehicle operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafferis, William; Sanicandro, Rocco; Rompalla, John; Wohlman, Richard

    1992-11-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the USAF Eastern Space Missile Center (ESMC) covering an area of 25 x 40 km are frequently called America's Spaceport. This title is earned through the integration, by labor and management, of many skills in a wide variety of engineering fields to solve many technical problems that occur during the launch processing of space vehicles. Weather is one of these problems, and although less frequent in time and duration when compared to engineering type problems, has caused costly and life threatening situations. This sensitivity to weather, especially lightning, was recognized in the very early pioneer days of space operations. The need to protect the many v\\facilities, space flight hardware, and personnel from electrified clouds capable of producing lightning was a critical element in improving launch operations. A KSC lightning committee was formed and directed to improve lightning protection, detection, and measuring systems and required that all theoretical studies be confirmed by KSC field data. Over the years, there have been several lightning incidents involving flight vehicles during ground processing as well as launch. Subsequent investigations revealed the need to improve these systems as well as the knowledge of the electrical atmosphere and its effects on operations in regard to cost and safety. Presented here is how, KSC Atmospheric Science Field Laboratory (AFSL), in particular Rocket Triggered Lightning, is being used to solve these problems.

  10. The 14 TH Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition: intelligent teams creating intelligent ground robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.; Nguyen, Dmitri

    2006-10-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of three, unmanned systems, student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) in the 1990s. The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics, and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned system. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip ground vehicles of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 14 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from over 50 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the three-day competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participant feedback is presented.

  11. The 15 TH annual intelligent ground vehicle competition: intelligent ground robots created by intelligent students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.

    2007-09-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of three, unmanned systems, student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) in the 1990s. The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics, and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned system. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip ground vehicles of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 15 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from over 50 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the four-day competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participation is presented.

  12. Large eddy simulation of flows around ground vehicles and other bluff bodies.

    PubMed

    Krajnovic, Sinisa

    2009-07-28

    A brief review of large eddy simulation (LES) applications for different bluff-body flows performed by the author and his co-workers is presented. Examples of flows range from simple cube flows characterized by sharp edge separation over a three-dimensional hill where LES relies on good near-wall resolution, to complex flows of a tall, finite cylinder that contains several flow regimes that cause different challenges to LES. The second part of the paper is devoted to flows around ground vehicles at moderate Reynolds numbers. Although the present review proves the applicability of LES for various bluff-body flows, an increase of the Reynolds number towards the operational speeds of ground vehicles requires accurate near-wall modelling for a successful LES.

  13. Distributed pheromone-based swarming control of unmanned air and ground vehicles for RSTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, John A.; Mathews, Robert S.; Yinger, Andrew; Robinson, Joshua S.; Moody, John; Riddle, Stephanie

    2008-04-01

    The use of unmanned vehicles in Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA) applications has received considerable attention recently. Cooperating land and air vehicles can support multiple sensor modalities providing pervasive and ubiquitous broad area sensor coverage. However coordination of multiple air and land vehicles serving different mission objectives in a dynamic and complex environment is a challenging problem. Swarm intelligence algorithms, inspired by the mechanisms used in natural systems to coordinate the activities of many entities provide a promising alternative to traditional command and control approaches. This paper describes recent advances in a fully distributed digital pheromone algorithm that has demonstrated its effectiveness in managing the complexity of swarming unmanned systems. The results of a recent demonstration at NASA's Wallops Island of multiple Aerosonde Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) and Pioneer Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) cooperating in a coordinated RSTA application are discussed. The vehicles were autonomously controlled by the onboard digital pheromone responding to the needs of the automatic target recognition algorithms. UAVs and UGVs controlled by the same pheromone algorithm self-organized to perform total area surveillance, automatic target detection, sensor cueing, and automatic target recognition with no central processing or control and minimal operator input. Complete autonomy adds several safety and fault tolerance requirements which were integrated into the basic pheromone framework. The adaptive algorithms demonstrated the ability to handle some unplanned hardware failures during the demonstration without any human intervention. The paper describes lessons learned and the next steps for this promising technology.

  14. Evaluation of Bare Ground on Rangelands using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins

    2011-01-01

    Attention is currently being given to methods that assess the ecological condition of rangelands throughout the United States. There are a number of different indicators that assess ecological condition of rangelands. Bare Ground is being considered by a number of agencies and resource specialists as a lead indicator that can be evaluated over a broad area. Traditional methods of measuring bare ground rely on field technicians collecting data along a line transect or from a plot. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide an alternative to collecting field data, can monitor a large area in a relative short period of time, and in many cases can enhance safety and time required to collect data. In this study, both fixed wing and helicopter UAVs were used to measure bare ground in a sagebrush steppe ecosystem. The data were collected with digital imagery and read using the image analysis software SamplePoint. The approach was tested over seven different plots and compared against traditional field methods to evaluate accuracy for assessing bare ground. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho in locations where there is very little disturbance by humans and the area is grazed only by wildlife. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

  15. Design and realization of an intelligent ground vehicle with modular payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmanalp, Mehmet A.; Doherty, Ryan M.; Gorges, Jeffrey; Kalauskas, Peter; Peterson, Ellen; Polido, Felipe; Nestinger, Stephen S.; Padir, Taskin

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011, Worcester Polytechnic Institute's (WPI) unmanned ground vehicle Prometheus participated in the 8th Annual Robotic Lawnmower and 19th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competitions back-to-back. This paper details the two-year design and development cycle for WPI's intelligent ground vehicle, Prometheus. The on-board intelligence algorithms include lane detection, obstacle avoidance, path planning, world representation and waypoint navigation. The authors present experimental results and discuss practical implementations of the intelligence algorithms used on the robot.

  16. Autonomous Vehicle Panel 2011 Pacific Operations Science and Technology Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-16

    Transportable Robot System (MTRS) POR Multi- Mission Unmanned Ground Vehicle (MM- UGV) CDD Husky Mounted Detection System (HMDS) POR...Battlefield Extraction Assist Robot (BEAR) Initiative Squad Multi- purpose Equipment Transport (SMET) CDD Exoskeleton (XOS) CDD Autonomous Mobility...Appliqué System (AMAS) CDD M160 Light Flail POR 3 CPD To be released Ground Robotics Capability Sets (photos are notional representations

  17. Ensuring Safe Exploration: Ares Launch Vehicle Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, M. L.; Chenevert, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated vehicle ground vibration testing (IVGVT) will be a vital component for ensuring the safety of NASA's next generation of exploration vehicles to send human beings to the Moon and beyond. A ground vibration test (GVT) measures the fundamental dynamic characteristics of launch vehicles during various phases of flight. The Ares Flight & Integrated Test Office (FITO) will be leading the IVGVT for the Ares I crew launch vehicle at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from 2012 to 2014 using Test Stand (TS) 4550. MSFC conducted similar GVT for the Saturn V and Space Shuttle vehicles. FITO is responsible for performing the IVGVT on the Ares I crew launch vehicle, which will lift the Orion crew exploration vehicle to low Earth orbit, and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, which can launch the lunar lander into orbit and send the combined Orionilander vehicles toward the Moon. Ares V consists of a six-engine core stage with two solid rocket boosters and an Earth departure stage (EDS). The same engine will power the EDS and the Ares I second stage. For the Ares IVGVT, the current plan is to test six configurations in three unique test positions inside TS 4550. Position 1 represents the entire launch stack at liftoff (using inert first stage segments). Position 2 consists of the entire launch stack at first stage burn-out (using empty first stage segments). Four Ares I second stage test configurations will be tested in Position 3, consisting of the Upper Stage and Orion crew module in four nominal conditions: J-2X engine ignition, post Launch Abort System (LAS) jettison, critical slosh mass, and J-2X burn-out. Because of long disuse, TS 4550 is being repaired and reactivated to conduct the Ares I IVGVT. The Shuttle-era platforms have been removed and are being replaced with mast climbers that provide ready access to the test articles and can be moved easily to support different positions within the test stand. The electrical power distribution system for TS 4550 was

  18. Feasibility study of launch vehicle ground cloud neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderarend, P. C.; Stoy, S. T.; Kranyecz, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of hydrogen chloride in the cloud was analyzed as a function of launch pad geometry and rate of rise of the vehicle during the first 24 sec of burn in order to define neutralization requirements. Delivery systems of various types were developed in order to bring the proposed chemical agents in close contact with the hydrogen chloride. Approximately one-third of the total neutralizing agent required can be delivered from a ground installed system at the launch pad; concentrated sodium carbonate solution is the preferred choice of agent for this launch pad system. Two-thirds of the neutralization requirement appears to need delivery by aircraft. Only one chemical agent (ammonia) may be reasonably considered for delivery by aircraft, because weight and bulk of all other agents are too large.

  19. Mobility Performance Algorithms for Small Unmanned Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    test data that are from full-sized vehicles and reflect the effects of track tension and flexing. There appears to be no rea- son these equations...STNDMob 3.4. vehiclePitch float Vehicle pitch (radians) should be based on the vehicle location and heading ( effectively the terrain slope). vehicleRoll... effects .......................................................................................................................... 24 Autonomous

  20. Shuttle Ground Operations Efficiencies/Technologies (SGOE/T) study. Volume 2: Ground Operations evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, A. L.; Hart, M. T.; Lowry, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The Ground Operations Evaluation describes the breath and depth of the various study elements selected as a result of an operational analysis conducted during the early part of the study. Analysis techniques used for the evaluation are described in detail. Elements selected for further evaluation are identified; the results of the analysis documented; and a follow-on course of action recommended. The background and rationale for developing recommendations for the current Shuttle or for future programs is presented.

  1. Ground cloud related weather modification effects. [heavy lift launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    The principal concerns about inadvertent weather modification by the solar power satellite system rocket effluents are discussed, namely the possibility that the ground cloud might temporarily modify local weather and the cumulative effects of nearly 500 launches per year. These issues are discussed through the consideration of (1) the possible alteration of the microphysical processes of clouds in the general area due to rocket effluents and debris and cooling water entrained during the launch and (2) the direct dynamical and thermodynamical responses to the inputs of thermal energy and moisture from the rocket exhaust for given ambient meteorological conditions. The huge amount of thermal energy contained in the exhaust of the proposed launch vehicle would in some situations induce a saturated, wet convective cloud or enhance an existing convective activity. Nevertheless, the effects would be limited to the general area of the launch site. The observed long lasting high concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei produced during and after a rocket launch may appreciably affect the frequency of occurrence and persistence of fogs and haze. In view of the high mission frequency proposed for the vehicle launches, a potential exists for a cumulative effect.

  2. Ground Contact Modeling for the Morpheus Test Vehicle Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The Morpheus vertical test vehicle is an autonomous robotic lander being developed at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to test hazard detection technology. Because the initial ground contact simulation model was not very realistic, it was decided to improve the model without making it too computationally expensive. The first development cycle added capability to define vehicle attachment points (AP) and to keep track of their states in the lander reference frame (LFRAME). These states are used with a spring damper model to compute an AP contact force. The lateral force is then overwritten, if necessary, by the Coulomb static or kinetic friction force. The second development cycle added capability to use the PolySurface class as the contact surface. The class can load CAD data in STL (Stereo Lithography) format, and use the data to compute line of sight (LOS) intercepts. A polygon frame (PFRAME) is computed from the facet intercept normal and used to convert the AP state to PFRAME. Three flat plane tests validate the transitions from kinetic to static, static to kinetic, and vertical impact. The hazardous terrain test will be used to test for visual reasonableness. The improved model is numerically inexpensive, robust, and produces results that are reasonable.

  3. Ground Contact Modeling for the Morpheus Test Vehicle Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The Morpheus vertical test vehicle is an autonomous robotic lander being developed at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to test hazard detection technology. Because the initial ground contact simulation model was not very realistic, it was decided to improve the model without making it too computationally expensive. The first development cycle added capability to define vehicle attachment points (AP) and to keep track of their states in the lander reference frame (LFRAME). These states are used with a spring damper model to compute an AP contact force. The lateral force is then overwritten, if necessary, by the Coulomb static or kinetic friction force. The second development cycle added capability to use the PolySurface class as the contact surface. The class can load CAD data in STL (Stereo Lithography) format, and use the data to compute line of sight (LOS) intercepts. A polygon frame (PFRAME) is computed from the facet intercept normal and used to convert the AP state to PFRAME. Three flat plane tests validate the transitions from kinetic to static, static to kinetic, and vertical impact. The hazardous terrain test will be used to test for visual reasonableness. The improved model is numerically inexpensive, robust, and produces results that are reasonable.

  4. 10 CFR 490.306 - Vehicle operation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vehicle operation requirements. 490.306 Section 490.306 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel... vehicles acquired pursuant to section 490.302 of this part shall be operated solely on alternative...

  5. Training Program for Operation of Emergency Vehicles. Trainee Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    INNOVATRIX, Inc., Ingomar, PA.

    A two-part trainee study guide for use in the classroom phase of the Emergency Vehicle Operation (EVO) training program is provided. Part 1, to be taken by all trainees, contains seven units organized into various subunits and includes the following: (1) introduction to the course; (2) some legal aspects of emergency vehicle operation (state…

  6. Operations analysis (study 2.6). Volume 4: Computer specification; logistics of orbiting vehicle servicing (LOVES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The logistics of orbital vehicle servicing computer specifications was developed and a number of alternatives to improve utilization of the space shuttle and the tug were investigated. Preliminary results indicate that space servicing offers a potential for reducing future operational and program costs over ground refurbishment of satellites. A computer code which could be developed to simulate space servicing is presented.

  7. Spheres: from Ground Development to ISS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2016-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES National Lab Facility aboard ISS is managed and operated by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. SPHERES has served to mature the adaptability of control algorithms of future formation flight missions in microgravity (6 DOF (Degrees of Freedom) / long duration microgravity), demonstrate key close-proximity formation flight and rendezvous and docking maneuvers, understand fault diagnosis and recovery, improve the field of human telerobotic operation and control, and lessons learned on ISS have significant impact on ground robotics, mapping, localization, and sensing in three-dimensions - among several other areas of study.

  8. System and method of vehicle operating condition management

    DOEpatents

    Sujan, Vivek A.; Vajapeyazula, Phani; Follen, Kenneth; Wu, An; Moffett, Barty L.

    2015-10-20

    A vehicle operating condition profile can be determined over a given route while also considering imposed constraints such as deviation from time targets, deviation from maximum governed speed limits, etc. Given current vehicle speed, engine state and transmission state, the present disclosure optimally manages the engine map and transmission to provide a recommended vehicle operating condition that optimizes fuel consumption in transitioning from one vehicle state to a target state. Exemplary embodiments provide for offline and online optimizations relative to fuel consumption. The benefit is increased freight efficiency in transporting cargo from source to destination by minimizing fuel consumption and maintaining drivability.

  9. Aerodynamic Drag Reduction Apparatus For Wheeled Vehicles In Ground Effect

    DOEpatents

    Ortega, Jason M.; Salari, Kambiz

    2005-12-13

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic drag of a wheeled vehicle in a flowstream, the vehicle having a vehicle body and a wheel assembly supporting the vehicle body. The apparatus includes a baffle assembly adapted to be positioned upstream of the wheel assembly for deflecting airflow away from the wheel assembly so as to reduce the incident pressure on the wheel assembly.

  10. Anomaly Detection for Next-Generation Space Launch Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Iverson, David L.; Hall, David R.; Taylor, William M.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Brown, Barbara; Ferrell, Bob A.; Waterman, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing new capabilities that will enable future human exploration missions while reducing mission risk and cost. The Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) project aims to demonstrate the utility of integrated vehicle health management (IVHM) tools in the domain of ground support equipment (GSE) to be used for the next generation launch vehicles. In addition to demonstrating the utility of IVHM tools for GSE, FDIR aims to mature promising tools for use on future missions and document the level of effort - and hence cost - required to implement an application with each selected tool. One of the FDIR capabilities is anomaly detection, i.e., detecting off-nominal behavior. The tool we selected for this task uses a data-driven approach. Unlike rule-based and model-based systems that require manual extraction of system knowledge, data-driven systems take a radically different approach to reasoning. At the basic level, they start with data that represent nominal functioning of the system and automatically learn expected system behavior. The behavior is encoded in a knowledge base that represents "in-family" system operations. During real-time system monitoring or during post-flight analysis, incoming data is compared to that nominal system operating behavior knowledge base; a distance representing deviation from nominal is computed, providing a measure of how far "out of family" current behavior is. We describe the selected tool for FDIR anomaly detection - Inductive Monitoring System (IMS), how it fits into the FDIR architecture, the operations concept for the GSE anomaly monitoring, and some preliminary results of applying IMS to a Space Shuttle GSE anomaly.

  11. Path duplication using GPS carrier based relative position for automated ground vehicle convoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, William E., III

    use of this method is limited to short following distances, or line of sight operation, similar to vision based following approaches. The following vehicle turns about a smaller radius than the lead vehicle, and this effect intensifies as following distance increases. The second path duplication method allows for non line of sight operation by combining the vector odometry with the relative position to create a virtual leader to follow. The actual difference between the vehicles could be in excess of 100 meters, but the perceived distance is reduced to a predetermined value based on vehicle speed by re-generating the lead vehicle's position at a previous instance in time with the relative position and odometry information. Performance curves of path duplication accuracy versus following distance using different odometry techniques show that the partially integrated tactical unit provides the best performance, but the time differenced carrier approach offered very similar performance for a lower total system cost. Both following methods were implemented on an unmanned ground vehicle. Tests showed following accuracy for the line of sight method was within 50 centimeters on straight sections, though the reference accuracy was centimeter level. The non line of sight method predicted the virtual leader position to within 5 centimeters for following distances ranging from 10 to 120 meters.

  12. Preventive Maintenance and Operating Techniques for Heavy Vehicles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This correspondence course, originally developed for the Marine Corps, is designed to provide students who are acquainted with motor transport and tactical heavy vehicles with information on how to operate and perform preventive maintenance of those vehicles. The course contains five study units covering 2.5-ton M-Series tactical trucks, 5-ton and…

  13. Evaluating the Performance of Unmanned Ground Vehicle Water Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Arturo; Ivanov, Tonislav; Brennan, Shane

    2010-01-01

    Water detection is a critical perception requirement for unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) autonomous navigation over cross-country terrain. During the Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliances (RCTA) program, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a set of water detection algorithms that are used to detect, localize, and avoid water bodies large enough to be a hazard to a UGV. The JPL water detection software performs the detection and localization stages using a forward-looking stereo pair of color cameras. The 3D coordinates of water body surface points are then output to a UGV's autonomous mobility system, which is responsible for planning and executing safe paths. There are three primary methods for evaluating the performance of the water detection software. Evaluations can be performed in image space on the intermediate detection product, in map space on the final localized product, or during autonomous navigation to characterize the avoidance of a variety of water bodies. This paper describes a methodology for performing the first two types of water detection performance evaluations.

  14. Magnetorheological impact seat suspensions for ground vehicle crash mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-04-01

    Semi-active magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) are one type of the most promising actuator for both the vibration and shock control. This paper investigates the frontal crash mitigation performance of semi-active MR impact seat suspensions for ground vehicles. The characteristics of two MREAs, a conventional MREA and an MREA with an internal bypass, with an identical volume, are theoretically evaluated and compared. To explore the control effectiveness of MREAs in the shock control systems, the mechanical model of a 4-degree-of-freedom (4DOF) sliding seat suspension system with MREAs is constructed. An optimal Bingham number control, which is to minimize the crash pulse loads transmitted to occupants by utilizing maximum stroke of the MREAs based on initial velocity of crash pulse, mass, and damping, is proposed and developed to improve the crash mitigation performance of the 4DOF MR sliding seat suspension control systems. The simulated control performances of the mitigation systems based on the MREAs with different functional structures are evaluated, compared, and analyzed. The research results indicate that (1) the constant stroking load velocity range of the MREAs is of significance to evaluate the controllability of the MREAs (i.e., the effectiveness of the semi-active shock control systems), and (2) suboptimal Bingham number control cannot realize "soft landing" (i.e., either an end-stop impact or incomplete utilization of the MREA stroke happens).

  15. Robust leader tracking from an unmanned ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, Camille S.; German, Stan; Ostapchenko, Andrey

    2013-05-01

    While many leader-follower technologies for robotic mules have been developed in recent years, the problem of reliably tracking and re-acquiring a human leader through cluttered environments continues to pose a challenge to widespread acceptance of these systems. Recent approaches to leader tracking rely on leader-worn equipment that may be damaged, hidden from view, or lost, such as radio transmitters or special clothing, as well as specialized sensing hardware such as high-resolution LIDAR. We present a vision-based approach for robustly tracking a leader using a simple monocular camera. The proposed method requires no modification to the leader's equipment, nor any specialized sensors on board the host platform. The system learns a discriminative model of the leader's appearance to robustly track him or her through long occlusions, changing lighting conditions, and cluttered environments. We demonstrate the system's tracking capabilities on publicly available benchmark datasets, as well as in representative scenarios captured using a small unmanned ground vehicle (SUGV).

  16. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs): a new tool in counterterrorism operations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörtbudak, Mehmet F.

    2015-05-01

    Terrorism is not a new phenomenon to the world, yet it remains difficult to define and counter. Countering terrorism requires several measures that must be taken simultaneously; however, counterterrorism strategies of many countries mostly depend on military measures. In the aftermath of the 2001 terrorist attack on the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, the United States (U.S.) has started and led the campaign of Global War on Terrorism. They have invaded Afghanistan and Iraq and have encountered insurgencies run by terrorist organizations, such as al-Qaeda and its affiliates. The U.S. made the utilization of Air and Space Power very intensively during these operations. In order to implement operations; Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) assets were used to collect the necessary information. Before the successful insertion of a small number of U.S. Special Operation Force (SOF) teams into Afghanistan, the U.S. Air Force attacked al-Qaeda and Taliban's targets such as infrastructure, airfields, ground forces, command-control facilities etc. As soon as the U.S. troops got on the ground and started to marshal to Kabul, the Air Force supported them by attacking jointly determined targets. The Air Force continued to carry out the missions and played a significant role to achieve the objective of operation during all the time. This is not the only example of utilization of Air and Space Power in counterterrorism and counterinsurgency operations. All around the world, many countries have also made the utilization of Air Power in different missions ranging from ISR to attacking. Thinking that terrorism has a psychological dimension and losing a pilot during operations may result in decreasing the population support to operations, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) started to be used by practitioners and took priority over other assets. Although UAVs have been on the theatre for a long time used for ISR mission in conventional conflicts, with the advent

  17. Investigations into near-real-time surveying for geophysical data collection using an autonomous ground vehicle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, Geoffrey A.; Ippolito, C.; Lee, R.; Spritzer, R.; Yeh, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are cooperatively investigating the utility of unmanned vehicles for near-real-time autonomous surveys of geophysical data collection. Initially focused on unmanned ground vehicle collection of magnetic data, this cooperative effort has brought unmanned surveying, precision guidance, near-real-time communication, on-the-fly data processing, and near-real-time data interpretation into the realm of ground geophysical surveying, all of which offer advantages over current methods of manned collection of ground magnetic data. An unmanned ground vehicle mission has demonstrated that these vehicles can successfully complete missions to collect geophysical data, and add advantages in data collection, processing, and interpretation. We view the current experiment as an initial phase in further unmanned vehicle data-collection missions, including aerial surveying.

  18. Study of passive fuel tank inerting systems for ground combat vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Steven J.; Motzenbecker, Peter F.; Clauson, Michael J.

    1988-09-01

    Many flammable materials are carried aboard combat vehicles, including fuel, hydraulic fluid, and munitions. A fire involving any of these can lead to destruction of the vehicle and injury to the crew. Ground combat vehicles have relied on fire extinguishing systems to protect the vehicles and crew, while aircraft use passive inerting techniques as well as fire extinguishing systems. The apparent disparity between ground combat vehicles and aircraft has caused the U.S. Congress to direct the Secretary of the Army to examine the use of passive, multiple-hit, fuel tank inerting systems in tracked and wheeled vehicles. This report examines passive fuel tank inerting techniques and provides an assessment of their applicability to ground combat vehicles. The extent of the hazard posed by the combat vehicle fuel tanks has been defined. The adequacy of the technology in reducing this hazard is evaluated for each technique considered. The current technology for the suppression of fires in and from vehicle fuel tanks available to and in use by the armed services, other government agencies, the private sector, and foreign armed services has also been examined. Attention was restricted to passive systems (systems which do not require any mechanical or electrical activation) which can suppress multiple occurrences of fire. Both fuel tank fillers and systems which surround the fuel tanks were considered. A review of currently available passive fuel tank inerting technologies has shown that the majority of these techniques are not effective for ground combat vehicles considering the large antiarmor threats. A significant quantity of testing has been conducted which bears this out. An exception to this are fuel tank jackets which show great promise in improving ground combat fire survivability. Futher development work must be done before this approach can be integrated into production vehicles or retrofitted into fielded vehicles. Proper fuel system and vehicle design, in

  19. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units Testing Plans and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.; Currin, Kelly M.; Orozco-Smith, Evelyn M.

    2012-01-01

    Cryogenic propellant loading operations with their associated flight and ground systems are some of the most complex, critical activities in launch operations. Consequently, these systems and operations account for a sizeable portion of the life cycle costs of any launch program. NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite advances in cryogenics, system health management and command and control technologies. This project was developed to mature, integrate and demonstrate advancement in the current state of the art in these areas using two distinct integrated ground operations demonstration units (GODU): GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage (IRAS) and GODU Autonomous Control

  20. Propellant Densification Ground Testing Conducted for Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has taken the lead in the development of practical densified cryogenic propellants for launch vehicle applications. The technology of subcooling cryogenic propellants below their normal boiling point to produce a denser fluid is one of the key process technologies necessary to meet the challenge of single-stage-to-orbit and reusable launch vehicles. Densified propellants are critical to lowering launch costs because they enable more propellant to be packed into a given unit volume, thus improving the performance by reducing the overall size and weight of the launch vehicle. This two-pronged research and test program has evolved into (1) conducting tank loading tests using densified liquid hydrogen and (2) developing two large-scale propellant densification systems that will be performance tested next year at Glenn. The propellant-loading test program was undertaken at Glenn in coordination with Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems. In this testing, the liquid hydrogen recirculation and densification process was simulated, and the thermal stratification of the densified propellant was recorded throughout the tank. The test article was a flight-weight tank constructed from composite materials similar to those to be used on the X-33 launch vehicle. The tank geometry as designed by Lockheed Martin had two cylindrical lobes with a center septum. Liquid hydrogen flow rate, pressure data, and temperature data plotted over time were collected while the subscale tank was filled with 27 R (15 K) densified liquid hydrogen propellant. This testing has validated mathematical models and demonstrated the readiness of densified propellant technology for near-term use. It marks the first time that such a process has been carried out with a multiple-lobe, flight-similar tank. Glenn researchers have also been working on providing a process and critical test data for the continuous production of densified liquid hydrogen (LH2) and

  1. Kansas State University electric vehicle site operator program

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1991-01-01

    K-State is presently working with Grumman Allied and Unique Mobility to establish a working agreement for the research and development of a pure electric postal vehicle. K-State has worked on the design of this vehicle for the past year and is working to establish the appropriate consortium to bring this vehicle to commercial realization. K-State is working to establish infrastructure support for electric vehicles. Presently, a Kansas company is working with K-State to bring its patented low-cost vehicle metering product to market. An anticipated second year DOE project would provide 100 electric metering stations to Southern California for a large scale electric vehicle infrastructure demonstration project. This project would allow a parking lot(s) to be made EV ready. K-State's Site Operator Program continues to get the word-out'' about electric vehicles. From a personal visit by Senator Bob Dole, to Corporate Board of Director Meetings, to school classrooms, to shopping mall demonstrations; K-State Employees are increasing public access and awareness about the electric vehicle industry. As has been shown in this report, K-State's G-Van has logged an average eighteen miles per day while maintaining a full schedule of public relations tours within the state of Kansas and Missouri. K-State has now been contacted by companies in Nebraska and Iowa requesting information and involvement in this program. Kansas and Kansas State will continue its work to contribute to the Site Operator Program effort. With the purchase of two additional electric vehicles and the pending request to purchase two more electric vehicles during the next contractual year, K-states's program will grow. When vehicle development plans and infrastructure requirements are solidified, K-State's program will be ready to participate and be a major contributor to the development and introduction of this technology.

  2. Modeling operating weight and axle weight distributions for highway vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.; Liang, J.C.

    1988-07-01

    The estimation of highway cost responsibility requires detailed information on vehicle operating weights and axle weights by type of vehicle. Typically, 10--20 vehicle types must be cross-classified by 10--20 registered weight classes and again by 20 or more operating weight categories, resulting in 100--400 relative frequencies to be determined for each vehicle type. For each of these, gross operating weight must be distributed to each axle or axle unit. Given the rarity of many of the heaviest vehicle types, direct estimation of these frequencies and axle weights from traffic classification count statistics and truck weight data may exceed the reliability of even the largest (e.g., 250,000 record) data sources. An alternative is to estimate statistical models of operating weight distributions as functions of registered weight, and models of axle weight shares as functions of operating weight. This paper describes the estimation of such functions using the multinomial logit model (a log-linear model) and the implementation of the modeling framework as a PC-based FORTRAN program. Areas for further research include the addition of highway class and region as explanatory variables in operating weight distribution models, and the development of theory for including registration costs and costs of operating overweight in the modeling framework. 14 refs., 45 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Computer vision applied to vehicle operation

    SciTech Connect

    Metzler, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    Among many tasks of car development, safety, economy, environmental benefits and convenience, safety should have a high priority. One of the main goals is the reduction of the number of accidents. Environment and situation recognition by autonomous vehicle-electronic systems can contribute to the recognition of problems together with information to the driver or direct intervention in the car's behaviour. This paper describes some techniques for environment recognition, the status of a present project, and the goals of some PROMETHEUS (Program for a European Traffic with Highest Efficiency and Unprecedented Safety) projects.

  4. Limiting performance of ground transportation vehicles subject to transient loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Wang, B. P.

    1974-01-01

    A computational approach to determining the limiting performance of vehicles subject to transient disturbances based on response variable criteria is set forth. For the purposes of a limiting performance study, the transportation system dynamics are described using second- or first-order equations in which the sought for quantity is a vector of time-varying functions called control or isolator forces that have replaced portions of the physical system. Computations are performed as a linear programming problem. As an example of the limiting performance of vehicles in protecting passengers or cargo under crash conditions, the problem of lading damage of a rail vehicle that is struck by another vehicle is considered.

  5. A Concept of Operations for an Integrated Vehicle Health Assurance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Ross, Richard W.; Berger, David E.; Lekki, John D.; Mah, Robert W.; Perey, Danie F.; Schuet, Stefan R.; Simon, Donald L.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    This document describes a Concept of Operations (ConOps) for an Integrated Vehicle Health Assurance System (IVHAS). This ConOps is associated with the Maintain Vehicle Safety (MVS) between Major Inspections Technical Challenge in the Vehicle Systems Safety Technologies (VSST) Project within NASA s Aviation Safety Program. In particular, this document seeks to describe an integrated system concept for vehicle health assurance that integrates ground-based inspection and repair information with in-flight measurement data for airframe, propulsion, and avionics subsystems. The MVS Technical Challenge intends to maintain vehicle safety between major inspections by developing and demonstrating new integrated health management and failure prevention technologies to assure the integrity of vehicle systems between major inspection intervals and maintain vehicle state awareness during flight. The approach provided by this ConOps is intended to help optimize technology selection and development, as well as allow the initial integration and demonstration of these subsystem technologies over the 5 year span of the VSST program, and serve as a guideline for developing IVHAS technologies under the Aviation Safety Program within the next 5 to 15 years. A long-term vision of IVHAS is provided to describe a basic roadmap for more intelligent and autonomous vehicle systems.

  6. Color night vision system for ground vehicle navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, E. A.; Qadir, H.; Kozaitis, S. P.

    2014-06-01

    Operating in a degraded visual environment due to darkness can pose a threat to navigation safety. Systems have been developed to navigate in darkness that depend upon differences between objects such as temperature or reflectivity at various wavelengths. However, adding sensors for these systems increases the complexity by adding multiple components that may create problems with alignment and calibration. An approach is needed that is passive and simple for widespread acceptance. Our approach uses a type of augmented display to show fused images from visible and thermal sensors that are continuously updated. Because the raw fused image gave an unnatural color appearance, we used a color transfer process based on a look-up table to replace the false colors with a colormap derived from a daytime reference image obtained from a public database using the GPS coordinates of the vehicle. Although the database image was not perfectly registered, we were able to produce imagery acquired at night that appeared with daylight colors. Such an approach could improve the safety of nighttime navigation.

  7. Inexpensive semi-autonomous ground vehicles for defusing IEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Chris; Lodmell, James; Womble, Phillip C.; Barzilov, Alexander; Paschal, Jon; Hernandez, Robert; Moss, Kyle T.; Hopper, Lindsay

    2008-04-01

    Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are an important concern to coalition forces during the conflicts in the Middle East. These devices are responsible for many casualties to American armed forces in the Middle East. These explosives are particularly dangerous because they are improvised with materials readily available to the designer, and there is no systematic way of explosive ordinance disposal. IEDs can be made from things such as standard military ammunition and can be detonated with common electronic devices such as cell phones and garage door openers. There is a great need for a low cost solution to neutralize these IEDs. At the Applied Physics Institute we are building a single function disrupter robot whose sole purpose is to neutralize these IEDs. We are modifying a toy remote control car to control it either wirelessly using WI-FI (IEEE 802.11) or wired by tethering the vehicle with an Ethernet cable (IEEE 802.3). The robot will be equipped with a high velocity fuze disrupter to neutralize the IED as well as a video camera for inspection and aiming purposes. This robot utilizes commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components which keeps the cost relatively low. Currently, similar robot systems have been deployed in Iraq and elsewhere but their method of operation is such that it is impractical to use in non-combat situations. We will discuss our design and possible deployment scenarios.

  8. Longitudinal static stability requirements for wing in ground effect vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhigang; Collu, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    The issue of the longitudinal stability of a WIG vehicle has been a very critical design factor since the first experimental WIG vehicle has been built. A series of studies had been performed and focused on the longitudinal stability analysis. However, most studies focused on the longitudinal stability of WIG vehicle in cruise phase, and less is available on the longitudinal static stability requirement of WIG vehicle when hydrodynamics are considered: WIG vehicle usually take off from water. The present work focuses on stability requirement for longitudinal motion from taking off to landing. The model of dynamics for a WIG vehicle was developed taking into account the aerodynamic, hydrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, and then was analyzed. Following with the longitudinal static stability analysis, effect of hydrofoil was discussed. Locations of CG, aerodynamic center in pitch, aerodynamic center in height and hydrodynamic center in heave were illustrated for a stabilized WIG vehicle. The present work will further improve the longitudinal static stability theory for WIG vehicle.

  9. Sensor Technology Baseline Study for Enabling Condition Based Maintenance Plus in Army Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    high cost driver components in Army ground vehicles as identified by TARDEC are engines, transmissions, batteries, and alternators . This report...7 4.3 Alternator .......................................................................................................................12...C7 diesel engine. ...........................................................................................4 Figure 2. Allison transmission 2500 SP

  10. Monocular camera/IMU/GNSS integration for ground vehicle navigation in challenging GNSS environments.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tianxing; Guo, Ningyan; Backén, Staffan; Akos, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Low-cost MEMS-based IMUs, video cameras and portable GNSS devices are commercially available for automotive applications and some manufacturers have already integrated such facilities into their vehicle systems. GNSS provides positioning, navigation and timing solutions to users worldwide. However, signal attenuation, reflections or blockages may give rise to positioning difficulties. As opposed to GNSS, a generic IMU, which is independent of electromagnetic wave reception, can calculate a high-bandwidth navigation solution, however the output from a self-contained IMU accumulates errors over time. In addition, video cameras also possess great potential as alternate sensors in the navigation community, particularly in challenging GNSS environments and are becoming more common as options in vehicles. Aiming at taking advantage of these existing onboard technologies for ground vehicle navigation in challenging environments, this paper develops an integrated camera/IMU/GNSS system based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF). Our proposed integration architecture is examined using a live dataset collected in an operational traffic environment. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed integrated system provides accurate estimations and potentially outperforms the tightly coupled GNSS/IMU integration in challenging environments with sparse GNSS observations.

  11. Monocular Camera/IMU/GNSS Integration for Ground Vehicle Navigation in Challenging GNSS Environments

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Tianxing; Guo, Ningyan; Backén, Staffan; Akos, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Low-cost MEMS-based IMUs, video cameras and portable GNSS devices are commercially available for automotive applications and some manufacturers have already integrated such facilities into their vehicle systems. GNSS provides positioning, navigation and timing solutions to users worldwide. However, signal attenuation, reflections or blockages may give rise to positioning difficulties. As opposed to GNSS, a generic IMU, which is independent of electromagnetic wave reception, can calculate a high-bandwidth navigation solution, however the output from a self-contained IMU accumulates errors over time. In addition, video cameras also possess great potential as alternate sensors in the navigation community, particularly in challenging GNSS environments and are becoming more common as options in vehicles. Aiming at taking advantage of these existing onboard technologies for ground vehicle navigation in challenging environments, this paper develops an integrated camera/IMU/GNSS system based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF). Our proposed integration architecture is examined using a live dataset collected in an operational traffic environment. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed integrated system provides accurate estimations and potentially outperforms the tightly coupled GNSS/IMU integration in challenging environments with sparse GNSS observations. PMID:22736999

  12. 32 CFR 935.139 - Motor vehicle operator qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motor vehicle operator qualifications. 935.139 Section 935.139 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL... shall present his operator's permit to any peace officer, for inspection, upon request....

  13. Feature-aided tracking of moving ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duy H.; Kay, John H.; Orchard, Bradley J.; Whiting, Robert H.

    2002-08-01

    Airborne radars tasked with tracking moving targets face the challenge of surveillance over large geographic areas where military vehicles will be interspersed with civilian traffic. There is a major need to develop robust, efficient, and reliable identification and tracking techniques to identify selected targets, and to maintain tracks for selected, critical targets, in dense target environments. Traditionally, tracking and identification have been considered separately - one may identify a target, and then track it kinematically to sustain the identification. The difficulty with separate identification and tracking is that neither is sufficient by itself to satisfy the demands of the other. Identification techniques applied to moving targets require some degree of evidence accrual, which requires the kinematic tracker to have a high degree of fidelity. Conversely, kinematic association could be aided considerably with high confidence single-look identification, but high confidence identification only builds up with several looks. What is needed is to incorporate the distinctive target signature information into the tracker, so that identification and tracking, or signature comparison and tracking, perform together as a unit. Kinematic moving target indication (MTI) trackers receive reports in the form of ground coordinates and Doppler (range rate) and attempt to maintain track of the moving targets by associating the reports to target tracks. In situations where different targets exhibit similar kinematics, the association logic used for track-report association may not yield the correct pairings. In such complex and challenging environments, the additional information arising from distinctive target signatures can be used to aid the tracking algorithms. The approach to moving target identification and feature-aided tracking (FAT) described here combines accumulated target classification information, obtained from HRR, with kinematic association scores to yield

  14. New uses of remote vehicles for law enforcement operations

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, L. )

    1992-01-01

    The use of teleoperated robotic devices for law enforcement operations has risen dramatically in recent years. The typical device is a portable, teleoperated vehicle with a manipulator. The availability of reliable, affordable equipment and emphasis on personnel safety are some of the primary driving forces. The primary use of these robots is for investigation and handling of explosive devices. The Kentucky State Police (KSP) have been using a remote vehicle since December 1988.

  15. Infrared image guidance for ground vehicle based on fast wavelet image focusing and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2009-08-01

    We studied the infrared image guidance for ground vehicle based on the fast wavelet image focusing and tracking. Here we uses the image of the uncooled infrared imager mounted on the two axis gimbal system and the developed new auto focusing algorithm on the Daubechies wavelet transform. The developed new focusing algorithm on the Daubechies wavelet transform processes the result of the high pass filter effect to meet the direct detection of the objects. This new focusing gives us the distance information of the outside world smoothly, and the information of the gimbal system gives us the direction of objects in the outside world to match the sense of the spherical coordinate system. We installed this system on the hand made electric ground vehicle platform powered by 24VDC battery. The electric vehicle equips the rotary encoder units and the inertia rate sensor units to make the correct navigation process. The image tracking also uses the developed newt wavelet focusing within several image processing. The size of the hand made electric ground vehicle platform is about 1m long, 0.75m wide, 1m high, and 50kg weight. We tested the infrared image guidance for ground vehicle based on the new wavelet image focusing and tracking using the electric vehicle indoor and outdoor. The test shows the good results by the developed infrared image guidance for ground vehicle based on the new wavelet image focusing and tracking.

  16. Quantification of the Design Relationship Between Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    engineering model built in the software (Randers-Pehrson & Bannister, 1997; LSTC, 2007), where the charge intensity (in TNT mass- equivalent ) and charge...mass (mc) in kilograms TNT - equivalent . As vehicle mass is an input that can be designed for, the sample for mv is taken uniformly with a lower bound a...on the NATO report on protecting vehicle occupants from landmine effects, the ground vehicle safety benchmark is for occupants to have no greater than

  17. Intelligent vision system for autonomous vehicle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    1991-01-01

    A complex optical system consisting of a 4f optical correlator with programmatic filters under the control of a digital on-board computer that operates at video rates for filter generation, storage, and management is described.

  18. Air vehicle displays in the operational environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Byrd, James C.

    2007-04-01

    Displays in the operational environment can be direct-view or virtual-view, and are analyzed in terms of a broad range of performance parameters. These parameters include image area, field of view, eye-relief, weight and power, luminance and contrast ratio, night vision goggle compatibility (type and class), resolution (pixels per inch or line pairs per milliradian), image intensification, viewing angle, grayscale (shades or levels), dimming range, video capability (frame rate, refresh), operating and storage altitude, operating and storage temperature range, shock and vibration limits, mean time between failure, color vs. monochrome, and display engine technology. This study further looks at design class: custom, versus rugged commercial, versus commercial off-the-shelf designs and issues such as whether the design meets requirements for the operational environment and modes of use, ease of handling, failure modes and soldier recommended upgrades.

  19. A survey of unmanned ground vehicles with applications to agricultural and environmental sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unmanned ground vehicles have been utilized in the last few decades in an effort to increase the efficiency of agriculture, in particular, by reducing labor needs. Unmanned vehicles have been used for a variety of purposes including: soil sampling, irrigation management, precision spraying, mechanic...

  20. Navigation and Hazard Avoidance for High-Speed Unmanned Ground Vehicles in Rough Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-07

    Potential Field Navigation of High Speed Vehicles on Rough Terrain,” Robotica , Vol. 25, No. 4, pp 409-424, July 2007 Udengaard, M., and Iagnemma, K...Navigation of Unmanned Ground Vehicles on Uneven Terrain using Potential Fields," to appear in Robotica , 2007 [16] Spenko, M., Kuroda, Y., Dubowsky, S

  1. An SINS/GNSS Ground Vehicle Gravimetry Test Based on SGA-WZ02.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ruihang; Cai, Shaokun; Wu, Meiping; Cao, Juliang; Zhang, Kaidong

    2015-09-16

    In March 2015, a ground vehicle gravimetry test was implemented in eastern Changsha to assess the repeatability and accuracy of ground vehicle SINS/GNSS gravimeter-SGA-WZ02. The gravity system developed by NUDT consisted of a Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS), a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) remote station on test vehicle, a GNSS static master station on the ground, and a data logging subsystem. A south-north profile of 35 km along the highway in eastern Changsha was chosen and four repeated available measure lines were obtained. The average speed of a vehicle is 40 km/h. To assess the external ground gravity disturbances, precise ground gravity data was built by CG-5 precise gravimeter as the reference. Under relative smooth conditions, internal accuracy among repeated lines shows an average agreement at the level of 1.86 mGal for half wavelengths about 1.1 km, and 1.22 mGal for 1.7 km. The root-mean-square (RMS) of difference between calculated gravity data and reference data is about 2.27 mGal/1.1 km, and 1.74 mGal/1.7 km. Not all of the noises caused by vehicle itself and experiments environments were eliminated in the primary results. By means of selecting reasonable filters and improving the GNSS observation conditions, further developments in ground vehicle gravimetry are promising.

  2. An SINS/GNSS Ground Vehicle Gravimetry Test Based on SGA-WZ02

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ruihang; Cai, Shaokun; Wu, Meiping; Cao, Juliang; Zhang, Kaidong

    2015-01-01

    In March 2015, a ground vehicle gravimetry test was implemented in eastern Changsha to assess the repeatability and accuracy of ground vehicle SINS/GNSS gravimeter—SGA-WZ02. The gravity system developed by NUDT consisted of a Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS), a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) remote station on test vehicle, a GNSS static master station on the ground, and a data logging subsystem. A south-north profile of 35 km along the highway in eastern Changsha was chosen and four repeated available measure lines were obtained. The average speed of a vehicle is 40 km/h. To assess the external ground gravity disturbances, precise ground gravity data was built by CG-5 precise gravimeter as the reference. Under relative smooth conditions, internal accuracy among repeated lines shows an average agreement at the level of 1.86 mGal for half wavelengths about 1.1 km, and 1.22 mGal for 1.7 km. The root-mean-square (RMS) of difference between calculated gravity data and reference data is about 2.27 mGal/1.1 km, and 1.74 mGal/1.7 km. Not all of the noises caused by vehicle itself and experiments environments were eliminated in the primary results. By means of selecting reasonable filters and improving the GNSS observation conditions, further developments in ground vehicle gravimetry are promising. PMID:26389916

  3. Transient growth of energy and aeroelastic stability of ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hémon, Pascal; Noger, Christophe

    2004-03-01

    Transient growth of energy is shown to be possible in the lateral dynamics of passenger cars. This mechanism might be generated during one vehicle overtaking another. Starting from a simple linearized quasi-steady model, which couples the lateral displacement and the yaw angle of the vehicle, the transient growth appears when an initial condition in the yawing rate is applied. To cite this article: P. Hémon, C. Noger, C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  4. Apparatus and method for grounding compressed fuel fueling operator

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Joseph Perry; Farese, David John; Xu, Jianguo

    2002-06-11

    A safety system for grounding an operator at a fueling station prior to removing a fuel fill nozzle from a fuel tank upon completion of a fuel filling operation is provided which includes a fuel tank port in communication with the fuel tank for receiving and retaining the nozzle during the fuel filling operation and a grounding device adjacent to the fuel tank port which includes a grounding switch having a contact member that receives physical contact by the operator and where physical contact of the contact member activates the grounding switch. A releasable interlock is included that provides a lock position wherein the nozzle is locked into the port upon insertion of the nozzle into the port and a release position wherein the nozzle is releasable from the port upon completion of the fuel filling operation and after physical contact of the contact member is accomplished.

  5. Shuttle Ground Operations Efficiencies/Technologies (SGOE/T) study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, A. L.; Hart, M. T.; Lowry, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Methods and technolgoy were defined to reduce the overall operations cost of a major space program. Space Shuttle processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was designed as the working model that would be the source of the operational information. Methods of improving efficiency of ground operations were assessed and technology elements that could reduce cost identified. Emphasis is on: (1) specific technology items and (2) management approaches required to develop and support efficient ground operations. Prime study results are to be recommendations on how to achieve more efficient operations and identification of existing or new technology that would make vehicle processing in both the current program and future programs more efficient and, therefore, less costly.

  6. Remote Operations and Ground Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Barry S.; Lankford, Kimberly; Pitts, R. Lee

    2004-01-01

    The Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center supports the International Space Station (ISS) through remote interfaces around the world. The POIC was originally designed as a gateway to space for remote facilities; ranging from an individual user to a full-scale multiuser environment. This achievement was accomplished while meeting program requirements and accommodating the injection of modern technology on an ongoing basis to ensure cost effective operations. This paper will discuss the open POIC architecture developed to support similar and dissimilar remote operations centers. It will include technologies, protocols, and compromises which on a day to day basis support ongoing operations. Additional areas covered include centralized management of shared resources and methods utilized to provide highly available and restricted resources to remote users. Finally, the effort of coordinating the actions of participants will be discussed.

  7. Kansas State University Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1991-01-01

    During the past fifteen years Kansas State's faculty has been involved in research of alternative fuel vehicles. From formulation of fuels and automotive fuel storage to development of electronic controls, K-State's faculty research has been ongoing. With the increased awareness of what is occurring to the world's environment, the catalyst -- to ensure applied results from faculty research will occur -- has been activated. The Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program is the platform being used to demonstrate international efforts to bring a more acceptable daily mode of transportation to our highways. The first new electrical vehicle procured at K-State in the last ten years, a G-Van, is a technological dinosaur. It does not incorporate leading edge control or drive systems nor does it provide the type of vehicle frame and body to meet a majority of the daily commuter needs required by the American market. Yet, this vehicle represents initial efforts to bring a federally crash certified vehicle to the commercial automotive market. As such, it is an evolutionary step in the mass production of electric vehicle products.

  8. Special Operations Aerial Mobility Vehicle Training Syllabus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    failure. For instance, on 6 August 2011, a U.S. Boeing CH-47 Chinook helicopter , call sign Extortion 17, was shot down in Afghanistan, resulting in...of Federal Regulations using the following language. Light-sport aircraft means an aircraft, other than a helicopter or powered- lift that, since...Hours Yes NVG Landings 90 Days 3 No Swarm Procedures 180 Days 2 Hours Yes Landing Zone Operations 180 Days 5 Landings No Formation Flight

  9. Evaluation of electric vehicle production and operating costs

    SciTech Connect

    Cuenca, R. M.; Gaines, L. L.; Vyas, A. D.

    2000-05-23

    This report presents an analysis of the initial cost of electric vehicles (EVs). The manufacturing and retail cost structure of mature conventional vehicles produced at high volume is analyzed first, and the contributions by various cost categories to vehicle price are estimated. The costs are then allocated to such vehicle component groups as body, chassis, and powertrain. The similarities and differences among various component systems are reviewed. In electric vehicles, an electric drive replaces the conventional powertrain, and a battery pack replaces the fuel system. Three types of traction motors are reviewed, and their cost in high-volume production is analyzed. Various components of the motor and controller package are analyzed, and their representative costs are summarized. Four types of EV batteries are reviewed, and their costs are presented. Various alternatives for the low-, medium-, and high-volume production of EVs are evaluated, and some sample costs are presented. A methodology that estimates initial and operating costs on the basis of this analysis is presented. The methodology also estimates the average lifetime cost of owning and operating an electric vehicle.

  10. Advances in ground vehicle-based LADAR for standoff detection of road-side hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, Jim; Vessey, Alyssa; Close, Ryan; Middleton, Seth; Williams, Kathryn; Rupp, Ronald; Nguyen, Son

    2016-05-01

    Commercial sensor technology has the potential to bring cost-effective sensors to a number of U.S. Army applications. By using sensors built for a widespread of commercial application, such as the automotive market, the Army can decrease costs of future systems while increasing overall capabilities. Additional sensors operating in alternate and orthogonal modalities can also be leveraged to gain a broader spectrum measurement of the environment. Leveraging multiple phenomenologies can reduce false alarms and make detection algorithms more robust to varied concealment materials. In this paper, this approach is applied to the detection of roadside hazards partially concealed by light-to-medium vegetation. This paper will present advances in detection algorithms using a ground vehicle-based commercial LADAR system. The benefits of augmenting a LADAR with millimeter-wave automotive radar and results from relevant data sets are also discussed.

  11. Large-Scale Cryogenic Testing of Launch Vehicle Ground Systems at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, E. W.; Sass, J. P.; Lobemeyer, D. A.; Sojourner, S. J.; Hatfield, W. H.; Rewinkel, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new launch vehicle to support NASA's future exploration plans requires significant redesign and upgrade of Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) launch pad and ground support equipment systems. In many cases, specialized test equipment and systems will be required to certify the function of the new system designs under simulated operational conditions, including propellant loading. This paper provides an overview of the cryogenic test infrastructure that is in place at KSC to conduct development and qualification testing that ranges from the component level to the integrated-system level. An overview of the major cryogenic test facilities will be provided, along with a detailed explanation of the technology focus area for each facility

  12. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program; Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Activities during the first quarter centered around integrating the new participants into the program. A meeting of the Site Operators, in conjunction with the first meeting of the Electric Vehicle Users Task Force, was held in October. A second meeting of the Task Force was held in December. During these meetings the new contractual requirements were explained to the participants. The Site Operator Data Base was distributed and explained. The Site Operators will begin using the data base in December 1991 and will supply the operating and maintenance data to the INEL on a monthly basis. The Operators requested that they be able to have access to the data of the other Operators and it was agreed that they would be provided this on floppy disk monthly from the INEL. Presentations were made to the DOE sponsored Automotive Technology Development-Contractors Coordination Meeting in October. An overview of the program was given by EG G. Representatives from Arizona Public Service, Texas A M University, and York Technical College provided details of their programs and the results and future goals. Work was begun on commercializing the Versatile Data Acquisition System (VDAS). A Scope of Work has been written for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to be submitted to the USABC. If implemented, the CRADA will provide funds for the development and commercialization of the VDAS. Participants in the Site Operator Program will test prototypes of the system within their fleets, making the data available to the USABC and other interested organizations. The USABC will provide recommendations on the data to be collected. Major activities by the majority of the Operators were involved with the continued operation and demonstration of existing vehicles. In addition, several of the operators were involved in identifying and locating vehicles to be added to their fleets. A list of the vehicles in each Site Operator fleet is included as Appendix A to this report.

  13. Airbreathing Hypersonic Vision-Operational-Vehicles Design Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James L.; Pegg, Robert J.; Petley, Dennis H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the airbreathing hypersonic airplane and space-access vision-operational-vehicle design matrix, with emphasis on horizontal takeoff and landing systems being studied at Langley; it reflects the synergies and issues, and indicates the thrust of the effort to resolve the design matrix including Mach 5 to 10 airplanes with global-reach potential, pop-up and dual-role transatmospheric vehicles and airbreathing launch systems. The convergence of several critical systems/technologies across the vehicle matrix is indicated. This is particularly true for the low speed propulsion system for large unassisted horizontal takeoff vehicles which favor turbines and/or perhaps pulse detonation engines that do not require LOX which imposes loading concerns and mission flexibility restraints.

  14. Airbreathing Hypersonic Vision-Operational-Vehicles Design Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James L.; Pegg, Robert J.; Petley, Dennis H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the airbreathing hypersonic airplane and space-access vision-operational-vehicle design matrix, with emphasis on horizontal takeoff and landing systems being, studied at Langley, it reflects the synergies and issues, and indicates the thrust of the effort to resolve the design matrix including Mach 5 to 10 airplanes with global-reach potential, pop-up and dual-role transatmospheric vehicles and airbreathing launch systems. The convergence of several critical systems/technologies across the vehicle matrix is indicated. This is particularly true for the low speed propulsion system for large unassisted horizontal takeoff vehicles which favor turbines and/or perhaps pulse detonation engines that do not require LOX which imposes loading concerns and mission Flexibility restraints.

  15. Application of System Operational Effectiveness Methodology to Space Launch Vehicle Development and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Kelley, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) defined System Operational Effectiveness (SOE) model provides an exceptional framework for an affordable approach to the development and operation of space launch vehicles and their supporting infrastructure. The SOE model provides a focal point from which to direct and measure technical effectiveness and process efficiencies of space launch vehicles. The application of the SOE model to a space launch vehicle's development and operation effort leads to very specific approaches and measures that require consideration during the design phase. This paper provides a mapping of the SOE model to the development of space launch vehicles for human exploration by addressing the SOE model key points of measurement including System Performance, System Availability, Technical Effectiveness, Process Efficiency, System Effectiveness, Life Cycle Cost, and Affordable Operational Effectiveness. In addition, the application of the SOE model to the launch vehicle development process is defined providing the unique aspects of space launch vehicle production and operations in lieu of the traditional broader SOE context that examines large quantities of fielded systems. The tailoring and application of the SOE model to space launch vehicles provides some key insights into the operational design drivers, capability phasing, and operational support systems.

  16. Real-Time and High-Fidelity Simulation Environment for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan; Myint, Steven; Kuo, Calvin; Jain, Abhi; Grip, Havard; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Overholt, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a collaborative project between U.S. Army TARDEC and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to develop a unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) simulation model using the ROAMS vehicle modeling framework. Besides modeling the physical suspension of the vehicle, the sensing and navigation of the HMMWV vehicle are simulated. Using models of urban and off-road environments, the HMMWV simulation was tested in several ways, including navigation in an urban environment with obstacle avoidance and the performance of a lane change maneuver.

  17. Design requirements for operational earth resources ground data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, C. J.; Bradford, L. H.; Burnett, E. S.; Hutson, D. E.; Kinsler, B. A.; Kugle, D. R.; Webber, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    Realistic tradeoff data and evaluation techniques were studied that permit conceptual design of operational earth resources ground processing systems. Methodology for determining user requirements that utilize the limited information available from users is presented along with definitions of sensor capabilities projected into the shuttle/station era. A tentative method is presented for synthesizing candidate ground processing concepts.

  18. Shuttle Ground Operations Efficiencies/Technologies Study (SGOE/T). Volume 5: Technical Information Sheets (TIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, A. L.; Hart, M. T.; Lowry, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The Technology Information Sheet was assembled in database format during Phase I. This document was designed to provide a repository for information pertaining to 144 Operations and Maintenance Instructions (OMI) controlled operations in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), and PAD. It provides a way to accumulate information about required crew sizes, operations task time duration (serial and/or parallel), special Ground Support Equipment (GSE). required, and identification of a potential application of existing technology or the need for the development of a new technolgoy item.

  19. Advancing Autonomous Operations for Deep Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Angie T.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Starting in Jan 2012, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) Project began to investigate the ability to create and execute "single button" crew initiated autonomous activities [1]. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) designed and built a fluid transfer hardware test-bed to use as a sub-system target for the investigations of intelligent procedures that would command and control a fluid transfer test-bed, would perform self-monitoring during fluid transfers, detect anomalies and faults, isolate the fault and recover the procedures function that was being executed, all without operator intervention. In addition to the development of intelligent procedures, the team is also exploring various methods for autonomous activity execution where a planned timeline of activities are executed autonomously and also the initial analysis of crew procedure development. This paper will detail the development of intelligent procedures for the NASA MSFC Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) as well as the autonomous plan execution capabilities being investigated. Manned deep space missions, with extreme communication delays with Earth based assets, presents significant challenges for what the on-board procedure content will encompass as well as the planned execution of the procedures.

  20. Method of Controlling Steering of a Ground Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Andrew D. (Inventor); Bluethmann, William J. (Inventor); Lee, Chunhao J. (Inventor); Vitale, Robert L. (Inventor); Guo, Raymond (Inventor); Atluri, Venkata Prasad (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method of controlling steering of a vehicle through setting wheel angles of a plurality of modular electronic corner assemblies (eModules) is provided. The method includes receiving a driving mode selected from a mode selection menu. A position of a steering input device is determined in a master controller. A velocity of the vehicle is determined, in the master controller, when the determined position of the steering input device is near center. A drive mode request corresponding to the selected driving mode to the plurality of steering controllers is transmitted to the master controller. A required steering angle of each of the plurality of eModules is determined, in the master controller, as a function of the determined position of the steering input device, the determined velocity of the vehicle, and the selected first driving mode. The eModules are set to the respective determined steering angles.

  1. iPhone in NASA Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, Ashley; Byrd, Keena; Ignacio, Lalaine; Lagu, Amit; Palmer, Ralph Curtis, III; Savoy, April; Surabattula, Deepti; Vaitkunas, Samantha

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature and historical background of NASA established a need for an easy-to-implement technological improvement to displaying procedures which is cost effective and risk reducing. Previous unsuccessful attempts have led this team to explore the practicality of using a mobile handheld device. The major products, inputs, resources, constraints, planning and effort required for consideration of this type of solution were outlined. After analyzing the physical, environmental, life-cycle, functional, and socio-technical requirements, a Functional Analysis was performed to describe the top-level, second-level, and third-level functions of the system requirements. In addition, the risk/value proposition of conversion to a new technology was considered and gave a blueprint for transitioning along with the tasks necessary to implement the device into the Vehicle Assembly Building's (VAB) current infrastructure. A Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) described the elemental work items of the implementation. Once the viability of this system was confirmed, a device was selected through use of technical design comparison methods including the Pugh Matrix and House of Quality. Comparison and evaluation of the Apple iPhone, Motorola Q, Blackberry, PC Notebook, and PDA revealed that the iPhone is the most suitable device for this task. This paper outlines the device design/ architecture, as well as some of the required infrastructure.

  2. KSC ground support operations and equipment for the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utsman, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    A significant element of the Kennedy Space Center's ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle is the Launch Processing System, which provides a high level of automation for all operations, including the checkout of the Orbiter, Solid Rocket Boosters, and External Tank. Other direct support elements of the Ground Support Equipment accomplish environmental conditioning, provide and control power, gases, and fluids, and supply vehicle facility and personnel fire protection. Attention is given to the prelaunch functions of the Launch Control Center's Firing Rooms, which contain minicomputers, a data recording area, the Hardware Interface Modules, a Common Data Buffer, and Front End Processors.

  3. Ground operation of robotics on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojcik, Z. Alex; Hunter, David G.; Cantin, Marc R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reflects work carried out on Ground Operated Telerobotics (GOT) in 1992 to refine further the ideas, procedures, and technologies needed to test the procedures in a high latency environment, and to integrate GOT into Space Station Freedom operations. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will be in operation for 30 years, and will depend on robots to carry out a significant part of the assembly, maintenance, and utilization workload. Current plans call for on-orbit robotics to be operated by on-board crew members. This approach implies that on-orbit robotics operations use up considerable crew time, and that these operations cannot be carried out when SSF is unmanned. GOT will allow robotic operations to be operated from the ground, with on-orbit crew interventions only when absolutely required. The paper reviews how GOT would be implemented, how GOT operations would be planned and supported, and reviews GOT issues, critical success factors, and benefits.

  4. A summary of recent aircraft/ground vehicle friction measurement tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were carried out to evaluate a variety of runway surface types and wetness conditions, using specially instrumented NASA B-737 and B-727 aircraft and several ground friction measuring devices. The performance data for aircraft braking on dry, wet, snow-covered, and ice-covered runway conditions are presented and compared to ground-vehicle friction data obtained under similar runway conditions. The relationships between ground vehicles and the aircraft friction data are identified, and the effects on friction of major test parameters, such as the speed, the tire characteristics, and the type of surface-contaminant are discussed. The results demonstrated that properly maintained and calibrated ground vehicles can be used to monitor the runway friction conditions.

  5. The IUE Science Operations Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Ronald E.; Arquilla, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Science Operations System provides full realtime operations capabilities and support to the operations staff and astronomer users. The components of this very diverse and extremely flexible hardware and software system have played a major role in maintaining the scientific efficiency and productivity of the IUE. The software provides the staff and user with all the tools necessary for pre-visit and real-time planning and operations analysis for any day of the year. Examples of such tools include the effects of spacecraft constraints on target availability, maneuver times between targets, availability of guide stars, target identification, coordinate transforms, e-mail transfer of Observatory forms and messages, and quick-look analysis of image data. Most of this extensive software package can also be accessed remotely by individual users for information, scheduling of shifts, pre-visit planning, and actual observing program execution. Astronomers, with a modest investment in hardware and software, may establish remote observing sites. We currently have over 20 such sites in our remote observers' network.

  6. Vehicle conversion to hybrid gasoline/alternative fuel operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donakowski, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    The alternative fuels considered are compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and methanol; vehicles were required to operate in a hybrid or dual-fuel gasoline/alternative fuel mode. Economic feasibility was determined by comparing the costs of continued use of gasoline fuel with the use of alternative fuel and retrofitted equipment. Differences in the amounts of future expenditures are adjusted by means of a total life-cycle costing. All fuels studied are technically feasible to allow a retrofit conversion to hybrid gasoline/alternative fuel operation except for methanol. Conversion to LPG is not recommended for vehicles with more than 100,000 km (60,000 miles) of prior use. Methanol conversion is not recommended for vehicles with more than 50,00 km (30,000 miles).

  7. Ground moving target geo-location from monocular camera mounted on a micro air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Ang, Haisong; Zheng, Xiangming

    2011-08-01

    The usual approaches to unmanned air vehicle(UAV)-to-ground target geo-location impose some severe constraints to the system, such as stationary objects, accurate geo-reference terrain database, or ground plane assumption. Micro air vehicle(MAV) works with characteristics including low altitude flight, limited payload and onboard sensors' low accuracy. According to these characteristics, a method is developed to determine the location of ground moving target which imaged from the air using monocular camera equipped on MAV. This method eliminates the requirements for terrain database (elevation maps) and altimeters that can provide MAV's and target's altitude. Instead, the proposed method only requires MAV flight status provided by its inherent onboard navigation system which includes inertial measurement unit(IMU) and global position system(GPS). The key is to get accurate information on the altitude of the ground moving target. First, Optical flow method extracts background static feature points. Setting a local region around the target in the current image, The features which are on the same plane with the target in this region are extracted, and are retained as aided features. Then, inverse-velocity method calculates the location of these points by integrated with aircraft status. The altitude of object, which is calculated by using position information of these aided features, combining with aircraft status and image coordinates, geo-locate the target. Meanwhile, a framework with Bayesian estimator is employed to eliminate noise caused by camera, IMU and GPS. Firstly, an extended Kalman filter(EKF) provides a simultaneous localization and mapping solution for the estimation of aircraft states and aided features location which defines the moving target local environment. Secondly, an unscented transformation(UT) method determines the estimated mean and covariance of target location from aircraft states and aided features location, and then exports them for the

  8. Army Transitions Hybrid Electric Technology to FCS Manned Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    system consists of an engine, generator, generator dissipater controller, traction drive system, energy storage system and cooling system. The system is...completely new way of maneuvering on the battlefield. The system’s advanced energy storage, power generation, regenerative braking and power management...vehicles for more than 50 years. Propulsion technologies are the engines, transmissions, generators, air cleaners, cooling systems and energy

  9. Road-Following Formation Control of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro; Droge, Greg; Grip, Havard; Toupet, Olivier; Scrapper, Chris; Rahmani, Amir

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a novel cooperative path planning for formation keeping robots traversing along a road with obstacles and possible narrow passages. A unique challenge in this problem is a requirement for spatial and temporal coordination between vehicles while ensuring collision and obstacle avoidance.

  10. An intelligent ground operator support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goerlach, Thomas; Ohlendorf, Gerhard; Plassmeier, Frank; Bruege, Uwe

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents first results of the project 'Technologien fuer die intelligente Kontrolle von Raumfahrzeugen' (TIKON). The TIKON objective was the demonstration of feasibility and profit of the application of artificial intelligence in the space business. For that purpose a prototype system has been developed and implemented for the operation support of the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT), a scientific spacecraft designed to perform the first all-sky survey with a high-resolution X-ray telescope and to investigate the emission of specific celestial sources. The prototype integrates a scheduler and a diagnosis tool both based on artificial intelligence techniques. The user interface is menu driven and provides synoptic displays for the visualization of the system status. The prototype has been used and tested in parallel to an already existing operational system.

  11. 76 FR 27300 - Hazardous Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous... impacting interested parties affected by the cargo tank motor vehicle proposals in this notice, we...

  12. Training Program for Operation of Emergency Vehicles. Course Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    INNOVATRIX, Inc., Ingomar, PA.

    Guidelines for organizing and administering the three-part Emergency Vehicle Operation (EVO) Course are provided. The first section of the guide describes the course structure and lists the unit objectives (by unit module) for each of the courses's three parts. Part I contains seven units, organized into twenty-one modules, to be taken by all…

  13. What Influences Youth to Operate All-Terrain Vehicles Safely?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grummon, A. H.; Heaney, C. A.; Dellinger, W. A.; Wilkins, J. R., III

    2014-01-01

    The operation of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) by youth has contributed to the incidence of serious and fatal injuries among children. This study explored factors related to the frequency with which youth wore a helmet and refrained from engaging in three risky driving behaviors (driving at risky speeds, on paved roads and on unfamiliar terrain)…

  14. 45 CFR 1310.15 - Operation of vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of vehicles. 1310.15 Section 1310.15 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  15. 45 CFR 1310.15 - Operation of vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation of vehicles. 1310.15 Section 1310.15 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  16. 45 CFR 1310.15 - Operation of vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation of vehicles. 1310.15 Section 1310.15 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  17. 45 CFR 1310.15 - Operation of vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of vehicles. 1310.15 Section 1310.15 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  18. 45 CFR 1310.15 - Operation of vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of vehicles. 1310.15 Section 1310.15 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD...

  19. Training Program for Operation of Emergency Vehicles. Instructor Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    INNOVATRIX, Inc., Ingomar, PA.

    Unit lesson plans for the three parts of the Emergency Vehicle (EV) Operator training program are provided. The units in parts 1 and 2 are designed for use in a classroom setting and contain the following components: description of the unit; trainees' knowledge objectives; instructor preparation activities; instructional content/presentation…

  20. LANDSAT-D ground segment operations plan, revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, B.

    1982-01-01

    The basic concept for the utilization of LANDSAT ground processing resources is described. Only the steady state activities that support normal ground processing are addressed. This ground segment operations plan covers all processing of the multispectral scanner and the processing of thematic mapper through data acquisition and payload correction data generation for the LANDSAT 4 mission. The capabilities embedded in the hardware and software elements are presented from an operations viewpoint. The personnel assignments associated with each functional process and the mechanisms available for controlling the overall data flow are identified.

  1. Lights Out Operations of a Space, Ground, Sensorweb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Tran, Daniel; Johnston, Mark; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Castano, Rebecca; Rabideau, Gregg; Cichy, Benjamin; Doubleday, Joshua; Pieri, David; Scharenbroich, Lucas; Kedar, Sharon; Chao, Yi; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Song, WenZhan; Kyle, Philip; LaHusen, Rick; Cappelaere, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We have been operating an autonomous, integrated sensorweb linking numerous space and ground sensors in 24/7 operations since 2004. This sensorweb includes elements of space data acquisition (MODIS, GOES, and EO-1), space asset retasking (EO-1), integration of data acquired from ground sensor networks with on-demand ground processing of data into science products. These assets are being integrated using web service standards from the Open Geospatial Consortium. Future plans include extension to fixed and mobile surface and subsurface sea assets as part of the NSF's ORION Program.

  2. TALON: a universal unmanned ground vehicle platform, enabling the mission to be the focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Peter; Deguire, Dan

    2005-05-01

    Foster-Miller's unmanned ground vehicle, TALON, was originally developed under DARPA's Tactical Mobile Robotics (TMR) program. TALON has evolved over the years and has proven to be a robust, mobile, universal platform. As a result of the advances made in the evolution of TALON, new and far-reaching opportunities have been realized for unmanned ground vehicles. In recent conflicts such as in Afghanistan and Iraq, unmanned systems have played an important role and have extended the reach and capabilities of the War fighter. Technological advances have transformed unmanned vehicles in to useful tools and in some cases are used in lieu of sending in a soldier. Unmanned ground vehicles have seen recent and persistent success, as shown in theater, in the explosive ordinance disposal (EOD) and improvised ordinance disposal (IED) missions. Foster-Miller's TALON has experienced over ten thousand EOD and IED missions in Iraq alone. The success of the unmanned system has resulted in the doctrine "Send the robot in first". Foster-Miller has taken the role of the unmanned vehicle in yet another direction. Foster-Miller has transformed the TALON from a "practical" to "tactical" system. Through the combined efforts of Foster-Miller and the US Army, TALON has been involved in a weaponization program. To date, Foster-Miller has outfitted the TALON with 11 systems. As one can see, the unmanned ground vehicle is much more than a mobility platform.

  3. Orion Pad Abort 1 Flight Test - Ground and Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackenbergy, Davis L.; Hicks, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the ground and flight operations aspects to the Pad Abort 1 launch. The paper details the processes used to plan all operations. The paper then discussions the difficulties of integration and testing, while detailing some of the lessons learned throughout the entire launch campaign. Flight operational aspects of the launc are covered in order to provide the listener with the full suite of operational issues encountered in preparation for the first flight test of the Orion Launch Abort System.

  4. Aircraft Energy Conservation during Airport Ground Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    PUSHBACK 3-1 TAXIING OUT OR IN WITH ONE OR MORE ENGINES SHUTDOWN. . 3-2 PLANNING LANDING ROLL, TURN-OFF AND TAXIING TO THE TERMINAL WITH THE MOST...DIRECT ROUTING 3-3 GATE HOLD PROCEDURES 3-3 FUEL LOAD PLANNING PRACTICES 3-5 AIRLINE OPERATION PRACTICES 3-6 IMPACT OF ENERGY CONSERVATION MEASURES...ENGINES SHUTDOWN G-6 PLANNING LANDING ROLL TURN-OFF AND TAXIING TO THE TERMINAL WITH THE MOST DIRECT ROUTING G-12 GATE HOLD PROCEDURES G-20 FUEL

  5. Field Operations Program Neighborhood Electric Vehicles - Fleet Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, James Edward; Carroll, M.

    2001-07-01

    This report summarizes a study of 15 automotive fleets that operate neighborhood electric vehicles(NEVs) in the United States. The information was obtained to help Field Operations Program personnel understand how NEVs are being used, how many miles they are being driven, and if they are being used to replace other types of fleet vehicles or as additions to fleets. (The Field Operations Program is a U.S. Department of Energy Program within the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Transportation Technologies). The NEVs contribution to petroleum avoidance and cleaner air can be estimated based on the miles driven and by assuming gasoline use and air emissions values for the vehicles being replaced. Gasoline and emissions data for a Honda Civic are used as the Civic has the best fuel use for a gasoline-powered vehicle and very clean emissions. Based on these conservation assumptions, the 348 NEVs are being driven a total of about 1.2 million miles per year. This equates to an average of 3,409 miles per NEV annually or 9 miles per day. It is estimated that 29,195 gallons of petroleum use is avoided annually by the 348 NEVs. This equates to 87 gallons of petroleum use avoided per NEV, per year. Using the 348 NEVs avoids the generation of at least 775 pounds of smog- forming emissions annually.

  6. Field Operations Program - Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Fleet Use

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J. E.; Carroll, M. R.

    2001-07-02

    This report summarizes a study of 15 automotive fleets that operate neighborhood electric vehicles (NEVs) in the United States. The information was obtained to help Field Operations Program personnel understand how NEVs are being used, how many miles they are being driven, and if they are being used to replace other types of fleet vehicles or as additions to fleets. (The Field Operations Program is a U.S. Department of Energy Program within the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Transportation Technologies). The NEVs contribution to petroleum avoidance and cleaner air can be estimated based on the miles driven and by assuming gasoline use and air emissions values for the vehicles being replaced. Gasoline and emissions data for a Honda Civic are used as the Civic has the best fuel use for a gasoline-powered vehicle and very clean emissions. Based on these conservation assumptions, the 348 NEVs are being driven a total of about 1.2 million miles per year. This equates to an average of 3,409 miles per NEV annually or 9 miles per day. It is estimated that 29,195 gallons of petroleum use is avoided annually by the 348 NEVs. This equates to 87 gallons of petroleum use avoided per NEV, per year. Using the 348 NEVs avoids the generation of at least 775 pounds of smog-forming emissions annually.

  7. Simulation of Ground Winds Time Series for the NASA Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, Stanley I.

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of wind time series based on power spectrum density (PSD) and spectral coherence models for ground wind turbulence is described. The wind models, originally developed for the Shuttle program, are based on wind measurements at the NASA 150-m meteorological tower at Cape Canaveral, FL. The current application is for the design and/or protection of the CLV from wind effects during on-pad exposure during periods from as long as days prior to launch, to seconds or minutes just prior to launch and seconds after launch. The evaluation of vehicle response to wind will influence the design and operation of constraint systems for support of the on-pad vehicle. Longitudinal and lateral wind component time series are simulated at critical vehicle locations. The PSD model for wind turbulence is a function of mean wind speed, elevation and temporal frequency. Integration of the PSD equation over a selected frequency range yields the variance of the time series to be simulated. The square root of the PSD defines a low-pass filter that is applied to adjust the components of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of Gaussian white noise. The first simulated time series near the top of the launch vehicle is the inverse transform of the adjusted FFT. Simulation of the wind component time series at the nearest adjacent location (and all other succeeding next nearest locations) is based on a model for the coherence between winds at two locations as a function of frequency and separation distance, where the adjacent locations are separated vertically and/or horizontally. The coherence function is used to calculate a coherence weighted FFT of the wind at the next nearest location, given the FFT of the simulated time series at the previous location and the essentially incoherent FFT of the wind at the selected location derived a priori from the PSD model. The simulated time series at each adjacent location is the inverse Fourier transform of the coherence weighted FFT. For a selected

  8. Operational noise data for the LACV-30 air cushion vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomer, P. D.

    1985-03-01

    Operational data for the LACV-30 air cushion vehicle were gathered and developed into sound exposure level vs distance curves. These data are available for the Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (AEHA) to use in developing noise zone maps for LACV-30 operations in support of the Army Installation Compatible Use Program (ICUZ). ICUZ defines Hand use compatible with various noise levels and establishes a policy for achieving such uses. Although the Army classifies the LACV-30 as an amphibious vehicle, an examination of its noise characteristics and operations showed it most closely resembles a helicopter. Thus, the methodology for gathering rotary wing aircraft data was used. Measurements of LACV-30's passby runs over water at various distances and speeds were similar in concept to flyover and flyby measurements for helicopters, and the land maneuver measurements corresponded most nearly to a helicopter's hover measurements.

  9. Mechatronic description of a laser autoguided vehicle for greenhouse operations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hermosilla, Julián; González, Ramón; Rodríguez, Francisco; Donaire, Julián G

    2013-01-08

    This paper presents a novel approach for guiding mobile robots inside greenhouses demonstrated by promising preliminary physical experiments. It represents a comprehensive attempt to use the successful principles of AGVs (auto-guided vehicles) inside greenhouses, but avoiding the necessity of modifying the crop layout, and avoiding having to bury metallic pipes in the greenhouse floor. The designed vehicle can operate different tools, e.g., a spray system for applying plant-protection product, a lifting platform to reach the top part of the plants to perform pruning and harvesting tasks, and a trailer to transport fruits, plants, and crop waste. Regarding autonomous navigation, it follows the idea of AGVs, but now laser emitters are used to mark the desired route. The vehicle development is analyzed from a mechatronic standpoint (mechanics, electronics, and autonomous control).

  10. Mechatronic Description of a Laser Autoguided Vehicle for Greenhouse Operations

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Hermosilla, Julián; González, Ramón; Rodríguez, Francisco; Donaire, Julián G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for guiding mobile robots inside greenhouses demonstrated by promising preliminary physical experiments. It represents a comprehensive attempt to use the successful principles of AGVs (auto-guided vehicles) inside greenhouses, but avoiding the necessity of modifying the crop layout, and avoiding having to bury metallic pipes in the greenhouse floor. The designed vehicle can operate different tools, e.g., a spray system for applying plant-protection product, a lifting platform to reach the top part of the plants to perform pruning and harvesting tasks, and a trailer to transport fruits, plants, and crop waste. Regarding autonomous navigation, it follows the idea of AGVs, but now laser emitters are used to mark the desired route. The vehicle development is analyzed from a mechatronic standpoint (mechanics, electronics, and autonomous control). PMID:23299624

  11. The Effect of Heavy-Duty Diesel Emission Standards on U.S. Army Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-05

    Program) - ‘Environmental Impact of Fuel Use on Military Engines ’ December 5, 2007 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...Standards • Emission Control Technology Discussion • Fuels and Lubricants Discussion • Current Army Ground Vehicle Engine Philosophy and Conclusion...P.J. Schihl Conclusion • The Army can not buy 2007 compliant COTS engines and directly integrate into current and new heavy-duty vehicles. P.J

  12. Technologies for low-bandwidth high-latency unmanned ground vehicle control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Teresa; Cogan, Ken; Hunt, Lee; Restine, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Automation technology has evolved at a rapid pace in recent years; however, many real-world problems require contextual understanding, problem solving, and other forms of higher-order thinking that extends beyond the capabilities of robots for the foreseeable future. This limits the complexity of automation which can be supplied to modern unmanned ground robots (UGV) and necessitates human-in-the-loop monitoring and control for some portions of missions. In order for the human operator to make decisions and provide tasking during key portions of the mission, existing solutions first derive significant information from a potentially dense reconstruction of the scene utilizing LIDAR, video, and other onboard sensors. A dense reconstruction contains too much data for real-time transmission over a modern wireless data link, so the robot electronics must first condense the scene representation prior to transmission. The control station receives this condensed scene representations and provides visual information to the human operator; the human operator then provides tele-operation commands in real-time to the robot. This paper discusses approaches to dense scene reduction of the data required to transmit to a human-in-the loop as well as the challenges associated with them. In addition, the complex and unstructured nature of real-world environments increases the need for tele-operation. Furthermore, many environments reduce the bandwidth and increase the latency of the link. Ultimately, worsening conditions will cause the tele-operation control process to break down, rendering the robot ineffective. In a worst-case scenario, extreme conditions causing a complete loss-of-communications could result in mission failure and loss of the vehicle.

  13. UAV-guided navigation for ground robot tele-operation in a military reconnaissance environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jessie Y C

    2010-08-01

    A military reconnaissance environment was simulated to examine the performance of ground robotics operators who were instructed to utilise streaming video from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to navigate his/her ground robot to the locations of the targets. The effects of participants' spatial ability on their performance and workload were also investigated. Results showed that participants' overall performance (speed and accuracy) was better when she/he had access to images from larger UAVs with fixed orientations, compared with other UAV conditions (baseline- no UAV, micro air vehicle and UAV with orbiting views). Participants experienced the highest workload when the UAV was orbiting. Those individuals with higher spatial ability performed significantly better and reported less workload than those with lower spatial ability. The results of the current study will further understanding of ground robot operators' target search performance based on streaming video from UAVs. The results will also facilitate the implementation of ground/air robots in military environments and will be useful to the future military system design and training community.

  14. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study, 1985. Volume 2: OTV concept definition and evaluation. Book 4: Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Jack C.; Keeley, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The benefits of the reusable Space Shuttle and the advent of the new Space Station hold promise for increasingly effective utilization of space by the scientific and commercial as well as military communities. A high energy reusable oribital transfer vehicle (OTV) represents an additional capability which also exhibits potential for enhancing space access by allowing more ambitious missions and at the same time reducing launch costs when compared to existing upper stages. This section, Vol. 2: Book 4, covers launch operations and flight operations. The launch operations section covers analyses of ground based and space based vehicles, launch site facilities, logistics requirements, propellant loading, space based maintenance and aft cargo carrier access options. The flight operations sections contain summary descriptions of ground based and space based OTV missions, operations and support requirements, and a discussion of fleet implications.

  15. Command and control displays for space vehicle operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Zetocha, Paul; Aleva, Denise

    2010-04-01

    This paper shall examine several command and control facility display architectures supporting space vehicle operations, to include TacSat 2, TacSat 3, STPSat 2, and Communications Navigation Outage Forecasting System (CNOFS), located within the Research Development Test & Evaluation Support Complex (RSC) Satellite Operations Center 97 (SOC-97) at Kirtland Air Force Base. A principal focus is to provide an understanding for the general design class of displays currently supporting space vehicle command and control, e.g., custom, commercial-off-the-shelf, or ruggedized commercial-off-the-shelf, and more specifically, what manner of display performance capabilities, e.g., active area, resolution, luminance, contrast ratio, frame/refresh rate, temperature range, shock/vibration, etc., are needed for particular aspects of space vehicle command and control. Another focus shall be to address the types of command and control functions performed for each of these systems, to include how operators interact with the displays, e.g., joystick, trackball, keyboard/mouse, as well as the kinds of information needed or displayed for each function. [Comparison with other known command and control facilities, such as Cheyenne Mountain and NORAD Operations Center, shall be made.] Future, anticipated display systems shall be discussed.

  16. Cooperative Surveillance and Pursuit Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Unattended Ground Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Las Fargeas, Jonathan; Kabamba, Pierre; Girard, Anouck

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of path planning for a team of unmanned aerial vehicles performing surveillance near a friendly base. The unmanned aerial vehicles do not possess sensors with automated target recognition capability and, thus, rely on communicating with unattended ground sensors placed on roads to detect and image potential intruders. The problem is motivated by persistent intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and base defense missions. The problem is formulated and shown to be intractable. A heuristic algorithm to coordinate the unmanned aerial vehicles during surveillance and pursuit is presented. Revisit deadlines are used to schedule the vehicles' paths nominally. The algorithm uses detections from the sensors to predict intruders' locations and selects the vehicles' paths by minimizing a linear combination of missed deadlines and the probability of not intercepting intruders. An analysis of the algorithm's completeness and complexity is then provided. The effectiveness of the heuristic is illustrated through simulations in a variety of scenarios. PMID:25591168

  17. Cooperative surveillance and pursuit using unmanned aerial vehicles and unattended ground sensors.

    PubMed

    Las Fargeas, Jonathan; Kabamba, Pierre; Girard, Anouck

    2015-01-13

    This paper considers the problem of path planning for a team of unmanned aerial vehicles performing surveillance near a friendly base. The unmanned aerial vehicles do not possess sensors with automated target recognition capability and, thus, rely on communicating with unattended ground sensors placed on roads to detect and image potential intruders. The problem is motivated by persistent intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and base defense missions. The problem is formulated and shown to be intractable. A heuristic algorithm to coordinate the unmanned aerial vehicles during surveillance and pursuit is presented. Revisit deadlines are used to schedule the vehicles' paths nominally. The algorithm uses detections from the sensors to predict intruders' locations and selects the vehicles' paths by minimizing a linear combination of missed deadlines and the probability of not intercepting intruders. An analysis of the algorithm's completeness and complexity is then provided. The effectiveness of the heuristic is illustrated through simulations in a variety of scenarios.

  18. Data Quality and Reliability Analysis of U.S. Marine Corps Ground Vehicle Maintenance Records

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Logistics Base USMC (1992). Mission need statement (MNS) for the medium tactical vehicle (NO. MOB 211.4.2A). Quantico, VA: Marine Corps Combat...Corps Systems Command. USMC (1994b). Operational requirements document for the medium tactical vehicle replacement (MTVR) (NO. MOB 211.4.2A

  19. 14 CFR 437.51 - Rest rules for vehicle safety operations personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rest rules for vehicle safety operations... the 7 days preceding a permitted activity, or (3) 14 consecutive work days. (b) All vehicle safety... rules for vehicle safety operations personnel. A permittee must ensure that all vehicle...

  20. Ground controlled robotic assembly operations for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    A number of dextrous robotic systems and associated positioning and transportation devices are available on Space Station Freedom (SSF) to perform assembly tasks that would otherwise need to be performed by extravehicular activity (EVA) crewmembers. The currently planned operating mode for these robotic systems during the assembly phase is teleoperation by intravehicular activity (IVA) crewmembers. While this operating mode is less hazardous and expensive than manned EVA operations, and has insignificant control loop time delays, the amount of IVA time available to support telerobotic operations is much less than the anticipated requirements. Some alternative is needed to allow the robotic systems to perform useful tasks without exhausting the available IVA resources; ground control is one such alternative. The issues associated with ground control of SSF robotic systems to alleviate onboard crew time availability constraints are investigated. Key technical issues include the effect of communication time delays, the need for safe, reliable execution of remote operations, and required modifications to the SSF ground and flight system architecture. Time delay compensation techniques such as predictive displays and world model-based force reflection are addressed and collision detection and avoidance strategies to ensure the safety of the on-orbit crew, Orbiter, and SSF are described. Although more time consuming and difficult than IVA controlled teleoperations or manned EVA, ground controlled telerobotic operations offer significant benefits during the SSF assembly phase, and should be considered in assembly planning activities.

  1. Electric and hybrid vehicle program; Site Operator Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J. F.

    1992-05-01

    Activities during the second quarter included the second meeting of the Site Operators in Phoenix, AZ in late April. The meeting was held in conjunction with the Solar and Electric 500 Race activities. Delivery of vehicles ordered previously has begun, although two of the operators are experiencing some delays in receiving their vehicles. Public demonstration activities continue, with an apparent increasing level of awareness and interest being displayed by the public. Initial problems with the Site Operator Database have been corrected and revised copies of the program have been supplied to the program participants. Operating and Maintenance data is being supplied and submitted to INEL on a monthly basis. Interest in the Site Operator Program is being reflected in requests for information from several organizations from across the country, representing a wide diversity of interests. These organizations have been referred to existing Site Operators with the explanation that the program will not be adding new participants, but that most of the existing organizations are willing to work with other groups. The exception to this was the addition of Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) to the program. PEPCO has been awarded a subcontract to operate and maintain the DOE owned G-Van and Escort located in Washington, DC. They will provide data on these vehicles, as well as a Solectria Force which PEPCO has purchased. The Task Force intends to be actively involved in the infrastructure development in a wide range of areas. These include, among others, personnel development, safety, charging, and servicing. Work continues in these areas. York Technical College (YORK) has completed the draft outline for the EV Technician course. This is being circulated to organizations around the country for comments. Kansas State University (KSU) is working with a private sector company to develop a energy dispensing meter for opportunity charging in public areas.

  2. Electric and hybrid vehicle program; Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.F.

    1992-05-01

    Activities during the second quarter included the second meeting of the Site Operators in Phoenix, AZ in late April. The meeting was held in conjunction with the Solar and Electric 500 Race activities. Delivery of vehicles ordered previously has begun, although two of the operators are experiencing some delays in receiving their vehicles. Public demonstration activities continue, with an apparent increasing level of awareness and interest being displayed by the public. Initial problems with the Site Operator Database have been corrected and revised copies of the program have been supplied to the Program participants. Operating and Maintenance data is being supplied and submitted to INEL on a monthly basis. Interest in the Site Operator Program is being reflected in requests for information from several organizations from across the country, representing a wide diversity of interests. These organizations have been referred to existing Site Operators with the explanation that the program will not be adding new participants, but that most of the existing organizations are willing to work with other groups. The exception to this was the addition of Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) to the program. PEPCO has been awarded a subcontract to operate and maintain the DOE owned G-Van and Escort located in Washington, DC. They will provide data on these vehicles, as well as a Solectria Force which PEPCO has purchased. The Task Force intends to be actively involved in the infrastructure development in a wide range of areas. These include, among others, personnel development, safety, charging, and servicing. Work continues in these areas. York Technical College (YORK) has completed the draft outline for the EV Technician course. This is being circulated to organizations around the country for comments. Kansas State University (KSU) is working with a private sector company to develop a energy dispensing meter for opportunity charging in public areas.

  3. Vehicle management and mission planning in support of shuttle operations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, W. R.; Bell, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An operational approach to shuttle mission planning during high flight frequency years (20 or more flights per year) is described wherein diverse mission planning functions interface via an interactive computer system and common data base. The Vehicle Management and Mission Planning System (VMMPS) is proposed as a means of helping to accomplish the mission planning function. The VMMPS will link together into an interactive system the major mission planning areas such as trajectory, crew, vehicle performance, and launch operations. A common data base will be an integral part of the system and the concept of standard mission types and phases will be used to minimize mission to mission uniqueness. The use of this system will eliminate much redundancy and replanning, shorten interface times between functions, and provide a means to evaluate unplanned events and modify schedules.

  4. Optimization of shared autonomy vehicle control architectures for swarm operations.

    PubMed

    Sengstacken, Aaron J; DeLaurentis, Daniel A; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad R

    2010-08-01

    The need for greater capacity in automotive transportation (in the midst of constrained resources) and the convergence of key technologies from multiple domains may eventually produce the emergence of a "swarm" concept of operations. The swarm, which is a collection of vehicles traveling at high speeds and in close proximity, will require technology and management techniques to ensure safe, efficient, and reliable vehicle interactions. We propose a shared autonomy control approach, in which the strengths of both human drivers and machines are employed in concert for this management. Building from a fuzzy logic control implementation, optimal architectures for shared autonomy addressing differing classes of drivers (represented by the driver's response time) are developed through a genetic-algorithm-based search for preferred fuzzy rules. Additionally, a form of "phase transition" from a safe to an unsafe swarm architecture as the amount of sensor capability is varied uncovers key insights on the required technology to enable successful shared autonomy for swarm operations.

  5. Science ground operations for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Z. A.; Alvarez, P.; Black, D.; Ediss, G.; Granen, S.; Hanna, K.; Kandlagunta, M.; Koerber, C.; Lott, J.; Perryman, G.; Sandberg, E.; Tanaka, L.; Waddell, P.; Kaminski, C.; Latter, W.

    2016-09-01

    The NASA Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), is a 2.5 meter telescope in a modified Boeing 747SP aircraft that is flown at high altitude to do unique astronomy in the infrared. SOFIA is a singular integration of aircraft operations, telescope design, and science instrumentation that delivers observational opportunities outside the capability of any other facility. The science ground operations are the transition and integration point of the science, aircraft, and telescope. We present the ground operations themselves and the tools used to prepare for mission success. Specifically, we will discuss the concept of operations from science instrument delivery to aircraft operation and mission readiness. Included in that will be a description of the facilities and their development, an overview of the SOFIA telescope assembly simulator, as well as an outlook to the future of novel science instrument support for SOFIA

  6. Web Application Software for Ground Operations Planning Database (GOPDb) Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanham, Clifton; Kallner, Shawn; Gernand, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    A Web application facilitates collaborative development of the ground operations planning document. This will reduce costs and development time for new programs by incorporating the data governance, access control, and revision tracking of the ground operations planning data. Ground Operations Planning requires the creation and maintenance of detailed timelines and documentation. The GOPDb Web application was created using state-of-the-art Web 2.0 technologies, and was deployed as SaaS (Software as a Service), with an emphasis on data governance and security needs. Application access is managed using two-factor authentication, with data write permissions tied to user roles and responsibilities. Multiple instances of the application can be deployed on a Web server to meet the robust needs for multiple, future programs with minimal additional cost. This innovation features high availability and scalability, with no additional software that needs to be bought or installed. For data governance and security (data quality, management, business process management, and risk management for data handling), the software uses NAMS. No local copy/cloning of data is permitted. Data change log/tracking is addressed, as well as collaboration, work flow, and process standardization. The software provides on-line documentation and detailed Web-based help. There are multiple ways that this software can be deployed on a Web server to meet ground operations planning needs for future programs. The software could be used to support commercial crew ground operations planning, as well as commercial payload/satellite ground operations planning. The application source code and database schema are owned by NASA.

  7. A study on model fidelity for model predictive control-based obstacle avoidance in high-speed autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiechao; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Stein, Jeffrey L.; Ersal, Tulga

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the level of model fidelity needed in order for a model predictive control (MPC)-based obstacle avoidance algorithm to be able to safely and quickly avoid obstacles even when the vehicle is close to its dynamic limits. The context of this work is large autonomous ground vehicles that manoeuvre at high speed within unknown, unstructured, flat environments and have significant vehicle dynamics-related constraints. Five different representations of vehicle dynamics models are considered: four variations of the two degrees-of-freedom (DoF) representation as lower fidelity models and a fourteen DoF representation with combined-slip Magic Formula tyre model as a higher fidelity model. It is concluded that the two DoF representation that accounts for tyre nonlinearities and longitudinal load transfer is necessary for the MPC-based obstacle avoidance algorithm in order to operate the vehicle at its limits within an environment that includes large obstacles. For less challenging environments, however, the two DoF representation with linear tyre model and constant axle loads is sufficient.

  8. Unmanned Ground Vehicles in Support of Irregular War: A Non-lethal Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    Observation Remote Direct-Action System (SWORDS) and Moreau, 2 Gladiator , both armed UGV s. (See Appendix A) On the surface, the development of lethal...medium-ugv/swords.html Above Image: GLADIATOR Unmanned Ground Vehicle Source: http://www .defenseindustrydaily .com/usmc- gladiators -to-pack-a-sw arm-0

  9. Unmanned Ground Vehicle Navigation and Coverage Hole Patching in Wireless Sensor Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guyu

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents a study of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) navigation and coverage hole patching in coordinate-free and localization-free Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). Navigation and coverage maintenance are related problems since coverage hole patching requires effective navigation in the sensor network environment. A…

  10. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ground-water pathway,'' which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  11. Coordination Between Unmanned Aerial and Ground Vehicles: A Taxonomy and Optimization Perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Xing; Xin, Bin; Fang, Hao

    2016-04-01

    The coordination between unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) is a proactive research topic whose great value of application has attracted vast attention. This paper outlines the motivations for studying the cooperative control of UAVs and UGVs, and attempts to make a comprehensive investigation and analysis on recent research in this field. First, a taxonomy for classification of existing unmanned aerial and ground vehicles systems (UAGVSs) is proposed, and a generalized optimization framework is developed to allow the decision-making problems for different types of UAGVSs to be described in a unified way. By following the proposed taxonomy, we show how different types of UAGVSs can be built to realize the goal of a common task, that is target tracking, and how optimization problems can be formulated for a UAGVS to perform specific tasks. This paper presents an optimization perspective to model and analyze different types of UAGVSs, and serves as a guidance and reference for developing UAGVSs.

  12. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford operations

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work

  13. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 5: Transportation and operations analysis. [heavy lift launch and orbit transfer vehicles for orbital assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, G.

    1978-01-01

    The development of transportation systems to support the operations required for the orbital assembly of a 5-gigawatt satellite is discussed as well as the construction of a ground receiving antenna (rectenna). Topics covered include heavy lift launch vehicle configurations for Earth-to LEO transport; the use of chemical, nuclear, and electric orbit transfer vehicles for LEO to GEO operations; personnel transport systems; ground operations; end-to-end analysis of the construction, operation, and maintenance of the satellite and rectenna; propellant production and storage; and payload packaging.

  14. Transport systems research vehicle color display system operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, Wesley C.; Johnson, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    A recent upgrade of the Transport Systems Research Vehicle operated by the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program Office at the NASA Langley Research Center has resulted in an all-glass panel in the research flight deck. Eight ARINC-D size CRT color displays make up the panel. A major goal of the display upgrade effort was ease of operation and maintenance of the hardware while maintaining versatility needed for flight research. Software is the key to this required versatility and will be the area demanding the most detailed technical design expertise. This document is is intended to serve as a single source of quick reference information needed for routine operation and system level maintenance. Detailed maintenance and modification of the display system will require specific design documentation and must be accomplished by individuals with specialized knowledge and experience.

  15. The Application of the Human Engineering Modeling and Performance Laboratory for Space Vehicle Ground Processing Tasks at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbury, Sarah K.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of United Space Alliance's Human Engineering Modeling and Performance Laboratory began in early 2007 in an attempt to address the problematic workspace design issues that the Space Shuttle has imposed on technicians performing maintenance and inspection operations. The Space Shuttle was not expected to require the extensive maintenance it undergoes between flights. As a result, extensive, costly resources have been expended on workarounds and modifications to accommodate ground processing personnel. Consideration of basic human factors principles for design of maintenance is essential during the design phase of future space vehicles, facilities, and equipment. Simulation will be needed to test and validate designs before implementation.

  16. Soldier Cognitive Processes: Supporting Teleoperated Ground Vehicle Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Performance Errors ...................................................8 Cognitive Load and Memory ...For example, skill-based errors (inadvertent errors due to attention and memory failures) are the most common type of error seen in most aviation...various subtasks so they have more resources available to address the novel aspects of each situation they encounter. Cognitive Load and Memory

  17. Characteristics of a Maritime Interdiction Operations Unmanned Ground Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    the robots would have fallen a long distance to the concrete floor.) The team members then practiced throwing weights and the actual robots onto a...distance should be 5 m, with an objective distance of 10 m, onto a steel deck. 3.4 Waterproofing and Flotation Being a maritime system, the robot and its...OCU must possess some degree of waterproofing . At the minimum, the OCU should be splash proof (IP64), while the robot should be waterproof to 1 m

  18. Reusable Space Vehicle Ground Operations Baseline Conceptual Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    Figure B-49. ECLSS ........................................................................................................116 Figure B-50. Fan Package...Environmental Control & Life Support System ( ECLSS ) - Communications (COMM) Though start and finish data was provided, it was unclear if this...and other instrumentation systems. Cockpit & Crew Panel and the ECLSS include inspection and maintenance of the cabin air conditioning

  19. Collaborative Autonomous Unmanned Aerial - Ground Vehicle Systems for Field Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-31

    and to an LQR MIMO controller for different flight profiles. The major advantage of this method is the tutorial-like but simplified control design...achieving desired performance objectives. Additional contributions include simplicity of such SISO controllers when compared to full MIMO designs...available video data. In the future, the flying time and the observable area can be increased massively .

  20. Passive Fuel Tank Inerting Systems for Ground Combat Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    operating principle is to supply an inert gas , usually nitrogen (N2 ) or carbon dioxide (CO), into the ullage or dry bay. The inert gas dilutes ?he available...logistics and economics tend to favor N2 . The source of the inert gas can be either a liquid (cryogenic) supply or an onboard generator. Liquid supplies have...Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 5.1.3. Damage Nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5.2. Current Fuel SIstem Descriptions . . . . . . . 14 5.2.1

  1. A tube-based robust nonlinear predictive control approach to semiautonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yiqi; Gray, Andrew; Tseng, H. Eric; Borrelli, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a robust control framework for lane-keeping and obstacle avoidance of semiautonomous ground vehicles. It presents a systematic way of enforcing robustness during the MPC design stage. A robust nonlinear model predictive controller (RNMPC) is used to help the driver navigating the vehicle in order to avoid obstacles and track the road centre line. A force-input nonlinear bicycle vehicle model is developed and used in the RNMPC control design. A robust invariant set is used in the RNMPC design to guarantee that state and input constraints are satisfied in the presence of disturbances and model error. Simulations and experiments on a vehicle show the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  2. Near-Optimal Operation of Dual-Fuel Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.; Chou, H. C.; Bowles, J. V.

    1996-01-01

    A near-optimal guidance law for the ascent trajectory from earth surface to earth orbit of a fully reusable single-stage-to-orbit pure rocket launch vehicle is derived. Of interest are both the optimal operation of the propulsion system and the optimal flight path. A methodology is developed to investigate the optimal throttle switching of dual-fuel engines. The method is based on selecting propulsion system modes and parameters that maximize a certain performance function. This function is derived from consideration of the energy-state model of the aircraft equations of motion. Because the density of liquid hydrogen is relatively low, the sensitivity of perturbations in volume need to be taken into consideration as well as weight sensitivity. The cost functional is a weighted sum of fuel mass and volume; the weighting factor is chosen to minimize vehicle empty weight for a given payload mass and volume in orbit.

  3. Operations and support cost modeling of conceptual space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The University of Dayton is pleased to submit this annual report to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center which documents the development of an operations and support (O&S) cost model as part of a larger life cycle cost (LCC) structure. It is intended for use during the conceptual design of new launch vehicles and spacecraft. This research is being conducted under NASA Research Grant NAG-1-1327. This research effort changes the focus from that of the first two years in which a reliability and maintainability model was developed to the initial development of an operations and support life cycle cost model. Cost categories were initially patterned after NASA's three axis work breakdown structure consisting of a configuration axis (vehicle), a function axis, and a cost axis. A revised cost element structure (CES), which is currently under study by NASA, was used to established the basic cost elements used in the model. While the focus of the effort was on operations and maintenance costs and other recurring costs, the computerized model allowed for other cost categories such as RDT&E and production costs to be addressed. Secondary tasks performed concurrent with the development of the costing model included support and upgrades to the reliability and maintainability (R&M) model. The primary result of the current research has been a methodology and a computer implementation of the methodology to provide for timely operations and support cost analysis during the conceptual design activities.

  4. Effects of Command and Control Vehicle (C2V) operational environment on soldier health and performance.

    PubMed

    Cowings, P S; Toscano, W B; DeRoshia, C; Tauso, R

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to use NASA technology to assist the US Army in the assessment of motion sickness incidences and effects on soldier performance and mood states within the Command and Control Vehicle (C2V). Specific objectives were (1) to determine if there was a significant difference between three internal configurations of the C2V and/or between seats within these vehicles; (2) to determine if there was a significant difference between the park, move, or short-halt field conditions; and (3) to validate a method of converging indicators developed by NASA to assess environmental impact of long duration spaceflight on crewmembers, using a large sample of subjects under ground-based operational conditions.

  5. Effects of Command and Control Vehicle (C2V) operational environment on soldier health and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.; DeRoshia, C.; Tauso, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use NASA technology to assist the US Army in the assessment of motion sickness incidences and effects on soldier performance and mood states within the Command and Control Vehicle (C2V). Specific objectives were (1) to determine if there was a significant difference between three internal configurations of the C2V and/or between seats within these vehicles; (2) to determine if there was a significant difference between the park, move, or short-halt field conditions; and (3) to validate a method of converging indicators developed by NASA to assess environmental impact of long duration spaceflight on crewmembers, using a large sample of subjects under ground-based operational conditions.

  6. A Ground-Based Research Vehicle for Base Drag Studies at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diebler, Corey; Smith, Mark

    2002-01-01

    A ground research vehicle (GRV) has been developed to study the base drag on large-scale vehicles at subsonic speeds. Existing models suggest that base drag is dependent upon vehicle forebody drag, and for certain configurations, the total drag of a vehicle can be reduced by increasing its forebody drag. Although these models work well for small projectile shapes, studies have shown that they do not provide accurate predictions when applied to large-scale vehicles. Experiments are underway at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to collect data at Reynolds numbers to a maximum of 3 x 10(exp 7), and to formulate a new model for predicting the base drag of trucks, buses, motor homes, reentry vehicles, and other large-scale vehicles. Preliminary tests have shown errors as great as 70 percent compared to Hoerner's two-dimensional base drag prediction. This report describes the GRV and its capabilities, details the studies currently underway at NASA Dryden, and presents preliminary results of both the effort to formulate a new base drag model and the investigation into a method of reducing total drag by manipulating forebody drag.

  7. Ground operation of space-based telerobots will enhance productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schober, Wayne R.

    1988-01-01

    Due to the limited human resources which will be available on the U.S. Space Station, automation and robotics technologies are being developed to enhance the productivity on the Space Station. The need for space telerobots which can be operated from the ground is explored, taking into consideration the resulting time delay, the technology involved, and some currently planned experiments. The proposed experiments include a remote link with the Kennedy Space Center robotics laboratory and the Telerobot Intelligent Interface Flight Experiment (TRIIFEX). It is concluded that there is a need to develop and implement ground-remote telerobotics technology which can effectively operate in the time-delay environment. This capability will enable servicing operations in polar and geosynchronous orbits and assist EVA astronauts on the Space Station.

  8. CATIA V5 Virtual Environment Support for Constellation Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This summer internship primarily involved using CATIA V5 modeling software to design and model parts to support ground operations for the Constellation program. I learned several new CATIA features, including the Imagine and Shape workbench and the Tubing Design workbench, and presented brief workbench lessons to my co-workers. Most modeling tasks involved visualizing design options for Launch Pad 39B operations, including Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) access and internal access to the Ares I rocket. Other ground support equipment, including a hydrazine servicing cart, a mobile fuel vapor scrubber, a hypergolic propellant tank cart, and a SCAPE (Self Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensemble) suit, was created to aid in the visualization of pad operations.

  9. Satellite Ground Operations Automation: Lessons Learned and Future Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catena, John; Frank, Lou; Saylor, Rick; Weikel, Craig; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Reducing spacecraft ground system operations costs is a major goal in all missions. The Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) flight operations team at the NASA/Goddard Spacecraft Flight Center developed in-house scripts and procedures to automate monitoring of critical spacecraft functions. The initial staffing profile of 16x7 was reduced first to 8x5 and then to 'lights out'. Operations functions became an offline review of system performance and the generation of future science plans for subsequent upload to the spacecraft. Lessons learned will be applied to the challenging Triana mission, where 24x7 contact with the spacecraft will be necessary at all times.

  10. Application of radio control cars as intelligent unmanned ground vehicles with collaborative and independent behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Steven R.; Kouns, John; Bruder, Stephen; Wedeward, Kevin; El-Osery, Aly

    2004-09-01

    Simple radio control cars commonly sold as toys can provide a viable starting platform for the development of low-cost intelligent Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) for the study of robot collectives. In a collaborative effort, Sandia National Labs and New Mexico Tech have successfully demonstrated proof-of-concept by utilizing low-cost radio control cars manufactured by Nikko. Initial tests have involved using a small number (two to ten) of these UGVs to successfully demonstrate both collaborative and independent behavior simultaneously. In the tests individuals share their locations with the collective to cover an area, thus demonstrating collaborative behavior. Independent behavior is demonstrated as each member of the collective maintains a desired compass heading while simultaneously avoiding obstacles in its path. These UGVs are powered by high-capacity rechargeable batteries and equipped with a custom-designed microcontroller board with a stackable modular interface and wireless communication. The initial modular sensor configuration includes a digital compass and GPS unit for navigation as well as ultrasonic sensors for obstacle avoidance. This paper describes the design and operations of these UGVs, their possible uses, and the advantages of using a radio control car platform as a low-cost starting point for the development of intelligent UGV collectives.

  11. NASDA's view of ground control in mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tateno, Satoshi

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the present status and future plans of the National Space Development Agency of Japan 's (NASDA's) ground segment and related space missions. The described ground segment consists of the tracking and data acquisition (T&DA) system and the Earth Observation Center (EOC) system. In addition to these systems, the current plan of the Engineering Support Center (ESC) for the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) attached to Space Station Freedom is introduced. Then, NASDA's fundamental point of view on the future trend of operations and technologies in the coming new space era is discussed. Within the discussion, the increasing importance of international cooperation is also mentioned.

  12. 41 CFR 109-38.301-1.53 - Responsibilities of motor vehicle operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... motor vehicle operators. 109-38.301-1.53 Section 109-38.301-1.53 Public Contracts and Property... MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 38-MOTOR EQUIPMENT MANAGEMENT 38.3-Official Use of Government Motor Vehicles § 109-38.301-1.53 Responsibilities of motor vehicle...

  13. 41 CFR 109-38.301-1.53 - Responsibilities of motor vehicle operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... motor vehicle operators. 109-38.301-1.53 Section 109-38.301-1.53 Public Contracts and Property... MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 38-MOTOR EQUIPMENT MANAGEMENT 38.3-Official Use of Government Motor Vehicles § 109-38.301-1.53 Responsibilities of motor vehicle...

  14. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration for Responsive Space Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project developed to mature, integrate and demonstrate advancements in cryogenics, system health management and command and control technologies. Two Distinct Testing Environments: a) GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage - GODU LH2; b) GODU Autonomous Control - GODU LO2. Scope: I. GODU LH2: a) Investigate alternative storage and distribution architecture for future cryogenic propellant operations. b) Demonstrate advanced cryogenic propellant handling operations (liquefaction, storage and distribution) of normal boiling point and sub-cooled cryogenic propellants. II. GODU L02: a) Develop and demonstrate advanced control and health management technologies and techniques to autonomously control cryogenic propellant servicing operations. b) Investigate modern COTS hardware and control systems in an effort to reduce the "standing army" of engineers associated with maintaining and operating ground systems through the use of health management and autonomous control technologies. Goals: a) Raise Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) and Integration Readiness Levels (IRL) of several key technology development areas. b) Reduce operations lifecycle costs of future test programs and launch complexes. c) Demonstrate technologies for future exploration beyond low earth orbit. d) Serve as test environments for extraterrestrial surface operations.

  15. Techniques for inferring terrain parameters related to ground vehicle mobility using UAV born IFSAR and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, Phillip J.; Baylot, Alex; McKinley, Burney

    2011-05-01

    Predicting ground vehicle performance requires in-depth knowledge, captured as numeric parameters, of the terrain on which the vehicles will be operating. For off-road performance, predictions are based on rough terrain ride comfort, which is described using a parameter entitled root-mean-square (RMS) surface roughness. Likewise, on-road vehicle performance depends heavily on the slopes of the individual road segments. Traditional methods of computing RMS and road slope values call for high-resolution (inch-scale) surface elevation data. At this scale, surface elevation data is both difficult and time consuming to collect. Nevertheless, a current need exists to attribute large geographic areas with RMS and road slope values in order to better support vehicle mobility predictions, and high-resolution surface data is neither available nor collectible for many of these regions. On the other hand, meter scale data can be quickly and easily collected for these areas using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) based IFSAR and LIDAR sensors. A statistical technique for inferring RMS values for large areas using a combination of fractal dimension and spectral analysis of five-meter elevation data is presented. Validation of the RMS prediction technique was based on 43 vehicle ride courses with 30-centimeter surface elevation data. Also presented is a model for classifying road slopes for long road sections using five-meter elevation data. The road slope model was validated against one-meter LIDAR surface elevation profiles. These inference algorithms have been successfully implemented for regions of northern Afghanistan, and some initial results are presented.

  16. The Interim: Until You Achieve an Operationally Responsive Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendlandt, Bob; Clarke, Kelly; Miyamoto, Charles; Lei, Jordan; Owen-Mankovich, Kyran

    2008-01-01

    Everyone wants to achieve a 'Responsive' Ground Data System (GDS), but that takes time. What do you do in the interim? Our group, called the Integration, Test and Deployment Team (ITD), is a group of responsive engineers whose primary focus is to assist JPL projects to successfully adapt, test, integrate and deploy their ground data system. The team configures and adapts the GDS for a project, so that analysts, engineers and scientist do not need to be experts in the GDS to operate it. The team has developed a human interface to accommodate all types of users. It provides Graphical User Interfaces (GUI's) for those that want GUI's, command line interfaces for those that want control, and selection button interfaces for other users. The cornerstone of a responsive Ground Data System is responsive people. Without individuals who can be aware of a project's changing needs and requirements, how can the GDS become responsive?.

  17. The Interim : until you achieve an operationally responsive ground system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendlandt, Bob; Clarke, Kelly; Lei, Jordan; Miyamoto, Charles; Owen-Mankovich, Kyran

    2008-01-01

    Everyone wants to achieve a 'Responsive' Ground Data System (GDS), but that takes time. What do you do in the interim? Our group, called the Integration, Test and Deployment Team (ITD), is a group of responsive engineers whose primary focus is to assist JPL projects to successfully adapt, test, integrate and deploy their ground data system. The team configures and adapts the GDS for a project, so that analysts, engineers and scientist do not need to be experts in the GDS to operate it. The team has developed a human interface to accommodate all types of users. It provides Graphical User Interfaces (GUI's) for those that want GUI's, command line interfaces for those that want control, and selection button interfaces for other users. The cornerstone of a responsive Ground Data System is responsive people. Without individuals who can be aware of a project's changing needs and requirements, how can the GDS become responsive

  18. The CREATE Program Software Applications for the Design and Analysis of Air Vehicles, Naval Vessels, Radio Frequency Antennas, and Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-10

    1 The CREATE Program Software Applications for the Design and Analysis of Air Vehicles, Naval Vessels, Radio Frequency Antennas, and Ground ... ground vehicles) through the construction and analysis of virtual prototypes for those systems. Code development began in 2008, and eight years later...in history–we have the potential to make accurate predictions of the behavior of complex physical systems (e.g. the weather, the behavior of chemical

  19. Effect of vehicle front end profiles leading to pedestrian secondary head impact to ground.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Yang, King H

    2013-11-01

    Most studies of pedestrian injuries focus on reducing traumatic injuries due to the primary impact between the vehicle and the pedestrian. However, based on the Pedestrian Crash Data Study (PCDS), some researchers concluded that one of the leading causes of head injury for pedestrian crashes can be attributed to the secondary impact, defined as the impact of the pedestrian with the ground after the primary impact of the pedestrian with the vehicle. The purpose of this study is to understand if different vehicle front-end profiles can affect the risk of pedestrian secondary head impact with the ground and thus help in reducing the risk of head injury during secondary head impact with ground. Pedestrian responses were studied using several front-end profiles based off a mid-size vehicle and a SUV that have been validated previously along with several MADYMO pedestrian models. Mesh morphing is used to explore changes to the bumper height, bonnet leading-edge height, and bonnet rear reference-line height. Simulations leading up to pedestrian secondary impact with ground are conducted at impact speeds of 40 and 30 km/h. In addition, three pedestrian sizes (50th, 5th and 6yr old child) are used to enable us to search for a front-end profile that performs well for multiple sizes of pedestrians, not just one particular size. In most of the simulations, secondary ground impact with pedestrian head/neck/shoulder region occurred. However, there were some front-end profiles that promoted secondary ground impact with pedestrian lower extremities, thus avoiding pedestrian secondary head impact with ground. Previous pedestrian safety research work has suggested the use of active safety methods, such as 'pop up hood', to reduce pedestrian head injury during primary impact. Accordingly, we also conducted simulations using a model with the hood raised to capture the effect of a pop-up hood. These simulations indicated that even though pop-up hood helped reducing the head injury

  20. Objectives and Progress on Ground Vibration Testing for the Ares Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Askins, Bruce R.; Chenevert, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has conducted dynamic tests on each of its major launch vehicles during the past 45 years. Each test has provided invaluable data to correlate and correct analytical models used to predict structural responses to differing dynamics for these vehicles. With both Saturn V and Space Shuttle, hardware changes were also required to the flight vehicles to ensure crew and vehicle safety. The Ares I IVGVT will undoubtedly provide similar valuable test data to support successful flights of the Constellation Program. The IVGVT will provide test determined natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping for the Ares I. This data will be used to support controls analysis by providing this test data to reduce uncertainty in the models. The value of this testing has been proven by past launch vehicle successes and failures. Performing dynamic testing on the Ares vehicles will provide confidence that the launch vehicles will be safe and successful in their missions. In addition, IVGVT will provide the following benefits for the Ares rockets: a) IVGVT data along with Ares development flights like Ares I-X, Ares I-Y, Ares I-X Prime, and Orion-1 or others will reduce the risk to the Orion-2 crew. IVGVT will permit anchoring the various analytical and operational models used in so many different aspects of Ares operations. b) IVGVT data will permit better understanding of the structural and GN&C margins of the spacecraft and may permit mass savings or expanded day-of-launch opportunities or fewer constraints to launch. c) Undoubtedly IVGVT will uncover some of the "unknown unknowns" so often seen in developing, launching, and flying new spacecraft vehicles and data from IVGVT may help prevent a loss of vehicle or crew. d) IVGVT also will be the first time Ares I flight-like hardware is transported, handled, rotated, mated, stacked, and integrated. e) Furthermore, handling and stacking the IVGVT launch vehicle stacks will be an opportunity to understand certain aspects of vehicle

  1. Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen Initial Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Swanger, A. M.; Tomsik, T.

    2015-01-01

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project has designed, assembled, and started testing of a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The system is unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. This paper will present and discuss the results of the initial phase of testing of the GODU LH2 system.

  2. Ground operations demonstration unit for liquid hydrogen initial test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Swanger, A. M.; Tomsik, T.

    2015-12-01

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project has designed, assembled, and started testing of a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The system is unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. This paper will present and discuss the results of the initial phase of testing of the GODU LH2 system.

  3. Integrated Procedures for Flight and Ground Operations Using International Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, John

    2011-01-01

    Imagine astronauts using the same Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETM's) as the ground personnel who assemble or maintain their flight hardware, and having all of that data interoperable with design, logistics, reliability analysis, and training. Modern international standards and their corresponding COTS tools already used in other industries provide a good foundation for streamlined technical publications in the space industry. These standards cover everything from data exchange to product breakdown structure to business rules flexibility. Full Product Lifecycle Support (PLCS) is supported. The concept is to organize, build once, reuse many ways, and integrate. This should apply to all future and some current launch vehicles, payloads, space stations/habitats, spacecraft, facilities, support equipment, and retrieval ships.

  4. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration for Responsive Space Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program has a three year project to develop and demonstrate technologies to fundamentally change the way ground servicing activities support future access to space architectures. The AES Integrated Ground Operation Demonstration Units (IGODU) project has created two test beds for investigating and maturing two key elements of spaceport processing activities. The first is the GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage test bed that is demonstrating zero-loss storage of liquid hydrogen propellants and studying the storage and transfer of densified propellants. The second activity is the GODU Autonomous Control test bed that is implementing health management technologies and autonomous control capability of the propellant loading process to reduce the standing army of experts historically needed to ensure safe propellant loading operations. This presentation will give an overview of the activities at the Kennedy Space Center on these two test beds and its potential impact on future access to space programs.

  5. Computational Simulation of Dynamic Response of Vehicle Tatra T815 and the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlček, Jozef; Valašková, Veronika

    2016-10-01

    The effect of a moving load represents the actual problem which is analysed in engineering practice. The response of the vehicle and its dynamic effect on the pavement can be analysed by experimental or computational ways. The aim of this paper was to perform computer simulations of a vehicle-ground interaction. For this purpose, a half-part model of heavy lorry Tatra 815 and ground was modelled in computational programmes ADINA and PLAXIS based on FEM methods, utilizing analytical approaches. Two procedures were then selected for further calculations. The first one is based on the simplification of the stiffer pavement layers to the beam element supported by the springs simulating the subgrade layers using Winkler-Pasternak theory of elastic half-space. Modulus of subgrade reaction was determined in the standard programme trough the simulation of a plate load test. Second approach considers a multi-layered ground system with layers of different thicknesses and material properties. For comparison of outputs of both approaches, the same input values were used for every calculation procedure. Crucial parameter for the simulations was the velocity of the passing vehicle with regard to the ground response to the impulse of the pass. Lower velocities result in almost static response of the pavement, but higher velocities induce response that can be better described by the dynamic theory. For small deformations, an elastic material model seems to be sufficient to define the ground response to the moving load, but for larger deformations advanced material models for the ground environment would be more reliable.

  6. Vehicle-mounted ground penetrating radar (Mine Stalker III) field evaluation in Angola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudato, Stephen; Hart, Kerry; Nevard, Michael; Lauziere, Steven; Grant, Shaun

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technology (NIITEK), Inc. and The HALO Trust have over the last decade funded, developed and tested various prototype vehicle mounted ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems named the Mine Stalker. The HD R&D Program and NIITEK developed the Mine Stalker to detect low metal anti-tank (LM-AT) mines in roads. The country of Angola is severely affected by LM-AT mines in and off road, some of which are buried beyond the effective range of detection sensors current used in country. The threat from LM-AT mines such as the South African Number 8 (No. 8) and the Chinese Type 72 (72AT) still persist from Angola's 30 years of civil war. These LM-AT threats are undetectable at depths greater than 5 to 10 centimeters using metal detection technology. Clearing commerce routes are a critical requirement before Angola can rebuild its infrastructure and improve safety conditions for the local populace. The Halo Trust, a non-governmental demining organization (NGO) focused on demining and clearance of unexploded ordnance (UXO), has partnered with the HD R&D Program to conduct an operational field evaluation (OFE) of the Mine Stalker III (MS3) in Angola. Preliminary testing and training efforts yielded encouraging results. This paper presents a review of the data collected, testing results, system limitations and deficiencies while operating in a real world environment. Our goal is to demonstrate and validate this technology in live minefield environments, and to collect data to prompt future developments to the system.

  7. Tracked-vehicle fuel consumption. Final report on international test operations procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-18

    This document describes procedures for evaluating the fuel efficiency of tracked vehicles under controlled operating conditions. The test data are a major source for comparisons with similar vehicles, and can also serve to predict the operational range of these vehicles during tactical missions.

  8. 49 CFR 396.9 - Inspection of motor vehicles and intermodal equipment in operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inspection of motor vehicles and intermodal... SAFETY REGULATIONS INSPECTION, REPAIR, AND MAINTENANCE § 396.9 Inspection of motor vehicles and... inspections of a motor carrier's vehicles in operation and intermodal equipment in operation. (b)...

  9. 49 CFR 396.9 - Inspection of motor vehicles and intermodal equipment in operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inspection of motor vehicles and intermodal... SAFETY REGULATIONS INSPECTION, REPAIR, AND MAINTENANCE § 396.9 Inspection of motor vehicles and... inspections of a motor carrier's vehicles in operation and intermodal equipment in operation. (b)...

  10. 49 CFR 396.9 - Inspection of motor vehicles and intermodal equipment in operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inspection of motor vehicles and intermodal... SAFETY REGULATIONS INSPECTION, REPAIR, AND MAINTENANCE § 396.9 Inspection of motor vehicles and... inspections of a motor carrier's vehicles in operation and intermodal equipment in operation. (b)...

  11. Electric and hybrid vehicle project. Quarterly report of private-sector operations, first quarter 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1982-06-01

    As of January 1, 1982 sixteen private-sector site operators at 30 sites in the US were involved in electric and hybrid electric-powered vehicle demonstration programs. Data for 1981 and the first quarter of 1982 are presented on vehicle selection, miles accumulated, energy usage, maintenance requirements, reliability and operating performance for demonstration vehicles at each site. (LCL)

  12. Risk analysis for autonomous underwater vehicle operations in extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Brito, Mario Paulo; Griffiths, Gwyn; Challenor, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are used increasingly to explore hazardous marine environments. Risk assessment for such complex systems is based on subjective judgment and expert knowledge as much as on hard statistics. Here, we describe the use of a risk management process tailored to AUV operations, the implementation of which requires the elicitation of expert judgment. We conducted a formal judgment elicitation process where eight world experts in AUV design and operation were asked to assign a probability of AUV loss given the emergence of each fault or incident from the vehicle's life history of 63 faults and incidents. After discussing methods of aggregation and analysis, we show how the aggregated risk estimates obtained from the expert judgments were used to create a risk model. To estimate AUV survival with mission distance, we adopted a statistical survival function based on the nonparametric Kaplan-Meier estimator. We present theoretical formulations for the estimator, its variance, and confidence limits. We also present a numerical example where the approach is applied to estimate the probability that the Autosub3 AUV would survive a set of missions under Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica in January-March 2009.

  13. An operating system for future aerospace vehicle computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foudriat, E. C.; Berman, W. J.; Will, R. W.; Bynum, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    The requirements for future aerospace vehicle computer operating systems are examined in this paper. The computer architecture is assumed to be distributed with a local area network connecting the nodes. Each node is assumed to provide a specific functionality. The network provides for communication so that the overall tasks of the vehicle are accomplished. The O/S structure is based upon the concept of objects. The mechanisms for integrating node unique objects with node common objects in order to implement both the autonomy and the cooperation between nodes is developed. The requirements for time critical performance and reliability and recovery are discussed. Time critical performance impacts all parts of the distributed operating system; e.g., its structure, the functional design of its objects, the language structure, etc. Throughout the paper the tradeoffs - concurrency, language structure, object recovery, binding, file structure, communication protocol, programmer freedom, etc. - are considered to arrive at a feasible, maximum performance design. Reliability of the network system is considered. A parallel multipath bus structure is proposed for the control of delivery time for time critical messages. The architecture also supports immediate recovery for the time critical message system after a communication failure.

  14. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 2: Compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The principal elements and functions of the Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL) compiler are presented. The technique used to transcribe the syntax diagrams into machine processable format for use by the parsing routines is described. An explanation of the parsing technique used to process GOAL source statements is included. The compiler diagnostics and the output reports generated during a GOAL compilation are explained. A description of the GOAL program package is provided.

  15. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 1: Study overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A series of NASA and Contractor studies sponsored by NASA/KSC resulted in a specification for the Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). The Cape Kennedy Facility of the IBM Corporation was given the responsibility, under existing contracts, to perform an analysis of the Language Specification, to design and develop a GOAL Compiler, to provide a specification for a data bank, to design and develop an interpretive code translator, and to perform associated application studies.

  16. Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicles as an Opportunity to Consolidate and Calibrate Ground Based and Satellite Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    2014-12-01

    XCOR Aerospace, a commercial space company, is planning to provide frequent, low cost access to near-Earth space on the Lynx suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV). Measurements in the external vacuum environment can be made and can launch from most runways on a limited lead time. Lynx can operate as a platform to perform suborbital in situ measurements and remote sensing to supplement models and simulations with new data points. These measurements can serve as a quantitative link to existing instruments and be used as a basis to calibrate detectors on spacecraft. Easier access to suborbital data can improve the longevity and cohesiveness of spacecraft and ground-based resources. A study of how these measurements can be made on Lynx sRLV will be presented. At the boundary between terrestrial and space weather, measurements from instruments on Lynx can help develop algorithms to optimize the consolidation of ground and satellite based data as well as assimilate global models with new data points. For example, current tides and the equatorial electrojet, essential to understanding the Thermosphere-Ionosphere system, can be measured in situ frequently and on short notice. Furthermore, a negative-ion spectrometer and a Faraday cup, can take measurements of the D-region ion composition. A differential GPS receiver can infer the spatial gradient of ionospheric electron density. Instruments and optics on spacecraft degrade over time, leading to calibration drift. Lynx can be a cost effective platform for deploying a reference instrument to calibrate satellites with a frequent and fast turnaround and a successful return of the instrument. A calibrated reference instrument on Lynx can make collocated observations as another instrument and corrections are made for the latter, thus ensuring data consistency and mission longevity. Aboard a sRLV, atmospheric conditions that distort remotely sensed data (ground and spacecraft based) can be measured in situ. Moreover, an

  17. On the radar cross section (RCS) prediction of vehicles moving on the ground

    SciTech Connect

    Sabihi, Ahmad

    2014-12-10

    As readers should be aware, Radar Cross Section depends on the factors such as: Wave frequency and polarization, Target dimension, angle of ray incidence, Target’s material and covering, Type of radar system as monostatic or bistatic, space in which contains target and propagating waves, and etc. Having moved or stationed in vehicles can be effective in RCS values. Here, we investigate effective factors in RCS of moving targets on the ground or sea. Image theory in electromagnetic applies to be taken into account RCS of a target over the ground or sea.

  18. Analysis and Prediction of Weather Impacted Ground Stop Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2014-01-01

    When the air traffic demand is expected to exceed the available airport's capacity for a short period of time, Ground Stop (GS) operations are implemented by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Traffic Flow Management (TFM). The GS requires departing aircraft meeting specific criteria to remain on the ground to achieve reduced demands at the constrained destination airport until the end of the GS. This paper provides a high-level overview of the statistical distributions as well as causal factors for the GSs at the major airports in the United States. The GS's character, the weather impact on GSs, GS variations with delays, and the interaction between GSs and Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) at Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) are investigated. The machine learning methods are used to generate classification models that map the historical airport weather forecast, schedule traffic, and other airport conditions to implemented GS/GDP operations and the models are evaluated using the cross-validations. This modeling approach produced promising results as it yielded an 85% overall classification accuracy to distinguish the implemented GS days from the normal days without GS and GDP operations and a 71% accuracy to differentiate the GS and GDP implemented days from the GDP only days.

  19. Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, James

    2014-01-01

    The Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management plays a key role for future ground operations at NASA. The software that is integrated into this system is called G2 2011 Gensym. The purpose of this report is to describe the Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management with the use of the G2 Gensym software and the G2 NASA toolkit for Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) which is a Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI). The decision rationale for the use of the G2 platform is to develop a modular capability for ISHM and AC. Toolkit modules include knowledge bases that are generic and can be applied in any application domain module. That way, there's a maximization of reusability, maintainability, and systematic evolution, portability, and scalability. Engine modules are generic, while application modules represent the domain model of a specific application. Furthermore, the NASA toolkit, developed since 2006 (a set of modules), makes it possible to create application domain models quickly, using pre-defined objects that include sensors and components libraries for typical fluid, electrical, and mechanical systems.

  20. Functional design for operational earth resources ground data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, C. J. (Principal Investigator); Bradford, L. H.; Hutson, D. E.; Jugle, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Study emphasis was on developing a unified concept for the required ground system, capable of handling data from all viable acquisition platforms and sensor groupings envisaged as supporting operational earth survey programs. The platforms considered include both manned and unmanned spacecraft in near earth orbit, and continued use of low and high altitude aircraft. The sensor systems include both imaging and nonimaging devices, operated both passively and actively, from the ultraviolet to the microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  1. Characteristic Model of a Shock Absorber in an Unmanned Ground Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danko, Ján; Milesich, Tomáš; Bugár, Martin; Madarás, Juraj

    2012-12-01

    The paper deals with mathematical models for the shock absorber of an unmanned ground vehicle. The possibility of mathematically modeling the shock absorber is discussed. Specific types of mathematical models are described and the experimental measurement of a shock absorber is made. For modeling the characteristics of the shock absorber the modified Bouc-Wen model (Spencer model) is selected. From the mathematical model, a simulation model in Matlab/Simulink is created. The identification of the Spencer model parameters is performed and force-velocity and force-displacement characteristics of the shock absorber of an unmanned ground vehicle is made. In the conclusions, the simulated characteristics are verified and evaluated by the measured characteristics.

  2. Study on shift schedule saving energy of automatic transmission of ground vehicles.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jie; Zhao, Ding-Xuan; Chen, Ying; Chen, Ning

    2004-07-01

    To improve ground vehicle efficiency, shift schedule energy saving was proposed for the ground vehicle automatic transmission by studying the function of the torque converter and transmission in the vehicular drivetrain. The shift schedule can keep the torque converter working in the high efficiency range under all the working conditions except in the low efficiency range on the left when the transmission worked at the lowest shift, and in the low efficiency range on the right when the transmission worked at the highest shift. The shift quality key factors were analysed. The automatic trans-mission's bench-test adopting this shift schedule was made on the automatic transmission's test-bed. The experimental results showed that the shift schedule was correct and that the shift quality was controllable.

  3. Robust H∞ output-feedback control for path following of autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuan; Jing, Hui; Wang, Rongrong; Yan, Fengjun; Chadli, Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a robust H∞ output-feedback control strategy for the path following of autonomous ground vehicles (AGVs). Considering the vehicle lateral velocity is usually hard to measure with low cost sensor, a robust H∞ static output-feedback controller based on the mixed genetic algorithms (GA)/linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach is proposed to realize the path following without the information of the lateral velocity. The proposed controller is robust to the parametric uncertainties and external disturbances, with the parameters including the tire cornering stiffness, vehicle longitudinal velocity, yaw rate and road curvature. Simulation results based on CarSim-Simulink joint platform using a high-fidelity and full-car model have verified the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  4. Expert system decision support for low-cost launch vehicle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, G. P.; Levin, Barry E.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in assessing the feasibility, benefits, and risks associated with AI expert systems applied to low cost expendable launch vehicle systems is described. Part one identified potential application areas in vehicle operations and on-board functions, assessed measures of cost benefit, and identified key technologies to aid in the implementation of decision support systems in this environment. Part two of the program began the development of prototypes to demonstrate real-time vehicle checkout with controller and diagnostic/analysis intelligent systems and to gather true measures of cost savings vs. conventional software, verification and validation requirements, and maintainability improvement. The main objective of the expert advanced development projects was to provide a robust intelligent system for control/analysis that must be performed within a specified real-time window in order to meet the demands of the given application. The efforts to develop the two prototypes are described. Prime emphasis was on a controller expert system to show real-time performance in a cryogenic propellant loading application and safety validation implementation of this system experimentally, using commercial-off-the-shelf software tools and object oriented programming techniques. This smart ground support equipment prototype is based in C with imbedded expert system rules written in the CLIPS protocol. The relational database, ORACLE, provides non-real-time data support. The second demonstration develops the vehicle/ground intelligent automation concept, from phase one, to show cooperation between multiple expert systems. This automated test conductor (ATC) prototype utilizes a knowledge-bus approach for intelligent information processing by use of virtual sensors and blackboards to solve complex problems. It incorporates distributed processing of real-time data and object-oriented techniques for command, configuration control, and auto-code generation.

  5. An MPC Algorithm with Combined Speed and Steering Control for Obstacle Avoidance in Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-24

    Borrelli, “A unified approach to threat assessment and control for automotive active safety,” IEEE Transactions On Intelligent Transportation Systems , vol...Proceedings of ASME 2015 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference DSCC 2015 October 28-30, 2015, Ohio, USA DSCC2015 - 9747 AN MPC ALGORITHM WITH... INTRODUCTION Obstacle avoidance is a critical capability for autonomous ground vehicles (AGVs). It refers to the task of sensing the vehicle’s

  6. Performance Comparison between Stereausis and Incoherent Wideband Music for Localization of Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    PERFORMANCE COMPARISON BETWEEN STEREAUSIS AND INCOHERENT WIDEBAND MUSIC FOR LOCALIZATION OF GROUND VEHICLES September 1999 Tien Pham U.S. Army...present experimental results comparing the incoherent wideband MUSIC (IWM) algorithm developed by the Army Research Laboratory (ARL)1, 2 and the...Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) ("DD MON YYYY") Title and Subtitle Performance Comparison Between Stereausis and Incoherent Wideband Music for

  7. Finite Element Optimization for Nondestructive Evaluation on a Graphics Processing Unit for Ground Vehicle Hull Inspection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-22

    Toledo , Toledo , OH 3 US Army TARDEC, Warren, MI UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A Approved for Public Release Finite Element Optimization for...2 University of Toledo , Toledo , OH 3 US Army TARDEC, Warren, MI This is a reprint of the paper presented under the same title in the...GRAPHICS PROCESSING UNIT FOR GROUND VEHICLE HULL INSPECTION Victor U. Karthik ECE Department Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824

  8. Practical To Tactical: Making the Case for a Shift in Ground Vehicle Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-10

    can’t guarantee their behavior under all conditions – Some soldiers think robots will take their jobs EOD LTL C-IED Convoy Urban 7 UNCLASSIFIED...specialty sensors Large ROI EOD Robot Convoying Structure can help Toughest to solve Mobility & Hostility Immediate need Recognize Predict...UNCLASSIFIED: Dist A. Approved for public release TARDEC Ground Vehicle Robotics Overview Briefing for OESA 10 May 2012 Report Documentation

  9. Apparatus and method for modifying the operation of a robotic vehicle in a real environment, to emulate the operation of the robotic vehicle operating in a mixed reality environment

    DOEpatents

    Garretson, Justin R [Albuquerque, NM; Parker, Eric P [Albuquerque, NM; Gladwell, T Scott [Albuquerque, NM; Rigdon, J Brian [Edgewood, NM; Oppel, III, Fred J.

    2012-05-29

    Apparatus and methods for modifying the operation of a robotic vehicle in a real environment to emulate the operation of the robotic vehicle in a mixed reality environment include a vehicle sensing system having a communications module attached to the robotic vehicle for communicating operating parameters related to the robotic vehicle in a real environment to a simulation controller for simulating the operation of the robotic vehicle in a mixed (live, virtual and constructive) environment wherein the affects of virtual and constructive entities on the operation of the robotic vehicle (and vice versa) are simulated. These effects are communicated to the vehicle sensing system which generates a modified control command for the robotic vehicle including the effects of virtual and constructive entities, causing the robot in the real environment to behave as if virtual and constructive entities existed in the real environment.

  10. The 21st annual intelligent ground vehicle competition: robotists for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.

    2013-12-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of four, unmanned systems, student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned system. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip ground vehicles of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 21 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from over 80 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the fourday competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participation is presented.

  11. The 20th annual intelligent ground vehicle competition: building a generation of robotists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.; Kosinski, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of four, unmanned systems, student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned system. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip ground vehicles of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 20 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from over 80 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the four-day competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participation is presented.

  12. The 17th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition: intelligent robots built by intelligent students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.

    2010-01-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of four unmanned systems student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned ground vehicle. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip their system of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 17 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from over 70 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the four-day competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participation is presented.

  13. SpaceOps 1992: Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Ground Data Systems for Space Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Second International Symposium featured 135 oral presentations in these 12 categories: Future Missions and Operations; System-Level Architectures; Mission-Specific Systems; Mission and Science Planning and Sequencing; Mission Control; Operations Automation and Emerging Technologies; Data Acquisition; Navigation; Operations Support Services; Engineering Data Analysis of Space Vehicle and Ground Systems; Telemetry Processing, Mission Data Management, and Data Archiving; and Operations Management. Topics focused on improvements in the productivity, effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of mission operations, ground systems, and data acquisition. Also emphasized were accomplishments in management of human factors; use of information systems to improve data retrieval, reporting, and archiving; design and implementation of logistics support for mission operations; and the use of telescience and teleoperations.

  14. Operationally Efficient Propulsion System Study (OEPSS) data book. Volume 2: Ground operations problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldrop, Glen S.

    1990-01-01

    Operations problems and cost drivers were identified for current propulsion systems and design and technology approaches were identified to increase the operational efficiency and to reduce operations costs for future propulsion systems. To provide readily usable data for the ALS program, the results of the OEPSS study were organized into a series of OEPSS Data Books. This volume presents a detailed description of 25 major problems encountered during launch processing of current expendable and reusable launch vehicles. A concise description of each problem and its operational impact on launch processing is presented, along with potential solutions and technology recommendation.

  15. Navigation of military and space unmanned ground vehicles in unstructured terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lescoe, Paul; Lavery, David; Bedard, Roger

    1991-01-01

    Development of unmanned vehicles for local navigation in terrains unstructured by humans is reviewed. Modes of navigation include teleoperation or remote control, computer assisted remote driving (CARD), and semiautonomous navigation (SAN). A first implementation of a CARD system was successfully tested using the Robotic Technology Test Vehicle developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Stereo pictures were transmitted to a remotely located human operator, who performed the sensing, perception, and planning functions of navigation. A computer provided range and angle measurements and the path plan was transmitted to the vehicle which autonomously executed the path. This implementation is to be enhanced by providing passive stereo vision and a reflex control system for autonomously stopping the vehicle if blocked by an obstacle. SAN achievements include implementation of a navigation testbed on a six wheel, three-body articulated rover vehicle, development of SAN algorithms and code, integration of SAN software onto the vehicle, and a successful feasibility demonstration that represents a step forward towards the technology required for long-range exploration of the lunar or Martian surface. The vehicle includes a passive stereo vision system with real-time area-based stereo image correlation, a terrain matcher, a path planner, and a path execution planner.

  16. MAIUS-1- Vehicle, Subsystems Design and Mission Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamminger, A.; Ettl, J.; Grosse, J.; Horschgen-Eggers, M.; Jung, W.; Kallenbach, A.; Raith, G.; Saedtler, W.; Seidel, S. T.; Turner, J.; Wittkamp, M.

    2015-09-01

    In November 2015, the DLR Mobile Rocket Base will launch the MAIUS-1 rocket vehicle at Esrange, Northern Sweden. The MAIUS-A experiment is a pathfinder atom optics experiment. The scientific objective of the mission is the first creation of a BoseEinstein Condensate in space and performing atom interferometry on a sounding rocket [3]. MAIUS-1 comprises a two-stage unguided solid propellant VSB-30 rocket motor system. The vehicle consists of a Brazilian 53 1 motor as 1 st stage, a 530 motor as 2nd stage, a conical motor adapter, a despin module, a payload adapter, the MAIUS-A experiment consisting of five experiment modules, an attitude control system module, a newly developed conical service system, and a two-staged recovery system including a nosecone. In contrast to usual payloads on VSB-30 rockets, the payload has a diameter of 500 mm due to constraints of the scientific experiment. Because of this change in design, a blunted nosecone is necessary to guarantee the required static stability during the ascent phase of the flight. This paper will give an overview on the subsystems which have been built at DLR MORABA, especially the newly developed service system. Further, it will contain a description of the MAIUS-1 vehicle, the mission and the unique requirements on operations and attitude control, which is additionally required to achieve a required attitude with respect to the nadir vector. Additionally to a usual microgravity environment, the MAIUS-l payload requires attitude control to achieve a required attitude with respect to the nadir vector.

  17. Autonomous urban reconnaissance ingress system (AURIS): providing a tactically relevant autonomous door-opening kit for unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, David J.; Rufo, Michael A.; Berkemeier, Matthew D.; Alberts, Joel A.

    2012-06-01

    The Autonomous Urban Reconnaissance Ingress System (AURIS™) addresses a significant limitation of current military and first responder robotics technology: the inability of reconnaissance robots to open doors. Leveraging user testing as a baseline, the program has derived specifications necessary for military personnel to open doors with fielded UGVs (Unmanned Ground Vehicles), and evaluates the technology's impact on operational mission areas: duration, timing, and user patience in developing a tactically relevant, safe, and effective system. Funding is provided through the US ARMY Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) and the project represents a leap forward in perception, autonomy, robotic implements, and coordinated payload operation in UGVs. This paper describes high level details of specification generation, status of the last phase of development, an advanced view of the system autonomy capability, and a short look ahead towards the ongoing work on this compelling and important technology.

  18. Underwater maintenance guide: A guide to diving and remotely operated vehicle operations for nuclear maintenance personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Jenco, J. and Associates, Inc., Covington, LA )

    1990-12-01

    This Underwater Maintenance Guide has been developed to provide utility plant personnel with a single-source reference to underwater services. These services, which include both manned diving and remotely-operated vehicle operations, are required to perform certain underwater maintenance functions at nuclear power generating stations. This Guide provides an introduction to those underwater services and their general operations, as well as overviews of specific work tasks which have been identified thus far. This information is intended to familiarize utility maintenance personnel with the general scope and capabilities of underwater services, without encroaching upon the contractor's flexibility to develop responses to individual maintenance tasks.

  19. Intelligent Command and Control Systems for Satellite Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1999-01-01

    This grant, Intelligent Command and Control Systems for Satellite Ground Operations, funded by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, has spanned almost a decade. During this time, it has supported a broad range of research addressing the changing needs of NASA operations. It is important to note that many of NASA's evolving needs, for example, use of automation to drastically reduce (e.g., 70%) operations costs, are similar requirements in both government and private sectors. Initially the research addressed the appropriate use of emerging and inexpensive computational technologies, such as X Windows, graphics, and color, together with COTS (commercial-off-the-shelf) hardware and software such as standard Unix workstations to re-engineer satellite operations centers. The first phase of research supported by this grant explored the development of principled design methodologies to make effective use of emerging and inexpensive technologies. The ultimate performance measures for new designs were whether or not they increased system effectiveness while decreasing costs. GT-MOCA (The Georgia Tech Mission Operations Cooperative Associate) and GT-VITA (Georgia Tech Visual and Inspectable Tutor and Assistant), whose latter stages were supported by this research, explored model-based design of collaborative operations teams and the design of intelligent tutoring systems, respectively. Implemented in proof-of-concept form for satellite operations, empirical evaluations of both, using satellite operators for the former and personnel involved in satellite control operations for the latter, demonstrated unequivocally the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed modeling and design strategy underlying both research efforts. The proof-of-concept implementation of GT-MOCA showed that the methodology could specify software requirements that enabled a human-computer operations team to perform without any significant performance differences from the standard two-person satellite

  20. Path planning and energy management of solar-powered unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Adam

    Many of the applications pertinent to unmanned vehicles, such as environmental research and analysis, communications, and information-surveillance and reconnaissance, benefit from prolonged vehicle operation time. Conventional efforts to increase the operational time of electric-powered unmanned vehicles have traditionally focused on the design of energy-efficient components and the identification of energy efficient search patterns, while little attention has been paid to the vehicle's mission-level path plan and power management. This thesis explores the formulation and generation of integrated motion-plans and power-schedules for solar-panel equipped mobile robots operating under strict energy constraints, which cannot be effectively addressed through conventional motion planning algorithms. Transit problems are considered to design time-optimal paths using both Balkcom-Mason and Pseudo-Dubins curves. Additionally, a more complicated problem to generate mission plans for vehicles which must persistently travel between certain locations, similar to the traveling salesperson problem (TSP), is presented. A comparison between one of the common motion-planning algorithms and experimental results of the prescribed algorithms, made possible by use of a test environment and mobile robot designed and developed specifically for this research, are presented and discussed.

  1. Space station operations task force. Panel 2 report: Ground operations and support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Ground Operations Concept embodied in this report provides for safe multi-user utilization of the Space Station, eases user integration, and gives users autonomy and flexibility. It provides for meaningful multi-national participation while protecting U.S. interests. The concept also supports continued space operations technology development by maintaining NASA expertise and enabling technology evolution. Given attention here are pre/post flight operations, logistics, sustaining engineering/configuration management, transportation services/rescue, and information systems and communication.

  2. Building Operations Efficiencies into NASA's Crew Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Vision for Space Exploration guides NASA's challenging missions of technological innovation and scientific investigation. With the Agency's commitment to complete the International Space Station (ISS) and to retire the Space Shuttle by 2010, the NASA Administrator commissioned the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) in mid 2005 to analyze options for a safer, simpler, more cost efficient launch system that could deliver timely human-rated space transportation capabilities. NASA's finite resources yield discoveries with infinite possibilities. As the Agency begins the process of replacing the Shuttle with new launch vehicles destined for missions beyond low-Earth orbit to the Moon and Mars, NASA is designing the follow-on crew and cargo systems for maximum operational efficiencies. This mandate is imperative to reduce the $4.5 billion NASA spends on space transportation each year. This paper gives top-level details of how the follow-on Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) is being designed for reduced lifecycle costs as a primary catalyst for the expansion of future frontiers.

  3. Man-Vehicle Systems Research Facility - Design and operating characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiner, Robert J.; Sullivan, Barry T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the full-mission flight simulation facility at the NASA Ames Research Center. The Man-Vehicle Systems Research Facility (MVSRF) supports aeronautical human factors research and consists of two full-mission flight simulators and an air-traffic-control simulator. The facility is used for a broad range of human factors research in both conventional and advanced aviation systems. The objectives of the research are to improve the understanding of the causes and effects of human errors in aviation operations, and to limit their occurrence. The facility is used to: (1) develop fundamental analytical expressions of the functional performance characteristics of aircraft flight crews; (2) formulate principles and design criteria for aviation environments; (3) evaluate the integration of subsystems in contemporary flight and air traffic control scenarios; and (4) develop training and simulation technologies.

  4. Vehicle Operator/Dispatcher, AFSC 603X0.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    8217().w t o ) --0-r - r- - W M -C M ;,---a 4.0 V) 0).CI 1, 1-d- C,0)M 000 F-f, - r--*- rt Y C ~ D’c 0 C r r * .0 .0 LA 0) .Z . .* * . . . . . . . . LLJ k ...LLULU LIc O ’--<’ --2 - >. (.l’.LL (.) LL =< - = C K 3C> =CC( Q u C L) - c (.) -Z37 k There are also approximately 288 tasks covering a variety of...STATES AIR FORCE 0i ,n NATE , , 00 ’V..-- -+ 5 VEHICLE OPERATOR/DISPATCHER AFSC 60310 w"a iAFPT 90-603-549 o EAUGUST 1987 OCCUPATIONAL ANALYSIS PROGRAM

  5. Progress in Operational Analysis of Launch Vehicles in Nonstationary Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Kaouk, Mo; Cao, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents recent results in an ongoing effort to understand and develop techniques to process launch vehicle data, which is extremely challenging for modal parameter identification. The primary source of difficulty is due to the nonstationary nature of the situation. The system is changing, the environment is not steady, and there is an active control system operating. Hence, the primary tool for producing clean operational results (significant data lengths and data averaging) is not available to the user. This work reported herein uses a correlation-based two step operational modal analysis approach to process the relevant data sets for understanding and development of processes. A significant drawback for such processing of short time histories is a series of beating phenomena due to the inability to average out random modal excitations. A recursive correlation process coupled to a new convergence metric (designed to mitigate the beating phenomena) is the object of this study. It has been found in limited studies that this process creates clean modal frequency estimates but numerically alters the damping.

  6. Operationally Efficient Propulsion System Study (OEPSS) data book. Volume 1: Generic ground operations data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Raymond J.

    1990-01-01

    This study was initiated to identify operations problems and cost drivers for current propulsion systems and to identify technology and design approaches to increase the operational efficiency and reduce operations costs for future propulsion systems. To provide readily usable data for the Advance Launch System (ALS) program, the results of the Operationally Efficient Propulsion System Study (OEPSS) were organized into a series of OEPSS Data Books as follows: Volume 1, Generic Ground Operations Data; Volume 2, Ground Operations Problems; Volume 3, Operations Technology; Volume 4, OEPSS Design Concepts; and Volume 5, OEPSS Final Review Briefing, which summarizes the activities and results of the study. This volume presents ground processing data for a generic LOX/LH2 booster and core propulsion system based on current STS experience. The data presented includes: top logic diagram, process flow, activities bar-chart, loaded timelines, manpower requirements in terms of duration, headcount and skill mix per operations and maintenance instruction (OMI), and critical path tasks and durations.

  7. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Operational Test and Evaluation Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    from which command and control of the Air Vehicle (AV) may be affected. Air Vehicle Air Vehicle 10Kw 2Kw GCS2 GDT2 10Kw 2Kw GCS1 Launcher 2Kw...and either could assume control of the TUAV recovery at a moment’s notice. Air Vehicle GCS2 GDT2 10Kw 2Kw GCS1 GDT1 PGCS AG TALS TALS PGDT 2Kw 2Kw

  8. 48 CFR 970.2307-1 - Motor vehicle fleet operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor vehicle fleet..., Renewable Energy Technologies, Occupational Safety and Drug-Free Work Place 970.2307-1 Motor vehicle fleet... that the Federal motor vehicle fleet will serve as an example and provide a leadership role in...

  9. Engineering a Multimission Approach to Navigation Ground Data System Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerasimatos, Dimitrios V.; Attiyah, Ahlam A.

    2012-01-01

    The Mission Design and Navigation (MDNAV) Section at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) supports many deep space and earth orbiting missions from formulation to end of mission operations. The requirements of these missions are met with a multimission approach to MDNAV ground data system (GDS) infrastructure capable of being shared and allocated in a seamless and consistent manner across missions. The MDNAV computing infrastructure consists of compute clusters, network attached storage, mission support area facilities, and desktop hardware. The multimission architecture allows these assets, and even personnel, to be leveraged effectively across the project lifecycle and across multiple missions simultaneously. It provides a more robust and capable infrastructure to each mission than might be possible if each constructed its own. It also enables a consistent interface and environment within which teams can conduct all mission analysis and navigation functions including: trajectory design; ephemeris generation; orbit determination; maneuver design; and entry, descent, and landing analysis. The savings of these efficiencies more than offset the costs of increased complexity and other challenges that had to be addressed: configuration management, scheduling conflicts, and competition for resources. This paper examines the benefits of the multimission MDNAV ground data system infrastructure, focusing on the hardware and software architecture. The result is an efficient, robust, scalable MDNAV ground data system capable of supporting more than a dozen active missions at once.

  10. 14 CFR 437.51 - Rest rules for vehicle safety operations personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.51 Rest rules for vehicle safety operations personnel. A permittee must ensure that all vehicle safety... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rest rules for vehicle safety...

  11. 49 CFR 398.8 - Administration inspection of motor vehicles in operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Administration inspection of motor vehicles in... REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF MIGRANT WORKERS § 398.8 Administration inspection of motor vehicles in operation... this title, are authorized to enter upon and perform inspections of motor carrier's vehicles...

  12. 49 CFR 398.8 - Administration inspection of motor vehicles in operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Administration inspection of motor vehicles in... REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF MIGRANT WORKERS § 398.8 Administration inspection of motor vehicles in operation... this title, are authorized to enter upon and perform inspections of motor carrier's vehicles...

  13. 49 CFR 398.8 - Administration inspection of motor vehicles in operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Administration inspection of motor vehicles in... REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF MIGRANT WORKERS § 398.8 Administration inspection of motor vehicles in operation... this title, are authorized to enter upon and perform inspections of motor carrier's vehicles...

  14. 76 FR 13313 - Hazardous Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Hazardous Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations AGENCY: Pipeline and... or unload cargo tank motor vehicles (CTMVs). In addition, PHMSA is proposing to require each employee... reduce the risk associated with the loading and unloading of cargo tank motor vehicles that...

  15. Concept of Operations for a Prospective "Proving Ground" in the Lunar Vicinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Hill, James J.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is studying a "Proving Ground" near the Moon to conduct human space exploration missions in preparation for future flights to Mars. This paper describes a concept of operations ("conops") for activities in the Proving Ground, focusing on the construction and use of a mobile Cislunar Transit Habitat capable of months-long excursions within and beyond the Earth-Moon system. Key elements in the conops include the Orion spacecraft (with mission kits for docking and other specialized operations) and the Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket. Potential additions include commercial launch vehicles and logistics carriers, solar electric propulsion stages to move elements between different orbits and eventually take them on excursions to deep space, a node module with multiple docking ports, habitation and life support blocks, and international robotic and piloted lunar landers. The landers might include reusable ascent modules which could remain docked to in-space elements between lunar sorties. The architecture will include infrastructure for launch preparation, communication, mission control, and range safety. The conops describes "case studies" of notional missions chosen to guide the design of the architecture and its elements. One such mission is the delivery of a 10-ton pressurized element, co-manifested with an Orion on a Block 1B Space Launch System rocket, to the Proving Ground. With a large solar electric propulsion stage, the architecture could enable a year-long mission to land humans on a near-Earth asteroid. In the last case, after returning to near-lunar space, two of the asteroid explorers could join two crewmembers freshly arrived from Earth for a Moon landing, helping to safely quantify the risk of landing deconditioned crews on Mars. The conops also discusses aborts and contingency operations. Early return to Earth may be difficult, especially during later Proving Ground missions. While adding risk, limited-abort conditions provide needed practice

  16. Preliminary analysis of the JAPE ground vehicle test data with an artificial neural network classifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Nathan F.; Carnes, Ben L.

    1993-01-01

    Remotely sensing and classifying military vehicles in a battlefield environment have been the source of much research over the past 20 years. The ability to know where threat vehicles are located is an obvious advantage to military personnel. In the past active methods of ground vehicle detection such as radar have been used, but with the advancement of technology to locate these active sensors, passive sensors are preferred. Passive sensors detect acoustic emissions, seismic movement, electromagnetic radiation, etc., produced by the target and use this information to describe it. Deriving the mathematical models to classify vehicles in this manner has been, and is, quite complex and not always reliable. However, with the resurgence of artificial neural network (ANN) research in the past few years, developing models for this work may be a thing of the past. Preliminary results from an ANN analysis to the tank signatures recorded at the Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE) at the US Army White Sands Missile Range, NM, in July 1991, are presented.

  17. Pandora’s Box: Lethally-Armed Ground Robots in Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-27

    lethal, safer, and easier to control than its predecessor.4 Another example is Carnegie-Mellon University‟s “ Gladiator ” which also mounts a machine...www.qinetiq-na.com/products-maars.htm (accessed 6 October 2010). 5 Hanlon, "The Gladiator : US Marines’ Unmanned Ground Vehicle," http://www.gizmag.com/go...of Technology, 2007. Hanlon, Mike. "The Gladiator : US Marines’ Unmanned Ground Vehicle." Gizmag, 27 July 2005. http://www.gizmag.com/go/4484

  18. SPHERES: From Ground Development to Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2015-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES Facility on ISS is managed and operated by the SPHERES National Lab Facility at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. To help make science a reality on the ISS, the SPHERES ARC team supports a Guest Scientist Program (GSP). This program allows anyone with new science the possibility to interface with the SPHERES team and hardware. In addition to highlighting the available SPHERES hardware on ISS and on the ground, this presentation will also highlight ground support, facilities, and resources available to guest researchers. Investigations on the ISS evolve through four main phases: Strategic, Tactical, Operations, and Post Operations. The Strategic Phase encompasses early planning beginning with initial contact by the Principle Investigator (PI) and the SPHERES program who may work with the PI to assess what assistance the PI may need. Once the basic parameters are understood, the investigation moves to the Tactical Phase which involves more detailed planning, development, and testing. Depending on the nature of the investigation, the tactical phase may be split into the Lab Tactical Phase or the ISS Tactical Phase due to the difference in requirements for the two destinations. The Operations Phase is when the actual science is performed; this can be either in the lab, or on the ISS. The Post Operations Phase encompasses data analysis and distribution, and generation of summary status and reports. The SPHERES Operations and Engineering teams at ARC is composed of

  19. Standards and Specifications for Ground Processing of Space Vehicles: From an Aviation-Based Shuttle Project to Global Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, John; Cipolletti, John

    2011-01-01

    Proprietary or unique designs and operations are expected early in any industry's development, and often provide a competitive early market advantage. However, there comes a time when a product or industry requires standardization for the whole industry to advance...or survive. For the space industry, that time has come. Here, we will focus on standardization of ground processing for space vehicles and their ground systems. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, and emergence of a new global space race, affordability and sustainability are more important now than ever. The growing commercialization of the space industry and current global economic environment are driving greater need for efficiencies to save time and money. More RLV's (Reusable Launch Vehicles) are being developed for the gains of reusability not achievable with traditional ELV's (Expendable Launch Vehicles). More crew/passenger vehicles are also being developed. All of this calls for more attention needed for ground processing-repeatedly before launch and after landing/recovery. RLV's should provide more efficiencies than ELV's, as long as MRO (Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul) is well-planned-even for the unplanned problems. NASA's Space Shuttle is a primary example of an RLV which was supposed to thrive on reusability savings with efficient ground operations, but lessons learned show that costs were (and still are) much greater than expected. International standards and specifications can provide the commonality needed to simplify design and manufacturing as well as to improve safety, quality, maintenance, and operability. There are standards organizations engaged in the space industry, but ground processing is one of the areas least addressed. Challenges are encountered due to various factors often not considered during development. Multiple vehicle elements, sites, customers, and contractors pose various functional and integration difficulties. Resulting technical publication structures

  20. An investigation of drag reduction on box-shaped ground vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, V. U.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the reduction in drag which could be obtained by making various configuration changes to a box-shaped ground vehicle. Tests were conducted at yaw (relative wind) angles of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 degrees and Reynolds numbers of 300,000 to 850,000. The power required to overcome the aerodynamic drag was reduced by a maximum of 73% for a head wind for the best configuration relative to the smooth bottom box-shape, or 75% relative to the rough bottom box-shape. The reduction for a 20 MPH wind at 30 deg to the vehicle path was, respectively, 77% and 79%.

  1. Passive Night Vision Sensor Comparison for Unmanned Ground Vehicle Stereo Vision Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Ken; Matthies, Larry

    2000-01-01

    One goal of the "Demo III" unmanned ground vehicle program is to enable autonomous nighttime navigation at speeds of up to 10 m.p.h. To perform obstacle detection at night with stereo vision will require night vision cameras that produce adequate image quality for the driving speeds, vehicle dynamics, obstacle sizes, and scene conditions that will be encountered. This paper analyzes the suitability of four classes of night vision cameras (3-5 micrometer cooled FLIR, 8-12 micrometer cooled FLIR, 8-12 micrometer uncooled FLIR, and image intensifiers) for night stereo vision, using criteria based on stereo matching quality, image signal to noise ratio, motion blur and synchronization capability. We find that only cooled FLIRs will enable stereo vision performance that meets the goals of the Demo III program for nighttime autonomous mobility.

  2. Fishery research in the Great Lakes using a low-cost remotely operated vehicle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Gregory W.; Brown, Charles L.; Argyle, Ray L.

    1988-01-01

    We used a MiniROVER MK II remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to collect ground-truth information on fish and their habitat in the Great Lakes that have traditionally been collected by divers, or with static cameras, or submersibles. The ROV, powered by 4 thrusters and controlled by the pilot at the surface, was portable and efficient to operate throughout the Great Lakes in 1987, and collected a total of 30 h of video data recorded for later analysis. We collected 50% more substrate information per unit of effort with the ROV than with static cameras. Fish behavior ranged from no avoidance reaction in ambient light, to erratic responses in the vehicle lights. The ROV's field of view depended on the time of day, light levels, and density of zooplankton. Quantification of the data collected with the ROV (either physical samples or video image data) will serve to enhance the use of the ROV as a research tool to conduct fishery research on the Great Lakes.

  3. Applied Virtual Reality in Reusable Launch Vehicle Design, Operations Development, and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph P.

    1997-01-01

    Application of Virtual Reality (VR) technology offers much promise to enhance and accelerate the development of Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) infrastructure and operations while simultaneously reducing developmental and operational costs. One of the primary cost areas in the RLV concept that is receiving special attention is maintenance and refurbishment operations. To produce and operate a cost effective RLV, turnaround cost must be minimized. Designing for maintainability is a necessary requirement in developing RLVs. VR can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is beginning to utilize VR for design, operations development, and design analysis for RLVs. A VR applications program has been under development at NASA/MSFC since 1989. The objectives of the MSFC VR Applications Program are to develop, assess, validate, and utilize VR in hardware development, operations development and support, mission operations training and science training. The NASA/MSFC VR capability has also been utilized in several applications. These include: 1) the assessment of the design of the late Space Station Freedom Payload Control Area (PCA), the control room from which onboard payload operations are managed; 2) a viewing analysis of the Tethered Satellite System's (TSS) "end-of-reel" tether marking options; 3) development of a virtual mockup of the International Space Welding Experiment for science viewing analyses from the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System elbow camera and as a trainer for ground controllers; and 4) teleoperations using VR. This presentation will give a general overview of the MSFC VR Applications Program and describe the use of VR in design analyses, operations development, and training for RLVs.

  4. Assuring Ground-Based Detect and Avoid for UAS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen W.; Pai, Ganeshmadhav Jagadeesh; Berthold, Randall; Fladeland, Matthew; Storms, Bruce; Sumich, Mark

    2014-01-01

    One of the goals of the Marginal Ice Zones Observations and Processes Experiment (MIZOPEX) NASA Earth science mission was to show the operational capabilities of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) when deployed on challenging missions, in difficult environments. Given the extreme conditions of the Arctic environment where MIZOPEX measurements were required, the mission opted to use a radar to provide a ground-based detect-and-avoid (GBDAA) capability as an alternate means of compliance (AMOC) with the see-and-avoid federal aviation regulation. This paper describes how GBDAA safety assurance was provided by interpreting and applying the guidelines in the national policy for UAS operational approval. In particular, we describe how we formulated the appropriate safety goals, defined the processes and procedures for system safety, identified and assembled the relevant safety verification evidence, and created an operational safety case in compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements. To the best of our knowledge, the safety case, which was ultimately approved by the FAA, is the first successful example of non-military UAS operations using GBDAA in the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS), and, therefore, the first nonmilitary application of the safety case concept in this context.

  5. Optical embedded dust sensor for engine protection and early warning on M1 Abrams/ground combat vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai; Waldherr, Gregor A.; Burch, Timothy

    2012-06-01

    The Dual Optical Embedded Dust Sensor (DOEDS) is designed for the sensitive, accurate detection of particles for preventive health monitoring of the AGT1500 engine and M1 Abrams/Ground Combat Vehicles (GCVs). DOEDS is a real-time sensor that uses an innovative combination of optical particle sensing technologies and mechanical packaging in a rugged, compact and non-intrusive optical design. The optical sensor, implementing both a single particle sensor and a mass sensor, can operate in harsh environments (up to 400°F) to meet the particle size, size distribution, mass concentration, and response time criteria. The sensor may be flush- or inline-mounted in multiple engine locations and environments.

  6. Magnetic Sensor for Detection of Ground Vehicles Based on Microwave Spin Wave Generation in Ferrite Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    kPMHHkHf 042, ππ γ += , 2 where γ/2π = 2.8 MHz/Oe is the gyromagnetic ratio, M0 is the saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic material, and...measured by the frequency meter. Using typical values for high-quality magnetic films of yttrium-iron garnet ( YIG ) 4πM0 = 1750 Oe, H0 = 100 Oe... MAGNETIC SENSOR FOR DETECTION OF GROUND VEHICLES BASED ON MICROWAVE SPIN WAVE GENERATION IN FERRITE FILMS A. Slavin*, and V. Tiberkevich

  7. Flight tests of Viking parachute system in three Mach number regimes. 1: Vehicle description, test operations, and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstrom, R. R.; Raper, J. L.; Bendura, R. J.; Shields, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    Flight qualifications for parachutes were tested on full-scale simulated Viking spacecraft at entry conditions for the Viking 1975 mission to Mars. The vehicle was carried to an altitude of 36.6 km for the supersonic and transonic tests by a 980.000 cu m balloon. The vehicles were released and propelled to test conditions with rocket engines. A 117,940 cu m balloon carried the test vehicle to an altitude of 27.5 km and the conditions for the subsonic tests were achieved in free fall. Aeroshell separation occurred on all test vehicles from 8 to 14 seconds after parachute deployment. This report describes: (1) the test vehicle; (2) methods used to insure that the test conditions were achieved; and (3) the balloon system design and operations. The report also presents the performance data from onboard and ground based instruments and the results from a statistical trajectory program which gives a continuous history of test-vehicle motions.

  8. Remotely Operated Vehicle ROV/AUV Reliability Study. Phase 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Cable Connectors for Deep Ocean Applications . Port Hueneme, CA: Civil Engineering Lab., Naval Construction Battalion Center, Technical Report R806...competition. As a result, commercial- grade vehicles with broad applications are modified for specific requirements. These vehicles have reliability and other...Navy’s use of commercial grade broad application vehicles that have been modified for specific requirements. Long term reliability is not a design

  9. Nano-based chemical sensor array systems for uninhabited ground and airborne vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, Christina; Ruffin, Paul B.; Edwards, Eugene

    2009-03-01

    In a time when homemade explosive devices are being used against soldiers and in the homeland security environment, it is becoming increasingly evident that there is an urgent need for high-tech chemical sensor packages to be mounted aboard ground and air vehicles to aid soldiers in determining the location of explosive devices and the origin of bio-chemical warfare agents associated with terrorist activities from a safe distance. Current technologies utilize relatively large handheld detection systems that are housed on sizeable robotic vehicles. Research and development efforts are underway at the Army Aviation & Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) to develop novel and less expensive nano-based chemical sensors for detecting explosives and chemical agents used against the soldier. More specifically, an array of chemical sensors integrated with an electronics control module on a flexible substrate that can conform to and be surface-mounted to manned or unmanned vehicles to detect harmful species from bio-chemical warfare and other explosive devices is being developed. The sensor system under development is a voltammetry-based sensor system capable of aiding in the detection of any chemical agent and in the optimization of sensor microarray geometry to provide nonlinear Fourier algorithms to characterize target area background (e.g., footprint areas). The status of the research project is reviewed in this paper. Critical technical challenges associated with achieving system cost, size, and performance requirements are discussed. The results obtained from field tests using an unmanned remote controlled vehicle that houses a CO2/chemical sensor, which detects harmful chemical agents and wirelessly transmits warning signals back to the warfighter, are presented. Finally, the technical barriers associated with employing the sensor array system aboard small air vehicles will be discussed.

  10. Impact of mesh tracks and low-ground-pressure vehicle use on blanket peat hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKendrick-Smith, Kathryn; Holden, Joseph; Parry, Lauren

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are subject to multiple uses including drainage, farming and recreation. Low-ground-pressure vehicle access is desirable by land owners and tracks facilitate access. However, there is concern that such activity may impact peat hydrology and so granting permission for track installation has been problematic, particularly without evidence for decision-making. We present the first comprehensive study of mesh track and low-ground-pressure vehicle impacts on peatland hydrology. In the sub-arctic oceanic climate of the Moor House World Biosphere Reserve in the North Pennines, UK, a 1.5 km long experimental track was installed to investigate hydrological impacts. Surface vegetation was cut and the plastic mesh track pinned into the peat surface. The experimental track was split into 7 treatments, designed to reflect typical track usage (0 - 5 vehicle passes per week) and varying vehicle weight. The greatest hydrological impacts were expected for sections of track subject to more frequent vehicle use and in close proximity to the track. In total 554 dipwells (including 15 automated recording at 15-min intervals) were monitored for water-table depth, positioned to capture potential spatial variability in response. Before track installation, samples for vertical and lateral hydraulic conductivity (Ks) analysis (using the modified cube method) were taken at 0-10 cm depth from a frequently driven treatment (n = 15), an infrequently driven treatment (0.5 passes per week) (n = 15) and a control site with no track/driving (n = 15). The test was repeated after 16 months of track use. We present a spatially and temporally rich water-table dataset from the study site showing how the impacts of the track on water table are spatially highly variable. Water-table depths across the site were shallow, typically within the upper 10 cm of the peat profile for > 75% of the time. We show that mesh track and low-ground-pressure vehicle impacts on water-table depth were small except

  11. Development of Nereid-UI: A Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle for Oceanographic Access Under Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, L. L.; Bowen, A.; Yoerger, D. R.; German, C. R.; Kinsey, J. C.; Mayer, L. A.; Jakuba, M.; Gomez-Ibanez, D.; Taylor, C. L.; Machado, C.; Howland, J. C.; Kaiser, C. L.; Heintz, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and collaborators from the Johns Hopkins University and the University of New Hampshire are developing a remotely-controlled underwater robotic vehicle to provide the Polar Research Community with a capability to be tele-operated under ice under direct real-time human supervision. The Nereid Under-Ice (Nereid-UI) vehicle, Figure 1, will enable exploration and detailed examination of biological and physical environments at glacial ice-tongues and ice-shelf margins through the use of HD video in addition to acoustic, chemical, and biological sensors, Table 1. We anticipate propulsion system optimization that will enable us to attain distances up to 20 km from an ice-edge boundary, as dictated by the current maximum tether length. The goal of the Nereid-UI system is to provide scientific access to under-ice and ice-margin environments that is presently impractical or infeasible. The project design phase is underway, with incremental field testing planned in 2014. We welcome input from the Polar Science Community on how best to serve your scientific objectives. The Nereid-UI vehicle will employ technology developed during the Nereus HROV project including lightweight expendable tethers and tolerance of communications failures. Performance goals include: 1. Extreme horizontal and vertical mobility - access to under-ice crevasses and glacier grounding- lines, close inspection and mapping. 2. Real-time exploration under direct human control. 3. Response to features of interest by altering sensing modality and trajectory as desired 4. Access to the calving front 5. Access to the under-ice boundary layer 6. Future manipulation, sample retrieval, and instrument emplacement capability Supported by NSF OPP under ANT-1126311, James Family Foundation, George Frederick Jewett Foundation East, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Fig. 1: Nereid-UI Concept of Operations. Table 1: Nereid-UI Specifications;

  12. Stepped leaders observed in ground operations of ADELE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. M.; Kelley, N.; Lowell, A.; Martinez-McKinney, F.; Dwyer, J. R.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Cramer, E. S.; Levine, S.; Cummer, S. A.; Lu, G.; Shao, X.; Ho, C.; Eastvedt, E. M.; Trueblood, J.; Edens, H. E.; Hunyady, S. J.; Winn, W. P.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2010-12-01

    While the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) was designed primarily to study high-energy radiation associated with thunderstorms at aircraft altitude, it can also be used as a mobile ground-based instrument when mounted in a van. ADELE contains scintillation detectors optimized for faint and bright events and a flat-plate antenna measuring dE/dt. In July and August 2010, ADELE was brought to Langmuir Laboratory in New Mexico as a stationary detector and to the Florida peninsula (based at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne) for rapid-response (storm-chasing) operations. In ten days of chasing, stepped-leader x-ray emission was observed from at least four close CG flashes, a much higher rate of success than can be achieved from a stationary detector or array. We will present these four events as well as the results of a study of candidate events of lesser statistical significance. We will also discuss the optimization of lightning-chasing strategies, science goals for future ground campaigns, and what additional instrumentation would be most scientifically beneficial. In the latter category, a proximity sensor (comparing flash and thunder arrival times) and a field mill are particularly important.

  13. Concept of Operations for a Prospective "Proving Ground" in the Lunar Vicinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Hill, James J.; Goodliff, Kandyce

    2016-01-01

    NASA is studying conceptual architectures for a "Proving Ground" near the Moon or in high lunar orbit to conduct human space exploration missions that bridge the gap between today's operations with the International Space Station (ISS) and future human exploration of Mars beginning in the 2030s. This paper describes the framework of a concept of operations ("Conops") for candidate activities in the Proving Ground. The Conops discusses broad goals that the Proving Ground might address, such as participation from commercial entities, support for human landings on the Moon, use of mature technologies, and growth of capability through a steady cadence of increasingly ambitious piloted missions. Additional Proving Ground objectives are outlined in a companion paper. Key elements in the Conops include the Orion spacecraft (with mission kits for docking and other specialized operations) and the Space Launch System (SLS) heavy-lift rocket. Potential additions include a new space suit, commercial launch vehicles and logistics carriers, Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) stages to move elements between different orbits and eventually take them on excursions to deep space, a core module with multiple docking ports, a habitation block, and robotic and piloted lunar landers. The landers might include reusable ascent modules which could remain docked to in-space elements between lunar sorties. A module providing advanced regenerative life support functions could launch to the ISS, and later move to the Proving Ground. The architecture will include infrastructure for launch preparation, communication, mission control, and range safety. The Conops describes notional missions chosen to guide the design of the architecture and its elements. One such mission might be the delivery of a approximately 10-t Transit Habitat element, comanifested with Orion on a Block 1B SLS launcher, to the Proving Ground. In another mission, the architecture might participate in direct human exploration of

  14. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 5: Application Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL) was designed to be used by test oriented personnel to write procedures which would be executed in a test environment. A series of discussions between NASA LV-CAP personnel and IBM resulted in some peripheral tasks which would aid in evaluating the applicability of the language in this environment, and provide enhancement for future applications. The results of these tasks are contained within this volume. The GOAL vocabulary provides a high degree of readability and retainability. To achieve these benefits, however, the procedure writer utilizes words and phrases of considerable length. Brief form study was undertaken to determine a means of relieving this burden. The study resulted in a version of GOAL which enables the writer to develop a dialect suitable to his needs and satisfy the syntax equations. The output of the compiler would continue to provide readability by printing out the standard GOAL language. This task is described.

  15. FootFall: A Ground Based Operations Toolset Enabling Walking for the ATHLETE Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SunSpiral, Vytas; Chavez-Clemente, Daniel; Broxton, Michael; Keely, Leslie; Mihelich, Patrick; Mittman, David; Collins, Curtis

    2008-01-01

    The ATHLETE (All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer) vehicle consists of six identical, six degree of freedom limbs. FootFall is a ground tool for ATHLETE intended to provide an operator with integrated situational awareness, terrain reconstruction, stability and safety analysis, motion planning, and decision support capabilities to enable the efficient generation of flight software command sequences for walking. FootFall has been under development at NASA Ames for the last year, and having accomplished the initial integration, it is being used to generate command sequences for single footfalls. In this paper, the architecture of FootFall in its current state will be presented, results from the recent Human Robotic Systems Project?s Integrated Field Test (Moses Lake, Washington, June, 2008) will be discussed, and future plans for extending the capabilities of FootFall to enable ATHLETE to walk across a boulder field in real time will be described.

  16. A pose estimation method for unmanned ground vehicles in GPS denied environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamjidi, Amirhossein; Ye, Cang

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a pose estimation method based on the 1-Point RANSAC EKF (Extended Kalman Filter) framework. The method fuses the depth data from a LIDAR and the visual data from a monocular camera to estimate the pose of a Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) in a GPS denied environment. Its estimation framework continuy updates the vehicle's 6D pose state and temporary estimates of the extracted visual features' 3D positions. In contrast to the conventional EKF-SLAM (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) frameworks, the proposed method discards feature estimates from the extended state vector once they are no longer observed for several steps. As a result, the extended state vector always maintains a reasonable size that is suitable for online calculation. The fusion of laser and visual data is performed both in the feature initialization part of the EKF-SLAM process and in the motion prediction stage. A RANSAC pose calculation procedure is devised to produce pose estimate for the motion model. The proposed method has been successfully tested on the Ford campus's LIDAR-Vision dataset. The results are compared with the ground truth data of the dataset and the estimation error is ~1.9% of the path length.

  17. A new min-max methodology for computing optimised obstacle avoidance steering manoeuvres of ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanarachos, Stratis

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a new methodology for computing optimised obstacle avoidance steering manoeuvres for ground vehicles is presented and discussed. Most of the existing methods formulate the obstacle avoidance problem as an optimal control problem which is hard to solve or as a numerical optimisation problem with a large number of unknowns. This method is based on a reformulation of Pontryagin's Maximum Principle and leads to the solution of an adjustable time optimal controller. The control input is significantly simplified and permits its application in a sample and hold sense. Furthermore, with the proposed approach the maximum tyre forces exerted during the manoeuvre are minimised. In this study, it is shown how to 'warm start' the proposed algorithm and which constraints to 'relax'. Numerical examples and benchmark tests illustrate the performance of the proposed controller and compare it with other standard controllers. A sensitivity analysis for different vehicle parameters is performed and finally conclusions are drawn. A significant advantage of the method is the small computational complexity. The overall simplicity of the controller makes it attractive for application on autonomous vehicles.

  18. Estimation of longitudinal speed robust to road conditions for ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Ehsan; Kasaiezadeh, Alireza; Khosravani, Saeid; Khajepour, Amir; Moshchuk, Nikolai; Chen, Shih-Ken

    2016-08-01

    This article seeks to develop a longitudinal vehicle velocity estimator robust to road conditions by employing a tyre model at each corner. Combining the lumped LuGre tyre model and the vehicle kinematics, the tyres internal deflection state is used to gain an accurate estimation. Conventional kinematic-based velocity estimators use acceleration measurements, without correction with the tyre forces. However, this results in inaccurate velocity estimation because of sensor uncertainties which should be handled with another measurement such as tyre forces that depend on unknown road friction. The new Kalman-based observer in this paper addresses this issue by considering tyre nonlinearities with a minimum number of required tyre parameters and the road condition as uncertainty. Longitudinal forces obtained by the unscented Kalman filter on the wheel dynamics is employed as an observation for the Kalman-based velocity estimator at each corner. The stability of the proposed time-varying estimator is investigated and its performance is examined experimentally in several tests and on different road surface frictions. Road experiments and simulation results show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed approach in estimating longitudinal speed for ground vehicles.

  19. Milestones Towards Hot CMC Structures for Operational Space Rentry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hald, H.; Weihs, H.; Reimer, T.

    2002-01-01

    little nose cap had been developed and tested during the EXPRESS mission in 1995. These three flight tests were the first ones in Europe carried out with such a kind of material and hot structural concept and manifold lessons learned w.r.t. material behaviour and structural design performance under the severe environment conditions of ballistic capsule reentry could be achieved. Within an ESA program called FESTIP we developed a new design concept for a rigid surface TPS based on CMC's which should be adaptable to the outer side of a cryogenic tank structure of a future SSTO vehicle. Special TPS concept features are (flat) integral stiffened CMC panels, hot CMC fasteners for outside attachment capability, thermal displacement compensation, sealing and insulation, provision of a purge gap etc. Two test samples have been constructed and manufactured in close cooperation with industrial companies and finally they were tested very successfully under realistic thermal and mechanical loading conditions. A further key technology is high temperature fastening of shell like CMC components; here two new CMC based fastener concepts featuring a combination of screwing and riveting methods could be developed and qualified even under high temperature fatigue loads within ESA and national German programs. In addition high temperature testing technology has been matured over years and some extraordinary tests of components like the EMA bearing for the X-38 body flaps designed and manufactured by MAN-T could be tested very successfully. Finally these developments put DLR in the position to develop and provide the nose cap system for X-38 from NASA and some of the most demanding basic features will be highlighted briefly (details in a separate paper). Reflecting the described developments and considering near future programs like CRV and other ongoing experimental developments it is obvious that we now entered a state of transition from basic technology development towards operational use

  20. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  1. Study of high-definition and stereoscopic head-aimed vision for improved teleoperation of an unmanned ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyczka, Dale R.; Wright, Robert; Janiszewski, Brian; Chatten, Martha Jane; Bowen, Thomas A.; Skibba, Brian

    2012-06-01

    Nearly all explosive ordnance disposal robots in use today employ monoscopic standard-definition video cameras to relay live imagery from the robot to the operator. With this approach, operators must rely on shadows and other monoscopic depth cues in order to judge distances and object depths. Alternatively, they can contact an object with the robot's manipulator to determine its position, but that approach carries with it the risk of detonation from unintentionally disturbing the target or nearby objects. We recently completed a study in which high-definition (HD) and stereoscopic video cameras were used in addition to conventional standard-definition (SD) cameras in order to determine if higher resolutions and/or stereoscopic depth cues improve operators' overall performance of various unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) tasks. We also studied the effect that the different vision modes had on operator comfort. A total of six different head-aimed vision modes were used including normal-separation HD stereo, SD stereo, "micro" (reduced separation) SD stereo, HD mono, and SD mono (two types). In general, the study results support the expectation that higher resolution and stereoscopic vision aid UGV teleoperation, but the degree of improvement was found to depend on the specific task being performed; certain tasks derived notably more benefit from improved depth perception than others. This effort was sponsored by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise under Robotics Technology Consortium Agreement #69-200902 T01. Technical management was provided by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Robotics Research and Development Group at Tyndall AFB, Florida.

  2. Transformational Spaceport and Range Concept of Operations: A Vision to Transform Ground and Launch Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Transformational Concept of Operations (CONOPS) provides a long-term, sustainable vision for future U.S. space transportation infrastructure and operations. This vision presents an interagency concept, developed cooperatively by the Department of Defense (DoD), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for the upgrade, integration, and improved operation of major infrastructure elements of the nation s space access systems. The interagency vision described in the Transformational CONOPS would transform today s space launch infrastructure into a shared system that supports worldwide operations for a variety of users. The system concept is sufficiently flexible and adaptable to support new types of missions for exploration, commercial enterprise, and national security, as well as to endure further into the future when space transportation technology may be sufficiently advanced to enable routine public space travel as part of the global transportation system. The vision for future space transportation operations is based on a system-of-systems architecture that integrates the major elements of the future space transportation system - transportation nodes (spaceports), flight vehicles and payloads, tracking and communications assets, and flight traffic coordination centers - into a transportation network that concurrently accommodates multiple types of mission operators, payloads, and vehicle fleets. This system concept also establishes a common framework for defining a detailed CONOPS for the major elements of the future space transportation system. The resulting set of four CONOPS (see Figure 1 below) describes the common vision for a shared future space transportation system (FSTS) infrastructure from a variety of perspectives.

  3. Emissions from a vehicle fitted to operate on either petrol or compressed natural gas.

    PubMed

    Ristovski, Z; Morawska, L; Ayoko, G A; Johnson, G; Gilbert, D; Greenaway, C

    2004-05-05

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the physical and chemical properties of emission products from a six-cylinder sedan car under a variety of operating conditions, before and after it has been converted to compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel. The specific focus of the measurements was on emission levels and characteristics of ultra fine particles and the emission levels together with the emissions of gaseous pollutants for a range of operating conditions before and up to 3 months after the vehicle was converted are presented and discussed in the paper. The investigations showed that converting a petrol operating vehicle to CNG has the potential of reducing some of the emissions and thus risks, while it does not appear to have an impact on others. In particular there was no statistically significant change in the emission of particles for the vehicle operating on petrol, before the conversion, compared to the emissions for the vehicle operating on CNG, after the conversion. There was a significant lowering of emissions of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and formaldehyde when the vehicle was operated on CNG, and a reduction of global warming potential was also observed when the vehicle was run on CNG, but the later gain is only at high vehicle speeds/loads, and would thus have to be considered in view of traffic and transport models for the region (in these models vehicle speed is an important parameter).

  4. Unmanned Ground Vehicle for Autonomous Non-Destructive Testing of FRP Bridge Decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhachorn, P.; Mercer, A. Scott; Halabe, Udaya B.; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    2007-03-01

    Current non-destructive techniques for defect analysis of FRP bridge decks have a narrow scope. These techniques are very good at detecting certain types of defects but are not robust enough to detect all defects by themselves. For example, infrared thermography (IRT) can detect air filled defects and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is good at detecting water filled ones. These technologies can be combined to create a more robust defect detection scheme. To accomplish this, an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) has been designed that incorporates both IR and GPR analysis to create a comprehensive defect map of a bridge deck. The UGV autonomously surveys the deck surface and acquires data. The UGV has two 1.5 GHz ground coupled GPR antennas that are mounted on the front of the UGV to collect GPR data. It also incorporates an active heating source and a radiometric IR camera to capture IR images of the deck, even in less than ideal weather scenarios such as cold cloudy days. The UGV is designed so that it can collect data in an assembly line fashion. It moves in 1 foot increments. When moving, it collects GPR data from the two antennas. When it stops it heats a section of the deck. The next time it stops to heat a section, the IR camera is analyzing the preheated deck section while preparing for the next section. Because the data is being continually collected using this method, the UGV can survey the entire deck in an efficient and timely manner.

  5. Space Mission Operations Ground Systems Integration Customer Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    , and cultural differences, to ensure an efficient response to customer issues using a small Customer Service Team (CST) and adaptability, constant communication with customers, technical expertise and knowledge of services, and dedication to customer service. The HOSC Customer Support Team has implemented a variety of processes, and procedures that help to mitigate the potential problems that arise when integrating ground system services for a variety of complex missions and the lessons learned from this experience will lead the future of customer service in the space operations industry.

  6. Vertically operating flight vehicle for drilling and agricultural use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pabst, W.

    1986-01-01

    The invention deals with an aircraft which ascends and descends vertically and which is used for recreational aircraft, as well as for drilling and in agriculture. The invention combines the floating effect of a parachute with the helicopter to develop a flight vehicle with multiple uses which go beyond those of contemporary flight vehicles. Both hub mechanisms and thrust power are implemented to achieve this goal. Four designs are described in detail.

  7. Method and appartus for converting static in-ground vehicle scales into weigh-in-motion systems

    DOEpatents

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Jordan, John K.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for converting in-ground static weighing scales for vehicles to weigh-in-motion systems. The apparatus upon conversion includes the existing in-ground static scale, peripheral switches and an electronic module for automatic computation of the weight. By monitoring the velocity, tire position, axle spacing, and real time output from existing static scales as a vehicle drives over the scales, the system determines when an axle of a vehicle is on the scale at a given time, monitors the combined weight output from any given axle combination on the scale(s) at any given time, and from these measurements automatically computes the weight of each individual axle and gross vehicle weight by an integration, integration approximation, and/or signal averaging technique.

  8. Optimization Review: Ogallala Ground Water Contamination Superfund Site, Operable Unit 2 (Tip Top Cleaners), Ogallala, Nebraska

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Ogallala Ground Water Contamination Superfund site was identified in 1989 through municipal well sampling. Tetrachloroethene (PCE), a solvent commonly used in dry cleaner operations, was the primary ground water target chemical of concern (COC) that..

  9. Electric and hybrid vehicle program site operator program. Quarterly progress report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Site Operator Program was initially established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to incorporate the electric vehicle activities dictated by the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976. In the ensuing years, the Program has evolved in response to new legislation and interests. The Program currently includes twelve sites located in diverse geographic, metrologic, and metropolitan areas across the United States. Information is shared reciprocally with a thirteenth site, not under Program contract. The vehicles are operator-owned. The Mission Statement of the Site Operator Program includes three major activities: (1) Advancement of electric vehicle technologies; (2) Development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and (3) Increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs) by the public. The current participants in the Site Operator Program are shown. Table 1 indicates the EVs in each of the Site Operator fleets. Table 2 provides baseline information on several EVs currently in use by the Site Operators, or which have evolved to the point that they may be introduced in the near future. The Program is currently managed by personnel of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The current principal management functions include: Coordination of Site Operator efforts in the areas of public awareness and infrastructure development (program-related meetings, and educational presentations).

  10. Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Walker, Mark; Wilkins, Kim; Johnson, Robert; Sass, Jared; Youney, Justin

    2014-01-01

    An intelligent autonomous control capability has been developed and is currently being validated in ground cryogenic fluid management operations. The capability embodies a physical architecture consistent with typical launch infrastructure and control systems, augmented by a higher level autonomous control (AC) system enabled to make knowledge-based decisions. The AC system is supported by an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability that detects anomalies, diagnoses causes, determines effects, and could predict future anomalies. AC is implemented using the concept of programmed sequences that could be considered to be building blocks of more generic mission plans. A sequence is a series of steps, and each executes actions once conditions for the step are met (e.g. desired temperatures or fluid state are achieved). For autonomous capability, conditions must consider also health management outcomes, as they will determine whether or not an action is executed, or how an action may be executed, or if an alternative action is executed instead. Aside from health, higher level objectives can also drive how a mission is carried out. The capability was developed using the G2 software environment (www.gensym.com) augmented by a NASA Toolkit that significantly shortens time to deployment. G2 is a commercial product to develop intelligent applications. It is fully object oriented. The core of the capability is a Domain Model of the system where all elements of the system are represented as objects (sensors, instruments, components, pipes, etc.). Reasoning and decision making can be done with all elements in the domain model. The toolkit also enables implementation of failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), which are represented as root cause trees. FMEA's are programmed graphically, they are reusable, as they address generic FMEA referring to classes of subsystems or objects and their functional relationships. User interfaces for integrated awareness by

  11. Tethered Operation of Autonomous Aerial Vehicles to Provide Extended Field of View for Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    the MAV, which requires moving at a speed of 10 - 20 m /s to maintain flight. The limited payload of a MAV, as addressed in the articles, restricts...map coordinates using a conversion factor for the location as follows: 25 Latitude conversion factor = 111119.99966 m /degree Longitude...conversion factor = 91023.79479 m /degree The conversion factors are applied to the x-coordinate and y-coordinate only. The z-coordinate is unaffected due to

  12. Results of the second (1996) experiment to lead cranes on migration behind a motorized ground vehicle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Clauss, B.; Watanabe, T.; Mykut, R.C.; Shawkey, M.; Mummert, D.P.; Sprague, D.T.; Ellis, Catherine H.; Trahan, F.B.

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) were trained to follow a specially-equipped truck and 12 were led along a ca 620-km route from Camp Navajo in northern Arizona to the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge near the Arizona/Mexico border. Ten survived the trek, 380 km of which were flown, although only a few cranes flew every stage of the route. Major problems during the migration were powerline collisions (ca 15, 2 fatal) and overheating (when air temperatures exceeded ca 25 C). The tenacity of the cranes in following both in 1995 and 1996 under unfavorable conditions (e.g., poor light, extreme dust, or heat) demonstrated that cranes could be led over long distances by motorized vehicles on the ground.

  13. Computational architecture for image processing on a small unmanned ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Sean; Nguyen, Hung

    2010-08-01

    Man-portable Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) have been fielded on the battlefield with limited computing power. This limitation constrains their use primarily to teleoperation control mode for clearing areas and bomb defusing. In order to extend their capability to include the reconnaissance and surveillance missions of dismounted soldiers, a separate processing payload is desired. This paper presents a processing architecture and the design details on the payload module that enables the PackBot to perform sophisticated, real-time image processing algorithms using data collected from its onboard imaging sensors including LADAR, IMU, visible, IR, stereo, and the Ladybug spherical cameras. The entire payload is constructed from currently available Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components including an Intel multi-core CPU and a Nvidia GPU. The result of this work enables a small UGV to perform computationally expensive image processing tasks that once were only feasible on a large workstation.

  14. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program: Site Operation Program. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.; Bassett, R.R.; Briasco, S.

    1995-12-01

    The Site Operator Program has evolved substantially since its inception in response to the Electric Vehicle Research and Demonstration Act of 1976. In its original form, a commercialization effort was intended but this was not feasible for lack of vehicle suppliers and infrastructure. Nonetheless, with DOE sponsorship and technical participation, a few results (primarily operating experience and data) were forthcoming. The current Program comprises eleven sites and over 200 vehicles, of which about 50 are latest generation vehicles. DOE partially funds the Program participant expenditures and the INEL receives operating and maintenance data for the DOE-owned, and participant-owned or monitored vehicles, as well as Program reports. As noted elsewhere in this report, participants represent several widely differing categories: electric utilities, academic institutions, and federal agencies. While both the utilities and the academic institutions tend to establish beneficial relationships with the industrial community.

  15. Situational awareness for unmanned ground vehicles in semi-structured environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsell, Thomas G.; Snorrason, Magnus; Stevens, Mark R.

    2002-07-01

    Situational Awareness (SA) is a critical component of effective autonomous vehicles, reducing operator workload and allowing an operator to command multiple vehicles or simultaneously perform other tasks. Our Scene Estimation & Situational Awareness Mapping Engine (SESAME) provides SA for mobile robots in semi-structured scenes, such as parking lots and city streets. SESAME autonomously builds volumetric models for scene analysis. For example, a SES-AME equipped robot can build a low-resolution 3-D model of a row of cars, then approach a specific car and build a high-resolution model from a few stereo snapshots. The model can be used onboard to determine the type of car and locate its license plate, or the model can be segmented out and sent back to an operator who can view it from different viewpoints. As new views of the scene are obtained, the model is updated and changes are tracked (such as cars arriving or departing). Since the robot's position must be accurately known, SESAME also has automated techniques for deter-mining the position and orientation of the camera (and hence, robot) with respect to existing maps. This paper presents an overview of the SESAME architecture and algorithms, including our model generation algorithm.

  16. Phobetor: Princeton University's entry in the 2010 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Joshua; Zhu, Han; Partridge, Brenton A.; Szocs, Laszlo J.; Abiola, Solomon O.; Corey, Ryan M.; Suresh, Srinivasan A.; Yu, Derrick D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present Phobetor, an autonomous outdoor vehicle originally designed for the 2010 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). We describe new vision and navigation systems that have yielded 3x increase in obstacle detection speed using parallel processing and robust lane detection results. Phobetor also uses probabilistic local mapping to learn about its environment and Anytime Dynamic A* (AD*) to plan paths to reach its goals. Our vision software is based on color stereo images and uses robust, RANSAC-based algorithms while running fast enough to support real-time autonomous navigation on uneven terrain. AD* allows Phobetor to respond quickly in all situations even when optimal planning takes more time, and uses incremental replanning to increase search efficiency. We augment the cost map of the environment with a potential field which addresses the problem of "wall-hugging" and smoothes generated paths to allow safe and reliable path-following. In summary, we present innovations on Phobetor that are relevant to real-world robotics platforms in uncertain environments.

  17. Preliminary comparison of high-range resolution signatures of moving and stationary ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, David C.; Oppenheimer, Michael W.; Kahler, Bart; Keaffaber, Brett L.; Williams, Robert L.

    2002-08-01

    High-Range Resolution (HRR) radar modes have become increasingly important in the past few years due to the ability to form focused range profiles of moving targets with enhanced target-to-clutter ratios via Doppler filtering and/or clutter cancellation. To date, much research has been performed on using HRR radar profiles of both moving and stationary ground targets for Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) and Feature-Aided Tracking (FAT) applications. However, little work evaluating the correlation between moving versus stationary HRR profiles has been reported. This paper presents analytical comparisons between HRR profiles generated from a moving vehicle and profiles formed from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of the identical stationary vehicle. The moving target HRR profiles are formed by integrating range-Doppler target images detected from clutter suppressed phase history data. The stationary target HRR profiles are formed from SAR imagery target chips by segmenting the target from clutter and reversing the image formation process. The purpose of this research is to identify which features, such as profile peaks, peak intensity, electrical length, among others, are common to profiles of the same target type and class and at the same imaging geometry.

  18. The design and results of an algorithm for intelligent ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Matthew; Milam, Justin; Tote, Caleb; Riggins, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the design, design method, test platform, and test results of an algorithm used in autonomous navigation for intelligent vehicles. The Bluefield State College (BSC) team created this algorithm for its 2009 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) robot called Anassa V. The BSC robotics team is comprised of undergraduate computer science, engineering technology, marketing students, and one robotics faculty advisor. The team has participated in IGVC since the year 2000. A major part of the design process that the BSC team uses each year for IGVC is a fully documented "Post-IGVC Analysis." Over the nine years since 2000, the lessons the students learned from these analyses have resulted in an ever-improving, highly successful autonomous algorithm. The algorithm employed in Anassa V is a culmination of past successes and new ideas, resulting in Anassa V earning several excellent IGVC 2009 performance awards, including third place overall. The paper will discuss all aspects of the design of this autonomous robotic system, beginning with the design process and ending with test results for both simulation and real environments.

  19. Operational Considerations and Comparisons of the Saturn, Space Shuttle and Ares Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruzen, Craig; Chavers, Greg; Wittenstein, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) space exploration policy has directed the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to retire the Space Shuttle and to replace it with a new generation of space transportation systems for crew and cargo travel to the International Space Station, the Moon, Mars, and beyond. As part of the Constellation Program, engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama are working to design and build the Ares I, the first of two large launch vehicles to return humans to the Moon. A deliberate effort is being made to ensure a high level of operability in order to significantly increase safety and availability as well as reduce recurring costs of this new launch vehicle. It is the Ares Project's goal to instill operability as part of the requirements development, design and operations of the vehicle. This paper will identify important factors in launch vehicle design that affect the operability and availability of the system. Similarities and differences in operational constraints will also be compared between the Saturn V, Space Shuttle and current Ares I design. Finally, potential improvements in operations and operability for large launch vehicles will be addressed. From the examples presented, the paper will discuss potential improvements for operability for future launch vehicles.

  20. Eastern States institutional issues study for commercial vehicle operations (CVO). Final research report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of the study is to: Identify institutional issues in eight Eastern States which adversely impact the productivity of commercial vehicle operations and efficient government administration. Identify technologies addressing these institutional issues. Develop recommendations for reducing barriers to implementation of IVHS-CVO programs, to enhance the productivity, to streamline commercial vehicle administration processes, and for assuring safety.

  1. Carbonaceous Aerosols Emitted from Light-Duty Vehicles Operating on Gasoline and Ethanol Fuel Blends

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the chemical properties of carbonaceous aerosols emitted from three light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDVs) operating on gasoline (e0) and ethanol-gasoline fuel blends (e10 and e85). Vehicle road load simulations were performed on a chassis dynamometer using the t...

  2. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  3. Wind Tunnel Investigation of Ground Wind Loads for Ares Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Donald F.; Ivanco, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    A three year program was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Aeroelasticity Branch (AB) and Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) with the primary objective to acquire scaled steady and dynamic ground-wind loads (GWL) wind-tunnel data for rollout, on-pad stay, and on-pad launch configurations for the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle (FTV). The experimental effort was conducted to obtain an understanding of the coupling of aerodynamic and structural characteristics that can result in large sustained wind-induced oscillations (WIO) on such a tall and slender launch vehicle and to generate a unique database for development and evaluation of analytical methods for predicting steady and dynamic GWL, especially those caused by vortex shedding, and resulting in significant WIO. This paper summarizes the wind-tunnel test program that employed two dynamically-aeroelastically scaled GWL models based on the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle. The first model tested, the GWL Checkout Model (CM), was a relatively simple model with a secondary objective of restoration and development of processes and methods for design, fabrication, testing, and data analysis of a representative ground wind loads model. In addition, parametric variations in surface roughness, Reynolds number, and protuberances (on/off) were investigated to determine effects on GWL characteristics. The second windtunnel model, the Ares I-X GWL Model, was significantly more complex and representative of the Ares I-X FTV and included the addition of simplified rigid geometrically-scaled models of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Mobile Launch Platform (MLP) and Launch Complex 39B primary structures. Steady and dynamic base bending moment as well as model response and steady and unsteady pressure data was acquired during the testing of both models. During wind-tunnel testing of each model, flow conditions (speed and azimuth) where significant WIO occurred, were identified and thoroughly investigated. Scaled data from

  4. Rockot Launch Vehicle Commercial Operations for Grace and Iridium Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viertel, Y.; Kinnersley, M.; Schumacher, I.

    2002-01-01

    The GRACE mission and the IRIDIUM mission on ROCKOT launch vehicle are presented. Two identical GRACE satellites to measure in tandem the gravitational field of the earth with previously unattainable accuracy - it's called the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment, or and is a joint project of the U.S. space agency, NASA and the German Centre for Aeronautics and Space Flight, DLR. In order to send the GRACE twins into a 500x500 km , 89deg. orbit, the Rockot launch vehicle was selected. A dual launch of two Iridium satellites was scheduled for June 2002 using the ROCKOT launch vehicle from Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Northern Russia. This launch will inject two replacement satellites into a low earth orbit (LEO) to support the maintenance of the Iridium constellation. In September 2001, Eurockot successfully carried out a "Pathfinder Campaign" to simulate the entire Iridium mission cycle at Plesetsk. The campaign comprised the transport of simulators and related equipment to the Russian port-of-entry and launch site and also included the integration and encapsulation of the simulators with the actual Rockot launch vehicle at Eurockot's dedicated launch facilities at Plesetsk Cosmodrome. The pathfinder campaign lasted four weeks and was carried out by a joint team that also included Khrunichev, Russian Space Forces and Eurockot personnel on the contractors' side. The pathfinder mission confirmed the capability of Eurockot Launch Services to perform the Iridium launch on cost and on schedule at Plesetsk following Eurockot's major investment in international standard preparation, integration and launch facilities including customer facilities and a new hotel. In 2003, Eurockot will also launch the Japanese SERVI'S-1 satellite for USEF. The ROCKOT launch vehicle is a 3 stage liquid fuel rocket whose first 2 stages have been adapted from the Russian SS-19. A third stage, called "Breeze", can be repeatedly ignited and is extraordinarily capable of manoeuvre. Rockot can place

  5. Multilevel Vehicle Design: Fuel Economy, Mobility and Safety Considerations, Part B. Ground Vehicle Weight and Occupant Safety Under Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-11

    TNT - equivalent ) UNCLASSIFIED 8 Uncertainty in Charge Size & Location Underbody Blast Simulation Uncertainty in Vehicle Peak Acceleration Drop Tower...for Protection of Vehicle Occupants against Anti-Vehicular Landmine Effects.” North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, Neuilly-sur-Seine Cedex, France

  6. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 2: part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls Study addresses both ground operational data and technical requirements that span the Tug planning phase and operations phase. A similar study covering mission operations (by others) provides the complimentary flight operations details. The two studies provide the planning data requirements, resource allocation, and control milestones for supporting the requirements of the STS program. This Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls Study incorporates the basic ground operations requirements and concepts provided by previous studies with the interrelationships of the planning, IUS transition, and Tug fleet operations phases. The interrelationships of these phases were studied as a system to optimize overall program benefits and minimize operational risk factors.

  7. Benefits of Using Remotely Operated Vehicles to Inspect USACE Navigation Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    navigation structures. ROVs are a class of maneuverable underwater robotic vehicles that are tethered via an umbilical cord to a surface operator...station. The umbilical carries power and operation signals to the ROV and returns video, still images, and vehicle status and sensor data to the...inspections. The primary users driving ROV technology have been the offshore oil industry, the hydroelectric and nuclear power industries, various navies

  8. An Analysis of Skill Requirements for Operators of Amphibious Air Cushion Vehicles (ACVs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, A. James; And Others

    This report describes the skills required in the operation of an amphibious air cushion vehicle (ACV) in Army tactical and logistic missions. The research involved analyzing ACV characteristics, operating requirements, environmental effects, and results of a simulation experiment. The analysis indicates that ACV operation is complicated by an…

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Image of Hyper-X Research Vehicle at Mach 7 with Engine Operating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) image shows the Hyper-X vehicle at a Mach 7 test condition with the engine operating. The solution includes both internal (scramjet engine) and external flow fields, including the interaction between the engine exhaust and vehicle aerodynamics. The image illustrates surface heat transfer on the vehicle surface (red is highest heating) and flowfield contours at local Mach number. The last contour illustrates the engine exhaust plume shape. This solution approach is one method of predicting the vehicle performance, and the best method for determination of vehicle structural, pressure and thermal design loads. The Hyper-X program is an ambitious series of experimental flights to expand the boundaries of high-speed aeronautics and develop new technologies for space access. When the first of three aircraft flies, it will be the first time a non-rocket engine has powered a vehicle in flight at hypersonic speeds--speeds above Mach 5, equivalent to about one mile per second or approximately 3,600 miles per hour at sea level. Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly

  10. Unmanned Surface Vehicle Human-Computer Interface for Amphibious Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    FIGURES Figure 1. MOCU Baseline HCI using Both Aerial Photo and Digital Nautical Chart ( DNC ) Maps to Control and Monitor Land, Sea, and Air...Action DNC Digital Nautical Chart FNC Future Naval Capability HCI Human-Computer Interface HRI Human-Robot Interface HSI Human-Systems Integration...Digital Nautical Chart ( DNC ) Maps to Control and Monitor Land, Sea, and Air Vehicles. 3.2 BASELINE MOCU HCI The Baseline MOCU interface is a tiled

  11. Bantam System Technology Project Ground System Operations Concept and Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Jesse M.; Beveridge, James R.

    1997-01-01

    The Low Cost Booster Technology Program, also known as the Bantam Booster program, is a NASA sponsored initiative to establish a viable commercial technology to support the market for placing small payloads in low earth orbit. This market is currently served by large boosters which orbit a number of small payloads on a single launch vehicle, or by these payloads taking up available space on major commercial launches. Even by sharing launch costs, the minimum cost to launch one of these small satellites is in the 6 to 8 million dollar range. Additionally, there is a shortage of available launch opportunities which can be shared in this manner. The goal of the Bantam program is to develop two competing launch vehicles, with launch costs in the neighborhood of 1.5 million dollars to launch a 150 kg payload into low earth orbit (200 nautical mile sun synchronous). Not only could the cost of the launch be significantly less than the current situation, but the payload sponsor could expect better service for his expenditure, the ability to specify his own orbit, and a dedicated vehicle. By developing two distinct launch vehicles, market forces are expected to aid in keeping customer costs low.

  12. Aircraft and ground vehicle friction correlation test results obtained under winter runway conditions during joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Vogler, William A.; Baldasare, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Aircraft and ground vehicle friction data collected during the Joint FAA/NASA Runway Friction Program under winter runway conditions are discussed and test results are summarized. The relationship between the different ground vehicle friction measurements obtained on compacted snow- and ice-covered conditions is defined together with the correlation to aircraft tire friction performance under similar runway conditions.

  13. Effect of vertical ground motion on earthquake-induced derailment of railway vehicles over simply-supported bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhibin; Pei, Shiling; Li, Xiaozhen; Liu, Hongyan; Qiang, Shizhong

    2016-11-01

    The running safety of railway vehicles on bridges can be negatively affected by earthquake events. This phenomenon has traditionally been investigated with only the lateral ground excitation component considered. This paper presented results from a numerical investigation on the contribution of vertical ground motion component to the derailment of vehicles on simply-supported bridges. A full nonlinear wheel-rail contact model was used in the investigation together with the Hertzian contact theory and nonlinear creepage theory, which allows the wheel to jump vertically and separate from the rail. The wheel-rail relative displacement was used as the criterion for derailment events. A total of 18 ground motion records were used in the analysis to account for the uncertainty of ground motions. The results showed that inclusion of vertical ground motion will likely increase the chance of derailment. It is recommended to include vertical ground motion component in earthquake induced derailment analysis to ensure conservative estimations. The derailment event on bridges was found to be more closely related to the deck acceleration rather than the ground acceleration.

  14. Proceedings of the 7th Annual TARDEC Ground Vehicle Survivability Symposium, March 26-28, 1996, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA Volume 1 - Unclassified Session Papers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    Vehicles - Lower Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) and Payload Capability - High weights of armor and armament - Poorer Mobility - Track provides better ground...Light Weight and Affordable Armor and Armament Better Automotive Technology High Mobility Greater RAM-D New Missions OOTW Police Actions & Peace...52) * High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle 12 Lb Mine Blast ...... M998 w/oArmnor XMI114

  15. A Multidisciplinary Optimization Framework for Occupant Centric Ground Vehicle System Design. Part 1: Vehicle Design Parameter Screening Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    shell components. The effects of suspension components on blast loading to a vehicle structure are assumed to be minimal. Therefore, the vehicle...seating mount position rigidly. There is no foot rest included in the model. In the underbody blast modeling and simulation, the cylindrical charge is...assembly and reinforcement structure. The crew cabin is a hull of a box shape with four side walls, a roof attached to the top of the box, and a crew

  16. Analysis of the Effects of Vitiates on Surface Heat Flux in Ground Tests of Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuda, Vincent; Gaffney, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    To achieve the high enthalpy conditions associated with hypersonic flight, many ground test facilities burn fuel in the air upstream of the test chamber. Unfortunately, the products of combustion contaminate the test gas and alter gas properties and the heat fluxes associated with aerodynamic heating. The difference in the heating rates between clean air and a vitiated test medium needs to be understood so that the thermal management system for hypersonic vehicles can be properly designed. This is particularly important for advanced hypersonic vehicle concepts powered by air-breathing propulsion systems that couple cooling requirements, fuel flow rates, and combustor performance by flowing fuel through sub-surface cooling passages to cool engine components and preheat the fuel prior to combustion. An analytical investigation was performed comparing clean air to a gas vitiated with methane/oxygen combustion products to determine if variations in gas properties contributed to changes in predicted heat flux. This investigation started with simple relationships, evolved into writing an engineering-level code, and ended with running a series of CFD cases. It was noted that it is not possible to simultaneously match all of the gas properties between clean and vitiated test gases. A study was then conducted selecting various combinations of freestream properties for a vitiated test gas that matched clean air values to determine which combination of parameters affected the computed heat transfer the least. The best combination of properties to match was the free-stream total sensible enthalpy, dynamic pressure, and either the velocity or Mach number. This combination yielded only a 2% difference in heating. Other combinations showed departures of up to 10% in the heat flux estimate.

  17. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.; Bassett, R.R.; Briasco, S.

    1996-08-01

    Goals of the site operator program include field evaluation of electric vehicles (EVs) in real-world applications and environments, advancement of electric vehicle technologies, development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant EV use, and increasing the awareness and acceptance of EVs by the public. The site operator program currently consists of 11 participants under contract and two other organizations with data-sharing agreements with the program. The participants (electric utilities, academic institutions, Federal agencies) are geographically dispersed within US and their vehicles see a broad spectrum of service conditions. Current EV inventories of the site operators exceeds 250 vehicles. Several national organizations have joined DOE to further the introduction and awareness of EVs, including: (1) EVAmerica (a utility program) and DOE conduct performance and evaluation tests to support market development for EVs; (2) DOE, DOT, the Electric Transportation Coalition, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas are conducting a series of workshops to encourage urban groups in Clean Cities (a DOE program) to initiate the policies and infrastructure development necessary to support large-scale demonstrations, and ultimately the mass market use, of EVs. Current focus of the program is collection and dissemination of EV operations and performance data to aid in the evaluation of real- world EV use. This report contains several sections with vehicle evaluation as a focus: EV testing results, energy economics of EVs, and site operators activities.

  18. Remotely Operated Vehicles under sea ice - Experiences and results from five years of polar operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Lange, Benjamin; Belter, Hans Jakob; Schiller, Martin; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The availability of advanced robotic technologies to the Earth Science community has largely increased in the last decade. Remotely operated vehicles (ROV) enable spatially extensive scientific investigations underneath the sea ice of the polar oceans, covering a larger range and longer diving times than divers with significantly lower risks. Here we present our experiences and scientific results acquired from ROV operations during the last five years in the Arctic and Antarctic sea ice region. Working under the sea ice means to have all obstacles and investigated objects above the vehicle, and thus changes several paradigms of ROV operations as compared to blue water applications. Observations of downwelling spectral irradiance and radiance allow a characterization of the optical properties of sea ice and the spatial variability of the energy partitioning across the atmosphere-ice-ocean boundary. Our results show that the decreasing thickness and age of the sea ice have led to a significant increase in light transmission during summer over the last three decades. Spatially extensive measurements from ROV surveys generally provide more information on the light field variability than single spot measurements. The large number of sampled ice conditions during five cruises with the German research icebreaker RV Polarstern allows for the investigations of the seasonal evolution of light transmittance. Both, measurements of hyperspectral light transmittance through sea ice, as well as classification of upward-looking camera images were used to investigate the spatial distribution of ice-algal biomass. Buoyant ice-algal aggregates were found to be positioned in the stretches of level ice, rather than pressure ridges due to a physical interaction of aggregate-buoyancy and under-ice currents. Synchronous measurements of sea ice thickness by upward looking sonar provides crucial additional information to put light-transmittance and biological observations into context

  19. Reduced Order Modeling for Rapid Simulations of Blast and Rollover Events of a Ground Vehicle and its Occupants Using Rigid Body Dynamic Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-11

    MADYMO ground vehicle model developed in Task 1. - Route a standard seatbelt around the occupant model and connect it to vehicle anchor locations...Figure 3.1 Dummy and Harness System Setup Seatbelts were modeled with 2-dimensional finite element parts and 1-dimensional multi-body parts, with...well as adapting this methodology to specific ground vehicle programs and validate it against physical test results from LFT&E. 7.1: Technology

  20. Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU LH2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William U.

    2015-01-01

    When the technology associated with zero loss storage and transfer is implemented, NASA can reduce the LH2 losses and procurement costs by up to 30 compared to historical Shuttle numbers. This return on investment is based on the mission manifest and commodity use. LH2 densification can provide improved launch vehicle ascent performance by minimizing the size of the LH2 tanks or storing more mass of propellant in the given tank volume.

  1. Securing Ground Data System Applications for Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pajevski, Michael J.; Tso, Kam S.; Johnson, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and sophistication of cyber attacks has prompted the Multimission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) Program Office at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to initiate the Common Access Manager (CAM) effort to protect software applications used in Ground Data Systems (GDSs) at JPL and other NASA Centers. The CAM software provides centralized services and software components used by GDS subsystems to meet access control requirements and ensure data integrity, confidentiality, and availability. In this paper we describe the CAM software; examples of its integration with spacecraft commanding software applications and an information management service; and measurements of its performance and reliability.

  2. Atmospheric entry of nuclear-powered vehicles due to accidental/inadvertent termination of operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.; Park, Chul; Tauber, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The entries of the radioactive components into earth's atmosphere resulting from an accident or inadvertent abort of a space vehicle powered by nuclear-thermal-rockets are investigated. The study is made for a typical piloted Mars mission vehicle incapacitated by an accident or malfunction during the trans-Mars-injection maneuver due to simultaneous multiple failures of its component systems. The three different accident/abort modes considered are the following: (1) a constant-rate angular pitching motion of the vehicle, (2) a constant-acceleration angular pitching motion of the vehicle, and (3) the rocket engine breaks away from the rest of the vehicle with a finite relative (dispersion) velocity. The speeds and angles of the atmospheric entries are calculated for each mode for different values of the time of the accident, pitching rate, acceleration, and dispersion velocity. For the most severe entry speeds and flight-path angles, the stagnation-point pressures, heat transfer rates, thickness, and mass per unit area of the heat shields necessary to protect the radioactive components from disintegrating, deceleration g-loads, and high ground-impact velocities are calculated. The study points out that the high g-loads and high ground-impact velocities are the most serious problems that must be addressed.

  3. Business Case Analysis of the Special Operations Air Mobility Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT BUSINESS CASE ANALYSIS OF THE SPECIAL OPERATIONS AIR...2013 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED MBA Professional Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BUSINESS CASE ANALYSIS OF THE SPECIAL OPERATIONS AIR...perform an industry analysis of the WSC training and aircraft sales industry; and (3) determine the expected government training capabilities and costs

  4. Air Cushion Vehicle Operator Training System (ACVOTS) Problem Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Bays) - Close-in maneuvering (Long Point) - Overland operations (Crooked Island) - Open water operations (Gulf of Mexico ) Audio Visual Equipment...types of media are used to support their implementation. - programmed text/ storyboard text, - sound slide, - videotape, - computer based instruction...types which facilitate student knowledge learning. Examples of academic media include: instructor lecture, mediated lecture, storyboard text, program

  5. A Ground Systems Architecture Transition for a Distributed Operations System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Donna; Pitts, Lee; Bryant, Barry

    2003-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground Systems Department (GSD) recently undertook an architecture change in the product line that serves the ISS program. As a result, the architecture tradeoffs between data system product lines that serve remote users versus those that serve control center flight control teams were explored extensively. This paper describes the resulting architecture that will be used in the International Space Station (ISS) payloads program, and the resulting functional breakdown of the products that support this architecture. It also describes the lessons learned from the path that was followed, as a migration of products cause the need to reevaluate the allocation of functions across the architecture. The result is a set of innovative ground system solutions that is scalable so it can support facilities of wide-ranging sizes, from a small site up to large control centers. Effective use of system automation, custom components, design optimization for data management, data storage, data transmissions, and advanced local and wide area networking architectures, plus the effective use of Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) products, provides flexible Remote Ground System options that can be tailored to the needs of each user. This paper offers a description of the efficiency and effectiveness of the Ground Systems architectural options that have been implemented, and includes successful implementation examples and lessons learned.

  6. Introductions to Mission Operations and Ground Data Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Helen J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses how in the early concept studies the communications architecture plays an important part: The communications architecture is the arrangement, or configuration of satellites and ground systems in a space system, and the network of communications links that transfers information between them.

  7. Raising of Operating a Motor Vehicle Effects on Environment in Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertman, S. A.; Ertman, J. A.; Zakharov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    Severe low-temperature conditions, in which considerable part of Russian Motor Park is operated, affect vehicles negatively. Cold weather causes higher fuel consumption and C02 emissions always. It is because of temperature profile changing of automobile motors, other systems and materials. For enhancement of car operation efficiency in severe winter environment the dependency of engine warm-up and cooling time on ambient air temperature and wind speed described by multifactorial mathematical models is established. -On the basis of experimental research it was proved that the coolant temperature constitutes the engine representative temperature and may be used as representative temperature of engine at large. The model of generation of integrated index for vehicle adaptability to winter operating conditions by temperature profile of engines was developed. the method for evaluation of vehicle adaptability to winter operating conditions by temperature profile of engines allows to decrease higher fuel consumption in cold climate.

  8. Concepts, technology, and operations for a quick response, highly maneuverable launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabris, E. A.; Freeman, D. C., Jr.; Martin, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results from the NASA orbit-on-demand study are used to identify major technology issues for development of a quick response vehicle. Reasonable vehicles are found to require significant advances in propulsion, structures, materials, and flight mechanics technology. Vehicle concepts using normal growth technology predicted for the 1990s are compromised by expendable hardware or by unmanageable size and complexity. Operational analyses of the vertical-launch and horizontal-launch takeoff vehicles show that the latter have more inherent operational utility. The supply of liquid hydrogen propellant at alternate sites is a major issue; however, propane may be a viable option for at least one concept. Propellant for orbital maneuvering significantly increases gross weight for many of the concepts. This increase is greater for horizontal-takeoff systems becasue of their larger orbiters.

  9. Hybrid drive for motor vehicles with a preponderantly intermittent method of operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, H.

    1977-01-01

    A flywheel hybrid propulsion system is compared with a conventional propulsion system in a test vehicle under intermittent operation. An energy balance is presented for the conventional propulsion system. Results so far indicate especially high energy conversion of the gyro component under dynamic operation along with favorable internal combustion engine conditions.

  10. An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to Control Micro Aerial Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to Control Micro Aerial Vehicles Ming Hou...Report DRDC Toronto TR 2010-075 October 2010 An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to...drives the need for a small and light controller which will not hinder a soldier carrying it. This requirement brings an issue of designing an

  11. Ground Vehicle Safety Optimization Considering Blastworthiness and the Risks of High Weight and Fuel Consumption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    finding an optimal vehicle mass. Blast Protection Modeling Using a simplified rigid finite - element vehicle model (shown on the left of figure 1...charge parameters are not prescribed, but rather treated as random variables with some postulated Figure 1: Left: finite - element vehicle-representing...toward those of underbody explosives. For example, the MRAP vehicle is increasingly replacing the HMMWV, but it is much heavier and consumes twice as

  12. The Earth Observing System (EOS) Ground System: Leveraging an Existing Operational Ground System Infrastructure to Support New Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardison, David; Medina, Johnny; Dell, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The Earth Observer System (EOS) was officially established in 1990 and went operational in December 1999 with the launch of its flagship spacecraft Terra. Aqua followed in 2002 and Aura in 2004. All three spacecraft are still operational and producing valuable scientific data. While all are beyond their original design lifetime, they are expected to remain viable well into the 2020s. The EOS Ground System is a multi-mission system based at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that supports science and spacecraft operations for these three missions. Over its operational lifetime to date, the EOS Ground System has evolved as needed to accommodate mission requirements. With an eye towards the future, several updates are currently being deployed. Subsystem interconnects are being upgraded to reduce data latency and improve system performance. End-of-life hardware and operating systems are being replaced to mitigate security concerns and eliminate vendor support gaps. Subsystem hardware is being consolidated through the migration to Virtual Machine based platforms. While mission operations autonomy was not a design goal of the original system concept, there is an active effort to apply state-of-the-art products from the Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) to facilitate automation where possible within the existing heritage architecture. This presentation will provide background information on the EOS ground system architecture and evolution, discuss latest improvements, and conclude with the results of a recent effort that investigated how the current system could accommodate a proposed new earth science mission.

  13. Lightning Characteristics and Lightning Strike Peak Current Probabilities as Related to Aerospace Vehicle Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Vaughan, William W.

    1998-01-01

    A summary is presented of basic lightning characteristics/criteria for current and future NASA aerospace vehicles. The paper estimates the probability of occurrence of a 200 kA peak lightning return current, should lightning strike an aerospace vehicle in various operational phases, i.e., roll-out, on-pad, launch, reenter/land, and return-to-launch site. A literature search was conducted for previous work concerning occurrence and measurement of peak lighting currents, modeling, and estimating probabilities of launch vehicles/objects being struck by lightning. This paper presents these results.

  14. The Impact of Heterogeneity on Operator Performance in Futuristic Unmanned Vehicle Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    is instead meant to highlight the role of resource allocation strategies in influencing the effectiveness of human-vehicle/task interaction. Starting...attention allocation is presented. 3.1 Attention Allocation Strategy In supervising a UV mission, the operator’s role is that of a mission manager...the congruity of the vehicles, it can be assumed that operators exhibited a FIFO switching strategy in the two homogeneous cases. Figure 8(a) shows

  15. Absolute High-Precision Localisation of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle by Using Real-Time Aerial Video Imagery for Geo-referenced Orthophoto Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnert, Lars; Ax, Markus; Langer, Matthias; Nguyen van, Duong; Kuhnert, Klaus-Dieter

    This paper describes an absolute localisation method for an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) if GPS is unavailable for the vehicle. The basic idea is to combine an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to the ground vehicle and use it as an external sensor platform to achieve an absolute localisation of the robotic team. Beside the discussion of the rather naive method directly using the GPS position of the aerial robot to deduce the ground robot's position the main focus of this paper lies on the indirect usage of the telemetry data of the aerial robot combined with live video images of an onboard camera to realise a registration of local video images with apriori registered orthophotos. This yields to a precise driftless absolute localisation of the unmanned ground vehicle. Experiments with our robotic team (AMOR and PSYCHE) successfully verify this approach.

  16. A revolutionary and operational tethered aerostat system illustrating new LTA technology. [for ground-air-ground communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menke, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    An operational tethered aerostat system, which demonstrates utility of LTA systems, is described. It was made possible by development of a reliable tethered aerostat that is used to support broadcast equipment at an altitude of 10,000 feet. Two elements of the TCOM system, the aerostat and mooring station, are particularly relevant to the LTA Workshop. They demonstrate the feasibility of using LTA vehicles in real, operational, all-weather applications and, in addition, illustrate an advance in the overall technology base of LTA. The aerostat and the mooring station, including their technical design features and demonstrated performance characteristics, are described.

  17. Operational Assessment of CAS in COIN: Airing the Ground Truth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    might be excessively predisposed to organic fires. Such was the case during Anaconda, as a key lesson identified was the failure to include airmen...firing ordnance) might be optimal for a B-1 Bomber. This could be the case if an Army patrol is pinned in a valley based on SIGINT of enemy...build on practices adopted from service-oriented private industry rather than defense R&D constructs. The customer in this case is any ground commander

  18. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hwisoo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-06-12

    A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

  19. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Hwisoo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model. PMID:26076406

  20. Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) Provide a "Big Data Progression"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostra, D.; Sanghera, S. S.; Mangosing, D. C., Jr.; Lewis, P. M., Jr.; Chambers, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    This year, science and technology teams at the NASA Langley Science Directorate were challenged with creating an API-based web application using RockBlock Mobile sensors mounted on a zero pressure high-altitude balloon. The system tracks and collects meteorological data parameters and visualizes this data in near real time, using a MEAN development stack to create an HTML5 based tool that can send commands to the vehicle, parse incoming data, and perform other functions to store and serve data to other devices. NASA developers and science educators working on this project saw an opportunity to use this emerging technology to address a gap identified in science education between middle and high school curricula. As students learn about data analysis in elementary and middle school, they are taught to collect data from in situ sources. In high school, students are then asked to work with remotely sensed data, without always having the experience or understanding of how that data is collected. We believe that using ROVs to create a "big data progression" for students will not only enhance their ability to understand how remote satellite data is collected, but will also provide the outlet for younger students to expand their interest in science and data prior to entering high school. In this presentation, we will share and discuss our experiences with ROVs, APIs and data viz applications, with a focus on the next steps for developing this emerging capability.

  1. Tracking and data acquisition system for the 1990's. Volume 5: TDAS ground segment architecture and operations concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, R.

    1983-01-01

    Tracking and data acquisition system (TDAS) ground segment and operational requirements, TDAS RF terminal configurations, TDAS ground segment elements, the TDAS network, and the TDAS ground terminal hardware are discussed.

  2. Real-time Accurate Surface Reconstruction Pipeline for Vision Guided Planetary Exploration Using Unmanned Ground and Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almeida, Eduardo DeBrito

    2012-01-01

    This report discusses work completed over the summer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. A system is presented to guide ground or aerial unmanned robots using computer vision. The system performs accurate camera calibration, camera pose refinement and surface extraction from images collected by a camera mounted on the vehicle. The application motivating the research is planetary exploration and the vehicles are typically rovers or unmanned aerial vehicles. The information extracted from imagery is used primarily for navigation, as robot location is the same as the camera location and the surfaces represent the terrain that rovers traverse. The processed information must be very accurate and acquired very fast in order to be useful in practice. The main challenge being addressed by this project is to achieve high estimation accuracy and high computation speed simultaneously, a difficult task due to many technical reasons.

  3. Feasibility report: Operation of light air cushion vehicle at McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibbern, J. S.

    1987-02-01

    This report explores the viability of the use of an air cushion vehicle (ACV) or hovercraft to perform logistic and scientific support in the area of McMurdo Station, Antarctica. After a review of personnel assets and facilities at McMurdo Station to support the ACV plus a reconnaissance of the five major routes selected, it appears that an air cushion vehicle in the 1 to 1 1/2 ton payload class would be of significant value to support operations. It would reduce transit times for surface vehicle traverses on the routes selected and reduce requirements for expenditure of helicopter flight time in others. Of major significance is the ability to handle passenger/shuttle requirements between the Scott Base transition and Williams Field Skiway. Use of the ACV for high frequency passenger operations would help preserve the snow road for cargo operations during periods of road deterioration.

  4. Optical Embedded Dust Sensor for Engine Protection and Early Warning on M1 Abrams/Ground Combat Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-11

    Optical embedded dust sensor for engine protection and early warning on M1 Abrams/ground combat vehicles Hai Lina, Gregor A. Waldherrb, Timothy...Burch*a aIntelligent Optical Systems, 73 N. Vinedo Ave., Pasadena, CA, USA 91107-3759 bHal Technology, LLC, 7970 Cherry Avenue, Suite 303, Fontana, CA...the DoA, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. ABSTRACT The Dual Optical Embedded Dust Sensor (DOEDS) is designed

  5. Software Architecture of the NASA Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator - SGOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert P.; Lostroscio, Charles T.

    2005-01-01

    The SGOS executive and its subsystems have been an integral component of the Shuttle Launch Safety Program for almost thirty years. It is usable (via the LAN) by over 2000 NASA employees at the Kennedy Space Center and 11,000 contractors. SGOS supports over 800 models comprised of several hundred thousand lines of code and over 1,000 MCP procedures. Yet neither language has a for loop!! The simulation software described in this paper is used to train ground controllers and to certify launch countdown readiness.

  6. Onboard Autonomy and Ground Operations Automation for the Intelligent Payload Experiment (IPEX) CubeSat Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Ortega, Kevin; Tran, Daniel; Bellardo, John; Williams, Austin; Piug-Suari, Jordi; Crum, Gary; Flatley, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The Intelligent Payload Experiment (IPEX) is a cubesat manifested for launch in October 2013 that will flight validate autonomous operations for onboard instrument processing and product generation for the Intelligent Payload Module (IPM) of the Hyperspectral Infra-red Imager (HyspIRI) mission concept. We first describe the ground and flight operations concept for HyspIRI IPM operations. We then describe the ground and flight operations concept for the IPEX mission and how that will validate HyspIRI IPM operations. We then detail the current status of the mission and outline the schedule for future development.

  7. Intelligent command and control systems for satellite ground operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1994-01-01

    The Georgia Tech portion of the Intelligent Control Center project includes several complementary activities. Two major activities entail thesis level research; the other activities are either support activities or preliminary explorations (e.g., task analyses) to support the research. The first research activity is the development of principles for the design of active interfaces to support monitoring during real-time supports. It is well known that as the operator's task becomes less active, i.e., more monitoring and less active control, there is concern that the operator will be less involved and less able to rapidly identify anomalous or failure situations. The research project to design active monitoring interfaces is an attempt to remediate this undesirable side-effect of increasingly automated control systems that still depend ultimately on operator supervision. The second research activity is the exploration of the use of case-based reasoning as a way to accumulate operator experience and make it available in computational form.

  8. Operation JANGLE. Project 1(9)a. Ground Acceleration, Ground and Air Pressures for Underground Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-04-01

    Salmon 0, April .1952 -0o So 0 * per telecon w/Betty Fox ( DNA Tech Libr, Chief), the classified references contained herein may remain. 6-Z I- 7...73 693 Earth Pr.essure . 77 6.4 Damage Criteria - Surface Stracture .... 78 6.5 D-miage Criteria - Underground Targets ... 8...ground pressures, and air pressures produced by a buried shallow) nuclear explosive. AU2 of these physical quantities are functions of at least two

  9. Bradley Fighting Vehicle Conduct of Fire Trainer: The Instructor Operator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    poorly trained. Black and Graham (1986) urged development of expanded and more adequate COFT performance measures. Kraemer and Bessemer (1987), in an...operator reassessment must be a continuous process in order to maintain the quality personnel needed. 1O COFT behavior must be standardized, and then...phenomenon. Journal of Applied Psychology, 71, No.4, 630-640. 27 Kraemer, R. E. & Bessemer , D. W. (1987). Tank platoon training for the 1987 Canadian

  10. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program; Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Activities during the first quarter centered around integrating the new participants into the program. A meeting of the Site Operators, in conjunction with the first meeting of the Electric Vehicle Users Task Force, was held in October. A second meeting of the Task Force was held in December. During these meetings the new contractual requirements were explained to the participants. The Site Operator Data Base was distributed and explained. The Site Operators will begin using the data base in December 1991 and will supply the operating and maintenance data to the INEL on a monthly basis. The Operators requested that they be able to have access to the data of the other Operators and it was agreed that they would be provided this on floppy disk monthly from the INEL. Presentations were made to the DOE sponsored Automotive Technology Development-Contractors Coordination Meeting in October. An overview of the program was given by EG&G. Representatives from Arizona Public Service, Texas A&M University, and York Technical College provided details of their programs and the results and future goals. Work was begun on commercializing the Versatile Data Acquisition System (VDAS). A Scope of Work has been written for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to be submitted to the USABC. If implemented, the CRADA will provide funds for the development and commercialization of the VDAS. Participants in the Site Operator Program will test prototypes of the system within their fleets, making the data available to the USABC and other interested organizations. The USABC will provide recommendations on the data to be collected. Major activities by the majority of the Operators were involved with the continued operation and demonstration of existing vehicles. In addition, several of the operators were involved in identifying and locating vehicles to be added to their fleets. A list of the vehicles in each Site Operator fleet is included as Appendix A to this report.

  11. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 3: Ground real-time mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The payloads tentatively planned to fly on the first two Spacelab missions were analyzed to examine the cost relationships of providing mission operations support from onboard vs the ground-based Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The quantitative results indicate that use of a POCC, with data processing capability, to support real-time mission operations is the most cost effective case.

  12. Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operated megapixel spectral camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkynen, Jussi; Holmlund, Christer; Saari, Heikki; Ojala, Kai; Antila, Tapani

    2011-11-01

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometer based hyperspectral imager weighting only 400 g which makes it compatible with various small UAV platforms. The concept of the hyperspectral imager has been published in SPIE Proc. 74741 and 76682. This UAV spectral imager is capable of recording 5 Mpix multispectral data in the wavelength range of 500 - 900 nm at resolutions of 10-40 nm, Full-Width-Half-Maximum (FWHM). An internal memory buffer allows 16 Mpix of image data to be stored during one image burst. The user can configure the system to take either three 5 Mpix images or up to 54 VGA resolution images with each triggering. Each image contains data from one, two or three wavelength bands which can be separated during post processing. This allows a maximum of 9 spectral bands to be stored in high spatial resolution mode or up to 162 spectral bands in VGA-mode during each image burst. Image data is stored in a compact flash memory card which provides the mass storage for the imager. The field of view of the system is 26° × 36° and the ground pixel size at 150 m flying altitude is around 40 mm in high-resolution mode. The design, calibration and test flight results will be presented.

  13. 77 FR 67399 - Trim Systems Operating Corp., a Subsidiary of Commercial Vehicle Group, Inc., Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... Employment and Training Administration Trim Systems Operating Corp., a Subsidiary of Commercial Vehicle Group... of Trim Systems Operating Corp., a subsidiary of Commercial Vehicle Group, Inc., Statesville, North... applicable to TA-W-81,393 is hereby issued as follows: All workers of Trim Systems Operating Corp.,...

  14. Remote operated vehicle with carbon dioxide blasting (ROVCO{sub 2})

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, A.M.

    1995-10-01

    The Remote Operated Vehicle with Carbon Dioxide Blasting (ROVCO{sub 2}), as shown in a front view is a six-wheeled remote land vehicle used to decontaminate concrete floors. The remote vehicle has a high pressure Cryogenesis blasting subsystem, Oceaneering Technologies (OTECH) developed a CO{sub 2} xY Orthogonal Translational End Effector (COYOTEE) subsystem, and a vacuum/filtration and containment subsystem. The cryogenesis subsystem performs the actual decontamination work and consists of the dry ice supply unit, the blasting nozzle, the remotely controlled electric and pneumatic valves, and the vacuum work-head. The COYOTEE subsystem positions the blasting work-head within a planar work space and the vacuum subsystem provides filtration and containment of the debris generated by the CO{sub 2} blasting. It employs a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filtration unit to separate contaminants for disposal. All of the above systems are attached to the vehicle subsystem via the support structure.

  15. Robust Stability and Control of Multi-Body Ground Vehicles with Uncertain Dynamics and Failures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Modeling for Heavy Articulated Tractor Semi- Trailer Vehicle 2.2.3.1 Rollover Index (RI) for A single Unit Vehicle 2.2.3.2...increasing complexity to capture Roll Over phenomenon and Other Performance and Ride Quality requirements. In this connection, first simple ` Bicycle ...methodology to a specific heavy articulated vehicle with tractor semi- trailer shows that a single active anti-roll bar system at the trailer unit gives

  16. Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE) interface requirements analysis: Operations scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Phillips, John

    1991-01-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the functional and data interface requirements to the link between the GSDE GS/SPF (Amdahl) and the Space Station Control Center (SSCC) and Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) Integration, Verification, and Test Environments (IVTE's). These interfaces will be involved in ground software development of both the control center and the simulation and training systems. Our understanding of the configuration management (CM) interface and the expected functional characteristics of the Amdahl-IVTE interface is described. A set of assumptions and questions that need to be considered and resolved in order to complete the interface functional and data requirements definitions are presented. A listing of information items defined to describe software configuration items in the GSDE CM system is included. It also includes listings of standard reports of CM information and of CM-related tools in the GSDE.

  17. Increasing the Mobility of Dismounted Marines. Small Unit Mobility Enhancement Technologies: Unmanned Ground Vehicles Market Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Robotic Porter (Israel Aerospace Industries, Ltd.) ...........................................16 10 . Ranlo (Defense Technologies, Inc... 10 5. Selected Data for Top 15 Candidate Systems...26 10 . Vehicle Mobility (Speed) Scoring

  18. Analysis and Modeling of Ground Operations at Hub Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, Stephen (Technical Monitor); Andersson, Kari; Carr, Francis; Feron, Eric; Hall, William D.

    2000-01-01

    Building simple and accurate models of hub airports can considerably help one understand airport dynamics, and may provide quantitative estimates of operational airport improvements. In this paper, three models are proposed to capture the dynamics of busy hub airport operations. Two simple queuing models are introduced to capture the taxi-out and taxi-in processes. An integer programming model aimed at representing airline decision-making attempts to capture the dynamics of the aircraft turnaround process. These models can be applied for predictive purposes. They may also be used to evaluate control strategies for improving overall airport efficiency.

  19. Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Education 101: Exploration Begins Here [Grades 9-12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Presentation to inform the non-NASA general public and school children of ground systems development and operations activities at Kennedy Space Center, particularly on what GSDO is and does, in a high level overview.

  20. Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO): Exploration Begins Here [Grades K-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Presentation to inform the non-NASA general public and school children of ground systems development and operations activities at Kennedy Space Center, particularly on what GSDO is and does, in a high level overview.

  1. Ground Systems Development and Operations: Exploration Begins Here

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Mary; Phillips, Pepper; VanNes, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Hunger Hydraulik of Lohr, Germany has been selected as the vendor to build replacement Jacking, Leveling and Equalization cylinders for one Crawler Transporter. A site visit has been scheduled and a overview of how the Crawler Transporter fits into KSC launch operations will be presented as information. The presentation will be presented on July 11, 2012 by Pepper Phillips, the Program Manager for GSDO.

  2. Achieving Lights-Out Operation of SMAP Using Ground Data System Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The approach used in the SMAP ground data system to provide reliable, automated capabilities to conduct unattended operations has been presented. The impacts of automation on the ground data system architecture were discussed, including the three major automation patterns identified for SMAP and how these patterns address the operations use cases. The architecture and approaches used by SMAP will set the baseline for future JPL Earth Science missions.

  3. Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

    2006-09-01

    This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  4. A scientific operations plan for the NASA space telescope. [ground support systems, project planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, D. K.; Costa, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    A ground system is described which is compatible with the operational requirements of the space telescope. The goal of the ground system is to minimize the cost of post launch operations without seriously compromising the quality and total throughput of space telescope science, or jeopardizing the safety of the space telescope in orbit. The resulting system is able to accomplish this goal through optimum use of existing and planned resources and institutional facilities. Cost is also reduced and efficiency in operation increased by drawing on existing experience in interfacing guest astronomers with spacecraft as well as mission control experience obtained in the operation of present astronomical spacecraft.

  5. Third International Symposium on Space Mission Operations and Ground Data Systems, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James L. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Under the theme of 'Opportunities in Ground Data Systems for High Efficiency Operations of Space Missions,' the SpaceOps '94 symposium included presentations of more than 150 technical papers spanning five topic areas: Mission Management, Operations, Data Management, System Development, and Systems Engineering. The papers focus on improvements in the efficiency, effectiveness, productivity, and quality of data acquisition, ground systems, and mission operations. New technology, techniques, methods, and human systems are discussed. Accomplishments are also reported in the application of information systems to improve data retrieval, reporting, and archiving; the management of human factors; the use of telescience and teleoperations; and the design and implementation of logistics support for mission operations.

  6. Path Tracking for Unmanned Ground Vehicle Navigation: Implementation and Adaptation of the Pure Pursuit Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    a user for a patrol mission. To increase the vehicle’s abilities, other behaviours such as obstacle avoidance, path planning or leader / follower augment...15 5.4 Leader / Follower Behaviour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 5.5 Waypoint Following...Navigation Behaviour - Provide goal directedness in concert with an obstacle avoid- ance algorithm. 3. Leader / Follower - Allow a follower vehicle to

  7. NPSNET: Real-Time 3D Ground-Based Vehicle Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    9 C. NEWTON -EULER EQUATIONS .................................... 9 1 . Linear And Angular Acceleration............................. 9 2...Baraff, 91]. C. NEWTON -EULER EQUATIONS 1. Linear and Angular Acceleration Two parts of Newton -Euler equations are the translational motion of its...in each time step. 2. Vehicle Speed And Direction The vehicle speed is computed by linear acceleration using Newton -Euler equations. Newton -Euler

  8. The MER/CIP Portal for Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Louise; Desai, Sanjay; DOrtenzio, Matthew; Filman, Robtert E.; Heher, Dennis M.; Hubbard, Kim; Johan, Sandra; Keely, Leslie; Magapu, Vish; Mak, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    We developed the Mars Exploration Rover/Collaborative Information Portal (MER/CIP) to facilitate MER operations. MER/CIP provides a centralized, one-stop delivery platform integrating science and engineering data from several distributed heterogeneous data sources. Key issues for MER/CIP include: 1) Scheduling and schedule reminders; 2) Tracking the status of daily predicted outputs; 3) Finding and analyzing data products; 4) Collaboration; 5) Announcements; 6) Personalization.

  9. Operations Research Flight Ground Service Education/Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a nutritional biochemistry assessment of astronauts in preflight, in-flight, and post-flight operations. In-flight collections of blood and urine samples from astronauts to test the effects of Vitamin K, Pro K, Vitamin D, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Iron, and Sodium in spaceflight is shown. A demonstration of a 1-carbon metabolism pathway that determines the existence of enzymes and polymorphisms is also presented.

  10. Autonomy and manual operation in a small robotic system for under-vehicle inspections at security checkpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smuda, William; Muench, Paul L.; Gerhart, Grant R.; Moore, Kevin L.

    2002-07-01

    Unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) technology can be used in a number of ways to assist in counter-terrorism activities. In addition to the conventional uses of tele-operated robots for unexploded ordinance handling and disposal, water cannons and other crowd control devices, robots can also be employed for a host of terrorism deterrence and detection applications. In previous research USU developed a completely autonomous prototype robot for performing under- vehicle inspections in parking areas (ODIS). Testing of this prototype and discussions with the user community indicated that neither the technology nor the users are ready for complete autonomy. In this paper we present a robotic system based on ODIS that balances the users' desire/need for tele- operation with a limited level of autonomy that enhances the performance of the robot. The system can be used by both civilian law enforcement and military police to replace the traditional mirror on a stick system of looking under cars for bombs and contraband.

  11. SCAILET: An intelligent assistant for satellite ground terminal operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahidi, A. K.; Crapo, J. A.; Schlegelmilch, R. F.; Reinhart, R. C.; Petrik, E. J.; Walters, J. L.; Jones, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has applied artificial intelligence to an advanced ground terminal. This software application is being deployed as an experimenter interface to the link evaluation terminal (LET) and was named Space Communication Artificial Intelligence for the Link Evaluation Terminal (SCAILET). The high-burst-rate (HBR) LET provides 30-GHz-transmitting and 20-GHz-receiving, 220-Mbps capability for wide band communications technology experiments with the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS). The HBR-LET terminal consists of seven major subsystems. A minicomputer controls and monitors these subsystems through an IEEE-488 or RS-232 protocol interface. Programming scripts (test procedures defined by design engineers) configure the HBR-LET and permit data acquisition. However, the scripts are difficult to use, require a steep learning curve, are cryptic, and are hard to maintain. This discourages experimenters from utilizing the full capabilities of the HBR-LET system. An intelligent assistant module was developed as part of the SCAILET software. The intelligent assistant addresses critical experimenter needs by solving and resolving problems that are encountered during the configuring of the HBR-LET system. The intelligent assistant is a graphical user interface with an expert system running in the background. In order to further assist and familiarize an experimenter, an on-line hypertext documentation module was developed and included in the SCAILET software.

  12. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 2: Technical summary. Book 3: Booster vehicle modifications and ground systems definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A definition of the expendable second stage and space shuttle booster separation system is presented. Modifications required on the reusable booster for expendable second stage/payload flight and the ground systems needed to operate the expendable second stage in conjuction with the space shuttle booster are described. The safety, reliability, and quality assurance program is explained. Launch complex operations and services are analyzed.

  13. Human machine interface to manually drive rhombic like vehicles in remote handling operations

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Pedro; Vale, Alberto; Ventura, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    In the thermonuclear experimental reactor ITER, a vehicle named CTS is designed to transport a container with activated components inside the buildings. In nominal operations, the CTS is autonomously guided under supervision. However, in some unexpected situations, such as in rescue and recovery operations, the autonomous mode must be overridden and the CTS must be remotely guided by an operator. The CTS is a rhombic-like vehicle, with two drivable and steerable wheels along its longitudinal axis, providing omni-directional capabilities. The rhombic kinematics correspond to four control variables, which are difficult to manage in manual mode operation. This paper proposes a Human Machine Interface (HMI) to remotely guide the vehicle in manual mode. The proposed solution is implemented using a HMI with an encoder connected to a micro-controller and an analog 2-axis joystick. Experimental results were obtained comparing the proposed solution with other controller devices in different scenarios and using a software platform that simulates the kinematics and dynamics of the vehicle. (authors)

  14. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 02-2-603A Vehicle Fuel Consumption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-10

    API) Hydrometer . The API Hydrometer is used for accurate determination of the density, relative density (specific gravity), or API gravity of... Hydrometer Method. 5. TOP 02-2-505, Inspection and Preliminary Operation of Vehicles, 4 February 1987. 6. TOP 02-1-003, Hybrid Electric

  15. 49 CFR 396.9 - Inspection of motor vehicles in operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inspection of motor vehicles in operation. 396.9 Section 396.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY...

  16. 49 CFR 396.9 - Inspection of motor vehicles in operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inspection of motor vehicles in operation. 396.9 Section 396.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY...

  17. 49 CFR 37.163 - Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities. 37.163 Section 37.163 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Provision of Service § 37.163 Keeping...

  18. 49 CFR 37.163 - Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities. 37.163 Section 37.163 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Provision of Service § 37.163 Keeping...

  19. 49 CFR 37.163 - Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities. 37.163 Section 37.163 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Provision of Service § 37.163 Keeping...

  20. 49 CFR 37.163 - Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities. 37.163 Section 37.163 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Provision of Service § 37.163 Keeping...

  1. 33 CFR 117.31 - Drawbridge operations for emergency vehicles and emergency vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emergency vehicles and emergency vessels. 117.31 Section 117.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS General Requirements § 117.31... notice, or a proper signal as provided in § 117.15 of this part, the drawtender shall take all...

  2. 14 CFR 437.51 - Rest rules for vehicle safety operations personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rest rules for vehicle safety operations personnel. 437.51 Section 437.51 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.51...

  3. 14 CFR 437.51 - Rest rules for vehicle safety operations personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rest rules for vehicle safety operations personnel. 437.51 Section 437.51 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.51...

  4. 14 CFR 437.51 - Rest rules for vehicle safety operations personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rest rules for vehicle safety operations personnel. 437.51 Section 437.51 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.51...

  5. 49 CFR 37.163 - Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Keeping vehicle lifts in operative condition: Public entities. 37.163 Section 37.163 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Provision of Service § 37.163 Keeping...

  6. A Navigation and Decision Making Architecture for Unmanned Ground Vehicles: Implementation and Results with the Raptor UGV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Obstacle Detection module, also known as Laser Safety, provides a continuous safety check for UGV operation, looking for any dangerous obstacles in the...Detection module, however, the vehicle is prevented from doing anything dangerous until the user can intervene. Figure 38: Typical loose grass which...complement to tele-operated or semi- autonomous control, halting the Raptor UGV in dangerous situations. It was especially effective when used in concert with

  7. Boots on the Ground: Troop Density in Contingency Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Singapore quickly prospered, and in 186 that port as well as Malacca and Penang , two small port enclaves on the western Malay coast, formally became the...operations was clearly indicated in statistical analyses maintained by the British com- mand.90 The British command formed larger Gurkha headquarters...displays the density statistics for the Balkans’ deployments. 5 Ta bl e 6. T ro op D en si ty in th e B al ka ns O pe ra tio ns M ili ta ry Fo

  8. Technical Survey and Evaluation of Underwater Sensors and Remotely Operated Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    and sensor technologies. "* An evaluation of how well each vehicle system would be able to meet operational and environmental requirements for sensor...delivery. "" An evaluation af how well each sensor would be able to meet the overall inspection requirements. "* The development of a conceptual...of damaged areas as well as crew efficiency and safety. 8 Precipitation (heavy snowfall, rain, or hail) contributes to low visibility, operator error

  9. Electric and hybrid vehicle site operators program: Thinking of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kansas State University, with support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one electric or hybrid van and two electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two Soleq 1993 Ford EVcort station wagons. The G-Van has been signed in order for the public to be aware that this is an electric drive vehicle. Financial participants' names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. This vehicle is available for short term loan to interested utilities and companies. When other vehicles are obtained, the G-Van will be maintained on K-State's campus.

  10. [Electric and hybrid vehicle site operators program]: Thinking of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid vans and two (2) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1993 Ford EVcort station wagons. The G-Van has been signed in order for the public to be aware that this is an electric drive vehicle. Financial participants' names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. This vehicle is available for short term loan to interested utilities and companies. When other vehicles are obtained, the G-Van will be maintained on K-State's campus.

  11. Ground Operations of the ISS GNC Babb-Mueller Atmospheric Density Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogan, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The ISS GNC system was updated recently with a new software release that provides onboard state determination capability. Prior to this release, only the Russian segment maintained and propagated the onboard state, which was periodically updated through Russian ground tracking. The new software gives the US segment the capability for maintaining the onboard state, and includes new GPS and state vector propagation capabilities. Part of this software package is an atmospheric density model based on the Babb-Mueller algorithm. Babb-Mueller efficiently mimics a full analytical density model, such as the Jacchia model. While lacchia is very robust and is used in the Mission Control Center, it is too computationally intensive for use onboard. Thus, Babb-Mueller was chosen as an alternative. The onboard model depends on a set of calibration coefficients that produce a curve fit to the lacchia model. The ISS GNC system only maintains one set of coefficients onboard, so a new set must be uplinked by controllers when the atmospheric conditions change. The onboard density model provides a real-time density value, which is used to calculate the drag experienced by the ISS. This drag value is then incorporated into the onboard propagation of the state vector. The propagation of the state vector, and therefore operation of the BabbMueller algorithm, will be most critical when GPS updates and secondary state vector sources fail. When GPS is active, the onboard state vector will be updated every ten seconds, so the propagation error is irrelevant. When GPS is inactive, the state vector must be updated at least every 24 hours, based on current protocol. Therefore, the Babb-Mueller coefficients must be accurate enough to fulfill the state vector accuracy requirements for at least one day. A ground operations concept was needed in order to manage both the on board Babb-Mueller density model and the onboard state quality. The Babb-Mueller coefficients can be determined operationally

  12. Exhaust particle characterization for lean and stoichiometric DI vehicles operating on ethanol-gasoline blends

    SciTech Connect

    Storey, John Morse; Barone, Teresa L; Thomas, John F; Huff, Shean P

    2012-01-01

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines can offer better fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected (PFI) counterparts, and are now appearing in increasingly more U.S. and European vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged GDI engines are replacing large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, in order for manufacturers to meet the U.S. fuel economy standards for 2016. Furthermore, lean-burn GDI engines can offer even higher fuel economy than stoichiometric GDI engines and have overcome challenges associated with cost-effective aftertreatment for NOx control. Along with changes in gasoline engine technology, fuel composition may increase in ethanol content beyond the current 10% due to the recent EPA waiver allowing 15% ethanol. In addition, the Renewable Fuels Standard passed as part of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) mandates the use of biofuels in upcoming years. GDI engines are of environmental concern due to their high particulate matter (PM) emissions relative to port-fuel injected (PFI) gasoline vehicles; widespread market penetration of GDI vehicles may result in additional PM from mobile sources at a time when the diesel contribution is declining. In this study, we characterized particulate emissions from a European certified lean-burn GDI vehicle operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. Particle mass and particle number concentration emissions were measured for the Federal Test Procedure urban driving cycle (FTP 75) and the more aggressive US06 driving cycle. Particle number-size distributions and organic to elemental carbon ratios (OC/EC) were measured for 30 MPH and 80 MPH steady-state operation. In addition, particle number concentration was measured during wide open throttle accelerations (WOTs) and gradual accelerations representative of the FTP 75. Fuels included certification gasoline and 10% (E10) and 20% (E20) ethanol blends from the same supplier. The particle

  13. Federal Alternative Fuel Program Light Duty Vehicle Operations. Second annual report to Congress for fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This annual report to Congress details the second year of the Federal light duty vehicle operations as required by Section 400AA(b)(1)(B) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended by the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988, Public Law 100-494. In 1992, the Federal alternative fuel vehicle fleet expanded significantly, from the 65 M85 (85 percent methanol and 15 percent unleaded gasoline) vehicles acquired in 1991 to an anticipated total of 3,267 light duty vehicles. Operating data are being collected from slightly over 20 percent, or 666, of these vehicles. The 601 additional vehicles that were added to the data collection program in 1992 include 75 compressed natural gas Dodge full-size (8-passenger) vans, 25 E85 (85 percent denatured ethanol and 15 percent unleaded gasoline) Chevrolet Lumina sedans, 250 M85 Dodge Spirit sedans (planned to begin operation in fiscal year 1993), and 251 compressed natural gas Chevrolet C-20 pickup trucks. Figure ES-1 illustrates the locations where the Federal light duty alternative fuel vehicles that are participating in the data collection program are operating. The primary criteria for placement of vehicles will continue to include air quality attainment status and the availability of an alternative fuel infrastructure to support the vehicles. This report details the second year of the Federal light duty vehicle operations, from October 1991 through September 1992.

  14. Remote Operated Vehicle with CO{sub 2} Blasting (ROVCO{sub 2}). Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This report documents the first phase of the Remote Operated Vehicle with CO{sub 2} Blasting (ROVCO{sub 2}) Program. The ROVCO{sub 2} Program`s goal is to develop and demonstrate a tool to improve the productivity of concrete floor decontamination. The first phase adapted and tested the critical subsystems: the CO{sub 2} blasting, the workhead manipulation, the controls, and the base vehicle. The testing documented the performance of the subsystems and preformed a concept demonstration of the integrated ROVCO{sub 2} system. This testing and demonstration verified that the ROVCO{sub 2} development exceeded it Phase 1 success criteria.

  15. Dual-image guidance system for autonomous vehicle on fast focusing and RGB similarity operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2010-08-01

    We have developed the dual camera image guidance system for autonomous vehicle based on the fast focusing and the spot RGB spectrum similarity operation. The fast focusing catches the distance information of outside world as a whole. The spot RGB spectrum similarity operation finds the object surface portion in the image. Our fast focusing algorithm works precisely on the differential image such as the Daubechies wavelet transformed high pass image, the Roberts image, Prewitt image, Sobel image and the Laplacian image. The spot RGB spectrum similarity operation for the surface detection comes from the idea of the laser range finder. The illuminated coherent laser reflects on the object surface and the reflected laser is detected on the spectrum band detector. The RGB spectrum distribution on the selected spot on one camera can give the expected similar spectrum information on the position-matched spot on another camera if the selected spot corresponds to the surface of the object. We move the autonomous vehicle based on the distance detection and the surface detection of the outside world due to the controlled dual color camera system. Our autonomous vehicle is equipped with the controllable independent four wheels drive. This vehicle can avoid the object geometrically even if it is just in front of the object. We mount the dual camera image guidance system on two axes jimbal system to aim the object in space.

  16. 75 FR 4996 - Safety Requirements for Operators of Small Passenger-Carrying Commercial Motor Vehicles Used in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... vehicles when they are operated within a 75 air-mile radius (86.3 statute miles or 138.9 kilometers) from... beyond a 75-air-mile radius. This action is required by the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient... direct compensation when the vehicle is operated beyond a 75 air-mile radius (86.3 statute miles or...

  17. Potential Technology Transfer to the DoD Unmanned Ground Vehicle Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    Specific Technologies 3 1. Vehicle Controls 3 2. Sensors ’ 3. Safety Issues 8 B. Potential for Technology Transfer 9 III. MICROBIOTICS n A...navigating, inspecting, and eventually performing surgery on the human colon and lower intestine . Currently, the robot, called Cleo, is powered by 10,000...rpm motors and worm drives and travels on two treads that can grip the interior lining of the intestine without damaging it. The "vehicle" is equipped

  18. Advanced Suspension and Control Algorithm for U.S. Army Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    torque convertor characteristics, and transmission gear ratios and efficiencies. A representative TruckSim tactical vehicle model (modified High...different type of nonlinear control algorithm, called single experiment–multiple pulses , was also considered and developed using Matlab/Simulink. This...vibration to the vehicle body. This effect indicates that the controllable dynamic force range, defined as the ratio of the field-on damping force

  19. Anthropometry of the Clothed US Army Ground Troop and Combat Vehicle Crewman

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    Arithropometric data on the amount of space required for each person in a -omltat .ehicle are essential input for the development of ar efficient man- vehicle...Faotwear Cover, Chemical Protective (Overboots); MIL-F-43987 Handwear Gloves. Combat Vehicle Crewman’s, Summer; LP/P DES 13-78 Clove Set, Chemical...Protective (Overbocts); MIL-F-43987 Handwear Clove Set, Chemicel Protective (Butyl Outer Gloves with Cotton Inner Cloves ); MIL-C-43971 Cloves , Combat Vehi le

  20. Weight and Blastworthiness Design Considerations for Military Ground Vehicle Safety Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    mass. Section 4.3 outlines this formulation and its input parameters. 4.1. Blast protection model Using a simplified rigid finite - element vehicle model...from the threats of ballistics and missiles toward those of underbody explosives. For example, the MRAP vehicle is increasingly replacing the HMMWV, but...data to calculate and minimize combined total expected injuries from blast events and fuel convoys. Results are presented by means of two parametric

  1. Weight and Blastworthiness Design Considerations for Military Ground Vehicle Safety Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    vehicle mass. Section 4.3 outlines this formulation and its input parameters. 4.1. Blast protection model Using a simplified rigid finite - element ...from the threats of ballistics and missiles toward those of underbody explosives. For example, the MRAP vehicle is increasingly replacing the HMMWV, but...data to calculate and minimize combined total expected injuries from blast events and fuel convoys. Results are presented by means of two parametric

  2. Achieving Increased Mobility and Autonomy for Ground Vehicles Over Rough Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    solution of the path-planning problem in an un- structured , dynamically changing environment is known to be computationally intractable (in the language... Tyre mod- elling for use in vehicle dynamics studies. SAE Paper No. 870421, SAE Paper No. 870421. Bakolas, E. and P. Tsiotras, 2008: Multiresolution...motion planning for agile autonomous vehicles. Jour- nal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, 25 (1), 116– 129. Frere, P., 1992: Sports Car and

  3. A Conformal, Fully-Conservative Approach for Predicting Blast Effects on Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-09

    and hull. The decoupled inviscid CFD simulations (i.e. assuming a rigid vehicle) were used to examine the pressure variation and shock wave...interaction with the vehicle. Silver [8] used a commercial CFD code to predict the overpressure of a large caliber gun mounted on a simplified, rigid tank ...different locations under the crew cab and wheels. The pressures were calculated using the inviscid AUGUST-3D CFD code. The assessment of the structural

  4. Integrated optimal dynamics control of 4WD4WS electric ground vehicle with tire-road frictional coefficient estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongrong; Hu, Chuan; Wang, Zejiang; Yan, Fengjun; Chen, Nan

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an integrated optimal dynamics control of four-wheel driving and four-wheel steering (4WD4WS) electric ground vehicles via hierarchical control methodology. In the higher-level design, an LQR controller is proposed to obtain the integrated lateral force and yaw moment, according to their respective reference values. The lower-level controller is designed to ensure all the tires work in the stable region while realizing the tracking control of the vehicle dynamics. The tire-road friction coefficient is estimated through the integrated longitudinal force and lateral force, respectively, using a brush tire model. To reduce the estimation error, a novel data fusion function is employed to generate the final estimation value. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed control and estimation strategies is validated via CarSim-Simulink joint simulation.

  5. Precooled turbojet engine flight experiment using balloon-based operation vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sawai, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Tsuboi, N.; Taguchi, H.; Kojima, T.; Okai, K.; Sato, T.; Miyaji, Koji

    2006-07-01

    Development of the Balloon-based Operation Vehicle (BOV) is currently in progress for the first flight scheduled in 2006. In a series of BOV experiments, a vehicle in a wing-body configuration is lifted by a high-altitude balloon and dropped, after which the microgravity experiments will be performed onboard the vehicle under favor of the quasi-free-fall environments. Although the BOV is originally designed for the microgravity experiments, various types of experiments can also be performed in a hypersonic flight at lower altitudes. One candidate currently under review is a flight experiment of a precooled turbojet engine in reduced dimension. In this article, an overview of the BOV experiment is introduced, and the current development status of the BOV and a flight model of the precooled turbojet engine is presented. The aerodynamic load and the aerodynamic characteristics of the BOV are obtained by computational fluid-dynamic analyses and wind-tunnel experiments.

  6. Observer based output feedback tuning for underwater remotely operated vehicle based on linear quadratic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aras, Mohd Shahrieel Mohd; Abdullah, Shahrum Shah; Kamarudin, Muhammad Nizam; Rahman, Ahmad Fadzli Nizam Abdul; Azis, Fadilah Abd; Jaafar, Hazriq Izzuan

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the effectiveness of observer-based output feedback for Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV) with Linear Quadratic Regulation (LQR) performance. Tuning of observer parameters is crucial for tracking purpose. Prior to tuning facility, the ranges of observer and LQR parameters are obtained via system output cum error. The validation of this technique using unmanned underwater vehicles called Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) modelling helps to improve steady state performance of system response. The ROV modeling is focused for depth control using ROV 1 developed by the Underwater Technology Research Group (UTeRG). The results are showing that this technique improves steady state performances in term of overshoot and settling time of the system response.

  7. Results from the Operational Testing of the Eaton Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Brion

    2014-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the Eaton smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from Eaton for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Eaton smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  8. Results from Operational Testing of the Siemens Smart Grid-Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Brion

    2015-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the Siemens smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from Siemens for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Siemens smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  9. Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Transit Agency Vehicle Fleet Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, Brent; Southworth, Frank; Meyer, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews calculation tools available for quantifying the greenhouse gas emissions associated with different types of public transit service, and their usefulness in helping a transit agency to reduce its carbon footprint through informed vehicle and fuel procurement decisions. Available calculators fall into two categories: registry/inventory based calculators most suitable for standardized voluntary reporting, carbon trading, and regulatory compliance; and multi-modal life cycle analysis calculators that seek comprehensive coverage of all direct and indirect emissions. Despite significant progress in calculator development, no single calculator as yet contains all of the information needed by transit agencies to develop a truly comprehensive, life cycle analysis-based accounting of the emissions produced by its vehicle fleet operations, and for a wide range of vehicle/fuel technology options.

  10. Human-robot interaction modeling and simulation of supervisory control and situational awareness during field experimentation with military manned and unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Tony; Metcalfe, Jason; Brewster, Benjamin; Manteuffel, Christopher; Jaswa, Matthew; Tierney, Terrance

    2010-04-01

    The proliferation of intelligent systems in today's military demands increased focus on the optimization of human-robot interactions. Traditional studies in this domain involve large-scale field tests that require humans to operate semiautomated systems under varying conditions within military-relevant scenarios. However, provided that adequate constraints are employed, modeling and simulation can be a cost-effective alternative and supplement. The current presentation discusses a simulation effort that was executed in parallel with a field test with Soldiers operating military vehicles in an environment that represented key elements of the true operational context. In this study, "constructive" human operators were designed to represent average Soldiers executing supervisory control over an intelligent ground system. The constructive Soldiers were simulated performing the same tasks as those performed by real Soldiers during a directly analogous field test. Exercising the models in a high-fidelity virtual environment provided predictive results that represented actual performance in certain aspects, such as situational awareness, but diverged in others. These findings largely reflected the quality of modeling assumptions used to design behaviors and the quality of information available on which to articulate principles of operation. Ultimately, predictive analyses partially supported expectations, with deficiencies explicable via Soldier surveys, experimenter observations, and previously-identified knowledge gaps.

  11. A human operator simulator model of the NASA Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, F. A., III; Doane, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    A generic operator model called HOS was used to simulate the behavior and performance of a pilot flying a transport airplane during instrument approach and landing operations in order to demonstrate the applicability of the model to problems associated with interfacing a crew with a flight system. The model which was installed and operated on NASA Langley's central computing system is described. Preliminary results of its application to an investigation of an innovative display system under development in Langley's terminal configured vehicle program are considered.

  12. Evaluation of Impacts of JP-8+100 on Army Aviation and Ground Vehicles: Phase I Impact Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-11-01

    i Evaluation of Impacts of JP-8+100 on Army Aviation and Ground Vehicles: Phase I Impact Study INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 353 By C. A . Moses E. A ...to U.S. Army TARDEC Petroleum and Water Business Area Warren, MI Contract No. DAAK70-92-C-0059 November 2000 AD A REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form...subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO

  13. Expectation values of single-particle operators in the random phase approximation ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosov, D. S.

    2017-02-01

    We developed a method for computing matrix elements of single-particle operators in the correlated random phase approximation ground state. Working with the explicit random phase approximation ground state wavefunction, we derived a practically useful and simple expression for a molecular property in terms of random phase approximation amplitudes. The theory is illustrated by the calculation of molecular dipole moments for a set of representative molecules.

  14. Expectation values of single-particle operators in the random phase approximation ground state.

    PubMed

    Kosov, D S

    2017-02-07

    We developed a method for computing matrix elements of single-particle operators in the correlated random phase approximation ground state. Working with the explicit random phase approximation ground state wavefunction, we derived a practically useful and simple expression for a molecular property in terms of random phase approximation amplitudes. The theory is illustrated by the calculation of molecular dipole moments for a set of representative molecules.

  15. Counter tunnel exploration, mapping, and localization with an unmanned ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jacoby; Okorn, Brian; Pastore, Tracy; Hooper, David; Edwards, Jim

    2014-06-01

    Covert, cross-border tunnels are a security vulnerability that enables people and contraband to illegally enter the United States. All of these tunnels to-date have been constructed for the purpose of drug smuggling, but they may also be used to support terrorist activity. Past robotic tunnel exploration efforts have had limited success in aiding law enforcement to explore and map the suspect cross-border tunnels. These efforts have made use of adapted explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) or pipe inspection robotic systems that are not ideally suited to the cross-border tunnel environment. The Counter Tunnel project was sponsored by the Office of Secretary of Defense (OSD) Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE) to develop a prototype robotic system for counter-tunnel operations, focusing on exploration, mapping, and characterization of tunnels. The purpose of this system is to provide a safe and effective solution for three-dimensional (3D) localization, mapping, and characterization of a tunnel environment. The system is composed of the robotic mobility platform, the mapping sensor payload, and the delivery apparatus. The system is able to deploy and retrieve the robotic mobility platform through a 20-cm-diameter borehole into the tunnel. This requirement posed many challenges in order to design and package the sensor and robotic system to fit through this narrow opening and be able to perform the mission. This paper provides a short description of a few aspects of the Counter Tunnel system such as mobility, perception, and localization, which were developed to meet the unique challenges required to access, explore, and map tunnel environments.

  16. Building Operations Efficiencies into NASA's Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Davis, Stephan R.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Vision for Space Exploration guides the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) challenging missions that expand humanity's boundaries and open new routes to the space frontier. With the Agency's commitment to complete the International Space Station (ISS) and to retire the venerable Space Shuttle by 2010, the NASA Administrator commissioned the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) in 2005 to analyze options for safe, simple, cost-efficient launch solutions that could deliver human-rated space transportation capabilities in a timely manner within fixed budget guidelines. The Exploration Launch Projects (ELP) Office, chartered by the Constellation Program in October 2005, has been conducting systems engineering studies and business planning to successively refine the design configurations and better align vehicle concepts with customer and stakeholder requirements, such as significantly reduced life-cycle costs. As the Agency begins the process of replacing the Shuttle with a new generation of spacecraft destined for missions beyond low-Earth orbit to the Moon and Mars, NASA is designing the follow-on crew and cargo launch systems for maximum operational efficiencies. To sustain the long-term exploration of space, it is imperative to reduce the $4 billion NASA typically spends on space transportation each year. This paper gives toplevel information about how the follow-on Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) is being designed for improved safety and reliability, coupled with reduced operations costs. These methods include carefully developing operational requirements; conducting operability design and analysis; using the latest information technology tools to design and simulate the vehicle; and developing a learning culture across the workforce to ensure a smooth transition between Space Shuttle operations and Ares vehicle development.

  17. Evaluation of Anomaly Detection Capability for Ground-Based Pre-Launch Shuttle Operations. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodney Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will provide a thorough end-to-end description of the process for evaluation of three different data-driven algorithms for anomaly detection to select the best candidate for deployment as part of a suite of IVHM (Integrated Vehicle Health Management) technologies. These algorithms were deemed to be sufficiently mature enough to be considered viable candidates for deployment in support of the maiden launch of Ares I-X, the successor to the Space Shuttle for NASA's Constellation program. Data-driven algorithms are just one of three different types being deployed. The other two types of algorithms being deployed include a "nile-based" expert system, and a "model-based" system. Within these two categories, the deployable candidates have already been selected based upon qualitative factors such as flight heritage. For the rule-based system, SHINE (Spacecraft High-speed Inference Engine) has been selected for deployment, which is a component of BEAM (Beacon-based Exception Analysis for Multimissions), a patented technology developed at NASA's JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and serves to aid in the management and identification of operational modes. For the "model-based" system, a commercially available package developed by QSI (Qualtech Systems, Inc.), TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System) has been selected for deployment to aid in diagnosis. In the context of this particular deployment, distinctions among the use of the terms "data-driven," "rule-based," and "model-based," can be found in. Although there are three different categories of algorithms that have been selected for deployment, our main focus in this chapter will be on the evaluation of three candidates for data-driven anomaly detection. These algorithms will be evaluated upon their capability for robustly detecting incipient faults or failures in the ground-based phase of pre-launch space shuttle operations, rather than based oil heritage as performed in previous studies. Robust

  18. Tip-over prevention through heuristic reactive behaviors for unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talke, Kurt; Kelley, Leah; Longhini, Patrick; Catron, Garret

    2014-06-01

    Skid-steer teleoperated robots are commonly used by military and civilian crews to perform high-risk, dangerous and critical tasks such as bomb disposal. Their missions are often performed in unstructured environments with irregular terrain, such as inside collapsed buildings or on rough terrain covered with a variety of media, such as sand, brush, mud, rocks and debris. During such missions, it is often impractical if not impossible to send another robot or a human operator to right a toppled robot. As a consequence, a robot tip-over event usually results in mission failure. To make matters more complicated, such robots are often equipped with heavy payloads that raise their centers of mass and hence increase their instability. Should the robot be equipped with a manipulator arm or flippers, it may have a way to self-right. The majority of manipulator arms are not designed for and are likely to be damaged during self-righting procedures, however, which typically have a low success rate. Furthermore, those robots not equipped with manipulator arms or flippers have no self-righting capabilities. Additionally, due to the on-board camera frame of reference, the video feed may cause the robot to appear to be on at level ground, when it actually may be on a slope nearing tip-over. Finally, robot operators are often so focused on the mission at hand they are oblivious to their surroundings, similar to a kid playing a video game. While this may not be an issue in the living room, it is not a good scenario to experience on the battlefield. Our research seeks to remove tip-over monitoring from the already large list of tasks an operator must perform. An autonomous tip-over prevention behavior for a mobile robot with a static payload has been developed, implemented and experimentally validated on two different teleoperated robotic platforms. Suitable for use with both teleoperated and autonomous robots, the prevention behavior uses the force-angle stability measure

  19. Exhaust Emissions from Gasoline- and LPG-Powered Vehicles Operating at the Altitude of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Gamas, Erick D; Diaz, Luis; Rodriguez, René; López-Salinas, E; Schifter, Isaac; Ontiveros, Luis

    1999-10-01

    Unburned hydrocarbons (HCs), carbon monoxide (CO), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) are the compounds regulated as pollutants by an environmental standard in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City (MAMC). The main fuel used in vehicular transportation is gasoline, and the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is now an alternative as low emission technology to decrease the environmental impact of transportation operations. The environmental impact of commercial gasoline consumption in the Valley of Mexico was estimated by on-road and FTP-75 testing of three formulations of gasoline (one leaded [octane 81] and two unleaded [one octane 87 and one octane 93]). A fleet of 30 vehicles was used: 10 were chosen that had pre-1990 technology, while 12 were 1991-1996 vehicles equipped with fuel injection, catalytic converters, and air/ fuel ratio control technology. The remaining eight vehicles were high-performance new model vehicles (1995-1996) equipped with the newest technology available for pollution control. Fifteen vehicles in the fleet were also tested for the effect of changing from leaded to unleaded gasoline. Three different LPG formulations were tested using three vehicles representative of the LPG-powered fleet in the MAMC. Two gasoline-to-LPG conversion certified commercial systems were evaluated following the BAR-90 and the HOT-505 procedures. Emissions corresponding to the high-octane (premium) gasoline showed a 15% higher contribution to HCs with a 6% lower reactivity than the 87 octane gasoline; the HCs in the exhaust for premium gasoline are mainly isoparaffins. When the vehicles were tested on the road at high speeds, an average 3% increase in mileage was obtained when vehicles were switched from leaded to unleaded gasoline, while a 5% increase in mileage was observed when vehicles were switched from 87 octane to premium gasoline. The tests of LPG formulations indicated that a change in composition from 60% vol of propane to 85.5% vol reduces levels of HCs and

  20. The safety of vehicles imported from right-hand-drive vehicle configuration countries when operated in a left-hand-drive vehicle environment.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Peter J; Meckle, Wayne; Nasvadi, Glenyth

    2009-01-01

    Vehicles over 15 years of age imported into Canada are exempt from complying with Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (CMVSS) applicable to their years of production. This has led to a developing market for older imported vehicles in British Columbia (BC). But while mechanical inspections are carried out on such vehicles before they can be registered in BC, vehicles from countries that drive on the left side of the road (such as Japan) retain their right-hand-drive (RHD) control configuration. The concern with these vehicles is two-fold: first, does the RHD configuration lead to increased risk of crash involvement; and second, are these vehicles inferior in comparison to built-for-Canada vehicles of a similar age, with respect to occupant protection potential? In this study three separate methodologies were utilized in approaching these concerns: a relative crash culpability analysis where RHD and left-hand-drive (LHD) crash rates were compared for the same group of drivers; a survival analysis where time-to-first-crash was compared between RHD and LHD drivers: and a multiple regression model where RHD vehicle driver risk was compared to that of a similarly constituted comparison group of LHD vehicle drivers. The results of all three analyses were consistent. RHD vehicles had a significantly greater risk of at-fault crash involvement over that of similar LHD vehicles. However, crashes involving RHD vehicles were no more severe than those involving LHD vehicles only.