Science.gov

Sample records for ground-based microgravity analog

  1. Zero-Gravity Locomotion Simulators: New Ground-Based Analogs for Microgravity Exercise Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perusek, Gail P.; DeWitt, John K.; Cavanagh, Peter R.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Gilkey, Kelly M.

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining health and fitness in crewmembers during space missions is essential for preserving performance for mission-critical tasks. NASA's Exercise Countermeasures Project (ECP) provides space exploration exercise hardware and monitoring requirements that lead to devices that are reliable, meet medical, vehicle, and habitat constraints, and use minimal vehicle and crew resources. ECP will also develop and validate efficient exercise prescriptions that minimize daily time needed for completion of exercise yet maximize performance for mission activities. In meeting these mission goals, NASA Glenn Research Center (Cleveland, OH, USA), in collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio, USA), has developed a suite of zero-gravity locomotion simulators and associated technologies to address the need for ground-based test analog capability for simulating in-flight (microgravity) and surface (partial-gravity) exercise to advance the health and safety of astronaut crews and the next generation of space explorers. Various research areas can be explored. These include improving crew comfort during exercise, and understanding joint kinematics and muscle activation pattern differences relative to external loading mechanisms. In addition, exercise protocol and hardware optimization can be investigated, along with characterizing system dynamic response and the physiological demand associated with advanced exercise device concepts and performance of critical mission tasks for Exploration class missions. Three zero-gravity locomotion simulators are currently in use and the research focus for each will be presented. All of the devices are based on a supine subject suspension system, which simulates a reduced gravity environment by completely or partially offloading the weight of the exercising test subject s body. A platform for mounting treadmill is positioned perpendicularly to the test subject. The Cleveland Clinic Zero-g Locomotion Simulator (ZLS) utilizes a

  2. Dietary nucleotides prevent decrease in cellular immunity in ground-based microgravity analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Keiko; Hales, Nathan W.; Robinson, Sandra M.; Niehoff, Michael L.; Ramesh, Vani; Pellis, Neal R.; Kulkarni, Anil D.

    2002-01-01

    Microgravity and stress of spaceflights result in immune dysfunction. The role of nutrition, especially nucleotide supplementation, has become an area of intensive research and significant interest in immunomodulation for maintenance of cellular immune responses. The studies presented here evaluate the plausibility of administering nucleotides to obviate immune dysfunction in an Earth-based in vivo analog of microgravity as studied in anti-orthostatic tail suspension (AOS) of mice. Mice were divided into three housing groups: group, isolation, and AOS. Mice were fed either control chow diet (CD), or RNA-, adenine-, or uracil-supplemented CD for the 1-wk duration of the experiments. In AOS mice, supplemental nucleotides significantly increased in vivo lymph node proliferation and ex vivo lymphoproliferation response to alloantigen and mitogens, respectively, and interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma production. A lower corticosterone level was observed in uracil-supplemented CD compared with CD. These results suggest that exogenous nucleotide supplementation, especially uracil, of normal diet is beneficial in the maintenance and restoration of the immune response during the microgravity analog conditions.

  3. Dietary nucleotides prevent decrease in cellular immunity in ground-based microgravity analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Keiko; Hales, Nathan W.; Robinson, Sandra M.; Niehoff, Michael L.; Ramesh, Vani; Pellis, Neal R.; Kulkarni, Anil D.

    2002-01-01

    Microgravity and stress of spaceflights result in immune dysfunction. The role of nutrition, especially nucleotide supplementation, has become an area of intensive research and significant interest in immunomodulation for maintenance of cellular immune responses. The studies presented here evaluate the plausibility of administering nucleotides to obviate immune dysfunction in an Earth-based in vivo analog of microgravity as studied in anti-orthostatic tail suspension (AOS) of mice. Mice were divided into three housing groups: group, isolation, and AOS. Mice were fed either control chow diet (CD), or RNA-, adenine-, or uracil-supplemented CD for the 1-wk duration of the experiments. In AOS mice, supplemental nucleotides significantly increased in vivo lymph node proliferation and ex vivo lymphoproliferation response to alloantigen and mitogens, respectively, and interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma production. A lower corticosterone level was observed in uracil-supplemented CD compared with CD. These results suggest that exogenous nucleotide supplementation, especially uracil, of normal diet is beneficial in the maintenance and restoration of the immune response during the microgravity analog conditions.

  4. Analysis by NASA's VESGEN Software of Vascular Branching in the Human Retina with a Ground-Based Microgravity Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Vyas, Ruchi J.; Raghunandan, Sneha; Vu, Amanda C.; Zanello, Susana B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Taibbi, Giovanni; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2016-01-01

    Significant risks for visual impairment were discovered recently in astronauts following spaceflight, especially after long-duration missions.1 We hypothesize that microgravity-induced fluid shifts result in pathological changes within the retinal vasculature that precede visual and other ocular impairments. We therefore are analyzing retinal vessels in healthy subjects with NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software2 before and after head-down tilt (HDT), a ground-based microgravity analog For our preliminary study of masked images, two groups of venous trees with and without small veins (G=7) were clearly identified by VESGEN analysis. Upon completing all images and unmasking the subject status of pre- and post- HDT, we will determine whether differences in the presence or absence of small veins are important correlates, and perhaps reliable predictors, of other ocular and physiological adaptations to prolonged HDT and microgravity. Greater peripapillary retinal thickening was measured following 70-day HDT bed rest than 14-day HDT bed rest, suggesting that time of HDT may increase the amount of optic disc swelling.3 Spectralis OCT detected retinal nerve fiber layer thickening post HDT, without clinical signs of optic disc edema. Such changes may have resulted from HDT-induced cephalad fluid shifts. Clinical methods for examining adaptive microvascular remodeling in the retina to microgravity space flight are currently not established.

  5. Microgravity research in NASA ground-based facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekan, Jack

    1989-01-01

    An overview of reduced gravity research performed in NASA ground-based facilities sponsored by the Microgravity Science and Applications Program of the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications is presented. A brief description and summary of the operations and capabilities of each of these facilities along with an overview of the historical usage of them is included. The goals and program elements of the Microgravity Science and Applications programs are described and the specific programs that utilize the low gravity facilities are identified. Results from two particular investigations in combustion (flame spread over solid fuels) and fluid physics (gas-liquid flows at microgravity conditions) are presented.

  6. Ground based research in microgravity materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Rathz, Tom

    1994-01-01

    The core activities performed during this time period have been concerned with tracking the TEMPEST experiments on the shuttle with drops of Zr, Ni, and Nb alloys. In particular a lot of Zr drops are being made to better define the recalescence characteristics of that system so that accurate comparisons of the drop tube results with Tempest can be made. A new liner, with minimal reflectivity characteristics, has been inserted into the drop tube in order to improve the recalescence measurements of the falling drops. The first installation to make the geometric measurements to ensure a proper fit has been made. The stovepipe sections are currently in the shop at MSFC being painted with low reflectivity black paint. Work has also continued on setting up the MEL apparatus obtained from Oak Ridge in the down stairs laboratory at the Drop Tube Facilities. Some ground-based experiments on the same metals as are being processed on TEMPEST are planned for the MEL. The flight schedules for the KC-135 experiments are still to be determined in the near future.

  7. Responds of Bone Cells to Microgravity: Ground-Based Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Jingbao; Xu, Huiyun; Yang, Pengfei; Xie, Li; Qian, Airong; Zhao, Yong; Shang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Severe loss of bone occurs due to long-duration spaceflight. Mechanical loading stimulates bone formation, while bone degradation happens under mechanical unloading. Bone remodeling is a dynamic process in which bone formation and bone resorption are tightly coupled. Increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation caused by reduced mechanical loading, generally result in disrupted bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is orchestrated by multiple bone cells including osteoblast, osteocyte, osteoclast and mesenchymal stem cell. It is yet not clear that how these bone cells sense altered gravity, translate physical stimulus into biochemical signals, and then regulate themselves structurally and functionally. In this paper, studies elucidating the bioeffects of microgravity on bone cells (osteoblast, osteocyte, osteoclast, mesenchymal stem cell) using various platforms including spaceflight and ground-based simulated microgravity were summarized. Promising gravity-sensitive signaling pathways and protein molecules were proposed.

  8. Behavior of stem cells under outer-space microgravity and ground-based microgravity simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Li, Liang; Chen, Jianling; Wang, Jinfu

    2015-06-01

    With rapid development of space engineering, research on life sciences in space is being conducted extensively, especially cellular and molecular studies on space medicine. Stem cells, undifferentiated cells that can differentiate into specialized cells, are considered a key resource for regenerative medicine. Research on stem cells under conditions of microgravity during a space flight or a ground-based simulation has generated several excellent findings. To help readers understand the effects of outer space and ground-based simulation conditions on stem cells, we reviewed recent studies on the effects of microgravity (as an obvious environmental factor in space) on morphology, proliferation, migration, and differentiation of stem cells.

  9. Facilities for Simulation of Microgravity in the ESA Ground-Based Facility Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brungs, Sonja; Egli, Marcel; Wuest, Simon L.; M. Christianen, Peter C.; W. A. van Loon, Jack J.; Ngo Anh, Thu Jennifer; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the role of gravity in fundamental biological processes and, consequently, the impact of exposure to microgravity conditions provide insight into the basics of the development of life as well as enabling long-term space exploration missions. However, experimentation in real microgravity is expensive and scarcely available; thus, a variety of platforms have been developed to provide, on Earth, an experimental condition comparable to real microgravity. With the aim of simulating microgravity conditions, different ground-based facilities (GBF) have been constructed such as clinostats and random positioning machines as well as magnets for magnetic levitation. Here, we give an overview of ground-based facilities for the simulation of microgravity which were used in the frame of an ESA ground-based research programme dedicated to providing scientists access to these experimental capabilities in order to prepare their space experiments.

  10. Ground Based Microgravity Emissions Testing Of Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samorezov, Sergey; McNelis, Anne M.

    2004-01-01

    To control microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS), NASA developed payloads have to meet the payload integration requirements of the Space Station Program, specifically a microgravity allocation plan. The Microgravity Emissions Laboratory (MEL) was developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for verification of the payloads compliance with payload integration requirements. MEL is a 6 degree of freedom inertial measurement system capable of characterizing the microgravity emissions, generated by a disturber, down to a micro g. Microgravity Emissions tests provide a payload developer with a tool to assess payload's compliance with the requirements, i.e. forces and moments, generated by the payload at its center of gravity. Forces and moments are presented in time domain for both stationary and transient signals, and in frequency domain for the stationary signals. To date, MEL conducted over thirty tests of ISS hardware. The test results are being successfully used by the payload developers for design verification and improvement.

  11. Insight into mechanisms of reduced orthostatic performance after exposure to microgravity: comparison of ground-based and space flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    Since the beginning of human spaceflight, the value of understanding mechanisms of physiological adaptation to microgravity became apparent to life scientists who were interested in maintining crew health and developing countermeasures agains adverse effects of the mission. However, several characteristics associated the the logistics of spaceflight presented significant limitations to the scientific study of human adaptation to microgravity. Because space missions are so infrequent and involve minimal numbers of crewmembers, meaninful statistical analysis of data are limited. Reproducibility of results from spaceflight experiments is difficult to assess since there are few repeated space missions involving the same crewmembers. Since the emphasis of space missions is placed on operations, experiments are compromised without adequate control over various factors (e.g., time, diet, physical activities, etc.) that can impact measured responses. With the mimimal opportunity to collect spaceflight data, there is a high risk of experiments that simultaneously interfere with other experiments by the increasing demand on the crewmembers to participate in mumerous experiments proposed by multiple investigators. The technology and ability to measure physiological functions necessary to test specific hypotheses can be severely limited by physical space and power constraints of the space enviroment. Finally, technical and logistical aspects of space missions such as launch delays, extended missions, and inflight operational emergencies can significantly compromise the timing and control of experiments. These limitations have stimulated scientists to develop ground-based analogs of microgravity in an effort to investigate the effects of spaceflight on physiological function in a controlled experimental setting. The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected comparison of data collected from ground-based experiments with those obtained from spaceflight in an effort to

  12. Insight into mechanisms of reduced orthostatic performance after exposure to microgravity: comparison of ground-based and space flight data.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A

    1998-07-01

    Since the beginning of human spaceflight, the value of understanding mechanisms of physiological adaptation to microgravity became apparent to life scientists who were interested in maintining crew health and developing countermeasures agains adverse effects of the mission. However, several characteristics associated the the logistics of spaceflight presented significant limitations to the scientific study of human adaptation to microgravity. Because space missions are so infrequent and involve minimal numbers of crewmembers, meaninful statistical analysis of data are limited. Reproducibility of results from spaceflight experiments is difficult to assess since there are few repeated space missions involving the same crewmembers. Since the emphasis of space missions is placed on operations, experiments are compromised without adequate control over various factors (e.g., time, diet, physical activities, etc.) that can impact measured responses. With the mimimal opportunity to collect spaceflight data, there is a high risk of experiments that simultaneously interfere with other experiments by the increasing demand on the crewmembers to participate in mumerous experiments proposed by multiple investigators. The technology and ability to measure physiological functions necessary to test specific hypotheses can be severely limited by physical space and power constraints of the space enviroment. Finally, technical and logistical aspects of space missions such as launch delays, extended missions, and inflight operational emergencies can significantly compromise the timing and control of experiments. These limitations have stimulated scientists to develop ground-based analogs of microgravity in an effort to investigate the effects of spaceflight on physiological function in a controlled experimental setting. The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected comparison of data collected from ground-based experiments with those obtained from spaceflight in an effort to

  13. Insight into mechanisms of reduced orthostatic performance after exposure to microgravity: comparison of ground-based and space flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    Since the beginning of human spaceflight, the value of understanding mechanisms of physiological adaptation to microgravity became apparent to life scientists who were interested in maintining crew health and developing countermeasures agains adverse effects of the mission. However, several characteristics associated the the logistics of spaceflight presented significant limitations to the scientific study of human adaptation to microgravity. Because space missions are so infrequent and involve minimal numbers of crewmembers, meaninful statistical analysis of data are limited. Reproducibility of results from spaceflight experiments is difficult to assess since there are few repeated space missions involving the same crewmembers. Since the emphasis of space missions is placed on operations, experiments are compromised without adequate control over various factors (e.g., time, diet, physical activities, etc.) that can impact measured responses. With the mimimal opportunity to collect spaceflight data, there is a high risk of experiments that simultaneously interfere with other experiments by the increasing demand on the crewmembers to participate in mumerous experiments proposed by multiple investigators. The technology and ability to measure physiological functions necessary to test specific hypotheses can be severely limited by physical space and power constraints of the space enviroment. Finally, technical and logistical aspects of space missions such as launch delays, extended missions, and inflight operational emergencies can significantly compromise the timing and control of experiments. These limitations have stimulated scientists to develop ground-based analogs of microgravity in an effort to investigate the effects of spaceflight on physiological function in a controlled experimental setting. The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected comparison of data collected from ground-based experiments with those obtained from spaceflight in an effort to

  14. Postural Responses Following Space Flight and Ground Based Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, Igor S.; Reschke, Millard F.; Cerisano, Jody M.; Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Tomilovskaya, Elena V.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa B.; Bloomberg, Jacob B.

    2013-01-01

    With the transition from the Shuttle program to the International Space Station (ISS), the opportunity to fly sensorimotor experiments in a weightless environment has become increasingly more difficult to obtain. As a result, more investigations have turned to ground-based analogs as a way of evaluating an experiment's viability. The two primary analogs available to most investigators are 6deg head down bed rest (HDBR) and dry immersion (DI). For the time being, HDBR investigations have been associated with studies conducted in the United States while the Russians and several other European Union states have concentrated their efforts on using DI as the space flight analog of choice. While either model may be viable for cardiovascular, bone and other system changes, vestibular and sensorimotor investigators have retained serious reservations of either analog's potential to serve as a replacement for a true weightless environment. These reservations have merit, but it is worthwhile to consider that not all changes associated with sensorimotor function during space flight are the result of top-down modifications, but may also be due to the lack, or change, of appropriate support surfaces applying force to the bottom of the feet. To this end we have compared quiet stance postural responses between short duration Space Shuttle flights, long duration ISS flights and HDBR of varying duration. Using these three platforms, representing different modifications of support we investigated postural ataxia using a quiet stance model. Quiet stance was obtained by asking the subjects to stand upright on a force plate, eyes open, arms at the side of the body for three min. From the force plate we obtained average sway velocity in two axes as well as length of line (stabilogram). These parameters were then related to EMG activity recorded from the medial gastrocnemius and lateral tibialis. It is significant to note that postural ataxia measured as quiet stance shows analogous

  15. Ground-based facilities for simulation of microgravity: organism-specific recommendations for their use, and recommended terminology.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Raul; Anken, Ralf; Boonstra, Johannes; Braun, Markus; Christianen, Peter C M; de Geest, Maarten; Hauslage, Jens; Hilbig, Reinhard; Hill, Richard J A; Lebert, Michael; Medina, F Javier; Vagt, Nicole; Ullrich, Oliver; van Loon, Jack J W A; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Research in microgravity is indispensable to disclose the impact of gravity on biological processes and organisms. However, research in the near-Earth orbit is severely constrained by the limited number of flight opportunities. Ground-based simulators of microgravity are valuable tools for preparing spaceflight experiments, but they also facilitate stand-alone studies and thus provide additional and cost-efficient platforms for gravitational research. The various microgravity simulators that are frequently used by gravitational biologists are based on different physical principles. This comparative study gives an overview of the most frequently used microgravity simulators and demonstrates their individual capacities and limitations. The range of applicability of the various ground-based microgravity simulators for biological specimens was carefully evaluated by using organisms that have been studied extensively under the conditions of real microgravity in space. In addition, current heterogeneous terminology is discussed critically, and recommendations are given for appropriate selection of adequate simulators and consistent use of nomenclature.

  16. Ground-Based Gas-Liquid Flow Research in Microgravity Conditions: State of Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, J.; Colin, C.; Fabre, J.

    1999-01-01

    During the last decade, ground-based microgravity facilities have been utilized in order to obtain predictions for spacecraft system designers and further the fundamental understanding of two-phase flow. Although flow regime, pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient data has been obtained for straight tubes and a limited number of fittings, measurements of the void fraction, film thickness, wall shear stress, local velocity and void information are also required in order to develop general mechanistic models that can be utilized to ascertain the effects of fluid properties, tube geometry and acceleration levels. A review of this research is presented and includes both empirical data and mechanistic models of the flow behavior.

  17. Microgravity Investigation of Crew Reactions in 0-G (MICR0-G): Ground-Based Development Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Dava J.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the technology development of an advanced load sensor ground-based prototype and details the preliminary tests in microgravity during parabolic flights. The research effort is entitled, the Microgravity Investigation and Crew Reactions in 0-G (MICR0-G), a ground-based research effort funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The MICR0-G project was a follow-on to the Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS) spaceflight experiment flown on the Russian Space Station Mir. The technology development of the advanced load sensor prototype has been carried out by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), with collaboration from Politecnico di Milano University and the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The key hardware of the advanced sensor prototype is a set of two types of load sensors - a hand-hold and foot restraints - similar in appearance to the mobility aids found in the Space Shuttle orbiter to assist the crew in moving inside the spacecraft, but able to measure the applied forces and moments about the x-, y-, and z- axes. The aim of Chapter 1 is to give a brief overview of the report contents. The first section summarizes the previous research efforts on astronaut-induced loads in microgravity. The second section provides information on the MICR0-G research project and the technology development work conducted at MIT. Section 1.3 details the motivation for designing a new generation of load sensors and describes the main enhancements and contributions of the MICR0-G advanced load sensors system compared to the EDLS system. Finally, the last section presents the outline of the report.

  18. Escherichia coli biofilms formed under low-shear modeled microgravity in a ground-based system.

    PubMed

    Lynch, S V; Mukundakrishnan, K; Benoit, M R; Ayyaswamy, P S; Matin, A

    2006-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms cause chronic diseases that are difficult to control. Since biofilm formation in space is well documented and planktonic cells become more resistant and virulent under modeled microgravity, it is important to determine the effect of this gravity condition on biofilms. Inclusion of glass microcarrier beads of appropriate dimensions and density with medium and inoculum, in vessels specially designed to permit ground-based investigations into aspects of low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG), facilitated these studies. Mathematical modeling of microcarrier behavior based on experimental conditions demonstrated that they satisfied the criteria for LSMMG conditions. Experimental observations confirmed that the microcarrier trajectory in the LSMMG vessel concurred with the predicted model. At 24 h, the LSMMG Escherichia coli biofilms were thicker than their normal-gravity counterparts and exhibited increased resistance to the general stressors salt and ethanol and to two antibiotics (penicillin and chloramphenicol). Biofilms of a mutant of E. coli, deficient in sigma(s), were impaired in developing LSMMG-conferred resistance to the general stressors but not to the antibiotics, indicating two separate pathways of LSMMG-conferred resistance.

  19. Solidification kinetics of a Cu-Zr alloy: ground-based and microgravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galenko, P. K.; Hanke, R.; Paul, P.; Koch, S.; Rettenmayr, M.; Gegner, J.; Herlach, D. M.; Dreier, W.; Kharanzhevski, E. V.

    2017-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical results obtained in the MULTIPHAS-project (ESA-European Space Agency and DLR-German Aerospace Center) are critically discussed regarding solidification kinetics of congruently melting and glass forming Cu50Zr50 alloy samples. The samples are investigated during solidification using a containerless technique in the Electromagnetic Levitation Facility [1]. Applying elaborated methodologies for ground-based and microgravity experimental investigations [2], the kinetics of primary dendritic solidification is quantitatively evaluated. Electromagnetic Levitator in microgravity (parabolic flights and on board of the International Space Station) and Electrostatic Levitator on Ground are employed. The solidification kinetics is determined using a high-speed camera and applying two evaluation methods: “Frame by Frame” (FFM) and “First Frame - Last Frame” (FLM). In the theoretical interpretation of the solidification experiments, special attention is given to the behavior of the cluster structure in Cu50Zr50 samples with the increase of undercooling. Experimental results on solidification kinetics are interpreted using a theoretical model of diffusion controlled dendrite growth.

  20. Ground-Based Facilities for Simulation of Microgravity: Organism-Specific Recommendations for Their Use, and Recommended Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Anken, Ralf; Boonstra, Johannes; Braun, Markus; Christianen, Peter C.M.; de Geest, Maarten; Hauslage, Jens; Hilbig, Reinhard; Hill, Richard J.A.; Lebert, Michael; Medina, F. Javier; Vagt, Nicole; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Research in microgravity is indispensable to disclose the impact of gravity on biological processes and organisms. However, research in the near-Earth orbit is severely constrained by the limited number of flight opportunities. Ground-based simulators of microgravity are valuable tools for preparing spaceflight experiments, but they also facilitate stand-alone studies and thus provide additional and cost-efficient platforms for gravitational research. The various microgravity simulators that are frequently used by gravitational biologists are based on different physical principles. This comparative study gives an overview of the most frequently used microgravity simulators and demonstrates their individual capacities and limitations. The range of applicability of the various ground-based microgravity simulators for biological specimens was carefully evaluated by using organisms that have been studied extensively under the conditions of real microgravity in space. In addition, current heterogeneous terminology is discussed critically, and recommendations are given for appropriate selection of adequate simulators and consistent use of nomenclature. Key Words: 2-D clinostat—3-D clinostat—Gravity—Magnetic levitation—Random positioning machine—Simulated microgravity—Space biology. Astrobiology 13, 1–17. PMID:23252378

  1. The thermo-vibrational convection in microgravity condition. Ground-based modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzgin, A. V.; Putin, G. F.; Harisov, A. F.

    In 1995-2000 at orbital station "Mir" has been carried out the series of experiments with the equipment "Alice" for the studying regimes of heat transfer in the supercritical fluids under influence inertial microaccelerations. The experiments have found out existence of the thermo-vibrational and thermo-inertial convective movements in the real weightlessness[1] and controlling microgravity fields[2]. However regarding structures of thermovibrational convection the results of experiments have inconsistent character. Therefore carrying out the ground-based modeling of the given problem is actually. In this work in laboratory conditions were investigated the thermo-vibrational convective movements from the dot heat source at high-frequency vibrations of the cavity with the fluid and presence quasi-static microacceleration. As the result of ground-based modeling, the regimes of convective flows, similar observed in the space experiment are received. Evolution of the convective structures and the spatial-temporary characteristics of movements are investigated in a wide range of the problem parameters. The control criteria and its critical value are determined. The received results well coordinated to the data of space experiments and allow adding and expanding representation about thermo-vibrational effects in conditions of real weightlessness and remove the contradictions concerning structures thermo-vibrational convective flows, received at the analysis of the given orbital experiments. The research described in this publication was made possible in part by Russian Foundation for Basic Research and Administration of Perm Region, Russia, under grant 04-02-96038, and Award No. PE-009-0 of the U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union (CRDF). A.V. Zyuzgin, A. I. Ivanov, V. I. Polezhaev, G. F. Putin, E. B. Soboleva Convective Motions in Near-Critical Fluids under Real Zero-Gravity Conditions. Cosmic Research

  2. Ground-based research of LiIO3 and NaClO3 crystal growth under microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Youting

    Ground-based research of LiIO3 and NaClO3 crystal growth under microgravity environment Youting Song*, Wanchun Chen, Xiaolong Chen Institute of Physics and Beijing National Lab-oratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Beijing, 100080 P. R. China ytsong@aphy.iphy.ac.cn The progress in ground-based research of LiIO3 and NaClO3 crystal growth under micro-gravity environment was reported. (a) A new apparatus used for growth of large size of LiIO3 crystals by the evaporation method has been developed, in which the hydrophobic poly-terafluorothytene micro-filtration (PEFT) film was used to resist the leakage of LiIO3 solution and control the growth rate of LiIO3 crystals along with CaCl2 adsorbent. The pore diameters of PEFT film should be between 0.1-1.0m, and the optimal weight of the adsorbent should be as three times as that of the solvent H2O evaporated. During crystal growth, the solution is re-plenished by a creeping pump to avoid separating the growing crystal from the solution. Using this technique we have obtained good quality LiIO3 crystals in the ground-based experiments. (b) The nucleating experiment of NaClO3 seed-induction was carried out in a ground-based en-vironment, and experimental results showed that seed-induction of NaClO3 played certainly a role of increasing crystal chiral enantiomer excess (cee), which will become the basis of contrast experiment under microgravity environment.

  3. Long-duration bed rest as an analog to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hargens, Alan R; Vico, Laurence

    2016-04-15

    Long-duration bed rest is widely employed to simulate the effects of microgravity on various physiological systems, especially for studies of bone, muscle, and the cardiovascular system. This microgravity analog is also extensively used to develop and test countermeasures to microgravity-altered adaptations to Earth gravity. Initial investigations of bone loss used horizontal bed rest with the view that this model represented the closest approximation to inactivity and minimization of hydrostatic effects, but all Earth-based analogs must contend with the constant force of gravity by adjustment of the G vector. Later concerns about the lack of similarity between headward fluid shifts in space and those with horizontal bed rest encouraged the use of 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest as pioneered by Russian investigators. Headward fluid shifts in space may redistribute bone from the legs to the head. At present, HDT bed rest with normal volunteers is the most common analog for microgravity simulation and to test countermeasures for bone loss, muscle and cardiac atrophy, orthostatic intolerance, and reduced muscle strength/exercise capacity. Also, current physiologic countermeasures are focused on long-duration missions such as Mars, so in this review we emphasize HDT bed rest studies with durations of 30 days and longer. However, recent results suggest that the HDT bed rest analog is less representative as an analog for other important physiological problems of long-duration space flight such as fluid shifts, spinal dysfunction and radiation hazards.

  4. Investigation of the Influence of Microgravity on Transport Mechanisms in a Virtual Spaceflight Chamber: A Ground Based Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Rangel, Roger; Witherow, William; Rogers, Jan; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1999-01-01

    In January 1992, the IML-1 FES experiment produced a set of classic experimental data and a 40 hour holographic "movie" of an ensemble of spheres in a fluid in microgravity. Because the data are in the form of holograms, we can study the three-dimensional distribution of particles with unprecedented detail by a variety of methods and for a wide variety of interests. The possession of the holographic movie is tantamount to having a complex experiment in space while working in an easily accessible laboratory on earth. The movie contains a vast amount of useful data, including residual g, g-jitter, convection and transport data, and particle fluid interaction data. The information content in the movie is so great that we have scarcely begun to tap into the data that is actually available in the more than 1000 holograms, each containing as much as 1000 megabytes of information. This ground-based project is exploiting this data and the concept of holographic storage of spaceflight data to provide an understanding of the effects of microgravity in materials processing. This paper provides the foundation, objectives, and status of the ground based project. The primary objective of this project is to advance the understanding of microgravity effects on crystal growth, convection in materials processing in the space environment, and complex transport phenomena at low Reynolds numbers. This objective is being achieved both experimentally and theoretically. Experiments are making use of existing holographic data recorded during the IML- I spaceflight. A parallel theoretical effort is providing the models for understanding the particle fields and their physics in the microgravity environment.

  5. Ground Based Studies of Gas-Liquid Flows in Microgravity Using Learjet Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, W. S.; Dukler, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    A 1.27 cm diameter two phase gas-liquid flow experiment has been developed with the NASA Lewis Research Center to study two-phase flows in microgravity. The experiment allows for the measurement of void fraction, pressure drop, film thickness and bubble and wave velocities as well as for high speed photography. Three liquids were used to study the effects of liquid viscosity and surface tension, and flow pattern maps are presented for each. The experimental results are used to develop mechanistically based models to predict void fraction, bubble velocity, pressure drop and flow pattern transitions in microgravity.

  6. Microgravity Apparatus And Ground-Based Study Of The Flame Propagation And Quenching In Metal Dust Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goroshin, Sam; Kolbe, Massimilliano; Bellerose, Julie; Lee, John

    2003-01-01

    Due to particle sedimentation and relatively low laminar flame speeds in dust suspensions, microgravity environment is essential for the observation of laminar dust flames in a wide range of particle sizes and fuel concentrations [1]. The capability of a reduced-gravity environment to facilitate study of dust combustion was realized by researchers long before current microgravity programs were established by the various national Space Agencies. Thus, several experimentalists even built their own, albeit very short-duration, drop tower facilities to study flames in particle and droplet suspensions [2,3]. About ten years ago, authors of the present paper started their dust combustion reduced gravity research with the investigation of the constant volume dust flames in a spherical-bomb on board a parabolic flight aircraft [4]. However it was soon realized that direct observation of the constant-pressure flame might be more beneficial. Thus, microgravity apparatus, permitting examination of the freely propagating flames in open-end tubes, was tested in parabolic flights three years later [5]. The improved design of the newlyconstructed apparatus for the experiments on board the NASA KC-135 aircraft is also based on the observation of the dust flame propagating in semi-opened tubes with free expansion of the combustion products that are continuously vented overboard. The apparatus design and results of its extensive ground-based testing are presented below.

  7. Loss of signal transduction and inhibition of lymphocyte locomotion in a ground-based model of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory adherence to, and locomotion through the interstitium is an important component of the immune response. Conditions such as microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) severely inhibit lymphocyte locomotion in vitro through gelled type I collagen. We used the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor or slow-turning lateral vessel as a prototype for MMG in ground-based experiments. Previous experiments from our laboratory revealed that when lymphocytes (human peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs]) were first activated with phytohemaglutinin followed by exposure to MMG, locomotory capacity was not affected. In the present study, MMG inhibits lymphocyte locomotion in a manner similar to that observed in microgravity. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatment of PBMCs restored lost locomotory capacity by a maximum of 87%. Augmentation of cellular calcium flux with ionomycin had no restorative effect. Treatment of lymphocytes with mitomycin C prior to exposure to MMG, followed by PMA, restored locomotion to the same extent as when nonmitomycin C-treated lymphocytes were exposed to MMG (80-87%), suggesting that deoxyribonucleic acid replication is not essential for the restoration of locomotion. Thus, direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with PMA was effective in restoring locomotion in MMG comparable to the normal levels seen in Ig cultures. Therefore, in MMG, lymphocyte calcium signaling pathways were functional, with defects occurring at either the level of PKC or upstream of PKC.

  8. Loss of signal transduction and inhibition of lymphocyte locomotion in a ground-based model of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory adherence to, and locomotion through the interstitium is an important component of the immune response. Conditions such as microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) severely inhibit lymphocyte locomotion in vitro through gelled type I collagen. We used the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor or slow-turning lateral vessel as a prototype for MMG in ground-based experiments. Previous experiments from our laboratory revealed that when lymphocytes (human peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs]) were first activated with phytohemaglutinin followed by exposure to MMG, locomotory capacity was not affected. In the present study, MMG inhibits lymphocyte locomotion in a manner similar to that observed in microgravity. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatment of PBMCs restored lost locomotory capacity by a maximum of 87%. Augmentation of cellular calcium flux with ionomycin had no restorative effect. Treatment of lymphocytes with mitomycin C prior to exposure to MMG, followed by PMA, restored locomotion to the same extent as when nonmitomycin C-treated lymphocytes were exposed to MMG (80-87%), suggesting that deoxyribonucleic acid replication is not essential for the restoration of locomotion. Thus, direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with PMA was effective in restoring locomotion in MMG comparable to the normal levels seen in Ig cultures. Therefore, in MMG, lymphocyte calcium signaling pathways were functional, with defects occurring at either the level of PKC or upstream of PKC.

  9. Fluid-structural dynamics of ground-based and microgravity caloric tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Oas, J. G.; Deserranno, Dimitri

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab1 mission produced nystagmus results with an intensity comparable to those elicited during post- and pre- flight tests, thus contradicting the basic premise of Barany's convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. In this work, we present a dynamic fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal based on two simultaneous driving forces for the endolymphatic flow: natural convection driven by the temperature-dependent density variation in the bulk fluid and expansive convection caused by direct volumetric displacement of the endolymph during the thermal irrigation. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, the natural convection mechanism is dominant. But in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing cupular displacement. A series of transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the differences between the dynamics of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The impact of these different flow dynamics on the endolymph-cupula fluid-structural interactions is also analyzed based on the time evolutions of cupular displacement and velocity and the transcupular pressure differences.

  10. Fluid-structural dynamics of ground-based and microgravity caloric tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Oas, J. G.; Deserranno, Dimitri

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity caloric tests aboard the 1983 SpaceLab1 mission produced nystagmus results with an intensity comparable to those elicited during post- and pre- flight tests, thus contradicting the basic premise of Barany's convection hypothesis for caloric stimulation. In this work, we present a dynamic fluid structural analysis of the caloric stimulation of the lateral semicircular canal based on two simultaneous driving forces for the endolymphatic flow: natural convection driven by the temperature-dependent density variation in the bulk fluid and expansive convection caused by direct volumetric displacement of the endolymph during the thermal irrigation. Direct numerical simulations indicate that on earth, the natural convection mechanism is dominant. But in the microgravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, where buoyancy effects are mitigated, expansive convection becomes the sole mechanism for producing cupular displacement. A series of transient 1 g and microgravity case studies are presented to delineate the differences between the dynamics of the 1 g and microgravity endolymphatic flows. The impact of these different flow dynamics on the endolymph-cupula fluid-structural interactions is also analyzed based on the time evolutions of cupular displacement and velocity and the transcupular pressure differences.

  11. Adaptation of Motility Analysis Apparatus for Space Science and Microgravity Ground-Based Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jacqueline U.

    1996-01-01

    Previous space flight studies have described unfavorable effects of microgravity on testicular morphology and spermatogenesis (Cosmos 1887 Biosputnik flight, 9/29/87 - 10/12/87). The flight animals demonstrated small reductions in testicular and epididymal size, the phenomenon explained as resulting water loss. Yet, light microscopic histological preparations revealed few spermatozoa in the rete testis of the flight males compared to control animals. The cause for this finding was subjectively assessed to be due to "the anatomical dislocation of the organs... and a disturbance in testicular blood supply". Unfortunately, the reported effects of microgravity on the reproductive processes (particularly within males) are few and divergent. If habitation in space is a futuristic goal, more objective testing (of male and female gametes) in a microgravity environment will provide insight to the developmental potential of these reproductive cells. As part of the Marshall Space Flight Centers' Summer Faculty Fellowship Program within the Biophysics Branch, a key component of the research investigation was to develop a test to evaluate individual cell motility and orientation in varying gravitational environments, using computerized assessment of sperm cell concentration, morphology and motility to provide objective, quantitative experimental control. In previous work performed jointly by the author and a NASA colleague, it has been shown that macroscopic motile aggregates of spermatozoa were not altered by the absence of microgravity. Variations in the number of normal versus abnormal sperm due to microgravity influences have yet to be established. It is therefore of interest to monitor the cytoskeletal matrix (microtubulin) of these organisms as a possible indicator of cell viability and/or function.

  12. Low Stretch PMMA Burning in Microgravity: Status of the Ground-Based Program and New ISS Glovebox Experiment SALSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; T'ien, J. S.; Armstrong, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this ground-based program is to study low stretch diffusion flames burning PMMA as the solid fuel to determine the relationship between buoyant low stretch burning in normal gravity and forced flow low stretch burning in microgravity. The low stretch is generated in normal gravity by using the buoyant convection induced by burning the bottom of a large radius of curvature sample. Low stretch is also generated using the Combustion Tunnel drop tower rig (2.2 and 5.2 second facilities), which provides a forced convective low velocity flow past smaller radius of curvature samples. Lastly, an ISS glovebox investigation is being developed to study low stretch burning of PMMA spheres to obtain long duration testing needed to accurately assess the flammability and burning characteristics of the material in microgravity. A comparison of microgravity experiment results with normal gravity test results allows us to establish a direct link between a material's burning characteristics in normal gravity (easily measured) with its burning characteristics in extraterrestrial environments, including microgravity forced convective environments. Theoretical predictions and recent experimental results indicate that it should be possible to understand a material's burning characteristics in the low stretch environment of spacecraft (non-buoyant air movement induced by fans and crew disturbances) by understanding its burning characteristics in an equivalent Earth-based low stretch environment (induced by normal gravity buoyancy). Similarly, Earth-based stretch environments can be made equivalent to those in Lunar- and Martian-surface stretch environments (which would induce partial-gravity buoyancy).

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    The Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Facility established at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) supports NASA's Microgravity Materials Science Research Program. NASA materials science investigations include ground-based, flight definition and flight projects. Flight definition projects, with demanding science concept review schedules, receive highest priority for scheduling experiment time in the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Facility.

  14. Summer-time Mass Balance of Wolverine Glacier, Alaska, Derived from Ground-based Time-lapse Microgravity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. V.; Muto, A.; Babcock, E.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring the mass balance of alpine glaciers is important because alpine glaciers presently account for about half of the cryospheric contribution to the global sea-level rise. Mass balance measurements of alpine glaciers have predominantly relied upon glaciological and hydrological methods. However, these methods can be logistically costly and have potential extrapolation errors. Remote sensing approaches, such as gravimetric methods using data from GRACE satellite missions, have provided monthly mass-balance estimates of aggregates of alpine glaciers but their spatial resolution is far too large for studying a single glacier. On the other hand, ground-based time-lapse microgravity geophysical measurements can potentially circumvent some of the disadvantages of the glaciological and hydrological methods. It may detect the change in a single glacier's mass and its spatial distribution. We conducted ground-based time-lapse microgravity surveys on Wolverine Glacier, Alaska, in May and August of 2016, using a Scintrex CG-5 Autograv gravimeter. We collected data at seventy-nine individual stations on the glacier, roughly five stations per square kilometer. We included repeat-station and base-station measurements made at least twice a day for instrumental drift control. The uncertainty of our gravity measurements is better than 0.03 mGal, which is about 0.7 meters water equivalent of surface mass balance. Our summer-time mass balance of Wolverine Glacier determined from the time-lapse gravity measurements is independent of that derived from the stake-network or stream-gauge measurements, and could provide spatial insight into the mass balance process on Wolverine Glacier and similar glaciers.

  15. Condensation of cosmic analog material in microgravity conditions - Preliminary analysis of a first set of flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancini, D.; Bussoletti, E.; Mennella, V.; Vittone, A. A.; Colangeli, L.; Mirra, C.; Stephens, J.; Nuth, J.; Lilleleht, L.; Furgeson, F.

    1992-01-01

    The first results of the STARDUST project, aimed at producing and analyzing cosmic-dust analog materials in microgravity conditions, are summarized. The discussion covers the purpose of the investigation, cosmic-dust formation and properties, previous simulations of cosmic-dust formation, the current approach, the microgravity experimental apparatus, and potential advantages of studying dust formation under microgravity conditions.

  16. Quantitative Computer Tomography for Determining Composition of Microgravity and Ground Based Solid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Engel, H. P.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in x-ray Computer Tomography (CT) have been led by the medical profession, and by evaluation of industrial products, particularly castings. Porosity can readily be determined as a function of the density of a material, and CT is thus an industrially important NDE tool. Providing high purity, 100% dense standards of pure elements and compounds can be fabricated, the composition of solid solution alloys can be determined by measuring the CT number, which is a function of the absorption of the sample. Average densities across slices 1 mm thick can generally be determined to better than 1 percent. With present technology this spatial sensitivity is less than ideal, but important benefits can nevertheless be obtained by using CT, particularly single crystals, prior to making any destructive assault upon the sample. The sample can in fact be examined prior to removal from the mold within which it has been grown and, in the cases of microgravity flight samples, before removal from the cartridge assembly. This greatly assists the researcher in the characterization of the products, particularly as a guide to cutting and sampling. Examples of work with germanium-silicon alloys and mercury cadmium telluride taken with a radioactive cobalt source will be demonstrated.

  17. Quantitative Computer Tomography for Determining Composition of Microgravity and Ground Based Solid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Engel, H. P.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in x-ray Computer Tomography (CT) have been led by the medical profession, and by evaluation of industrial products, particularly castings. Porosity can readily be determined as a function of the density of a material, and CT is thus an industrially important NDE tool. Providing high purity, 100% dense standards of pure elements and compounds can be fabricated, the composition of solid solution alloys can be determined by measuring the CT number, which is a function of the absorption of the sample. Average densities across slices 1 mm thick can generally be determined to better than 1 percent. With present technology this spatial sensitivity is less than ideal, but important benefits can nevertheless be obtained by using CT, particularly single crystals, prior to making any destructive assault upon the sample. The sample can in fact be examined prior to removal from the mold within which it has been grown and, in the cases of microgravity flight samples, before removal from the cartridge assembly. This greatly assists the researcher in the characterization of the products, particularly as a guide to cutting and sampling. Examples of work with germanium-silicon alloys and mercury cadmium telluride taken with a radioactive cobalt source will be demonstrated.

  18. Laminar Dust Flames: A Program of Microgravity and Ground Based Studies at McGill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goroshin, Sam; Lee, John

    1999-01-01

    Fundamental knowledge of heterogeneous combustion mechanisms is required to improve utilization of solid fuels (e.g. coal), safe handling of combustible dusts in industry, and solid propulsion systems. The objective of the McGill University research program on dust combustion is to obtain a reliable set of data on basic combustion parameters for dust suspensions (i.e. laminar burning velocity, flame structure, quenching distance, flammability limits, etc.) over a range of particle sizes, dust concentrations, and types of fuel. This set of data then permits theoretical models to be validated and, when necessary, new models to be developed to describe the detailed reaction mechanisms and transport processes. Microgravity is essential to the generation of a uniform dust suspension of arbitrary particle size and concentration. When particles with a characteristic size on the order of tens of microns are suspended, they rapidly settle in a gravitational field. To maintain a particulate in suspension for time duration adequate to carry out combustion experiments invariably requires continuous convective flow in excess of the gravitational settling velocity (which is comparable with and can even exceed the dust laminar burning velocity). This makes the experiments turbulent in nature and thus renders it impossible to study laminar dust flames. Even for small particle sizes on the order of microns, a stable laminar dust flow can be maintained only for relatively low dust concentrations at normal gravity conditions. High dust loading leads to gravitational instability of the dust cloud and to the formation of recirculation cells in the dust suspension in a confined volume, or to the rapid sedimentation of the dense dust cloud, as a whole, in an unconfined volume. Many important solid fuels such as carbon and boron also have low laminar flame speeds (of the order of several centimeters per second). Convection that occurs in combustion products due to buoyancy disrupts the

  19. Detachment of Tertiary Dendrite Arms during Controlled Directional Solidification in Aluminum - 7 wt Percent Silicon Alloys: Observations from Ground-based and Microgravity Processed Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Erdman, Robert; Van Hoose, James R.; Tewari, Surendra; Poirier, David

    2012-01-01

    Electron Back Scattered Diffraction results from cross-sections of directionally solidified aluminum 7wt% silicon alloys unexpectedly revealed tertiary dendrite arms that were detached and mis-oriented from their parent arm. More surprisingly, the same phenomenon was observed in a sample similarly processed in the quiescent microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in support of the joint US-European MICAST investigation. The work presented here includes a brief introduction to MICAST and the directional solidification facilities, and their capabilities, available aboard the ISS. Results from the ground-based and microgravity processed samples are compared and possible mechanisms for the observed tertiary arm detachment are suggested.

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1981-03-30

    Composite of Marshall Space Flight Center's Low-Gravity Free Fall Facilities.These facilities include a 100-meter drop tower and a 100-meter drop tube. The drop tower simulates in-flight microgravity conditions for up to 4.2 seconds for containerless processing experiments, immiscible fluids and materials research, pre-flight hardware design test and flight experiment simulation. The drop tube simulates in-flight microgravity conditions for up to 4.6 seconds and is used extensively for ground-based microgravity convection research in which extremely small samples are studied. The facility can provide deep undercooling for containerless processing experiments that require materials to remain in a liquid phase when cooled below the normal solidification temperature.

  1. A comparison between protein crystals grown with vapor diffusion methods in microgravity and protein crystals using a gel liquid-liquid diffusion ground-based method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Teresa Y.; He, Xiao-Min; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Crystals of human serum albumin have been successfully grown in a variety of gels using crystallization conditions otherwise equivalent to those utilized in the popular hanging-drop vapor-equilibrium method. Preliminary comparisons of gel grown crystals with crystals grown by the vapor diffusion method via both ground-based and microgravity methods indicate that crystals superior in size and quality may be grown by limiting solutal convection. Preliminary X-ray diffraction statistics are presented.

  2. Loss of Signal Transduction and Inhibition of Lymphocyte Locomotion in a Ground-Based Model of Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory adherence to, and locomotion through the interstitium is an important component of the immune response. Conditions such as true gravity (TG) and modeled microgravity (MMG) severely inhibit lymphocyte locomotion in vitro through gelled Type I collagen (Pellis et al., 1994, 1997). We used the rotating-wall vessel bioreactor (RWV) as a prototype for modeled microgravity. After observing that lymphocyte locomotion was severely affected in modeled microgravity, we found that polyclonal activation of lymphocytes before exposure to modeled microgravity reversed the locomotion inhibition. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatment of normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, after exposure to modeled microgravity, restored lymphocyte locomotion by 84%. Calcium ionophore had no effect on modeled microgravity-exposed lymphocytes. Therefore, the signal pathways involving calcium may not be affected by modeled microgravity. However, direct activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) with PMA was effective in restoring locomotion in modeled microgravity almost comparable to normal levels in lymphocytes cultured in static T flasks. Thus, events either at the level of PKC or upstream are affected by modeled microgravity. Treatment of lymphocytes with mitomycin C prior to exposure to modeled microgravity, followed by PMA, restored locomotion to the same extent as nonmitomycin C-treated lymphocytes exposed to modeled microgravity (80-85%). Therefore 1) new DNA synthesis is not necessary to restore locomotion and 2) traditional activation and locomotion share common pathways up to PKC. Thereafter the signals diverge. Furthermore PMA added immediately before or after initiation of modeled microgravity prevents the loss of lymphocyte locomotion.

  3. Loss of Signal Transduction and Inhibition of Lymphocyte Locomotion in a Ground-Based Model of Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory adherence to, and locomotion through the interstitium is an important component of the immune response. Conditions such as true gravity (TG) and modeled microgravity (MMG) severely inhibit lymphocyte locomotion in vitro through gelled Type I collagen (Pellis et al., 1994, 1997). We used the rotating-wall vessel bioreactor (RWV) as a prototype for modeled microgravity. After observing that lymphocyte locomotion was severely affected in modeled microgravity, we found that polyclonal activation of lymphocytes before exposure to modeled microgravity reversed the locomotion inhibition. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatment of normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, after exposure to modeled microgravity, restored lymphocyte locomotion by 84%. Calcium ionophore had no effect on modeled microgravity-exposed lymphocytes. Therefore, the signal pathways involving calcium may not be affected by modeled microgravity. However, direct activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) with PMA was effective in restoring locomotion in modeled microgravity almost comparable to normal levels in lymphocytes cultured in static T flasks. Thus, events either at the level of PKC or upstream are affected by modeled microgravity. Treatment of lymphocytes with mitomycin C prior to exposure to modeled microgravity, followed by PMA, restored locomotion to the same extent as nonmitomycin C-treated lymphocytes exposed to modeled microgravity (80-85%). Therefore 1) new DNA synthesis is not necessary to restore locomotion and 2) traditional activation and locomotion share common pathways up to PKC. Thereafter the signals diverge. Furthermore PMA added immediately before or after initiation of modeled microgravity prevents the loss of lymphocyte locomotion.

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    Dr. Alexander Chernov, of the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and based at Marshall Space Flight Center, is investigating why protein crystals grown in space are, in about 20 percent of cases, better-ordered than those grown on the ground. They are testing the idea that the amount of impurities trapped by space-grown crystals may be different than the amount trapped by crystals grown on Earth because convection is negligible in microgravity. The concentrations or impurities in many space-grown crystals turned out to be several times lower than that in the terrestrial ones, sometimes below the detection limit. The ground-based experiment also showed that the amount of impurities per unit volume of the crystals was usually higher than the amount per unit volume of the solution. This means that a growing crystal actually purifies the solution in its immediate vicinity. Here, an impurity depletion zone is created around apoferritin crystals grown in gel, imitating microgravity conditions.

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The manipulation of organic materials--cells, tissues, and even living organisms--offers many exciting possibilities for the future from organic computers to improved aquaculture. Commercial researchers are using the microgravity environment to produce large near perfect protein crystals Research on insulin has yielded crystals that far surpass the quality of insulin crystals grown on the ground. Using these crystals industry partners are working to develop new and improved treatments for diabetes. Other researchers are exploring the possibility of producing antibiotics using plant cell cultures which could lead to both orbital production and the improvement of ground-based antibiotic production.

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-02-05

    Scarning electron microscope images of the surface of ZBLAN fibers pulled in microgravity (ug) and on Earth (1g) show the crystallization that normally occurs in ground-based processing. The face of each crystal will reflect or refract a portion of the optical signal, thus degrading its quality. NASA is conducting research on pulling ZBLAN fibers in the low-g environment of space to prevent crystallization that limits ZBLAN's usefulness in optical fiber-based communications. ZBLAN is a heavy-metal fluoride glass that shows exdeptional promise for high-throughput communications with infrared lasers. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine Gel Formation During Antiorthostatic Bedrest - A Microgravity Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmi, Putcha; Singh, R. P.; Crady, V. A.; Derendorf, H.

    2011-01-01

    Space Motion sickness (SMS) is an age old problem for astronauts on both short and long duration space flights. Scopolamine (SCOP) is the most frequently used drug for the treatment of motion sickness (MS) which is currently available in transdermal patch and tablet dosage forms. These formulations of SCOP are ineffective for the treatment of SMS. Intranasal dosage forms are noninvasive with rapid absorption and enhanced bioavailability thus allowing precise and reduced dosing options in addition to offering rescue and treatment options. As such, an intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed and Pharmacokinetics (PK) and bioavailability were determined under IND guidelines. The present clinical trial compares PK and bioavailability of INSCOP in 12 normal, healthy subjects (6 male/ 6 female) during ambulation (AMB) and antiorthostatic bedrest (ABR) used as a ground-based microgravity analog. Subjects received 0.2 and 0.4 mg doses of INSCOP during AMB and ABR in a four-way crossover design. Results indicated no difference between AMB and ABR in PK parameters after 0.2 mg dose. Clearance (Cls) decreased with a concomitant increase in maximum concentration and area under concentration versus time curve (AUC) during ABR after the 0.4 mg dose. This difference in AUC and Cls at the higher but not the lower dose during ABR may suggest that ABR may affect metabolism and/or clearance at higher doses of INSCOP. These results indicate that dosing adjustment may be required for treatment of SMS with INSCOP in space.

  8. Synchrotron white beam x-ray topography characterization of structural defects in microgravity and ground-based CdZnTe crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Larson, D.J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    In a microgravity environment, gravity-dependent effects such as buoyancy, convection and hydrostatic pressure are minimized, providing an ideal environment for investigating diffusion-controlled, nonwetting crystal growth processes. To evaluate the influence of microgravity on the resultant crystal quality, Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography (SWBXT) is applied to characterize defect structures in both flight and ground-based CdZnTe single crystals. Transmission X-ray topographs recorded from one flight sample revealed regions of very low dislocation density with individual dislocations clearly resolved. Dislocations of very high density arrayed in a mosaic pattern were observed in all ground-base samples grown under identical growth conditions except for the gravity conditions. This observation indicates that the flight samples have much higher structural perfection than the ground-based samples. On the other hand, studies of defect configurations in a different flight sample revealed that structural defects and distributions can be strongly influenced by rapid cooling, thermal gradients, and constrained growth. Large thermal stresses induced by rapid cooling can be multiplied by wall contact leading to the formation of extensive slip bands and small angle tilt boundaries starting at the crystal periphery and propagating into the interior of the sample. It is concluded that an optimization of post solidification cooling rate is important to minimize the occurrence of slip.

  9. T cell regulation in microgravity - The current knowledge from in vitro experiments conducted in space, parabolic flights and ground-based facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Lauber, Beatrice; Thiel, Cora S.; Layer, Liliana E.; Ullrich, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    Dating back to the Apollo and Skylab missions, it has been reported that astronauts suffered from bacterial and viral infections during space flight or after returning to Earth. Blood analyses revealed strongly reduced capability of human lymphocytes to become active upon mitogenic stimulation. Since then, a large number of in vitro studies on human immune cells have been conducted in space, in parabolic flights, and in ground-based facilities. It became obvious that microgravity affects cell morphology and important cellular functions. Observed changes include cell proliferation, the cytoskeleton, signal transduction and gene expression. This review gives an overview of the current knowledge of T cell regulation under altered gravity conditions obtained by in vitro studies with special emphasis on the cell culture conditions used. We propose that future in vitro experiments should follow rigorous standardized cell culture conditions, which allows better comparison of the results obtained in different flight- and ground-based experiment platforms.

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Researcher Dr. Yi Li developed a technique to manipulate certain characteristics of plant growth such as anit-senescence. For example, the tobacco leaf was clipped from a transgenic plant (right), and a wildtype plant (left). During ground-based laboratory studies, both leaves were left in a darkened area for 4 months. When retrieved, the wildtype plant leaf was dried-out and the transgenic leaf remained fresh and green. A variation of this technology that involves manipulating plant hormones has been conducted in space-based studies on tomato plants through BioServe Space Technologies. The transport and distribution of auxin, an important plant hormone has shown to be influenced by microgravity, which could lead to improving the quality of fruits and vegetables grown on Earth.

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0103191

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-07-10

    TEMPUS, an electromagnetic levitation facility that allows containerless processing of metallic samples in microgravity, first flew on the IML-2 Spacelab mission. The principle of electromagnetic levitation is used commonly in ground-based experiments to melt and then cool metallic melts below their freezing points without solidification occurring. The TEMPUS operation is controlled by its own microprocessor system; although commands may be sent remotely from the ground and real time adjustments may be made by the crew. Two video cameras, a two-color pyrometer for measuring sample temperatures, and a fast infrared detector for monitoring solidification spikes, will be mounted to the process chamber to facilitate observation and analysis. In addition, a dedicated high-resolution video camera can be attached to the TEMPUS to measure the sample volume precisely.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine Gel Formulation During Antiorthostatic Bed Rest, a Microgravity Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Rajendra P.; Daniels, Vernie R.; Crady, Camille J.; Derendorf, H.; Putcha, L.

    2011-01-01

    Statement of Purpose, Innovation or Hypothesis: Space Motion sickness (SMS) is a long-standing problem for astronauts on both short and long duration space flights. Scopolamine (SCOP) is frequently used for the treatment of motion sickness (MS), and is available as transdermal patch and tablet dosage forms. These formulations of SCOP are ineffective for the treatment of SMS. Intranasal dosage forms are noninvasive with rapid absorption and enhanced bioavailability, thus allowing precise and reduced dosing in addition to offering rescue and treatment options. An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed and pharmacokinetics (PK) and bioavailability were determined in clinical trials with human subjects under IND guidelines.Description of Methods and Materials: The present clinical trial compares PK and bioavailability of INSCOP in 12 normal, healthy subjects (6 male/ 6 female) during ambulation (AMB) and antiorthostaticbed rest (ABR) used as a ground-based microgravity analog. Subjects received 0.2 mg and 0.4 mg doses of INSCOP during AMB and ABR in a 4-way crossover design.Data and Results: Results indicated no difference between AMB and ABR in PK parameters after 0.2 mg dose, Clearance (Cls) decreased with a concomitant increase in maximum concentration and area under concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) during ABR after the 0.4 mg dose.Interpretation, Conclusion or Significance: The difference in AUC and Cls at the higher (0.4 mg) but not the lower dose (0.2 mg) during ABR suggests that ABR may affect metabolism and/or clearance of INSCOP at higher doses . These results indicate that dosing adjustment may be required for treatment of SMS with INSCOP in space.

  14. Progress toward studies of bubble-geometry Bose-Einstein condensates in microgravity with a ground-based prototype of NASA CAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundblad, Nathan; Jarvis, Thomas; Paseltiner, Daniel; Lannert, Courtney

    2016-05-01

    We have proposed using NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL, launching to the International Space Station in 2017) to generate bubble-geometry Bose-Einstein condensates through radiofrequency dressing of an atom-chip magnetic trap. This geometry has not been truly realized terrestrially due to the perturbing influence of gravity, making it an ideal candidate for microgravity investigation aboard CAL. We report progress in the construction of a functional prototype of the orbital BEC apparatus: a compact atom-chip machine loaded by a 2D+MOT source, conventional 3D MOT, quadrupole trap, and transfer coil. We also present preliminary modeling of the dressed trap uniformity, which will crucially inform the geometric closure of the BEC shell surface as atom number, bubble radius, and bubble aspect ratio are varied. Finally, we discuss plans for experimental sequences to be run aboard CAL guided by intuition from ground-based prototype operation. JPL 1502172.

  15. Yin-yang of space travel: lessons from the ground-based models of microgravity and their applications to disease and health for life on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A.; Yamauchi, K.; Hales, N.; Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N.; Yamamoto, S.; Andrassy, R.

    Space flight environment has numerous clinical effects on human physiology; however, the advances made in physical and biological sciences have benefited humans on Earth. Space flight induces adverse effects on bone, muscle, cardiovascular, neurovestibular, gastrointestinal, and immune function. Similar pathophysiologic changes are also observed in aging with debilitating consequences. Anti-orthostatic tail-suspension (AOS) of rodents is an in vivo model to study many of these effects induced by the microgravity environment of space travel. Over the years AOS has been used by several researchers to study bone demineralization, muscle atrophy, neurovestibular and stress related effects. ecently we employed the AOS model in parallel with in vitro cell culture microgravity analog (Bioreactor) to document the decrease in immune function and its reversal by a nutritional countermeasure. We have modified the rodent model to study nutrient effects and benefits in a short period of time, usually within one to two weeks, in contrast to conventional aging research models which take several weeks to months to get the same results. This model has a potential for further development to study the role of nutrition in other pathophysiologies in an expedited manner. Using this model it is possible to evaluate the response of space travelers of various ages to microgravity stressors for long-term space travel. Hence this modified model will have significant impact on time and financial research budget. For the first time our group has documented a true potential immunonutritional countermeasure for the space flight induced effects on immune system (Clinical Nutrition 2002). Based on our nutritional and immunological studies we propose application of these microgravity analogs and its benefits and utility for nutritional effects on other physiologic parameters especially in aging. (Supported by NASA NCC8-168 grant, ADK)

  16. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Kidder, Louis S.; Williams, Philip C.; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-01-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed. PMID:20052306

  17. Investigation of the Influence of Microgravity on Transport Mechanisms in a Virtual Spaceflight Chamber: A Ground-Based Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Lal, Ravindra B.; Rangel, Roger; Witherow, William; Rogers, Jan

    2001-01-01

    The IML-1 Spaceflight produced over 1000 holograms of a well-defined particle field in the low g Spacelab environment; each containing as much as 1000 megabytes of information. This project took advantage of these data and the concept of holographic "virtual" spaceflight to advance the understanding of convection in the space shuttle environment, g-jitter effects on crystal growth, and complex transport phenomena in low Reynolds number flows. The first objective of the proposed work was to advance the understanding of microgravity effects on crystal growth. This objective was achieved through the use of existing holographic data recorded during the IML-1 Spaceflight. The second objective was to design a spaceflight experiment that exploits the "virtual space chamber concept" in which holograms of space chambers can provide a virtual access to space. This led to a flight definition project, which is now underway under a separate contract known as SHIVA, Spaceflight Holography Investigation in a Virtual Apparatus.

  18. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Bruce E; Kidder, Louis S; Williams, Philip C; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-11-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed.

  19. Ground Based Experiments in Support of Microgravity Research Results-Vapor Growth of Organic Nonlinear Optical Thin Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zugrav, M. Ittu; Carswell, William E.; Haulenbeek, Glen B.; Wessling, Francis C.

    2001-01-01

    This work is specifically focused on explaining previous results obtained for the crystal growth of an organic material in a reduced gravity environment. On STS-59, in April 1994, two experiments were conducted with N,N-dimethyl-p-(2,2-dicyanovinyl) aniline (DCVA), a promising nonlinear optical (NLO) material. The space experiments were set to reproduce laboratory experiments that yielded small, bulk crystals of DCVA. The results of the flight experiment, however, were surprising. Rather than producing a bulk single crystal, the result was the production of two high quality, single crystalline thin films. This result was even more intriguing when it is considered that thin films are more desirable for NLO applications than are bulk single crystals. Repeated attempts on the ground to reproduce these results were fruitless. A second set of flight experiments was conducted on STS-69 in September 1995. This time eight DCVA experiments were flown, with each of seven experiments containing a slight change from the first reference experiment. The reference experiment was programmed with growth conditions identical to those of the STS-59 mission. The slight variations in each of the other seven were an attempt to understand what particular parameter was responsible for the preference of thin film growth over bulk crystal growth in microgravity. Once again the results were surprising. In all eight cases thin films were grown again, albeit with varying quality. So now we were faced with a phenomenon that not only takes place in microgravity, but also is very robust, resisting all attempts to force the growth of bulk single crystals.

  20. Ground Based Experiments in Support of Microgravity Research Results-Vapor Growth of Organic Nonlinear Optical Thin Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zugrav, M. Ittu; Carswell, William E.; Haulenbeek, Glen B.; Wessling, Francis C.

    2001-01-01

    This work is specifically focused on explaining previous results obtained for the crystal growth of an organic material in a reduced gravity environment. On STS-59, in April 1994, two experiments were conducted with N,N-dimethyl-p-(2,2-dicyanovinyl) aniline (DCVA), a promising nonlinear optical (NLO) material. The space experiments were set to reproduce laboratory experiments that yielded small, bulk crystals of DCVA. The results of the flight experiment, however, were surprising. Rather than producing a bulk single crystal, the result was the production of two high quality, single crystalline thin films. This result was even more intriguing when it is considered that thin films are more desirable for NLO applications than are bulk single crystals. Repeated attempts on the ground to reproduce these results were fruitless. A second set of flight experiments was conducted on STS-69 in September 1995. This time eight DCVA experiments were flown, with each of seven experiments containing a slight change from the first reference experiment. The reference experiment was programmed with growth conditions identical to those of the STS-59 mission. The slight variations in each of the other seven were an attempt to understand what particular parameter was responsible for the preference of thin film growth over bulk crystal growth in microgravity. Once again the results were surprising. In all eight cases thin films were grown again, albeit with varying quality. So now we were faced with a phenomenon that not only takes place in microgravity, but also is very robust, resisting all attempts to force the growth of bulk single crystals.

  1. Shear shedding of drops and the use of superhydrophobic surfaces in microgravity: PFC and ground based results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew; Amirfazli, Alidad

    In free fall, the absence of gravity poses many challenges for fluid handling systems. One such example of this is condensers. On earth, the condensed liquid is removed from the tilted condenser plate by gravity forced shedding. In microgravity, proposed solutions include the use of surfaces with gradients in wettability [1], the use of electrowetting [2], and shearing airflow [3]. In this talk, shear shedding results for a variety of surface (hydrophilic to superhydrophobic (extremely water repelling)) will be presented. Surface science and aerodynamics are used to reveal fundamental parameters controlling incipient motion for drops exposed to shearing airflow. It is found that wetting parameters such as contact angle and surface tension are very influential in determining the minimum required air velocity for drop shedding. Based on experimental results for drops of water and hexadecane (0.5-100 l) on PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic aluminum surface, an exponential function is proposed that relates the critical air velocity for shedding to the ratio of drop base length to projected area. The results for the water systems can be collapsed to a self similar curve by normalization, which also explains results from other researchers. Since shedding from superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) is seen to be easier compared to other surfaces, the behaviour of SHS is also probed in this talk. SHS have space-based applications to shedding, self cleaning, anti-icing (spacecraft launch/re-entry), anti-fouling, fluid actuation, and decreased fluid friction. The mechanism for SHS is understood to be the existence of an air layer between large portions of the drop and solid. The first concrete visual evidence of this was gained performing a parabolic flight experiment with the ESA. Results of this experi-ment will be discussed, showing the extreme water repelling potential of SHS in microgravity, and demonstrating how the wetting behaviours seen (partial penetration, transition

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Viurus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully reduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystals grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were visually perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the x-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This stylized ribbon model shows the protein coat in white and the nucleic acid in yellow. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, University of California at Irvin.

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully deduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the same time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystal grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were viusally perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This computer model shows the external coating or capsid. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, Univeristy of California at Irvin.

  4. Pyrocystis noctiluca represents an excellent bioassay for shear forces induced in ground-based microgravity simulators (clinostat and random positioning machine).

    PubMed

    Hauslage, Jens; Cevik, Volkan; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based facilities, such as clinostats and random positioning machines aiming at simulating microgravity conditions, are tools to prepare space experiments and identify gravity-related signaling pathways. A prerequisite is that the facilities are operated in an appropriate manner and potentially induced non-gravitational effects, such as shearing forces, have to be taken into account. Dinoflagellates, here P. noctiluca, as fast and sensitive reporter system for shear stress and hydrodynamic gradients, were exposed on a clinostat (constant rotation around one axis, 60 rpm) or in a random positioning machine, that means rotating around two axes, whose velocity and direction were chosen at random. Deformation of the cell membrane of P. noctiluca due to shear stress results in a detectable bioluminescence emission. Our results show that the amount of mechanical stress is higher on an random positioning machine than during constant clinorotation, as revealed by the differences in photon counts. We conclude that one axis clinorotation induced negligible non-gravitational effects in the form of shear forces in contrast to random operation modes tested. For the first time, we clearly visualized the device-dependent occurrence of shear forces by means of a bioassay, which have to be considered during the definition of an appropriate simulation approach and to avoid misinterpretation of results.

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center employees visited DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky. NASA's Mini Drop Tower was used to demonstrate free fall and a presentation was given on microgravity and the science performed in a microgravity environment. The visit coincided with the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. Materials engineer Chris Cochrane explains the basics of microgravity research. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center employees visited DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky. NASA's Mini Drop Tower was used to demonstrate free fall and a presentation was given on microgravity and the science performed in a microgravity environment. The visit coincided with the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. Materials engineer Chris Cochrane explains the operation of the mini-drop tower. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center employees visited DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky. NASA's Mini Drop Tower was used to demonstrate free fall and a presentation was given on microgravity and the science performed in a microgravity environment. The visit coincided with the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. Students experiment with the mini-drop tower. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center employees visited DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky. NASA's Mini Drop Tower was used to demonstrate free fall and a presentation was given on microgravity and the science performed in a microgravity environment. The visit coincided with the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. Students watch the playback of video from the mini-drop tower. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-25

    The arnual conference for the Educator Resource Center Network (ERCN) Coordinators was held at Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field in Cleveland, Ohio. The conference included participants from NASA's Educator Resource Centers located throughout the country. The Microgravity Science Division at Glenn sponsored a Microgravity Day for all the conference participants. Kathy Higgins of the National Center for Microgravity Research at GRC explains educational resources to teachers. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-14

    Jimmy Grisham of the Microgravity Program Plarning Integration Office at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, demonstrates the classroom-size Microgravity Drop Tower Demonstrator. The apparatus provides 1/6 second of microgravity for small experiments. A video camera helps teachers observe what happens inside the package. This demonstration was at the April 2000 conference of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) in Chicago. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-09-12

    Two versions of (PCAM) Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity, (DCAM) Diffusion Controled Crystallization Apparatus is in the (STES) Single Locker Thermal Enclosure System. Principal Investigator was Dan Carter.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-29

    Dr. Richard DeLombard of NASA's Glenn Research Center, hands the relase line for the Microgravity Demonstrator to a visitor for her to start a short experiment showing the effects of microgravity on candle flames. Combustion physics will be a major line of investigation for NASA aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The Microgravity Demonstrator is frequently used at shows and schools to illustrate how phenomena change in microgravity. The exhibit was part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI

  13. Cosmic dust analog simulation in a microgravity environment: The STARDUST program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, F.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Carotenuto, L.; Colangeli, L.; Dell'aversana, P.; Mele, F.; Mennella, V.

    1995-01-01

    We have undertaken a project called STARDUST which is a collaboration with Italian and American investigators. The goals of this program are to study the condensation and coagulation of refractory materials from the vapor and to study the properties of the resulting grains as analogs to cosmic dust particles. To reduce thermal convective currents and to develop valuable experience in designing an experiment for the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility aboard Space Station, Freedom we have built and flown a new chamber to study these processes under periods of microgravity available on NASA's KC-135 Research Aircraft. Preliminary results from flights with magnesium and zinc are discussed.

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-15

    A versatile experiment facility for the International Space Station moved closer to flight recently with delivery of the ground-test model to NASA's Marshall Flight Center. The Microgravity Science Glovebox Ground Unit was delivered to the Microgravity Development Laboratory will be used to test hardware and procedures for the flight model of the glovebox aboard the ISS's Laboratory Module, Destiny.

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-13

    The first International Space Station experiment facility--the Microgravity Glovebox Ground Unit--has been delivered to Marshall Space Flight Center's Microgravity Development Laboratory. The glovebox is a facility that provides a sealed work area accessed by the crew in gloves. This glovebox will be used at the Marshall laboratory throughout the Space Station era.

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Protein isolated from hen egg-white and functions as a bacteriostatic enzyme by degrading bacterial cell walls. First enzyme ever characterized by protein crystallography. It is used as an excellent model system for better understanding parameters involved in microgravity experiments with data from laboratory experiments to study the equilibrium rate of hanging drop experiments in microgravity.

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-25

    The arnual conference for the Educator Resource Center Network (ERCN) Coordinators was held at Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field in Cleveland, Ohio. The conference included participants from NASA's Educator Resource Centers located throughout the country. The Microgravity Science Division at Glenn sponsored a Microgravity Day for all the conference participants. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-04

    Teachers, students, and parents listen as scientists explain what is different about the microgravity envirornment of space and why it is a valuable tool for research. This was part of the outreach session of the Pan Pacific Microgravity Conference on May 2, 2001, at the California Science Center.

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Sandi Thompson of the National Center for Microgravity Research GRC makes a final adjustment to the drop package. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Here students from Sycamore High School in Cincinnati, Ohio, talk with Dr. Dennis Stocker, one of Glenn's lead microgravity scientists, about the uses of the drop tower. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-20

    Onboard Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-73) Payload Commander Kathryn Thornton works with the Drop Physics Module (DPM) in the United States Microgravity Laboratory 2 (USML-2) Spacelab Science Module cleaning the experiment chamber of the DPM.

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-01

    International Flavors and Fragrances Inc., Dr. Braja Mookherjee with the Overnight Scentsation rose plant after its flight aboard NASA's shuttle mission STS-95 for experimentation on scent in microgravity.

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-20

    Onboard Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-73) Payload Commander Kathryn Thornton and Commander Ken Bowersox discuss the Drop Physics Module (DPM) experiment in the United States Microgravity Laboratory 2 (USML-2) spacelab science module.

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    Dr. Cila Herman, G.W.C. Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. She is the principal investigator for the Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields.

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Here Carol Hodanbosi of the National Center for Microgravity Research and Jose Carrion, a lab mechanic with AKAC, prepare a student experiment package (inside the silver-colored frame) inside the orange-colored drag shield that encloses all experiment hardware. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-20

    Astronaut Kathryn C. Thornton, payload commander, works at the Drop Physics Module (DPM) on the portside of the science module supporting the U.S. Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2). Astronaut Kerneth D. Bowersox, mission commander, looks on.

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-20

    Onboard Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-73) Mission Specialists Catherine Cady Coleman works at the glovebox facility in support of the Protein Crystal Growth Glovebox (PCG-GBX) experiment in the United States Microgravity Laboratory 2 (USML-2) Spacelab science module.

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-20

    Onboard Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-73) Payload Specialist Albert Sacco loads autoclaves using a power screwdriver into the Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) experiment in the middeck for the United States Microgravity Laboratory 2 (USML-2) Spacelab mission.

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-06-25

    Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-50) astronaut Bornie Dunbar wears protective goggles to assemble a zeolite sample cartridge for the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) in the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) science module.

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-04-24

    Ampoule view of the Vapor Crystal Growth System (VCGS) Furnace. Used on IML-1 International Microgravity Laboratory Spacelab 3. Prinicipal Investigator and Payload Specialist was Lodewijk van den Berg.

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-04-24

    Overall view of the Vapor Crystal Growth System (VCGS) Furnace. Used on IML-1 International Microgravity Laboratory Spacelab 3. Principal Investigator and Payload Specialist was Lodewijk van den Berg.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-20

    Interface Configuration Experiment on the Second United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2). Over time the photos show a change in the shape of the interface between a liquid and a gas in a sealed, slightly asymmetrical container. Under the force of Earth's gravity, the interface would remain nearly flat, but in microgravity, the interface shape and location changes significantly in the container, resulting in major shifts of liquid arising from small asymmetries in the container shape.

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-08

    Students discuss fine points of their final design for the Drop Tower experiment during the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    Students prepare to load fluids in their experiment apparatus during the Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    Students prepare their experiment apparatus for free-fall during the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-08

    Students discuss fine points of their final design for the drop tower experiment during the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    Students prepare to load fluids in their experiment apparatus during the Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-04

    Dr. Timothy G. Hammond of the Department of Internal Medicine, Nephrology Section, Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, is one of NASA's principal investigators conducting research with the NASA Bioreactor project directed by Johrnson Space Center. Hammond's investigations include Production of 1-25- diOH D3 by Renal Epithelial Cells in Simulated Microgravity Culture and Differentiation of Cultured Normal Human Renal Epithelial Cells in Microgravity. Photo credit: Tulane University.

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-15

    High school students observe the progress of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 mission (STS-87, Nov. 19 - Dec. 5, 1997) at the IDGE Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY. As part of the its outreach activity, the experiment team set up the center so students and the public could observe IDGE in progress and learn more about space and microgravity research. Photo credit: RPI

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-08

    Students pause while waiting their turn at the 2.2-second Drop Tower during the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-25

    Dan Carter and Charles Sisk center a Lysozyme Protein crystal grown aboard the USML-2 shuttle mission. Protein isolated from hen egg-white and functions as a bacteriostatic enzyme by degrading bacterial cell walls. First enzyme ever characterized by protein crystallography. It is used as an excellent model system for better understanding parameters involved in microgravity crystal growth experiments. The goal is to compare kinetic data from microgravity experiments with data from laboratory experiments to study the equilibrium.

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-25

    The arnual conference for the Educator Resource Center Network (ERCN) Coordinators was held at Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field in Cleveland, Ohio. The conference included participants from NASA's Educator Resource Centers located throughout the country. The Microgravity Science Division at Glenn sponsored a Microgravity Day for all the conference participants. Dr. Wil Roberson and Marge Lehky prepare a demonstration with the mini-drop tower. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    Student-designed and -built apparatus for the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-14

    Don Gillies, a materials scientist at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), demonstrates the classroom-size Microgravity Drop Tower Demonstrator. The apparatus provides 1/6 second of microgravity for small experiments. A video camera helps teachers observe what happens inside the package. This demonstration was at the April 2000 conference of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) in Chicago. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. NASA and contractor personnel who conducted the DIME activity with the students. Shown (L-R) are: Eric Baumann (NASA, 2.2-second Drop Tower Facility manager), Daniel Dietrich (NASA) mentor for Sycamore High School team), Carol Hodanbosi (National Center for Microgravity Research; DIME staff), Richard DeLombard (NASA; DIME staff), Jose Carrion (GRC Akima, drop tower technician), Dennis Stocker (NASA; DIME staff), Peter Sunderland (NCMR, mentor for COSI Academy student team), Sandi Thompson (NSMR sabbatical teacher; DIME staff), Dan Woodard (MASA Microgravity Outreach Program Manager), Adam Malcolm (NASA co-op student; DIME staff), Carla Rosenberg (NCMR; DIME staff), and Twila Schneider (Infinity Technology; NASA Microgravity Research program contractor). This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  6. Ground based materials science experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  7. Ground based materials science experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, M. B.; Johnston, J. C.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    The facilities at the Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) at the Lewis Research Center, created to offer immediate and low-cost access to ground-based testing facilities for industrial, academic, and government researchers, are described. The equipment in the MMSL falls into three categories: (1) devices which emulate some aspect of low gravitational forces, (2) specialized capabilities for 1-g development and refinement of microgravity experiments, and (3) functional duplicates of flight hardware. Equipment diagrams are included.

  8. Development of a Ground-Based Analog to the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nathaniel J.; Scott-Pandorf, M. M.; Caldwell, E.; DeWitt, J.K.; Fincke, R.; Peters, B.T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA and Wyle engineers constructed a Horizontal Exercise Fixture (HEF) that was patented in 2006. Recently modifications were made to HEF with the goal of creating a device that mimics squat exercise on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and can be used by bed rest subjects who must remain supine during exercise. This project posed several engineering challenges, such as how best to reproduce the hip motions (we used a sled that allowed hip motion in the sagittal plane), how to counterweight the pelvis against gravity (we used a pulley and free-weight mechanism), and how to apply large loads (body weight plus squat load) to the shoulders while simultaneously supporting the back against gravity (we tested a standard and a safety bar that allowed movement in the subject s z-axis, both of which used a retractable plate for back support). METHODS An evaluation of the HEF was conducted with human subjects (3F, 3M), who performed sets of squat exercises of increasing load from 10-repetition maximum (RM) up to 1-RM. Three pelvic counterweight loads were tested along with each of the two back-support squat bars. Data collection included 3-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF), muscle activation (EMG), body motion (video-based motion capture), and subjective comments. These data were compared with previous ground-based ARED study data. RESULTS All subjects in the evaluation were able to perform low- to high-loading squats on the HEF. Four of the 6 subjects preferred a pelvic counterweight equivalent to 60 percent of their body weight. Four subjects preferred the standard squat bar, whereas 2 female subjects preferred the safety bar. EMG data showed muscle activation in the legs and low back typical of squat motion. GRF trajectories and eccentric-concentric loading ratios were similar to ARED. CONCLUSION: Squat exercise performed on HEF approximated squat exercise on ARED.

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. This is the interior of the Sycamore High School (Cincinnati, Ohio) students' experiment to observe the flame spreading on a 100 percent cotton T-shirt under low-g. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Here Jose Carrion, a lab mechanic with AKAC, starts the orange-colored drag shield, and the experiment apparatus inside, on the hoist upward to the control station at the top of the drop tower. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Meredith Mendenhall of Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, flips on a tape recorder in preparation for a drop. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Here, students from Sycamore High School in Cincinnati, Ohio, help a NASA technician prepare their experiment. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Researchers have found that as melted metals and alloys (combinations of metals) solidify, they can form with different arrangements of atoms, called microstructures. These microstructures depend on the shape of the interface (boundary) between the melted metal and the solid crystal it is forming. There are generally three shapes that the interface can take: planar, or flat; cellular, which looks like the cells of a beehive; and dendritic, which resembles tiny fir trees. Convection at this interface can affect the interface shape and hide the other phenomena (physical events). To reduce the effects of convection, researchers conduct experiments that examine and control conditions at the interface in microgravity. Microgravity also helps in the study of alloys composed of two metals that do not mix. On Earth, the liquid mixtures of these alloys settle into different layers due to gravity. In microgravity, the liquid metals do not settle, and a solid more uniform mixture of both metals can be formed.

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Students from Sycamore High School in Cincinnati, Ohio (girls), and the COSI Academy, Columbus, Ohio (boys), participated. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Pictured are students from COSI Academy, Columbus, Ohio and their teacher. The other team was from Sycamore High School in Cincinnati, Ohio. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Here, students are briefed by NASA engineer Daniel Dietrich at the top of the drop tower. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Comparison of ground-based (left) and Skylab (right) electron beam welds in pure tantalum (Ta) (10X magnification). Residual votices left behind in the ground-based sample after the electron beam passed were frozen into the grain structure. These occurred because of the rapid cooling rate at the high temperature. Although the thermal characteristics and electron beam travel speeds were comparable for the skylab sample, the residual vortices were erased in the grain structure. This may have been due to the fact that final grain size of the solidified material was smaller in the Skylab sample compared to the ground-based sample. The Skylab sample was processed in the M512 Materials Processing Facility (MPF) during Skylab SL-2 Mission. Principal Investigator was Richard Poorman.

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-08-03

    SPD representative Steve Lambing shows the PentaPure water purification unit to some EAA visitors. The Microgravity Research and the Space Product Development Programs joined with the Johnson Space Center (JSC) for a first time ever ISS/Microgravity Research space-focused exhibit at Oshkosh AirVenture'99 from July 28-August 3, 1999. The Space Product Development (SPD) display included the STS-95 ASTROCULTURE training hardware used by John Glenn and his crewmates, a PentaPure water purfication system, and a Ford engine block.

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    Members from all four teams were mixed into pairs to work on a Lego (TM) Challenge device to operate in the portable drop tower demonstrator (background). These two team members are about to try out their LEGO (TM) creation. This was part of the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-01-01

    The Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test was designed to study flame spreading over solid fuels when air is flowing at a low speed in the same direction as the flame spread. Previous research has shown that in low-speed concurrent airflows, some materials are more flammable in microgravity than earth. This image shows a 10-cm flame in microgravity that burns almost entirely blue on both sides of a thin sheet of paper. The glowing thermocouple in the lower half of the flame provides temperature measurements.

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-05-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox is a facility for performing microgravity research in the areas of materials, combustion, fluids and biotechnology science. The facility occupies a full ISPR, consisting of: the ISPR rack and infrastructure for the rack, the glovebox core facility, data handling, rack stowage, outfitting equipment, and a video subsystem. MSG core facility provides the experiment developers a chamber with air filtering and recycling, up to two levels of containment, an airlock for transfer of payload equipment to/from the main volume, interface resources for the payload inside the core facility, resources inside the airlock, and storage drawers for MSG support equipment and consumables.

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Fluid Physics is study of the motion of fluids and the effects of such motion. When a liquid is heated from the bottom to the boiling point in Earth's microgravity, small bubbles of heated gas form near the bottom of the container and are carried to the top of the liquid by gravity-driven convective flows. In the same setup in microgravity, the lack of convection and buoyancy allows the heated gas bubbles to grow larger and remain attached to the container's bottom for a significantly longer period.

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    A student assembles a Lego (TM) Challenge device designed to operate in the portable drop tower demonstrator as part of the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    Two students show the Lego (TM) Challenge device they designed and built to operate in the portable drop tower demonstrator as part of the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    A NASA test conductor at the top of the 2.2-second Drop Tower monitors a student lecture at a lower level. This was part of the Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    Students watch a test run on their experiment before the actual drop. They designed and built their apparatus to fit within a NASA-provided drop structure. This was part of the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-29

    Paul Luz (right), an aerospace flight systems engineer at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), takes a question from a visitor as they discuss microgravity research at AirVenture 2000. Part of the NASA exhibits included demonstrations of knowledge gained from microgravity research aboard the Space Shuttle. These include liquid metal (liquid metal demonstrator is three plastic drop tubes at center) and dendritic growth (in front of Luz), both leading to improvements in processes of Earth. The exhibit was part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-30

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox Ground Unit, delivered to the Marshall Space Flight Center on August 30, 2002, will be used at Marshall's Microgravity Development Laboratory to test experiment hardware before it is installed in the flight glovebox aboard the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. Laboratory Module, Destiny. The glovebox is a sealed container with built in gloves on its sides and fronts that enables astronauts to work safely with experiments that involve fluids, flames, particles, and fumes that need to be safely contained.

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-30

    This excellent shot of Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Mark Whorton, testing experiment hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox Ground Unit delivered to MSFC on August 30, 2002, reveals a close look at the components inside of the Glovebox. The unit is being used at Marshall's Microgravity Development Laboratory to test experiment hardware before it is installed in the flight Glovebox aboard the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. Laboratory Module, Destiny. The glovebox is a sealed container with built in gloves on its sides and fronts that enables astronauts to work safely with experiments that involve fluids, flames, particles, and fumes that need to be safely contained.

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    A Bay High School team member prepares the oil and water samples for their next drop operation as part of the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-25

    The arnual conference for the Educator Resource Center Network (ERCN) Coordinators was held at Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field in Cleveland, Ohio. The conference included participants from NASA's Educator Resource Centers located throughout the country. The Microgravity Science Division at Glenn sponsored a Microgravity Day for all the conference participants. Twila Schneider of Infinity Technology, a NASA contractor, explains the basics of building a glovebox mockup from a copier paper box. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    Test tubes to hold different types of fluids while in free-fall were among the student-designed items for the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    Students from the four teams pose in front of he NASA Glenn Administration Building alongside the NASA Glenn Time Capsule. The students participated in the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-08

    In addition to drop tower activities, students assembled a plastic pipe structure underwater in a SCUBA exercise similar to training astronauts receive at NASA Johnson Space Center. This was part of the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-15

    Cadmium sulfide -- a semiconductor material -- can be grown in nanoclusters. Small molecules of cadmium sulfide, shown here, can be prepared by traditional chemical methods. However, if larger, more uniform nanoparticles of cadmium sulfide could be fabricated, they may be used to improve electronic devices such as light emitting diodes and diode lasers. Using a NASA grant, Dr. Jimmy Mays of the University of Alabama at Birmingham is studying whether microgravity will enhance the size and shape of a nanoparticle. This experiment is managed by the Microgravity Research Program Office at NASA's Marshall Spce Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  16. Ground-based experiments complement microgravity flight opportunities in the investigation of the effects of space flight on the immune response: is protein kinase C gravity sensitive?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    This manuscript briefly reviews ground-based and flight experiments, discusses how those experiments complement each other, and details how those experiments lead us to speculate about the gravity-sensitive nature of protein kinase C.

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    Typical metal sample that was processed by TEMPUS (Tiegelfreies Elektromagnetisches Prozessieren Unter Schwerelosigkeit), an electromagnetic levitation facility developed by German researchers and flown on the IML-2 and MSL-1 and 1R Spacelab missions. Electromagnetic levitation is used commonly in ground-based experiments to melt and then cool metallic melts below their freezing points without solidification occurring. Sample size is limited in ground-based experiments. Research with TEMPUS aboard Spacelab allowed scientists to study the viscosity, surface tension, and other properties of several metals and alloys while undercooled (i.e., cooled below their normal solidification points). The sample is about 1 cm (2/5 inch) in diameter.

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-10-22

    Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-47) onboard photo of Astronaut N. Jan Davis at work at the Continuous Heating Furnace (CHF) in the Spacelab-J Science Module. Spacelab-J is a combined National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) and NASA mission. The objectives included life sciences, microgravity and technology research.

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-10-22

    Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-47) onboard photo of Astronaut Mae Jemison working in Spacelab-J module. Spacelab-J is a combined National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) and NASA mission. The objectives included life sciences, microgravity and technology research.

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-01-01

    Gerard M. Faeth, University of Michigan, principal investigator in combustion science experiments, including Flow/Soot-Formation in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames, investigation of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity: A Paradigm for Soot Processes in Turbulent Flames, and Soot Processes in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames.

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several equiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. Dendrite irritator control for the EDSE in the Microgravity Development Lab (MDL).

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-26

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. NASA and contractor personnel who conducted the DIME activity with the students. Shown (L-R) are: Daniel Dietrich (NASA) mentor for Sycamore High School team), Carol Hodanbosi (National Center for Microgravity Research; DIME staff), Jose Carrion (GRC Akima, drop tower technician), Dennis Stocker (NASA; DIME staff), Richard DeLombard (NASA; DIME staff), Sandi Thompson (NSMR sabbatical teacher; DIME staff), Peter Sunderland (NCMR, mentor for COSI Academy student team), Adam Malcolm (NASA co-op student; DIME staff). This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    This photo shows the interior reach in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-31

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox is being developed by the European Space Agency and NASA to provide a large working volume for hands-on experiments aboard the International Space Station. Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. (Credit: NASA/Marshall)

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-09-12

    Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-47) onboard photo of Astronaut Jan Davis inside the Spacelab-J module. Spacelab-J is a combined National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) and NASA mission. The objectives included life sciences, microgravity and technology research.

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-20

    Astronaut Catherine G. Coleman, mission specialist, checks out an Astroculture sample on the mid-deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia. Coleman was joined by four other NASA astronauts and two guest researchers for 16 full days of in-space research in support of the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2) mission.

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The shuttle is a reusable launch vehicle that can maintain a consistent orbit and provide up to 17 days of high-quality microgravity conditions. The shuttle, which can accomodate a wide range of experiment apparatus, provides a laboratory environment in which scientists can conduct long-term investigations.

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-04-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-19

    Onboard Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-87) mid-deck, Leonid Kadenyuk, Ukrainian payload specialist, works with the Brassica rapa plants being grown for the Collaborative Ukrainian Experiment (CUE). Kadenyuk joined five astronauts for 16-days in Earth-orbit in support of the United States Microgravity Payload 4 (USMP-4) mission.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-03-04

    Onboard Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) Mission specialist Charles D. (Sam) Gemar works with the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE). The reusable test facility is designed to study the nonlinear, gravity-dependent behavior of liquids and skewed space structures in the microgravity environment.

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Manual activation of 8 FPAs in an earlier version of the Group Activation Pack. The Fluids Processing Apparatus is essentially a microgravity test tube that allows a variety of complex investigations to be performed in space. Developed by BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Commercial Space Center. Flown on STS-95.

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-11-03

    On the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis' middeck, Astronaut Donald R. McMonagle, mission commander, works with the Heat Pipe Performance (HPP-2) experiment during STS-66 mission. HPP-2 was flown to investigate the thermal performance and fluid dynamics of heat pipes operating with asymmetric and multiple heating zones under microgravity condition.

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-20

    Onboard Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-78) Mission Specialist Richard M. Lirnehan works out in the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS-1) Science Module. With an almost 17-day mission away from Earth's gravity, crew members maintained an exercise regimen above and beyond their assigned LMS-1 duty assignments.

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    BioServe researcher Dr. Yi Li first flew plant experiments on board STS-63. Li discovered that exposure to microgravity increased a particular hormone concentration in plants. Since that time, Li has been able to manipulate this phenomenon and grow fruits, such as tomatoes, that overproduce the hormone, and these plants bear larger seedless fruit in the absence of pollination.

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    Exterior view of Combustion Module-2 with callouts to identify key sections. The original CM flew on the Microgravity Sciences Lab-1 and 1R in 1997. It has been refurbished and placed in new racks for flight on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001. Glenn Research in Cleveland, OH, manages the project.

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-01-01

    Image taken during a ground based investigation of a methane-fueled laminar flame surrounded by co-flowing air. The flame was enclosed in a chamber, and the pressure reduced. As the pressure decreased, the velocity of the flow increased, causing the flame to change from a stabilized condition to near blow-out or extinction.

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-15

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Bioactive glass particles (left) with a microporous surface (right) are widely accepted as a synthetic material for periodontal procedures. Using the particles to grow three-dimensional tissue cultures may one day result in developing an improved, more rugged bone tissue that may be used to correct skeletal disorders and bone defects. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research.

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-02

    John Henson (grade 12) and Suzi Bryce (grade 10) from DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky, conduct a drop with NASA's Microgravity Demonstrator. A camera and a TV/VCR unit let students play back recordings of how different physical devices behave differently during freefall as compared to 1-g. The activity was part of the education outreach segment of the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. The event originated at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. The DuPont Manual students patched in to the event through the distance learning lab at the Louisville Science Center. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-02

    John Henson (grade 12) and Suzi Bryce (grade 10) conducted the drop from DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky, conduct a drop with NASA's Microgravity Demonstrator. A camera and a TV/VCR unit let students play back recordings of how different physical devices behave differently during freefall as compared to 1-g. The activity was part of the education outreach segment of the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. The event originated at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. The DuPont Manual students patched in to the event through the distance learning lab at the Louisville Science Center. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-31

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a modular, multi-user facility to accommodate microgravity science experiments on board Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory Module for the International Space Station (ISS). The FCF will be a permanet facility aboard the ISS, and will be capable of accommodating up to ten science investigations per year. It will support the NASA Science and Technology Research Plans for the International Space Station (ISS) which require sustained systematic research of the effects of reduced gravity in the areas of fluid physics and combustion science. From left to right are the Combustion Integrated Rack, the Shared Rack, and the Fluids Integrated Rack. The FCF is being developed by the Microgravity Science Division (MSD) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (Photo Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    Advanced finite element models are used to study three-dimensional, time-dependent flow and segregation in crystal growth systems. In this image of a prototypical model for melt and crystal growth, pathlines at one instant in time are shown for the flow of heated liquid silicon in a cylindrical container. The container is subjected to g-jitter disturbances along the vertical axis. A transverse magnetic field is applied to control them. Such computations are extremely powerful for understanding melt growth in microgravity where g-jitter drives buoyant flows. The simulation is part of the Theoretical Analysis of 3D, Transient Convection and Segregation in Microgravity Bridgman Crystal Growth investigation by Dr. Jeffrey J. Derby of the University of Mirnesota, Minneapolis.

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-06-25

    Zeolites are crystalline aluminosilicates that have complex framework structures. However, there are several features of zeolite crystals that make unequivocal structure determinations difficult. The acquisition of reliable structural information on zeolites is greatly facilitated by the availability of high-quality specimens. For structure determinations by conventional diffraction techniques, large single-crystal specimens are essential. Alternatively, structural determinations by powder profile refinement methods relax the constraints on crystal size, but still require materials with a high degree of crystalline perfection. Studies conducted at CAMMP (Center for Advanced Microgravity Materials Processing) have demonstrated that microgravity processing can produce larger crystal sizes and fewer structural defects relative to terrestrial crystal growth. Principal Investigator: Dr. Albert Sacco

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-02-03

    The objective of this facility is to investigate the potential of space grown semiconductor materials by the vapor transport technique and develop powdered metal and ceramic sintering techniques in microgravity. The materials processed or developed in the SEF have potential application for improving infrared detectors, nuclear particle detectors, photovoltaic cells, bearing cutting tools, electrical brushes and catalysts for chemical production. Flown on STS-60 Commercial Center: Consortium for Materials Development in Space - University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH)

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    These are images of CGEL-2 samples taken during STS-95. They show binary colloidal suspensions that have formed ordered crystalline structures in microgravity. In sample 5, there are more particles therefore, many, many crystallites (small crystals) form. In sample 6, there are less particles therefore, the particles are far apart and few, much larger crystallites form. The white object in the right corner of sample 5 is the stir bar used to mix the sample at the begirning of the mission.

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several quiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. George Myers, controls engineer, monitors the thermal environment of a ground test for the EDSE located in the Microgravity Development Laboratory (MDL).

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several equiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. This image shows the overview for the EDSE in the Microgravity Development Lab (MDL).

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several equiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. Video and power rack for the EDSE in the Microgravity Development Lab (MDL).

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several equiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. This image shows the isothermal bath and video system for the EDSE in the Microgravity Development Lab (MDL).

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-04

    Professor Gerard M. Faeth, Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor, MI, is a principal investigator in NASA combustion science directed by Glenn Research Center. His projects include: Soot Processes in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames; Investigation of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity: A Paradigm for Soot Processes in Turbulent Flames (scheduled to fly on the STS-107 mission); and Flow/Soot- Formation in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    The Diffusion-Controlled Apparatus for Microgravity (DCAM) was developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. A semi-permeable plug or fuse at the center controls the rate at which a precipitant diffuses from the reservoir chamber into the solution chamber , thus prompting protein molecules in the solution to form crystals. The principal investigator is Dr. Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, AL.

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several equiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. EDSE/TDSE project engineer, Zena Hester, monitors a test run of the EDSE located in the Microgravity Development Laboratory (MDL).

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several equiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. Dendrites growing at .4 supercooling from a 2 stinger growth chamber for the EDSE in the Microgravity Development Lab (MDL).

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    This photo shows one of three arrays of air filters inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    This photo shows a rubber glove and its attachment ring for the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    Metal droplet levitated inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    Interior lights give the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) the appearance of a high-tech juke box. The European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA are developing the MSG for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    Electrostatic levitation system inside Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    Schematic of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) electrodes and controls system. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    General oayout of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) general layout with captions. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    An array of miniature lamps will provide illumination to help scientists as they conduct experiments inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). The European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA are developing the MSG for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    This photo shows the access through the internal airlock (bottom right) on the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    The Protein Crystallization for Microgravity (DCAM) was developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. A droplet of solution with protein molecules dissolved in it is isolated in the center of a small well. In orbit, an elastomer seal is lifted so the solution can evaporate and be absorbed by a wick material. This raises the concentration of the solution, thus prompting protein molecules in the solution to form crystals. The principal investigator is Dr. Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, AL.

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-07-08

    Onboard Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-65) Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao (top) and Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas are seen at work in the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) spacelab science module. The two crewmembers are conducting experiments at the IML-2 Rack 5 Biorack (BR). Chiao places a sample in the BR incubator as Thomas handles another sample inside the BR glovebox. The glovebox is used to prepare samples for BR and slow rotating centrifuge microscope (NIZEMI) experiments.

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. The objective of the research was to define a way to differentiate between effects due to microgravity and those due to possible stress from non-optimal spaceflight conditions.

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-15

    Pratima Rao lectures students about materials science research in space during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) mission (STS-87, Nov. 19 - Dec. 5, 1997) in the visitor's center set up by the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) team at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY. IDGE, flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. Photo credit: RPI

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-15

    Matthew Koss lectures middle-school students about materials science research in space during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) mission (STS-87, Nov. 19 - Dec. 5, 1997) in the visitor's center set up by the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) team at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)in Troy, NY. IDGE, flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. Photo credit: RPI

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-02

    Students from DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky participated in a video-teleconference during the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. The event originated at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. The DuPont Manual students patched in to the event through the distance learning lab at the Louisville Science Center. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1986-06-03

    Crystals grown in the hand-held Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCAM) onboard STS-61C. The PCAM has a pedestal in the center of a circular chamber, the surrounding chamber holds an absorbent reservoir that contains a solution of the precipitant. Vapor pressure differences between the protein solution and the reservoir solution force water to move from the protein solution to the reservoir. As protein concentrations increase, protein crystals begin to nucleate and grow.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    Exterior view of Combustion Module-2 with an Experiment Module partially extracted during a crew training session. The original CM flew on the Microgravity Sciences Lab-1 and 1R in 1997. It has been refurbished and placed in new racks for flight on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001. See MSFC 0100158 for a view with callouts. Glenn Research in Cleveland, OH, manages the project.

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-01

    Dr. Donald Gilles, the Discipline Scientist for Materials Science in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Applications Department, demonstrates to Carl Dohrman a model of dendrites, the branch-like structures found in many metals and alloys. Dohrman was recently selected by the American Society for Metals International as their 1999 ASM International Foundation National Merit Scholar. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign freshman recently toured NASA's materials science facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-15

    Paula Crawford (assisted by an American Sign Language interpreter) lectures students about materials science research in space during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 mission (STS-87, Nov. 19 - Dec. 5, 1997) in the visitor's center set up by the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) team at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY. IDGE, flown on three Space Shuttle mission, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operation. Photo credit: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-15

    Students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY, monitor the progress of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) mission (STS-87, Nov. 19 - Dec. 5, 1997). Remote Operation Control Center (ROCC) like this one will become more common during operations with International Space Station. IDGE, flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. Photo credit: Renssenlaer Polythnic Institute (RPI)

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-02-10

    The image shows a test cell of Crystal Growth experiment inside the Vapor Crystal Growth System (VCGS) furnace aboard the STS-42, International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), mission. The goal of IML-1, a pressurized marned Spacelab module, was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. More than 200 scientists from 16 countires participated in the investigations.

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-01

    Research with plants in microgravity offers many exciting opportunities to gain new insights and could improve products on Earth ranging from crop production to fragrances and food flavorings. The ASTROCULTURE facility is a lead commercial facility for plant growth and plant research in microgravity and was developed by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WSCAR), a NASA Commercial Space Center. On STS-95 it will support research that could help improve crop development leading to plants that are more disease resistant or have a higher yield and provide data on the production of plant essential oils---oils that contain the essence of the plant and provide both fragrance and flavoring. On STS-95, a flowering plant will be grown in ASTROCULTURE and samples taken using a method developed by the industry partner for this investigation. On Earth, the samples will be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and the data used to evaluate both the production of fragrant oils in microgravity and in the development of one or more products. The ASTROCULTURE payload uses these pourous tubes with precise pressure sensing and control for fluid delivery to the plant root tray.

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-01

    Research with plants in microgravity offers many exciting opportunities to gain new insights and could improve products on Earth ranging from crop production to fragrances and food flavorings. The ASTROCULTURE facility is a lead commercial facility for plant growth and plant research in microgravity and was developed by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WSCAR), a NASA Commercial Space Center. On STS-95 it will support research that could help improve crop development leading to plants that are more disease resistant or have a higher yield and provide data on the production of plant essential oils---oils that contain the essence of the plant and provide both fragrance and flavoring. On STS-95, a flowering plant will be grown in ASTROCULTURE and samples taken using a method developed by the industry partner for this investigation. On Earth the samples will be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and the data used to evaluate both the production of fragrant oils in microgravity and in the development of one or more products.

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-15

    John Marshall, an investigator at Ames Research Center and a principal investigator in the microgravity fluid physics program, is studying the adhesion and cohesion of particles in order to shed light on how granular systems behave. These systems include everything from giant dust clouds that form planets to tiny compressed pellets, such as the ones you swallow as tablets. This knowledge should help us control the grains, dust, and powders that we encounter or use on a daily basis. Marshall investigated electrostatic charge in microgravity on the first and second U.S. Microgravity Laboratory shuttle missions to see how grains aggregate, or stick together. With gravity's effects eliminated on orbit, Marshall found that the grains of sand that behaved ever so freely on Earth now behaved like flour. They would just glom together in clumps and were quite difficult to disperse. That led to an understanding of the prevalence of the electrostatic forces. The granules wanted to aggregate as little chains, like little hairs, and stack end to end. Some of the chains had 20 or 30 grains. This phenomenon indicated that another force, what Marshall believes to be an electrostatic dipole, was at work.(The diagram on the right emphasizes the aggregating particles in the photo on the left, taken during the USML-2 mission in 1995.)

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-15

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Even in normal gravity, bioactive glass particles enhance bone growth in laboratory tests with flat tissue cultures. Ducheyne and his team believe that using the bioactive microcarriers in a rotating bioreactor in microgravity will produce improved, three-dimensional tissue cultures. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering.

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. Final samples from Mir and Earth appeared histologically cartilaginous throughout their entire cross sections (5-8 mm thick), with the exception of fibrous outer capsules. Constructs grown on Earth (A) appeared to have a more organized extracellular matrix with more uniform collagen orientation as compared with constructs grown on Mir (B), but the average collagen fiber diameter was similar in the two groups (22 +- 2 nm) and comparable to that previously reported for developing articular cartilage. Randomly oriented collagen in Mir samples would be consistent with previous reports that microgravity disrupts fibrillogenesis. These are transmission electron micrographs of constructs from Mir (A) and Earth (B) groups at magnifications of x3,500 and x120,000 (Inset). The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens of cartilage tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. Constructs grown on Mir (A) tended to become more spherical, whereas those grown on Earth (B) maintained their initial disc shape. These findings might be related to differences in cultivation conditions, i.e., videotapes showed that constructs floated freely in microgravity but settled and collided with the rotating vessel wall at 1g (Earth's gravity). In particular, on Mir the constructs were exposed to uniform shear and mass transfer at all surfaces such that the tissue grew equally in all directions, whereas on Earth the settling of discoid constructs tended to align their flat circular areas perpendicular to the direction of motion, increasing shear and mass transfer circumferentially such that the tissue grew preferentially in the radial direction. A and B are full cross sections of constructs from Mir and Earth groups shown at 10-power. C and D are representative areas at the construct surfaces enlarged to 200-power. They are stained red with safranin-O. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Photo credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Ecomaster, an affiliate of BioServe Space Technologies, this PentaPure technology has been used to purify water for our nation's Space Shuttle missions since 1981. WTC-Ecomaster of Mirneapolis, Minnesota manufactures water purification systems under the brand name PentaPure (TM). BioServe researcher Dr. George Marchin, of Kansas State University, first demonstrated the superiority of this technology and licensed it to WTC. Marchin continues to perform microgravity research in the development of new technologies for the benefit of life on Earth.

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-01

    Students in the Young Astronaut Program at the Coca-Cola Space Science Center in Columbus, GA, constructed gloveboxes using the new NASA Student Glovebox Education Guide. The young astronauts used cardboard copier paper boxes as the heart of the glovebox. The paper boxes transformed into gloveboxes when the students pasted poster-pictures of an actual NASA microgravity science glovebox inside and outside of the paper boxes. The young astronauts then added holes for gloves and removable transparent top covers, which completed the construction of the gloveboxes. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    Experiments with colloidal solutions of plastic microspheres suspended in a liquid serve as models of how molecules interact and form crystals. For the Dynamics of Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition (CDOT) experiment, Paul Chaikin of Princeton University has identified effects that are attributable to Earth's gravity and demonstrated that experiments are needed in the microgravity of orbit. Space experiments have produced unexpected dendritic (snowflake-like) structures. To date, the largest hard sphere crystal grown is a 3 mm single crystal grown at the cool end of a ground sample. At least two more additional flight experiments are plarned aboard the International Space Station. This image is from a video downlink.

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-03-12

    The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) with the Experimental Apparatus Container (EAC) removed flew during the USMP-2 mission. During USMP-2, the AADSF was used to study the growth of mercury cadmium telluride crystals in microgravity by directional solidification, a process commonly used on earth to process metals and grow crystals. The furnace is tubular and has three independently controlled temperature zones . The sample travels from the hot zone of the furnace (1600 degrees F) where the material solidifies as it cools. The solidification region, known as the solid/liquid interface, moves from one end of the sample to the other at a controlled rate, thus the term directional solidification.

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-09-01

    The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) flew during the USMP-2 mission. During USMP-2, the AADSF was used to study the growth of mercury cadmium telluride crystals in microgravity by directional solidification, a process commonly used on earth to process metals and grow crystals. The furnace is tubular and has three independently controlled temperature zones. The sample travels from the hot zone of the furnace (1600 degrees F) where the material solidifies as it cools. The solidification region, known as the solid/liquid interface, moves from one end of the sample to the other at a controlled rate, thus the term directional solidification.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    Once the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is sealed, additional experiment items can be inserted through a small airlock at the bottom right of the work volume. It is shown here with the door open. The European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA are developing the MSG for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-04-06

    An experiment vehicle plunges into the deceleration pit at the end of a 5.18-second drop in the Zero-Gravity Research Facility at NASA's Glenn Research Center. The Zero-Gravity Research Facility was developed to support microgravity research and development programs that investigate various physical sciences, materials, fluid physcis, and combustion and processing systems. Payloads up to 1 meter in diameter and 455 kg in weight can be accommodated. The facility has a 145-meter evacuated shaft to ensure a disturbance-free drop. This is No. 2 of a sequence of 4 images. (Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center)

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-04-06

    An experiment vehicle plunges into the deceleration at the end of a 5.18-second drop in the Zero-Gravity Research Facility at NASA's Glenn Research Center. The Zero-Gravity Research Facility was developed to support microgravity research and development programs that investigate various physical sciences, materials, fluid physics, and combustion and processing systems. Payloads up to one-meter in diameter and 455 kg in weight can be accommodated. The facility has a 145-meter evacuated shaft to ensure a disturbance-free drop. This is No. 3 of a sequence of 4 images. (Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center)

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    This photo shows the access through the internal airlock on the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The airlock will allow the insertion or removal of equipment and samples without opening the working volume of the glovebox. Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    Dr. Jan Rogers and Dr. Michael Robinson operate the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-04-06

    An experiment vehicle plunges into the deceleration pit at the end of a 5.18-second drop in the Zero-Gravity Research Facility at NASA's Glenn Research Center. The Zero-Gravity Research Facility was developed to support microgravity research and development programs that investigate various physical sciences, materials, fluid physics, and combustion and processing systems. Payloads up to one meter in diameter and 455 kg in weight can be accommodated. The facility has a 145-meter evacuated shaft to ensure a disturbance-free drop. This is No. 4 of a sequence of 4 images. (Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center)

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-04-06

    An experiment vehicle plunges into the deceleration pit at the end of a 5.18-second drop in the Zero-Gravity Research Facility at NASA's Glenn Research Center. The Zero-Gravity Research Facility was developed to support microgravity research and development programs that investigate various physical sciences, materials, fluid physics, and combustion and processing systems. Payloads up to 1 meter in diameter and 455 kg in weight can be accommodated. The facility has a 145-meter evacuated shaft to ensure a disturbance-free drop. This is No.1 of a sequence of 4 images. (Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center)

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    This photo shows the access through the internal airlock (bottom right) on the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The airlock will allow the insertion or removal of equipment and samples without opening the working volume of the glovebox. Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    Access ports, one on each side of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), will allow scientists to place large experiment items inside the MSG. The ports also provide additional glove ports (dark circle) for greater access to the interior. The European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA are developing the MSG for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-30

    Tim Broach (seen through window) of NASA/Marshall Spce Flight Center (MSFC), demonstrates the working volume inside the Microgravity Sciences Glovebox being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) for use aboard the U.S. Destiny laboratory module on the International Space Station (ISS). This mockup is the same size as the flight hardware. Observing are Tommy Holloway and Brewster Shaw of The Boeing Co. (center) and John-David Bartoe, ISS research manager at NASA/John Space Center and a payload specialist on Spacelab-2 mission (1985). Photo crdit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-03-11

    Access ports, one on each side of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), will allow scientists to place large experiment items inside the MSG. The ports also provide additional glove ports (silver disk) for greater access to the interior. The European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA are developing the MSG for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-31

    The optical bench for the Fluids Integrated Rack section of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is shown extracted for servicing and with the optical bench rotated 90 degrees for access to the rear elements. The FCF will be installed, in phases, in the Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS), and will accommodate multiple users for a range of investigations. This is an engineering mockup; the flight hardware is subject to change as designs are refined. The FCF is being developed by the Microgravity Science Division (MSD) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-31

    The optical bench for the Fluid Integrated Rack section of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is shown in its operational configuration. The FCF will be installed, in phases, in the Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS), and will accommodate multiple users for a range of investigations. This is an engineering mockup; the flight hardware is subject to change as designs are refined. The FCF is being developed by the Microgravity Science Division (MSD) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-31

    The combustion chamber for the Combustion Integrated Rack section of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is shown extracted for servicing. The FCF will be installed, in phases, in the Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS), and will accommodate multiple users for a range of investigations. This is an engineering mockup; the flight hardware is subject to change as designs are refined. The FCF is being developed by the Microgravity Science Division (MSD) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-31

    The optical bench for the Fluids Integrated Rack section of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is shown extracted for servicing. The FCF will be installed, in phases, in the Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS), and will accommodate multiple users for a range of investigations. This is an engineering mockup; the flight hardware is subject to change as designs are refined. The FCF is being developed by the Microgravity Science Division (MSD) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-31

    The combustion chamber for the Combustion Integrated Rack section of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is shown in its operational configuration. The FCF will be installed, in phases, in the Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS), and will accommodate multiple users for a range of investigations. This is an engineering mockup; the flight hardware is subject to change as designs are refined. The FCF is being developed by the Microgravity Science Division (MSD) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-31

    The optical bench for the Fluids Integrated Rack section of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is shown extracted for servicing and with the optical bench rotated 90 degrees to access the rear elements. The FCF will be installed, in phases, in the Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS), and will accommodate multiple users for a range of investigations. This is an engineering mockup; the flight hardware is subject to change as designs are refined. The FCF is being developed by the Microgravity Science Division (MSD) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-31

    The combustion chamber for the Combustion Integrated Rack section of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is shown opened for installation of burn specimens. The FCF will be installed, in phases, in the Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS), and will accommodate multiple users for a range of investigations. This is an engineering mockup; the flight hardware is subject to change as designs are refined. The FCF is being developed by the Microgravity Science Division (MSD) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-31

    The combustion chamber for the Combustion Integrated Rack section of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is shown extracted for servicing and with the optical bench rotated 90 degrees for access to the rear elements. The FCF will be installed, in phases, in the Destiny, the U.S. Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS), and will accommodate multiple users for a range of investigations. This is an engineering mockup; the flight hardware is subject to change as designs are refined. The FCF is being developed by the Microgravity Science Division (MSD) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. (Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Marshall Space Flight Center's researchers have conducted suborbital experiments with ZBLAN, an optical material capable of transmitting 100 times more signal and information than silica fibers. The next step is to process ZBLAN in a microgravity environment to stop the formation of crystallites, small crystals caused by a chemical imbalances. Scientists want to find a way to make ZBLAN an amorphous (without an internal shape) material. Producing a material such as this will have far-reaching implications on advanced communications, medical and manufacturing technologies using lasers, and a host of other products well into the 21st century.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-15

    Undergraduate students Kristina Wines and Dena Renzo at Rensselaer Poloytech Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY, monitor the progress of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) mission (STS-87), Nov. 19 - Dec.5, 1997). Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC) like this one will become more common during operations with the International Space Station. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. Photo credit: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-01

    The Magnetically Damped Furnace (MDF) breadboard is being developed in response to NASA's mission and goals to advance the scientific knowledge of microgravity research, materials science, and related technologies. The objective of the MDF is to dampen the fluid flows due to density gradients and surface tension gradients in conductive melts by introducing a magnetic field during the sample processing. The MDF breadboard will serve as a proof of concept that the MDF performance requirements can be attained within the International Space Station resource constraints.

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-30

    A 3 mm drop of nickel-zirconium, heated to incandescence, hovers between electrically charged plates inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-29

    Angie Jackman, a NASA project manager in microgravity research, demonstrates the enhanced resilience of undercooled metal alloys as compared to conventional alloys. Experiments aboard the Space Shuttle helped scientists refine their understanding of the physical properties of certain metal alloys when undercooled (i.e., kept liquid below their normal solidification temperature). This new knowledge then allowed scientists to modify a terrestrial production method so they can now make limited quantities marketed under the Liquid Metal trademark. The exhibit was a part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-31

    This diagram shows the general arrangement of the payloads to be carried by the multidisciplinary STS-107 Research-1 Space Shuttle mission in 2002. The Spacehab module will host experiments that require direct operation by the flight crew. Others with special requirements will be on the GAS Bridge Assembly sparning the payload bay. The Extended Duration Orbiter kit carries additional oxygen and hydrogen for the electricity-producing fuel cells. Research-1 experiments will cover space biology, life science, microgravity research, and commercial space product development, research sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. An alternative view without callouts is available at 0101765.

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-31

    Thisdiagram shows the general arrangement of the payloads to be carried by the multidisciplinary STS-107 Research-1 Space Shuttle mission in 2002. The Spacehab module will host experiments that require direct operation by the flight crew. Others with special requirements will be on the GAS Bridge Assembly sparning the payload bay. The Extended Duration Orbiter kit carries additional oxygen and hydrogen for the electricity-producing fuel cells. Research-1 experiments will cover space biology, life science, microgravity research, and commercial space product development, research sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. An alternative view with callouts is available at 0101764.

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-02

    Students from DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky participated in a video-teleconference during the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. The event originated at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. The DuPont Manual students patched in to the event through the distance learning lab at the Louisville Science Center. Education coordinator Twila Schneider (left) of Infinity Technology and NASA materials engineer Chris Cochrane prepare students for the on-line workshop. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-02

    Suzarne Nichols (12th grade) from DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky, asks a question of on of the on-line lecturers during the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. The event originated at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. The DuPont Manual students patched in to the event through the distance learning lab at the Louisville Science Center. NASA materials engineer Chris Cochrane prepare students for the on-line workshop helps two students prepare a drop demonstration. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-02

    Suzarne Nichols (12th grade) from DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky, asks a question of on of the on-line lecturers during the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. The event originated at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. The DuPont Manual students patched in to the event through the distance learning lab at the Louisville Science Center. Jie Ma (grade 10, at right) waits her turn to ask a question. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-02

    Sutta Chernubhotta (grade 10) from DuPont Manual High School in Louisville, Kentucky, asks a question of on of the on-line lecturers during the Pan-Pacific Basin Workshop on Microgravity Sciences held in Pasadena, California. The event originated at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. The DuPont Manual students patched in to the event through the distance learning lab at the Louisville Science Center. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. Because xenon near the critical point will collapse under its own weight, experiments on Earth (green line) are limited as they get closer (toward the left) to the critical point. CVX in the microgravity of space (red line) moved into unmeasured territory that scientists had not been able to reach.

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Some of the earliest concerns about fluid behavior in microgravity was the management of propellants in spacecraft tanks as they orbited the Earth. On the ground, gravity pulls a fluid to a bottom of a tank (ig, left). In orbit, fluid behavior depends on surface tension, viscosity, wetting effects with the container wall, and other factors. In some cases, a propellant can wet a tank and leave a large gas bubbles in the center (ug, right). Similar probelms can affect much smaller experiments using fluids in small spaces. Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center.

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-04-01

    Apfel's excellent match: This series of photos shows a water drop containing a surfactant (Triton-100) as it experiences a complete cycle of superoscillation on U.S. Microgravity Lab-2 (USML-2; October 1995). The time in seconds appears under the photos. The figures above the photos are the oscillation shapes predicted by a numerical model. The time shown with the predictions is nondimensional. Robert Apfel (Yale University) used the Drop Physics Module on USML-2 to explore the effect of surfactants on liquid drops. Apfel's research of surfactants may contribute to improvements in a variety of industrial processes, including oil recovery and environmental cleanup.

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-03-24

    Astronaut Michael Clifford places a liquid nitrogen Dewar containing frozen protein solutions aboard Russia's space station Mir during a visit by the Space Shuttle (STS-76). The protein samples were flash-frozen on Earth and will be allowed to thaw and crystallize in the microgravity environment on Mir Space Station. A later crew will return the Dewar to Earth for sample analysis. Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California at Riverside is the principal investigator. Photo credit: NASA/Johnson Space Center.

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The Commercial Vapor Diffusion Apparatus will be used to perform 128 individual crystal growth investigations for commercial and science research. These experiments will grow crystals of several different proteins, including HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor, Glycogen Phosphorylase A, and NAD Synthetase. The Commercial Vapor Diffusion Apparatus supports multiple commercial investigations within a controlled environment. The goal of the Commercial Protein Crystal Growth payload on STS-95 is to grow large, high-quality crystals of several different proteins of interest to industry, and to continue to refine the technology and procedures used in microgravity for this important commercial research.

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-20

    Astronaut Tom Akers places a liquid nitrogen Dewar containing frozen protein solutions aboard Russia's space Station Mir during a visit by the Space Shuttle (STS-79). The protein samples were flash-frozen on Earth and will be allowed to thaw and crystallize in the microgravity environment on Mir Space Station. A later crew will return the Dewar to Earth for sample analysis. Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California at Riverside is the principal investigator. Photo credit: NASA/Johnson Space Center.

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-04

    One of NASA's newest education publications made its debut at the arnual National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) conference held in Orlando, Florida April 5-7. How High Is It? An Educator's Guide with Activities Focused on Scale Models of Distances was presented by Carla Rosenberg of the National Center for Microgravity Research at Glenn Research Center. Rosenberg, an author of the Guide, led teachers in several hands-on activities from the Guide. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    Graph depicting Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) heating and cooling cycle to achieve undercooling of liquid metals. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity matierials sciences program.

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-29

    Paul Luz (right), an aerospace flight system engineer at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), discusses microgravity research with a visitor at AirVenture 2000. Part of the NASA exhibits included demonstration of knowledge gained from micorgravity research aboard the Space Shuttle. These include liquid metal (Liquid metal demonstrator is three plastic drop tubes at center) and dendritic growth (in front of Luz), both leading to improvements in processes on Earth. The exhibit was part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-15

    Matthew Koss (forground) and Martin Glicksman (rear), principal investigator and lead scientist (respectively), review plans for the next step in the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) during the U.S. Microgravity Payload-4 (USMP-4) mission (STS-87, Nov. 19 - Dec. 5, 1997). Remote Operations Control Center (ROCC) like this one, at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY, will become more common during operations with the International Space Station. IDGE, flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relavent metal and alloy forming operations. Photo credit: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-20

    Payload specialist Albert Sacco Jr. inspects a crystal in a cylindrical autoclave on the mid-deck of the earth-orbiting space shuttle Columbia. This Zeolite Crystal Growth (ZCG) experiment was one of a few U.S. Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2) experiments that were conducted in both the Shuttle proper and its primary cargo's science module in the payload bay. Most of the experiments were conducted solely in the science module. Sacco was one of two guest researchers who joined five NASA astronauts for 16 days of Earth-orbit.

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-02-21

    Vapor Crystal Growth System developed in IML-1, Mercuric Iodide Crystal grown in microgravity FES/VCGS (Fluids Experiment System/Vapor Crystal Growth Facility). During the mission, mercury iodide source material was heated, vaporized, and transported to a seed crystal where the vapor condensed. Mercury iodide crystals have practical uses as sensitive X-ray and gamma-ray detectors. In addition to their excellent optical properties, these crystals can operate at room temperature, which makes them useful for portable detector devices for nuclear power plant monitoring, natural resource prospecting, biomedical applications, and astronomical observing.

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-08-01

    STS-94 Payload Specialist Roger K. Crouch is helped into his launch/entry suit by a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout (OC) building after the suit has been given a pressure test. He is the Chief Scientist of the NASA Microgravity Space and Applications Division. He also has served as a Program Scientist for previous missions and is an expert in semiconductor crystal growth. Crouch and six other crewmembers prepare to depart the OC and head for Launch Pad 39a, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off.

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-01

    Engineering bench system hardware for the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested on a lab bench at the University of Colorado in Boulder. This is done in a horizontal arrangement to reduce pressure differences so the tests more closely resemble behavior in the microgravity of space. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  2. Cellular consequences of the microgravity environment on lymphocyte function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N. R.

    Microgravity induces a cascade of changes in cell morphology and function. Mammalian cells adapt to the environment of low gravity and express a series of responses, some possibly from direct effects on cells and others based on environmental conditions created by microgravity. Human lymphocytes in microgravity culture are functionally diminished in activation and locomotion. Both processes are integral to optimal immune response to fight pathogens. The NASA Rotating-wall vessel (RWV) is an analog to many aspects of microgravity and is used to model microgravity for ground-based experiments. We found that lymphocyte activation and locomotion were significantly down-regulated in spaceflight and in the RWV. Using this analog culture system, we have isolated a signal transduction lesion either at the level of, or upstream from, Protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Analysis of expression and adaptation by gene array experiments and immunoblotting to identified upstream events in human lymphocytes adapting to microgravity analog culture. Microgravity induces selective changes, many of which are cell membrane related. Results showed that upstream of PKC in the T cell activation cascade, PLC-gamma and LAT are significantly diminished. ZAP 70 which controls LAT activation is also down-regulated in modeled microgravity indicating that events governing cell shape might warrant special attention in microgravity conditions. The goal of this study is to delineate response suites which are consequential, direct or indirect effects of the microgravity environment and which of these are essential to lymphocytes.

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002 in the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. The Center for the Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, is investigating the properties of mist fire suppression in microgravity with Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. These experiments consist of varying water droplet sizes and water mist concentrations applied to flame fronts of different propane/air mixtures. Observations from these tests will provide valuable information on the change of flame speed in the presence of water mist. Shown here is a flame front propagating through the Mist flame tube during 1-g testing at NASA/Glenn Research Center.

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-05-04

    A 16mm film frame shows convective regions inside silicone oil playing the part of a stellar atmosphere in the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC). An electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. Numbers of the frame indicate temperatures and other conditions. This image is from the Spacelab-3 flight in 1985. GFFC was reflown on U.S. Microgravity Laboratory-2 in 1995. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-10

    This composite image depicts one set of flow patterns simulated in the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) that flew on two Spacelab missions. Silicone oil served as the atmosphere around a rotating steel hemisphere (dotted circle) and an electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. GFFC flew on Spacelab-3 in 1985 and U.S. Microgravity Laboratory-2 in 1995. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-07-15

    A steel hemisphere was at the core of the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) that flew on two Spacelab missions. It was capped by a sapphire dome. Silicone oil between the two played the part of a steller atmosphere. An electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. GFFC flew on Spacelab-3 in 1985 and U.S. Microgravity Laboratory-2 in 1995. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-20

    This drawing depicts one set of flow patterns simulated in the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) that flew on two Spacelab missions. Silicone oil served as the atmosphere around a rotating steel hemisphere (dotted circle) and an electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). An Acrobat PDF copy of this drawing is available at http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-15

    NASA is looking to biological techniques that are millions of years old to help it develop new materials and technologies for the 21st century. Sponsored by NASA, Viola Vogel, director of Washington University's Center for Nanotechnology and a principal investigator for the microgravity biotechnology program, is researching a monorail on a nanoscale to learn how to control translational motion of motor proteins in nonbiological environments in order to transport cargo between user-specified locations. Shear-deposition of Teflon on glass (top) is used in Viola Vogel's lab to create a nanogrooved surface. The topography controls the path that microtubules take as they shuttle nano-sized cargo between user-defined destinations.

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-06-25

    Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-50) onboard photo of astronauts working in United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1). USML-1 will fly in orbit for extended periods of time attached to the Shuttle, providing greater opportunities for research in materials science, fluid dynamics, biotechnology, and combustion science. The scientific data gained from the USML-1 missions will constitute a landmark in space science, pioneering investigations into the role of gravity in a wide array of important processes and phenomena. In addition, the missions will also provide much of the experience in performing research in space and in the design of instruments needed for Space Station Freedom and the programs to follow in the 21st Century.

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. The objective of the research was to define a way to differentiate between effects due to microgravity and those due to possible stress from non-optimal spaceflight conditions. These Jurkat cells, a human acute T-cell leukemia was obtained to evaluate three types of potential experimental stressors: a) Temperature elevation; b) Serum starvation; and c) Centrifugal force. The data from previous spaceflight experiments showed that actin filaments and cell shape are significantly different for the control. These normal cells serve as the baseline for future spaceflight experiments.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-02-16

    These Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA) trays were first flown in the Thermal Enclosure System (TES) during the USMP-2 (STS-62) mission. Each tray can hold 20 protein crystal growth chambers. Each chamber contains a double-barrel syringe; one barrel holds protein crystal solution and the other holds precipitant agent solution. During the microgravity mission, a torque device is used to simultaneously retract the plugs in all 20 syringes. The two solutions in each chamber are then mixed. After mixing, droplets of the combined solutions are moved onto the syringe tips so vapor diffusion can begin. During the length of the mission, protein crystals are grown in the droplets. Shortly before the Shuttle's return to Earth, the experiment is deactivated by retracting the droplets containing protein crystals, back into the syringes.

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    One concern about human adaptation to space is how returning from the microgravity of orbit to Earth can affect an astronaut's ability to fly safely. There are monitors and infrared video cameras to measure eye movements without having to affect the crew member. A computer screen provides moving images which the eye tracks while the brain determines what it is seeing. A video camera records movement of the subject's eyes. Researchers can then correlate perception and response. Test subjects perceive different images when a moving object is covered by a mask that is visible or invisible (above). Early results challenge the accepted theory that smooth pursuit -- the fluid eye movement that humans and primates have -- does not involve the higher brain. NASA results show that: Eye movement can predict human perceptual performance, smooth pursuit and saccadic (quick or ballistic) movement share some signal pathways, and common factors can make both smooth pursuit and visual perception produce errors in motor responses.

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-01

    CGBA, a facility developed by BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Space Center, allows a variety of sophisticated bioprocessing research to be performed using a common device. The Fluids Processing Apparatus is essentially a microgravity test tube that allows a variety of complex investigations to be performed in space. This is a glass barrel containing several chambers separated by rubber stoppers. Eight FPAs are placed together in a Group Activation Pack (GAP), which allows all of the research to be started simultaneously by turning a single crank. Eight GAPs, or similar-sized payloads, can be stored in a single CGBA temperature controlled locker, which now uses motor drives to automatically turn the cranks to start and stop experiments. On STS-95, research efforts cover eight major areas that will benefit Earth-based products ranging from the production of pharmaceuticals to fish hatcheries.

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-07

    The Transient Dentritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dentrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior of widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle flights (STS-62, STS-75, and STS-87) of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dentrites. Shown here is a cutaway of the isothermal bath containing its growth cell at the heart of the TDSE. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Note: an Acrobat PDF version is available from http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    As a liquefied metal solidifies, particles dispersed in the liquid are either pushed ahead of or engulfed by the moving solidification front. Similar effects can be seen when the ground freezes and pushes large particles out of the soil. The Particle Engulfment and Pushing (PEP) experiment, conducted aboard the fourth U.S. Microgravity Payload (USMP-4) mission in 1997, used a glass and plastic beads suspended in a transparent liquid. The liquid was then frozen, trapping or pushing the particles as the solidifying front moved. This simulated the formation of advanced alloys and composite materials. Such studies help scientists to understand how to improve the processes for making advanced materials on Earth. The principal investigator is Dr. Doru Stefanescu of the University of Alabama. This image is from a video downlink.

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-05-15

    While the microgravity environment of orbit eliminates a number of effects that impede the formation of materials on Earth, the change can also cause new, unwanted effects. A mysterious phenomenon, known as detached solidification, apparently stems from a small hydrostatic force that turns out to be pervasive. The contact of the solid with the ampoule transfers stress to the growing crystal and causing unwanted dislocations and twins. William Wilcox and Liya Regel of Clarkson University theorize that the melt is in contact with the ampoule wall, while the solid is not, and the melt and solid are cornected by a meniscus. Their work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Researcxh, and builds on earlier work by Dr. David Larson of the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This is an image of a colloidal crystal from the CDOT-2 investigation flown on STS-95. There are so many colloidal particles in this sample that it behaves like a glass. In the laboratory on Earth, the sample remained in an amorphous state, showing no sign of crystal growth. In microgravity the sample crystallized in 3 days, as did the other glassy colloidal samples examined in the CDOT-2 experiment. During the investigation, crystallization occurred in samples that had a volume fraction (number of particles per total volume) larger than the formerly reported glass transition of 0.58. This has great implications for theories of the structural glass transition. These crystals were strong enough to survive space shuttle re-entry and landing.

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-30

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), a natural bacteria found all over the Earth, has a fairly novel way of getting rid of unwanted insects. Bt forms a protein substance (shown on the right) that is not harmful to humans, birds, fish or other vertebrates. When eaten by insect larvae the protein causes a fatal loss of appetite. For over 25 years agricultural chemical companies have relied heavily upon safe Bt pesticides. New space based research promises to give the insecticide a new dimension in effectiveness and applicability. Researchers from the Consortium for Materials Development in Space along with industrial affiliates such as Abott Labs and Pern State University flew Bt on a Space Shuttle mission in the fall of 1996. Researchers expect that the Shuttle's microgravity environment will reveal new information about the protein that will make it more effective against a wider variety of pests.

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-11-01

    The Space Shuttle was designed to carry large payloads into Earth orbit. One of the most important payloads is Spacelab. The Spacelab serves as a small but well-equipped laboratory in space to perform experiments in zero-gravity and make astronomical observations above the Earth's obscuring atmosphere. In this photograph, Payload Specialist, Ulf Merbold, is working at Gradient Heating Facility on the Materials Science Double Rack (MSDR) inside the science module in the Orbiter Columbia's payload bay during STS-9, Spacelab-1 mission. Spacelab-1, the joint ESA (European Space Agency)/NASA mission, was the first operational flight for the Spacelab, and demonstrated new instruments and methods for conducting experiments that are difficult or impossible in ground-based laboratories. This facility performed, in extremely low gravity, a wide variety of materials processing experiments in crystal growth, fluid physics, and metallurgy. The Marshall Space Flight Center had overall management responsibilities.

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-01

    Cells from kidneys lose some of their special features in conventional culture but form spheres replete with specialized cell microvilli (hair) and synthesize hormones that may be clinically useful. Ground-based research studies have demonstrated that both normal and neoplastic cells and tissues recreate many of the characteristics in the NASA bioreactor that they display in vivo. Proximal kidney tubule cells that normally have rich apically oriented microvilli with intercellular clefts in the kidney do not form any of these structures in conventional two-dimensional monolayer culture. However, when normal proximal renal tubule cells are cultured in three-dimensions in the bioreactor, both the microvilli and the intercellular clefts form. This is important because, when the morphology is recreated, the function is more likely also to be rejuvenated. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Comparison of Germanium Telluride (GeTe) Crystals grown on Earth (left) and in space (right) during the Skylab SL-3 mission. These crystals were grown using a vapor transport crystal growth method in the Multipurpose Electric Furnace System (MEFS). Crystals grown on earth are needles and platelettes with distorted surfaces and hollow growth habits. The length of the ground-based needle is approximately 2 mm and the average lenth of the platelets is 1 mm. The dull appearance of the Skylab crystals resulted from condensation of the transport agent during the long cooling period dictated by the Skylab furnace. In a dedicated process, this would be prevented by removing the ampoule from the furnace and quenching the vapor source.

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Over a billion of mostly third world people are infected with a roundworm known as ascarids. Ascarids are tiny parasites that infect the intestinal tract of vertebrates. Movement of the larvae into the brain or other parts of the body can prove fatal. Space-based research is providing new hope in combating these parasitic worms. Ascarids are dependent upon a substance known as malic enzyme to regulate certain bodily functions. A new drug designed to interfere with normal functioning of malic enzyme should prove deadly to ascarids. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography, along with the University of North Texas grew malic enzyme crystals on the USML-1 Spacelab mission. Although these crystals proved to be smaller than ground based ones, they were more perfectly formed, therefore producing better data for drug design.

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-01

    High school students screen crystals of various proteins that are part of the ground-based work that supports Alexander McPherson's protein crystal growth experiment. The students also prepared and stored samples in the Enhanced Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar, which was launched on the STS-98 mission for delivery to the ISS. The crystals grown on the ground will be compared with crystals grown in orbit. Participants include Joseph Negron, of Terry Parker High School, Jacksonville, Florida; Megan Miskowski, of Ridgeview High School, Orange Park, Florida; and Sam Swank (shown), of Fletcher High School, Neptune Beach, Florida. The proteins are placed in plastic tubing that is heat-sealed at the ends, then flash-frozen and preserved in a liquid nitrogen Dewar. Aboard the ISS, the nitrogen will be allowed to evaporated so the samples thaw and then slowly crystallize. They will be analyzed after return to Earth. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-01

    High school students screen crystals of various proteins that are part of the ground-based work that supports Alexander McPherson's protein crystal growth experiment. The students also prepared and stored samples in the Enhanced Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar, which was launched on the STS-98 mission for delivery to the ISS. The crystals grown on the ground will be compared with crystals grown in orbit. Participants include Joseph Negron (shown), of Terry Parker High School, Jacksonville, Florida; Megan Miskowski, of Ridgeview High School, Orange Park, Florida; and Sam Swank, of Fletcher High School, Neptune Beach, Florida. The proteins are placed in plastic tubing that is heat-sealed at the ends, then flash-frozen and preserved in a liquid nitrogen Dewar. Aboard the ISS, the nitrogen will be allowed to evaporated so the samples thaw and then slowly crystallize. They will be analyzed after return to Earth. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-01

    High school students screen crystals of various proteins that are part of the ground-based work that supports Alexander McPherson's protein crystal growth experiment. The students also prepared and stored samples in the Enhanced Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar, which was launched on the STS-98 mission for delivery to the ISS. The crystals grown on the ground will be compared with crystals grown in orbit. Participants include Joseph Negron, of Terry Parker High School, Jacksonville, Florida; Megan Miskowski (shown), of Ridgeview High School, Orange Park, Florida; and Sam Swank, of Fletcher High School, Neptune Beach, Florida. The proteins are placed in plastic tubing that is heat-sealed at the ends, then flash-frozen and preserved in a liquid nitrogen Dewar. Aboard the ISS, the nitrogen will be allowed to evaporated so the samples thaw and then slowly crystallize. They will be analyzed after return to Earth. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    STEP will carry concentric test masses to Earth orbit to test a fundamental assumption underlying Einstein's theory of general relativity: that gravitational mass is equivalent to inertial mass. STEP is a 21st-century version of the test that Galileo is said to have performed by dropping a carnon ball and a musket ball simultaneously from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to compare their accelerations. During the STEP experiment, four pairs of test masses will be falling around the Earth, and their accelerations will be measured by superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS). The extended time sensitivity of the instruments will allow the measurements to be a million times more accurate than those made in modern ground-based tests.

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-11-15

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-24

    Close-up view of the Binary Colloidal Alloy Test during an experiment run aboard the Russian Mir space station. BCAT is part of an extensive series of experiments plarned to investigate the fundamental properties of colloids so that scientists can make colloids more useful for technological applications. Some of the colloids studied in BCAT are made of two different sized particles (binary colloidal alloys) that are very tiny, uniform plastic spheres. Under the proper conditions, these colloids can arrange themselves in a pattern to form crystals, which may have many unique properties that may form the basis of new classes of light switches, displays, and optical devices that can fuel the evolution of the next generation of computer and communication technologies. This Slow Growth hardware consisted of a 35-mm camera aimed toward a module which contained 10 separate colloid samples. To begin the experiment, one of the astronauts would mix the samples to disperse the colloidal particles. Then the hardware operated autonomously, taking photos of the colloidal samples over a 90-day period. The investigation proved that gravity plays a central role in the formation and stability of these types of colloidal crystal structures. The investigation also helped identify the optimum conditions for the formation of colloidal crystals, which will be used for optimizing future microgravity experiments in the study of colloidal physics. Dr. David Weitz of the University of Pennsylvania and Dr. Peter Pusey of the University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom, are the principal investigators.

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-25

    Astronaut James Reilly uses a laptop computer monitor the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment during STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment at the University of Colorado at Boulder include Tawnya Ferbiak (software engineer), Susan Batiste (research assistant), and Christina Winkler (graduate research assistant). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Proteins are the building blocks of our bodies and the living world around us. Within our bodies proteins make it possible for red blood cells to carry oxygen throughout the body. Others help transmit nerve impulses so we can hear, smell and feel the world around us. While others play a crucial role in preventing or causing disease. If the structure of a protein is known, then companies can develop new or improved drugs to fight the disease of which the protein is a part. To determine protein structure, researchers must grow near-perfect crystals of the protein. On Earth convection currents, sedimentation and other gravity-induced phenomena hamper crystal growth efforts. In microgravity researchers can grow near-perfect crystals in an environment free of these effects. Because of the enormous potential for new pharmaceutical products the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography--the NASA Commercial Space Center responsible for commercial protein crystal growth efforts has more than fifty major industry and academic partners. Research on crystals of human insulin could lead to improved treatments for diabetes.

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-05

    The Interferometer Protein Crystal Growth (IPCG) experiment was designed to measure details of how protein molecules move through a fluid. It was flown on the STS-86 mission for use aboard Russian Space Station Mir in 1998. It studied aspects of how crystals grow - and what conditions lead to the best crystals, details that remain a mystery. IPCG produces interference patterns by spilitting then recombining laser light. This let scientists see how fluid densities - and molecular diffusion - change around a crystal as it grows in microgravity. The heart of the IPCG apparatus is the interferometer cell comprising the optical bench, microscope, other optics, and video camera. IPCG experiment cells are made of optical glass and silvered on one side to serve as a mirror in the interferometer system that visuzlizes crystals and conditions around them as they grow inside the cell. This view shows a large growth cell. The principal investigator was Dr. Alexander McPherson of University of California, Irvine. Co-investigators are William Witherow and Dr. Marc Pusey of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-05

    The Interferometer Protein Crstal Growth (IPCG) experiment was designed to measure details of how protein molecules move through a fluid. It was flown on the STS-86 mission for use aboard Russin Space Station Mir in 1998. It studied aspects of how crystals grow - and what conditions lead to the best crystals, details that remain a mystery. IPCG produces interference patterns by splitting then recombining laser light. This let scientists see how fluid densities - and molecular diffusion - change around a crystal as it grows in microgravity. The heart of the IPCG apparatus is the interferometer cell comprising the optical bench, microscope, other optics, and video camera. IPCG experiment cells are made of optical glass and silvered on one side to serve as a mirror in the interferometer system that visualizes crystals and conditions around them as they grow inside the cell. This view shows the complete apparatus. The principal investigator was Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin. Co-investigators are William Witherow and Dr. Marc Pusey of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-05

    The Interferometer Protein Crystal Growth (IPCG) experiment was designed to measure details of how protein molecules move through a fluid. It was flown on the STS-86 mission for use aboard Russian Space Station Mir in 1998. It studied aspects of how crystals grow - and what conditions lead to the best crystals, details that remain a mystery. IPCG produces interference patterns by spilitting then recombining laser light. This let scientists see how fluid densities - and molecular diffusion - change around a crystal as it grows in microgravity. The heart of the IPCG apparatus is the interferometer cell comprising the optical bench, microscope, other optics, and video camera. IPCG experiment cells are made of optical glass and silvered on one side to serve as a mirror in the interferometer system that visuzlizes crystals and conditions around them as they grow inside the cell. This diagram shows the optical layout. The principal investigator was Dr. Alexander McPherson of University of California, Irvine. Co-investigators are William Witherow and Dr. Marc Pusey of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-05

    The Interferometer Protein Crystal Growth (IPCG) experiment was designed to measure details of how protein molecules move through a fluid. It was flown on the STS-86 mission for use aboard Russian Space Station Mir in 1998. It studied aspects of how crystals grow - and what conditions lead to the best crystals, details that remain a mystery. IPCG produces interference patterns by spilitting then recombining laser light. This let scientists see how fluid densities - and molecular diffusion - change around a crystal as it grows in microgravity. The heart of the IPCG apparatus is the interferometer cell comprising the optical bench, microscope, other optics, and video camera. IPCG experiment cells are made of optical glass and silvered on one side to serve as a mirror in the interferometer system that visuzlizes crystals and conditions around them as they grow inside the cell. This view shows interferograms produced in ground tests. The principal investigator was Dr. Alexander McPherson of University of California, Irvine. Co-investigators are William Witherow and Dr. Marc Pusey of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-05

    The Interferometer Protein Crystal Growth (IPCG) experiment was designed to measure details of how protein molecules move through a fluid. It was flown on the STS-86 mission for use aboard Russian Space Station Mir in 1998. It studied aspects of how crystals grow - and what conditions lead to the best crystals, details that remain a mystery. IPCG produces interference patterns by spilitting then recombining laser light. This let scientists see how fluid densities - and molecular diffusion - change around a crystal as it grows in microgravity. The heart of the IPCG apparatus is the interferometer cell comprising the optical bench, microscope, other optics, and video camera. IPCG experiment cells are made of optical glass and silvered on one side to serve as a mirror in the interferometer system that visuzlizes crystals and conditions around them as they grow inside the cell. This diagram shows the growth cells. The principal investigator was Dr. Alexander McPherson of University of California, Irvine. Co-investigators are William Witherow and Dr. Marc Pusey of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-06-01

    Cells cultured on Earth (left) typically settle quickly on the bottom of culture vessels due to gravity. In microgravity (right), cells remain suspended and aggregate to form three-dimensional tissue. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-31

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-05

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested for long-term storage with water in the system as plarned for STS-107. This view shows the top of the sand column with the metal platten removed. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-25

    CT scans of the spcimens on STS-79 reveal internal cone-shaped features and radial patterns not seen in specimens processed on the ground. The lighter areas are the densest in these images. CT scans produced richly detailed images allowing scientists to build 3D models of the interior of the specimens that can be compared with microscopic examination of thin slices. This view is made from a series of horizontal slices. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-18

    Astronaut Jay Apt installs Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM0 test cell on STS-79. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: NASA/John Space Center).

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-25

    CT scans of the specimens on STS-79 reveal internal cone-shaped features and radial patterns not seen in specimens processed on the ground. The lighter areas are the densest in these images. CT scans produced richly detailed images allowing scientists to build 3D models of the interior of the specimens that can be compared with microscopic examination of thin slices. This view is made from three orthogonal slices. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Colorado at Boulder).

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-25

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown approximately 20 and 60 minutes after the start of an experiment on STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-05

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested for long-term storage with water in the system as plarned for STS-107. This view shows the compressed sand column with the protective water jacket removed. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  12. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-25

    CT scans of the spcimens on STS-79 reveal internal cone-shaped features and radial patterns not seen in specimens processed on the ground. The lighter areas are the densest in these images. CT scans produced richly detailed images allowing scientists to build 3D models of the interior of the specimens that can be compared with microscopic examination of thin slices. These views depict vertical slices from side to middle of a flight specimen. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  13. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-01

    Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) flight hardware takes two twin double locker assemblies in the Space Shuttle middeck or the Spacehab module. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: NASA/MSFC).

  14. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-01

    What appear to be boulders fresh from a tumble down a mountain are really grains of Ottawa sand, a standard material used in civil engineering tests and also used in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment. The craggy surface shows how sand grans have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even causing sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM uses the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. These images are from an Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) study conducted by Dr. Binayak Panda of IITRI for Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). (Credit: NASA/MSFC)

  15. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-25

    CT scans of the spcimens on STS-79 reveal internal cone-shaped features and radial patterns not seen in specimens processed on the ground. The lighter areas are the densest in these images. CT scans produced richly detailed images allowing scientists to build 3D models of the interior of the specimens that can be compared with microscopic examination of thin slices. This view depict horizontal slices from top to bottom of a flight specimen. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  16. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-24

    Lunar Orbiter 2 oblique northward view towards Copernicus crater on the Moon shows crater wall slumping caused by soil liquefaction following the impact that formed the crater. The crater is about 100 km in diameter. The central peaks are visible towards the top of the image, rising about 400 m above the crater floor, and stretching for about 15 km. The northern wall of the crater is in the background. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-18

    One of three Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) test cells after flight on STS-79 and before impregnation with resin. Note that the sand column has bulged in the middle, and that the top of the column is several inches lower than the top of the plastic enclosure. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-18

    Astronaut Carl Walz installs Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) test cell on STS-79. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/John Space Center

  19. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-09-09

    A test cell for the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown in its on-orbit configuration in Spacehab during preparations for STS-89. The twin locker to the left contains the hydraulic system to operate the experiment. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Note: Because the image on the screen was muted in the original image, its brightness and contrast are boosted in this rendering to make the test cell more visible. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  20. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-01

    The packing of particles can change radically during cyclic loading such as in an earthquake or when shaking a container to compact a powder. A large hole (1) is maintained by the particles sticking to each other. A small, counterclockwise strain (2) collapses the hole, and another large strain (3) forms more new holes which collapse when the strain reverses (4). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (after T.L. Youd, Packing Changes and Liquefaction Susceptibility, Journal of the Geotechnical Engieering Division, 103: GT8,918-922, 1977)(Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.)(Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  1. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-10-17

    An automobile lies crushed under the third story of this apartment building in the Marina District after the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. The ground levels are no longer visible because of structural failure and sinking due to liquefaction. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: J.K. Nakata, U.S. Geological Survey.

  2. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment are Mark Lankton (Program Manager at University Colorado at Boulder), Susan Batiste (research assistance, UCB), and Stein Sture (principal investigator). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  3. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-10-17

    Sand boil or sand volcano measuring 2 m (6.6 ft.) in length erupted in median of Interstate Highway 80 west of the Bay Bridge toll plaza when ground shaking transformed loose water-saturated deposit of subsurface sand into a sand-water slurry (liquefaction) in the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Vented sand contains marine-shell fragments. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: J.C. Tinsley, U.S. Geological Survey)

  4. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-10-17

    Ground shaking triggered liquefaction in a subsurface layer of water-saturated sand, producing differential lateral and vertical movement in a overlying carapace of unliquified sand and slit, which moved from right to left towards the Pajaro River. This mode of ground failure, termed lateral spreading, is a principal cause of liquefaction-related earthquake damage caused by the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: S.D. Ellen, U.S. Geological Survey

  5. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-01-01

    On STS-89, three Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) test cells were subjected to five cycles of compression and relief (left) and three were subjected to shorter displacement cycles that simulate motion during an earthquake (right). In the compression/relief tests, the sand particles rearranged themselves and slightly re-expanded the column during relief. In the short displacement tests, the specimen's resistance to compression decreases, even though the displacement remains the same. The specimens were cycled up to 100 times or until the resistive force was less than 1% that of the previous cycle. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  6. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment include Khalid Alshibli, project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: MSFC).

  7. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-04

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  8. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  9. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  10. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-10

    Epithelial cell monoculture: Long-term growth of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) grown in monoculture as 3-dimensional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical construct about 3.5 mm (less than 1/8th inch) in diameter with slightly dehydrted, crinkled beads contained on the surface as well as within the 3-dimensional structure. B: The center of these constructs is hollow. Crinkling of the beads causes a few to fall out, leaving crater-like impressiions in the construct. The central impression shows a small hole that accesses the hollow center of the construct. C: A closeup view of the cells and the hole the central impression. D: Closer views of cells in the construct showing sell-to-cell interactions. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  11. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-06-27

    This is a computer generated model of a ground based casting. The objective of the therophysical properties program is to measure thermal physical properties of commercial casting alloys for use in computer programs that predict soldification behavior. This could reduce trial and error in casting design and promote less scrap, sounder castings, and less weight. In order for the computer models to reliably simulate the details of industrial alloy solidification, the input thermophysical property data must be absolutely reliable. Recently Auburn University and TPRL Inc. formed a teaming relationship to establish reliable measurement techniques for the most critical properties of commercially important alloys: transformation temperatures, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, specific heat, latent heat, density, solid fraction evolution, surface tension, and viscosity. A new initiative with the American Foundrymens Society has been started to measure the thermophysical properties of commercial ferrous and non-ferrous casting alloys and make the thermophysical property data widely available. Development of casting processes for the new gamma titanium aluminide alloys as well as existing titanium alloys will remain a trial-and-error procedure until accurate thermophysical properties can be obtained. These molten alloys react with their containers on earth and change their composition - invalidating the measurements even while the data are being acquired in terrestrial laboratories. However, measurements on the molten alloys can be accomplished in space using freely floating droplets which are completely untouched by any container. These data are expected to be exceptionally precise because of the absence of impurity contamination and buoyancy convection effects. Although long duration orbital experiments will be required for the large scale industrial alloy measurement program that results from this research, short duration experiments on NASA's KC-135 low

  12. Thin-bedded reservoir analogs in an ancient delta using terrestrial laser scanner and high-resolution ground-based hyperspectral cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Casey J.; Khan, Shuhab D.; Bhattacharya, Janok P.; Glennie, Craig; Seepersad, Darsel

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based terrestrial laser scanning and hyperspectral sensors were used to image fine-scale heterogeneity in outcrops of prodeltaic heterolithic facies of Parasequence 6 of the Cretaceous Ferron Notom delta in Southern Utah. Previous work shows that Parasequence 6 is an upward coarsening fluvial-dominated, wave-influenced deltaic deposit containing heterolithic thin-bedded facies representing distal delta front and proximal prodelta environments. Primarily, the thin beds have been interpreted as turbidites, storm beds (tempestites), and hyperpycnites. These deposits represent analogs for thin-bedded unconventional pay zones that lie at the margins of conventional deltaic sandstone reservoirs. The terrestrial laser scanner was used to create a centimeter- to decimeter-scale, digital representation of the outcrops in three dimensions. Hyperspectral sensors record electromagnetic radiation reflected off the outcrops in 840 contiguous bands, which were then used to generate a spectral signature for each pixel sampled. The spectral signatures are a function of mineralogy, chemistry, surface alteration, grain-size, and cements, and were used to distinguish thin mudstones from sandstones within an interbedded succession at the base of a deltaic parasequence. Comparison between the spectral signatures recorded from the outcrop and those of reference materials, and with previous facies architecture studies, enables lithofacies to be identified and subsequently accurately mapped. Hyperspectral data are then draped over the terrestrial laser scanner model to generate a spatially-accurate detailed three-dimensional (3D) geologic map of the heterogeneity. Approximately 100 m of outcrop was imaged laterally with the hyperspectral camera and terrestrial laser scanner on the previously mapped distal delta front and prodeltaic facies of Parasequence 6. Bed thickness data, based on measurements made along depositional dip versus strike, show that bed geometries are anisotropic

  13. The role of nucleotides in augmentation of lymphocyte locomotion: Adaptional countermeasure development in microgravity analog environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Kulkarni, Anil D.; Yamauchi, Keiko; Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-09-01

    Space travel and long-term space residence such as envisaged in the exploration era implicates burdens on the immune system. An optimal immune response is required to countered and with-stand exposure to pathogens. Countermeasure development is an important avenue in space research especially for long-term space exploration. Microgravity exposure causes detrimental effects in lymphocyte functions which may impair immune response. Impaired lymphocyte function can be remedied by bypassing cell membrane events. This is done by using compounds such as Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA). Since activation in mouse splenocytes was augmented using nucleotides, it was essential to observe their effects on human lymphocyte locomotion. A nucleotide/nucleoside (NT/NT) mixture from Otsuka Pharmaceuticals (Naruto, Japan) was used at recommended doses. In lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity, the NT/NT mixture used orchestrated locomotion recovery by more than 87%, similar to the response documented with PMA in lymphocytes. Both 12µM and 120µM doses worked similarly. These are preliminary results leading to the possible use of the NT/NT mixture to mitigate immune suppression in micro-gravity. More studies in this direction are required to delineate the role of NT/NT on the immune response in microgravity.

  14. The pituitary-testicular axis in microgravity: analogies with the aging male syndrome.

    PubMed

    Strollo, F; Boitani, C; Basciani, S; Pecorelli, L; Palumbo, D; Borgia, L; Masini, M A; Morè, M; Strollo, G; Spera, G; Uva, B M; Riondino, G

    2005-01-01

    Extraterrestrial exploration has gone on for decades before reversible testicular failure was shown to be a consequence of space flight in humans and animals at the end of the XXth century. This phenomenon was initially thought to depend on the psycho-physical stress expected to derive from a decidedly unusual environment, but the lack of consistent data concerning cortisol increase and/or gonadotrophin suppression pointed to the possibility of a primary defect. This was indirectly confirmed by the observation that a continuum of testicular androgen secretion potential exists from microgravity to centrifuge-derived hypergravity. Further experiments using tissue slices and suspended cells confirmed a direct inhibitory effect of microgravity upon testicular androgen production. A parallel deterioration of major physiological parameters, such as bone density, muscle mass/force, red blood cell mass, hydration and cardiopulmonary performance, has been repeatedly described during space missions, which, luckily enough, fully recover within days to weeks after landing, the time lag depending on single organ/system adaptation rates. According to the Authors of the present review, when taking together all reported changes occurring in space, a picture emerges closely resembling the so-called aging male syndrome, which is currently the object of daily screening and clinical care in their endocrine unit, so that microgravity may become a tool for better understanding subtle mechanisms of testicular senescence.

  15. Characteristics of human dendritic cells generated in a microgravity analog culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, C. A.; Grazziuti, M. L.; Przepiorka, D.; Tomasovic, S. P.; McIntyre, B. W.; Woodside, D. G.; Pellis, N. R.; Pierson, D. L.; Rex, J. H.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Generation of an effective immune response requires that antigens be processed and presented to T lymphocytes by antigen-presenting cells, the most efficient of which are dendritic cells (DC). Because of their influence on both the innate and the acquired arms of immunity, a defect in DC would be expected to result in a broad impairment of immune function, not unlike that observed in astronauts during or after space flight. In the study reported here, we investigated whether DC generation and function are altered in a culture environment that models microgravity, i.e., the rotary-cell culture system (RCCS). We observed that RCCS supported the generation of DC identified by morphology, phenotype (HLA-DR+ and lacking lineage-associated markers), and function (high allostimulatory activity). However, the yield of DC from RCCS was significantly lower than that from static cultures. RCCS-generated DC were less able to phagocytose Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and expressed a lower density of surface HLA-DR. The proportion of DC expressing CD80 was also significantly reduced in RCCS compared to static cultures. When exposed to fungal antigens, RCCS-generated DC produced lower levels of interleukin-12 and failed to upregulate some costimulatory/adhesion molecules involved in antigen presentation. These data suggest that DC generation, and some functions needed to mount an effective immune response to pathogens, may be disturbed in the microgravity environment of space.

  16. Characteristics of human dendritic cells generated in a microgravity analog culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, C. A.; Grazziuti, M. L.; Przepiorka, D.; Tomasovic, S. P.; McIntyre, B. W.; Woodside, D. G.; Pellis, N. R.; Pierson, D. L.; Rex, J. H.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Generation of an effective immune response requires that antigens be processed and presented to T lymphocytes by antigen-presenting cells, the most efficient of which are dendritic cells (DC). Because of their influence on both the innate and the acquired arms of immunity, a defect in DC would be expected to result in a broad impairment of immune function, not unlike that observed in astronauts during or after space flight. In the study reported here, we investigated whether DC generation and function are altered in a culture environment that models microgravity, i.e., the rotary-cell culture system (RCCS). We observed that RCCS supported the generation of DC identified by morphology, phenotype (HLA-DR+ and lacking lineage-associated markers), and function (high allostimulatory activity). However, the yield of DC from RCCS was significantly lower than that from static cultures. RCCS-generated DC were less able to phagocytose Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and expressed a lower density of surface HLA-DR. The proportion of DC expressing CD80 was also significantly reduced in RCCS compared to static cultures. When exposed to fungal antigens, RCCS-generated DC produced lower levels of interleukin-12 and failed to upregulate some costimulatory/adhesion molecules involved in antigen presentation. These data suggest that DC generation, and some functions needed to mount an effective immune response to pathogens, may be disturbed in the microgravity environment of space.

  17. Signaling in Human and Murine Lymphocytes in Microgravity: Parallels and Contrasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Pellis; Alamelu, Sundaresan; Kulkarni, A. D.; Yamauchi, K.

    2006-01-01

    Immune function in space undergoes dramatic changes, some of which are detrimental to lymphocyte function. These changes may lead to significant immune suppression. Studies with human lymphocytes both in space flight and with ground-based models (NASA in vitro ground-based microgravity analog) indicate that T cell activation is inhibited in microgravity. Other lymphocyte functions, such as locomotion, are also inhibited. There is about an 80 percent homology in the immune response of mice to that of humans. A murine model was investigated because of its ability to parallel some microgravity using hind limb suspension. In in vivo antiorthostatically (AOS)-suspended mice, T cell activation is greatly suppressed, with the majority of activation related cytokines being inhibited. PHA activation in lymphocytes derived from AOS mice (in vivo ground-based microgravity analog) is also suppressed. Calcium ionophore studies in human lymphocytes exposed to modeled microgravity indicate that the calcium pathways are probably unaffected in microgravity. IP3 (inositol triphosphate) receptor expression in both human and mouse lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity indicate no suppression of calcium signaling. In the human system, microgravity seems to inhibit signaling cascades either at the level of, or up-stream of, Protein Kinase C (PKC). In particular, a membrane event, such as phospholipase C gamma 1 activity in human lymphocytes is affected, with its direct upstream effector, LAT, being deficiently expressed. In the mouse pathway, LAT is undiminished while another critical intermediate, SLP-76, is diminished significantly. This study identifies critical stages in the human and mouse immune systems and in lymphocytes as a function of microgravity.

  18. Signaling in Human and Murine Lymphocytes in Microgravity: Parallels and Contrasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Pellis; Alamelu, Sundaresan; Kulkarni, A. D.; Yamauchi, K.

    2006-01-01

    Immune function in space undergoes dramatic changes, some of which are detrimental to lymphocyte function. These changes may lead to significant immune suppression. Studies with human lymphocytes both in space flight and with ground-based models (NASA in vitro ground-based microgravity analog) indicate that T cell activation is inhibited in microgravity. Other lymphocyte functions, such as locomotion, are also inhibited. There is about an 80 percent homology in the immune response of mice to that of humans. A murine model was investigated because of its ability to parallel some microgravity using hind limb suspension. In in vivo antiorthostatically (AOS)-suspended mice, T cell activation is greatly suppressed, with the majority of activation related cytokines being inhibited. PHA activation in lymphocytes derived from AOS mice (in vivo ground-based microgravity analog) is also suppressed. Calcium ionophore studies in human lymphocytes exposed to modeled microgravity indicate that the calcium pathways are probably unaffected in microgravity. IP3 (inositol triphosphate) receptor expression in both human and mouse lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity indicate no suppression of calcium signaling. In the human system, microgravity seems to inhibit signaling cascades either at the level of, or up-stream of, Protein Kinase C (PKC). In particular, a membrane event, such as phospholipase C gamma 1 activity in human lymphocytes is affected, with its direct upstream effector, LAT, being deficiently expressed. In the mouse pathway, LAT is undiminished while another critical intermediate, SLP-76, is diminished significantly. This study identifies critical stages in the human and mouse immune systems and in lymphocytes as a function of microgravity.

  19. Analogy between training for dancers and problems of adjustment to microgravity: An evaluation of the subjective vertical in dancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Kitsou

    "Moderne dance" (as opposed to a more academic or classical dance form) uses techniques from kinesiology, anatomy and improvization which are adapted to a cultural, technological and political environment. The function of a choreographic system is to take and give a measure of the world. This includes, with the present tendency of the evolution of culture, a new "naturalism" which seeks the secrets of the body. Dance movements express in terms of space the dimension fo the infinite. It gives somehow the measure of a world within which everything is relative. Except for the speed of light, time and space are bound together by the same principle. The qualities of body awareness and specific motricity in dancers imply—besides a strict discipline—balance, coordination, muscular performance and perfect orientation, problems that astronauts also encounter in microgravity. Could chosen exercises used in modern dance technique be applied to the training of astronauts? Dancer-choreographer Kitsou Dubois has been working in this direction since 1988. She was granted a "Villa Medicis Hors Les Murs" by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, to carry on with her research at NASA, Houston, Tex. in April 1989. It allowed her to investigate the reality of this analogy. She intends to evaluate the dancers' subjective vertical refering to Mittelstaedt's observations on the proportional relationship between "space sickness" and some astronauts poor evaluation of the subjective vertical. This study should create a relationship between a choreographer's empirical intuition and a scientific reality.

  20. Analogy between training for dancers and problems of adjustment to microgravity: an evaluation of the subjective vertical in dancers.

    PubMed

    Dubois, K

    1991-01-01

    "Moderne dance" (as opposed to a more academic or classical dance form) uses techniques from kinesiology, anatomy and improvization which are adapted to a cultural, technological and political environment. The function of a choreographic system is to take and give a measure of the world. This includes, with the present tendency of the evolution of culture, a new "naturalism" which seeks the secrets of the body. Dance movements express in terms of space the dimension fo the infinite. It gives somehow the measure of a world within which everything is relative. Except for the speed of light, time and space are bound together by the same principle. The qualities of body awareness and specific motricity in dancers imply--besides a strict discipline--balance, coordination, muscular performance and perfect orientation, problems that astronauts also encounter in microgravity. Could chosen exercises used in modern dance technique be applied to the training of astronauts? Dancer-choreographer Kitsou Dubois has been working in this direction since 1988. She was granted a "Villa Medicis Hors Les Murs" by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, to carry on with her research at NASA, Houston, Tex. in April 1989. It allowed her to investigate the reality of this analogy. She intends to evaluate the dancers' subjective vertical refering to Mittelstaedt's observations on the proportional relationship between "space sickness" and some astronauts poor evaluation of the subjective vertical. This study should create a relationship between a choreographer's empirical intuition and a scientific reality.

  1. Lunar Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2009-01-01

    In this viewgraph presentation, a ground-based lunar analog is developed for the return of manned space flight to the Moon. The contents include: 1) Digital Astronaut; 2) Bed Design; 3) Lunar Analog Feasibility Study; 4) Preliminary Data; 5) Pre-pilot Study; 6) Selection of Stockings; 7) Lunar Analog Pilot Study; 8) Bed Design for Lunar Analog Pilot.

  2. Flight- and Ground-Based Materials Science Programs at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Research Division of NASA funds research programs in all branches of materials science including ceramics and glasses. A NASA Research Announcement (NRA)is currently planned with proposals due in March 1999. Proposals are accepted for both flight- definition and ground- based research projects with a main criterion being a strong justification for microgravity. A review of the program in its entirety will be given, with special emphasis on microgravity related ceramics research. The topics of current interest in the NRA will be discussed in terms of International Space Station research and NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative.

  3. Ground based infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic instrumentation has been developed for ground-based measurements of astrophysical objects in the intermediate infrared. A conventional Michelson interferometer is limited for astronomical applications in the intermediate infrared by quantum noise fluctuations in the radiation form the source and/or background incident on the detector, and the multiplex advantage is no longer available. One feasible approach to recovering the multiplex advantage is post-dispersion. The infrared signal after passing through telescope and interferometer, is dispersed by a low resolution grating spectrometer onto an array of detectors. The feasibility of the post-dispersion system has been demonstrated with observations of astrophysical objects in the 5 and 10 micrometer atmospheric windows from ground-based telescopes. During FY87/88 the post-disperser was used at the Kitt Peak 4-meter telescope and McMath telescope with facility Fourier transform spectrometers. Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, and Venus were observed. On Jupiter, the resolution at 12 micrometer was 0.01/cm, considerably higher than had been acheived previously. The spectrum contains Jovian ethane and acetylene emission. Construction was begun on the large cryogenic grating spectrometer.

  4. Microgravity and aging of animals.

    PubMed

    Serova, L V

    2001-07-01

    A study of changed gravity effects upon viability, life span and aging is of interest, on one hand, from a practical viewpoint in relation to the growing duration of space missions and on other hand, from a theoretical viewpoint, because gravity is one of the key factors in the evolutionary process on the Earth. In 1978 special conference titled "Space Gerontology" was held. Well known experts in space biology and physiology of aging participated in it. However, all the materiales presented at the conference were based on analogies and on what could be during exposure to microgravity rather than on real data. I shall try to discuss this problem, basing on the results of rats experiments on board "Cosmos" biosatellites and ground based model experiments. Male wistar rats examined after 1-3 weeks exposure to microgravity on board biosatellites demonstrated some changes similar to the signs [correction of sings] of aging, such as decreased motor activity, thymus involution, muscle atrophy, osteoporosis etc. But all these changes were reversible and in rats examined 3 weeks after return to the Earth we did not find any deviations from the controls.

  5. Computational and ground-based experimental investigations of the effects of specified and unspecified (free) pressure conditions at the condenser exit for condensing flows in terrestrial and microgravity environments.

    PubMed

    Narain, Amitabh; Kulkarni, Shantanu; Mitra, Soumya; Kurita, Jorge H; Kivisalu, Michael T

    2009-04-01

    Reported experimental and computational results confirm that both the flow features and heat transfer rates inside a condenser depend on the specification of inlet, wall, and exit conditions. The theoretical and experimental results presented in this paper allow us to propose important exit condition based categorization of these flows. Of these, category II flows are defined to be cases for which exit pressures are left unspecified. However it is shown here that steady flows under specified exit pressure conditions (category I flows) are more stable and can be more easily achieved under all conditions (normal or zero-gravity). Existence of self-selected exit pressure conditions for unspecified exit condition cases (category II flows) are more difficult to achieve and are often limited to gravity driven flows. In practice, however, special hardware arrangements are required for repeatable realization of both these categories of flow. If this is not so, one often has an inadvertent category I flow (flows with specified exit pressure) without the explicit knowledge of the exit pressure value. For microgravity situations, the remedy is to run condensers under suitably specified inlet and exit pressures (category I conditions) as well as a proper cooling strategy (i.e., proper wall temperature variations).

  6. NASA's Microgravity Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, Jack A.

    1994-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the NASA Microgravity Science Program has implemented a systematic effort to expand microgravity research. In 1992, 114 new investigators were selected to enter the program and more US microgravity experiments were conducted in space than in all the years combined since Skylab (1973-74). The use of NASA Research Announcements (NRA's) to solicit research proposals has proven to be highly successful in building a strong base of high-quality peer-reviewed science in both the ground-based and flight experiment elements of the program. The ground-based part of the program provides facilities for low gravity experiments including drop towers and aircraft for making parabolic flights. Program policy is that investigations should not proceed to the flight phase until all ground-based investigative capabilities have been exhausted. In the space experiments program, the greatest increase in flight opportunities has been achieved through dedicated or primary payload Shuttle missions. These missions will continue to be augmented by both mid-deck and GAS-Can accommodated experiments. A US-Russian cooperative flight program envisioned for 1995-97 will provide opportunities for more microgravity research as well as technology demonstration and systems validation efforts important for preparing for experiment operations on the Space Station.

  7. Ground-based photo monitoring

    Treesearch

    Frederick C. Hall

    2000-01-01

    Ground-based photo monitoring is repeat photography using ground-based cameras to document change in vegetation or soil. Assume those installing the photo location will not be the ones re-photographing it. This requires a protocol that includes: (1) a map to locate the monitoring area, (2) another map diagramming the photographic layout, (3) type and make of film such...

  8. Electrophoresis. [in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1977-01-01

    Ground-based techniques for electrophoresis take account of the need either to circumvent the effects of gravity to prevent convection, or to use gravity for fluid stabilization through artificial density gradients. The microgravity environments of orbiting spacecraft provides a new alternative for electrophoresis by avoiding the need for either of these two approaches. The paper presents some theoretical considerations concerning electrophoresis, examines certain experimental techniques (zone and high density gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing and isotachophoresis), and examines the electrophoresis of living cells.

  9. Ground-based photographic monitoring.

    Treesearch

    Frederick C. Hall

    2001-01-01

    Land management professionals (foresters, wildlife biologists, range managers, and land managers such as ranchers and forest land owners) often have need to evaluate their management activities. Photographic monitoring is a fast, simple, and effective way to determine if changes made to an area have been successful. Ground-based photo monitoring means using photographs...

  10. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; Helliwell, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The key concepts that attracted crystal growers, macromolecular or solid state, to microgravity research is that density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of the growing crystals are greatly reduced. Thus, defects and flaws in the crystals can be reduced, even eliminated, and crystal volume can be increased. Macromolecular crystallography differs from the field of crystalline semiconductors. For the latter, crystals are harnessed for their electrical behaviors. A crystal of a biological macromolecule is used instead for diffraction experiments (X-ray or neutron) to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal of a biological macromolecule then the more molecular structure detail that can be extracted. This structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics meet to enable insight to the basic fundamentals of life. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment, and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyze the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural

  11. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; Helliwell, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The key concepts that attracted crystal growers, macromolecular or solid state, to microgravity research is that density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of the growing crystals are greatly reduced. Thus, defects and flaws in the crystals can be reduced, even eliminated, and crystal volume can be increased. Macromolecular crystallography differs from the field of crystalline semiconductors. For the latter, crystals are harnessed for their electrical behaviors. A crystal of a biological macromolecule is used instead for diffraction experiments (X-ray or neutron) to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal of a biological macromolecule then the more molecular structure detail that can be extracted. This structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics meet to enable insight to the basic fundamentals of life. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment, and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyze the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural

  12. Ground based silicon zoning program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    The preparation of building flight hardware and carrying out experiments in space was investigated. The ground based investigation phase A/B of the experimental float zoning of silicon is outlined. The overall program goals, leading to recommending experiments to be done in phase C/D are spelled out. Thermophysical properties which must be accurately known to compare thermophysical models to experimental zoning of silicon are listed.

  13. Microgravity metal processing: from undercooled liquids to bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Roberts, Scott N

    2015-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a novel class of metal alloys that are poised for widespread commercialization. Over 30 years of NASA and ESA (as well as other space agency) funding for both ground-based and microgravity experiments has resulted in fundamental science data that have enabled commercial production. This review focuses on the history of microgravity BMG research, which includes experiments on the space shuttle, the ISS, ground-based experiments, commercial fabrication and currently funded efforts. PMID:28725709

  14. Comparison of Changes in Immunological Parameters in Human Lymphocytes in 2D Versus 3D Clinostats-Goal Towards Microgravity Analog Calibration for Future Space Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Russomano, Thais; Pellis, Neal R.

    2008-06-01

    Exposure to microgravity may produce changes in the performance of the immunological system at the cellular level as well as in the major physiological systems of the body. Studies in true spaceflight and similar studies in 2D clinostats (Rotating wall vessels) related to decreased immune function in astronaut blood and normal human lymphocytes indicate a decrease in cell proliferation, T cell activation, locomotion and altered lymphocyte signal transduction (Sundaresan and Pellis, 2008, Sundaresan et al., 2004). The present study was designed to investigate whether the proliferation and viability of lymphocytes are reduced by exposure to rotation in a 3D-Clinostat, which is used to simulate microgravity for cells.

  15. Microgravity Research: A Retrospective of Accomplishments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhees, Peter

    2005-03-01

    During the early days of human spaceflight U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) began giving researchers the ability to perform experiments under extremely low gravity conditions (microgravity). Early microgravity experiments were rudimentary and discovery driven. The limitations of such an approach were clear and in the early 1990s, NASA broadened its program significantly beyond those experiments that were destined to be flown to include a ground- based program that contained both experimental and theoretical investigations. The ground-based program provided a source of carefully designed microgravity experiments. This led to the program in the Physical Sciences Division that involved research in, for example, fluids, materials and low temperature physics. The impact of the microgravity research program has been the focus of a recent National Research Council report titled “Assessment of Directions in Microgravity and Physical Sciences Research at NASA.” We found that there have been numerous high impact ground-based and flight investigations. For example, NASA funding has been instrumental in elucidating the nature of surface-tension-driven fluid flows, dendritic crystal growth and the thermodynamics of phase transitions near critical points. Using this report as a basis, a discussion of the impact of microgravity research on the fields in which it is a part will be given.

  16. Second Microgravity Fluid Physics Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The conference's purpose was to inform the fluid physics community of research opportunities in reduced-gravity fluid physics, present the status of the existing and planned reduced gravity fluid physics research programs, and inform participants of the upcoming NASA Research Announcement in this area. The plenary sessions provided an overview of the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program information on NASA's ground-based and space-based flight research facilities. An international forum offered participants an opportunity to hear from French, German, and Russian speakers about the microgravity research programs in their respective countries. Two keynote speakers provided broad technical overviews on multiphase flow and complex fluids research. Presenters briefed their peers on the scientific results of their ground-based and flight research. Fifty-eight of the sixty-two technical papers are included here.

  17. Ground-based IRCM testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Derek; Owen, Mark

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances in the ability to perform comprehensive ground based Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) testing have the capability to fill the Test and Evaluation (T&E) gaps for existing and future weapons system acquisition. IRCM testing has historically been dominated and in a manner limited by expensive live fire testing requirements. While live fire testing is a vital part of IRCM T&E, next generation technological developments now enable closed-loop, ground-based IRCM testing to provide valuable complementary test data at a much lower cost. The high cost and limited assets that have prevented live fire and flight testing from providing a thorough hardware based data set required for previous T&E analysis is no longer an issue. In the past, traditional physics based digital system model (DSM) analysis has been utilized to augment the IRCM data sets to make them statistically significant. While DSM is a useful tool in the development of IRCM systems, the newly developed installed system testing utilizing a hardware-in-the-loop construct provides for an enhanced level of fidelity and assurance that the systems will meet the warfighter's needs. The goal of the newly developed test technologies is to develop a statistical significant data set utilizing hardware-in-the-loop at a significantly lower cost than historical methods.

  18. Low Temperature Research in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D.

    1993-01-01

    The recent flight of the Lambda Point Experiment has demonstrated the potential for performing precise tests of fundamental theories using low temperature techniques in Earth orbit. NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division has established a program of successor expermients to investigate other aspects of condensed matter physics using the same low temperature flight facility. This paper describes the new investigations that have been chosen for flight experiments, and those selected for ground-based studies that could lead to flight experiments later.

  19. Low Temperature Research in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D.

    1993-01-01

    The recent flight of the Lambda Point Experiment has demonstrated the potential for performing precise tests of fundamental theories using low temperature techniques in Earth orbit. NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division has established a program of successor expermients to investigate other aspects of condensed matter physics using the same low temperature flight facility. This paper describes the new investigations that have been chosen for flight experiments, and those selected for ground-based studies that could lead to flight experiments later.

  20. Demonstrating Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Richard DeLombard of NASA's Glenn Research Center, hands the relase line for the Microgravity Demonstrator to a visitor for her to start a short experiment showing the effects of microgravity on candle flames. Combustion physics will be a major line of investigation for NASA aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The Microgravity Demonstrator is frequently used at shows and schools to illustrate how phenomena change in microgravity. The exhibit was part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI

  1. Interplay of space radiation and microgravity in DNA damage and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Villanueva, María; Wong, Michael; Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    In space, multiple unique environmental factors, particularly microgravity and space radiation, pose constant threat to the DNA integrity of living organisms. Specifically, space radiation can cause damage to DNA directly, through the interaction of charged particles with the DNA molecules themselves, or indirectly through the production of free radicals. Although organisms have evolved strategies on Earth to confront such damage, space environmental conditions, especially microgravity, can impact DNA repair resulting in accumulation of severe DNA lesions. Ultimately these lesions, namely double strand breaks, chromosome aberrations, micronucleus formation, or mutations, can increase the risk for adverse health effects, such as cancer. How spaceflight factors affect DNA damage and the DNA damage response has been investigated since the early days of the human space program. Over the years, these experiments have been conducted either in space or using ground-based analogs. This review summarizes the evidence for DNA damage induction by space radiation and/or microgravity as well as spaceflight-related impacts on the DNA damage response. The review also discusses the conflicting results from studies aimed at addressing the question of potential synergies between microgravity and radiation with regard to DNA damage and cellular repair processes. We conclude that further experiments need to be performed in the true space environment in order to address this critical question.

  2. Simulated microgravity alters the expression of key genes involved in fracture healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, N. Patrick; Androjna, Caroline; Hill, Esther; Globus, Ruth K.; Midura, Ronald J.

    2013-11-01

    Fracture healing in animal models has been shown to be altered in both ground based analogs of spaceflight and in those exposed to actual spaceflight. The molecular mechanisms behind altered fracture healing as a result of chronic exposure to microgravity remain to be elucidated. This study investigates temporal gene expression of multiple factors involved in secondary fracture healing, specifically those integral to the development of a soft tissue callus and the transition to that of hard tissue. Skeletally mature female rats were subjected to a 4 week period of simulated microgravity and then underwent a closed femoral fracture procedure. Thereafter, they were reintroduced to the microgravity and allowed to heal for a 1 or 2 week period. A synchronous group of weight bearing rats was used as a normal fracture healing control. Utilizing Real-Time quantitative PCR on mRNA from fracture callus tissue, we found significant reductions in the levels of transcripts associated with angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. These data suggest an altered fracture healing process in a simulated microgravity environment, and these alterations begin early in the healing process. These findings may provide mechanistic insight towards developing countermeasure protocols to mitigate these adaptations.

  3. Microgravity research at LeRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Fred J.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting a wide variety of ground-based science and microgravity flight experiments in the disciplines of fluid physics and transport phenomena, combustion science, and materials science. Extensive use is made of low-gravity ground-based facilities such as drop towers and a Learjet aircraft, as well as extensive normal-gravity laboratories. The ground-based facilities are utilized to execute science programs, perform precursor tests to define space experiment science requirements and conceptual designs, and also to perform tests for space experiment technology development and verification. Finally, flight hardware is designed, developed and flown on the Space Shuttle.

  4. Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory (MMSL) has been planned, designed, and is being developed. This laboratory will support related efforts to define the requirements for the Microgravity and Materials Processing Laboratory (MMPF) and the MMPF Test Bed for the Space Station. The MMSL will serve as a check out and training facility for science mission specialists for STS, Spacelab and Space Station prior to the full operation of the MMPF Test Bed. The focus of the MMSL will be on experiments related to the understanding of metal/ceramic/glass solidification, high perfection crystal growth and fluid physics. This ground-based laboratory will be used by university/industry/government researchers to examine and become familiar with the potential of new microgravity materials science concepts and to conduct longer term studies aimed at fully developing a l-g understanding of materials and processing phenomena. Such research will help create new high quality concepts for space experiments and will provide the basis for modeling, theories, and hypotheses upon which key space experiments can be defined and developed.

  5. Ukrainian Program for Material Science in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Oleg

    Ukrainian Program for Material Sciences in Microgravity O.P. Fedorov, Space Research Insti-tute of NASU -NSAU, Kyiv, The aim of the report is to present previous and current approach of Ukrainian research society to the prospect of material sciences in microgravity. This approach is based on analysis of Ukrainian program of research in microgravity, preparation of Russian -Ukrainian experiments on Russian segment of ISS and development of new Ukrainian strategy of space activity for the years 2010-2030. Two parts of issues are discussed: (i) the evolution of our views on the priorities in microgravity research (ii) current experiments under preparation and important ground-based results. item1 The concept of "space industrialization" and relevant efforts in Soviet and post -Soviet Ukrainian research institutions are reviewed. The main topics are: melt supercooling, crystal growing, testing of materials, electric welding and study of near-Earth environment. The anticipated and current results are compared. item 2. The main experiments in the framework of Ukrainian-Russian Research Program for Russian Segment of ISS are reviewed. Flight installations under development and ground-based results of the experiments on directional solidification, heat pipes, tribological testing, biocorrosion study is presented. Ground-based experiments and theoretical study of directional solidification of transparent alloys are reviewed as well as preparation of MORPHOS installation for study of succinonitrile -acetone in microgravity.

  6. Response and adaptation of bone cells to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lifang; Li, Runzhi; Su, Peihong; Arfat, Yasir; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Airong

    2014-11-01

    Bone loss induced by microgravity during space flight is one of the most deleterious factors on astronaut's health and is mainly attributed to an unbalance in the process of bone remodeling. Studies from the space microgravity have demonstrated that the disruption of bone remodeling is associated with the changes of four main functional bone cells, including osteoblast, osteoclast, osteocyte, and mesenchymal stem cells. For the limited availability, expensive costs and confined experiment conditions for conducting space microgravity studies, the mechanism of bone cells response and adaptation to microgravity is still unclear. Therefore, some ground-based simulated microgravity methods have been developed to investigate the bioeffects of microgravity and the mechanisms. Here, based on our studies and others, we review how bone cells (osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and mesenchymal stem cells) respond and adapt to simulated microgravity.

  7. Immune Function Changes during a Spaceflight-Analog Undersea Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Stowe, Raymond; Mehta, Satish; Quiniarte, Heather; Yetman, Deborah; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence

    2008-01-01

    There is ample evidence to suggest that space flight leads to immune system dysregulation. This may be a result of microgravity, confinement, physiological stress, radiation, environment or other mission-associated factors. It is attractive to utilize ground-based spaceflight analogs as appropriate to investigate this phenomenon. For spaceflight-associated immune dysregulation (SAID), the authors believe the most appropriate analogs might be NEEMO (short duration, Shuttle analog), Antarctic winter-over (long-duration, ISS analog) and the Haughton Mars Project in the Canadian Arctic (intermediate-duration). Each of these analogs replicate isolation, mission-associated stress, disrupted circadian rhythms, and other aspects of flight thought to contribute to SAID. To validate NEEMO as a flight analog with respect to SAID, a pilot study was conducted during the NEEMO-12 and 13 missions during 2007. Assays were performed that assessed immune status, physiological stress and latent viral reactivation. Blood and saliva samples were collected at pre-, mid-, and post-mission timepoints.

  8. New findings and instrumentation from the NASA Lewis microgravity facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    The study of fundamental combustion and fluid physics in a microgravity environment is a relatively new scientific endeavor. The microgravity environment enables a new range of experiments to be performed since: buoyancy-induced flows are nearly eliminated; normally obscured forces and flows may be isolated; gravitational settling or sedimentation is nearly eliminated; and larger time or length scales in experiments become permissible. Unexpected phenomena have been observed, with surprising frequency, in microgravity experiments, raising questions about the degree of accuracy and completeness of the classical understanding. An overview is provided of some new phenomena found through ground-based, microgravity research, the instrumentation used in this research, and plans for new instrumentation.

  9. Application of Acute Maximal Exercise to Enhance Mechanisms Underlying Blood Pressure Regulation and Orthostatic Tolerance After Exposure to Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Engelke, K. A.; Doerr, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Development of orthostatic hypotension and intolerance in astronauts who return to earth following a spaceflight mission represents a significant operational concern to NASA. Reduced plasma volume, vascular resistance, and baroreflex responsiveness following exposure to actual and ground-based analogs of microgravity have been associated with orthostatic instability, suggesting that these mechanisms may contribute alone or in combination to compromise of blood pressure regulation after spaceflight. It therefore seems reasonable that development of procedures designed to reverse or restore the effects of microgravity on regulatory mechanisms of blood volume, vascular resistance and cardiac function should provide some protection against postflight orthostatic intolerance. Several investigations have provided evidence that a single bout of exhaustive dynamic exercise enhances functions of mechanisms responsible for blood pressure stability. Therefore, the purpose of our research project was to conduct a series of experiments using ground-based analogs of reduced gravity (i.e., prolonged restriction to the upright standing posture) in human subjects to investigate the hypothesis that a single bout of dynamic maximal exercise would restore blood volume, vascular resistance and cardiac function and improve blood pressure stability.

  10. Application of Acute Maximal Exercise to Enhance Mechanisms Underlying Blood Pressure Regulation and Orthostatic Tolerance After Exposure to Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Engelke, K. A.; Doerr, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Development of orthostatic hypotension and intolerance in astronauts who return to earth following a spaceflight mission represents a significant operational concern to NASA. Reduced plasma volume, vascular resistance, and baroreflex responsiveness following exposure to actual and ground-based analogs of microgravity have been associated with orthostatic instability, suggesting that these mechanisms may contribute alone or in combination to compromise of blood pressure regulation after spaceflight. It therefore seems reasonable that development of procedures designed to reverse or restore the effects of microgravity on regulatory mechanisms of blood volume, vascular resistance and cardiac function should provide some protection against postflight orthostatic intolerance. Several investigations have provided evidence that a single bout of exhaustive dynamic exercise enhances functions of mechanisms responsible for blood pressure stability. Therefore, the purpose of our research project was to conduct a series of experiments using ground-based analogs of reduced gravity (i.e., prolonged restriction to the upright standing posture) in human subjects to investigate the hypothesis that a single bout of dynamic maximal exercise would restore blood volume, vascular resistance and cardiac function and improve blood pressure stability.

  11. Microgravity, bacteria, and the influence of motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Michael R.; Klaus, David M.

    Space microbiology studies date back to the 1960s, with most investigations reporting that increased bacterial populations occur in flight compared to ground controls. Several exceptions to these findings, however, have created controversy and complicated explanations of how, or whether, microgravity affects microorganisms. Upon closer examination of the literature, we identified a trend relating cell motility to experimental outcome. Related studies conducted in microgravity analog devices, such as the clinostat or rotating wall vessel bioreactor, further corroborate this trend. We review the literature regarding bacterial growth experiments conducted in space (and using microgravity analogs) and analyze the influence of bacterial motility.

  12. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  13. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  14. Flight Analogs (Bed Rest Research)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Flight Analogs / Bed Rest Research Projects provide NASA with a ground based research platform to complement space research. By mimicking the conditions of weightlessness in the human body here on ...

  15. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Wehland, Markus; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the short-term influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h on a 2D Fast-Rotating Clinostat (FRC) in DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with 10 % FCS. We detected holes in the vimentin network, perinuclear accumulations of vimentin after 2 h, and changes in the chondrocytes shape visualised by F-actin staining after 4 h of FRC-exposure. Scaffold-free cultivation of chondrocytes for 7 d on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), the FRC and the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) resulted in spheroid formation, a phenomenon already known from spaceflight experiments with chondrocytes (MIR Space Station) and thyroid cancer cells (SimBox/Shenzhou-8 space mission). The experiments enabled by the ESA-CORA-GBF programme gave us an optimal opportunity to study gravity-related cellular processes, validate ground-based facilities for our chosen cell system, and prepare long-term experiments under real microgravity conditions in space

  16. Strata-1: A Planetary Science Experiment on the Behavior of Asteroid Regolith in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, K. K.; Abell, P.; Brisset, J.; Britt, D.; Colwell, J.; Durda, D.; Dove, A.; Fries, M.; Graham, L.; Hartzell, C.; Leonard, M.; Love, S.; Sanchez, D. P.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2016-10-01

    Strata-1 is an experiment studying asteroid regolith in the microgravity environment of ISS. The prolonged microgravity and vibrational conditions of ISS are analogous to those on small Solar System bodies.

  17. Spaceflight Sensorimotor Analogs: Simulating Acute and Adaptive Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    reviewed. DISCUSSION. A true ground-based flight analog for sensorimotor function is not feasible. A combination of flight analogs; however, can be used to selectively mimic different aspects of the spaceflight-induced sensorimotor performance decrements.

  18. Spaceflight Sensorimotor Analogs: Simulating Acute and Adaptive Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    reviewed. DISCUSSION. A true ground-based flight analog for sensorimotor function is not feasible. A combination of flight analogs; however, can be used to selectively mimic different aspects of the spaceflight-induced sensorimotor performance decrements.

  19. Microgravity and Cellular Consequences in Lymphocyte Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cells adapt to the environment of low gravity and express a series of responses, some possibly from direct effects on cells and others based on environmental conditions created by microgravity. Human lymphocytes in microgravity culture are functionally diminished in activation and locomotion. Both processes are integral to optimal immune response to fight pathogens. The NASA Rotating-wall vessel (RWV) is a well-accepted analog for microgravity culture on the ground. Gene array experiments and immunoblotting identified upstream events in human lymphocytes adapting to microgravity analog culture. Microgravity induces selective changes, many of which are cell membrane related. Results showed that upstream of PKC in the T cell activation cascade, PLC-gamma and LAT are significantly diminished. ZAP 70 which controls LAT activation is also down regulated in modeled microgravity. Thus events governing cell shape might warrant attention in microgravity conditions. The goal of this study is to delineate response suites that are consequential, direct or indirect effects of the microgravity environment and which of these are essential to lymphocytes

  20. Microgravity and Cellular Consequences in Lymphocyte Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cells adapt to the environment of low gravity and express a series of responses, some possibly from direct effects on cells and others based on environmental conditions created by microgravity. Human lymphocytes in microgravity culture are functionally diminished in activation and locomotion. Both processes are integral to optimal immune response to fight pathogens. The NASA Rotating-wall vessel (RWV) is a well-accepted analog for microgravity culture on the ground. Gene array experiments and immunoblotting identified upstream events in human lymphocytes adapting to microgravity analog culture. Microgravity induces selective changes, many of which are cell membrane related. Results showed that upstream of PKC in the T cell activation cascade, PLC-gamma and LAT are significantly diminished. ZAP 70 which controls LAT activation is also down regulated in modeled microgravity. Thus events governing cell shape might warrant attention in microgravity conditions. The goal of this study is to delineate response suites that are consequential, direct or indirect effects of the microgravity environment and which of these are essential to lymphocytes

  1. NASA's Microgravity Materials Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Materials Science research programs are funded by NASA through the Microgravity Research Division. Such programs are normally designated as flight definition or ground based and can be awarded initially for up to four years. Selection is through a peer review process in response to a biennial NASA Research Announcement (NRA). The next announcement is due in November 1998 with proposals due in March 1999. Topics of special interest to NASA are described in the guidelines for proposal writing within the NRA. NASA's interest in materials is wide and covers a range which includes metals and alloys, ceramics, glasses, polymers, non-linear optics, aerogels and nanostructures. With increasing interest in the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) program, the materials research funded will not be exclusively devoted to processes dependent on microgravity, but will also support materials of strategic interest in meeting NASA's long range plans of interplanetary travel.

  2. NASA's Microgravity Materials Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Materials Science research programs are funded by NASA through the Microgravity Research Division. Such programs are normally designated as flight definition or ground based and can be awarded initially for up to four years. Selection is through a peer review process in response to a biennial NASA Research Announcement (NRA). The next announcement is due in November 1998 with proposals due in March 1999. Topics of special interest to NASA are described in the guidelines for proposal writing within the NRA. NASA's interest in materials is wide and covers a range which includes metals and alloys, ceramics, glasses, polymers, non-linear optics, aerogels and nanostructures. With increasing interest in the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) program, the materials research funded will not be exclusively devoted to processes dependent on microgravity, but will also support materials of strategic interest in meeting NASA's long range plans of interplanetary travel.

  3. Microgravity Effects on Transendothelial Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The Endothelial Cell (EC) layer which lines blood vessels from the aorta to the capillaries provides the principal barrier to transport of water and solutes between blood and underlying tissue. Endothelial cells are continuously exposed to the mechanical shearing force (shear stress) and normal force (pressure) imposed by flowing blood on their surface, and they are adapted to this mechanical environment. When the cardiovascular system is exposed to microgravity, the mechanical environmental of endothelial cells is perturbed drastically and the transport properties of EC layers are altered in response. We have shown recently that step changes in shear stress have an acute effect on transport properties of EC layers in a cell culture model, and several recent studies in different vessels of live animals have confirmed the shear-dependent transport properties of the endothelium. We hypothesize that alterations in mechanical forces induced by microgravity and their resultant influence on transendothelial transport of water and solutes are, in large measure, responsible for the characteristic cephalad fluid shift observed in humans experiencing microgravity. To study the effects of altered mechanical forces on transendothelial transport and to test pharmacologic agents as counter measures to microgravity induced fluid shifts we have proposed ground-based studies using well defined cell culture models.

  4. Ontogenesis of mammals in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazenko, O. G. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This report is an English translation of a Russian report prepared by a group of authors from the USSR, Bulgaria, Hungary, the GDR, Poland, Czechoslovakia, France, and the USA. It presents results of the first microgravity experiment on mammalian embryology performed during the flight of the biosatellite Cosmos-1514 and in ground-based simulation studies. An overview is provided of the data available about the role of gravity in animal growth and development, and future studies into this problem are discussed. A new introduction has been provided for the English version.

  5. Computational Material Processing in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Working with Professor David Matthiesen at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) a computer model of the DPIMS (Diffusion Processes in Molten Semiconductors) space experiment was developed that is able to predict the thermal field, flow field and concentration profile within a molten germanium capillary under both ground-based and microgravity conditions as illustrated. These models are coupled with a novel nonlinear statistical methodology for estimating the diffusion coefficient from measured concentration values after a given time that yields a more accurate estimate than traditional methods. This code was integrated into a web-based application that has become a standard tool used by engineers in the Materials Science Department at CWRU.

  6. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begley, Cynthia M.; Kleis, Stanley J.

    2002-01-01

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels

  7. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Begley, Cynthia M; Kleis, Stanley J

    2002-11-20

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels.

  8. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begley, Cynthia M.; Kleis, Stanley J.

    2002-01-01

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels

  9. Microgravity Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Basso, Steve

    2000-01-01

    The world's space agencies have been conducting microgravity research since the beginning of space flight. Initially driven by the need to understand the impact of less than- earth gravity physics on manned space flight, microgravity research has evolved into a broad class of scientific experimentation that utilizes extreme low acceleration environments. The U.S. NASA microgravity research program supports both basic and applied research in five key areas: biotechnology - focusing on macro-molecular crystal growth as well as the use of the unique space environment to assemble and grow mammalian tissue; combustion science - focusing on the process of ignition, flame propagation, and extinction of gaseous, liquid, and solid fuels; fluid physics - including aspects of fluid dynamics and transport phenomena; fundamental physics - including the study of critical phenomena, low-temperature, atomic, and gravitational physics; and materials science - including electronic and photonic materials, glasses and ceramics, polymers, and metals and alloys. Similar activities prevail within the Chinese, European, Japanese, and Russian agencies with participation from additional international organizations as well. While scientific research remains the principal objective behind these program, all hope to drive toward commercialization to sustain a long range infrastructure which .benefits the national technology and economy. In the 1997 International Space Station Commercialization Study, conducted by the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, some viable microgravity commercial ventures were identified, however, none appeared sufficiently robust to privately fund space access at that time. Thus, government funded micro gravity research continues on an evolutionary path with revolutionary potential.

  10. Microgravity research applications of interferometry to heat and mass transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Robert B.

    1987-01-01

    Major space flight experiments which have used interferometric measurement as a major support system are described together with similar ground-based research. Space experiments include those flown on Spacelab 3 ad on the D-1 mission. Included in the ground-based experiments are aircraft studies, Spacelab 3 data reduction and evaluation, and supportive laboratory hardware development. It is shown that optical measurement techniques are crucial to microgravity research.

  11. Cardiovascular system and microgravity simulation and inflight results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottier, J. M.; Patat, F.; Arbeille, P.; Pourcelot, L.; Massabuau, P.; Guell, A.; Gharib, C.

    Main results of cardiovascular investigation, performed with ultrasound methods during the common French/Soviet flight aboard Salyut VII in June 1982, are compared to variations of the same parameters studied during ground-based simulations on the same subject or observed by other investigators during various ground-based experiences. The antiorthostatic bed rest simulation partly reproduces microgravity conditions and seems to be better adaptated to cardiac hemodynamics, despite some differences, and to the cerebral circulation, than to the inferior limb circulation.

  12. The Use of Microgravity To Emulate Three-Dimensional Tissue Interactions in Colorectal Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessup, J. Milburn

    1997-01-01

    The hypothesis of this ground-based project was that simulated microgravity may be used to recreate with high fidelity the in vivo environment in tissue culture. The objectives were to determine whether: (1) simulated microgravity induces differentiation within poorly differentiated human colon carcinoma cells that are similar to that observed in experimental metastases in vivo in nude mice; and (2) the use of simulated microgravity helps define the experimental metastatic potential of human colorectal carcinoma.

  13. Microgravity science and applications: Apparatus and facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA support apparatus and facilities for microgravity research are summarized in fact sheets. The facilities are ground-based simulation environments for short-term experiments, and the shuttle orbiter environment for long duration experiments. The 17 items of the microgravitational experimental apparatus are described. Electronic materials, alloys, biotechnology, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, and combustion science are among the topics covered.

  14. The VO and Ground-Based Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchra, John

    The era of extremely large public databases in astronomy is upon us. such databases are opening the field to new research and new researchers. However it is important to be sure the resources are available to properly archive ground-based astronomical data and include the necessary quality checks and calibrations. A Virtual Observatory without proper archives will have limited usefulness. This also implies that with limited resources not all data can or should be archived. NASA already has a very good handle on US space-based astronomical data. Agencies and organizations that operate astronomical facilities particularly ground based observatories need to plan and budget for these activities now. We should not underestimate the effort required to produce high quality data products that will be useful for the broader community. Currently the best way to ""fill"" archives is with data ftom surveys. That will continue to be the case for most ground based observatories.

  15. Third Microgravity Fluid Physics Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The conference's purpose was to inform the fluid physics community of research opportunities in reduced-gravity fluid physics, present the status of the existing and planned reduced gravity fluid physics research programs, and inform participants of the upcoming NASA Research Announcement in this area. The plenary sessions provided an overview of the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program, present and future areas of emphasis, information on NASA's ground-based and space-based flight research facilities-especially use of the International Space Station, and the process by which future investigators enter the program. An international forum offered participants an opportunity to hear from Russian speakers about their microgravity research programs. Three keynote speakers provided broad technical overviews on the history and future development of the moon and on multiphase flow and complex fluids research. One keynote paper and an extended abstract are included in the proceedings. One hundred and thirty-two technical papers were presented in 28 sessions. Presenters briefed their peers on the scientific results of their ground-based and flight research. One hundred and twenty-two papers are included here.

  16. Ground-based gravitational-wave observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaime, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    After decades of development and recent upgrades, a network of ground-based interferometric gravitational-wave detectors has begun regular operation. Last year LIGO's two detectors ran for ca. 4 months, observing waves emitted during the inspiral and coalescence of pairs of black holes hundreds of megaparsec from Earth. The results from LIGO's first observational run will be described, as will plans and expectations for a larger network to include Virgo in Europe and other ground-based detectors in the coming years.

  17. Formation of Carbon Nanotubes in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Even though nanotube science has become one of the worlds most rapidly advancing areas of research, very little is known about the processes involved in nanotube synthesis. To study the formation of carbon nanotubes in an environment unhindered by the buoyancy induced flows generated by the high temperatures necessary to vaporize carbon and grow nanotubes, we have designed a miniature carbon arc apparatus that can produce carbon nanotubes under microgravity conditions. During the first phase of this project, we designed, built, and successfully tested the mini carbon arc in both 1g and 2.2 sec drop tower microgravity conditions. We have demonstrated that microgravity can eliminate the strong convective flows from the carbon arc and we have successfully produced single-walled carbon nanotubes in microgravity. We believe that microgravity processing will allow us to better understand the nanotube formation process and eventually allow us to grow nanotubes that are superior to ground-based production.

  18. Section summary: Ground-based field measurements

    Treesearch

    Nophea Sasaki

    2013-01-01

    Although deforestation has been the main focus of international debate in REDD+, forest degradation could emit even more carbon emissions because forest degradation can take place in any accessible forest. Accounting for emission factors requires the use of stockchange or gain-loss approach depending on the forests in questions. Ground based field measurements are a...

  19. Introduction: Photons and ground-based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, James; Moore, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    A Conference on Measurement Techniques for Solar and Space Physics was held on 20-24 April 2015 in Boulder, Colorado, at the National Center for Atmospheric Research Center Green Campus. The present volume collects together the conference papers for photons and ground-based categories.

  20. Materials science research in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H.

    1992-01-01

    There are several important attributes of an extended duration microgravity environment that offer a new dimension in the control of the microstructure, processing, and properties of materials. First, when gravitational effects are minimized, buoyancy driven convection flows are also minimized. The flows due to density differences, brought about either by composition or temperature gradients will then be reduced or eliminated to permit a more precise control of the temperature and the composition of a melt which is critical in achieving high quality crystal growth of electronic materials or alloy structures. Secondly, body force effects such as sedimentation, hydrostatic pressure, and deformation are similarly reduced. These effects may interfere with attempts to produce uniformly dispersed or aligned second phases during melt solidification. Thirdly, operating in a microgravity environment will facilitate the containerless processing of melts to eliminate the limitations of containment for reactive melts. The noncontacting forces such as those developed from electromagnet, electrostatic, or acoustic fields can be used to position samples. With this mode of operation, contamination can be minimized to enable the study of reactive melts and to eliminate extraneous crystal nucleation so that novel crystalline structures and new glass compositions may be produced. In order to take advantage of the microgravity environment for materials research, it has become clear that reliable processing models based on a sound ground based experimental experience and an established thermophysical property data base are essential.

  1. Virus protein assembly in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D.; Paulsen, A.; Johnson, T. C.; Consigli, R. A.

    1993-07-01

    The coat of polyomavirus is composed of three proteins that can self-assemble to form an icosahedral capsid. VP1 represents 75% of the virus capsid protein and the VP1 capsomere subunits are capable of self assembly to form a capsid-like structure. Ground-based and orbiter studies were conducted with VP1 protein cloned in an expression vector and purified to provide ample quantities for capsomere-capsid assembly. Flight studies were conducted on STS-37 on April 5-9, 1991. Assembly initiated when a VP1 protein solution was interfaced with a Ca+2 buffer solution (pH 5.0). After four days a second alignment terminated the assembly process and allowed for glutaraldehyde fixation. Flight and ground-based samples were analyzed by electron microscopy. Ground-based experiments revealed the assembly of VP1 into capsid-like structures and a heterogenous size array of capsomere subunits. Samples reacted in microgravity, however, showed capsomeres of a homogenous size, but lack of capsid-like assembly.

  2. Ground-Based Research within NASA's Materials Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ground-based research in Materials Science for NASA's Microgravity program serves several purposes, and includes approximately four Principal Investigators for every one in the flight program. While exact classification is difficult. the ground program falls roughly into the following categories: (1) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Theoretical Studies; (2) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Bringing to Maturity New Research; (3) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Enabling Characterization; (4) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Thermophysical Property Determination; (5) Radiation Shielding; (6) Preliminary In Situ Resource Utilization; (7) Biomaterials; (8) Nanostructured Materials; (9) Materials Science for Advanced Space Propulsion. It must be noted that while the first four categories are aimed at using long duration low gravity conditions, the other categories pertain more to more recent NASA initiatives in materials science. These new initiatives address NASA's future materials science needs in the realms of crew health and safety, and exploration, and have been included in the most recent NASA Research Announcements (NRA). A description of each of these nine categories will be given together with examples of the kinds of research being undertaken.

  3. Ground-Based Research within NASA's Materials Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ground-based research in Materials Science for NASA's Microgravity program serves several purposes, and includes approximately four Principal Investigators for every one in the flight program. While exact classification is difficult. the ground program falls roughly into the following categories: (1) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Theoretical Studies; (2) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Bringing to Maturity New Research; (3) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Enabling Characterization; (4) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Thermophysical Property Determination; (5) Radiation Shielding; (6) Preliminary In Situ Resource Utilization; (7) Biomaterials; (8) Nanostructured Materials; (9) Materials Science for Advanced Space Propulsion. It must be noted that while the first four categories are aimed at using long duration low gravity conditions, the other categories pertain more to more recent NASA initiatives in materials science. These new initiatives address NASA's future materials science needs in the realms of crew health and safety, and exploration, and have been included in the most recent NASA Research Announcements (NRA). A description of each of these nine categories will be given together with examples of the kinds of research being undertaken.

  4. The Microgravity Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Wargo, Michael J.

    The Microgravity Demonstrator is a tool used to create microgravity conditions in the classroom. A series of demonstrations is used to provide a dramatically visual, physical connection between free-fall and microgravity conditions in order to understand why various types of experiments are performed under microgravity conditions. The manual is…

  5. Ground-based observations of exoplanet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mooij, Ernst Johan Walter

    2011-11-01

    This thesis focuses on the properties of exoplanet atmospheres. The results for ground-based near-infrared secondary eclipse observations of three different exoplanets, TrES-3b, HAT-P-1b and WASP-33b, are presented which have been obtained with ground-based telescopes as part of the GROUSE project. In addition to secondary eclipse observations, the broadband transmission spectrum of the super-Earth GJ1214b is also presented. The transmission spectrum for this low-density planet indicates that it probably has a low-metallicity, hydrogen dominated atmosphere. Finally the results for an ensemble study of the thermal emission properties of hot Jupiters is presented, including the average spectrum for these planets separated based on the level of incident radiation and the activity of their host-stars.

  6. MSFC Skylab ground-based astronomy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Ground-Based Astronomy Program (SGAP) was conducted to enhance the data base of solar physics obtained during the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) mission flown in conjunction with the Skylab orbital station. Leading solar physicists from various observatories obtained data from the ground at the same time that orbital data were being acquired by ATM. The acquisition of corollary solar data from the ground simultaneously with the ATM orbital observations helped to provide a broader basis for understanding solar physics by increasing spectral coverage and by the use of additional sophisticated instruments of various types. This report briefly describes the individual tasks and the associated instrumentation selected for this ground-based program and contains as appendices, the final reports from the Principal Investigators.

  7. Space and Ground-Based Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weems, Jon; Zell, Martin

    This chapter deals first with the main characteristics of the space environment, outside and inside a spacecraft. Then the space and space-related (ground-based) infrastructures are described. The most important infrastructure is the International Space Station, which holds many European facilities (for instance the European Columbus Laboratory). Some of them, such as the Columbus External Payload Facility, are located outside the ISS to benefit from external space conditions. There is only one other example of orbital platforms, the Russian Foton/Bion Recoverable Orbital Capsule. In contrast, non-orbital weightless research platforms, although limited in experimental time, are more numerous: sounding rockets, parabolic flight aircraft, drop towers and high-altitude balloons. In addition to these facilities, there are a number of ground-based facilities and space simulators, for both life sciences (for instance: bed rest, clinostats) and physical sciences (for instance: magnetic compensation of gravity). Hypergravity can also be provided by human and non-human centrifuges.

  8. Illumination compensation in ground based hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, Alexander; Underwood, James

    2017-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has emerged as an important tool for analysing vegetation data in agricultural applications. Recently, low altitude and ground based hyperspectral imaging solutions have come to the fore, providing very high resolution data for mapping and studying large areas of crops in detail. However, these platforms introduce a unique set of challenges that need to be overcome to ensure consistent, accurate and timely acquisition of data. One particular problem is dealing with changes in environmental illumination while operating with natural light under cloud cover, which can have considerable effects on spectral shape. In the past this has been commonly achieved by imaging known reference targets at the time of data acquisition, direct measurement of irradiance, or atmospheric modelling. While capturing a reference panel continuously or very frequently allows accurate compensation for illumination changes, this is often not practical with ground based platforms, and impossible in aerial applications. This paper examines the use of an autonomous unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) to gather high resolution hyperspectral imaging data of crops under natural illumination. A process of illumination compensation is performed to extract the inherent reflectance properties of the crops, despite variable illumination. This work adapts a previously developed subspace model approach to reflectance and illumination recovery. Though tested on a ground vehicle in this paper, it is applicable to low altitude unmanned aerial hyperspectral imagery also. The method uses occasional observations of reference panel training data from within the same or other datasets, which enables a practical field protocol that minimises in-field manual labour. This paper tests the new approach, comparing it against traditional methods. Several illumination compensation protocols for high volume ground based data collection are presented based on the results. The findings in this paper are

  9. Ground based spectroscopy of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I will present results using a novel spectral retrieval method for near to mid infra-red emission and transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres taken from the ground and discuss the feasibility of future ground-based spectroscopy in a broader context. My recently commenced PhD project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  10. New scientific equipment for protein crystallization in microgravity, BELKA, and its approbation on the Bion-M No. 1 spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Baskakova, S. S. Kovalyov, S. I.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Zadorozhnaya, L. A.; Lyasnikova, M. S.; Dymshits, Y. M.; Shishkov, V. A.; Egorov, A. V.; Dolgin, A. M.; Voloshin, A. E.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2015-01-15

    A space experiment on the crystallization of lisozyme and glucose isomerase proteins in UK-1 and UK-2 crystallizers on the scientific equipment BELKA on the Bion-M no. 1 spacecraft was performed in April–May 2013. A ground-based experiment was carried out simultaneously at the Institute of Crystallography of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IC RAS). Transparent crystals were obtained in both cases. The lisozyme crystals grown in microgravity are larger than their terrestrial analogs. An optical study of glucose isomerase crystals grown in space has shown that the coalescence of equally oriented crystallites leads to the formation of quasi-single-crystal blocks. An X-ray diffraction experiment on lisozyme crystals has revealed the resolutions for crystals obtained under terrestrial conditions and in space to be 1.74 and 1.58 Å, respectively.

  11. Combustion Of Interacting Droplet Arrays In Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Struk, P. M.; Ikegami, M.; Xu, G.

    2003-01-01

    Theory and experiments involving single droplet combustion date back to 1953, with the first microgravity work appearing in 1956. The problem of a spherical droplet burning in an infinite, quiescent microgravity environment is a classical problem in combustion research with the classical solution appearing in nearly every textbook on combustion. The microgravity environment offered by ground-based facilities such as drop towers and space-based facilities is ideal for studying the problem experimentally. A recent review by Choi and Dryer shows significant advances in droplet combustion have been made by studying the problem experimentally in microgravity and comparing the results to one dimensional theoretical and numerical treatments of the problem. Studying small numbers of interacting droplets in a well-controlled geometry represents a logical step in extending single droplet investigations to more practical spray configurations. Studies of droplet interactions date back to Rex and co-workers, and were recently summarized by Annamalai and Ryan. All previous studies determined the change in the burning rate constant, k, or the flame characteristics as a result of interactions. There exists almost no information on how droplet interactions a effect extinction limits, and if the extinction limits change if the array is in the diffusive or the radiative extinction regime. Thus, this study examined experimentally the effect that droplet interactions have on the extinction process by investigating the simplest array configuration, a binary droplet array. The studies were both in normal gravity, reduced pressure ambients and microgravity facilities. The microgravity facilities were the 2.2 and 5.2 second drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the 10 second drop tower at the Japan Microgravity Center. The experimental apparatus and the data analysis techniques are discussed in detail elsewhere.

  12. Bacillus thuringiensis conjugation in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Beuls, Elise; Van Houdt, Rob; Leys, Natalie; Dijkstra, Camelia; Larkin, Oliver; Mahillon, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Spaceflight experiments have suggested a possible effect of microgravity on the plasmid transfer among strains of the Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis, as opposed to no effect recorded for Gram-negative conjugation. To investigate these potential effects in a more affordable experimental setup, three ground-based microgravity simulators were tested: the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), and a superconducting magnet. The bacterial conjugative system consisted in biparental matings between two B. thuringiensis strains, where the transfer frequencies of the conjugative plasmid pAW63 and its ability to mobilize the nonconjugative plasmid pUB110 were assessed. Specifically, potential plasmid transfers in a 0 g position (simulated microgravity) were compared to those obtained under 1 g (normal gravity) condition in each device. Statistical analyses revealed no significant difference in the conjugative and mobilizable transfer frequencies between the three different simulated microgravitational conditions and our standard laboratory condition. These important ground-based observations emphasize the fact that, though no stimulation of plasmid transfer was observed, no inhibition was observed either. In the case of Gram-positive bacteria, this ability to exchange plasmids in weightlessness, as occurs under Earth's conditions, should be seen as particularly relevant in the scope of spread of antibiotic resistances and bacterial virulence.

  13. MOBI: Microgravity Observations of Bubble Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Donald L.; Sangani, Ashok

    2004-01-01

    One of the greatest uncertainties affecting the design of multiphase flow technologies for space exploration is the spatial distribution of phases that will arise in microgravity or reduced gravity. On Earth, buoyancy-driven motion predominates whereas the shearing of the bubble suspension controls its behavior in microgravity. We are conducting a series of ground-based experiments and a flight experiment spanning the full range of ratios of buoyancy to shear. These include: (1) bubbles rising in a quiescent liquid in a vertical channel; (2) weak shear flow induced by slightly inclining the channel; (3) moderate shear flow in a terrestrial vertical pipe flow; and (4) shearing of a bubble suspension in a cylindrical Couette cell in microgravity. We consider nearly monodisperse suspensions of 1 to 1.8 mm diameter bubbles in aqueous electrolyte solutions. The liquid velocity disturbance produced by bubbles in this size range can often be described using an inviscid analysis. Electrolytic solutions lead to hydrophilic repulsion forces that stabilize the bubble suspension without causing Marangoni stresses. We will discuss the mechanisms that control the flow behavior and phase distribution in the ground-based experiments and speculate on the factors that may influence the suspension flow and bubble volume fraction distribution in the flight experiment.

  14. Bacillus thuringiensis Conjugation in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuls, Elise; van Houdt, Rob; Leys, Natalie; Dijkstra, Camelia; Larkin, Oliver; Mahillon, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Spaceflight experiments have suggested a possible effect of microgravity on the plasmid transfer among strains of the Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis, as opposed to no effect recorded for Gram-negative conjugation. To investigate these potential effects in a more affordable experimental setup, three ground-based microgravity simulators were tested: the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), and a superconducting magnet. The bacterial conjugative system consisted in biparental matings between two B. thuringiensis strains, where the transfer frequencies of the conjugative plasmid pAW63 and its ability to mobilize the nonconjugative plasmid pUB110 were assessed. Specifically, potential plasmid transfers in a 0-g position (simulated microgravity) were compared to those obtained under 1-g (normal gravity) condition in each device. Statistical analyses revealed no significant difference in the conjugative and mobilizable transfer frequencies between the three different simulated microgravitational conditions and our standard laboratory condition. These important ground-based observations emphasize the fact that, though no stimulation of plasmid transfer was observed, no inhibition was observed either. In the case of Gram-positive bacteria, this ability to exchange plasmids in weightlessness, as occurs under Earth's conditions, should be seen as particularly relevant in the scope of spread of antibiotic resistances and bacterial virulence.

  15. Microbial Cellulose Assembly in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. Malcolm, Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Based on evidence indicating a possible correlation between hypo-gravity conditions and alteration of cellulose production by the gram negative bacterium, Acetobacter xylinum, a ground-based study for a possible long term Space Shuttle flight has been conducted. The proposed experiment for A. xylinum aboard the Shuttle is the BRIC (Biological Research in a Canister), a metal container containing spaces for nine Petri plates. Using a common experimental design, the cellulose production capability as well as the survivability of the A. xylinum strains NQ5 and AY201 have been described. It should now be possible to use the BRIC for the first long term microgravity experiments involving the biosynthesis of cellulose.

  16. Ground-Based Telescope Parametric Cost Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Rowell, Ginger Holmes

    2004-01-01

    A parametric cost model for ground-based telescopes is developed using multi-variable statistical analysis, The model includes both engineering and performance parameters. While diameter continues to be the dominant cost driver, other significant factors include primary mirror radius of curvature and diffraction limited wavelength. The model includes an explicit factor for primary mirror segmentation and/or duplication (i.e.. multi-telescope phased-array systems). Additionally, single variable models based on aperture diameter are derived. This analysis indicates that recent mirror technology advances have indeed reduced the historical telescope cost curve.

  17. Testing Numerical Modeling of Phase Coarsening by Microgravity Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. G.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative understanding of the morphological evolution that occurs during phase coarsening is crucial for optimization of processing procedures to control the final structure and properties of multiphase materials. Generally, ground-based experimental studies of phase coarsening in solids are limited to model alloy systems. Data from microgravity experiments on phase coarsening in Sn-Pb solid-liquid mixtures, executed on the International Space Station, are archived in NASA's Physical Sciences Informatics (PSI) system. In such microgravity experiments, it is expected that the rate of sedimentation will be greatly reduced compared with terrestrial conditions, allowing the kinetics of phase coarsening to be followed more carefully and accurately. In this work we tested existing numerical models of phase coarsening using NASA's PSI microgravity data. Specially, we compared the microstructures derived from phase-field and multiparticle diffusion simulations with those observed in microgravity experiments.

  18. Archiving data from ground-based telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The scientific throughput of a particular observing facility has been demonstrated to be multiplied with the operation of a data archive and its corresponding retrieval system. A requisite to achieve such an exploitation is a well structured observations catalog, i.e. a catalog that includes all information necessary to reduce and analyze the data even many years after its acquisition. At the same time, an information system is required that allow users to browse through the catalog at different levels of detail, adapting the amount of information presented to the actual needs of the user. Archiving data acquired with ground-based telescopes is particularly difficult because of the relative short life-time of instruments and detectors in comparison to the expected life-time of the archive. This feature differentiates ground-based originated archives radically from its spaceborne counterparts. The organization of the observations catalog becomes highly dependent on the capability of the archive to deal with new instrumental configurations. We introduce in this paper, the concept of a catalog database as opposed to the static catalog design currently in use in many archiving facilities, as a method to deal with this problem. We also present a brief review of activities currently in progress in this area.

  19. Novel Receptor-Based Countermeasures to Microgravity-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OMalley, Bert W.

    1999-01-01

    The biological actions mediated by the estrogen receptor (ER), vitamin D receptor (VDR) and Ca(sup 2+) (sub o) -sensing receptor (CaR) play key roles in the normal control of bone growth and skeletal turnover that is necessary for skeletal health. These receptors act by controlling the differentiation and/or function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and other cell types within the bone and bone marrow microenvironment. The appropriate use of selective ER modulators (SERMS) which target bone, vitamin D analogs that favor bone formation relative to resorption, and CaR agonists may both stimulate osteoblastogenesis and inhibit osteoclastogenesis and the function of mature osteoclasts, should make it possible to prevent the reduction in bone formation and increase in bone resorption that normally contribute to the bone loss induced by weightlessness. Indeed, there may be synergistic interactions among these receptors that enhance the actions of any one used alone. Therefore, we proposed to: 1) assess the in vitro ability of novel ER, VDR and CaR agonists, alone or in combination, to modulate osteoblastogenesis and mature osteoblast function under conditions of 1g and simulated microgravity; 2) assess the in vitro ability of novel ER, VDR and CaR agonists, alone or in combination, to modulate osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption under conditions of lg and simulated microgravity; and 3) carry out baseline studies on the skeletal localization of the CaR in normal rat bone as well as the in vivo actions of our novel ER- and VDR-based therapeutics in the rat in preparation for their use, alone or in combination, in well-established ground-based models of microgravity and eventually in space flight.

  20. Spaceflight and Simulated Microgravity Increases Virulence of the Known Bacterial Pathogen S. Marcescens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens-Grisham, Rachel Andrea; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Wade, William

    2016-01-01

    After spaceflight, the number of immune cells is reduced in humans. In other research models, including Drosophila, not only is there a reduction in the number of plasmatocytes, but expression of immune-related genes is also changed after spaceflight. These observations suggest that the immune system is compromised after exposure to microgravity. It has also been reported that there is a change in virulence of some bacterial pathogens after spaceflight. We recently observed that samples of gram-negative S. marcescens retrieved from spaceflight is more virulent than ground controls, as determined by reduced survival and increased bacterial growth in the host. We were able to repeat this finding of increased virulence after exposure to simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel, a ground based analog to microgravity. With the ground and spaceflight samples, we looked at involvement of the Toll and Imd pathways in the Drosophila host in fighting infection by ground and spaceflight samples. We observed that Imd-pathway mutants were more susceptible to infection by the ground bacterial samples, which aligns with the known role of this pathway in fighting infections by gram-negative bacteria. When the Imd-pathway mutants were infected with the spaceflight sample, however, they exhibited the same susceptibility as seen with the ground control bacteria. Interestingly, all mutant flies show the same susceptibility to the spaceflight bacterial sample as do wild type flies. This suggests that neither humoral immunity pathway is effectively able to counter the increased pathogenicity of the space-flown S. marcescens bacteria.

  1. Microgravity Science Glovebox Investigations SUBSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrogorsky, A.; Marin, C.; Vogel, M.; Volz, M. P.; Luz, P.; Jeter, L.; Spivey, Reggie; Duffar, Thierry; Geveden, Rex D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) is a Microgravity Science Glovebox Investigation manifested for the UF2 flight, on the U.S. Orbiter 111, to the International Space Station (ISS). SUBSA complements the "parent" flight investigation CG13 (Space-and Groundbased Crystal Growth Using a Baffle). During directional solidification, the disk-shaped baffle acts as a partition, creating a small melt zone at the solid-liquid interface. As a result, the level of buoyancy-driven convection at the interface is significantly reduced. In space, the baffle will reduce convection driven by residual micro acceleration. The baffle reduces the Rayleigh number (Ra) of the melt by a factor of 103. The combined effect of the baffle and microgravity will yield a reduction in Ra by a factor of 107 to 109 approaching effectively the acceleration conditions in "nanogravity". The results of ground based tests and numerical modeling will be presented. The furnace for directional solidification (flight hardware and the ground unit) was developed by Tec-Masters Inc. The flight ampoules were produced jointly at Rensselaer, Tec-Masters Inc. and Crystallod Inc.

  2. Development of an improved ground-based prototype of space plant-growing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S.; Liu, X.; Ai, W.; Tang, Y.; Zhu, J.; Wang, X.; Wei, M.; Qin, L.; Yang, Y.

    Based on a formerly developed ground-based prototype of space plant-growing facility, the development of its improved prototype has been finished, so as to make its operating principle better adapt to the space microgravity environment. According to the developing experience of its first generation prototype and detailed demonstration and design of technique plan, its blueprint design and machining of related components, whole facility installment, debugging and trial operations were all done gradually. Its growing chamber contains a volume of about 0.5 m3 and a growing area of approximate 0.5 m2; the atmospheric environmental parameters in the growing chamber and water content in the growing media were controlled totally and effectively; lighting source is a combination of both red and blue light emitting diodes (LED). The following demonstrating results showed that the entire system design of the prototype is reasonable and its operating principle can nearly meet the requirements of space microgravity environment. Therefore, our plant-growing technique in space was advanced further, which laid an important foundation for next development of the space plant-growing facility and plant-cultivating experimental research in space microgravity condition.

  3. The Microgravity Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Wargo, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The Demonstrator is a tool to create microgravity conditions in your classroom. A series of demonstrations is used to provide a dramatically visual, physical connection between free-fall and microgravity conditions and to understand why various types of experiments are performed under microgravity conditions. A wealth of back-round material on free-fall, microgravity, and micro-gravity sciences is available in two educational documents available through the NASA Teacher Resource Centers: Microgravity-Activity Guide for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, and The Mathematics of Microgravity. The remainder of this manual is divided into five sections. The first explains how to put the Microgravity Demonstrator together. The next section introduces the individual demonstrations and discusses the underlying physical science concepts. Following that are detailed steps for conducting each demonstration to make your use of the Demonstrator most effective. Next are some ideas on how to make your own Microgravity Demonstrator. The last section is a tips and troubleshooting guide for video connections and operations. If you have one of the NASA Microgravity Demonstrators, this entire manual should be useful. If you have a copy of the Microgravity Demonstrator Videotape and would like to use that as a teaching tool, the Demonstrations and Scientific Background section of this manual will give you insight into the science areas studied in microgravity.

  4. Microgravity, industry related research for oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D'arcy; Hansen, Noah; Legros, Jean-Claude; Schramm, Laurier L.

    1997-01-01

    C-CORE of St. John's, Canada, has established CIRUS-Consortium for Industrial Research in the Use of Space-whose mandate is to provide benefits to industry for the energy and environment sectors. Research to date has focused on enhanced oil recovery and contaminant transport by the study of fluid physics in microgravity. Three experiments performed by CIRUS members in ground-based or parabolic flight programs have been chosen for further development. These experiments are combined in a Get Away Special (GAS) container which will fly on board NASA's space shuttle. The development program for the GAS container is entitled MIRROR-Microgravity, Industry Related Research for Oil Recovery. Research projects in the MIRROR program include the study of diffusion coefficients of crude oil (DCCO), foam stability in the absence of gravity drainage and capillary flow in porous media. This paper describes the development and potential benefits of the DCCO and foam stability projects.

  5. Microgravity science and applications bibliography, 1991 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This edition of the Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) Bibliography is a compilation of government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles dealing with flight experiments using a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes, or with ground based activities that provide supporting research. It encompasses literature published but not cited in the 1990 Revision and that literature which has been published in the past year. Subdivisions of the bibliography include: Electronic materials; Metals, alloys, and composites; Fluids, interfaces and transport; Glasses and ceramics; Biotechnology; Combustion science; and Experimental technology, instrumentation, and facilities. Also included are a limited number of publications from the European, Soviet, and Japanese programs.

  6. Microgravity science and applications bibliography, 1990 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This edition of the Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) Bibliography is a compilation of government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes, or with ground based activities that provide supporting research. It encompasses literature published but not cited in the 1989 Revision and that literature which has been published in the past year. Subdivisions of the bibliography include: electronic materials; metals, alloys, and composites; fluids, interfaces, and transport; glasses and ceramics; biotechnology; combustion science; and experimental technology, facilities, and instrumentation. Also included are publications from the European, Soviet, and Japanese programs.

  7. Microgravity science and applications bibliography, 1989 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This edition of the Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) Bibliography is a compilation of government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes, or with ground based activities that provide supported research. It encompasses literature published but not cited in the 1988 Revision and that literature which has been published in the past year. Subdivisions of the Bibliography include: electronic materials, metals, alloys, and composites; fluids, interfaces, and transport; glasses and ceramics; biotechnology; combustion science; experimental technology, facilities, and instrumentation. Also included are publications from the European, Soviet, and Japanese programs.

  8. Microgravity science & applications. Program tasks and bibliography for FY 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This annual report includes research projects funded by the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, Microgravity Science and Applications Division, during FY 1994. It is a compilation of program tasks (objective, description, significance, progress, students funded under research, and bibliographic citations) for flight research and ground based research in five major scientific disciplines: benchmark science, biotechnology, combustion science, fluid physics, and materials science. Advanced technology development (ATD) program task descriptions are also included. The bibliography cites the related principle investigator (PI) publications and presentations for these program tasks in FY 1994. Three appendices include a Table of Acronyms, a Guest Investigator index and a Principle Investigator index.

  9. Flocculation and aggregation in a microgravity environment (FAME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Suh, Kwang I.

    1994-01-01

    An experiment to study flocculation phenomena in the constrained microgravity environment of a space shuttle or space station is described. The small size and light weight experiment easily fits in a Spacelab Glovebox. Using an integrated fiber optic dynamic light scattering (DLS) system we obtain high precision particle size measurements from dispersions of colloidal particles within seconds, needs no onboard optical alignment, no index matching fluid, and offers sample mixing and shear melting capabilities to study aggregation (flocculation and coagulation) phenomena under both quiescent and controlled agitation conditions. The experimental system can easily be adapted for other microgravity experiments requiring the use of DLS. Preliminary results of ground-based study are reported.

  10. Characteristics of transitional and turbulent jet diffusion flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, Yousef M.; Small, James F., Jr.; Hegde, Uday G.; Zhou, Liming; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the ground-based results obtained to date in preparation of a proposed space experiment to study the role of large-scale structures in microgravity transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames by investigating the dynamics of vortex/flame interactions and their influence on flame characteristics. The overall objective is to gain an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames. Understanding of the role of large-scale structures on the characteristics of microgravity transitional and turbulent flames will ultimately lead to improved understanding of normal-gravity turbulent combustion.

  11. Cardiovascular physiology - Effects of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments during spaceflight and its groundbase analog, bedrest, provide consistent data which demonstrate that numerous changes in cardiovascular function occur as part of the physiological adaptation process to the microgravity environment. These include elevated heart rate and venous compliance, lowered blood volume, central venous pressure and stroke volume, and attenuated autonomic reflex functions. Although most of these adaptations are not functionally apparent during microgravity exposure, they manifest themselves during the return to the gravitational challenge of earth's terrestrial environment as orthostatic hypotension and instability, a condition which could compromise safety, health and productivity. Development and application of effective and efficient countermeasures such as saline "loading," intermittent venous pooling, pharmacological treatments, and exercise have become primary emphases of the space life sciences research effort with only limited success. Successful development of countermeasures will require knowledge of the physiological mechanisms underlying cardiovascular adaptation to microgravity which can be obtained only through controlled, parallel groundbased research to complement carefully designed flight experiments. Continued research will provide benefits for both space and clinical applications as well as enhance the basic understanding of cardiovascular homeostasis in humans.

  12. Exercise-training protocols for astronauts in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bulbulian, R.; Bernauer, E. M.; Haskell, W. L.; Moore, T.

    1989-01-01

    Based on physical working requirements for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activity and on the findings from bed-rest studies that utilized exercise training as a countermeasure for the reduction of aerobic power, deterioration of muscular strength and endurance, decrements in mood and cognitive performance, and possibly for bone loss, two exercise protocols are proposed. One assumes that, during microgravity, astronaut exercise physiological functions should be maintained at 100 percent of ground-based levels. The other assumes that maximal aerobic power in flight can be reduced by 10 percent of the ground-based level.

  13. Exercise-training protocols for astronauts in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bulbulian, R.; Bernauer, E. M.; Haskell, W. L.; Moore, T.

    1989-01-01

    Based on physical working requirements for astronauts during intra- and extravehicular activity and on the findings from bed-rest studies that utilized exercise training as a countermeasure for the reduction of aerobic power, deterioration of muscular strength and endurance, decrements in mood and cognitive performance, and possibly for bone loss, two exercise protocols are proposed. One assumes that, during microgravity, astronaut exercise physiological functions should be maintained at 100 percent of ground-based levels. The other assumes that maximal aerobic power in flight can be reduced by 10 percent of the ground-based level.

  14. Introduction: Photons and Ground-Based

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James; Moore, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A Conference on Measurement Techniques for Solar and Space Physics was held on 20-24 April 2015 in Boulder, Colorado, at the National Center for Atmospheric Research Center Green Campus. The present volume collects together the conference papers for photons and ground-based categories. This gathering of over 200 scientists and instrumentalists was born out of the desire to collect in one place the latest experiment and instrument technologies required for advancement of scientific knowledge in the disciplines of solar and space physics. The two goals for this conference and the subsequent publication of its content are (a) to describe measurement techniques and technology development needed to advance high priority science in the fields of solar and space physics; and (b) to provide a survey or reference of techniques for in situ measurement and remote sensing of space plasmas. Towards this end, our goal has always been inspired by the two 1998 Geophysical Monographs (Nos. 102 and 103) entitled, "Measurement Techniques in Space Plasmas" (particles and fields) [Pfaff et al., 1998a, 1998b], which have served as a reference and resource for advanced students, engineers, and scientists who wish to learn the fundamentals of measurement techniques and technology in this field. Those monographs were the product of an American Geophysical Union Chapman Conference that took place in Santa Fe, NM, in 1995: "Measurement Techniques in Space Plasmas-What Works, What Doesn't." Two decades later, we believe that it is appropriate to revisit this subject, in light of recent advances in technology, research platforms, and analysis techniques. Moreover, we now include direct measurements of neutral gases in the upper atmosphere, optical imaging techniques, and remote observations in space and on the ground. Accordingly, the workshop was organized among four areas of measurement techniques: particles, fields, photons, and ground-based. This two-set volume is largely composed of the

  15. SCIENTIFIC EFFICIENCY OF GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2012-10-01

    I scanned the six major astronomical journals of 2008 for all 1589 papers that are based on new data obtained from ground-based optical/IR telescopes worldwide. Then I collected data on numbers of papers, citations to them in 3+ years, the most-cited papers, and annual operating costs. These data are assigned to four groups by telescope aperture. For instance, while the papers from telescopes with an aperture >7 m average 1.29 more citations than those with an aperture of 2 to <4 m, this represents a small return for a factor of four difference in operating costs. Among the 17 papers that have received {>=}100 citations in 3+ years, only half come from the large (>7 m) telescopes. I wonder why the large telescopes do so relatively poorly and suggest possible reasons. I also found that papers based on archival data, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, produce 10.6% as many papers and 20.6% as many citations as those based on new data. Also, the 577.2 papers based on radio data produced 36.3% as many papers and 33.6% as many citations as the 1589 papers based on optical/IR telescopes.

  16. Progress in ground-based optical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Énard, Daniel; Maréchal, André; Espiard, Jean

    1996-05-01

    For several decades, the 5 metre Palomar telescope has set a practical limit to the size of ground-based optical telescopes only exceeded by the Russian 6 metre telescope. Using new technologies to produce either large monolithic mirrors or large mosaic of smaller elements, astronomers in Europe, the United States and Japan are developing a new generation of telescopes. Not only are these new telescopes much bigger in size, offering considerably more collecting power, but they also provide a much better angular resolution. To achieve this they rely heavily on computer control techniques and advanced modelling. Even more progress in angular resolution is expected when modern techniques such as adaptive optics and interferometry, which are being implemented on most of the new telescopes, are fully operational. This article evaluates the impact of new technologies on the development of large optical telescopes, in particular on the realization of their optics. The key mirror technologies are reviewed and a particular project, the ESO VLT is reviewed in some more detail as an illustration.

  17. Ground Based Studies of the Outer Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, Laurence M.

    2005-01-01

    This report covers progress to date under this grant on our continuing program to conduct ground based studies of the outer solar system planets and satellites, with emphasis on spectroscopy and atmospheric phenomena. The research continues under our new PAST grant, NNG04G131G beginning 5/1/2004. The original period of performance of the subject grant was 3/1/2001 to 2/28/2004, but was extended one year at no cost. Although there is some overlap in the scientific projects conducted during the extended year with those of the new grant, this report is confined to the portion of the work funded under NAG5-10435. The primary goals for this grant period were a comparative study of outer planet thermospheres/ionospheres near solar maximum, extended to the mid-IR, and the investigation of molecular dimers in outer solar system atmospheres. This project supports NASA's planned space missions, Jupiter Polar Orbiter, outer Planet Microprobes, and the recent Cassini flyby of Jupiter. It also supports the OSS strategic plan themes, The Exploration of the Solar System and The Sun-Earth Connection/ Understanding comparative planetary space environments.

  18. Scientific Efficiency of Ground-based Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2012-10-01

    I scanned the six major astronomical journals of 2008 for all 1589 papers that are based on new data obtained from ground-based optical/IR telescopes worldwide. Then I collected data on numbers of papers, citations to them in 3+ years, the most-cited papers, and annual operating costs. These data are assigned to four groups by telescope aperture. For instance, while the papers from telescopes with an aperture >7 m average 1.29 more citations than those with an aperture of 2 to <4 m, this represents a small return for a factor of four difference in operating costs. Among the 17 papers that have received >=100 citations in 3+ years, only half come from the large (>7 m) telescopes. I wonder why the large telescopes do so relatively poorly and suggest possible reasons. I also found that papers based on archival data, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, produce 10.6% as many papers and 20.6% as many citations as those based on new data. Also, the 577.2 papers based on radio data produced 36.3% as many papers and 33.6% as many citations as the 1589 papers based on optical/IR telescopes.

  19. Microgravity noncontact temperature requirements at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G.

    1989-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is currently supporting 66 microgravity science and applications projects. The 66 projects are separated into 23 flight projects and 43 ground-based projects. The part of the NASA Lewis program dealing with flight experiments is divided into six areas: Combustion Science, Materials Science, Fluid Physics, Instrumentation/Equipment, Advanced Technology Development, and Space Station Multi-User Facility studies. The part of the NASA Lewis program dealing with ground-based experiments is coincidentally also divided into six areas: Electronic Materials, Combustion Science, Fluid Dynamics and Transport Phenomena, Metals and Alloys, Glasses and Ceramics, and Physics and Chemistry Experiments. Several purposes exist for ground-based experimenting. Preliminary information is necessary before a decision can be made for flight status, the short low gravity durations available in ground facilities are adequate for a particular study, or extensive ground-based research must be conducted to define and support the microgravity science endeavors contemplated for space. Not all of the 66 microgravity science and application projects at NASA Lewis have temperature requirements, but most do. Since space allocation does not permit a review of all the pertinent projects, a decision was made to restrict the coverage to the science flight projects, flight projects minus the advanced technology development, and multiuser facility efforts. Very little is lost by this decision as the types of temperature requirements for science flight projects can be considered representative of those for the ground-based projects. The noncontact temperature needs at NASA Lewis, as represented by the science flight projects are discussed by describing briefly the experiments themselves, by displaying an illustration of each experimental setup, and by specifying their temperature requisites.

  20. Microgravity Day for Educators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The arnual conference for the Educator Resource Center Network (ERCN) Coordinators was held at Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field in Cleveland, Ohio. The conference included participants from NASA's Educator Resource Centers located throughout the country. The Microgravity Science Division at Glenn sponsored a Microgravity Day for all the conference participants. Kathy Higgins of the National Center for Microgravity Research at GRC explains educational resources to teachers. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  1. Role for Lower Extremity Interstitial Fluid Volume Changes in the Development of Orthostasis after Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Summers, Richard L.; Martin, David S.; Meck, Janice V.; Coleman, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    vein diameter and stroke volume upon tilting in contrast to the observations made before bed rest (54 vs 23% respectively). Compliance in the calf increased by an average of 36% by day 27 of bedrest. A systems analysis using a computer model of cardiovascular physiology suggests that microgravity induced interstitial volume depletion results in an accentuation of venous blood volume sequestration and is the initiating event in reentry orthostasis. This hypothesis was tested in volunteer subjects using a ground-based spaceflight analog model that simulated the body fluid redistribution induced by microgravity exposure. Measurements of changes in the interstitial spaces and observed responses of the anterior tibial vein with tilt, together with the increase in calf compliance, were consistent with our proposed mechanism for the initiation of postflight orthostasis often seen in astronauts.

  2. Brine shrimp development in space: ground-based data to shuttle flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; DeBell, L.; Hawkins, L.; Metcalf, J.; Guikema, J. A.; Rosowski, J.

    1992-01-01

    The brine shrimp, Artemia salina, has been used as a model system to assess microgravity effects on developing organisms. Following fertilization and early development, the egg can arrest in early gastrula as a dehydrated cyst stage that is stable to harsh environments over long time periods. When salt water is added, the cysts can reactivate, with embryonic development and egg hatching occurring in about 24 h. A series of larval molts or instars, over about a 2 week period, results in the adult crustacean. We have assessed these developmental events in a closed syringe system, a bioprocessing module, in ground-based studies, and have conducted preliminary in-orbit experiments aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the flights of STS-37 and STS-43. Although the in-flight data are limited, spectacular degrees of development have been achieved.

  3. Brine shrimp development in space: ground-based data to shuttle flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; DeBell, L.; Hawkins, L.; Metcalf, J.; Guikema, J. A.; Rosowski, J.

    1992-01-01

    The brine shrimp, Artemia salina, has been used as a model system to assess microgravity effects on developing organisms. Following fertilization and early development, the egg can arrest in early gastrula as a dehydrated cyst stage that is stable to harsh environments over long time periods. When salt water is added, the cysts can reactivate, with embryonic development and egg hatching occurring in about 24 h. A series of larval molts or instars, over about a 2 week period, results in the adult crustacean. We have assessed these developmental events in a closed syringe system, a bioprocessing module, in ground-based studies, and have conducted preliminary in-orbit experiments aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the flights of STS-37 and STS-43. Although the in-flight data are limited, spectacular degrees of development have been achieved.

  4. Material research in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langbein, D.

    1984-01-01

    A popular discussion is given of microgravity effects in engineering and medicine gained from Skylab experience. Areas covered include crystal growing, liquid surface properties, diffusion, ferromagnetism, and emulsions.

  5. Development of life sciences equipment for microgravity and hypergravity simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Evans, J.; Vasques, M.; Gundo, D. P.; Griffith, J. B.; Harper, J.; Skundberg, T.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the Life Science Division at the NASA Ames Research Center is to investigate the effects of gravity on living systems in the spectrum from cells to humans. The range of these investigations is from microgravity, as experienced in space, to Earth's gravity, and hypergravity. Exposure to microgravity causes many physiological changes in humans and other mammals including a headward shift of body fluids, atrophy of muscles - especially the large muscles of the legs - and changes in bone and mineral metabolism. The high cost and limited opportunity for research experiments in space create a need to perform ground based simulation experiments on Earth. Models that simulate microgravity are used to help identify and quantify these changes, to investigate the mechanisms causing these changes and, in some cases, to develop countermeasures.

  6. Commercial applications in biomedical processing in the microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Terry C.; Taub, Floyd

    1995-01-01

    A series of studies have shown that a purified cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) that arrests cell division and induces cellular differentiation is fully capable of functionally interacting with target insect and mammalian cells in the microgravity environment. Data from several shuttle missions suggest that the signal transduction events that are known to be associated with CeReS action function as well in microgravity as in ground-based experiments. The molecular events known to be associated with CeReS include an ability to interfere with Ca2+ metabolism, the subsequent alkalinization of cell cytosol, and the inhibition of the phosphorylation of the nuclear protein product encoded by the retinoblastoma (RB) gene. The ability of CeReS to function in microgravity opens a wide variety of applications in space life sciences.

  7. Use of microgravity simulators for plant biological studies.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Raúl; Valbuena, Miguel A; Manzano, Aránzazu; Kamal, Khaled Y; Medina, F Javier

    2015-01-01

    Simulated microgravity and partial gravity research on Earth is highly convenient for every space biology researcher due to limitations of access to spaceflight. However, the use of ground-based facilities for microgravity simulation is far from simple. Microgravity simulation usually results in the need to consider additional environmental parameters which appear as secondary effects in the generation of altered gravity. These secondary effects may interfere with gravity alteration in the changes observed in the biological processes under study. Furthermore, ground-based facilities are also capable of generating hypergravity or fractional gravity conditions, which are worth being tested and compared with the results of microgravity exposure. Multiple technologies (2D clinorotation, random positioning machines, magnetic levitators or centrifuges), experimental hardware (proper use of containers and substrates for the seedlings or cell cultures), and experimental requirements (some life support/environmental parameters are more difficult to provide in certain facilities) should be collectively considered in defining the optimal experimental design that will allow us to anticipate, modify, or redefine the findings provided by the scarce spaceflight opportunities that have been (and will be) available.

  8. Skeletal responses to space flight and the bed rest analog: a review.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, A D; Spector, E R; Evans, H J; Sibonga, J D

    2007-01-01

    The potential for loss of bone mineral mass due to space flight was recognized by space scientists even before man's first venture into micro-gravity. Early life science studies in both the U.S. and Russian space programs attempted to measure the effects of reduced gravity on skeletal homeostasis, and these measurements have become more sophisticated with time. Bone-related measurements have typically included: bone mineral density measured by X-ray absorptiometry and more recently CT scanning; bonerelated hormones and other biochemical markers of bone turnover; and calcium excretion and balance. These measurements, conducted over the last 4 decades, have shed light on the nature of disuse bone loss and have provided preliminary information regarding bone recovery. Ground-based analog (bed rest) studies have provided information complementary to the space flight data and have allowed the testing of various countermeasures to bone loss. In spite of the wealth of knowledge obtained thus far, many questions remain regarding bone loss, bone recovery, and the factors affecting these skeletal processes. This paper will summarize the skeletal data obtained to date by the U.S. and Russian space programs and in ground-based disuse studies. In addition, related body composition data will be briefly discussed, as will possible countermeasures to space flight-induced bone loss.

  9. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  10. Microgravity Combustion Science: 1995 Program Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D. (Editor); Gokoglu, Suleyman A. (Editor); Friedman, Robert (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Microgravity greatly benefits the study of fundamental combustion processes. In this environment, buoyancy-induced flow is nearly eliminated, weak or normally obscured forces and flows can be isolated, gravitational settling or sedimentation is nearly eliminated, and temporal and spatial scales can be expanded. This document reviews the state of knowledge in microgravity combustion science with the emphasis on NASA-sponsored developments in the current period of 1992 to early 1995. The subjects cover basic research in gaseous premixed and diffusion-flame systems, flame structure and sooting, liquid droplets and pools, and solid-surface ignition and flame spread. They also cover applied research in combustion synthesis of ceramic-metal composites, advanced diagnostic instrumentation, and on-orbit fire safety. The review promotes continuing research by describing the opportunities for Principal Investigator participation through the NASA Research Announcement program and the available NASA Lewis Research Center ground-based facilities and spaceflight accommodations. This review is compiled by the members and associates of the NASA Lewis Microgravity Combustion Branch, and it serves as an update of two previous overview reports.

  11. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  12. Functional assessment of ubiquitin-depended processes under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhabereva, Anastasia; Shenkman, Boris S.; Gainullin, Murat; Gurev, Eugeny; Kondratieva, Ekaterina; Kopylov, Arthur

    Ubiquitylation, a widespread and important posttranslational modification of eukaryotic proteins, controls a multitude of critical cellular processes, both in normal and pathological conditions. The present work aims to study involvement of ubiquitin-dependent regulation in adaptive response to the external stimuli. Experiments were carried out on C57BL/6 mice. The microgravity state under conditions of real spaceflight on the biosatellite “BION-M1” was used as a model of stress impact. Additionally, number of control series including the vivarium control and experiments in Ground-based analog were also studied. The aggregate of endogenously ubiquitylated proteins was selected as specific feature of ubiquitin-dependent processes. Dynamic changes of modification pattern were characterized in liver tissue by combination of some methods, particularly by specific isolation of explicit protein pool, followed by immunodetection and/or mass spectrometry-based identification. The main approach includes specific extraction of proteins, modified by multiubiquitin chains of different length and topology. For this purpose two techniques were applied: 1) immunoprecipitation with antibodies against ubiquitin and/or multiubiquitin chains; 2) pull-down using synthetic protein construct termed Tandem Ubiquitin Binding Entities (TUBE, LifeSensors). TUBE represents fusion protein, composed of well characterized ubiquitin-binding domains, and thereby allows specific high-affinity binding and extraction of ubiquitylated proteins. Resulting protein fractions were analyzed by immunoblotting with antibodies against different types of multiubiquitin chains. Using this method we mapped endogenously modified proteins involved in two different types of ubiquitin-dependent processes, namely catabolic and non-catabolic ubiquitylation, in liver tissues, obtained from both control as well as experimental groups of animals, mentioned above. Then, isolated fractions of ubiquitylated proteins

  13. Development of an improved ground-based prototype of space vegetable-producing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Guo, S.; Zhu, J.; Wang, X.; Ai, W.; Wei, M.; Qin, L.; Deng, Y.

    Based on the development of a ground-based prototype of space vegetable-producing facility development of its improved prototype has been finished so as to make its operating principle adapt to the space microgravity environment better According to the developing experience of first-generation prototype of the space vegetable-producing facility and detailed demonstration and design of technique plan its blueprint design and machining of related components whole facility installment debugging and trial operations were done Its growing chamber contains a volume of about 0 5m 3 and a growing area of approximate 0 5m 2 the atmospheric environmental parameters in the growing chamber and water content in the growing media were totally and effectively controlled lighting sources are the combinations of both red and blue light emitting diode LED The following demonstrating results showed that the entire system design of the facility is reasonable and its operating principle can meet nearly the requirements of space microgravity environment Therefore our plant growing technique in space was advanced greatly which laid an important foundation for next development of the space vegetable-producing facility to be tested and applied in space station

  14. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-Aki K; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-05-20

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo") on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides "space-based controls" by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments.

  15. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-aki K.; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module (“Kibo”) on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides “space-based controls” by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  16. Weightlessness and Microgravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, David

    1991-01-01

    The term "microgravity" has begun to appear in science texts as a substitute for "weightlessness." Presents examples to clarify three common misconceptions about gravity and weightlessness. Further examines these and other examples with respect to microgravity to make distinctions between the terms and avoid additional…

  17. Microgravity Manufacturing Via Fused Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. G.; Griffin, M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing polymer hardware during space flight is currently outside the state of the art. A process called fused deposition modeling (FDM) can make this approach a reality by producing net-shaped components of polymer materials directly from a CAE model. FDM is a rapid prototyping process developed by Stratasys, Inc.. which deposits a fine line of semi-molten polymer onto a substrate while moving via computer control to form the cross-sectional shape of the part it is building. The build platen is then lowered and the process is repeated, building a component directly layer by layer. This method enables direct net-shaped production of polymer components directly from a computer file. The layered manufacturing process allows for the manufacture of complex shapes and internal cavities otherwise impossible to machine. This task demonstrated the benefits of the FDM technique to quickly and inexpensively produce replacement components or repair broken hardware in a Space Shuttle or Space Station environment. The intent of the task was to develop and fabricate an FDM system that was lightweight, compact, and required minimum power consumption to fabricate ABS plastic hardware in microgravity. The final product of the shortened task turned out to be a ground-based breadboard device, demonstrating miniaturization capability of the system.

  18. Erythroid cell growth and differentiation in vitro in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytkowski, A. J.; Davis, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans and experimental animals to the altered gravitational conditions of space flight has adverse effects on the lymphoid and erythroid hematopoietic systems. Although some information is available regarding the cellular and molecular changes in lymphocytes exposed to microgravity, little is known about the erythroid cellular changes that may underlie the reduction in erythropoiesis and resultant anemia. We now report a reduction in erythroid growth and a profound inhibition of erythropoietin (Epo)-induced differentiation in a ground-based simulated microgravity model system. Rauscher murine erythroleukemia cells were grown either in tissue culture vessels at 1 x g or in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA-designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Logarithmic growth was observed under both conditions; however, the doubling time in simulated microgravity was only one-half of that seen at 1 x g. No difference in apoptosis was detected. Induction with Epo at the initiation of the culture resulted in differentiation of approximately 25% of the cells at 1 x g, consistent with our previous observations. In contrast, induction with Epo at the initiation of simulated microgravity resulted in only one-half of this degree of differentiation. Significantly, the growth of cells in simulated microgravity for 24 h prior to Epo induction inhibited the differentiation almost completely. The results suggest that the NASA RWV bioreactor may serve as a suitable ground-based microgravity simulator to model the cellular and molecular changes in erythroid cells observed in true microgravity.

  19. Erythroid cell growth and differentiation in vitro in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sytkowski, A J; Davis, K L

    2001-02-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans and experimental animals to the altered gravitational conditions of space flight has adverse effects on the lymphoid and erythroid hematopoietic systems. Although some information is available regarding the cellular and molecular changes in lymphocytes exposed to microgravity, little is known about the erythroid cellular changes that may underlie the reduction in erythropoiesis and resultant anemia. We now report a reduction in erythroid growth and a profound inhibition of erythropoietin (Epo)-induced differentiation in a ground-based simulated microgravity model system. Rauscher murine erythroleukemia cells were grown either in tissue culture vessels at 1 x g or in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA-designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Logarithmic growth was observed under both conditions; however, the doubling time in simulated microgravity was only one-half of that seen at 1 x g. No difference in apoptosis was detected. Induction with Epo at the initiation of the culture resulted in differentiation of approximately 25% of the cells at 1 x g, consistent with our previous observations. In contrast, induction with Epo at the initiation of simulated microgravity resulted in only one-half of this degree of differentiation. Significantly, the growth of cells in simulated microgravity for 24 h prior to Epo induction inhibited the differentiation almost completely. The results suggest that the NASA RWV bioreactor may serve as a suitable ground-based microgravity simulator to model the cellular and molecular changes in erythroid cells observed in true microgravity.

  20. Erythroid cell growth and differentiation in vitro in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytkowski, A. J.; Davis, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans and experimental animals to the altered gravitational conditions of space flight has adverse effects on the lymphoid and erythroid hematopoietic systems. Although some information is available regarding the cellular and molecular changes in lymphocytes exposed to microgravity, little is known about the erythroid cellular changes that may underlie the reduction in erythropoiesis and resultant anemia. We now report a reduction in erythroid growth and a profound inhibition of erythropoietin (Epo)-induced differentiation in a ground-based simulated microgravity model system. Rauscher murine erythroleukemia cells were grown either in tissue culture vessels at 1 x g or in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA-designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Logarithmic growth was observed under both conditions; however, the doubling time in simulated microgravity was only one-half of that seen at 1 x g. No difference in apoptosis was detected. Induction with Epo at the initiation of the culture resulted in differentiation of approximately 25% of the cells at 1 x g, consistent with our previous observations. In contrast, induction with Epo at the initiation of simulated microgravity resulted in only one-half of this degree of differentiation. Significantly, the growth of cells in simulated microgravity for 24 h prior to Epo induction inhibited the differentiation almost completely. The results suggest that the NASA RWV bioreactor may serve as a suitable ground-based microgravity simulator to model the cellular and molecular changes in erythroid cells observed in true microgravity.

  1. Archiving Microgravity Flight Data and Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    To obtain help in evaluating its current strategy for archiving data and samples obtained in microgravity research, NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) asked the Space Studies Board's Committee on Microgravity Research for guidance on the following questions: What data should be archived and where should it be kept? In what form should the data be maintained (electronic files, photographs, hard copy, samples)? What should the general format of the database be? To what extent should it be universally accessible and through what mechanisms? Should there be a period of time for which principal investigators have proprietary access? If so, how long should proprietary data be stored? What provisions should be made for data obtained from ground-based experiments? What should the deadline be for investigators placing their data in the archive? How long should data be saved? How long should data be easily accessible? As a prelude to making recommendations for optimum selection and storage of microgravity data and samples, the committee in this report briefly describes NASA's past archiving practices and outlines MSAD's current archiving strategy. Although the committee found that only a limited number of experiments have thus far been archived, it concluded that the general archiving strategy, characterized by MSAD as minimalist, appears viable. A central focus of attention is the Experiment Data Management Plan (EDMP), MSAD's recently instituted data management and archiving framework for flight experiments. Many of the report's recommendations are aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of the EDMP approach, which the committee regards as an appropriate data management method for MSAD. Other recommendations provide guidance on broader issues related to the questions listed above. This report does not address statutory or regulatory records retention requirements.

  2. Effects of microgravity on osteoblast growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Tjandrawinata, R.; Fitzgerald, J.; Gasuad, K.; Gilbertson, V.

    1998-01-01

    Studies from space flights over the past two decades have demonstrated that basic physiological changes occur in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalic fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known and until recently, the general approach was to investigate general systemic changes, not basic cellular responses to microgravity. Recently analyzed data from the 1973-1974 Skylabs disclose that there is a rise in the systemic hormone, cortisol, which may play a role in bone loss in flight. In two flights where bone growth was measured (Skylabs 3 and 4), the crew members had a significant loss of calcium accompanied by a rise in 24 hour urinary cortisol during the entire flight period. In ground-based work on osteoblasts, we have demonstrated that equivalent amounts of glucocorticoids can inhibit osteoblast cell growth. In addition, this laboratory has recently studied gene growth and activation of mouse osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) during spaceflight. Osteoblast cells were grown on glass coverslips, loaded in the Biorack plunger boxes 18 hours before launch and activated 19 hours after launch in the Biorack incubator under microgravity conditions. The osteoblasts were launched in a serum deprived state, activated and collected in microgravity. Samples were collected at 29 hours after sera activation (0-g, n=4; 1-g, n=4). The osteoblasts were examined for changes in gene expression and cell morphology. Approximately one day after growth activation, remarkable differences were observed in gene expression in 0-g and 1-g flight samples. The 0-g activated cells had increased c-fos mRNA when compared to flight 1-g controls. The message of immediate early growth gene, cox-2 was decreased in the microgravity activated cells when compared to ground or 1-g flight controls. Cox-1 was not

  3. Effects of microgravity on osteoblast growth.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Fulford, M; Tjandrawinata, R; Fitzgerald, J; Gasuad, K; Gilbertson, V

    1998-05-01

    Studies from space flights over the past two decades have demonstrated that basic physiological changes occur in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalic fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known and until recently, the general approach was to investigate general systemic changes, not basic cellular responses to microgravity. Recently analyzed data from the 1973-1974 Skylabs disclose that there is a rise in the systemic hormone, cortisol, which may play a role in bone loss in flight. In two flights where bone growth was measured (Skylabs 3 and 4), the crew members had a significant loss of calcium accompanied by a rise in 24 hour urinary cortisol during the entire flight period. In ground-based work on osteoblasts, we have demonstrated that equivalent amounts of glucocorticoids can inhibit osteoblast cell growth. In addition, this laboratory has recently studied gene growth and activation of mouse osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) during spaceflight. Osteoblast cells were grown on glass coverslips, loaded in the Biorack plunger boxes 18 hours before launch and activated 19 hours after launch in the Biorack incubator under microgravity conditions. The osteoblasts were launched in a serum deprived state, activated and collected in microgravity. Samples were collected at 29 hours after sera activation (0-g, n=4; 1-g, n=4). The osteoblasts were examined for changes in gene expression and cell morphology. Approximately one day after growth activation, remarkable differences were observed in gene expression in 0-g and 1-g flight samples. The 0-g activated cells had increased c-fos mRNA when compared to flight 1-g controls. The message of immediate early growth gene, cox-2 was decreased in the microgravity activated cells when compared to ground or 1-g flight controls. Cox-1 was not

  4. Effects of microgravity on osteoblast growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Tjandrawinata, R.; Fitzgerald, J.; Gasuad, K.; Gilbertson, V.

    1998-01-01

    Studies from space flights over the past two decades have demonstrated that basic physiological changes occur in humans during space flight. These changes include cephalic fluid shifts, loss of fluid and electrolytes, loss of muscle mass, space motion sickness, anemia, reduced immune response, and loss of calcium and mineralized bone. The cause of most of these manifestations is not known and until recently, the general approach was to investigate general systemic changes, not basic cellular responses to microgravity. Recently analyzed data from the 1973-1974 Skylabs disclose that there is a rise in the systemic hormone, cortisol, which may play a role in bone loss in flight. In two flights where bone growth was measured (Skylabs 3 and 4), the crew members had a significant loss of calcium accompanied by a rise in 24 hour urinary cortisol during the entire flight period. In ground-based work on osteoblasts, we have demonstrated that equivalent amounts of glucocorticoids can inhibit osteoblast cell growth. In addition, this laboratory has recently studied gene growth and activation of mouse osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) during spaceflight. Osteoblast cells were grown on glass coverslips, loaded in the Biorack plunger boxes 18 hours before launch and activated 19 hours after launch in the Biorack incubator under microgravity conditions. The osteoblasts were launched in a serum deprived state, activated and collected in microgravity. Samples were collected at 29 hours after sera activation (0-g, n=4; 1-g, n=4). The osteoblasts were examined for changes in gene expression and cell morphology. Approximately one day after growth activation, remarkable differences were observed in gene expression in 0-g and 1-g flight samples. The 0-g activated cells had increased c-fos mRNA when compared to flight 1-g controls. The message of immediate early growth gene, cox-2 was decreased in the microgravity activated cells when compared to ground or 1-g flight controls. Cox-1 was not

  5. Machining in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Graylan

    2003-01-01

    A CNC mill was flown aboard NASA's KC-135 ``Weightless Wonder'' microgravity research aircraft to investigate the effect of gravity on the machining process and to demonstrate the feasibility and functionality of a CNC mill in a weightless environment, such as aboard the International Space Station. The experiment hypothesis was that the surface roughness of milling cuts made in microgravity would be of higher quality than cuts made in a gravitational environment due to increased chip removal. The technical problems associated with microgravity machining (such as the chip removal and collection process), and the engineering solutions to these problems were also evaluated in this experiment.

  6. Microgravity ignition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motevalli, Vahid; Elliott, William; Garrant, Keith

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a flight ready apparatus of the microgravity ignition experiment for the GASCan 2 program. This involved redesigning, testing, and making final modifications to the existing apparatus. The microgravity ignition experiment is intended to test the effect of microgravity on the time to ignition of a sample of alpha-cellulose paper. An infrared heat lamp is used to heat the paper sample within a sealed canister. The interior of the canister was redesigned to increase stability and minimize conductive heat transfer to the sample. This design was fabricated and tested and a heat transfer model of the paper sample was developed.

  7. Fundamental results from microgravity cell experiments with possible commericial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, Charles M.; Fast, Thomas N.; Hinds, Williams E.; Schaefer, R. L.; Callahan, Paul X.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the major milestones are presented for studies in cell biology that were conducted by the Soviet Union and the United States in the upper layers of the atmosphere and in outer space for more than thirty-five years. The goals have changed as new knowledge is acquired and the priorities for the use of microgravity have shifted toward basic research and commercial applications. Certain details concerning the impact of microgravity on cell systems is presented. However, it needs to be emphasized that in planning and conducting microgravity experiments, there are some important prerequisites not normally taken into account. Apart from the required background knowledge of previous microgravity and ground-based experiments, the investigator should have the understanding of the hardware as a physical unit, the complete knowledge of its operation, the range of its capabilities and the anticipation of problems that may occur. Moreover, if the production of commercial products in space is to be manifested, data obtained from previous microgravity experiments must be used to optimize the design of flight hardware.

  8. Space transfer with ground-based laser/electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Stavnes, Mark; Oleson, Steve; Bozek, John

    1993-01-01

    A new method of providing power to space vehicles consists of using ground-based lasers to beam power to photovoltaic receivers in space. This can be used as a power source for electrically propelled orbital transfer vehicles.

  9. Challenges and Opportunities for Ground-based Helioseismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    I summarize the current status of ground-based helioseismic observations, in particular the two operational networks GONG and BiSON. I then discuss requirements for continued and future ground-based observations based on key science drivers, finishing with a discussion of SPRING, a proposed future high-spatial-resolution network that would provide helioseismic data and a broad range of synoptic data products.

  10. Microbial responses to microgravity and other low-shear environments.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Cheryl A; Ott, C Mark; Wilson, James W; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Pierson, Duane L

    2004-06-01

    Microbial adaptation to environmental stimuli is essential for survival. While several of these stimuli have been studied in detail, recent studies have demonstrated an important role for a novel environmental parameter in which microgravity and the low fluid shear dynamics associated with microgravity globally regulate microbial gene expression, physiology, and pathogenesis. In addition to analyzing fundamental questions about microbial responses to spaceflight, these studies have demonstrated important applications for microbial responses to a ground-based, low-shear stress environment similar to that encountered during spaceflight. Moreover, the low-shear growth environment sensed by microbes during microgravity of spaceflight and during ground-based microgravity analogue culture is relevant to those encountered during their natural life cycles on Earth. While no mechanism has been clearly defined to explain how the mechanical force of fluid shear transmits intracellular signals to microbial cells at the molecular level, the fact that cross talk exists between microbial signal transduction systems holds intriguing possibilities that future studies might reveal common mechanotransduction themes between these systems and those used to sense and respond to low-shear stress and changes in gravitation forces. The study of microbial mechanotransduction may identify common conserved mechanisms used by cells to perceive changes in mechanical and/or physical forces, and it has the potential to provide valuable insight for understanding mechanosensing mechanisms in higher organisms. This review summarizes recent and future research trends aimed at understanding the dynamic effects of changes in the mechanical forces that occur in microgravity and other low-shear environments on a wide variety of important microbial parameters.

  11. Microbial Responses to Microgravity and Other Low-Shear Environments

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Ott, C. Mark; Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Pierson, Duane L.

    2004-01-01

    Microbial adaptation to environmental stimuli is essential for survival. While several of these stimuli have been studied in detail, recent studies have demonstrated an important role for a novel environmental parameter in which microgravity and the low fluid shear dynamics associated with microgravity globally regulate microbial gene expression, physiology, and pathogenesis. In addition to analyzing fundamental questions about microbial responses to spaceflight, these studies have demonstrated important applications for microbial responses to a ground-based, low-shear stress environment similar to that encountered during spaceflight. Moreover, the low-shear growth environment sensed by microbes during microgravity of spaceflight and during ground-based microgravity analogue culture is relevant to those encountered during their natural life cycles on Earth. While no mechanism has been clearly defined to explain how the mechanical force of fluid shear transmits intracellular signals to microbial cells at the molecular level, the fact that cross talk exists between microbial signal transduction systems holds intriguing possibilities that future studies might reveal common mechanotransduction themes between these systems and those used to sense and respond to low-shear stress and changes in gravitation forces. The study of microbial mechanotransduction may identify common conserved mechanisms used by cells to perceive changes in mechanical and/or physical forces, and it has the potential to provide valuable insight for understanding mechanosensing mechanisms in higher organisms. This review summarizes recent and future research trends aimed at understanding the dynamic effects of changes in the mechanical forces that occur in microgravity and other low-shear environments on a wide variety of important microbial parameters. PMID:15187188

  12. Microbial Responses to Microgravity and Other Low-Shear Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Ott, C. Mark; Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Pierson, Duane L.

    2004-01-01

    Microbial adaptation to environmental stimuli is essential for survival. While several of these stimuli have been studied in detail, recent studies have demonstrated an important role for a novel environmental parameter in which microgravity and the low fluid shear dynamics associated with microgravity globally regulate microbial gene expression, physiology, and pathogenesis. In addition to analyzing fundamental questions about microbial responses to spaceflight, these studies have demonstrated important applications for microbial responses to a ground-based, low-shear stress environment similar to that encountered during spaceflight. Moreover, the low-shear growth environment sensed by microbes during microgravity of spaceflight and during ground-based microgravity analogue culture is relevant to those encountered during their natural life cycles on Earth. While no mechanism has been clearly defined to explain how the mechanical force of fluid shear transmits intracellular signals to microbial cells at the molecular level, the fact that cross talk exists between microbial signal transduction systems holds intriguing possibilities that future studies might reveal common mechanotransduction themes between these systems and those used to sense and respond to low-shear stress and changes in gravitation forces. The study of microbial mechanotransduction may identify common conserved mechanisms used by cells to perceive changes in mechanical and/or physical forces, and it has the potential to provide valuable insight for understanding mechanosensing mechanisms in higher organisms. This review summarizes recent and future research trends aimed at understanding the dynamic effects of changes in the mechanical forces that occur in microgravity and other low-shear environments on a wide variety of important microbial parameters.

  13. Microbial Responses to Microgravity and Other Low-Shear Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Ott, C. Mark; Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Pierson, Duane L.

    2004-01-01

    Microbial adaptation to environmental stimuli is essential for survival. While several of these stimuli have been studied in detail, recent studies have demonstrated an important role for a novel environmental parameter in which microgravity and the low fluid shear dynamics associated with microgravity globally regulate microbial gene expression, physiology, and pathogenesis. In addition to analyzing fundamental questions about microbial responses to spaceflight, these studies have demonstrated important applications for microbial responses to a ground-based, low-shear stress environment similar to that encountered during spaceflight. Moreover, the low-shear growth environment sensed by microbes during microgravity of spaceflight and during ground-based microgravity analogue culture is relevant to those encountered during their natural life cycles on Earth. While no mechanism has been clearly defined to explain how the mechanical force of fluid shear transmits intracellular signals to microbial cells at the molecular level, the fact that cross talk exists between microbial signal transduction systems holds intriguing possibilities that future studies might reveal common mechanotransduction themes between these systems and those used to sense and respond to low-shear stress and changes in gravitation forces. The study of microbial mechanotransduction may identify common conserved mechanisms used by cells to perceive changes in mechanical and/or physical forces, and it has the potential to provide valuable insight for understanding mechanosensing mechanisms in higher organisms. This review summarizes recent and future research trends aimed at understanding the dynamic effects of changes in the mechanical forces that occur in microgravity and other low-shear environments on a wide variety of important microbial parameters.

  14. Microgravity and Cell Biology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The lecture covers the rationale for cell based research in the space program, the coordinated role of physical forces in life processes, cellular responses to microgravity and environmental condit...

  15. Microgravity Simulation Facility (MSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The Microgravity Simulator Facility (MSF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was established to support visiting scientists for short duration studies utilizing a variety of microgravity simulator devices that negate the directional influence of the "g" vector (providing simulated conditions of micro or partial gravity). KSC gravity simulators can be accommodated within controlled environment chambers allowing investigators to customize and monitor environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, CO2, and light exposure.

  16. Microgravity strategic plan, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA agency-wide microgravity strategic plan is presented, and its research, applications, and commercialization for the 1990's is addressed. The plan presents an analysis of the current situation, identifies critical factors, and defines goals, objectives, and strategies, which are intended to: (1) provide a context for decision making; (2) assure realism in long-range planning and direction for hardware development; and (3) establish a framework for developing a national microgravity research plan.

  17. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  18. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  19. Sleep and vestibular adaptation: implications for function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobson, J. A.; Stickgold, R.; Pace-Schott, E. F.; Leslie, K. R.

    1998-01-01

    Optimal human performance depends upon integrated sensorimotor and cognitive functions, both of which are known to be exquisitely sensitive to loss of sleep. Under the microgravity conditions of space flight, adaptation of both sensorimotor (especially vestibular) and cognitive functions (especially orientation) must occur quickly--and be maintained--despite any concurrent disruptions of sleep that may be caused by microgravity itself, or by the uncomfortable sleeping conditions of the spacecraft. It is the three-way interaction between sleep quality, general work efficiency, and sensorimotor integration that is the subject of this paper and the focus of new work in our laboratory. To record sleep under field conditions including microgravity, we utilize a novel system called the Nightcap that we have developed and extensively tested on normal and sleep-disordered subjects. To perturb the vestibular system in ground-based studies, we utilize a variety of experimental conditions including optokinetic stimulation and both minifying and reversing goggle paradigms that have been extensively studied in relation to plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Using these techniques we will test the hypothesis that vestibular adaptation both provokes and is enhanced by REM sleep under both ground-based and space conditions. In this paper we describe preliminary results of some of our studies.

  20. Sleep and vestibular adaptation: implications for function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobson, J. A.; Stickgold, R.; Pace-Schott, E. F.; Leslie, K. R.

    1998-01-01

    Optimal human performance depends upon integrated sensorimotor and cognitive functions, both of which are known to be exquisitely sensitive to loss of sleep. Under the microgravity conditions of space flight, adaptation of both sensorimotor (especially vestibular) and cognitive functions (especially orientation) must occur quickly--and be maintained--despite any concurrent disruptions of sleep that may be caused by microgravity itself, or by the uncomfortable sleeping conditions of the spacecraft. It is the three-way interaction between sleep quality, general work efficiency, and sensorimotor integration that is the subject of this paper and the focus of new work in our laboratory. To record sleep under field conditions including microgravity, we utilize a novel system called the Nightcap that we have developed and extensively tested on normal and sleep-disordered subjects. To perturb the vestibular system in ground-based studies, we utilize a variety of experimental conditions including optokinetic stimulation and both minifying and reversing goggle paradigms that have been extensively studied in relation to plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Using these techniques we will test the hypothesis that vestibular adaptation both provokes and is enhanced by REM sleep under both ground-based and space conditions. In this paper we describe preliminary results of some of our studies.

  1. Microgravity science and applications bibliography, 1988 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) Bibliography is a compilation of government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low-gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes or with ground-based activities that provide supporting research. It encompasses literature published but not cited in the 1984 Revision and the literature which was published in the past year. Subdivisions of the bibliography include: electronic materials; metals, alloys, and composites; fluid dynamics and transports; biotechnology; glass and ceramics; and combustion. Also included are publications from the European, Soviet, and Japanese MSA programs. In addition, there is a list of patents and appendices providing a compilation of anonymously authored collections of reports and a cross reference index.

  2. Microgravity science and applications bibliography, 1987 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This edition of the Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) Bibliography is a compilation of Government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes or with ground based activities that provide supporting research. It encompasses literature published but not cited in the 1984 Revision and literature which has been published in the past year. Subdivisions of the bibliography include six major categories: Electronic Materials; Metals, Alloys, and Composites; Fluid Dynamics and Transport; Biotechnology; Glass and Ceramics; and Combustion. Also included are publications from the European, Soviet, and Japanese MSA programs. In addition, there is a list of patents and appendices providing a compilation of an anonymously authored collection of reports and a cross reference index.

  3. Microgravity science and applications bibliography, 1986 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This edition of the Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) Bibliography is a compilation of Government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low-gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes or ground-based activities providing supporting research. It encompasses literature published in FY-86 and part of FY-87 but not cited in the 1985 Revision, pending publications, and those submitted for publication during this time period. Subdivisions of the bibliography include six major categories: Electronic Materials, Metals, Alloys, and Combustion Science. Other categories include Experimental Technology and General Studies. Included are publications from the European and Soviet programs. In addition, there is a list of patents and a cross reference index.

  4. Microgravity science and applications bibliography, 1985 revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This edition of the Microgravity Science and Applications (MSA) Bibliography is a compilation of Government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low-gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes or with ground-based activities that provide supporting research. It encompasses literature published but not cited in the 1984 Revision and that literature which has been published in the past year. Subdivisions of the bibliography include six major categories: Electronic Materials; Metal, Alloys, and Composites; Fluid Dynamics and Transports; Biotechnology; Glass and Ceramics; and Combustion. Also included are publications from the European, Soviet, and Japanese MSA programs. In addition, there is a list of patents and appendices providing a compilation of anonymously authored collection of reports and a cross reference index.

  5. Microgravity Outreach and Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Rosenberg, Carla B.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Research Program has been actively developing classroom activities and educator's guides since the flight of the First United States Microgravity Laboratory. In addition, various brochures, posters, and exhibit materials have been produced for outreach efforts to the general public and to researchers outside of the program. These efforts are led by the Microgravity Research Outreach/Education team at Marshall Space Flight Center, with classroom material support from the K-12 Educational Program of The National Center for Microgravity Research on Fluids and Combustion (NCMR), general outreach material development by the Microgravity Outreach office at Hampton University, and electronic/media access coordinated by Marshall. The broad concept of the NCMR program is to develop a unique set of microgravity-related educational products that enable effective outreach to the pre-college community by supplementing existing mathematics, science, and technology curricula. The current thrusts of the program include summer teacher and high school internships during which participants help develop educational materials and perform research with NCMR and NASA scientists; a teacher sabbatical program which allows a teacher to concentrate on a major educational product during a full school year; frequent educator workshops held at NASA and at regional and national teachers conferences; a nascent student drop tower experiment competition; presentations and demonstrations at events that also reach the general public; and the development of elementary science and middle school mathematics classroom products. An overview of existing classroom products will be provided, along with a list of pertinent World Wide Web URLs. Demonstrations of some hands on activities will show the audience how simple it can be to bring microgravity into the classroom.

  6. Microgravity Outreach and Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Rosenberg, Carla B.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Research Program has been actively developing classroom activities and educator's guides since the flight of the First United States Microgravity Laboratory. In addition, various brochures, posters, and exhibit materials have been produced for outreach efforts to the general public and to researchers outside of the program. These efforts are led by the Microgravity Research Outreach/Education team at Marshall Space Flight Center, with classroom material support from the K-12 Educational Program of The National Center for Microgravity Research on Fluids and Combustion (NCMR), general outreach material development by the Microgravity Outreach office at Hampton University, and electronic/media access coordinated by Marshall. The broad concept of the NCMR program is to develop a unique set of microgravity-related educational products that enable effective outreach to the pre-college community by supplementing existing mathematics, science, and technology curricula. The current thrusts of the program include summer teacher and high school internships during which participants help develop educational materials and perform research with NCMR and NASA scientists; a teacher sabbatical program which allows a teacher to concentrate on a major educational product during a full school year; frequent educator workshops held at NASA and at regional and national teachers conferences; a nascent student drop tower experiment competition; presentations and demonstrations at events that also reach the general public; and the development of elementary science and middle school mathematics classroom products. An overview of existing classroom products will be provided, along with a list of pertinent World Wide Web URLs. Demonstrations of some hands on activities will show the audience how simple it can be to bring microgravity into the classroom.

  7. Germination of Arabidopsis Seed in Space and in Simulated Microgravity: Alterations in Root Cell Growth and Proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Ana I.; Matía, Isabel; González-Camacho, Fernando; Carnero-Díaz, Eugénie; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; Dijkstra, Camelia; Larkin, Oliver; Anthony, Paul; Davey, Michael R.; Marco, Roberto; Medina, F. Javier

    2009-11-01

    Changes have been reported in the pattern of gene expression in Arabidopsis on exposure to microgravity. Plant cell growth and proliferation are functions that are potentially affected by such changes in gene expression. In the present investigation, the cell proliferation rate, the regulation of cell cycle progression and the rate of ribosome biogenesis (this latter taken to estimate cell growth) have been studied using morphometric markers or parameters evaluated by light and electron microscopy in real microgravity on the International Space Station (ISS) and in ground-based simulated microgravity, using the Random Positioning Machine and the Magnetic Levitation Instrument. Results showed enhanced cell proliferation but depleted cell growth in both real and simulated microgravity, indicating that the two processes are uncoupled, unlike the situation under normal gravity on Earth in which they are strictly co-ordinated events. It is concluded that microgravity is an important stress condition for plant cells compared to normal ground gravity conditions.

  8. Scaffold-free Tissue Formation Under Real and Simulated Microgravity Conditions.

    PubMed

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Slumstrup, Lasse; Wehland, Markus; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-10-01

    Scaffold-free tissue formation in microgravity is a new method in regenerative medicine and an important topic in Space Medicine. In this MiniReview, we focus on recent findings in the field of tissue engineering that were observed by exposing cells to real microgravity in space or to devices simulating to at least some extent microgravity conditions on Earth (ground-based facilities). Under both conditions - real and simulated microgravity - a part of the cultured cells of various populations detaches from the bottom of a culture flask. The cells form three-dimensional (3D) aggregates resembling the organs from which the cells have been derived. As spaceflights are rare and extremely expensive, cell culture under simulated microgravity allows more comprehensive and frequent studies on the scaffold-free 3D tissue formation in some aspects, as a number of publications have proven during the last two decades. In this MiniReview, we summarize data from our own studies and work from various researchers about tissue engineering of multi-cellular spheroids formed by cancer cells, tube formation by endothelial cells and cartilage formation by exposing the cells to ground-based facilities such as the 3D Random Positioning Machine (RPM), the 2D Fast-Rotating Clinostat (FRC) or the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV). Subsequently, we investigated self-organization of 3D aggregates without scaffolds pursuing to enhance the frequency of 3D formation and to enlarge the size of the organ-like aggregates. The density of the monolayer exposed to real or simulated microgravity as well as the composition of the culture media revealed an impact on the results. Genomic and proteomic alterations were induced by simulated microgravity. Under microgravity conditions, adherent cells expressed other genes than cells grown in spheroids. In this MiniReview, the recent improvements in scaffold-free tissue formation are summarized and relationships between phenotypic and molecular appearance are

  9. The US Microgravity Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Robin

    2001-01-01

    Contents include the following: space science; earth science; human exploration and development of space; aerospace technology; and biological physical research; microgravity research strategic; microgravity research; space shuttle flight operations; and international space station preparation

  10. Ground Base Skylab Electron Beam Welds in Tantalum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of ground-based (left) and Skylab (right) electron beam welds in pure tantalum (Ta) (10X magnification). Residual votices left behind in the ground-based sample after the electron beam passed were frozen into the grain structure. These occurred because of the rapid cooling rate at the high temperature. Although the thermal characteristics and electron beam travel speeds were comparable for the skylab sample, the residual vortices were erased in the grain structure. This may have been due to the fact that final grain size of the solidified material was smaller in the Skylab sample compared to the ground-based sample. The Skylab sample was processed in the M512 Materials Processing Facility (MPF) during Skylab SL-2 Mission. Principal Investigator was Richard Poorman.

  11. Microgravity Environment Description Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; McPherson, Kevin; Hrovat, Kenneth; Moskowitz, Milton; Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    The Microgravity Measurement and Analysis Project (MMAP) at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) manages the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) and the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) instruments to measure the microgravity environment on orbiting space laboratories. These laboratories include the Spacelab payloads on the shuttle, the SPACEHAB module on the shuttle, the middeck area of the shuttle, and Russia's Mir space station. Experiments are performed in these laboratories to investigate scientific principles in the near-absence of gravity. The microgravity environment desired for most experiments would have zero acceleration across all frequency bands or a true weightless condition. This is not possible due to the nature of spaceflight where there are numerous factors which introduce accelerations to the environment. This handbook presents an overview of the major microgravity environment disturbances of these laboratories. These disturbances are characterized by their source (where known), their magnitude, frequency and duration, and their effect on the microgravity environment. Each disturbance is characterized on a single page for ease in understanding the effect of a particular disturbance. The handbook also contains a brief description of each laboratory.

  12. The Biophysics Microgravity Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, S.

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical microgravity research on the International Space Station using biological materials has been ongoing for several decades. The well-documented substantive effects of long duration microgravity include the facilitation of the assembly of biological macromolecules into large structures, e.g., formation of large protein crystals under micro-gravity. NASA is invested not only in understanding the possible physical mechanisms of crystal growth, but also promoting two flight investigations to determine the influence of µ-gravity on protein crystal quality. In addition to crystal growth, flight investigations to determine the effects of shear on nucleation and subsequent formation of complex structures (e.g., crystals, fibrils, etc.) are also supported. It is now considered that long duration microgravity research aboard the ISS could also make possible the formation of large complex biological and biomimetic materials. Investigations of various materials undergoing complex structure formation in microgravity will not only strengthen NASA science programs, but may also provide invaluable insight towards the construction of large complex tissues, organs, or biomimetic materials on Earth.

  13. Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Gilbert J. (Editor); Greenberg, Paul S. (Editor); Piltch, Nancy D. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Through the Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) of the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) at NASA Headquarters, a program entitled, Advanced Technology Development (ATD) was promulgated with the objective of providing advanced technologies that will enable the development of future microgravity science and applications experimental flight hardware. Among the ATD projects one, Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics (MCD), has the objective of developing advanced diagnostic techniques and technologies to provide nonperturbing measurements of combustion characteristics and parameters that will enhance the scientific integrity and quality of microgravity combustion experiments. As part of the approach to this project, a workshop was held on July 28 and 29, 1987, at the NASA Lewis Research Center. A small group of laser combustion diagnosticians met with a group of microgravity combustion experimenters to discuss the science requirements, the state-of-the-art of laser diagnostic technology, and plan the direction for near-, intermediate-, and long-term programs. This publication describes the proceedings of that workshop.

  14. ARADISH - Development of a Standardized Plant Growth Chamber for Experiments in Gravitational Biology Using Ground Based Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, Oliver; Krause, Lars; Görög, Mark; Hauslage, Jens; Kesseler, Leona; Böhmer, Maik; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    Plant development strongly relies on environmental conditions. Growth of plants in Biological Life Support Systems (BLSS), which are a necessity to allow human survival during long-term space exploration missions, poses a particular problem for plant growth, as in addition to the traditional environmental factors, microgravity (or reduced gravity such as on Moon or Mars) and limited gas exchange hamper plant growth. Studying the effects of reduced gravity on plants requires real or simulated microgravity experiments under highly standardized conditions, in order to avoid the influence of other environmental factors. Analysis of a large number of biological replicates, which is necessary for the detection of subtle phenotypical differences, can so far only be achieved in Ground Based Facilities (GBF). Besides different experimental conditions, the usage of a variety of different plant growth chambers was a major factor that led to a lack of reproducibility and comparability in previous studies. We have developed a flexible and customizable plant growth chamber, called ARAbidopsis DISH (ARADISH), which allows plant growth from seed to seedling, being realized in a hydroponic system or on Agar. By developing a special holder, the ARADISH can be used for experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana or a plant with a similar habitus on common GBF hardware, including 2D clinostats and Random Positioning Machines (RPM). The ARADISH growth chamber has a controlled illumination system of red and blue light emitting diodes (LED), which allows the user to apply defined light conditions. As a proof of concept we tested a prototype in a proteomic experiment in which plants were exposed to simulated microgravity or a 90° stimulus. We optimized the design and performed viability tests after several days of growth in the hardware that underline the utility of ARADISH in microgravity research.

  15. Microgravity Stress: Bone and Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Susan A; Martinez, Daniel A; Boudreaux, Ramon D; Mantri, Anita V

    2016-03-15

    The major alterations in bone and the dense connective tissues in humans and animals exposed to microgravity illustrate the dependency of these tissues' function on normal gravitational loading. Whether these alterations depend solely on the reduced mechanical loading of zero g or are compounded by fluid shifts, altered tissue blood flow, radiation exposure, and altered nutritional status is not yet well defined. Changes in the dense connective tissues and intervertebral disks are generally smaller in magnitude but occur more rapidly than those in mineralized bone with transitions to 0 g and during recovery once back to the loading provided by 1 g conditions. However, joint injuries are projected to occur much more often than the more catastrophic bone fracture during exploration class missions, so protecting the integrity of both tissues is important. This review focuses on the research performed over the last 20 years in humans and animals exposed to actual spaceflight, as well as on knowledge gained from pertinent ground-based models such as bed rest in humans and hindlimb unloading in rodents. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms for alterations in bone and connective tissues with exposure to microgravity, but intriguing questions remain to be solved, particularly with reference to biomedical risks associated with prolonged exploration missions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D; Pride, M W; Brown, E L; Risin, D; Pellis, N R

    2001-02-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  17. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pride, M. W.; Brown, E. L.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  18. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pride, M. W.; Brown, E. L.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  19. Ground-based laser radar measurements of satellite vibrations.

    PubMed

    Schultz, K I; Fisher, S

    1992-12-20

    Vibration signatures from the low-power atmospheric compensation (LACE) satellite are obtained by using the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Firepond coherent CO(2) laser radar facility located in Westford, Mass. The LACE satellite is equipped with IR germanium retroreflectors on deployable/retractable booms to enhance ground-based IR laser radar measurements of on-orbit boom vibrations. Analysis of pulsed cw laser radar measurements of the satellite during and subsequent to boom retraction indicates the presence of a complex time-varying model structure. The observed vibration spectra include vibration modes not previously predicted. These data represent the first observations of satellite vibration modes from a ground-based laser radar.

  20. Fluctuations in diffusion processes in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Stefano; Cerbino, Roberto; Vailati, Alberto; Giglio, Marzio

    2006-09-01

    It has been shown recently that diffusion processes exhibit giant nonequilibrium fluctuations (NEFs). That is, the diffusing fronts display corrugations whose length scale ranges from the molecular to the macroscopic one. The amplitude of the NEF diverges following a power law behavior proportional to q(-4) (where q is the wave vector). However, fluctuations of wave number smaller than a critical "rolloff" wave vector are quenched by the presence of gravity. It is therefore expected that in microgravity conditions, the amplitude of the NEF should be boosted by the absence of the buoyancy-driven restoring force. This may affect any diffusion process performed in microgravity, such as the crystallization of a protein solution induced by the diffusion of a salt buffer. The aim of GRADFLEX (GRAdient-Driven FLuctuation EXperiment), a joint project of ESA and NASA, is to investigate the presence of NEFs arising in a diffusion process under microgravity conditions. The project consists of two experiments. One is carried out by UNIMI (University of Milan) and INFM (Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia) and is focused on NEF in a concentration diffusion process. The other experiment is performed by UCSB (University of California at Santa Barbara) concerning temperature NEF in a simple fluid. In the UNIMI part of the GRADFLEX experimental setup, NEFs are induced in a binary mixture by means of the Soret effect. The diagnostic method is an all-optical quantitative shadowgraph technique. The power spectrum of the induced NEFs is obtained by the processing of the shadowgraph images. A detailed description of the experimental apparatus as well as the ground-based experimental results is presented here for the UNIMI-INFM experiment. The GRADFLEX payload is scheduled to fly on the FOTON M3 capsule in April 2007.