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Sample records for groundnut bud necrosis

  1. Nematode parasites of groundnut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Groundnut is the common name for several leguminous plant species producing seed that mature underground, including Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranean), Hausa groundnut (Macrotyloma geocarpum), and peanut (Arachis spp.). Hausa groundnut is cultivated as a food crop primarily in West Africa and t...

  2. Management of diseases caused by thrips-transmitted tospoviruses in subsistence agriculture: the case of Peanut bud necrosis virus in India

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Among the tospoviruses (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) reported in India, Peanut bud necrosis virus is by far the most economically significant for tomato production in subsistence agriculture. Management of PBNV has been a challenge for farmers due to the broad host-range of PBNV and its ve...

  3. Necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Necrosis is the death of body tissue. It occurs when too little blood flows to the tissue. This can be from injury, radiation, or chemicals. Necrosis cannot be reversed. When large ...

  4. Groundnut Ringspot Virus in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tospoviruses in vegetable crops are difficult to manage due to a shortage of basic information about the viruses and their vectors. This is especially true for the recently detected Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV). This publication presents all current knowledge of GRSV in Florida....

  5. Aspergillus and aflatoxin in groundnuts (Arachis hypogaea L.) and groundnut cake in Eastern Ethiopia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important cash and food crop in eastern Ethiopia. The lack of awareness and data on Aspergillus and aflatoxin contamination of groundnut and groundnut food products in the area are lacking. Therefore, this study was conducted to: i) assess major Aspergillus spec...

  6. Social Network Structures among Groundnut Farmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thuo, Mary; Bell, Alexandra A.; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Okello, David K.; Okoko, Evelyn Nasambu; Kidula, Nelson L.; Deom, C. Michael; Puppala, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Groundnut farmers in East Africa have experienced declines in production despite research and extension efforts to increase productivity. This study examined how social network structures related to acquisition of information about new seed varieties and productivity among groundnut farmers in Uganda and Kenya.…

  7. Social Network Structures among Groundnut Farmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thuo, Mary; Bell, Alexandra A.; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Okello, David K.; Okoko, Evelyn Nasambu; Kidula, Nelson L.; Deom, C. Michael; Puppala, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Groundnut farmers in East Africa have experienced declines in production despite research and extension efforts to increase productivity. This study examined how social network structures related to acquisition of information about new seed varieties and productivity among groundnut farmers in Uganda and Kenya.…

  8. Aspergillus and aflatoxin in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and groundnut cake in Eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Abdi; Chala, Alemayehu; Dejene, Mashilla; Fininsa, Chemeda; Hoisington, David A; Sobolev, Victor S; Arias, Renee S

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess major Aspergillus species and aflatoxins associated with groundnut seeds and cake in Eastern Ethiopia and evaluate growers' management practices. A total of 160 groundnut seed samples from farmers' stores and 50 groundnut cake samples from cafe and restaurants were collected. Fungal isolation was done from groundnut seed samples. Aspergillus flavus was the dominant species followed by Aspergillus parasiticus. Aflatoxin analyses of groundnut seed samples were performed using ultra performance liquid chromatography; 22.5% and 41.3% of samples were positive, with total aflatoxin concentrations of 786 and 3135 ng g(-1) from 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 samples, respectively. The level of specific aflatoxin concentration varied between 0.1 and 2526 ng g(-1) for B2 and B1, respectively. Among contaminated samples of groundnut cake, 68% exhibited aflatoxin concentration below 20 ng g(-1), while as high as 158 ng g(-1) aflatoxin B1 was recorded. The study confirms high contamination of groundnut products in East Ethiopia.

  9. Arenavirus Budding

    PubMed Central

    Urata, Shuzo; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever disease in humans and pose a significant public health concern in their endemic regions. On the other hand, the prototypic arenavirus LCMV is a superb workhorse for the investigation of virus-host interactions and associated disease. The arenavirus small RING finger protein called Z has been shown to be the main driving force of virus budding. The budding activity of Z is mediated by late (L) domain motifs, PT/SAP, and PPXY, located at the C-terminus of Z. This paper will present the current knowledge on arenavirus budding including the diversity of L domain motifs used by different arenaviruses. We will also discuss how improved knowledge of arenavirus budding may facilitate the development of novel antiviral strategies to combat human pathogenic arenaviruses. PMID:22312335

  10. Simultaneous detection of groundnut rosette assistor virus (GRAV), groundnut rosette virus (GRV) and satellite RNA (satRNA) in groundnuts using multiplex RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Anitha, S; Monyo, E S; Okori, P

    2014-11-01

    Groundnut rosette disease (GRD) is the most devastating disease of groundnuts in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is caused by synergistic interactions between viruses and virus-like pathogens: groundnut rosette assistor virus (GRAV), groundnut rosette virus (GRV) and a satellite RNA (satRNA). The multi-pathogenic nature of GRD requires efficient diagnostic systems for plant breeding and pathology work. Currently, TAS-ELISA and RT-PCR are used to detect all three pathogens. This approach is time-consuming, expensive and not easily amenable to high throughput. A multiplex PCR-based approach was developed to detect all three pathogens at once, reducing diagnostics costs and time by two thirds. The technique is highly robust and amenable to high throughput, with sensitivity and specificity values of 88 % and 100 %, respectively. The positive predictive value for the technique is 100 %, and the negative predictive value is 90.6 %.

  11. Genetics of a dwarf mutant in groundnut.

    PubMed

    Patil, S H; Mouli, C

    1975-01-01

    A spontaneous dwarf mutant of groundnut variety, Kopergaon-3, showed differential expression for plant height and secondary branching characters in the reciprocal F1 populations. These differences were assumed to be due to the interaction of nuclear and cytoplasmic factors which mutated with dwarfness.Segregation for dwarfness in the F2 and F3 generations confirmed the monogenic inheritance. The mutant expression was, therefore, controlled by a pair of recessive factors designated d(v)d(v), indicating dwarfism in the Valencia group.

  12. Genomic Tools in Groundnut Breeding Program: Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Janila, P; Variath, Murali T; Pandey, Manish K; Desmae, Haile; Motagi, Babu N; Okori, Patrick; Manohar, Surendra S; Rathnakumar, A L; Radhakrishnan, T; Liao, Boshou; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    Groundnut, a nutrient-rich food legume, is cultivated world over. It is valued for its good quality cooking oil, energy and protein rich food, and nutrient-rich fodder. Globally, groundnut improvement programs have developed varieties to meet the preferences of farmers, traders, processors, and consumers. Enhanced yield, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses and quality parameters have been the target traits. Spurt in genetic information of groundnut was facilitated by development of molecular markers, genetic, and physical maps, generation of expressed sequence tags (EST), discovery of genes, and identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for some important biotic and abiotic stresses and quality traits. The first groundnut variety developed using marker assisted breeding (MAB) was registered in 2003. Since then, USA, China, Japan, and India have begun to use genomic tools in routine groundnut improvement programs. Introgression lines that combine foliar fungal disease resistance and early maturity were developed using MAB. Establishment of marker-trait associations (MTA) paved way to integrate genomic tools in groundnut breeding for accelerated genetic gain. Genomic Selection (GS) tools are employed to improve drought tolerance and pod yield, governed by several minor effect QTLs. Draft genome sequence and low cost genotyping tools such as genotyping by sequencing (GBS) are expected to accelerate use of genomic tools to enhance genetic gains for target traits in groundnut.

  13. Genomic Tools in Groundnut Breeding Program: Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Janila, P.; Variath, Murali T.; Pandey, Manish K.; Desmae, Haile; Motagi, Babu N.; Okori, Patrick; Manohar, Surendra S.; Rathnakumar, A. L.; Radhakrishnan, T.; Liao, Boshou; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Groundnut, a nutrient-rich food legume, is cultivated world over. It is valued for its good quality cooking oil, energy and protein rich food, and nutrient-rich fodder. Globally, groundnut improvement programs have developed varieties to meet the preferences of farmers, traders, processors, and consumers. Enhanced yield, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses and quality parameters have been the target traits. Spurt in genetic information of groundnut was facilitated by development of molecular markers, genetic, and physical maps, generation of expressed sequence tags (EST), discovery of genes, and identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for some important biotic and abiotic stresses and quality traits. The first groundnut variety developed using marker assisted breeding (MAB) was registered in 2003. Since then, USA, China, Japan, and India have begun to use genomic tools in routine groundnut improvement programs. Introgression lines that combine foliar fungal disease resistance and early maturity were developed using MAB. Establishment of marker-trait associations (MTA) paved way to integrate genomic tools in groundnut breeding for accelerated genetic gain. Genomic Selection (GS) tools are employed to improve drought tolerance and pod yield, governed by several minor effect QTLs. Draft genome sequence and low cost genotyping tools such as genotyping by sequencing (GBS) are expected to accelerate use of genomic tools to enhance genetic gains for target traits in groundnut. PMID:27014312

  14. Groundnut improvement: use of genetic and genomic tools

    PubMed Central

    Janila, Pasupuleti; Nigam, S. N.; Pandey, Manish K.; Nagesh, P.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2013-01-01

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.), a self-pollinated legume is an important crop cultivated in 24 million ha world over for extraction of edible oil and food uses. The kernels are rich in oil (48–50%) and protein (25–28%), and are source of several vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, biologically active polyphenols, flavonoids, and isoflavones. Improved varieties of groundnut with high yield potential were developed and released for cultivation world over. The improved varieties belong to different maturity durations and possess resistance to diseases, tolerance to drought, enhanced oil content, and improved quality traits for food uses. Conventional breeding procedures along with the tools for phenotyping were largely used in groundnut improvement programs. Mutations were used to induce variability and wide hybridization was attempted to tap variability from wild species. Low genetic variability has been a bottleneck for groundnut improvement. The vast potential of wild species, reservoir of new alleles remains under-utilized. Development of linkage maps of groundnut during the last decade was followed by identification of markers and quantitative trait loci for the target traits. Consequently, the last decade has witnessed the deployment of molecular breeding approaches to complement the ongoing groundnut improvement programs in USA, China, India, and Japan. The other potential advantages of molecular breeding are the feasibility to target multiple traits for improvement and provide tools to tap new alleles from wild species. The first groundnut variety developed through marker-assisted back-crossing is a root-knot nematode-resistant variety, NemaTAM in USA. The uptake of molecular breeding approaches in groundnut improvement programs by NARS partners in India and many African countries is slow or needs to be initiated in part due to inadequate infrastructure, high genotyping costs, and human capacities. Availability of draft genome sequence for diploid (AA and

  15. What Are Taste Buds?

    MedlinePlus

    ... taste buds all the credit for your favorite flavors, it's important to thank your nose . Olfactory (say: ... with your taste buds to create the true flavor of that yummy slice of pizza by telling ...

  16. Fat necrosis.

    PubMed

    Canteli, B; Saez, F; de los Ríos, A; Alvarez, C

    1996-04-01

    We report the MR appearance of a case of subcutaneous fat necrosis, which is a previously unreported etiology for knee mass. The role of MR imaging in differentiating fat necrosis from other causes of soft tissue masses is discussed. We conclude that MR characteristics of subcutaneous fat necrosis are typical and allow its differentiation from other types of soft tissue lesions.

  17. Corrosion inhibition property of polyester-groundnut shell biodegradable composite.

    PubMed

    Sounthari, P; Kiruthika, A; Saranya, J; Parameswari, K; Chitra, S

    2016-12-01

    The use of natural fibers as reinforcing materials in thermoplastics and thermoset matrix composites provide optimistic environmental profits with regard to ultimate disposability and better use of raw materials. The present work is focused on the corrosion inhibition property of a polymer matrix composite produced by the use of groundnut shell (GNS) waste. Polyester (PE) was synthesized by condensation polymerization of symmetrical 1,3,4-oxadiazole and pimelic acid using sodium lauryl sulfate as surfactant. The polyester-groundnut shell composite (PEGNS) was prepared by ultrasonication method. The synthesized polyester-groundnut shell composite was characterized by FT-IR, TGA and XRD analysis. The corrosion inhibitory effect of PEGNS on mild steel in 1M H2SO4 was investigated using gravimetric method, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization, atomic absorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that PEGNS inhibited mild steel corrosion in acid solution and indicated that the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing inhibitor concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The composite inhibited the corrosion of mild steel through adsorption following the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Changes in the impedance parameters Rt, Cdl, Icorr, Ecorr, ba and bc suggested the adsorption of PEGNS onto the mild steel surface, leading to the formation of protective film.

  18. Use of sunlight to partially detoxify groundnut (peanut) cake flour and casein contaminated with aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Shantha, T.; Murthy, V.S.

    1981-03-01

    Sunlight destroyed 83 and 50% of the toxin added to casein and groundnut cake flour, respectively. Equilibrium dialysis revealed that both casein and groundnut protein bind aflatoxin but the toxin bound to casein appeared more photo-labile than that bound to groundnut protein.

  19. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and occupational health problems among groundnut farmers of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Banibrata; Ghosh, Tirthankar; Gangopadhyay, Somnath

    2013-12-01

    The main aim of the study was to determine the nature and extent of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and physiological and thermal working stress among the groundnut farmers. In the present investigation, eighty-five groundnut farmers were recruited from the villages of Tarakeswar of West Bengal, India. Eighty-five control office workers were also selected as a control group. The modified Nordic questionnaire and a posture analysis using the OWAS method were applied in the case of groundnut farmers. The working environment and physiological stress of the groundnut cultivators were also assessed. The analysis of working posture indicated that most of the groundnut cultivation activities needed corrective measures as soon as possible. Most of the groundnut farmers suffered from discomfort at different parts of the body, especially at the lower back (99%), knee (92%), ankle (66%), shoulder (61%) and hand (60%) regions. This study also showed that groundnut farmers suffered from excessive thermal (33.4 degrees C) and physiological stress (heart rate rose up to 121.5 beats/min, systolic and diastolic blood pressure up to 132 and 80 mm/Hg, respectively, PEFR values are 403 lit/min) which affects their health. From the observation and analysis of the results, it was concluded that the health of the groundnut farmers was highly affected by improper body postures and work-load. Twisting, bending, and awkward postures during work could lead to musculoskeletal disorders among them.

  20. Assessment of Adoption Gaps in Management of Aflatoxin Contamination of Groundnut ("Arachis Hypogaea" L.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, G. D. S.; Popat, M. N.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major impediments for diversification of groundnut ("Arachis Hypogaea" L.) as food crop is aflatoxin contamination. The study was conducted with an objective to assess the adoption gaps in aflatoxin management practices of groundnut (AMPG) and the farmer's characteristics influencing these gaps. The study used an expost-facto…

  1. Assessment of Adoption Gaps in Management of Aflatoxin Contamination of Groundnut ("Arachis Hypogaea" L.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, G. D. S.; Popat, M. N.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major impediments for diversification of groundnut ("Arachis Hypogaea" L.) as food crop is aflatoxin contamination. The study was conducted with an objective to assess the adoption gaps in aflatoxin management practices of groundnut (AMPG) and the farmer's characteristics influencing these gaps. The study used an expost-facto…

  2. What Are Taste Buds?

    MedlinePlus

    ... your taste buds for letting you appreciate the saltiness of pretzels and the sweetness of ice cream. ... allow you to experience tastes that are sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. How exactly do your taste ...

  3. Tropical Storm Bud

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  A Strengthening Eastern Pacific Storm     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) show then Tropical Storm Bud as it was intensifying toward hurricane status, which it acquired ...

  4. Laboratory evaluation of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae for the control of the groundnut bruchid, Caryedon serratus on groundnut.

    PubMed

    Ekesi, S; Egwurube, E A.; Akpa, A D.; Onu, I

    2001-10-01

    The pathogenicity of five isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae to adult Caryedon serratus was evaluated in the laboratory. All the isolates tested were virulent to the beetle but pathogenicity varied among the isolates. One isolate, CPD 4 was consistently superior to all other isolates in terms of mortality of the beetle, protection of groundnut pods from damage, reduction in progeny production and repellency to the beetle. At 10 days post-treatment, adult mortality treated with 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0g of dry conidia equivalent to 3.6x10(8), 1.8x10(9) and 3.6x10(9) conidia of isolate CPD 4 per 50g of groundnut pods was 100% which did not differ significantly from pirimiphos-methyl-treated pods at 10ppm. At the lowest dosage of 0.1g of conidia per 50g of pods, damage in pods protected with isolate CPD 4 was 5% which did not differ significantly from the 2% damage in pods protected by pirimiphos-methyl at 10ppm but significantly differed from damage in untreated pods which was 26%. Isolate CPD 4 caused complete reduction in progeny emergence at all dosages tested. It also exhibited some degree of repellency to the beetle with percentage repellency values of between 40-79% at concentrations of 0.1-1.0g of conidia per 50g of groundnut pods. These combined virulence and repellency characteristics of this isolate may increase its protectant potential against C. serratus.

  5. Effects of phosphorous fertilizer on growth and yield of groundnut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammed; Ismail B., S.

    2016-11-01

    The level of phosphorus (P) and the time of application are considered as two of the most important factors affecting crop growth and yield of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.). A field experiment was carried out at the greenhouse of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Malaysia, in 2014. The objective of the study was to find the best level and the timing of P application, with the aim of getting better growth and higher yield. A complete randomized design with three rates of P (27.5, 55 and 82.5 kg ha-1) were used. The dosage that gave the highest yield and growth was 82.5 kg ha-1 when P application was given at 7, 21, 42 and 60 days after sowing (DAS). The results show that the highest level of P (82.5 kg ha-1) at 7 DAS significantly increased plant height, number of nodules/plant, number of pods per plant, pod yield (kg ha-1), seed weight, oil content and shelling percentage. It can be concluded from the experiment that P fertilizer application at 82.5 kg ha-1 at 7 DAS was necessary for profitable groundnut production in the study area.

  6. Study of an Educational Hand Sorting Intervention for Reducing Aflatoxin B1 in Groundnuts in Rural Gambia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y A; Doel, Andrew; Watson, Sinead; Routledge, Michael N; Elliott, Christopher T; Moore, Sophie E; Gong, Yun Yun

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxin, a human liver carcinogen, frequently contaminates groundnuts, maize, rice, and other grains, especially in Africa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention that involved training rural Gambian women on how to identify and remove moldy groundnuts to reduce aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) contamination. In total, 25 women, recruited from the West Kiang region of The Gambia, were trained on how to recognize and remove moldy groundnuts. Market-purchased groundnuts were hand sorted by the women. Groundnuts were sampled at baseline (n =5), after hand sorting ("clean," n =25 and "moldy," n =25), and after roasting (n =5). All samples were analyzed for AFB1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A reduction of 42.9% was achieved based on the median AFB1 levels at baseline and after hand sorting (clean groundnuts), whereas an alternative estimate, based on the total AFB1 in moldy and clean groundnuts, indicated a reduction of 96.7%, with a loss of only 2% of the groundnuts. By roasting the already clean sorted groundnuts, the AFB1 reduction achieved (based on median levels) was 39.3%. This educational intervention on how to identify and remove moldy groundnuts was simple and effective in reducing AFB1 contamination.

  7. "Bud, Not Buddy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the award-winning book "Bud, Not Buddy" written by Christopher Paul Curtis. Lists different versions of the book; suggests learning activities; lists sources for biographical information and interviews with Curtis, teacher guides, professional articles, and other Depression era novels; and provides a citation for the author's…

  8. "Bud, Not Buddy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the award-winning book "Bud, Not Buddy" written by Christopher Paul Curtis. Lists different versions of the book; suggests learning activities; lists sources for biographical information and interviews with Curtis, teacher guides, professional articles, and other Depression era novels; and provides a citation for the author's…

  9. Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD)

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, Erika; Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank; Becker, Alex

    2007-01-01

    The Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD) is an optimally designed active electromagnetic system that not only detects but also characterizes UXO. The system incorporates three orthogonal transmitters and eight pairs of differenced receivers. it has two modes of operation: (1) search mode, in which BUD moves along a profile and exclusively detects targets in its vicinity, providing target depth and horizontal location, and (2) discrimination mode, in which BUD, stationary above a target, from a single position, determines three discriminating polarizability responses together with the object location and orientation. The performance of the system is governed by a target size-depth curve. Maximum detection depth is 1.5 m. While UXO objects have a single major polarizability coincident with the long axis of the object and two equal transverse polarizabilities, scrap metal has three different principal polarizabilities. The results clearly show that there are very clear distinctions between symmetric intact UXO and irregular scrap metal, and that BUD can resolve the intrinsic polarizabilities of the target. The field survey at the Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona showed excellent results within the predicted size-depth range.

  10. Aspergillus section Flavi community structure in Zambia influences aflatoxin contamination of Maize and Groundnut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aflatoxins are cancer-causing, immuno-suppressive mycotoxins that frequently contaminate important staples in Zambia including maize and groundnut. Several species within Aspergillus section Flavi have been implicated as causal agents of aflatoxin contamination in Africa. However, Aspergillus popula...

  11. Expansion of Groundnut ringspot virus host and geographic ranges in solanaceous vegetables in peninsular Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This report provides a timely account of Groundnut ringspot virus infection of additional hosts (pepper, tomatillo and eggplant) and in additional locations to growers, Extension personnel, crop consultants, and state and Federal regulatory and research scientists....

  12. How does a virus bud?

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, D M; Deutsch, J M; Oster, G F

    1993-01-01

    How does a virus bud from the plasma membrane of its host? Here we investigate several possible rate-limiting processes, including thermal fluctuations of the plasma membrane, hydrodynamic interactions, and diffusion of the glycoprotein spikes. We find that for bending moduli greater than 3 x 10(-13) ergs, membrane thermal fluctuations are insufficient to wrap the viral capsid, and the mechanical force driving the budding process must arise from some other process. If budding is limited by the rate at which glycoprotein spikes can diffuse to the budding site, we compute that the budding time is 10-20 min, in accord with the experimentally determined upper limit of 20 min. In light of this, we suggest some alternative mechanisms for budding and provide a rationale for the observation that budding frequently occurs in regions of high membrane curvature. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:8369463

  13. [HIV budding and Tsg101].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Jiro

    2005-12-01

    HIV, as well as many enveloped viruses, exits the cells by budding directly from the plasma membrane. HIV budding is dependent on a PTAP motif, which is located within the p6 domain of Gag. Recent studies have shown that the cellular protein Tsg101 binds to the PTAP L-domain motif of HIV p6 and facilitates the final stages of virus release. Tsg101 function in the cellular vacuolar protein sorting pathway, where they play central roles in selecting cargo for incorporation into vesicles that bud into the maturing endosome to create multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Vesicle budding into the MVB and viral budding at the plasma membrane are topologically equivalent, and the same machinery could catalyze both processes. It will be important to understand the mechanism of virus budding in detail, since virus budding may be a potential target for interference with HIV propagation.

  14. Strength Characteristics of Groundnut Leaf/Stem Ash (GLSA) Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oseni, O. W.; Audu, M. T.

    2016-09-01

    The compressive strength properties of concrete are substantial factors in the design and construction of concrete structures. Compressive strength directly affects the degree to which the concrete can be able to carry a load over time. These changes are complemented by deflections, cracks etc., in the structural elements of concrete. This research investigated the effect of groundnut leaf/stem ash (GLSA) on the compressive strength of concrete at 0%, 5 %, 10 % and 15 % replacements of cement. The effect of the water-cement ratio on properties such as the compressive strength, slump, flow and workability properties of groundnut leaf/stem ash (GLSA) mixes with OPC were evaluated to determine whether they are acceptable for use in concrete structural elements. A normal concrete mix with cement at 100 % (i.e., GLSA at 0%) with concrete grade C25 that can attain an average strength of 25 N/mm2 at 28 days was used as a control at design water-cement ratios of 0.65 and grading of (0.5-32) mm from fine to coarse aggregates was tested for: (1) compressive strength, and the (2) slump and flow Test. The results and observations showed that the concrete mixes from GLSA at 5 - 15 % ratios exhibit: pozzolanic properties and GLSA could be used as a partial replacement for cement at these percentage mix ratios compared with the control concrete; an increase in the water-cement ratio showed a significant decrease in the compressive strength and an increase in workability. Therefore, it is important that all concrete mixes exude an acceptably designed water-cement ratio for compressive strength characteristics for use in structures, water-cement ratio is a significant factor.

  15. Influenza virus morphogenesis and budding

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Debi P.; Balogun, Rilwan A.; Yamada, Hiroshi; Zhou, Z. Hong; Barman, Subrata

    2009-01-01

    Influenza viruses are enveloped, negative stranded, segmented RNA viruses belonging to Orthomyxoviridae family. Each virion consists of three major subviral components, namely (i) a viral envelope decorated with three transmembrane proteins hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and M2, (ii) an intermediate layer of matrix protein (M1), and (iii) an innermost helical viral ribonucleocapsid [vRNP] core formed by nucleoprotein (NP) and negative strand viral RNA (vRNA). Since complete virus particles are not found inside the cell, the processes of assembly, morphogenesis, budding and release of progeny virus particles at the plasma membrane of the infected cells are critically important for the production of infectious virions and pathogenesis of influenza viruses as well. Morphogenesis and budding require that all virus components must be brought to the budding site which is the apical plasma membrane in polarized epithelial cells whether in vitro cultured cells or in vivo infected animals. HA and NA forming the outer spikes on the viral envelope possess apical sorting signals and use exocytic pathways and lipid rafts for cell surface transport and apical sorting. NP also has apical determinant(s) and is probably transported to the apical budding site similarly via lipid rafts and/or through cortical actin microfilaments. M1 binds the NP and the exposed RNAs of vRNPs, as well as to the cytoplasmic tails (CT) and transmembrane (TM) domains of HA, NA and M2, and is likely brought to the budding site on the piggy-back of vRNP and transmembrane proteins. Budding processes involve bud initiation, bud growth and bud release. Presence of lipid rafts and assembly of viral components at the budding site can cause asymmetry of lipid bilayers and outward membrane bending leading to bud initiation and bud growth. Bud release requires fusion of the apposing viral and cellular membranes and scission of the virus buds from the infected cellular membrane. The processes involved in

  16. Transport via xylem and accumulation of aflatoxin in seeds of groundnut plant.

    PubMed

    Snigdha, M; Hariprasad, P; Venkateswaran, G

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination in groundnut seeds in the absence of any aflatoxigenic fungi leads to a hypothesis that aflatoxins are present naturally in soil and is transferred to seeds through uptake by roots. A survey was conducted on the natural occurrence of aflatoxins in agricultural soils, among nine main groundnut-growing regions of Karnataka state, India. All 71 soil samples collected in this survey were contaminated with aflatoxins esp. AFB1. An in vitro xylem sap experiment proved the ability of groundnut plant roots to absorb AFB1, and transport to aerial plant parts via the xylem. Hydroponics experiment also proved the uptake of AFB1 by the roots and their translocation to shoot. Uptake was affected by the initial concentration of toxin and pH of the medium. Among the 14 varieties screened, GPBD4 and MLT.K.107 (III) recorded highest and least AFB1 uptake, respectively. The above results were validated using a greenhouse experiment. Here, the aflatoxin absorbed by root gradually transferred to shoot that was later found in seeds towards the end of experiment. Thus, the groundnut seeds can also get contaminated with aflatoxin by direct uptake of aflatoxin through conducting tissue in addition to fungal infection. The present study revealed the novel mode of aflatoxin contamination in groundnut seeds without fungal infection.

  17. Risks of ingestion of aflatoxin-contaminated groundnuts in Benin: scale measurements, beliefs, and socioeconomic factors.

    PubMed

    Jolly, C M; Bayard, B; Vodouhe, S

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluates farmers' beliefs and perceived risks of aflatoxin (AF) on the consumption, production, and marketing of groundnuts. A survey was conducted with 181 farmers in Benin to assess their beliefs of AF effects on the marketing of groundnuts, and finally human and animal health. Awareness and action factors were also evaluated. Relationships of the belief and action factors with socioeconomic variables were evaluated using multiple indicators and multiple causes (MIMIC) models within a socioeconomic framework using a health belief model (HBM). The results indicate that the scale of the various constructs is reliable and the validity conforms to expectations. The unifactorial models developed in this study provide a satisfactory fit with NFl, CFI, and GFI exceeding 0.90. The results reveal that gender, age, and years of experience in farming significantly impact farmers' action regarding the reduction of AF in groundnut production and marketing. Male farmers are more likely to be aware of AF problems in groundnuts and feel more susceptible to the problems than their female counterparts. Gender and education seem to be dominating factors in the perception of barriers to mitigating the effects of AF, and male and older farmers are more likely to perceive the benefits of producing and marketing good quality groundnuts.

  18. Colon Cryptogenesis: Asymmetric Budding

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Wee; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Smith, David W.; Burgess, Antony W.

    2013-01-01

    The process of crypt formation and the roles of Wnt and cell-cell adhesion signaling in cryptogenesis are not well described; but are important to the understanding of both normal and cancer colon crypt biology. A quantitative 3D-microscopy and image analysis technique is used to study the frequency, morphology and molecular topography associated with crypt formation. Measurements along the colon reveal the details of crypt formation and some key underlying biochemical signals regulating normal colon biology. Our measurements revealed an asymmetrical crypt budding process, contrary to the previously reported symmetrical fission of crypts. 3D immunofluorescence analyses reveals heterogeneity in the subcellular distribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin in distinct crypt populations. This heterogeneity was also found in asymmetrical budding crypts. Singular crypt formation (i.e. no multiple new crypts forming from one parent crypt) were observed in crypts isolated from the normal colon mucosa, suggestive of a singular constraint mechanism to prevent aberrant crypt production. The technique presented improves our understanding of cryptogenesis and suggests that excess colon crypt formation occurs when Wnt signaling is perturbed (e.g. by truncation of adenomatous polyposis coli, APC protein) in most colon cancers. PMID:24205248

  19. Selection of groundnut variety for making a good quality peanut butter.

    PubMed

    Dhamsaniya, Navnitkumar K; Patel, Naginbhai C; Dabhi, Mukesh N

    2012-02-01

    Flavor and compositional quality are the ultimate criterion of the desirability of any food product. The nutritive value of any peanut product is closely associated with the fatty acid composition of its oil content, which influences its quality. Peanut butter was prepared using seven groundnut varieties commonly grown in major groundnut producing states of India. The flavor and compositional quality were determined using the standard procedures. The color code to the butter preparation was assigned by visually comparing the color of the butter with those given in the handbook of standard colors. On the basis of a combined evaluation, it could be recommended that the groundnut variety Somnath is the best-suited variety for producing peanut butter amongst the selected varieties.

  20. Mycotoxin risk assessment for consumers of groundnut in domestic markets in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oyedele, Oluwawapelumi A; Ezekiel, Chibundu N; Sulyok, Michael; Adetunji, Modupeade C; Warth, Benedikt; Atanda, Olusegun O; Krska, Rudolf

    2017-06-19

    The fungal and multi-mycotoxin profiles of groundnuts sold in domestic markets in Nigeria as well as the associated risk to consumers were assessed in the present study. Four hundred fungal isolates representing mainly Aspergillus [58.6%: Aspergillus section Flavi (37.1%) and A. niger-clade (21.5%)], Penicillium (40.9%) and Fusarium (0.5%) were isolated from 82 (97.6%, n=84) groundnut samples collected from four agro-ecological zones (AEZs) of Nigeria. The incidence of aflatoxin-producing A. flavus isolates (71%) was significantly (p<0.05) higher in the groundnuts than that of the non-aflatoxigenic isolates (29%). Fifty-four fungal metabolites [including aflatoxins (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, AFG2 and AFM1), beauvericin (BEAU), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), moniliformin, nivalenol and ochratoxin A] and four bacterial metabolites were detected in the groundnuts by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Aflatoxins (39%; max: 2076μg/kg; mean: 216μg/kg) were detected in more samples than any other mycotoxin. About 25, 23 and 14% of the samples respectively were above the 2μg/kg AFB1, 4 and 20μg/kg total aflatoxin limits of the European Union and US FDA respectively. The mean margins of exposure of AFB1 and total aflatoxins for adult consumers were 1665 and 908, respectively, while mean estimated daily intake values for infants, children and adults were <0.1% for BEAU and 4% for CPA. Consumers of mycotoxin contaminated groundnuts in Nigeria may therefore be at a risk of liver cancer in addition to other combinatory effects of mycotoxin/metabolite cocktails. There is need for increased targeted interventions in the groundnut value chain in Nigeria for public health benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Aflatoxin B1 levels in groundnut and sunflower oils in different Sudanese states.

    PubMed

    Mariod, Abdalbasit Adam; Idris, Yousif Mohamed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the level of contamination of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in groundnut and sunflower oils was determined. The 241 oil samples were collected from Khartoum, Gezira, Kordofan and Algadarif states of Sudan and assessed for AFB1 using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). AFB1 levels in groundnut oil samples ranged from 0.5 to 70 µg/kg and were 0.7 to 35 µg/kg in sunflower oil samples. High contamination was found in unrefined samples. It was concluded that AFB1 levels in oil samples indicated that growing, harvesting, handling and storage of the crops were not done properly.

  2. Influenza Virus Assembly and Budding

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Jeremy S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A virus causes seasonal epidemics, sporadic pandemics and is a significant global heath burden. Influenza virus is an enveloped virus that contains a segmented negative strand RNA genome. Assembly and budding of progeny influenza virions is a complex, multistep process that occurs in lipid raft domains on the apical membrane of infected cells. The viral proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) are targeted to lipid rafts, causing the coalescence and enlargement of the raft domains. This clustering of HA and NA may cause a deformation of the membrane and the initiation of the virus budding event. M1 is then thought to bind to the cytoplasmic tails of HA and NA where it can then polymerize and form the interior structure of the emerging virion. M1, bound to the cytoplasmic tails of HA and NA, additionally serves as a docking site for the recruitment of the viral RNPs and may mediate the recruitment of M2 to the site of virus budding. M2 initially stabilizes the site of budding, possibly enabling the polymerization of the matrix protein and the formation of filamentous virions. Subsequently, M2 is able to alter membrane curvature at the neck of the budding virus, causing membrane scission and the release of the progeny virion. This review investigates the latest research on influenza virus budding in an attempt to provide a step-by-step analysis of the assembly and budding processes for influenza viruses. PMID:21237476

  3. ESCRT requirements for EIAV budding.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Virginie; Sundquist, Wesley I

    2013-10-09

    Retroviruses and many other enveloped viruses usurp the cellular ESCRT pathway to bud from cells. However, the stepwise process of ESCRT-mediated virus budding can be challenging to analyze in retroviruses like HIV-1 that recruit multiple different ESCRT factors to initiate budding. In this study, we characterized the ESCRT factor requirements for budding of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV), whose only known direct ESCRT protein interaction is with ALIX. siRNA depletion of endogenous ESCRT proteins and "rescue" experiments with exogenous siRNA-resistant wild type and mutant constructs revealed budding requirements for the following ESCRT proteins: ALIX, CHMP4B, CHMP2A and VPS4A or VPS4B. EIAV budding was inhibited by point mutations that abrogate the direct interactions between ALIX:CHMP4B, CHMP4B:CHMP2A, and CHMP2A:VPS4A/B, indicating that each of these interactions is required for EIAV budding. Unexpectedly, CHMP4B depletion led to formation of multi-lobed and long tubular EIAV virions. We conclude that EIAV budding requires an ESCRT protein network that comprises EIAV Gag-ALIX-CHMP4B-CHMP2A-VPS4 interactions. Our experiments also suggest that CHMP4B recruitment/polymerization helps control Gag polymerization and/or processing to ensure that ESCRT factor assembly and membrane fission occur at the proper stage of virion assembly. These studies help establish EIAV as a streamlined model system for dissecting the stepwise processes of lentivirus assembly and ESCRT-mediated budding.

  4. Thermal degradation of groundnut oil during continuous and intermittent frying.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit K; Babylatha, R; Pavithra, A S; Khatoon, Sakina

    2013-12-01

    The quality of refined groundnut oil, as affected by frying Poori, was assessed with respect to two types of frying operations viz., continuous frying and intermittent frying. Continuous frying was carried out consistently for 8 h, whereas intermittent frying was performed for 2 h everyday for 4 days for a total of 8 frying hours. The purpose of the study was to compare the level of deterioration that occurred during the two operations. Among the parameters studied, peroxide value (11.3 ± 0.26 meqO2/kg), anisidine value (172.4 ± 2.71), diene value (1.57 ± 0.095), oxidized fatty acid (2.6 ± 0.17%) and viscosity (103.8 ± 2.5 mPa s(-1)), were found to be higher after 8 h due to intermittent frying. The corresponding values 4.9 ± 0.15, 133.3 ± 0.49, 0.811 ± 0.04, 0.38 ± 0.023 and 81.8 ± 2.02 were observed in continuous frying. Parameters such as iodine value, unsaturated fatty acids, saponification value and smoke point decreased significantly (P < 0.5) due to intermittent frying. Results showed that intermittent frying caused more quality degradation to GNO than continuous frying.

  5. Paenibacillus arachidis sp. nov., isolated from groundnut seeds.

    PubMed

    Sadaf, K; Tushar, L; Nirosha, P; Podile, A R; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2016-08-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, rod-shaped, facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated as strain E3T, was isolated from groundnut seeds. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain E3T belongs to the genus Paenibacillus with Paenibacillus thailandensis S3-4AT (96.0 %), Paenibacillus xanthinilyticus 11N27T (95.7 %), Paenibacillus mendelii C/2T (95.7 %) and other members of the genus Paenibacillus (<95.5 %) as its closest phylogenetic neighbours. The DNA G+C content of strain E3T was 53 mol%. Strain E3T was positive for gelatin hydrolysis, ammonification, catalase, chitinase production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity, HCN production, siderophore production, biofilm formation, and urea and starch hydrolysis. Strain E3T had phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphotidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, an unidentified aminophospholipid, two unidentified aminolipids and two unidentified lipids as polar lipids. Strain E3T had diploptene, deplopterol and bacteriohopaneterol as major hopanoids. anteiso-C15 : 0 was the predominant cellular fatty acid with significant proportions of iso-C16 : 0, C16 : 0, C17 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c and iso-C14 : 0. Strain E3T had meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. On the basis of physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and molecular analysis, strain E3T represents a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus arachidis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is E3T (=KCTC 33574T=LMG 28417T).

  6. Biosynthesis of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol: studies with groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.D.; Sastry, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) was investigated using groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) leaf discs and /sup 35/S-labeled precursors. (/sup 35/S)SO/sub 4/(2-) was actively taken up by the leaf discs and rapidly incorporated into SQDG. After 2 h, 1.5% of the (/sup 35/S)SO4(2-) added to the incubation medium was taken up, of which 28% was incorporated into SQDG. The methanol-water phases of the lipid extracts of the leaf discs were analyzed for the /sup 35/S-labeled intermediates. Up to 2 h of incubation, cysteic acid, 3-sulfopyruvate, 3-sulfolactate, 3-sulfolactaldehyde, and sulfoquinovose (SQ) which have been proposed as intermediates were not labeled. Only a negligible amount of radioactivity was observed in these compounds after incubation for 4 h and more. Addition of sodium molybdate inhibited the uptake of (/sup 35/S)SO/sub 4/(2-) as well as its incorporation into SQDG by the leaf discs, suggesting that 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate may be involved in the biosynthesis of SQDG. Addition of unlabeled cysteic acid to the incubation medium enhanced the uptake of (/sup 35/S)SO/sub 4/(2-) but did not affect its incorporation into SQDG. /sup 35/S-labeled cysteic acid was taken up by the leaf discs and metabolized to sulfoacetic acid but not incorporated into SQ or SQDG. These results show that cysteic acid is not an intermediate in SQDG biosynthesis. (/sup 35/S)SQ was taken up by the leaf discs and incorporated into SQDG in a time-dependent manner. (/sup 35/S)Sulfoquinovosylglycerol was also taken up by the leaf discs but not incorporated into SQDG. It is concluded that SQDG is not biosynthesized by the proposed sulfoglycolytic pathway in higher plants.

  7. Bud8p and Bud9p, Proteins That May Mark the Sites for Bipolar Budding in YeastV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Harkins, Heidi A.; Pagé, Nicolas; Schenkman, Laura R.; De Virgilio, Claudio; Shaw, Sidney; Bussey, Howard; Pringle, John R.

    2001-01-01

    The bipolar budding pattern of a/α Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells appears to depend on persistent spatial markers in the cell cortex at the two poles of the cell. Previous analysis of mutants with specific defects in bipolar budding identified BUD8 and BUD9 as potentially encoding components of the markers at the poles distal and proximal to the birth scar, respectively. Further genetic analysis reported here supports this hypothesis. Mutants deleted for BUD8 or BUD9 grow normally but bud exclusively from the proximal and distal poles, respectively, and the double-mutant phenotype suggests that the bipolar budding pathway has been totally disabled. Moreover, overexpression of these genes can cause either an increased bias for budding at the distal (BUD8) or proximal (BUD9) pole or a randomization of bud position, depending on the level of expression. The structures and localizations of Bud8p and Bud9p are also consistent with their postulated roles as cortical markers. Both proteins appear to be integral membrane proteins of the plasma membrane, and they have very similar overall structures, with long N-terminal domains that are both N- and O-glycosylated followed by a pair of putative transmembrane domains surrounding a short hydrophilic domain that is presumably cytoplasmic. The putative transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the two proteins are very similar in sequence. When Bud8p and Bud9p were localized by immunofluorescence and tagging with GFP, each protein was found predominantly in the expected location, with Bud8p at presumptive bud sites, bud tips, and the distal poles of daughter cells and Bud9p at the necks of large-budded cells and the proximal poles of daughter cells. Bud8p localized approximately normally in several mutants in which daughter cells are competent to form their first buds at the distal pole, but it was not detected in a bni1 mutant, in which such distal-pole budding is lost. Surprisingly, Bud8p localization to the presumptive bud

  8. Aflatoxin contamination of groundnut and maize in Zambia: observed and potential concentrations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maize and groundnut, important staples in Zambia, are susceptible to aflatoxin-producing fungi. Aflatoxins are potent human carcinogens also associated with stunting and immunosuppression. Although health and economic burdens of aflatoxins are well known, patterns of contamination in maize and grou...

  9. Modification and improvement of nutritive quality of cornpap "Ogi" with cowpea and groundnut milk.

    PubMed

    Ojofeitimi, E O; Abiose, S; Ijadunola, K T; Pedro, T; Jinadu, M K

    2001-01-01

    The study aimed at improving the nutritive quality of cornpap, "Ogi", the most popular infant feed in Nigeria. Milk samples of cowpea, groundnut and soyabean and their complementations with cornpap were assessed chemically, organoleptically and anthropometrically. The protein contents of milk from cowpea, groundnut and soyabean were 1.18, 1.6, and 1.23% respectively. On separate complementation of the milk sources with cornpap, the low protein content of "ogi" was increased from 0.3% to 2.79% with cowpea; 3.0% with groundnut and 3.64% with soyabean. The fat content of the complementary feeds also increased remarkably. The anthropometric study revealed that there were significant differences P = 0.001 between the mean weight of children aged 13 to 18 (92 +/- 1.2) and 19 to 24 months (9.9 +/- 1.3) who were fed the three sources of milk with cornpap, and the control group of the same age groups (8.5 + 1.5; 9.3 + 1.11) who received nutrition education and no complementary feeds. Of the three sources of milk, groundnut milk was ranked as the most likeable, the easiest to prepare and the least costly by the nursing mothers. This study has shown that some of the deep rooted cultural food taboos that prohibit locally available and nutritious feeds to infants could be changed through practical food demonstrations.

  10. Emergence of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus in U.S. vegetable production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host and geographic ranges, genetic diversity and thrips transmission of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus isolates from the U.S. were characterized. This report provides an overview of these viruses for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory...

  11. Groundnut ringspot virus and tomato spotted wilt virus – Tospoviruses in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A growing number of solanaceous crop and weed species infected with groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) has been identified in Florida. Continuing geographic spread of GRSV into additional vegetable production areas of Florida has also been documented. Much has been learned about GRSV in Florida altho...

  12. First report of Groundnut ringspot virus infecting tomato in south Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Typical tospovirus symptoms were observed on tomato plants in Homestead, FL from November 2009 through February 2010. The presence of Groundnut ringspot virus was confirmed from serological and molecular tests incuding ELISA and PCR. This is the first report of GRSV within the U.S....

  13. Modelling Bambara Groundnut Yield in Southern Africa: Towards a Climate-Resilient Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karunaratne, A. S.; Walker, S.; Ruane, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Current agriculture depends on a few major species grown as monocultures that are supported by global research underpinning current productivity. However, many hundreds of alternative crops have the potential to meet real world challenges by sustaining humanity, diversifying agricultural systems for food and nutritional security, and especially responding to climate change through their resilience to certain climate conditions. Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.), an underutilised African legume, is an exemplar crop for climate resilience. Predicted yield performances of Bambara groundnut by AquaCrop (a crop-water productivity model) were evaluated for baseline (1980-2009) and mid-century climates (2040-2069) under 20 downscaled Global Climate Models (CMIP5-RCP8.5), as well as for climate sensitivities (AgMIPC3MP) across 3 locations in Southern Africa (Botswana, South Africa, Namibia). Different land - races of Bambara groundnut originating from various semi-arid African locations showed diverse yield performances with diverse sensitivities to climate. S19 originating from hot-dry conditions in Namibia has greater future yield potential compared to the Swaziland landrace Uniswa Red-UN across study sites. South Africa has the lowest yield under the current climate, indicating positive future yield trends. Namibia reported the highest baseline yield at optimum current temperatures, indicating less yield potential in future climates. Bambara groundnut shows positive yield potential at temperatures of up to 31degC, with further warming pushing yields down. Thus, many regions in Southern Africa can utilize Bambara groundnut successfully in the coming decades. This modelling exercise supports decisions on genotypic suitability for present and future climates at specific locations.

  14. Optimization of food materials for development of nutritious pasta utilizing groundnut meal and beetroot.

    PubMed

    Mridula, D; Gupta, R K; Bhadwal, Sheetal; Khaira, Harjot; Tyagi, S K

    2016-04-01

    Present study was undertaken to optimize the level of food materials viz. groundnut meal, beetroot juice and refined wheat flour for development of nutritious pasta using response surface methodology. Box-benken design of experiments was used to design different experimental combinations considering 10 to 20 g groundnut meal, 6 to 18 mL beetroot juice and 80 to 90 g refined wheat flour. Quality attributes such as protein content, antioxidant activity, colour, cooking quality (solid loss, rehydration ratio and cooking time) and sensory acceptability of pasta samples were the dependent variables for the study. The results revealed that pasta samples with higher levels of groundnut meal and beetroot juice were high in antioxidant activity and overall sensory acceptability. The samples with higher content of groundnut meal indicated higher protein contents in them. On the other hand, the samples with higher beetroot juice content were high in rehydration ratio and lesser cooking time along with low solid loss in cooking water. The different level of studied food materials significantly affected the colour quality of pasta samples. Optimized combination for development of nutritious pasta consisted of 20 g groundnut meal, 18 mL beetroot juice and 83.49 g refined wheat flour with overall desirability as 0.905. This pasta sample required 5.5 min to cook and showed 1.37 % solid loss and rehydration ratio as 6.28. Pasta sample prepared following optimized formulation provided 19.56 % protein content, 23.95 % antioxidant activity and 125.89 mg/100 g total phenols with overall sensory acceptability scores 8.71.

  15. Modelling Bambara Groundnut Yield in Southern Africa: Towards a Climate-Resilient Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karunaratne, A. S.; Walker, S.; Ruane, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Current agriculture depends on a few major species grown as monocultures that are supported by global research underpinning current productivity. However, many hundreds of alternative crops have the potential to meet real world challenges by sustaining humanity, diversifying agricultural systems for food and nutritional security, and especially responding to climate change through their resilience to certain climate conditions. Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.), an underutilised African legume, is an exemplar crop for climate resilience. Predicted yield performances of Bambara groundnut by AquaCrop (a crop-water productivity model) were evaluated for baseline (1980-2009) and mid-century climates (2040-2069) under 20 downscaled Global Climate Models (CMIP5-RCP8.5), as well as for climate sensitivities (AgMIPC3MP) across 3 locations in Southern Africa (Botswana, South Africa, Namibia). Different land - races of Bambara groundnut originating from various semi-arid African locations showed diverse yield performances with diverse sensitivities to climate. S19 originating from hot-dry conditions in Namibia has greater future yield potential compared to the Swaziland landrace Uniswa Red-UN across study sites. South Africa has the lowest yield under the current climate, indicating positive future yield trends. Namibia reported the highest baseline yield at optimum current temperatures, indicating less yield potential in future climates. Bambara groundnut shows positive yield potential at temperatures of up to 31degC, with further warming pushing yields down. Thus, many regions in Southern Africa can utilize Bambara groundnut successfully in the coming decades. This modelling exercise supports decisions on genotypic suitability for present and future climates at specific locations.

  16. The anillin-related region of Bud4 is the major functional determinant for Bud4's function in septin organization during bud growth and axial bud site selection in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huan; Guo, Jia; Zhou, Ya-Ting; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2015-03-01

    The anillin-related protein Bud4 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for axial bud site selection by linking the axial landmark to the septins, which localize at the mother bud neck. Recent studies indicate that Bud4 plays a role in septin organization during cytokinesis. Here we show that Bud4 is also involved in septin organization during bud growth prior to cytokinesis, as bud4Δ shs1Δ cells displayed an elongated bud morphology and defective septin organization at 18°C. Bud4 overexpression also affected septin organization during bud growth in shs1Δ cells at 30°C. Bud4 was previously thought to associate with the septins via its central region, while the C-terminal anillin-related region was not involved in septin association. Surprisingly, we found that the central region of Bud4 alone targets to the bud neck throughout the cell cycle, unlike full-length Bud4, which localizes to the bud neck only during G2/M phase. We identified the anillin-related region to be a second targeting domain that cooperates with the central region for proper septin association. In addition, the anillin-related region could largely mediate Bud4's function in septin organization during bud growth and bud site selection. We show that this region interacts with the C terminus of Bud3 and the two segments depend on each other for association with the septins. Moreover, like the bud4Δ mutant, the bud3Δ mutant genetically interacts with shs1Δ and cdc12-6 mutants in septin organization, suggesting that Bud4 and Bud3 may cooperate in septin organization during bud growth. These observations provide new insights into the interaction of Bud4 with the septins and Bud3.

  17. The Anillin-Related Region of Bud4 Is the Major Functional Determinant for Bud4's Function in Septin Organization during Bud Growth and Axial Bud Site Selection in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huan; Guo, Jia; Zhou, Ya-Ting

    2015-01-01

    The anillin-related protein Bud4 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for axial bud site selection by linking the axial landmark to the septins, which localize at the mother bud neck. Recent studies indicate that Bud4 plays a role in septin organization during cytokinesis. Here we show that Bud4 is also involved in septin organization during bud growth prior to cytokinesis, as bud4Δ shs1Δ cells displayed an elongated bud morphology and defective septin organization at 18°C. Bud4 overexpression also affected septin organization during bud growth in shs1Δ cells at 30°C. Bud4 was previously thought to associate with the septins via its central region, while the C-terminal anillin-related region was not involved in septin association. Surprisingly, we found that the central region of Bud4 alone targets to the bud neck throughout the cell cycle, unlike full-length Bud4, which localizes to the bud neck only during G2/M phase. We identified the anillin-related region to be a second targeting domain that cooperates with the central region for proper septin association. In addition, the anillin-related region could largely mediate Bud4's function in septin organization during bud growth and bud site selection. We show that this region interacts with the C terminus of Bud3 and the two segments depend on each other for association with the septins. Moreover, like the bud4Δ mutant, the bud3Δ mutant genetically interacts with shs1Δ and cdc12-6 mutants in septin organization, suggesting that Bud4 and Bud3 may cooperate in septin organization during bud growth. These observations provide new insights into the interaction of Bud4 with the septins and Bud3. PMID:25576483

  18. The biosynthesis of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol: studies with groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) leaves.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S D; Sastry, P S

    1988-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) was investigated using groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) leaf discs and 35S-labeled precursors. [35S]SO4(2-) was actively taken up by the leaf discs and rapidly incorporated into SQDG. After 2 h, 1.5% of the [35S]SO4(2-) added to the incubation medium was taken up, of which 28% was incorporated into SQDG. The methanol-water phases of the lipid extracts of the leaf discs were analyzed for the 35S-labeled intermediates. Up to 2 h of incubation, cysteic acid, 3-sulfopyruvate, 3-sulfolactate, 3-sulfolactaldehyde, and sulfoquinovose (SQ) which have been proposed as intermediates [Davies et al. (1966) Biochem. J. 98, 369-373] were not labeled. Only a negligible amount of radioactivity was observed in these compounds after incubation for 4 h and more. Addition of sodium molybdate inhibited the uptake of [35S]SO4(2-) as well as its incorporation into SQDG by the leaf discs, suggesting that 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate may be involved in the biosynthesis of SQDG. Addition of unlabeled cysteic acid to the incubation medium enhanced the uptake of [35S]SO4(2-) but did not affect its incorporation into SQDG. 35S-labeled cysteic acid was taken up by the leaf discs and metabolized to sulfoacetic acid but not incorporated into SQ or SQDG. These results show that cysteic acid is not an intermediate in SQDG biosynthesis. [35S]SQ was taken up by the leaf discs and incorporated into SQDG in a time-dependent manner. [35S]Sulfoquinovosylglycerol was also taken up by the leaf discs but not incorporated into SQDG. It is concluded that SQDG is not biosynthesized by the proposed sulfoglycolytic pathway in higher plants. Though [35S]SQ was converted to SQDG, the rates are much lower compared to [35S]SO4(2-) incorporation, which suggests that a more direct pathway involving sulfonation of a lipid precursor may exist in higher plants.

  19. Glycoconjugate in rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Kano, K; Ube, M; Taniguchi, K

    2001-05-01

    The taste buds of the fungiform papillae, circumvallate papilla, foliate papillae, soft palate and epiglottis of the rat oral cavity were examined by lectin histochemistry to elucidate the relationships between expression of glycoconjugates and innervation. Seven out of 21 lectins showed moderate to intense staining in at least more than one taste bud. They were succinylated wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA). Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). UEA-I and BSL-I showed moderate to intense staining in all of the taste buds examined. They strongly stained the taste buds of the epiglottis, which are innervated by the cranial nerve X. UEA-I intensely stained the taste buds of the fungiform papillae and soft palate, both of which are innervated by the cranial nerve VII. The taste buds of circumvallate papilla and foliate papillae were innervated by the cranial nerve IX and strongly stained by BSL-I. Thus, UEA-I and BSL-I binding glycoconjugates, probably alpha-linked fucose and alpha-D-galactose, respectively, might be specific for taste buds. Although the expression of these glycoconjugates would be related to the innervation of the cranial nerve X, the differential expression of alpha-linked fucose and alpha-D-galactose might be related to the innervation of the cranial nerve VII and IX, respectively.

  20. Mitochondrial inheritance in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Boldogh, I R; Yang, H C; Pon, L A

    2001-06-01

    During the past decade significant advances were made toward understanding the mechanism of mitochondrial inheritance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A combination of genetics, cell-free assays and microscopy has led to the discovery of a great number of components. These fall into three major categories: cytoskeletal elements, mitochondrial membrane components and regulatory proteins. These proteins mediate activities, including movement of mitochondria from mother cells to buds, segregation of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA, and equal distribution of the organelle between mother cells and buds during yeast cell division.

  1. Effect of bambara groundnut flour (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) supplementation on chemical, physical, nutritional and sensory evaluation of wheat bread.

    PubMed

    Abdualrahman, Mohammed A Y; Ali, Ali O; Elkhalifa, Elamin A; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim E

    2012-09-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterrenea (L) Verdc) is a major source of vegetable protein in sub-Saharan Africa. And the aim of this study was to enhance the nutritional value of wheat bread through the addition of bambara groundnut flour to wheat four. For this, bambara groundnut seeds were soaked in tap water, manually decorticated, sun dried and milled into fine flour. Proximate analysis of flours of de-hulled bambara groundnut and wheat were conducted. Flour of de-hulled bambara groundnut was used for bread supplementation in ratios of 5, 10 and 15%. Rheological properties of the control flour and wheat flour supplemented with 10% of de-hulled bambara groundnut flour were conducted. The total area and dough development time increased. However, water absorption, stability and extensibility respectively decreased, from 71.3; 8.5; 190 in the control flour to 71.0; 5.5; 180 in the 10% supplemented flour. The increases in the resistance to extension and proportional number from 260 to 280 and 1.37 to 1.56, respectively resulted in stiff dough. The most important effect of wheat bread supplementation was the improvement of protein quantity from 13.74 +/- 0.02% for the control bread to 15.49 +/- 0.02, 17.00 +/- 0.05 and 18.98 +/- 0.02% for the 5, 10 and 15% blending ratios, respectively. The in-vitro protein digestibility progressively increased from 84.33 +/- 0.03 in the control bread to 85.42 +/- 0.04, 86.57 +/- 0.04 and 87.64 +/- 0.03 in breads containing 5, 10 and 15% bambara groundnut flour. The sensory attributes of different types of bread showed that, a significant difference was observed in texture, colour and overall acceptability. However, the panelists gave higher score for 10% de-hulled bambara groundnut flour bread than bread made from other blends. The loaf weights, loaf volume and specific volume increased. However, while the loaf weight increased with addition of 15% de-hulled bambara groundnut flour, both of loaf volume and specific volume decreased

  2. Potential negative consequences of geoengineering on crop production: A study of Indian groundnut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huiyi; Dobbie, Steven; Ramirez-Villegas, Julian; Feng, Kuishuang; Challinor, Andrew J.; Chen, Bing; Gao, Yao; Lee, Lindsay; Yin, Yan; Sun, Laixiang; Watson, James; Koehler, Ann-Kristin; Fan, Tingting; Ghosh, Sat

    2016-11-01

    Geoengineering has been proposed to stabilize global temperature, but its impacts on crop production and stability are not fully understood. A few case studies suggest that certain crops are likely to benefit from solar dimming geoengineering, yet we show that geoengineering is projected to have detrimental effects for groundnut. Using an ensemble of crop-climate model simulations, we illustrate that groundnut yields in India undergo a statistically significant decrease of up to 20% as a result of solar dimming geoengineering relative to RCP4.5. It is somewhat reassuring, however, to find that after a sustained period of 50 years of geoengineering crop yields return to the nongeoengineered values within a few years once the intervention is ceased.

  3. Potential negative consequences of geoengineering on crop production: A study of Indian groundnut.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiyi; Dobbie, Steven; Ramirez-Villegas, Julian; Feng, Kuishuang; Challinor, Andrew J; Chen, Bing; Gao, Yao; Lee, Lindsay; Yin, Yan; Sun, Laixiang; Watson, James; Koehler, Ann-Kristin; Fan, Tingting; Ghosh, Sat

    2016-11-28

    Geoengineering has been proposed to stabilize global temperature, but its impacts on crop production and stability are not fully understood. A few case studies suggest that certain crops are likely to benefit from solar dimming geoengineering, yet we show that geoengineering is projected to have detrimental effects for groundnut. Using an ensemble of crop-climate model simulations, we illustrate that groundnut yields in India undergo a statistically significant decrease of up to 20% as a result of solar dimming geoengineering relative to RCP4.5. It is somewhat reassuring, however, to find that after a sustained period of 50 years of geoengineering crop yields return to the nongeoengineered values within a few years once the intervention is ceased.

  4. Potential negative consequences of geoengineering on crop production: A study of Indian groundnut

    PubMed Central

    Dobbie, Steven; Ramirez‐Villegas, Julian; Feng, Kuishuang; Challinor, Andrew J.; Chen, Bing; Gao, Yao; Lee, Lindsay; Yin, Yan; Sun, Laixiang; Watson, James; Koehler, Ann‐Kristin; Fan, Tingting; Ghosh, Sat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Geoengineering has been proposed to stabilize global temperature, but its impacts on crop production and stability are not fully understood. A few case studies suggest that certain crops are likely to benefit from solar dimming geoengineering, yet we show that geoengineering is projected to have detrimental effects for groundnut. Using an ensemble of crop‐climate model simulations, we illustrate that groundnut yields in India undergo a statistically significant decrease of up to 20% as a result of solar dimming geoengineering relative to RCP4.5. It is somewhat reassuring, however, to find that after a sustained period of 50 years of geoengineering crop yields return to the nongeoengineered values within a few years once the intervention is ceased. PMID:28190903

  5. Foamy Virus Budding and Release

    PubMed Central

    Hütter, Sylvia; Zurnic, Irena; Lindemann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Like all other viruses, a successful egress of functional particles from infected cells is a prerequisite for foamy virus (FV) spread within the host. The budding process of FVs involves steps, which are shared by other retroviruses, such as interaction of the capsid protein with components of cellular vacuolar protein sorting (Vps) machinery via late domains identified in some FV capsid proteins. Additionally, there are features of the FV budding strategy quite unique to the spumaretroviruses. This includes secretion of non-infectious subviral particles and a strict dependence on capsid-glycoprotein interaction for release of infectious virions from the cells. Virus-like particle release is not possible since FV capsid proteins lack a membrane-targeting signal. It is noteworthy that in experimental systems, the important capsid-glycoprotein interaction could be bypassed by fusing heterologous membrane-targeting signals to the capsid protein, thus enabling glycoprotein-independent egress. Aside from that, other systems have been developed to enable envelopment of FV capsids by heterologous Env proteins. In this review article, we will summarize the current knowledge on FV budding, the viral components and their domains involved as well as alternative and artificial ways to promote budding of FV particle structures, a feature important for alteration of target tissue tropism of FV-based gene transfer systems. PMID:23575110

  6. Trichoderma viride induces pathogenesis related defense response against rot pathogen infection in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Gajera, H P; Savaliya, Disha D; Patel, S V; Golakiya, B A

    2015-08-01

    The study examine induction of defense enzymes involved in phenylpropanoid pathway and accumulation of pathogenesis related proteins in rot pathogen (Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem) challenged groundnut seedlings in response to Trichoderma viride JAU60. Seeds of five groundnut varieties differing in collar rot susceptibility were sown under non-infested, pathogen infested and pathogen+T. viride JAU60 seed treatment. Collar rot disease evident between 31.0% (J-11, GG-2) and 67.4% (GG-20) in different groundnut varieties under pathogen infested which was significantly reduced from 58.1% (J-11, GG-2) to 51.6% (GG-20) by Trichoderma treatment. The specific activities of polyphenol oxidase (EC 1.14.18.1) and β-1,3 glucanase (EC 3.2.1.6) elevated 3.5 and 2.3-fold, respectively, at 3 days; phenylalanine ammonia lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) evident 1.6-fold higher at 6 days; and chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) sustained 2.3-2.8 folds up to 9 days in Trichoderma treated+pathogen infested seedlings of tolerant varieties (J-11, GG-2) compared with moderate and susceptible (GAUG-10, GG-13, GG-20). T. viride JAU60 induces defense enzymes in a different way for tolerant and susceptible varieties to combat the disease. This study indicates the synergism activation of defense enzymes under the pathogenic conditions or induced resistance by T. viride JAU60 in a different groundnut varieties susceptible to collar rot disease.

  7. The effect of microwave roasting on the antioxidant properties of the Bangladeshi groundnut cultivar.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abbas; Islam, Anowarul; Pal, Tarun K

    2016-01-01

    Groundnut seeds are an important source of bioactive phenolic compounds with noteworthy antioxidant capacity, which may be enhanced by the microwave roasting process. The aim of this work is   to study the changes in antioxidant activity in groundnut seeds during microwave roasting, as a function of roasting time and extract concentration, in order to maximise the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of roasted seeds. The study was conducted to evaluate total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and antioxidative activity of methanolic (GME), ethanolic (GEE), and chloroform (GCE) extracts and methanolic extract of oil (GMO) from groundnut seeds exposed to microwaves. The antioxidant activity was investigated using several assays, namely phosphomolybdenum assay, DPPH radical scavenging activity, H2O2 scavenging activity, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and reducing power. The microwave roasting process significantly increased the TPC, whilst the TFC decreased with roasting time. Antioxidant activity increased with increased roasting time and extract concentration in all extracts. Antioxidant activity increased significantly at lower concentrations; however, the rate of increment decreased gradually as the concentration of the solvent extract increased. Thus, among all the extracts, methanol extracts at all roasting times and extract concentrations appeared to display the highest effectiveness. The various scavenging activities of the samples are ranked in the following order: GME > GEE > GCE > GMO, in both raw and roasted samples. Both roasting time and extract concentration were found to be critical factors in determining the overall quality of the product. This investigation is important to determine optimum roasting conditions, in order to maximise the anti-oxidative health benefits of the Bangladeshi groundnut cultivar.

  8. First evidence on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide in groundnut using solution culture technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, Manchala; Sudhakar, Palagiri; Nagamadhuri, Kandula Venkata; Balakrishna Reddy, Kota; Giridhara Krishna, Thimmavajjula; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale materials, whose size typically falls below 100 nm, exhibit novel chemical, physical and biological properties which are different from their bulk counterparts. In the present investigation, we demonstrated that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (n-CaO) could transport through phloem tissue of groundnut unlike the corresponding bulk materials. n-CaO particles are prepared using sol-gel method. The size of the as prepared n-CaO measured (69.9 nm) using transmission electron microscopic technique (TEM). Results of the hydroponics experiment using solution culture technique revealed that foliar application of n-CaO at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500, 1,000 ppm) on groundnut plants confirmed the entry of calcium into leaves and stems through phloem compared to bulk source of calcium sprayed (CaO and CaNO3). After spraying of n-CaO, calcium content in roots, shoots and leaves significantly increased. Based on visual scoring of calcium deficiency correction and calcium content in plant parts, we may establish the fact that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (size 69.9 nm) could move through phloem tissue in groundnut. This is the first report on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide particles in plants and this result points to the use of nanoscale calcium oxide particles as calcium source to the plants through foliar application, agricultural crops in particular, as bulk calcium application through foliar nutrition is restricted due to its non-mobility in phloem.

  9. Construction of a genetic linkage map and QTL analysis in bambara groundnut.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nariman Salih; Redjeki, Endah Sri; Ho, Wai Kuan; Aliyu, Siise; Mayes, Katie; Massawe, Festo; Kilian, Andrzej; Mayes, Sean

    2016-07-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an indigenous underutilized legume that has the potential to improve food security in semi-arid Africa. So far, there are a lack of reports of controlled breeding populations that could be used for variety development and genetic studies. We report here the construction of the first genetic linkage map of bambara groundnut using a F3 population derived from a "narrow" cross between two domesticated landraces (Tiga Nicuru and DipC) with marked divergence in phenotypic traits. The map consists of 238 DArT array and SSR based markers in 21 linkage groups with a total genetic distance of 608.3 cM. In addition, phenotypic traits were evaluated for a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis over two generations. A total of 36 significant QTLs were detected for 19 traits. The phenotypic effect explained by a single QTL ranged from 11.6% to 49.9%. Two stable QTLs were mapped for internode length and growth habit. The identified QTLs could be useful for marker-assisted selection in bambara groundnut breeding programmes.

  10. Evaluation of allium and its seasoning on toxigenic, nutritional, and sensorial profiles of groundnut oil.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kasi; Anandaraj, K; Al-Sohaibani, Saleh A

    2014-04-01

    Mitigation of xerophilic storage fungi-associated aflatoxin threat in culinary oil will be a new technology advantage to food industries. Groundnut oil isolate Aspergillus flavus MTCC 10680 susceptibility to Allium species (A. sativum L., A. cepa L., and A. cepa var. aggregatum) extracts, composition, and in silico confirmation of extract's phytoconstituent aflatoxin synthesis inhibition were determined. The behavior of seasoning carrier medium groundnut oil in the presence of Allium was also determined. All the Allium species extracts exhibited concentration dependent in vitro inhibition on mycelial biomass, radial growth, and toxin elaboration. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of 28, 16, and 9 compounds in the extracts of A. sativum, A. cepa, A. cepa var. aggregatum, respectively. The Allium phytocostituents-like hexadecanoic acid, 5-Octanoyl-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-pyrimidinetrione, Guanosine, and so on, showed higher binding energy with aflatoxin synthesis key enzyme ver1. Allium seasoning increased the typical nutty odor of the groundnut oil with sweet aroma note as well as intensification of pale yellow color. Allium seasoning exhibited the highest aflatoxin detoxification and aroma development without any nutritional loss. Culinary oil Allium seasoning has anti-aflatoxin and food additive potential for use in food industries.

  11. Evaluating the skill of seasonal weather forecasts in predicting aflatoxin contamination of groundnut in Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brak, B.; Challinor, A.

    2011-12-01

    Aflatoxins, a group of toxic secondary metabolites produced by some strains of a number of species within Aspergillus section Flavi, contaminate a range of crops grown at latitudes between 40N° and 40S° of the equator. Digestion of food products derived from aflatoxin-contaminated crops may result in acute and chronic health problems in human beings. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa in particular have seen large percentages of the human population exposed to aflatoxin. A recent study showed that over 98% of subjects in West Africa tested positive for aflatoxin biomarkers. According to other research, every year 250,000 people die from hepato-cellular carcinoma related causes due to aflatoxin ingestion in parts of West Africa. Strict aflatoxin levels set by importing countries in accordance with the WTO Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) also impair the value of agricultural trade. Over the last thirty years this has led to a reduction of African exports of groundnut by 19% despite the consumption of groundnut derived food products going up by 209%. The occurrence of aflatoxin on crops is strongly influenced by weather. Empirical studies in the US have shown that pre-harvest, aflatoxin contamination of groundnuts is induced by conditions of drought stress in combination with soil temperatures between 25°C and 31°C. Post-harvest, aflatoxin production of stored, Aspergillus-contaminated groundnuts is exacerbated in conditions where relative humidity is above 83%. The GLAM crop model was extended to include a soil temperature subroutine and subroutines containing pre- and post-harvest aflatoxin algorithms. The algorithms used to estimate aflatoxin contamination indices are based on findings from multiple empirical studies and the pre-harvest aflatoxin model has been validated for Australian conditions. Hence, there was sufficient scope to use GLAM with these algorithms to answer the foremost research question: Is the

  12. The Energy of COPI for Budding Membranes.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Pincet, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    As a major actor of cellular trafficking, COPI coat proteins assemble on membranes and locally bend them to bud 60 nm-size coated particles. Budding requires the energy of the coat assembly to overcome the one necessary to deform the membrane which primarily depends on the bending modulus and surface tension, γ. Using a COPI-induced oil nanodroplet formation approach, we modulated the budding of nanodroplets using various amounts and types of surfactant. We found a Heaviside-like dependence between the budding efficiency and γ: budding was only dependent on γ and occurred beneath 1.3 mN/m. With the sole contribution of γ to the membrane deformation energy, we assessed that COPI supplies ~1500 kBT for budding particles from membranes, which is consistent with common membrane deformation energies. Our results highlight how a simple remodeling of the composition of membranes could mechanically modulate budding in cells.

  13. The Energy of COPI for Budding Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Pincet, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    As a major actor of cellular trafficking, COPI coat proteins assemble on membranes and locally bend them to bud 60 nm-size coated particles. Budding requires the energy of the coat assembly to overcome the one necessary to deform the membrane which primarily depends on the bending modulus and surface tension, γ. Using a COPI-induced oil nanodroplet formation approach, we modulated the budding of nanodroplets using various amounts and types of surfactant. We found a Heaviside-like dependence between the budding efficiency and γ: budding was only dependent on γ and occurred beneath 1.3 mN/m. With the sole contribution of γ to the membrane deformation energy, we assessed that COPI supplies ~1500 kBT for budding particles from membranes, which is consistent with common membrane deformation energies. Our results highlight how a simple remodeling of the composition of membranes could mechanically modulate budding in cells. PMID:26218078

  14. Plant growth-promoting Methylobacterium induces defense responses in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) compared with rot pathogens.

    PubMed

    Madhaiyan, M; Suresh Reddy, B V; Anandham, R; Senthilkumar, M; Poonguzhali, S; Sundaram, S P; Sa, Tongmin

    2006-10-01

    This study, framed in two different phases, studied the plant-growth promotion and the induction of systemic resistance in groundnut by Methylobacterium. Seed imbibition with Methylobacterium sp. increased germination by 19.5% compared with controls. Combined inoculation of Methylobacterium sp. with Rhizobium sp. also significantly increased plant growth, nodulation, and yield attributes in groundnut compared with individual inoculation of Rhizobium sp. Methylobacterium sp. challenge-inoculated with Aspergillus niger/Sclerotium rolfsii in groundnut significantly enhanced germination percentage and seedling vigour and showed increased phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), beta-1,3-glucanase, and peroxidase (PO) activities. Under pot-culture conditions, in Methylobacterium sp. seed-treated groundnut plants challenge-inoculated with A. niger/S. rolfsii through foliar sprays on day 30, the activities of enzymes PO, PAL, and beta-1,3-glucanase increased constantly from 24 to 72 hours, after which decreased activity was noted. Five isozymes of polyphenol oxidase and PO could be detected in Methylobacterium-treated plants challenged with A. niger/S. rolfsii. Induced systemic resistance activity in groundnut against rot pathogens in response to methylotrophic bacteria suggests the possibility that pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic bacteria might be used as a means of biologic disease control.

  15. Efficacy and insecticidal properties of some essential oils against Caryedon serratus (Oliver)-a storage pest of groundnut.

    PubMed

    Harish, G; Nataraja, M V; Holajjer, Prasanna; Thirumalaisamy, P P; Jadon, K S; Savaliya, S D; Padavi, R D; Koradia, V G; Gedia, M V

    2014-11-01

    During storage groundnut is attacked by number of stored grain pest and management of these insect pests particularly bruchid beetle, Caryedon serratus (Oliver) is of prime importance as they directly damage the pod and kernels. Hence, some essential oils were tested for their insecticidal and fungicidal properties. Highest total bruchid mortality was recorded with the application of neem oil and pongamia oil at 10% (v/w) concentration and lowest in eucalyptus oil at 5% (v/w). Number of eggs laid was recorded 2.3 in neem oil 10% (v/w) which was lowest and significantly superior over untreated control and was at par with castor oil 10% (v/w) which recorded 2.5 eggs per 100 g of groundnut pods. There was no adult emergence in the groundnut pods treated with castor oil, eucalyptus oil, neem oil and pongamia oil at 10% (v/w) concentration. Groundnut pods treated with castor oil, eucalyptus oil, neem oil and pongamia oil at 10% (v/w) and neem oil at 5% (v/w) concentrations recorded no damage to pods and kernels and also zero per cent weight loss. These oils effectively influenced groundnut bruchid establishment and reduce damage besides reduction in aflatoxin contamination.

  16. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of MISR nadir-camera images.

    The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image.

    The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 6552). Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image.

    Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation.

    Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  17. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) nadir-camera images. The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image. The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001. Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image. Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation. Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide. Image courtesy NASA/JPL/GSFC/LaRC, MISR Team

  18. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of MISR nadir-camera images.

    The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image.

    The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 6552). Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image.

    Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation.

    Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  19. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) nadir-camera images. The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image. The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001. Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image. Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation. Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide. Image courtesy NASA/JPL/GSFC/LaRC, MISR Team

  20. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-04

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of MISR nadir-camera images. The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image. The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 6552). Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image. Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation. Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03400

  1. Coevolutionary patterning of teeth and taste buds

    PubMed Central

    Bloomquist, Ryan F.; Parnell, Nicholas F.; Phillips, Kristine A.; Fowler, Teresa E.; Yu, Tian Y.; Sharpe, Paul T.; Streelman, J. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Teeth and taste buds are iteratively patterned structures that line the oro-pharynx of vertebrates. Biologists do not fully understand how teeth and taste buds develop from undifferentiated epithelium or how variation in organ density is regulated. These organs are typically studied independently because of their separate anatomical location in mammals: teeth on the jaw margin and taste buds on the tongue. However, in many aquatic animals like bony fishes, teeth and taste buds are colocalized one next to the other. Using genetic mapping in cichlid fishes, we identified shared loci controlling a positive correlation between tooth and taste bud densities. Genome intervals contained candidate genes expressed in tooth and taste bud fields. sfrp5 and bmper, notable for roles in Wingless (Wnt) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, were differentially expressed across cichlid species with divergent tooth and taste bud density, and were expressed in the development of both organs in mice. Synexpression analysis and chemical manipulation of Wnt, BMP, and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways suggest that a common cichlid oral lamina is competent to form teeth or taste buds. Wnt signaling couples tooth and taste bud density and BMP and Hh mediate distinct organ identity. Synthesizing data from fish and mouse, we suggest that the Wnt-BMP-Hh regulatory hierarchy that configures teeth and taste buds on mammalian jaws and tongues may be an evolutionary remnant inherited from ancestors wherein these organs were copatterned from common epithelium. PMID:26483492

  2. Coevolutionary patterning of teeth and taste buds.

    PubMed

    Bloomquist, Ryan F; Parnell, Nicholas F; Phillips, Kristine A; Fowler, Teresa E; Yu, Tian Y; Sharpe, Paul T; Streelman, J Todd

    2015-11-03

    Teeth and taste buds are iteratively patterned structures that line the oro-pharynx of vertebrates. Biologists do not fully understand how teeth and taste buds develop from undifferentiated epithelium or how variation in organ density is regulated. These organs are typically studied independently because of their separate anatomical location in mammals: teeth on the jaw margin and taste buds on the tongue. However, in many aquatic animals like bony fishes, teeth and taste buds are colocalized one next to the other. Using genetic mapping in cichlid fishes, we identified shared loci controlling a positive correlation between tooth and taste bud densities. Genome intervals contained candidate genes expressed in tooth and taste bud fields. sfrp5 and bmper, notable for roles in Wingless (Wnt) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, were differentially expressed across cichlid species with divergent tooth and taste bud density, and were expressed in the development of both organs in mice. Synexpression analysis and chemical manipulation of Wnt, BMP, and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways suggest that a common cichlid oral lamina is competent to form teeth or taste buds. Wnt signaling couples tooth and taste bud density and BMP and Hh mediate distinct organ identity. Synthesizing data from fish and mouse, we suggest that the Wnt-BMP-Hh regulatory hierarchy that configures teeth and taste buds on mammalian jaws and tongues may be an evolutionary remnant inherited from ancestors wherein these organs were copatterned from common epithelium.

  3. Comparison of the protein nutritional value of food blends based on sorghum, bambara groundnut and sweet potatoes.

    PubMed

    Nnam, N M

    2001-01-01

    The protein quality of four blends based on sprouted sorghum, bambara groundnuts and fermented sweet potatoes had been evaluated by rat feeding experiments; casein served as a reference protein. The test proteins were incorporated to make up 1.6% total nitrogen. There was an inverse relationship between % nitrogen disgestibility and the proportion of sorghum protein in the blend; being highest (89.7%) in the diets based on sorghum:bambara groundnut:sweet potatoes with protein ratios of 52:46:2. This blend proved to be optimum when the biological value (93.6%) and the net protein utilization (84%) were used as protein indices. The findings imply that foods with good protein quality could be formulated from a blend of sorghum-bambara groundnut and sweet potatoes, provided appropriate processing and blending are taken into consideration.

  4. Identification of Gene Modules Associated with Low Temperatures Response in Bambara Groundnut by Network-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bonthala, Venkata Suresh; Mayes, Katie; Moreton, Joanna; Blythe, Martin; Wright, Victoria; May, Sean Tobias; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean; Twycross, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an African legume and is a promising underutilized crop with good seed nutritional values. Low temperature stress in a number of African countries at night, such as Botswana, can effect the growth and development of bambara groundnut, leading to losses in potential crop yield. Therefore, in this study we developed a computational pipeline to identify and analyze the genes and gene modules associated with low temperature stress responses in bambara groundnut using the cross-species microarray technique (as bambara groundnut has no microarray chip) coupled with network-based analysis. Analyses of the bambara groundnut transcriptome using cross-species gene expression data resulted in the identification of 375 and 659 differentially expressed genes (p<0.01) under the sub-optimal (23°C) and very sub-optimal (18°C) temperatures, respectively, of which 110 genes are commonly shared between the two stress conditions. The construction of a Highest Reciprocal Rank-based gene co-expression network, followed by its partition using a Heuristic Cluster Chiseling Algorithm resulted in 6 and 7 gene modules in sub-optimal and very sub-optimal temperature stresses being identified, respectively. Modules of sub-optimal temperature stress are principally enriched with carbohydrate and lipid metabolic processes, while most of the modules of very sub-optimal temperature stress are significantly enriched with responses to stimuli and various metabolic processes. Several transcription factors (from MYB, NAC, WRKY, WHIRLY & GATA classes) that may regulate the downstream genes involved in response to stimulus in order for the plant to withstand very sub-optimal temperature stress were highlighted. The identified gene modules could be useful in breeding for low-temperature stress tolerant bambara groundnut varieties. PMID:26859686

  5. The use of testa of groundnut shell (Arachis hypogea) for the adsorption of Ni(II) from the aqueous system.

    PubMed

    Ajmal, Mohammad; Rao, R A K; Ahmad, Jameel; Ahmad, Rais

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the use of testa of groundnut shell for the removal of nickel from dilute aqueous solutions at laboratory scale. The adsorption isotherm of Ni(II) on the testa of groundnut shell was carried out by the batch adsorption process. Various parameters such as initial concentration, pH and amount of the adsorbent doses were studied. The experimental adsorption data obtained followed both Langmuir as well as Freundlich isotherms. Maximum adsorption (85%) was observed at pH 6. The monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 18.79 mg/g, which is greater than most of the low-cost adsorbents reported.

  6. ICP-AES and FT-IR Studies on the Effect of Cadmium on the Groundnut Cultivar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpagavalli, K.

    2008-11-01

    Atomic emission and Infra Red spectroscopic techniques are utilized in the present investigations for the accurate estimation of the effect of Cadmium on groundnut plant. Descriptions on the effect of cadmium applied to soil, at varying concentrations regarding a change in the dry matter yield and other elemental concentrations are also provided. An attempt has been made to correlate the variations in the extinction co-efficient (K) calculated for prominent lines in FT-IR spectrum, with the changes in the essential organic contents of the groundnut plant. Results obtained by two spectroscopic techniques are analyzed and conclusions are drawn.

  7. Adsorption of malachite green on groundnut shell waste based powdered activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, R.; Ramteke, D.S. Wate, S.R.

    2007-07-01

    In the present technologically fast changing situation related to waste management practices, it is desirable that disposal of plant waste should be done in a scientific manner by keeping in view economic and pollution considerations. This is only possible when the plant waste has the potential to be used as raw material for some useful product. In the present study, groundnut shell, an agricultural waste, was used for the preparation of an adsorbent by chemical activation using ZnCl{sub 2} under optimized conditions and its comparative characterisation was conducted with commercially available powdered activated carbon (CPAC) for its physical, chemical and adsorption properties. The groundnut shell based powdered activated carbon (GSPAC) has a higher surface area, iodine and methylene blue number compared to CPAC. Both of the carbons were used for the removal of malachite green dye from aqueous solution and the effect of various operating variables, viz. adsorbent dose (0.1-1 g l{sup -1}), contact time (5-120 min) and adsorbate concentrations (100-200 mg l{sup -1}) on the removal of dye, has been studied. The experimental results indicate that at a dose of 0.5 g l{sup -1} and initial concentration of 100 mg l{sup -1}, GSPAC showed 94.5% removal of the dye in 30 min equilibrium time, while CPAC removed 96% of the dye in 15 min. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the linearized forms of Freundlich, Langmuir and BET equations to determine maximum adsorptive capacities. The equilibrium data fit well to the Freundlich isotherm, although the BET isotherm also showed higher correlation for both of the carbons. The results of comparative adsorption capacity of both carbons indicate that groundnut shell can be used as a low-cost alternative to commercial powdered activated carbon in aqueous solution for dye removal.

  8. Adsorption of malachite green on groundnut shell waste based powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Malik, R; Ramteke, D S; Wate, S R

    2007-01-01

    In the present technologically fast changing situation related to waste management practices, it is desirable that disposal of plant waste should be done in a scientific manner by keeping in view economic and pollution considerations. This is only possible when the plant waste has the potential to be used as raw material for some useful product. In the present study, groundnut shell, an agricultural waste, was used for the preparation of an adsorbent by chemical activation using ZnCl2 under optimized conditions and its comparative characterisation was conducted with commercially available powdered activated carbon (CPAC) for its physical, chemical and adsorption properties. The groundnut shell based powdered activated carbon (GSPAC) has a higher surface area, iodine and methylene blue number compared to CPAC. Both of the carbons were used for the removal of malachite green dye from aqueous solution and the effect of various operating variables, viz. adsorbent dose (0.1-1 g l(-1)), contact time (5-120 min) and adsorbate concentrations (100-200 mg l(-1)) on the removal of dye, has been studied. The experimental results indicate that at a dose of 0.5 g l(-1) and initial concentration of 100 mg l(-1), GSPAC showed 94.5% removal of the dye in 30 min equilibrium time, while CPAC removed 96% of the dye in 15 min. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the linearized forms of Freundlich, Langmuir and BET equations to determine maximum adsorptive capacities. The equilibrium data fit well to the Freundlich isotherm, although the BET isotherm also showed higher correlation for both of the carbons. The results of comparative adsorption capacity of both carbons indicate that groundnut shell can be used as a low-cost alternative to commercial powdered activated carbon in aqueous solution for dye removal.

  9. Experimental evolution in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    I will discuss our progress in analyzing evolution in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We take two basic approaches. The first is to try and examine quantitative aspects of evolution, for example by determining how the rate of evolution depends on the mutation rate and the population size or asking whether the rate of mutation is uniform throughout the genome. The second is to try to evolve qualitatively novel, cell biologically interesting phenotypes and track the mutations that are responsible for the phenotype. Our efforts include trying to alter cell morphology, evolve multicellularity, and produce a biological oscillator.

  10. An efficient method of agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation and regeneration in local Indian cultivar of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) using grafting.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivekanand; Chaturvedi, Amit Kumar; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-01-01

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an industrial crop used as a source of edible oil and nutrients. In this study, an efficient method of regeneration and Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation is reported for a local cultivar GG-20 using de-embryonated cotyledon explant. A high regeneration 52.69 ± 2.32 % was achieved by this method with 66.6 μM 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), while the highest number of shoot buds per explant, 17.67 ± 3.51, was found with 20 μM BAP and 10 μM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The bacterial culture OD, acetosyringone and L-cysteine concentration were optimized as 1.8, 200 μM and 50 mg L(-1), respectively, in co-cultivation media. It was observed that the addition of 2,4-D in co-cultivation media induced accumulation of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The optimized protocol exhibited 85 % transformation efficiency followed by 14.65 ± 1.06 % regeneration, of which 3.82 ± 0.6 % explants were survived on hygromycin after selection. Finally, 14.58 ± 2.95 % shoots (regenerated on survived explants) were rooted on rooting media (RM3). In grafting method, regenerated shoots (after hygromycin selection) were grafted on the non-transformed stocks with 100 % survival and new leaves emerged in 3 weeks. The putative transgenic plants were then confirmed by PCR, Southern hybridization, reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) histochemical assay. The reported method is efficient and rapid and can also be applied to other crops which are recalcitrant and difficult in rooting.

  11. HIV Pol Inhibits HIV Budding and Mediates the Severe Budding Defect of Gag-Pol

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xin; Gould, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The prevailing hypothesis of HIV budding posits that the viral Gag protein drives budding, and that the Gag p6 peptide plays an essential role by recruiting host-cell budding factors to sites of HIV assembly. HIV also expresses a second Gag protein, p160 Gag-Pol, which lacks p6 and fails to bud from cells, consistent with the prevailing hypothesis of HIV budding. However, we show here that the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol is not caused by the absence of p6, but rather, by the presence of Pol. Specifically, we show that (i) the budding defect of Gag-Pol is unaffected by loss of HIV protease activity and is therefore an intrinsic property of the Gag-Pol polyprotein, (ii) the N-terminal 433 amino acids of Gag and Gag-Pol are sufficient to drive virus budding even though they lack p6, (iii) the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol is caused by a dominant, cis-acting inhibitor of budding in the HIV Pol domain, and (iv) Gag-Pol inhibits Gag and virus budding in trans, even at normal levels of Gag and Gag-Pol expression. These and other data support an alternative hypothesis of HIV budding as a process that is mediated by the normal, non-viral pathway of exosome/microvesicle biogenesis. PMID:22235295

  12. [Impact of TDZ and NAA on adventitious bud induction and cluster bud multiplication in Tulipa edulis].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Fang; Xu, Chao; Zhu, Zai-Biao; Yang, He-Tong; Guo, Qiao-Sheng; Xu, Hong-jian; Ma, Hong-Jian; Zhao, Gui-Hua

    2014-08-01

    To explore the method of explants directly induced bud and establish the tissue culture system of mutiple shoot by means of direct organogenesis, core bud and daughter bulbs (the top of bud stem expanded to form daughter bulb) of T. edulis were used as explants and treated with thidiazuron (TDZ) and 1-naphthlcetic acid (NAA). The results showed that the optimal medium for bud inducted form core bud and daughter bulb were MS + TDZ 2.0 mg x L(-1) + NAA 4.0 mg x L(-1) and MS +TDZ 2.0 mg x L(-1) + NAA 2.0 mg x L(-1) respectively, both of them had a bud induction rate of 72.92%, 79.22%. The optimal medium for cluster buds multiplication was MS + TDZ 0.2 mg x L(-1) + NAA 0.2 mg x L(-1), and proliferation coefficient was 2.23. After proliferation, cluster buds rooting occurred on MS medium with IBA 1.0 mg x L(-1) and the rooting rate was 52.6%, three to five seedlings in each plant. Using core bud and daughter bulb of T. edulis, the optimum medium for adventitious bud directly inducted from daughter bulb, core bud and cluster bud multiplication were screened out and the tissue culture system of multiple shoot by means of direct organogenesis was established.

  13. Actin cable dynamics in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Pon, Liza A.

    2002-01-01

    Actin cables, bundles of actin filaments that align along the long axis of budding yeast, are crucial for establishment of cell polarity. We fused green fluorescent protein (GFP) to actin binding protein 140 (Abp140p) and visualized actin cable dynamics in living yeast. We detected two populations of actin cables: (i) bud-associated cables, which extend from the bud along the mother-bud axis, and (ii) randomly oriented cables, which are relatively short. Time-lapse imaging of Abp140p–GFP revealed an apparent increase in the length of bud-associated actin cables. Analysis of movement of Abp140p–GFP fiduciary marks on bud-associated cables and fluorescence loss in photobleaching experiments revealed that this apparent elongation occurs by assembly of new material at the end of the cable within the bud and movement of the opposite end of the cable toward the tip of the mother cell distal to the bud. The rate of extension of the tip of an elongating actin cable is 0.29 ± 0.08 μm/s. Latrunculin A (Lat-A) treatment completely blocked this process. We also observed movement of randomly oriented cables around the cortex of cells at a rate of 0.59 ± 0.14 μm/s. Mild treatment with Lat-A did not affect the velocity of movement of randomly oriented cables. However, Lat-A treatment did increase the number of randomly oriented, motile cables per cell. Our observations suggest that establishment of bud-associated actin cables during the cell cycle is accomplished not by realignment of existing cables but by assembly of new cables within the bud or bud neck, followed by elongation. PMID:11805329

  14. Study of disbudding goat kids following injection of clove oil essence in horn bud region.

    PubMed

    Molaei, Mohammad Mahdi; Mostafavi, Ali; Kheirandish, Reza; Azari, Omid; Shaddel, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of injection of essential oil of Eugenia caryophyllata in the kid horn buds, as a new chemical technique for disbudding. Five-day-old healthy goat kids from both sexes (n = 16) were divided randomly into 4 equal groups. In groups 1, 2 and 3, 0.2 mL of clove essence and in group 4 (control) 0.2 mL of normal saline was injected into the left horn bud of goat kids. Right horn bud in all kids was considered to ensure that they are horned. During the study, the rate of horn growth were evaluated in determined time intervals between groups 1 and 4. Tissue samples were taken from right and left horn bud in groups 2 and 3, at five and ten days after clove essence injection, for microscopic study. The results of the study showed that the clove essence stopped horn growth, whereas there was no significant difference in horn growth rate between left and right horns after injection of normal saline, in group 4. Histopathological study showed that injection of clove essence caused complete necrosis of epidermis and underlying dermis with collagenolysis in horn bud tissues, 5 days after injection and then progress in healing process was observed after 10 days. According to the results of this study, it can be concluded that the injection of clove essence is an effective method to stop horn growth without any undesirable effects on clinical parameters in goat kids.

  15. Bud development in corydalis (Corydalis bracteata) requires low temperature: a study of developmental and carbohydrate changes

    PubMed Central

    Khodorova, Nadejda V.; Miroslavov, Evgeniy A.; Shavarda, Alexey L.; Laberche, Jean-Claude; Boitel-Conti, Michèle

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Spring geophytes require a period of low temperature for proper flower development but the mechanism that underlies the relationship between cold treatment and flowering remains unknown. The present study aims to compare the developmental anatomy and carbohydrate content of the tuberous geophyte Corydalis bracteata growing under natural winter conditions from 10 to −10 °C (field-grown) and under a mild temperature regime of 18 °C (indoor-grown plants). Methods Samples were studied under light and electron microscopy. A histochemical test (periodic acid – Schiff's) was employed to identify starch in sectioned material. Sugars were analysed by capillary gas chromatography. Apoplastic wash fluid was prepared. Key Results Under natural conditions, shoots were elongated, and buds gained in dry mass and developed normally. For indoor-grown plants, these parameters were lower in value and, from December, a progressive necrosis of flower buds was observed. The tuber consisted of the new developing one, which was connected to the bud, and the old tuber with its starch reserve. Due to the absence of plasmodesmata between new and old tuber cells, sugar transport cannot be through the symplast. Thus, a potential apoplastic route is proposed from old tuber phloem parenchyma cells to the adjacent new tuber cells. Sugar content in buds during the autumn months (September–November) was lower for indoor-grown plants than control plants, whereas the sugar content in tubers during the same period was similar for plants from both temperature treatments. However, the amount of apoplastic sugars in tubers of field-grown plants was almost 15-fold higher than in indoor-grown tubers. Conclusions The results suggest that low temperature activates the apoplastic route of sugar transport in C. bracteata tubers and a consequent carbohydrate delivery to the bud. In the absence of cold treatment, the carbohydrate reserve is locked in old tuber cells so the nutrient

  16. Beyond landraces: developing improved germplasm resources for underutilized species - a case for Bambara groundnut.

    PubMed

    Aliyu, Siise; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2014-10-01

    The potential for underutilized crops (also known as minor, neglected or orphan crops) to improve food and nutrition security has been gaining prominence within the research community in recent years. This is due to their significance for diversified agricultural systems which is a necessary component of future agriculture to address food and nutritional security concerns posed by changing climate and a growing world population. Developing workable value chain systems for underutilized crop species, coupled with comparative trait studies with major crops, potentially allows us to identify suitable agricultural modalities for such species. Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.), an underutilized leguminous species, is of interest for its reported high levels of drought tolerance in particular, which contributes to environmental resilience in semi-arid environments. Here, we present a synopsis of suitable strategies for the genetic improvement of Bambara groundnut as a guide to other underutilized crop species. Underutilized crops have often been adapted over thousands of years in particular regions by farmers and largely still exist as landraces with little or no genetic knowledge of key phenotypic traits. Breeding in these species is fundamentally different to breeding in major crops, where significant pedigree structures and history allow highly directed improvement. In this regard, deploying new integrated germplasm development approaches for variety development and genetic analysis, such as multi-parent advance generation inter-crosses (MAGIC), within breeding programmes of underutilized species will be important to be able to fully utilize such crops.

  17. Evaluation of aqueous Moringa seed extract as a seed treatment biofungicide for groundnuts.

    PubMed

    Donli, Patricia O; Dauda, Hassan

    2003-09-01

    In a search for alternatives to currently used fungicides, the potential of aqueous Moringa seed extract (AMSE) as a seed treatment was evaluated. Seeds of groundnut, Arachis hypogea L cv Dakar, were soaked in AMSE at concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 g litre(-1) for 24 h. Comparison was made with Apron Plus (metalaxyl+carboxin+furathiocarb), until recently a recommended seed-treatment chemical, and distilled water, which was the medium for extraction of Moringa seeds. The results showed that AMSE has potential for use as a biofungicide on groundnut seeds, since all the concentrations used except 1 g litre(-1) brought about significant reduction in the incidence of fungi on the seeds, such reduction increasing as the dosage of AMSE increased. There were no significant differences in control between the highest concentration of AMSE (20 g litre(-1)) and Apron Plus at the manufacturer's recommended level. Water also produced slight reductions in the incidence of fungi, although this was not significant at P = 0.05. The sensitivity to AMSE of the fungi tested varied, Mucor sp being the most sensitive and Aspergillus niger the least, with Rhizopus stolonifer and Aspergillus flavus intermediate.

  18. Effects of replacing groundnut cake with blood vegetable waste meal in the diets of weaner rabbits.

    PubMed

    Adeniji, Adedayo Abiodun

    2012-01-01

    A total of seventy-two weaner rabbits of eight weeks of age were used to assess the effects of replacing groundnut cake (GNC) with blood vegetable waste meal (BVWM) in the diets of rabbits. The BVWM was fed to replace dietary GNC at 0, 15, 30, and 45%, with GNC being 15% in the control diet. The four experimental diets were fed ad libitum for a period of eight weeks. BVWM was analyzed to contain a crude protein value of 62.35%. There were comparable feed intake values by rabbits on all the diets although the rabbits in the higher replacement levels of BVWM tended to have consumed more of the feed. There were significant increases (P < 0.05) in body weight gain by rabbits as the BVWM level increased in the diet. Similarly, the feed to gain ratio improved and nitrogen digestibility increased (P < 0.05) with higher levels of BVWM in the diet. This study shows that rabbits can tolerate the 45% BVWM replacement of groundnut cake effectively.

  19. Pyrolysis of groundnut de-oiled cake and characterization of the liquid product.

    PubMed

    Agrawalla, Ankit; Kumar, Sachin; Singh, R K

    2011-11-01

    Renewable biomass is considered as an important energy resource all over the world and for an agriculture based economy like that of India, the future prospects of being able to convert widely available biomass materials into various forms of fuel is most attractive. In this study, pyrolysis of groundnut de-oiled cake was investigated with an aim of studying the physical and chemical characteristics of the bio-fuel produced and to determine its feasibility as a commercial fuel. Thermal pyrolysis of groundnut de-oiled cake was done in a semi-batch reactor at a temperature range of 200-500 °C and at a heating rate of 20 °C/min. The chemical analysis of the bio-fuel showed the presence of functional groups such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, nitriles, nitro compounds and aromatics rings. The physical properties of the bio-fuel obtained were close to that of diesel and petrol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanisms and diversity of resistance to insect pests in wild relatives of groundnut.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H C; Pampapathy, G; Dwivedi, S L; Reddy, L J

    2003-12-01

    The levels of resistance to insect pests in cultivated groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) germplasm are quite low, and therefore, we screened 30 accessions of Arachis spp. and 12 derived lines for resistance to insect pests under field and greenhouse conditions. Accessions belonging to Arachis cardenasii, Arachis duranensis, Arachis kempff-mercadoi, Arachis monticola, Arachis stenosperma, Arachis paraguariensis, Arachis pusilla, and Arachis triseminata showed multiple resistance to the leaf miner Aproaerema modicella, Helicoverpa armigera, Empoasca kerri, and to rust, Puccnia arachidis Speg., and late leaf spot, Cercosporidium personatum (Berk. et Curt.). Arachis cardenasii (ICG 8216), Arachis ipaensis (ICG 8206), A. paraguariensis (ICG 8130), and Arachis appressipila (ICG 8946) showed resistance to leaf feeding and antibiosis to Spodoptera litura under no-choice conditions. Six lines, derived from wild relatives, showed resistance to H. armigera and S. litura, and/or leaf miner. Plant morphological characteristics such as main stem thickness, hypanthium length, leaflet shape and length, leaf hairiness, standard petal length and petal markings, basal leaflet width, main stem thickness and hairiness, stipule adnation length and width, and peg length showed significant correlation and/or regression coefficients with damage by H. armigera, S. litura, and leafhoppers, and these traits can possibly be used as markers to select for resistance to these insect pests. Principal component analysis placed the Arachis spp. accessions into five groups, and these differences can be exploited to diversify resistance to the target insect pests in groundnut.

  1. Herbivore- and Elicitor- Induced Resistance in Groundnut to Asian armyworm, Spodoptera litura (Fab.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    War, Abdul Rashid; Paulraj, Michael Gabriel; War, Mohd Yousf; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2011-01-01

    Induced defense was studied in three groundnut genotypes ICGV 86699 (resistant), NCAc 343 (resistant) and TMV 2 (susceptible) in response to Spodoptera litura infestation and jasmonic acid (JA) application. The activity of the oxidative enzymes [peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO)] and the amounts other host plant defense components [total phenols, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein content] were recorded at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h in JA pretreated (one day before) plants and infested with S. litura, and JA application and simultaneous infestation with S. litura to understand the defense response of groundnut genotypes against S. litura damage. Data on plant damage, larval survival and larval weights were also recorded. There was a rapid increase in the activities of POD and PPO and in the quantities of total phenols, H2O2, MDA and protein content in the JA pretreated + S. litura infested plants. All the three genotypes showed quick response to JA application and S. litura infestation by increasing the defensive compounds. Among all the genotypes, higher induction was recorded in ICGV 86699 in most of the parameters. Reduced plant damage, low larval survival and larval weights were observed in JA pretreated plants. It suggests that pretreatment with elicitors, such as JA could provide more opportunity for plant defense against herbivores. PMID:22042128

  2. A novel M RNA reassortant of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus infecting vegetables in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) was recently identified using serology and nucleocapsid gene sequence from tomato plants with severe tospovirus symptoms in south Florida, which extends the geographic range of this virus from South America and South Africa to now include North America. Full genome s...

  3. Solanaceous vegetables in Florida infected with a novel M RNA reassortant of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We recently identified Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) using serology and nucleocapsid gene sequence from tomato plants with severe tospovirus symptoms in south Florida. This extends the geographic range of this virus from South America and South Africa to now include North America. Full genome se...

  4. Iron and phosphorus utilization in rats fed soaked and dehulled bambara groundnut supplemented with sorghum or crayfish.

    PubMed

    Anyika, Juliana U

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-six adult Wistar albino male rats (75-128 g) of age 8 weeks were used to study the effect of dehulled and soaked bambara groundnut combined with sorghum or crayfish on iron and phosphorus balances of rats fed for 10 days. Three out of the ten days were for adjustment and the rest for the balance period. Six diets were formulated and fed to the rats. The mixed protein diets provided 10% protein daily for the entire study period. Casein (CA) served as a reference protein. Rats fed the CA diet had significant decreases (p<0.05) in food intake, maintenance body weight, phosphorus intake and phosphorus balance when compared with those of the test groups. As judged by iron nutriture, dehulled brown bambara groundnut (DBGB) appeared to be superior to the white variety. Soaking seriously affected iron utilization in brown variety. Dehulling produced significant increases (p<0.05) in phosphorus balance in animals fed the white variety of bambara groundnut compared with the brown variety. On the other hand, soaking produced positive phosphorus balance in rats consuming the brown variety. Addition of crayfish produced a slight nonsignificant decrease (p>0.05) in rodents eating the brown variety. These results suggested that varietal difference and treatment affected iron and phosphorus utilization in rats fed bambara groundnut in conjunction with sorghum and/or crayfish.

  5. A Cross-Species Gene Expression Marker-Based Genetic Map and QTL Analysis in Bambara Groundnut.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hui Hui; Ho, Wai Kuan; Graham, Neil; May, Sean; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2017-02-22

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an underutilised legume crop, which has long been recognised as a protein-rich and drought-tolerant crop, used extensively in Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in agronomic and drought-related traits using an expression marker-based genetic map based on major crop resources developed in soybean. The gene expression markers (GEMs) were generated at the (unmasked) probe-pair level after cross-hybridisation of bambara groundnut leaf RNA to the Affymetrix Soybean Genome GeneChip. A total of 753 markers grouped at an LOD (Logarithm of odds) of three, with 527 markers mapped into linkage groups. From this initial map, a spaced expression marker-based genetic map consisting of 13 linkage groups containing 218 GEMs, spanning 982.7 cM (centimorgan) of the bambara groundnut genome, was developed. Of the QTL detected, 46% were detected in both control and drought treatment populations, suggesting that they are the result of intrinsic trait differences between the parental lines used to construct the cross, with 31% detected in only one of the conditions. The present GEM map in bambara groundnut provides one technically feasible route for the translation of information and resources from major and model plant species to underutilised and resource-poor crops.

  6. Application of response surface methodology for studying the product characteristics of extruded rice-cowpea-groundnut blends.

    PubMed

    Asare, Emmanuel Kwasi; Sefa-Dedeh, Samuel; Sakyi-Dawson, Esther; Afoakwa, Emmanuel Ohene

    2004-08-01

    Response surface methodology (with central composite rotatable design for k=3) was used to investigate the product properties of extruded rice-cowpea-groundnut blends in a single screw extruder. The combined effect of cowpea (0-20%), groundnut (0-10%), and feed moisture (14-48%) levels were used for formulation of the products. The product moisture, expansion ratio, bulk density and total colour change were studied using standard analytical methods. Well-expanded rice-legume blend extrudates of less bulk density and lower moisture content were produced at low feed moisture. Increasing legume addition affected the various shades of colour in the product. Models developed for the indices gave R(2) values ranging from 52.8% (for the b-value) to 86.5% (for bulk density). The models developed suggested that the optimal process variables for the production of a puffed snack with an enhanced nutrition and spongy structure from a rice-cowpea-groundnut blend are low feed moisture of 14-20% and maximum additions of 20% cowpea and 10% groundnut. A lack-of-fit test showed no significance, indicating that the models adequately fitted the data.

  7. A Cross-Species Gene Expression Marker-Based Genetic Map and QTL Analysis in Bambara Groundnut

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Hui Hui; Ho, Wai Kuan; Graham, Neil; May, Sean; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an underutilised legume crop, which has long been recognised as a protein-rich and drought-tolerant crop, used extensively in Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in agronomic and drought-related traits using an expression marker-based genetic map based on major crop resources developed in soybean. The gene expression markers (GEMs) were generated at the (unmasked) probe-pair level after cross-hybridisation of bambara groundnut leaf RNA to the Affymetrix Soybean Genome GeneChip. A total of 753 markers grouped at an LOD (Logarithm of odds) of three, with 527 markers mapped into linkage groups. From this initial map, a spaced expression marker-based genetic map consisting of 13 linkage groups containing 218 GEMs, spanning 982.7 cM (centimorgan) of the bambara groundnut genome, was developed. Of the QTL detected, 46% were detected in both control and drought treatment populations, suggesting that they are the result of intrinsic trait differences between the parental lines used to construct the cross, with 31% detected in only one of the conditions. The present GEM map in bambara groundnut provides one technically feasible route for the translation of information and resources from major and model plant species to underutilised and resource-poor crops. PMID:28241413

  8. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney infection (pyelonephritis) Kidney transplant rejection Sickle cell anemia , a common cause of renal papillary necrosis in ... Controlling diabetes or sickle cell anemia may reduce your risk. To ... provider's instructions when using medicines, including over- ...

  9. Distinct Domains of Yeast Cortical Tag Proteins Bud8p and Bud9p Confer Polar Localization and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Krappmann, Anne-Brit; Taheri, Naimeh; Heinrich, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, diploid yeast cells follow a bipolar budding program, which depends on the two transmembrane glycoproteins Bud8p and Bud9p that potentially act as cortical tags to mark the cell poles. Here, we have performed systematic structure-function analyses of Bud8p and Bud9p to identify functional domains. We find that polar transport of Bud8p and Bud9p does not depend on N-terminal sequences but instead on sequences in the median part of the proteins and on the C-terminal parts that contain the transmembrane domains. We show that the guanosine diphosphate (GDP)/guanosine triphosphate (GTP) exchange factor Bud5p, which is essential for bud site selection and physically interacts with Bud8p, also interacts with Bud9p. Regions of Bud8p and Bud9p predicted to reside in the extracellular space are likely to confer interaction with the N-terminal region of Bud5p, implicating indirect interactions between the cortical tags and the GDP/GTP exchange factor. Finally, we have identified regions of Bud8p and Bud9p that are required for interaction with the cortical tag protein Rax1p. In summary, our study suggests that Bud8p and Bud9p carry distinct domains for delivery of the proteins to the cell poles, for interaction with the general budding machinery and for association with other cortical tag proteins. PMID:17581861

  10. [Intraabdominal fat necrosis].

    PubMed

    Aguilar-García, J J; Alcaide-León, P; Vargas-Serrano, B

    2012-01-01

    The processes that course with intraabdominal fat necrosis often manifest with acute or subacute abdominal pain; these clinical findings can be caused by various conditions, including epiploic appendagitis, omental infarction, encapsulated fat necrosis, mesenteric panniculitis, appendicitis, diverticulitis, and certain neoplasms. In this context, although the anatomic location of the pain and accompanying symptomatology can help orient the diagnosis, there is a risk of unnecessary surgery. Imaging tests like ultrasonography and especially computed tomography are essential for diagnosing intraabdominal fat necrosis. Radiologists must be familiar with the characteristic findings for all the conditions that can cause acute or subacute abdominal pain to ensure appropriate management and prevent unnecessary surgery. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers and their application for diversity assessment in cultivated groundnut (Arachis hypogaea)

    PubMed Central

    Cuc, Luu M; Mace, Emma S; Crouch, Jonathan H; Quang, Vu D; Long, Tran D; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2008-01-01

    Background Cultivated peanut or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is the fourth most important oilseed crop in the world, grown mainly in tropical, subtropical and warm temperate climates. Due to its origin through a single and recent polyploidization event, followed by successive selection during breeding efforts, cultivated groundnut has a limited genetic background. In such species, microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are very informative and useful for breeding applications. The low level of polymorphism in cultivated germplasm, however, warrants a need of larger number of polymorphic microsatellite markers for cultivated groundnut. Results A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from the genotype TMV2. Sequencing of 720 putative SSR-positive clones from a total of 3,072 provided 490 SSRs. 71.2% of these SSRs were perfect type, 13.1% were imperfect and 15.7% were compound. Among these SSRs, the GT/CA repeat motifs were the most common (37.6%) followed by GA/CT repeat motifs (25.9%). The primer pairs could be designed for a total of 170 SSRs and were optimized initially on two genotypes. 104 (61.2%) primer pairs yielded scorable amplicon and 46 (44.2%) primers showed polymorphism among 32 cultivated groundnut genotypes. The polymorphic SSR markers detected 2 to 5 alleles with an average of 2.44 per locus. The polymorphic information content (PIC) value for these markers varied from 0.12 to 0.75 with an average of 0.46. Based on 112 alleles obtained by 46 markers, a phenogram was constructed to understand the relationships among the 32 genotypes. Majority of the genotypes representing subspecies hypogaea were grouped together in one cluster, while the genotypes belonging to subspecies fastigiata were grouped mainly under two clusters. Conclusion Newly developed set of 104 markers extends the repertoire of SSR markers for cultivated groundnut. These markers showed a good level of PIC value in cultivated germplasm and therefore would be

  12. The dormant buds of Rhabdopleura compacta (Hemichordata).

    PubMed

    Dilly, P N

    1975-06-13

    Rhabdopleura has an overwintering stage that consists of two layers of cells surrounding a central yolk mass. This cellular part is surrounded by a thick electron dense capsule which is secreted by the bud itself. The capsule is probably impervious and protective to its contents. Blood vessels join the buds to the zooids of the colony. They form the probable route of transfer of yolk from the zooids to the dormant bud. The capsule of the dormant bud has some structural features in common with the black stolon of the adult zooids. The black stolon is probably formed in a manner similar to that which made the fusellar fabric of the periderm of fossil graptolities.

  13. Supercooling in Overwintering Azalea Flower Buds 1

    PubMed Central

    George, Milon F.; Burke, Michael J.; Weiser, Conrad J.

    1974-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments on whole flower buds and excised floral primordia of azalea (Rhododendron kosterianum, Schneid.) proved that supercooling is the mode of freezing resistance (avoidance) of azalea flower primordia. Increase in the linewidth of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for water upon thawing supports the view that injury to the primordia occurs at the moment of freezing. Nonliving primordia freeze at the same temperatures as living primordia, indicating that morphological features of primordial tissues are a key factor in freezing avoidance of dormant azalea flower primordia. Differential thermal analyses was used to study the relationship of cooling rate to the freezing points of floral primordia in whole flower buds. At a cooling rate of 8.5 C per hour, primordia in whole buds froze at about the same subfreezing temperatures as did excised primordia cooled at 37 C per hour. At more rapid cooling rates primordia in intact buds froze at higher temperatures. PMID:16658832

  14. Potential of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc) milk as a probiotic beverage-a review.

    PubMed

    Murevanhema, Yvonne Y; Jideani, Victoria A

    2013-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterraenea (L.) verdc) (BGN) is a legume; its origin have been traced back to Africa, and it is the third important legume; however, it is one of the neglected crops. It is highly nutritious, and has been termed a complete food. Its seed consist of 49%-63.5% carbohydrate, 15%-25% protein, 4.5%-7.4% fat, 5.2%-6.4% fiber, 3.2%-4.4% ash and 2% mineral compared to whole fresh cow milk 88% moisture, 4.8% carbohydrate, 3.2% proteins, 3.4% fat, 0.7% ash, and 0.01% cholesterol. Its chemical composition is comparable to that of soy bean. Furthermore, BGN has been reported to be a potential crop, owing to its nutritional composition, functional properties, antioxidant potential, and a drought resistant crop. Bambara groundnut milk (BGNM) had been rated higher in acceptability than milk from other legumes like soybean and cowpea. Probiotics have been defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer a health benefit on the host. These benefits have been reported to be therapeutic, suppressing the growth and activity in conditions like infectious diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. The nutritional profile of BGNM is high enough to sustain the growth of probiotics. BGNs are normally boiled and salted, eaten as a relish or roasted, and eaten as a snack. Hence, BGNM can also be fermented with lactic acid bacteria to make a probiotic beverage that not only increase the economic value of the nutritious legume but also help in addressing malnutrition.

  15. Quality evaluation of beef patties formulated with bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranean L.) seed flour.

    PubMed

    Alakali, J S; Irtwange, S V; Mzer, M T

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluated composite beef-bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranean L.) seed flour patties to determine the effect of bambara groundnut flour (BGF) inclusion on the quality and acceptability of the products. The effect of different levels of BGF (0%, 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5%) on the proximate composition and pH indicate that BGF had no significant (p0.05) effect on moisture, protein and carbohydrate of raw patties except ash and pH whereas there was significant (p0.05) effect on all the parameters for the cooked patties. BGF significantly (p0.05) reduced the shrinkage of the cooked patties from 9.13% to 6.76%, while percentage cooking yield, moisture retention, and fat retention increased significantly (p0.05) with increasing BGF levels from 79.1% to 87.2%, 67.51% to 78.05% and 73.51% to 88.34%, respectively. The use of BGF significantly (p0.05) increased the pH of cooked patties from 6.16 to 6.23. Beef patties extended with BGF up to 5% addition exhibited good quality attributes most acceptable to the consumers. The pH of the 0% BGF-beef patties decreased significantly during storage, up to day 14, and increased thereafter. However, the pH of the patties with BGF consistently decreased significantly up to day 21. The TBA values of both (0% and 5% BGF-beef patties) increased significantly (p0.05) from 0.054 to 0.25 and from 0.05 to 0.24mg malonaldehyde/kg, respectively. All sensory attributes decreased significantly (p0.05) as storage time progressed. The physico-chemical, microbiological and sensory characteristics of the patties were found to be acceptable after 21days refrigerated storage. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitrous oxide emissions from an ultisol of the humid tropics under maize-groundnut rotation.

    PubMed

    Khalil, M I; Rosenani, A B; Van Cleemput, O; Fauziah, C I; Shamshuddin, J

    2002-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N20) contributes to global climate change and agricultural soils seem to be the major source. Lack of information led to this study on the influence of different amounts and sources of nitrogen on N2O emission from a maize (Zea mays L.)-groundnut (Arachis hypogae L.) crop rotation in an Ultisol of the humid tropics. The treatments were: inorganic N + crop residues (NC), inorganic N only (RN), and half of inorganic N + crop residues + chicken manure (NCM). The corresponding amount of N applied was 322, 180, and 400 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively. The N2O emissions depended on the amounts and types of N. A maximum peak (9,889 +/- 2,106 microg N2O-N m(-2) d(-1)) was detected at 2 wk before maize sowing amended with chicken manure, showing a persistent influence on N transformations and N2O release. The mineral N from either applied source became low by 2 to 4 wk, coinciding with the small N2O fluxes or its consumption to a few isolated instances. The N2O flux significantly correlated with the mineral N and water-filled pore spaces. The direct annual N2O emission was 3.94 +/- 0.23, 1.90 +/- 0.08, and 1.41 +/- 0.07 kg N2O-N ha(-1) from the NCM, NC, and RN treatments, respectively. The corresponding N2O-N loss of the applied N plus N fixed by groundnut was 0.83, 0.49, and 0.59%. Overestimations of direct annual N2O emission using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methodology suggest a location-specific emission factor for variable N sources to be considered.

  17. Apoptosis, oncosis, and necrosis. An overview of cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Majno, G.; Joris, I.

    1995-01-01

    The historical development of the cell death concept is reviewed, with special attention to the origin of the terms necrosis, coagulation necrosis, autolysis, physiological cell death, programmed cell death, chromatolysis (the first name of apoptosis in 1914), karyorhexis, karyolysis, and cell suicide, of which there are three forms: by lysosomes, by free radicals, and by a genetic mechanism (apoptosis). Some of the typical features of apoptosis are discussed, such as budding (as opposed to blebbing and zeiosis) and the inflammatory response. For cell death not by apoptosis the most satisfactory term is accidental cell death. Necrosis is commonly used but it is not appropriate, because it does not indicate a form of cell death but refers to changes secondary to cell death by any mechanism, including apoptosis. Abundant data are available on one form of accidental cell death, namely ischemic cell death, which can be considered an entity of its own, caused by failure of the ionic pumps of the plasma membrane. Because ischemic cell death (in known models) is accompanied by swelling, the name oncosis is proposed for this condition. The term oncosis (derived from ónkos, meaning swelling) was proposed in 1910 by von Reckling-hausen precisely to mean cell death with swelling. Oncosis leads to necrosis with karyolysis and stands in contrast to apoptosis, which leads to necrosis with karyorhexis and cell shrinkage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856735

  18. Properties of Peach Flower Buds Which Facilitate Supercooling

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Edward N.

    1982-01-01

    Water in dormant peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch. var. `Harbrite') flower buds deep supercooled. Both supercooling and the freezing of water within the bud axis and primordium as distinct components depended on the viability of the bud axis tissue. The viability of the primordium was not critical. Supercooling was prevented by wounding buds with a dissecting needle, indicating that bud structural features were important. Bud morphological features appeared to prevent the propagation of ice through the vascular tissue and into the primordium. In dormant buds, procambial cells had not yet differentiated into xylem vessel elements. Xylem continuity between the bud primordium and adjacent tissues did not appear to be established until buds had deacclimated. It was concluded that structural, morphological, and physiological features of the bud facilitated supercooling. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16662701

  19. Budded baculovirus particle structure revisited.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushi; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M; Rottier, Peter J; van Lent, Jan W M

    2016-02-01

    Baculoviruses are a group of enveloped, double-stranded DNA insect viruses with budded (BV) and occlusion-derived (ODV) virions produced during their infection cycle. BVs are commonly described as rod shaped particles with a high apical density of protein extensions (spikes) on the lipid envelope surface. However, due to the fragility of BVs the conventional purification and electron microscopy (EM) staining methods considerably distort the native viral structure. Here, we use cryo-EM analysis to reveal the near-native morphology of two intensively studied baculoviruses, Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Spodoptera exigua MNPV (SeMNPV), as models for BVs carrying GP64 and F as envelope fusion protein on the surface. The now well-preserved AcMNPV and SeMNPV BV particles have a remarkable elongated, ovoid shape leaving a large, lateral space between nucleocapsid (NC) and envelope. Consistent with previous findings the NC has a distinctive cap and base structure interacting tightly with the envelope. This tight interaction may explain the partial retaining of the envelope on both ends of the NC and the disappearance of the remainder of the BV envelope in the negative-staining EM images. Cryo-EM also reveals that the viral envelope contains two layers with a total thickness of ≈ 6-7 nm, which is significantly thicker than a usual biological membrane (<4 nm) as measured by X-ray scanning. Most spikes are densely clustered at the two apical ends of the virion although some envelope proteins are also found more sparsely on the lateral regions. The spikes on the surface of AcMNPV BVs appear distinctly different from those of SeMNPV. Based on our observations we propose a new near-native structural model of baculovirus BVs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Growth and yield of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) as influenced by weed management practices and Rhizobium inoculation.

    PubMed

    Jhala, A; Rathod, P H; Patel, K C; Van Damme, P

    2005-01-01

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) productivity in India is low, because of many problems beset in its cultivation. One of the serious problems are weeds. Groundnut yield losses due to weeds have been estimated as high as 24 to 70 percent. This has created a scope for using herbicides in groundnut crop. A field investigation was carried out during kharif (rainy) season of 2001-2002 on a sandy loam soil at College Agronomy Farm, B.A. College of Agriculture, Gujarat Agricultural University, Anand, India to study the effect of weed management practices and Rhizobium inoculation on growth and yield of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.). Ten weed control treatments, comprising four treatments of sole application of fluchloralin, pendimethalin, butachlor and metolachlor, respectively each applied at 1.0 kg ha(-1); four treatments comprising of an application of the same herbicides at the same levels coupled with one hand weeding at 30 DAS; one weed-free treatment (hand weedings at 15, 30, 45 DAS); and one unweeded control. All 10 treatmets were combined with and without Rhizobium inoculation (i.e. a total of 20 treatment combinations) under a factorial randomized complete block design (FRBD) with four replications. Minimum weed dry matter accumulation (70 kg/ha) with higher weed control efficiency (90.70%) was recorded under an integrated method i.e. pendimethalin at 1.0 kg ha(-1) + hand weeding at 30 DAS, which also resulted in maximum pod yield (1773.50 kg ha(-1)). This treatment was comparable to fluchloralin applied at 1.0 kg ha(-1) combined with hand- weeding at 30 DAS. Weedy conditions in the unweeded control treatment reduced pod yield by 29.90-35.95% as compared to integrated method. Significantly higher pod yield was obtained with Rhizobium inoculation than the mean value of all treatments without inoculation. For most agronomical parameters examined, Rhizobium inoculation and weed control treatments were independent in their effect.

  1. Effects of malting on the milling performance and acceptability of bambara groundnut (Voandzeia subterranea Thouars) seeds and products.

    PubMed

    Uvere, P O; Uwaegbute, A C; Adedeji, E M

    1999-01-01

    Germinated bambara groundnut was dried by three methods--oven-drying at 50 degrees C, in a solar drier at 38-42 degrees C, and sun drying at 28 +/- 2 degrees C. The samples were milled into flour, and made into 'okpa', a steamed gel. Flour yield increased only in oven-dried malts. The quality of the 'okpa' based on appearance and taste decreased with malting time; solar drying resulted in the poorest product because of its dark color.

  2. Preformation in vegetative buds of Prunus persica: factors influencing number of leaf primordia in overwintering buds.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D; Damiano, C; DeJong, T M

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the influence of bud position, cultivar, tree age, tree carbohydrate status, sampling date, drought and light exposure on the number of leaf primordia formed in dormant vegetative peach buds (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) relative to the number of primordia formed after bud break (neoformed). During winter dormancy, vegetative peach buds from California and Italy were dissected and the number of leaf primordia recorded. Between leaf drop and bud break, the number of leaf primordia doubled from about five to about 10. Parent shoot length, number of nodes on the parent shoot, cross-sectional area of the parent shoot, bud position along the parent shoot and bud cross-sectional area were correlated with the number of leaf primordia. Previous season light exposure, drought and tree carbohydrate status did not affect the number of leaf primordia present. The number of leaf primordia differed significantly among peach varieties and tree ages at leaf drop, but not at bud break. Our results indicate that neoformation accounted for all shoot growth beyond about 10 nodes. The predominance of neoformed shoot growth in peach allows this species great plasticity in its response to current-season conditions.

  3. Uncommon occurrence ratios of aflatoxin B1, B 2, G 1, and G 2 in maize and groundnuts from Malawi.

    PubMed

    Matumba, Limbikani; Sulyok, Michael; Njoroge, Samuel M C; Njumbe Ediage, Emmanuel; Van Poucke, Christof; De Saeger, Sarah; Krska, Rudolf

    2015-02-01

    We report an unusual aflatoxin profile in maize and groundnuts from Malawi, with aflatoxin G1 found routinely at equal or even higher levels than aflatoxin B1. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) ratio in a contaminated sample is generally greater than 50% of total aflatoxin (sum of aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, and G2). In Malawi, the aflatoxin occurrence ratios were determined by examining LC-MS/MS and HPLC fluorescence detection (FLD) data of 156 naturally contaminated raw maize and 80 groundnut samples collected in 2011 and 2012. Results showed that natural aflatoxin occurrence ratio differed. In 47% of the samples, the concentration of AFG1 was higher than that of AFB1. The mean concentration percentages of AFB1/AFB2/AFG1/AFG2 in reference to total aflatoxins were found to be 47:5:43:5%, respectively. The AFG1 and AFB1 50/50 trend was observed in maize and groundnuts and was consistent for samples collected in both years. If the AFB1 measurement was used to check compliance of total aflatoxin regulatory limit set at 10, 20, 100, and 200 μg/kg with an assumption that AFB1≥50% of the total aflatoxin content, 8, 13, 24, and 26% false negative rates would have occurred respectively. It is therefore important for legislation to consider total aflatoxins rather than AFB1 alone.

  4. PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF RESVERATROL AND COUMARIC ACID ON TWO MAJOR GROUNDNUT PESTS AND THEIR EGG PARASITOID BEHAVIOR.

    PubMed

    Sambangi, Pratyusha; Rani, Pathipati Usha

    2016-04-01

    Groundnut, Arachis hypogea L., is one of the plant species that synthesizes phenolic compounds, resveratrol and coumaric acid. They are induced as a defense strategy in plant in response to feeding lepidopterans. The present study investigated the role of resveratrol and coumaric acid in producing antiherbivore effects as a direct defense against two major groundnut pests, Spodoptera litura F. and Amsacta albistriga W., and in indirect defense by attracting the egg parasitoid Trichogramma chilonis Ishii under laboratory conditions. The phenolic compounds deterred the feeding of both pests and caused reduction in the larval weights in a dose-dependent manner in leaf disk bioassays. Antioxidant mechanisms of larvae fed with these phenols were measured by estimating the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APOX), and catalase (CAT). Enzyme activities increased significantly in experimental larvae, more so in resveratrol-treated than in coumaric acid treated larvae. Feeding larvae with resveratrol and coumaric acid resulted in enhanced activities of detoxifying enzymes, carboxyl esterase (EST), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in the midgut tissues of both species, indicating the toxic nature of these compounds. Trichogramma chilonis was more attracted toward coumaric acid treatments in Y-olfactometer tests than to resveratrol. This study contributes to the understanding of the roles of resveratrol and coumaric acid in direct as well as indirect defense, we infer a possible utilization of these compounds in alternate measures of groundnut pest control in future.

  5. Intraspecific and interspecific competition in Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) and Callosobruchus subinnotatus (Pic) on stored bambara groundnut, Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdcourt.

    PubMed

    Lale, N E.S.; Vidal, S

    2001-10-01

    Intraspecific competition was studied in Callosobruchus maculatus and Callosobruchus subinnotatus. Interspecific competition between the two bruchids was also studied to determine which of these species is likely to cause more damage to stored bambara groundnuts, Vigna subterranea in cases of joint infestation. Results showed that increasing the adult density up to 8 females per 10g of bambara groundnut seeds did not significantly reduce the mean number of eggs laid per female, the number of eggs developing to the adult stage, or the weight of emerged adults of either species. The developmental period of the two species was also not significantly affected. The adult emergence curve of C. maculatus was similar to that of C. subinnotatus and was of the scramble type. C. maculatus performed better than C. subinnotatus in interspecific competition and it achieved this through a higher egg-laying ability and a higher rate of progeny production coupled with a shorter life-cycle. The implications of these findings with respect to damage and possible loss of stored bambara groundnut are discussed.

  6. Induced resistance to Helicoverpa armigera through exogenous application of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid in groundnut, Arachis hypogaea.

    PubMed

    War, Abdul Rashid; Paulraj, Michael Gabriel; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu; Sharma, Hari Chand

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance to Helicoverpa armigera through exogenous application of jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) was studied in groundnut genotypes (ICGV 86699, ICGV 86031, ICG 2271 and ICG 1697) with different levels of resistance to insects and the susceptible check JL 24 under greenhouse conditions. Activities of oxidative enzymes and the amounts of secondary metabolites and proteins were quantified at 6 days after JA and SA application/insect infestation. Data were also recorded on plant damage and H. armigera larval weights and survival. Higher levels of enzymatic activities and amounts of secondary metabolites were observed in the insect-resistant genotypes pretreated with JA and then infested with H. armigera than in JL 24. The insect-resistant genotypes suffered lower insect damage and resulted in poor survival and lower weights of H. armigera larvae than JL 24. In some cases, JA and SA showed similar effects. JA and SA induced the activity of antioxidative enzymes in groundnut plants against H. armigera, and reduced its growth and development. However, induced response to application of JA was greater than to SA, and resulted in reduced plant damage, and larval weights and survival, suggesting that induced resistance can be used as a component of pest management in groundnut. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Growth analysis and yield of two varieties of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) as influenced by different weed control methods.

    PubMed

    Olayinka, Bolaji U; Etejere, Emmanuel O

    Field trials were carried out to evaluate the effects of seven weed management strategies on the growth and yield of two groundnut varieties (Samnut 10 and MK 373) for two successive seasons (2010-2011). The experimental layout was a split plot complete randomized block design with three replications. The two groundnut varieties showed identical pattern of results for leaf area index, dry matter accumulation, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and crop growth rate as well as yield. All the weed control treatments significantly enhanced the growth and yield compared with the weedy check. The weed free check had the highest growth but the highest yield was recorded from rice straw mulch at 0.1 m depth + one hand weeding at 6 weeks after sowing (WAS) due to increase in number of matured pods per plant, seed weight per plant and 100-seed weight. The results showed that rice straw mulch at 0.1 m depth + one hand weeding at 6 WAS was better agronomical practice for enhancing growth and yield of groundnut. This enhancement could be as a result of its positive influence on physiological parameters such as leaf area index, dry matter accumulation, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and crop growth rate. Its use is also ecofriendly as it limits the need for synthetic herbicide.

  8. Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts in the Breast Mastitis Duct Ectasia Other Non-cancerous Breast Conditions Breast ... Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts in the Breast Mastitis Duct Ectasia Other Non-cancerous Breast Conditions Back ...

  9. Tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ming

    2013-01-28

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a critical cytokine, which contributes to both physiological and pathological processes. This mini-review will briefly touch the history of TNF discovery, its family members and its biological and pathological functions. Then, it will focus on new findings on the molecular mechanisms of how TNF triggers activation of the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways, which are critical for expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as the MLKL cascade, which is critical for the generation of ROS in response to TNF. Finally, this review will briefly summarize recent advances in understanding TNF-induced cell survival, apoptosis and necrosis (also called necroptosis). Understanding new findings and emerging concepts will impact future research on the molecular mechanisms of TNF signaling in immune disorders and cancer-related inflammation.

  10. Death by necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Syntichaki, Popi; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2002-01-01

    Cells suffer necrotic death when exposed to extreme environmental conditions, adverse and excessive stimuli, or when deleterious mutations are encoded in their genetic material. Unlike apoptosis, which involves a highly regulated and elaborate network of biochemical events and cascades, necrosis has been considered generally to be a chaotic decadence process that effects the inexorable demise of cells otherwise not destined to die. This grim prospect is now slowly being overturned, mostly by exciting new findings in two simple model organisms, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Despite the wide spectrum of necrosis-initiating conditions, evidence is accumulating that execution of necrotic or neurodegenerative cell death may be carried out by a finite common set of mechanisms. PMID:12101090

  11. Necrosis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Büttner, Sabrina; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Madeo, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Necrosis was long regarded as an accidental cell death process resulting from overwhelming cellular injury such as chemical or physical disruption of the plasma membrane. Such a definition, however, proved to be inapplicable to many necrotic scenarios. The discovery that genetic manipulation of several proteins either protected or enhanced necrotic cell death argued in favor of a regulated and hence programmed process, as it is the case for apoptosis. For more than a decade, yeast has served as a model for apoptosis research; recently, evidence accumulated that it also harbors a necrotic program. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about factors that control necrotic cell death in yeast. Mitochondria, aging and a low pH are positive regulators of this process while cellular polyamines (e.g. spermidine) and endonuclease G as well as homeostatic organelles like the vacuole or peroxisomes are potent inhibitors of necrosis. Physiological necrosis may stimulate intercellular signaling via the release of necrotic factors that promote viability of healthy cells and, thus, assure survival of the clone. Together, the data obtained in yeast argue for the existence of a necrotic program, which controls longevity and whose physiological function may thus be aging.

  12. Photoperiod and temperature responses of bud swelling and bud burst in four temperate forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Basler, David; Körner, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Spring phenology of temperate forest trees is optimized to maximize the length of the growing season while minimizing the risk of freezing damage. The release from winter dormancy is environmentally mediated by species-specific responses to temperature and photoperiod. We investigated the response of early spring phenology to temperature and photoperiod at different stages of dormancy release in cuttings from four temperate tree species in controlled environments. By tracking bud development, we were able to identify the onset of bud swelling and bud growth in Acer pseudoplatanus L., Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl. and Picea abies (L.) H. Karst. At a given early stage of dormancy release, the onset and duration of the bud swelling prior to bud burst are driven by concurrent temperature and photoperiod, while the maximum growth rate is temperature dependent only, except for Fagus, where long photoperiods also increased bud growth rates. Similarly, the later bud burst was controlled by temperature and photoperiod (in the photoperiod sensitive species Fagus, Quercus and Picea). We conclude that photoperiod is involved in the release of dormancy during the ecodormancy phase and may influence bud burst in trees that have experienced sufficient chilling. This study explored and documented the early bud swelling period that precedes and defines later phenological stages such as canopy greening in conventional phenological works. It is the early bud growth resumption that needs to be understood in order to arrive at a causal interpretation and modelling of tree phenology at a large scale. Classic spring phenology events mark visible endpoints of a cascade of processes as evidenced here.

  13. Oxytocin signaling in mouse taste buds.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Michael S; Perea-Martinez, Isabel; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Yoshida, Masahide; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Roper, Stephen D; Chaudhari, Nirupa

    2010-08-05

    The neuropeptide, oxytocin (OXT), acts on brain circuits to inhibit food intake. Mutant mice lacking OXT (OXT knockout) overconsume salty and sweet (i.e. sucrose, saccharin) solutions. We asked if OXT might also act on taste buds via its receptor, OXTR. Using RT-PCR, we detected the expression of OXTR in taste buds throughout the oral cavity, but not in adjacent non-taste lingual epithelium. By immunostaining tissues from OXTR-YFP knock-in mice, we found that OXTR is expressed in a subset of Glial-like (Type I) taste cells, and also in cells on the periphery of taste buds. Single-cell RT-PCR confirmed this cell-type assignment. Using Ca2+ imaging, we observed that physiologically appropriate concentrations of OXT evoked [Ca2+]i mobilization in a subset of taste cells (EC50 approximately 33 nM). OXT-evoked responses were significantly inhibited by the OXTR antagonist, L-371,257. Isolated OXT-responsive taste cells were neither Receptor (Type II) nor Presynaptic (Type III) cells, consistent with our immunofluorescence observations. We also investigated the source of OXT peptide that may act on taste cells. Both RT-PCR and immunostaining suggest that the OXT peptide is not produced in taste buds or in their associated nerves. Finally, we also examined the morphology of taste buds from mice that lack OXTR. Taste buds and their constituent cell types appeared very similar in mice with two, one or no copies of the OXTR gene. We conclude that OXT elicits Ca2+ signals via OXTR in murine taste buds. OXT-responsive cells are most likely a subset of Glial-like (Type I) taste cells. OXT itself is not produced locally in taste tissue and is likely delivered through the circulation. Loss of OXTR does not grossly alter the morphology of any of the cell types contained in taste buds. Instead, we speculate that OXT-responsive Glial-like (Type I) taste bud cells modulate taste signaling and afferent sensory output. Such modulation would complement central pathways of appetite

  14. Development and Evaluation of a High Density Genotyping ‘Axiom_Arachis’ Array with 58 K SNPs for Accelerating Genetics and Breeding in Groundnut

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manish K.; Agarwal, Gaurav; Kale, Sandip M.; Clevenger, Josh; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Sriswathi, Manda; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Chavarro, Carolina; Chen, Xiaoping; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Vishwakarma, Manish K.; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya; Liang, Xuanqiang; Bertioli, David J.; Guo, Baozhu; Jackson, Scott A.; Ozias-Akins, Peggy; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most abundant DNA sequence variation in the genomes which can be used to associate genotypic variation to the phenotype. Therefore, availability of a high-density SNP array with uniform genome coverage can advance genetic studies and breeding applications. Here we report the development of a high-density SNP array ‘Axiom_Arachis’ with 58 K SNPs and its utility in groundnut genetic diversity study. In this context, from a total of 163,782 SNPs derived from DNA resequencing and RNA-sequencing of 41 groundnut accessions and wild diploid ancestors, a total of 58,233 unique and informative SNPs were selected for developing the array. In addition to cultivated groundnuts (Arachis hypogaea), fair representation was kept for other diploids (A. duranensis, A. stenosperma, A. cardenasii, A. magna and A. batizocoi). Genotyping of the groundnut ‘Reference Set’ containing 300 genotypes identified 44,424 polymorphic SNPs and genetic diversity analysis provided in-depth insights into the genetic architecture of this material. The availability of the high-density SNP array ‘Axiom_Arachis’ with 58 K SNPs will accelerate the process of high resolution trait genetics and molecular breeding in cultivated groundnut. PMID:28091575

  15. Interaction between bud-site selection and polarity-establishment machineries in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chi-Fang; Savage, Natasha S.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells polarize in order to form a single bud in each cell cycle. Distinct patterns of bud-site selection are observed in haploid and diploid cells. Genetic approaches have identified the molecular machinery responsible for positioning the bud site: during bud formation, specific locations are marked with immobile landmark proteins. In the next cell cycle, landmarks act through the Ras-family GTPase Rsr1 to promote local activation of the conserved Rho-family GTPase, Cdc42. Additional Cdc42 accumulates by positive feedback, creating a concentrated patch of GTP-Cdc42, which polarizes the cytoskeleton to promote bud emergence. Using time-lapse imaging and mathematical modelling, we examined the process of bud-site establishment. Imaging reveals unexpected effects of the bud-site-selection system on the dynamics of polarity establishment, raising new questions about how that system may operate. We found that polarity factors sometimes accumulate at more than one site among the landmark-specified locations, and we suggest that competition between clusters of polarity factors determines the final location of the Cdc42 cluster. Modelling indicated that temporally constant landmark-localized Rsr1 would weaken or block competition, yielding more than one polarity site. Instead, we suggest that polarity factors recruit Rsr1, effectively sequestering it from other locations and thereby terminating landmark activity. PMID:24062579

  16. The relationship between tumour budding, the tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gujam, F J A; McMillan, D C; Mohammed, Z M A; Edwards, J; Going, J J

    2015-09-29

    Tumour budding has previously been reported to predict survival in several solid organ tumours, including breast; however, whether this is independent of other aspects of the tumour microenvironment is unknown. In the present study, the relationship between tumour budding, the tumour microenvironment and survival was examined in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Patients presenting between 1995 and 1998 were studied (n=474). Using routine pathological sections, tumour budding was measured at the invasive margin and its association with clinicopathological characteristics and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was examined. Tumour budding was associated with several adverse pathological characteristics, including lymph node involvement, lymph vessel invasion (LVI), increased tumour stroma percentage (TSP) and weaker local inflammatory infiltrative. Tumour budding was associated with reduced CSS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-3.09, P=0.004), independent of nodal status, molecular subtypes, tumour necrosis, CD8+, CD138+, LVI, blood vessel invasion and TSP. Further, tumour budding was independently associated with reduced CSS in node-negative patients (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.16-5.92, P=0.020) and those who have low TSP (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.09-3.57, P=0.024) and high-grade local inflammatory infiltrative (HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.35-5.36, P=0.014). Tumour budding was a significant predictor of survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer, independent of adverse pathological characteristics and components of tumour microenvironment. The present study further confirms the clinical utility of both tumour and host-based factors of tumour microenvironment.

  17. The relationship between tumour budding, the tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gujam, F J A; McMillan, D C; Mohammed, Z M A; Edwards, J; Going, J J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumour budding has previously been reported to predict survival in several solid organ tumours, including breast; however, whether this is independent of other aspects of the tumour microenvironment is unknown. In the present study, the relationship between tumour budding, the tumour microenvironment and survival was examined in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Methods: Patients presenting between 1995 and 1998 were studied (n=474). Using routine pathological sections, tumour budding was measured at the invasive margin and its association with clinicopathological characteristics and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was examined. Results: Tumour budding was associated with several adverse pathological characteristics, including lymph node involvement, lymph vessel invasion (LVI), increased tumour stroma percentage (TSP) and weaker local inflammatory infiltrative. Tumour budding was associated with reduced CSS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14–3.09, P=0.004), independent of nodal status, molecular subtypes, tumour necrosis, CD8+, CD138+, LVI, blood vessel invasion and TSP. Further, tumour budding was independently associated with reduced CSS in node-negative patients (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.16–5.92, P=0.020) and those who have low TSP (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.09–3.57, P=0.024) and high-grade local inflammatory infiltrative (HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.35–5.36, P=0.014). Conclusions: Tumour budding was a significant predictor of survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer, independent of adverse pathological characteristics and components of tumour microenvironment. The present study further confirms the clinical utility of both tumour and host-based factors of tumour microenvironment. PMID:26263482

  18. Forecasting emergence and movement of overwintering hazelnut big bud mites from big buds.

    PubMed

    Webber, Janette; Bruce Chapman, R; Worner, S P

    2008-06-01

    Eriophyoid big bud mites are key pests of hazelnut throughout the world, but they are difficult to control with chemicals or other methods because they are protected inside the bud. The most effective time for control is during the relatively short emergence period which is difficult for growers to predict. The key objectives of this study were to monitor mite emergence from big buds in spring, determine the phenology of mites in relation to tree phenology and weather, and identify the optimum timing for control measures. Mite emergence was found to occur between early and late spring in Canterbury, New Zealand. Mite emergence and movement occurred when daily maximum temperatures were >15 degrees C and when mean temperatures were >9 degrees C, with mite emergence increasing with temperature. The developmental status of new buds during mite emergence was a crucial factor in the infestation of new buds. An accumulated heat sum model (DD), starting at Julian date 152 and using a lower threshold temperature of 6 degrees C, predicted the onset of emergence on two cultivars and at two sites at approximately 172 DD. A regression model based on leaf number, bud length, bud width, DD and Julian date provided a more satisfactory prediction of percent accumulated mite emergence. It is recommended both peak mite emergence and the developmental status of hazelnut buds be used to optimise the time to apply control measures. The optimum time to apply a control was predicted to be before buds measure 0.5 x 0.5 mm (width x length), are enclosed within the axil, and have a rounded tip, or, when 50% accumulated mite emergence has occurred, whichever occurs first.

  19. The relationship between tumour budding, the tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with primary operable colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, Hester C; Park, James H; Edwards, Joanne; Horgan, Paul G; McMillan, Donald C; Going, James J

    2016-07-12

    Tumour budding has been reported to reflect invasiveness, metastasis and unfavourable prognosis in colorectal cancer. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between tumour budding and clinicopathological characteristics, tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with primary operable colorectal cancer. A total of 303 patients from a prospective data set of patients with primary operable colorectal cancer were included in the study. The presence of budding was determined through assessment of all tumour-containing H&E slides and the number of tumour buds was counted using a 10 high-powered field method. Routine pathologic sections were used to assess: tumour necrosis, the tumour inflammatory cell infiltrate using Klintrup-Makinen (KM) grade and tumour stroma percentage (TSP) combined as the Glasgow Microenvironment Score (GMS). High-grade tumour budding was present in 39% of all tumours and in 28% of node-negative tumours respectively. High-grade budding was significantly associated with T stage (P<0.001), N stage (P<0.001), TNM stage (P<0.001), serosal involvement (P<0.001), venous invasion (P<0.005), KM grade (P=0.022), high tumour stroma (P<0.001) and GMS (P<0.001). Tumour budding was associated with reduced cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR=4.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.50-6.52; P<0.001), independent of age (HR=1.47; 95% CI, 1.13-1.90; P=0.004), TNM stage (HR=1.52; 95% CI, 1.02-2.25; P=0.040), venous invasion (HR=1.73; 95% CI, 1.13-2.64; P=0.012) and GMS (HR=1.54; 95% CI, 1.15-2.07; P=0.004). The presence of tumour budding was associated with elements of the tumour microenvironment and was an independent adverse prognostic factor in patients with primary operable colorectal cancer. Specifically high tumour budding stratifies effectively the prognostic value of tumour stage, venous invasion and GMS. Taken together, tumour budding should be assessed routinely in patients with primary operable colorectal cancer.

  20. The relationship between tumour budding, the tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with primary operable colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Wyk, Hester C; Park, James H; Edwards, Joanne; Horgan, Paul G; McMillan, Donald C; Going, James J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumour budding has been reported to reflect invasiveness, metastasis and unfavourable prognosis in colorectal cancer. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between tumour budding and clinicopathological characteristics, tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with primary operable colorectal cancer. Methods: A total of 303 patients from a prospective data set of patients with primary operable colorectal cancer were included in the study. The presence of budding was determined through assessment of all tumour-containing H&E slides and the number of tumour buds was counted using a 10 high-powered field method. Routine pathologic sections were used to assess: tumour necrosis, the tumour inflammatory cell infiltrate using Klintrup–Makinen (KM) grade and tumour stroma percentage (TSP) combined as the Glasgow Microenvironment Score (GMS). Results: High-grade tumour budding was present in 39% of all tumours and in 28% of node-negative tumours respectively. High-grade budding was significantly associated with T stage (P<0.001), N stage (P<0.001), TNM stage (P<0.001), serosal involvement (P<0.001), venous invasion (P<0.005), KM grade (P=0.022), high tumour stroma (P<0.001) and GMS (P<0.001). Tumour budding was associated with reduced cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR=4.03; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.50–6.52; P<0.001), independent of age (HR=1.47; 95% CI, 1.13–1.90; P=0.004), TNM stage (HR=1.52; 95% CI, 1.02–2.25; P=0.040), venous invasion (HR=1.73; 95% CI, 1.13–2.64; P=0.012) and GMS (HR=1.54; 95% CI, 1.15–2.07; P=0.004). Conclusions: The presence of tumour budding was associated with elements of the tumour microenvironment and was an independent adverse prognostic factor in patients with primary operable colorectal cancer. Specifically high tumour budding stratifies effectively the prognostic value of tumour stage, venous invasion and GMS. Taken together, tumour budding should be assessed routinely in patients with

  1. (22)Na influx is significantly lower in salt tolerant groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Smitharani, J A; Sowmyashree, M L; Vasantha, K M; Srivastava, M; Sashidhar, V R

    2014-01-01

    Distinct varieties differing in salt tolerance were initially identified from two separate green house experiments using two systems; solution as well as soil culture. The first screening involved a diverse group of 27 cultivars. Several physiological traits; Chlorophyll Stability Index (CSI), Salt Tolerance Index (STI) and ion content were determined to screen the cultivars for differences in salt tolerance using solution culture in the first experiment. A set of six varieties (three tolerant and three susceptible) were selected from this experiment and then subjected again to salt stress adopting a natural soil system in the second experiment which involved a screening approach essentially similar to that of the first experiment. In the third experiment using two distinct cultivars differing in salt tolerance selected from experiment II, (22)Na influx rate was determined in the root and shoot at the end of a 24 h salt imposition in Hoagland's nutrient system containing 180 KBq of (22)Na. The results suggested that there were distinct differences in (22)Na influx rate into root and concurrently in the shoot. The salt tolerant Spanish improved and one of the moderately tolerant Trombay variety TAG 24, showed good regulation of (22)Na influx resulting in low (22)Na concentration. The salt susceptible variety JSP39 had nearly 7-8 fold higher root (22)Na content as compared to the tolerant and moderately tolerant cultivars. The results have highlighted the importance of Na exclusion as an important determinant of salt tolerance in groundnut.

  2. Relative efficacy of different distillery effluents on growth, nitrogen fixation and yield of groundnut.

    PubMed

    Ramana, S; Biswas, A K; Singh, A B; Yadava, R B R

    2002-01-01

    A field experiment with groundnut as test crop was conducted to evaluate the manurial potential of three distillery effluents: raw spent wash (RSW), biomethanated spent wash (BSW) and lagoon sludge (LS) vis-à-vis recommended fertilizers (NPK + farm yard manure (FYM)) and a control (no fertilizer or distillery effluent). It was found that all the three distillery effluents increased total chlorophyll content, crop growth rate (CGR), total dry matter, nutrient uptake (N, P and K) and finally seed yield compared to the control but inhibited nodulation and decreased nitrogen fixation. Among the three distillery effluents, BSW produced the highest seed yield (619 kg ha(-1)) twice that of control (3.10 kg ha(-1)), followed by RSW (557 kg ha(-1)) and LS (472 kg ha(-1)). However, the distillery effluents did not influence protein and oil contents. It was concluded that these distillery effluents because of their high manurial potential could supply nutrients, particularly potassium, nitrogen and sulphur, to the crops and thus reduce the fertilizer requirement of crops. Nevertheless, the crop performance and yield with three distillery effluents were overall less than that produced by recommended NPK + FYM probably on account of failure of the effluents to supply balanced nutrition to the plants for achieving their potential growth capacity.

  3. In Vitro Seeds Germination and Seedling Growth of Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc. (Fabaceae))

    PubMed Central

    Koné, Mongomaké; Koné, Tchoa; Silué, Nakpalo; Soumahoro, André Brahima; Kouakou, Tanoh Hilaire

    2015-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an indigenous grain legume. It occupies a prominent place in the strategies to ensure food security in sub-Saharan Africa. Development of an efficient in vitro regeneration system, a prerequisite for genetic transformation application, requires the establishment of optimal conditions for seeds germination and plantlets development. Three types of seeds were inoculated on different basal media devoid of growth regulators. Various strengths of the medium of choice and the type and concentration of carbon source were also investigated. Responses to germination varied with the type of seed. Embryonic axis (EA) followed by seeds without coat (SWtC) germinated rapidly and expressed a high rate of germination. The growth performances of plantlets varied with the basal medium composition and the seeds type. The optimal growth performances of plants were displayed on half strength MS basal medium with SWtC and EA as source of seeds. Addition of 3% sucrose in the culture medium was more suitable for a maximum growth of plantlets derived from EA. PMID:26550604

  4. Combining Ability of Pod Yield and Related Traits of Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) under Salinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Shah-E-Alam, Md.; Hamid, Md. Abdul; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Malek, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    A study was performed using 6 × 6 F1 diallel population without reciprocals to assess the mode of inheritance of pod yield and related traits in groundnut with imposed salinity stress. Heterosis was found for pod number and yield. Data on general and specific combining ability (gca and sca) indicated additive and nonadditive gene actions. The gca: sca ratios were much less than unity suggesting predominant role of nonadditive gene effects. Cultivars “Binachinabadam-2” and “Dacca-1” and mutant M6/25/64-82 had the highest, second highest, and third highest pod number, as well as gca values, respectively. These two cultivars and another mutant M6/15/70-19 also had the highest, second highest, and third highest pod yield, as well as gca values, respectively. Therefore, “Dacca-1”, “Binachinabadam-2”, M6/25/64-82, and M6/15/70-19 could be used as source of salinity tolerance. Cross combinations showing high sca effects arising from parents with high and low gca values for any trait indicate the influence of nonadditive genes on their expression. Parents of these crosses can be used for biparental mating or reciprocal recurrent selection for developing high yielding varieties. Crosses with high sca effects having both parents with good gca effects could be exploited by pedigree breeding to get transgressive segregants. PMID:24737982

  5. In Vitro Seeds Germination and Seedling Growth of Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc. (Fabaceae)).

    PubMed

    Koné, Mongomaké; Koné, Tchoa; Silué, Nakpalo; Soumahoro, André Brahima; Kouakou, Tanoh Hilaire

    2015-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an indigenous grain legume. It occupies a prominent place in the strategies to ensure food security in sub-Saharan Africa. Development of an efficient in vitro regeneration system, a prerequisite for genetic transformation application, requires the establishment of optimal conditions for seeds germination and plantlets development. Three types of seeds were inoculated on different basal media devoid of growth regulators. Various strengths of the medium of choice and the type and concentration of carbon source were also investigated. Responses to germination varied with the type of seed. Embryonic axis (EA) followed by seeds without coat (SWtC) germinated rapidly and expressed a high rate of germination. The growth performances of plantlets varied with the basal medium composition and the seeds type. The optimal growth performances of plants were displayed on half strength MS basal medium with SWtC and EA as source of seeds. Addition of 3% sucrose in the culture medium was more suitable for a maximum growth of plantlets derived from EA.

  6. Tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma assessed by cytokeratin immunostaining and budding areas: possible involvement of c-Met.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Keisuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Aoki, Mikiko; Hamasaki, Makoto; Koga, Kaori; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Yuichi; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2014-11-01

    Tumor budding/sprouting has been shown to be an independent adverse prognostic factor in T1 and T3N0 colorectal carcinomas, however, its assessment could be improved by more accurate identification of budding carcinoma cells and consideration of budding areas. Moreover, tumor budding mechanisms are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the identification of budding tumor cells by either H&E staining alone or H&E with immunohistochemistry and developed a scoring system based on budding grades and areas. We examined whether the budding score correlated with clinicopathologic features and prognosis and the association between tumor budding/sprouting and c-Met protein expression and phosphorylation and MET gene copy numbers because c-Met is known to play an important role in colorectal carcinoma tumorigenesis. Cytokeratin immunohistochemistry could identify tumors with shorter disease-free survival (DFS) from the low-grade budding group assessed with H&E alone. High budding scores based on budding grade and area were more significantly correlated with DFS than scores obtained using the budding grade alone. In tumors with a high budding score, c-Met expression and phosphorylation levels and MET gene copy numbers were significantly increased at the invasive front compared with those in superficial tumor portions. This study showed for the first time that high levels of phospho-c-Met at the invasive front were significantly associated with a high budding score and shorter DFS. In conclusion, a budding score assessed by budding grades and budding-positive areas correlates highly with clinicopathologic aggressive features of colorectal carcinoma. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma assessed by cytokeratin immunostaining and budding areas: Possible involvement of c-Met

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Keisuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Aoki, Mikiko; Hamasaki, Makoto; Koga, Kaori; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Yuichi; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    Tumor budding/sprouting has been shown to be an independent adverse prognostic factor in T1 and T3N0 colorectal carcinomas, however, its assessment could be improved by more accurate identification of budding carcinoma cells and consideration of budding areas. Moreover, tumor budding mechanisms are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the identification of budding tumor cells by either H&E staining alone or H&E with immunohistochemistry and developed a scoring system based on budding grades and areas. We examined whether the budding score correlated with clinicopathologic features and prognosis and the association between tumor budding/sprouting and c-Met protein expression and phosphorylation and MET gene copy numbers because c-Met is known to play an important role in colorectal carcinoma tumorigenesis. Cytokeratin immunohistochemistry could identify tumors with shorter disease-free survival (DFS) from the low-grade budding group assessed with H&E alone. High budding scores based on budding grade and area were more significantly correlated with DFS than scores obtained using the budding grade alone. In tumors with a high budding score, c-Met expression and phosphorylation levels and MET gene copy numbers were significantly increased at the invasive front compared with those in superficial tumor portions. This study showed for the first time that high levels of phospho-c-Met at the invasive front were significantly associated with a high budding score and shorter DFS. In conclusion, a budding score assessed by budding grades and budding-positive areas correlates highly with clinicopathologic aggressive features of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:25220207

  8. Bud Necrosis of Green Ash Nursery Trees is Influenced by Nitrogen Availability and Fertilizer Type

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to determine whether nitrogen (N) status of nursery-grown green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica ‘Summit’) trees in the autumn is related to tip die back during the following spring. In 2005, different rates of N from either urea formaldehyde (UF) or a controlled release fertilizer ...

  9. Bilingual Buds: The Evolution of a Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The impetus to begin Bilingual Buds came about six years ago when the author, pregnant with twins and commuting into New York City, was reading about the numerous cognitive benefits for children of acquiring a second language early in their lives. She was surprised to learn that even by the age of six months, children begin to lose the ability to…

  10. Bud-grafting yellow-poplar

    Treesearch

    David T. Funk

    1963-01-01

    Several years ago we began work on the vegetative propagation of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) with the aim of eventually establishing a clonal seed orchard. We tried field grafting, field budding, and air layering. We then attempted rooting cuttings in the greenhouse and in an indoor propagation bench. The best we could do with any of these methods was 4...

  11. Bilingual Buds: The Evolution of a Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The impetus to begin Bilingual Buds came about six years ago when the author, pregnant with twins and commuting into New York City, was reading about the numerous cognitive benefits for children of acquiring a second language early in their lives. She was surprised to learn that even by the age of six months, children begin to lose the ability to…

  12. Cryopreservation of Salix sp. dormant winter buds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In cryopreservation, using dormant winter buds (DB) as source plant materials is economically advantageous over tissue culture options (TC). Processing DB does not require aseptic conditions and elaborate cryopreservation procedures. However, the DB approach is only feasible for cryopreserving a sel...

  13. Radiation effects on bovine taste bud membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shatzman, A.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1982-11-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced taste loss, the effects of radiation on preparations of enriched bovine taste bud membranes were studied. Taste buds containing circumvallate papilae, and surrounding control epithelial tissues devoid of taste buds, were obtained from steers and given radiation doses of 0-7000 cGy (rad). Tissue fractions were isolated into membrane-enriched and heterogeneous components using differential and sucrose gradient centrifugation of tissue homogenates. The yield of membranes, as measured by protein content in the buoyant membrane-enriched fractions, was reduced in quantity with increasing radiation dose. The relation between radiation dose and membrane quantity in membrane-enriched fractions could be fit by a simple exponential model with taste bud-derived membranes twice as radiosensitive as membranes from control epithelial tissue. Binding of sucrose, sodium, and acetate and fluoride stimulation of adenylate cyclase were nearly identical in both irradiated and nonirradiated intact membranes. Radiation had no effect on fractions of heterogeneous components. While it is not clear what changes are occurring in enriched taste cell membranes, damage to membranes may play an important role in the taste loss observed in patients following radiotherapy.

  14. Sprouting of dormant buds on border trees

    Treesearch

    G.R., Jr. Trimble; H. Clay Smith; H. Clay Smith

    1970-01-01

    As part of an evaluation of silvicultura1 systems used in managing Appalachian hardwoods, we are studying degrade of border trees surrounding harvest-cut openings made in the patch cutting and group selection systems. One facet of this research dealt with determining what portion of visually evident dormant buds on border tree boles sprouted when the openings were cut...

  15. Programmed Cell Death Initiation and Execution in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Strich, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death (PCD) was initially described in metazoans as a genetically controlled process leading to intracellular breakdown and engulfment by a neighboring cell . This process was distinguished from other forms of cell death like necrosis by maintenance of plasma membrane integrity prior to engulfment and the well-defined genetic system controlling this process. Apoptosis was originally described as a mechanism to reshape tissues during development. Given this context, the assumption was made that this process would not be found in simpler eukaryotes such as budding yeast. Although basic components of the apoptotic pathway were identified in yeast, initial observations suggested that it was devoid of prosurvival and prodeath regulatory proteins identified in mammalian cells. However, as apoptosis became extensively linked to the elimination of damaged cells, key PCD regulatory proteins were identified in yeast that play similar roles in mammals. This review highlights recent discoveries that have permitted information regarding PCD regulation in yeast to now inform experiments in animals. PMID:26272996

  16. Dietary exposure to aflatoxin from maize and groundnut in young children from Benin and Togo, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Egal, S; Hounsa, A; Gong, Y Y; Turner, P C; Wild, C P; Hall, A J; Hell, K; Cardwell, K F

    2005-10-15

    impact of groundnut consumption on aflatoxin exposure was limited in this population. High AF-alb adduct levels were correlated with high prevalence of A. flavus and aflatoxin in groundnut, but significance was weak after adjustment for weaning status, agro-ecological zone and maternal socio-economic status (resp. p=0.091 and p=0.083). Ingestion of A. flavus and aflatoxin was high in certain agro-ecological zones (SS and SGS) and among the higher socio-economic strata due to higher frequencies of groundnut consumption. Contamination of groundnuts was similar across socio-economic and agro-ecological boundaries. In conclusion, dietary exposure to aflatoxin from groundnut was less than from maize in young children from Benin and Togo. Intervention strategies that aim to reduce dietary exposure in this population need to focus on maize consumption in particular, but they should not ignore consumption of groundnuts.

  17. Arthroscopic assessment of avascular necrosis.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; Durrant, Adam W

    2011-08-01

    Avascular necrosis of the lunate is a process that is not well understood. The cause is uncertain, but a common theory persists that it is caused by disruption of the vascular supply to the lunate. This article discusses an approach to assessment that respects the articular cartilage and places at the front of the decision-making process the pathoanatomic components of the articular cartilage. It primarily respects the articular cartilage in the patient with avascular necrosis. This approach was developed for avascular necrosis of the lunate, but in principle applies to other joints with avascular necrosis as well.

  18. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds123

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood. PMID:26730405

  19. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood.

  20. Localization of Bud2p, a GTPase-activating protein necessary for programming cell polarity in yeast to the presumptive bud site

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hay-Oak; Sanson, Anthony; Herskowitz, Ira

    1999-01-01

    Yeast cells of different cell type exhibit distinct budding patterns that reflect the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Bud1p (Rsr1p), a Ras-like GTPase, and Bud2p, a GTPase-activating protein for Bud1p, are essential for proper budding pattern. We show that Bud2p is localized at the presumptive bud site in G1 cells in all cell types and that this localization is independent of Bud1p. Bud2p subsequently localizes to the mother-bud neck after bud emergence; this localization depends on the integrity of the septins. These observations indicate that Bud2p becomes positioned in G1 cells by recognizing cell type-specific landmarks at the presumptive bud site. PMID:10444589

  1. Processing umami and other tastes in mammalian taste buds.

    PubMed

    Roper, Stephen D; Chaudhari, Nirupa

    2009-07-01

    Neuroscientists are now coming to appreciate that a significant degree of information processing occurs in the peripheral sensory organs of taste prior to signals propagating to the brain. Gustatory stimulation causes taste bud cells to secrete neurotransmitters that act on adjacent taste bud cells (paracrine transmitters) as well as on primary sensory afferent fibers (neurocrine transmitters). Paracrine transmission, representing cell-cell communication within the taste bud, has the potential to shape the final signal output that taste buds transmit to the brain. The following paragraphs summarize current thinking about how taste signals generally, and umami taste in particular, are processed in taste buds.

  2. Eukaryotic-Like Virus Budding in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Quemin, Emmanuelle R J; Chlanda, Petr; Sachse, Martin; Forterre, Patrick; Prangishvili, David; Krupovic, Mart

    2016-09-13

    Similar to many eukaryotic viruses (and unlike bacteriophages), viruses infecting archaea are often encased in lipid-containing envelopes. However, the mechanisms of their morphogenesis and egress remain unexplored. Here, we used dual-axis electron tomography (ET) to characterize the morphogenesis of Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1), the prototype of the family Fuselloviridae and representative of the most abundant archaea-specific group of viruses. Our results show that SSV1 assembly and egress are concomitant and occur at the cellular cytoplasmic membrane via a process highly reminiscent of the budding of enveloped viruses that infect eukaryotes. The viral nucleoprotein complexes are extruded in the form of previously unknown rod-shaped intermediate structures which have an envelope continuous with the host membrane. Further maturation into characteristic spindle-shaped virions takes place while virions remain attached to the cell surface. Our data also revealed the formation of constricted ring-like structures which resemble the budding necks observed prior to the ESCRT machinery-mediated membrane scission during egress of various enveloped viruses of eukaryotes. Collectively, we provide evidence that archaeal spindle-shaped viruses contain a lipid envelope acquired upon budding of the viral nucleoprotein complex through the host cytoplasmic membrane. The proposed model bears a clear resemblance to the egress strategy employed by enveloped eukaryotic viruses and raises important questions as to how the archaeal single-layered membrane composed of tetraether lipids can undergo scission. The replication of enveloped viruses has been extensively studied in eukaryotes but has remained unexplored for enveloped viruses infecting Archaea Here, we provide a sequential view on the assembly and egress of SSV1, a prototypic archaeal virus. The observed process is highly similar to the budding of eukaryotic enveloped viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus

  3. Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Insoluble Dietary Fiber Isolated from Bambara Groundnut (Vigna subterranea [L.] Verdc.).

    PubMed

    Diedericks, Claudine F; Jideani, Victoria A

    2015-09-01

    Bambara groundnut (BGN) is a widely cultivated legume with a rich nutritional profile, yet despite its many benefits it still remains underutilized. To highlight its potential value, 4 BGN varieties-brown, red, black eye, and brown eye were subjected to sequential enzymatic treatments followed by centrifugation to obtain the insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) fraction. The IDFs were vacuum-dried and evaluated for color, hydration properties, fat absorption, polyphenolic compounds, neutral sugars, and uronic acids. An optimized white bread formulation was also determined using brown BGN-IDF in an optimal (IV) mixture design. Three mixture components constrained at lower and upper limits (water: 57% to 60%, yeast: 2.3% to 5.3%, and BGN-IDF: 7% to 10%) were evaluated for their effects on responses of specific loaf volume, gumminess, chewiness, and resilience of the loaves. All BGN-IDFs differed significantly (P ≤ 0.05) across all color parameters. Polyphenols were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) highest in red and brown BGN-IDFs. Arabinose/galactose (31.04% to 37.12%), xylose (16.53% to 27.30%), and mannose (14.48% to 22.24%) were the major sugars identified. Swelling capacity was significantly (P ≤ 0.05) highest for brown eye BGN-IDF (7.72 ± 0.49 mL/g). Water retention capacity ranged from 1.63 to 2.01 g water/g dry weight. Fat absorption for red BGN-IDF differed significantly (P ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, the best optimal white bread formulation enriched with brown BGN-IDF was established with numerical optimization at 59.5% water, 4.3% yeast, and 8.5% BGN-IDF. Overall positive physicochemical and functional properties were observed for BGN-IDFs, and it was shown that an optimal white bread enriched with BGN-IDF could be produced. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Bradyrhizobium subterraneum sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium from root nodules of groundnuts.

    PubMed

    Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Chimwamurombe, Percy; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Seven strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of local races of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) grown on subsistence farmers' fields in the Kavango region, Namibia, were previously characterized and identified as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To corroborate their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized using a polyphasic approach. All strains possessed identical 16S rRNA gene sequences with Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T being the most closely related type strain in the 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis, and Bradyrhizobium daqingense CCBAU 15774T in the ITS sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated glnII-recA-rpoB-dnaK placed the strains in a highly supported lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, most closely related to Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T. The species status was validated by results of DNA–DNA hybridization. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH genes placed the novel strains in a group with nifH of ‘Bradyrhizobium arachidis’ CCBAU 051107 that also nodulates peanuts. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests including carbon source utilization and antibiotic resistance could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Novel strain 58 2-1T induced effective nodules on V. subterranea, Vigna unguiculata and A. hypogaea, and some strains on Lablab purpureus. Based on the data presented, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium subterraneum sp. nov. is proposed, with 58 2-1T [ = DSM 100298T = LMG 28792T = NTCCM0016T (Windhoek)] as the type strain. The DNA G+C content of strain 58 2-1T was 64.7 mol% (T m).

  5. Rhizobium pakistanensis sp. nov., isolated from groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) nodules grown in rainfed Pothwar, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Rabia; Zhang, Yu Jing; Ali, Safdar; Sui, Xin Hua; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Amara, Ummay; Chen, Wen Xin; Hayat, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-negative, white, non-motile, rod shaped bacterial strain BN-19(T) was isolated from a root nodule of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) in Pakistan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain BN-19(T) formed a subclade in the genus Rhizobium together with Rhizobium alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T), Rhizobium vignae CCBAU 05176(T), Rhizobium huautlense SO2(T) and Rhizobium tarimense PL-41(T) with sequence similarities of 97.5, 97.3, 97.2 and 97.1 % respectively. Sequence analysis of housekeeping genes atpD, glnII and recA (with sequence similarities of ≤92 %) confirmed the unique position of BN-19(T) in the genus Rhizobium. DNA-DNA relatedness between the strain BN-19(T) and R. alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T), R. vignae CCBAU 05176(T), R. huautlense SO2(T) and R. tarimense PL-41(T) were 20.6, 22.5, 15.9 and 20.5 % respectively, further confirming that BN-19(T) represents a novel species in the genus Rhizobium. The DNA G + C content was 60.1 mol%. The dominant fatty acids of strain BN-19(T) were C19:0 cyclo ω8c, summed feature 2 (C14:0 3OH and/or C16:1 iso I) and summed feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c). Some phenotypic features also differentiate the strain BN-19(T) from the related species. On the basis of these results, strain BN-19(T) is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium pakistanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BN-19(T) (=LMG 27895(T) = CCBAU 101086(T)).

  6. An electrophoretic investigation of groundnut proteins: the structure of arachins A and B

    PubMed Central

    Tombs, M. P.

    1965-01-01

    1. The proteins of the groundnut cotyledon have been fractionated and analysed by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography and acrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Seventeen components were detected. 2. A new method is described for the preparation of arachin, using calcium precipitation. The product contains at least 99% of arachin. 3. The theory of acrylamide-gel electrophoresis is developed and applied to the arachin system to predict the molecular weight of one sub-unit of arachin. 4. A variant form of arachin, arachin B, has been discovered. Of 81 nuts, 27 contained only arachin B, 53 contained both arachin A and B, and one contained arachin A only. This is almost certainly a polymorphism of arachin; this is the first example of polymorphism to be reported in plant proteins. 5. A combination of controlled denaturation, electrophoretic analysis, ultracentrifuge and Sephadex filtration data has shown that arachin A contains four different kinds of peptide chains (α, β, γ and δ). Arachin B contains only β, γ and δ chains. 6. The most probable structure for arachin B, mol.wt. 330000 form, is 8 β, 2 γ and 2 δ chains, and for arachin A, 4 α, 4 β, 2 γ and 2 δ chains. Arachin without β chains was not found. 7. The α and β chains have mol.wts. of about 35000 and the γ and δ chains of about 10000. 8. Three N-terminal groups were found: the α and β chains both terminate in glycine; the γ and δ chains terminate in isoleucine and glutamic acid. 9. Arachin contains no carbohydrate. 10. Disulphide bonds are not important in arachin: there are none between the α, β, γ and δ chains. 11. The amino acid compositions of arachins A and B are very similar. Glutamic acid and aspartic acid residues are exceptionally frequent. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:14343121

  7. Budding of domains in mixed bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Jean; Komura, Shigeyuki; Andelman, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model that accounts for the budding behavior of domains in lipid bilayers, where each of the bilayer leaflets has a coupling between its local curvature and the local lipid composition. The compositional asymmetry between the two monolayers leads to an overall spontaneous curvature. The membrane free energy contains three contributions: the bending energy, the line tension, and a Landau free energy for a lateral phase separation. Within a mean-field treatment, we obtain various phase diagrams which contain fully budded, dimpled, and flat states. In particular, for some range of membrane parameters, the phase diagrams exhibit a tricritical behavior as well as a three-phase coexistence region. The global phase diagrams can be divided into three types and are analyzed in terms of the curvature-composition coupling parameter and domain size.

  8. Live confocal imaging of Arabidopsis flower buds.

    PubMed

    Prunet, Nathanaël; Jack, Thomas P; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-11-01

    Recent advances in confocal microscopy, coupled with the development of numerous fluorescent reporters, provide us with a powerful tool to study the development of plants. Live confocal imaging has been used extensively to further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the formation of roots, shoots and leaves. However, it has not been widely applied to flowers, partly because of specific challenges associated with the imaging of flower buds. Here, we describe how to prepare and grow shoot apices of Arabidopsis in vitro, to perform both single-point and time-lapse imaging of live, developing flower buds with either an upright or an inverted confocal microscope. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Synchronization of the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Foltman, Magdalena; Molist, Iago; Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A number of model organisms have provided the basis for our understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. These model organisms are generally much easier to manipulate than mammalian cells and as such provide amenable tools for extensive genetic and biochemical analysis. One of the most common model organisms used to study the cell cycle is the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model provides the ability to synchronise cells efficiently at different stages of the cell cycle, which in turn opens up the possibility for extensive and detailed study of mechanisms regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, we describe methods in which budding yeast cells are arrested at a particular phase of the cell cycle and then released from the block, permitting the study of molecular mechanisms that drive the progression through the cell cycle.

  10. The ESCRT pathway and HIV-1 budding.

    PubMed

    Usami, Yoshiko; Popov, Sergei; Popova, Elena; Inoue, Michio; Weissenhorn, Winfried; G Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2009-02-01

    HIV-1 Gag engages components of the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) pathway via so-called L (late-assembly) domains to promote virus budding. Specifically, the PTAP (Pro-Thr-Ala-Pro)-type primary L domain of HIV-1 recruits ESCRT-I by binding to Tsg101 (tumour susceptibility gene 101), and an auxiliary LYPX(n)L (Leu-Tyr-Pro-Xaa(n)-Leu)-type L domain recruits the ESCRT-III-binding partner Alix [ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2)-interacting protein X]. The structurally related CHMPs (charged multivesicular body proteins), which form ESCRT-III, are kept in an inactive state through intramolecular interactions, and become potent inhibitors of HIV-1 budding upon removal of an autoinhibitory region. In the absence of the primary L domain, HIV-1 budding is strongly impaired, but can be efficiently rescued through the overexpression of Alix. This effect of Alix depends on its ability to interact with CHMP4, suggesting that it is the recruitment of CHMPs that ultimately drives virus release. Surprisingly, HIV-1 budding defects can also be efficiently corrected by overexpressing Nedd (neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated) 4-2s, a member of a family of ubiquitin ligases previously implicated in the function of PPXY (Pro-Pro-Xaa-Tyr)-type L domains, which are absent from HIV-1. At least under certain circumstances, Nedd4-2s stimulates the activity of PTAP-type L domains, raising the possibility that the ubiquitin ligase regulates the activity of ESCRT-I.

  11. Delayed cerebral radiation necrosis.

    PubMed

    Morris, J G; Grattan-Smith, P; Panegyres, P K; O'Neill, P; Soo, Y S; Langlands, A O

    1994-02-01

    The clinical features and long-term outcome of seven patients with delayed cerebral radiation necrosis (DCRN) are described. Radiotherapy had been given for pituitary tumour (1), astrocytoma (2), pinealoma (2), craniopharyngioma (1) and parotid carcinoma (1). The mean latency to onset of the first neurological symptoms was 22 months (range 6-40 months), and mean duration of follow-up was 86 months (range 60-126). Three patients died at a mean of 84 months after radiotherapy (range 62-98). A fourth patient probably died from metastatic disease. Three patients remain alive, albeit severely disabled, after 5-10 years. The illness typically ran a stepwise course, with fits and stroke-like episodes occurring against a background of progressive dementia and somnolence. CT and MRI scans showed progressive ventricular dilatation associated with cerebral atrophy and diffuse or focal changes in the white matter. Four patients had had two or more neurosurgical procedures after the radiotherapy. In only one of the seven patients was the diagnosis made at presentation. DCRN produces a distinctive clinical picture, yet remains a poorly recognized complication of cranial irradiation.

  12. Avascular necrosis in HIV.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Puja; Nelson, Mark; Brand, Alexander; Boag, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is an emerging complication of HIV infection. The incidence of AVN in HIV patients is greater than the general population. Although the incidence has increased in the HAART era, the aetiology remains unclear. We report our experience of AVN from our tertiary referral HIV centre and evaluate risk factors for its development. Review of MRI reports of HIV-positive patients between 2007 and 2010 identified 22 patients with AVN (19 men, 3 women). Case notes and electronic records were reviewed. Twenty-two patients developed AVN, among 6,487 HIV patients attending our centre (0.34% incidence; 95% CI, 0.2-0.48%). 68% of patients had multi-joint involvement. The median nadir CD4 count was 52 cells/μL. 73% of patients had more than two risk factors including HAART (91%), protease inhibitors (68%), hypercholesterolaemia (59%), corticosteroids (55%), hypertriglyceridaemia (45%), smoking (45%), alcohol (27%) and CD4 <200 cells/μL (23%). 9% were idiopathic. AVN is an important musculoskeletal manifestation of HIV and may be multi-focal with multi-factorial aetiology. Preventative strategies should focus on risk factor modification. When investigating joint pain in HIV-infected patients, clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for AVN. Unexplained AVN, particularly if multi-focal, should prompt consideration of HIV testing.

  13. Eukaryotic-Like Virus Budding in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Quemin, Emmanuelle R. J.; Chlanda, Petr; Sachse, Martin; Forterre, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Similar to many eukaryotic viruses (and unlike bacteriophages), viruses infecting archaea are often encased in lipid-containing envelopes. However, the mechanisms of their morphogenesis and egress remain unexplored. Here, we used dual-axis electron tomography (ET) to characterize the morphogenesis of Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1), the prototype of the family Fuselloviridae and representative of the most abundant archaea-specific group of viruses. Our results show that SSV1 assembly and egress are concomitant and occur at the cellular cytoplasmic membrane via a process highly reminiscent of the budding of enveloped viruses that infect eukaryotes. The viral nucleoprotein complexes are extruded in the form of previously unknown rod-shaped intermediate structures which have an envelope continuous with the host membrane. Further maturation into characteristic spindle-shaped virions takes place while virions remain attached to the cell surface. Our data also revealed the formation of constricted ring-like structures which resemble the budding necks observed prior to the ESCRT machinery-mediated membrane scission during egress of various enveloped viruses of eukaryotes. Collectively, we provide evidence that archaeal spindle-shaped viruses contain a lipid envelope acquired upon budding of the viral nucleoprotein complex through the host cytoplasmic membrane. The proposed model bears a clear resemblance to the egress strategy employed by enveloped eukaryotic viruses and raises important questions as to how the archaeal single-layered membrane composed of tetraether lipids can undergo scission. PMID:27624130

  14. Epithelial mesenchymal transition and tumor budding in aggressive colorectal cancer: tumor budding as oncotarget.

    PubMed

    Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is proposed as a critical mechanism for the acquisition of malignant phenotypes by epithelial cells. In colorectal cancer, tumor cells having undergone EMT are histologically represented by the presence of tumor buds defined as single cells or small clusters of de-differentiated tumor cells at the invasive front. Tumor budding is not a static, histological feature rather it represents a snap-shot of a dynamic process undertaken by an aggressive tumor with the potential to disseminate and metastasize. Strong, consistent evidence shows that tumor budding is a predictor of lymph node metastasis, distant metastatic disease, local recurrence, worse overall and disease-free survival time and an independent prognostic factor. Moreover, the International Union against Cancer (UICC) recognizes tumor budding as a highly relevant, additional prognostic parameter. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting the implementation of tumor budding into diagnostic pathology and patient management and additionally to illustrate its worthiness as a potential therapeutic target.

  15. Epithelial mesenchymal transition and tumor budding in aggressive colorectal cancer: Tumor budding as oncotarget

    PubMed Central

    Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is proposed as a critical mechanism for the acquisition of malignant phenotypes by epithelial cells. In colorectal cancer, tumor cells having undergone EMT are histologically represented by the presence of tumor buds defined as single cells or small clusters of de-differentiated tumor cells at the invasive front. Tumor budding is not a static, histological feature rather it represents a snap-shot of a dynamic process undertaken by an aggressive tumor with the potential to disseminate and metastasize. Strong, consistent evidence shows that tumor budding is a predictor of lymph node metastasis, distant metastatic disease, local recurrence, worse overall and disease-free survival time and an independent prognostic factor. Moreover, the International Union against Cancer (UICC) recognizes tumor budding as a highly relevant, additional prognostic parameter. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting the implementation of tumor budding into diagnostic pathology and patient management and additionally to illustrate its worthiness as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:21317460

  16. Antioxidant defense response induced by Trichoderma viride against Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem causing collar rot in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Gajera, H P; Katakpara, Zinkal A; Patel, S V; Golakiya, B A

    2016-02-01

    The study was conducted to examine the antioxidant enzymes induced by Trichoderma viride JAU60 as initial defense response during invasion of rot pathogen Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem in five groundnut varieties under pot culture. Seed treatment of T. viride JAU60 reduced 51-58% collar rot disease incidence in different groundnut varieties under pathogen infected soil culture. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes, viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, EC 1.11.1.7) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), elevated in response to pathogen infection, in higher rate by tolerant varieties (J-11 and GG-2) compared with susceptible (GAUG-10, GG-13, GG-20) and further induced by T. viride treatment. Trichoderma treatment remarkably increased the 2.3 fold SOD, 5 fold GPX and 2.5 fold APX activities during disease development in tolerant varieties and the same was found about 1.2, 1.5 and 2.0 folds, respectively, in susceptible varieties. Overall, T. viride JAU60 treated seedlings (T3) witnessed higher activities of SOD (1.5 fold), GPX (3.25 fold) and APX (1.25 fold) than pathogen treatment (T2) possibly suggest the induction of antioxidant defense response by Trichoderma bio-controller to combat oxidative burst produced by invading pathogen.

  17. Physico-chemical, sensory and microbiological characteristics of plain yoghurt from bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) and soybeans (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Falade, Kolawole O; Ogundele, Opeolu M; Ogunshe, Adenike O; Fayemi, Olanrewaju E; Ocloo, Fidelis C K

    2015-09-01

    Physico-chemical, sensory and microbiological characteristics of plain yoghurt from bambara groundnut and soybean milks were studied. Milks were prepared from bambara and soybean and then fermented using Lactobacillus delbruieckii subspp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus salivarus subspp. thermophilus to produce yoghurt. The yoghurts were stored at 7 °C and 27 °C for 9 days and their quality monitored. Results showed that pH of soy and bambara yoghurts decreased during the storage period for both storage temperatures. This decrease in pH was accompanied by simultaneous increase in titratable acidity. Total solids and apparent viscosities of soy and bambara yoghurts increased at 7 °C, but decreased at 27 °C during storage period. Bambara yoghurt received higher sensory acceptability than soy yoghurt. Predominant microorganisms in the stored yoghurts were lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The LAB count in the yoghurts stored at 7 °C decreased but increased at 27 °C during the storage period. Similar trends were followed by total aerobic bacteria, yeast and moulds counts. Pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella, Coliform and E. coli were absent in all the yogurt samples. Yoghurts of acceptable quality and safety were produced from bambara groundnut and soybeans.

  18. Fostering triacylglycerol accumulation in novel oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus psychrotolerans IITRFD utilizing groundnut shell for improved biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Deeba, Farha; Pruthi, Vikas; Negi, Yuvraj S

    2017-10-01

    The investigation was carried out to examine the potential of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation by novel oleaginous yeast isolate Cryptococcus psychrotolerans IITRFD on utilizing groundnut shell acid hydrolysate (GSH) as cost-effective medium. The maximum biomass productivity and lipid productivity of 0.095±0.008g/L/h and 0.044±0.005g/L/h, respectively with lipid content 46% was recorded on GSH. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profile obtained by GC-MS analysis revealed oleic acid (37.8%), palmitic (29.4%) and linoleic (32.8%) as major fatty acids representing balance between oxidative stability (OS) and cold flow filter properties (CFFP) for improved biodiesel quality. The biodiesel property calculated were correlated well with the fuel standards limits of ASTM D6751, EN 14214 and IS 15607. The present findings raise the possibility of using agricultural waste groundnut shell as a substrate for production of biodiesel by novel oleaginous yeast isolate C. psychrotolerans IITRFD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced expression of AtNHX1, in transgenic groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) improves salt and drought tolerence.

    PubMed

    Asif, Muhammad Ahsan; Zafar, Yusuf; Iqbal, Javaid; Iqbal, Muhammad Munir; Rashid, Umer; Ali, Ghulam Muhammad; Arif, Anjuman; Nazir, Farhat

    2011-11-01

    Salinity and drought are main threat to agriculture productivity, to avoid further losses it is necessary to improve the genetic material of crops against these stresses In this present study, AtNHX1, a vacuolar type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene driven by 35S promoter was introduced into groundnut using Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation system. The stable integration of the AtNHX1 gene was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and southern blot analysis. It was found that transgenic plants having AtNHX1 gene are more resistant to high concentration of salt and water deprivation than the wild type plants. Salt and proline level in the leaves of the transgenic plants were also much higher than that of wild type plants. The results showed that overexpression of AtNHX1 gene not only improved salt tolerance but also drought tolerance in transgenic groundnut. Our results suggest that these plants could be cultivated in salt and drought-affected soils.

  20. QTL-seq approach identified genomic regions and diagnostic markers for rust and late leaf spot resistance in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rust and late leaf spot (LLS) are the two major foliar fungal diseases in groundnut, and their co-occurrence leads to yield loss up to 50–70% in addition to the deterioration of fodder quality. To identify candidate genomic regions controlling rust and LLS resistance, we deployed whole genome re-seq...

  1. Tumor budding in colorectal cancer--ready for diagnostic practice?

    PubMed

    Koelzer, Viktor H; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Tumor budding is an important additional prognostic factor for patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Defined as the presence of single tumor cells or small clusters of up to 5 cells in the tumor stroma, tumor budding has been likened to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Based on well-designed retrospective studies, tumor budding is linked to adverse outcome of CRC patients in 3 clinical scenarios: (1) in malignant polyps, detection of tumor buds is a risk factor for lymph node metastasis indicating the need for colorectal surgery; (2) tumor budding in stage II CRC is a highly adverse prognostic indicator and may aid patient selection for adjuvant therapy; (3) in the preoperative setting, presence of tumor budding in biopsy material may help to identify high-risk rectal cancer patients for neoadjuvant therapy. However, lack of consensus guidelines for standardized assessment still limits reporting in daily diagnostic practice. This article provides a practical and comprehensive overview on tumor budding aimed at the practicing pathologist. First, we review the prognostic value of tumor budding for the management of colon and rectal cancer patients. Second, we outline a practical, evidence-based proposal for the assessment of tumor budding in the daily sign-out. Last, we summarize the current knowledge of the molecular characteristics of high-grade budding tumors in the context of personalized treatment approaches and biomarker discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Potential for plant growth promotion in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cv. ALR-2 by co-inoculation of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Anandham, R; Sridar, R; Nalayini, P; Poonguzhali, S; Madhaiyan, M; Sa, Tongmin

    2007-01-01

    The use of Rhizobium inoculant for groundnut is a common practice in India. Also, co-inoculation of Rhizobium with other plant growth-promoting bacteria received considerable attention in legume growth promotion. Hence, in the present study we investigated effects of co-inoculating the sulfur (S)-oxidizing bacterial strains with Rhizobium, a strain that had no S-oxidizing potential in groundnut. Chemolithotrophic S-oxidizing bacterial isolates from different sources by enrichment isolation technique included three autotrophic (LCH, SWA5 and SWA4) and one heterotrophic (SGA6) strains. All the four isolates decreased the pH of the growth medium through oxidation of elemental S to sulfuric acid. Characterization revealed that these isolates tentatively placed into the genus Thiobacillus. Clay-based pellet formulation (2.5 x 10(7) cf ug(-1) pellet) of the Thiobacillus strains were developed and their efficiency to promote plant growth was tested in groundnut under pot culture and field conditions with S-deficit soil. Experiments in pot culture yielded promising results on groundnut increasing the plant biomass, nodule number and dry weight, and pod yield. Co-inoculation of Thiobacillus sp. strain LCH (applied at 60 kg ha(-1)) with Rhizobium under field condition recorded significantly higher nodule number, nodule dry weight and plant biomass 136.9 plant(-1), 740.0mg plant(-1) and 15.0 g plant(-1), respectively, on 80 days after sowing and enhanced the pod yield by 18%. Also inoculation of S-oxidizing bacteria increased the soil available S from 7.4 to 8.43 kg ha(-1). These results suggest that inoculation of S-oxidizing bacteria along with rhizobia results in synergistic interactions promoting the yield and oil content of groundnut, in S-deficit soils.

  3. Singularity in polarization: rewiring yeast cells to make two buds.

    PubMed

    Howell, Audrey S; Savage, Natasha S; Johnson, Sam A; Bose, Indrani; Wagner, Allison W; Zyla, Trevin R; Nijhout, H Frederik; Reed, Michael C; Goryachev, Andrew B; Lew, Daniel J

    2009-11-13

    For budding yeast to ensure formation of only one bud, cells must polarize toward one, and only one, site. Polarity establishment involves the Rho family GTPase Cdc42, which concentrates at polarization sites via a positive feedback loop. To assess whether singularity is linked to the specific Cdc42 feedback loop, we disabled the yeast cell's endogenous amplification mechanism and synthetically rewired the cells to employ a different positive feedback loop. Rewired cells violated singularity, occasionally making two buds. Even cells that made only one bud sometimes initiated two clusters of Cdc42, but then one cluster became dominant. Mathematical modeling indicated that, given sufficient time, competition between clusters would promote singularity. In rewired cells, competition occurred slowly and sometimes failed to develop a single "winning" cluster before budding. Slowing competition in normal cells also allowed occasional formation of two buds, suggesting that singularity is enforced by rapid competition between Cdc42 clusters.

  4. Estimation of population effects in synchronized budding yeast experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemistoe, Antti; Aho, Tommi; Thesleff, Henna; Tiainen, Mikko; Marjanen, Kalle; Linne, Marja-Leena; Yli-Harja, Olli P.

    2003-05-01

    An approach for estimating the distribution of a synchronized budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cell population is discussed. This involves estimation of the phase of the cell cycle for each cell. The approach is based on counting the number of buds of different sizes in budding yeast images. An image processing procedure is presented for the bud-counting task. The procedure employs clustering of the local mean-variance space for segmentation of the images. The subsequent bud-detection step is based on an object separation method which utilizes the chain code representation of objects as well as labeling of connected components. The procedure is tested with microscopic images that were obtained in a time-series experiment of a synchronized budding yeast cell population. The use of the distribution estimate of the cell population for inverse filtering of signals that are obtained in time-series microarray measurements is discussed as well.

  5. Identification of an Amphipathic Helix Important for the Formation of Ectopic Septin Spirals and Axial Budding in Yeast Axial Landmark Protein Bud3p

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Gong, Ting; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Correct positioning of polarity axis in response to internal or external cues is central to cellular morphogenesis and cell fate determination. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Bud3p plays a key role in the axial bud-site selection (axial budding) process in which cells assemble the new bud next to the preceding cell division site. Bud3p is thought to act as a component of a spatial landmark. However, it is not clear how Bud3p interacts with other components of the landmark, such as the septins, to control axial budding. Here, we report that overexpression of Bud3p causes the formation of small septin rings (∼1 µm in diameter) and arcs aside from previously reported spiral-like septin structures. Bud3p closely associates with the septins in vivo as Bud3p colocalizes with these aberrant septin structures and forms a complex with two septins, Cdc10p and Cdc11p. The interaction of Bud3p with the septins may involve multiple regions of Bud3p including 1–858, 850–1220, and 1221–1636 a.a. since they all target to the bud neck but exhibit different effects on septin organization when overexpressed. In addition, our study reveals that the axial budding function of Bud3p is mediated by the N-terminal region 1–858. This region shares an amphipathic helix (850–858) crucial for bud neck targeting with the middle portion 850–1103 involved in the formation of ectopic septin spirals and rings. Interestingly, the Dbl-homology domain located in 1–858 is dispensable for axial bud-site selection. Our findings suggest that multiple regions of Bud3p ensure efficient targeting of Bud3p to the bud neck in the assembly of the axial landmark and distinct domains of Bud3p are involved in axial bud-site selection and other cellular processes. PMID:21408200

  6. Genetic evidence for the roles of the bud-site-selection genes BUD5 and BUD2 in control of the Rsr1p (Bud1p) GTPase in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, A

    1993-01-01

    Yeast cells normally display either an axial (for MATa or MAT alpha cells) or bipolar (for MATa/alpha cells) pattern of bud-site selection. The RSR1 gene, which was previously identified as a multicopy suppressor of Ts- mutations in the bud-emergence gene CDC24, encodes a GTPase of the Ras family that is required for both budding patterns. Mutations in Rsr1p that presumably block its ability to bind or hydrolyze GTP cause a randomized budding phenotype, suggesting that regulators of Rsr1p will prove to be required for proper bud positioning. The BUD5 gene product is required for proper bud-site selection and contains similarity to GDP-dissociation stimulators (GDS) for Ras-type proteins, suggesting that Bud5p may be a GDS for Rsr1p. Here I report that BUD5 is required for wild-type RSR1, but not for mutationally activated rsr1val12, to serve as a multicopy suppressor of cdc24, indicating that Bud5p functions as a GDS for Rsr1p in vivo. To identify the GAP (GTPase-activating protein) for Rsr1p, a genetic selection was designed based on the observation that mutationally activated rsr1val12, but not wild-type RSR1, can serve as a multicopy suppressor of yeast RAS2(Ts) mutants. Mutants were selected that allowed wild-type RSR1 to act as a multicopy suppressor of RAS2(Ts). Two such mutations proved to be in the BUD2 gene, suggesting that Bud2p functions as a GAP for Rsr1p in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8234337

  7. Cell Polarization and Cytokinesis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Erfei; Park, Hay-Oak

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division, which includes cell polarization and cytokinesis, is essential for generating cell diversity during development. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reproduces by asymmetric cell division, and has thus served as an attractive model for unraveling the general principles of eukaryotic cell polarization and cytokinesis. Polarity development requires G-protein signaling, cytoskeletal polarization, and exocytosis, whereas cytokinesis requires concerted actions of a contractile actomyosin ring and targeted membrane deposition. In this chapter, we discuss the mechanics and spatial control of polarity development and cytokinesis, emphasizing the key concepts, mechanisms, and emerging questions in the field. PMID:22701052

  8. Assembly and budding of negative-strand RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Lyles, Douglas S

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of negative-strand RNA viruses occurs by budding from host plasma membranes. The budding process involves association of the viral core or nucleocapsid with a region of cellular membrane that will become the virus budding site, which contains the envelope glycoproteins and matrix protein. This region of membrane then buds out and pinches off to become the virus envelope. This review will address the questions of what are the mechanisms that bring the nucleocapsid and envelope glycoproteins together to form the virus budding site, and how does this lead to release of progeny virions? Recent evidence supports the idea that viral envelope glycoproteins and matrix proteins are organized into membrane microdomains that coalesce to form virus budding sites. There has also been substantial progress in understanding the last step in virus release, referred to as the "late budding function," which often involves host proteins of the vacuolar protein sorting apparatus. Key questions are raised as to the mechanism of the initial steps in formation of virus budding sites: How are membrane microdomains brought together and how are nucleocapsids selected for incorporation into these budding sites, particularly in the case of viruses for which genome RNA sequences are important for envelopment of nucleocapsids? 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  9. Complex bud architecture and cell-specific chemical patterns enable supercooling of Picea abies bud primordia.

    PubMed

    Kuprian, Edith; Munkler, Caspar; Resnyak, Anna; Zimmermann, Sonja; Tuong, Tan D; Gierlinger, Notburga; Müller, Thomas; Livingston, David P; Neuner, Gilbert

    2017-09-29

    Bud primordia of Picea abies, despite a frozen shoot, stay ice free down to -50°C by a mechanism termed supercooling whose biophysical and biochemical requirements are poorly understood. Bud architecture was assessed by 3D-reconstruction, supercooling and freezing patterns by infrared video thermography, freeze dehydration and extra-organ freezing by water potential measurements and cell-specific chemical patterns by RAMAN microscopy and Mass Spectrometry Imaging. A bowl-like ice barrier tissue insulates primordia from entrance by intrinsic ice. Water repellent and densely packed bud scales prevent extrinsic ice penetration. At -18°C break-down of supercooling was triggered by intrinsic ice nucleators while the ice barrier remained active. Temperature-dependent freeze dehydration (-0.1 MPa/K) caused accumulation of extra-organ ice masses that by rupture of the shoot pith tissue are accommodated in large voids. The barrier tissue has exceptionally pectin-rich cell walls and intercellular spaces and the cell lumina were lined or filled with proteins, especially near the primordium. Primordial cells close to the barrier accumulate di-, tri- and tetrasaccharides. Bud architecture efficiently prevents ice penetration but ice nucleators become active inside the primordium below a temperature threshold. Biochemical patterns indicate a complex cellular interplay enabling supercooling and the necessity for cell-specific biochemical analysis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Epicormic buds in trees: a review of bud establishment, development and dormancy release

    Treesearch

    Andrew R. ​Meier; Michael R. Saunders; Charles H. Michler

    2012-01-01

    The formation of epicormic sprouts on the boles of trees is a phenomenon that has, until recently, been poorly understood. Renewed interest in the topic in the last two decades has led to significant advances in our knowledge of the subject, especially in regard to bud anatomy, morphology and ontogeny. There exists, however, no comprehensive synthesis of results from...

  11. Tritrichomonas foetus: budding from multinucleated pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Benchimol, Marlene

    2009-11-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes trichomoniasis, a major sexually transmitted disease in cattle. T. foetus presents a simple life cycle, exhibiting only the trophozoitic form. However, under unfavorable growth conditions, the trophozoites, which are polar and flagellated, can round up and internalize their flagella forming pseudocysts. In this form no cyst wall surrounds the cell and it also displays a distinct mitosis when compared with the trophozoite form. In pseudocyst mitosis, the cell proceeds with duplication of cytoskeletal and mastigont structures; nuclear division occurs but without the corresponding cytoplasm division. Thus, giant multinucleated cells which present many mastigont structures are formed (approximately 62% of the population). These polymastigont/multinucleated cells are maintained when the cells are under stress conditions. When environmental conditions become favorable, the flagella are externalized and new flagellated trophozoites one by one, gradually bud from the multinucleated cell. Thus, in order to better understand the pseudocyst mitosis, the polymastigont formation and the generation of new cells by this budding process, video microscopy and other complementary techniques, such as immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy were used.

  12. Electrochemical Regulation of Budding Yeast Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Piel, Matthieu; Chang, Fred; Minc, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs) at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs), which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization. PMID:25548923

  13. Glutamate: Tastant and Neuromodulator in Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2016-07-01

    In taste buds, glutamate plays a double role as a gustatory stimulus and neuromodulator. The detection of glutamate as a tastant involves several G protein-coupled receptors, including the heterodimer taste receptor type 1, member 1 and 3 as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Both receptor types participate in the detection of glutamate as shown with knockout animals and selective antagonists. At the basal part of taste buds, ionotropic glutamate receptors [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA] are expressed and participate in the modulation of the taste signal before its transmission to the brain. Evidence suggests that glutamate has an efferent function on taste cells and modulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as serotonin and ATP. This short article reviews the recent developments in the field with regard to glutamate receptors involved in both functions as well as the influence of glutamate on the taste signal. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Functional Diversity of Silencers in Budding Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Sjöstrand, Jimmy O. O.; Kegel, Andreas; Åström, Stefan U.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the silencing of the cryptic mating-type loci HMLα and HMRa in the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. A 102-bp minimal silencer fragment was defined that was both necessary and sufficient for silencing of HMLα. Mutagenesis of the silencer revealed three distinct regions (A, B, and C) that were important for silencing. Recombinant K. lactis ribosomal DNA enhancer binding protein 1 (Reb1p) could bind the silencer in vitro, and point mutations in the B box abolished both Reb1p binding and silencer function. Furthermore, strains carrying temperature-sensitive alleles of the REB1 gene derepressed the transcription of the HMLα1 gene at the nonpermissive temperature. A functional silencer element from the K. lactis cryptic HMRa locus was also identified, which contained both Reb1p binding sites and A boxes, strongly suggesting a general role for these sequences in K. lactis silencing. Our data indicate that different proteins bind to Kluyveromyces silencers than to Saccharomyces silencers. We suggest that the evolution of silencers is rapid in budding yeasts and discuss the similarities and differences between silencers in Saccharomyces and Kluyveromyces. PMID:12456003

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Arenavirus Assembly and Budding

    PubMed Central

    Urata, Shuzo; Yasuda, Jiro

    2012-01-01

    Arenaviruses have a bisegmented negative-strand RNA genome, which encodes four viral proteins: GP and NP by the S segment and L and Z by the L segment. These four viral proteins possess multiple functions in infection, replication and release of progeny viruses from infected cells. The small RING finger protein, Z protein is a matrix protein that plays a central role in viral assembly and budding. Although all arenaviruses encode Z protein, amino acid sequence alignment showed a huge variety among the species, especially at the C-terminus where the L-domain is located. Recent publications have demonstrated the interactions between viral protein and viral protein, and viral protein and host cellular protein, which facilitate transportation and assembly of viral components to sites of virus egress. This review presents a summary of current knowledge regarding arenavirus assembly and budding, in comparison with other enveloped viruses. We also refer to the restriction of arenavirus production by the antiviral cellular factor, Tetherin/BST-2. PMID:23202453

  16. Molecular mechanism of arenavirus assembly and budding.

    PubMed

    Urata, Shuzo; Yasuda, Jiro

    2012-10-10

    Arenaviruses have a bisegmented negative-strand RNA genome, which encodes four viral proteins: GP and NP by the S segment and L and Z by the L segment. These four viral proteins possess multiple functions in infection, replication and release of progeny viruses from infected cells. The small RING finger protein, Z protein is a matrix protein that plays a central role in viral assembly and budding. Although all arenaviruses encode Z protein, amino acid sequence alignment showed a huge variety among the species, especially at the C-terminus where the L-domain is located. Recent publications have demonstrated the interactions between viral protein and viral protein, and viral protein and host cellular protein, which facilitate transportation and assembly of viral components to sites of virus egress. This review presents a summary of current knowledge regarding arenavirus assembly and budding, in comparison with other enveloped viruses. We also refer to the restriction of arenavirus production by the antiviral cellular factor, Tetherin/BST-2.

  17. Spontaneous Necrosis of Choroidal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Thareja, Shalini; Rashid, Alia; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical presentations and pathological features of spontaneously necrotic choroidal melanomas. Methods The clinical and histological features of patients who underwent enucleation for uveal melanoma from 1989 to 2012 at Emory University and were found to have spontaneously necrotic choroidal melanomas were retrospectively analyzed. Results A total of 6 cases were identified. All cases had 90-100% tumor necrosis and also exhibited marked ischemic necrosis of the iris and ciliary body; 5 of 6 cases exhibited marked ischemic necrosis of the retina. The tumor consisted of melanoma ghost cells often surrounded by a zone of pigmented macrophages. Thrombi were not found in any of the cases. All of the tumors in our cases were centered around the equatorial choroid and 2 extended into the ciliary body. One of the cases exhibited a wedge-shaped infarct in a lateral aspect of the tumor. In most of the cases, microscopic areas of intact tumor cells were present in the peripheries of the tumors. Conclusions Spontaneous necrosis may occur in uveal melanoma. We believe that this occurs secondary to tumor hypoxia in the center of the tumor, followed by secondary inflammation, generalized ischemia and finally complete tumor necrosis. PMID:27175363

  18. Molecular Mapping of Oil Content and Fatty Acids Using Dense Genetic Maps in Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    PubMed Central

    Shasidhar, Yaduru; Vishwakarma, Manish K.; Pandey, Manish K.; Janila, Pasupuleti; Variath, Murali T.; Manohar, Surendra S.; Nigam, Shyam N.; Guo, Baozhu; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing seed oil content with desirable fatty acid composition is one of the most important objectives of groundnut breeding programs globally. Genomics-assisted breeding facilitates combining multiple traits faster, however, requires linked markers. In this context, we have developed two different F2 mapping populations, one for oil content (OC-population, ICGV 07368 × ICGV 06420) and another for fatty acid composition (FA-population, ICGV 06420 × SunOleic 95R). These two populations were phenotyped for respective traits and genotyped using Diversity Array Technology (DArT) and DArTseq genotyping platforms. Two genetic maps were developed with 854 (OC-population) and 1,435 (FA-population) marker loci with total map distance of 3,526 and 1,869 cM, respectively. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis using genotyping and phenotyping data identified eight QTLs for oil content including two major QTLs, qOc-A10 and qOc-A02, with 22.11 and 10.37% phenotypic variance explained (PVE), respectively. For seven different fatty acids, a total of 21 QTLs with 7.6–78.6% PVE were identified and 20 of these QTLs were of major effect. Two mutant alleles, ahFAD2B and ahFAD2A, also had 18.44 and 10.78% PVE for palmitic acid, in addition to oleic (33.8 and 17.4% PVE) and linoleic (41.0 and 19.5% PVE) acids. Furthermore, four QTL clusters harboring more than three QTLs for fatty acids were identified on the three LGs. The QTLs identified in this study could be further dissected for candidate gene discovery and development of diagnostic markers for breeding improved groundnut varieties with high oil content and desirable oil quality. PMID:28588591

  19. African origin of Bradyrhizobium populations nodulating Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc) in Ghanaian and South African soils.

    PubMed

    Puozaa, Doris K; Jaiswal, Sanjay K; Dakora, Felix D

    2017-01-01

    Flavonoids secreted by legumes play a major role as signal molecules for attracting compatible rhizobia. The aim of this study was to assess and understand the diversity of microsymbionts nodulating Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc.) landraces of different seedcoat colours using restriction fragment length polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis. Seedcoat pigmentation of landraces had effect on the diversity of microsymbionts of Bambara groundnut. Even when planted together in one hole, nodulating bradyrhizobia clustered differently. For example, 16S rDNA-RFLP typing of rhizobial samples TUTVSBLM.I, TUTVSCRM.I and TUTVSRDM.I originating respectively from Black, Cream and Red landraces that were co-planted in the same hole at Manga in the Sudano-sahelian savanna, as well as TUTVSCRK.I and TUTVSRDK.I respectively from Cream and Red landraces co-planted at Kpalisogu in the Guinea savanna, revealed different 16S rDNA- RFLP types. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA, glnII, recA and atpD sequences showed that Vigna subterranea was nodulated specifically by a diverse group of Bradyrhizobium species (e.g. Bradyrhizobium vignae, and a novel group of Bradyrhizobium spp.) in soils from Ghana and South Africa. The recA gene phylogeny showed incongruency with the other housekeeping genes, indicating the possibility of lateral gene transfer and/or recombination events. The grouping of isolates according to symbiotic gene (nifH and nodD) phylogenies revealed inter- and intra-specific symbiotic plasmid transfer and different evolutionary history. The results also showed that a cropping history and physico-chemical environment of soils increased bradyrhizobial diversity in Ghana and South Africa.

  20. Nitrogen management in a maize-groundnut crop rotation of humid tropics: effect on N2O emission.

    PubMed

    Khalil, M I; Rosenani, A B; Van Cleemput, O; Fauziah, C I; Shamshuddin, J

    2001-12-12

    Development of appropriate land management techniques to attain sustainability and increase the N use efficiency of crops in the tropics has been gaining momentum. The nitrous oxides (N2Os) affect global climate change and its contribution from N and C management systems is of great significance. Thus, N transformations and N2O emission during maize-groundnut crop rotation managed with various N sources were studied. Accumulation of nitrate (NO3- ) and its disappearance happened immediately after addition of various N sources, showing liming effect. The mineral N retained for 2-4 weeks depending on the type and amount of N application. The chicken manure showed rapid nitrification in the first week after application during the fallow period, leading to a maximum N2O flux of 9889 g N2O-N m(-2) day(-1). The same plots showed a residual effect by emitting the highest N2O (4053 microg N2O-N m(-2) day(-1)) during maize cultivation supplied with a half-rate of N fertilizer. Application of N fertilizer only or in combination with crop residues exhibited either lowered fluxes or caused a sink during the groundnut and fallow periods due to small availability of substrates and/or low water-filled pore space (<40%). The annual N2O emission ranged from 1.41 to 3.94 kg N2O-N ha(-1); the highest was estimated from the chicken manure plus crop residues and half-rate of inorganic N-amended plots. Results indicates a greater influence of chicken manure on the N transformations and thereby N2O emission.

  1. Season of fire manipulates bud bank dynamics in northern mixed-grass prairie

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In perennial grassland dominated systems, belowground bud banks regulate plant community dynamics. Plant community responses to disturbance are largely driven by the ability to generate future aboveground growth originating from belowground axillary buds. This study examined bud bank dynamics for...

  2. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi; Bosman, Fred; Cathomas, Gieri; Dawson, Heather; El Zimaity, Hala; Fléjou, Jean-François; Hansen, Tine Plato; Hartmann, Arndt; Kakar, Sanjay; Langner, Cord; Nagtegaal, Iris; Puppa, Giacomo; Riddell, Robert; Ristimäki, Ari; Sheahan, Kieran; Smyrk, Thomas; Sugihara, Kenichi; Terris, Benoît; Ueno, Hideki; Vieth, Michael; Zlobec, Inti; Quirke, Phil

    2017-09-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer but a standardized method for its assessment has been lacking. The primary aim of the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) was to reach agreement on an international, evidence-based standardized scoring system for tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The ITBCC included nine sessions with presentations, a pre-meeting survey and an e-book covering the key publications on tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The 'Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation' method was used to determine the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence. The following 10 statements achieved consensus: tumor budding is defined as a single tumor cell or a cell cluster consisting of four tumor cells or less (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of lymph node metastases in pT1 colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of survival in stage II colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding should be taken into account along with other clinicopathological features in a multidisciplinary setting (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is counted on H&E (19/22, 86%). Intratumoral budding exists in colorectal cancer and has been shown to be related to lymph node metastasis (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is assessed in one hotspot (in a field measuring 0.785 mm(2)) at the invasive front (22/22, 100%). A three-tier system should be used along with the budding count in order to facilitate risk stratification in colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding and tumor grade are not the same (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding should be included in guidelines/protocols for colorectal cancer reporting (23/23, 100%). Members of the ITBCC were able to reach strong consensus on a single international, evidence-based method for tumor budding assessment and reporting. It is proposed that this method be incorporated into colorectal cancer

  3. Bud gall midges - potential invaders on larches in North America

    Treesearch

    Yuri N. Baranchikov

    2007-01-01

    Larch bud gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) form a specialized group of gall insects inhabiting buds of larch (Larix) in the northern Palaearctic Region. Currently there are four described species in this group. Dasineura kellneri Henschel is found in Central Europe and infests Larix decidua; D....

  4. Dormancy induction and release in buds and seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dormancy is a complex trait in both buds and seeds, which is an important mechanism for survival during the life cycle of plants. Over the years, a vast wealth of information has been generated on how environmental and developmental signals impact dormancy in buds and seeds. At the molecular level, ...

  5. Kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus budding and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) belongs to a large family of RNA viruses, retroviruses. Unlike budding of regular enveloped viruses, retroviruses bud concurrently with the assembly of retroviral capsids on the cell membrane. The kinetics of HIV (and other retroviruses) budding and assembly is therefore strongly affected by the elastic energy of the membrane and fundamentally different from regular viruses. The main result of this work shows that the kinetics is tunable from a fast budding process to a slow and effectively trapped partial budding process, by varying the attractive energy of retroviral proteins (call Gags), relative to the membrane elastic energy. When the Gag-Gag attraction is relatively high, the membrane elastic energy provides a kinetic barrier for the two pieces of the partial capsids to merge. This energy barrier determines the slowest step in the kinetics and the budding time. In the opposite limit, the membrane elastic energy provides not only a kinetic energy barrier, but a free energy barrier. The budding and assembly is effectively trapped at local free energy minimum, corresponding to a partially budded state. The time scale to escape from this metastable state is exponentially large. In both cases, our result fit with experimental measurements pretty well.

  6. An elastic model of partial budding of retroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2008-03-01

    Retroviruses are characterized by their unique infection strategy of reverse transcription, in which the genetic information flows from RNA back to DNA. The most well known representative is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Unlike budding of traditional enveloped viruses, retrovirus budding happens together with the formation of spherical virus capsids at the cell membrane. Led by this unique budding mechanism, we proposed an elastic model of retrovirus budding in this work. We found that if the lipid molecules of the membrane are supplied fast enough from the cell interior, the budding always proceeds to completion. In the opposite limit, there is an optimal size of partially budded virions. The zenith angle of these partially spherical capsids, α, is given by α˜(2̂/κσ)^1/4, where κ is the bending modulus of the membrane, σ is the surface tension of the membrane, and τ characterizes the strength of capsid protein interaction. If τ is large enough such that α˜π, the budding is complete. Our model explained many features of retrovirus partial budding observed in experiments.

  7. Desiccation tolerance of dormant buds from selected Prunus species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dormant buds of woody plant species present a convenient material for backing-up of germplasm in liquid nitrogen. Routinely, this type of material is used in long-term preservation of only a few species (e.g. apple and sour cherry). Cryopreservation procedures of dormant buds are species dependent, ...

  8. Anatomy and morphology in developing vegetative buds on detached Norway spruce branches in controlled conditions before bud burst.

    PubMed

    Sutinen, Sirkka; Partanen, Jouni; Viherä-Aarnio, Anneli; Häkkinen, Risto

    2009-11-01

    We studied the light and stereomicroscopic structure of developing vegetative buds from a 16-year-old Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] of southern Finnish origin in relation to temperature sum and to externally visible changes in the buds before and during bud burst in forcing conditions. Branches were collected on 17 January and transferred to the greenhouse where they were first subjected to preforcing conditions (darkness, +4 degrees C) for 7 days and then to the forcing conditions (day length 12 h, +20 degrees C). Buds were sampled 20 times between 17 January and 13 February. Air temperature was recorded hourly throughout the study period. The first microscopic change was a temporary increase in the size and number of lipid droplets before the onset of temperature sum (T > or = +5 degrees C) accumulation. From the 4th to the 9th day under the forcing conditions, tracheids started to develop from the base up to the top of the bud. This was closely synchronized with an observed morphological change in the shape of needle tip from rounded to pointed ones. Development from the first visible change in the bud scales on the 12th forcing day to bud burst took 9 days when the temperature sum was 313 d.d. The temperature sums in our experiment overestimated the requirements of temperature sum for bud development phases measured in the field. Bud development could be divided into four structural phases. The first two phases, i.e., morphological changes in the primary needles, occurred without any externally visible changes in the buds. Thus, these phases have a potential for testing and improving the phenological models, which, up to now, have mainly been based on the bud burst observation by the naked eye.

  9. Warfarin-Induced Skin Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Papanas, Nikolaos; Karadimas, Efthimios; Polychronidis, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin-induced skin necrosis is an infrequent complication occurring in individuals under warfarin treatment who have a thrombophilic history or after administration of large loading doses of warfarin particularly without simultaneous initial use of heparin. A 62-year-old lady developed skin necrosis 4 days after initiating warfarin therapy of 5 mg daily without initial co-administration of heparin. The patient had a normal clotting profile. Skin necrosis progressed to eschar formation after cessation of warfarin and heparinization stopped expanding. Warfarin was reintroduced at 2 mg daily, initially together with low molecular weight heparin. Autolytic debridement of the necrotic tissue was followed by healing of the cutaneous deficit by secondary intention. Prompt diagnosis and discontinuation of warfarin are crucial for the prognosis. PMID:24648693

  10. Therapy for acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Spencer, Doran B; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a progressive necrotizing retinopathy caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). The mainstay of its treatment is antiviral therapy against these pathogenic organisms, such as intravenous acyclovir or oral valacyclovir. Systemic and topical corticosteroids together with antiviral therapy are used as an anti-inflammatory treatment to minimize damages to the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels. Because the majority of severe cases of the disease show occlusive retinal vasculitis, a low dosage of aspirin is used as anti-thrombotic treatment. Vitreo-retinal surgery is useful to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, one of the main late-stage complications. Moreover, recent articles have reported some encouraging results of prophylactic vitrectomy before rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation to prevent the development or extension of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is controversial. Despite these treatments, the visual prognosis of acute retinal necrosis is still poor, in particular VZV-induced acute retinal necrosis.

  11. [Nephrocalcinosis and subcutaneous fat necrosis].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cláudia; Lobo, Luísa; Azevedo, António Siborro; Simão, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn is an uncommon, transient and self-healing panniculits. This entity generally follows an uncomplicated course, however there are rare and important complications. The authors present a case of a newborn with subcutaneous fat necrosis complicated by hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis. The pathogenesis of hypercalcemia is not fully understood and the nephrocalcinosis can evolve to chronic kidney disease. Clinicians should be aware of subcutaneous fat necrosis as a possible risk factor for hypercalcemia and patients should have serial serum and urinary calcium determinations for up to 6 months after the appearance of the skin lesions. The early diagnosis and prompt treatment of hypercalcemia are essential to prevent severe complications.

  12. Rabies virus inactivates cofilin to facilitate viral budding and release.

    PubMed

    Zan, Jie; An, Shu-Ting; Mo, Kai-Kun; Zhou, Jian-Wei; Liu, Juan; Wang, Hai-Long; Yan, Yan; Liao, Min; Zhou, Ji-Yong

    2016-09-02

    Cytoplasmic actin and actin-associated proteins have been identified in RABV particles. Although actin is involved in RABV entry into cells, the specific role of actin in RABV budding and release remains unknown. Our study found that RABV M protein-mediated virion budding depends on intact actin filaments. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a block to virions budding, with a number of M protein-mediated budding vesicles detained in the cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, RABV infection resulted in inactivation of cofilin and upregulation of phosphorylated cofilin. Knockdown of cofilin reduced RABV release. These results for the first time indicate that RABV infection resulted in upregulation of phosphorylated cofilin to facililtate actin polymerization for virus budding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic and serological characterization of chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus, a member of the genus Tospovirus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Ru; Chien, Wan-Chu; Okuda, Mitsuru; Takeshita, Minoru; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Wang, Yun-Chi; Chen, Tsung-Chi

    2015-02-01

    Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus (CSNV) is a member of a tentative tospovirus species. In this study, the complete genomic sequence of the Japanese CSNV isolate TcCh07A was determined. The L RNA is 8960 nt long and encodes the 331.0-kDa RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The M RNA is 4828 nt long and encodes the 34.1-kDa movement protein (NSm) and the 127.7-kDa glycoprotein precursor (Gn/Gc). The S RNA is 2949 nt long and encodes the 52.4-kDa silencing suppressor protein (NSs) and the 29.3-kDa nucleocapsid (N) protein. The N protein of CSNV-TcCh07A was purified from virus-infected plant tissues and used for production of a rabbit polyclonal antiserum (RAs) and a monoclonal antibody (MAb). Results of serological tests by indirect ELISA and western blotting using the prepared RAs and MAb and a previously produced RAs against the N protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) indicated that CSNV-TcCh07A, TSWV, tomato chlorotic spot virus, groundnut ringspot virus, alstroemeria necrotic streak virus and impatiens necrotic spot virus are serologically related.

  14. Avascular necrosis of carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Golimbu, C N; Firooznia, H; Rafii, M

    1995-05-01

    MR imaging is extremely well suited to detection of early phases of avascular necrosis, permitting diagnosis before collapse of the carpal bones has occurred. The sensitivity of this imaging modality allows differentiation of subtle changes in the bone marrow signal. This is used as criteria for a new stage classification of Kienböck's disease based on MR imaging appearance. The prognosis of scaphoid fractures and estimation of likelihood of avascular necrosis of the proximal fragment can be inferred by using gadolinium enhancement to evaluate the bone marrow vascularity.

  15. High tumor budding stratifies breast cancer with metastatic properties.

    PubMed

    Salhia, Bodour; Trippel, Mafalda; Pfaltz, Katrin; Cihoric, Nikola; Grogg, André; Lädrach, Claudia; Zlobec, Inti; Tapia, Coya

    2015-04-01

    Tumor budding refers to single or small cluster of tumor cells detached from the main tumor mass. In colon cancer high tumor budding is associated with positive lymph nodes and worse prognosis. Therefore, we investigated the value of tumor budding as a predictive feature of lymph node status in breast cancer (BC). Whole tissue sections from 148 surgical resection specimens (SRS) and 99 matched preoperative core biopsies (CB) with invasive BC of no special type were analyzed on one slide stained with pan-cytokeratin. In SRS, the total number of intratumoral (ITB) and peripheral tumor buds (PTB) in ten high-power fields (HPF) were counted. A bud was defined as a single tumor cell or a cluster of up to five tumor cells. High tumor budding equated to scores averaging >4 tumor buds across 10HPFs. In CB high tumor budding was defined as ≥10 buds/HPF. The results were correlated with pathological parameters. In SRS high PTB stratified BC with lymph node metastases (p ≤ 0.03) and lymphatic invasion (p ≤ 0.015). In CB high tumor budding was significantly (p = 0.0063) associated with venous invasion. Pathologists are able, based on morphology, to categorize BC into a high and low risk groups based in part on lymph node status. This risk assessment can be easily performed during routine diagnostics and it is time and cost effective. These results suggest that high PTB is associated with loco-regional metastasis, highlighting the possibility that this tumor feature may help in therapeutic decision-making.

  16. Constituents of the cotton bud: XII. The carotenoids in buds, seeds and other tissue.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A C; Henson, R D; Hedin, P A; Minyard, J P

    1968-11-01

    Eleven carotenoid pigments were found in the bud, leaf, flower petal, seedling and seed of the cotton plant; nine were identified and quantitated. The most abundant carotenoids in the green tissue of the cotton plant were beta-carotene and lutein. Carotene hydrocarbons comprised 12% of the total carotenoids in the seed, 15% in the 1-day-old flower petal, 51% in the bud and 57% in green leaves. Only 5,8-epoxy carotenoids were found in the flower petals and only 5,6-epoxides in the other tissue but both were present in the seed. The colorless phytoene precursors to the carotenoids comprised from 20% to 38% of the total carotenoid pigment in the growing tissue of the plant.

  17. Budding Yeast for Budding Geneticists: A Primer on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model System

    PubMed Central

    Duina, Andrea A.; Miller, Mary E.; Keeney, Jill B.

    2014-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful model organism for studying fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. This Primer article presents a brief historical perspective on the emergence of this organism as a premier experimental system over the course of the past century. An overview of the central features of the S. cerevisiae genome, including the nature of its genetic elements and general organization, is also provided. Some of the most common experimental tools and resources available to yeast geneticists are presented in a way designed to engage and challenge undergraduate and graduate students eager to learn more about the experimental amenability of budding yeast. Finally, a discussion of several major discoveries derived from yeast studies highlights the far-reaching impact that the yeast system has had and will continue to have on our understanding of a variety of cellular processes relevant to all eukaryotes, including humans. PMID:24807111

  18. Budding yeast for budding geneticists: a primer on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system.

    PubMed

    Duina, Andrea A; Miller, Mary E; Keeney, Jill B

    2014-05-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful model organism for studying fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. This Primer article presents a brief historical perspective on the emergence of this organism as a premier experimental system over the course of the past century. An overview of the central features of the S. cerevisiae genome, including the nature of its genetic elements and general organization, is also provided. Some of the most common experimental tools and resources available to yeast geneticists are presented in a way designed to engage and challenge undergraduate and graduate students eager to learn more about the experimental amenability of budding yeast. Finally, a discussion of several major discoveries derived from yeast studies highlights the far-reaching impact that the yeast system has had and will continue to have on our understanding of a variety of cellular processes relevant to all eukaryotes, including humans.

  19. Mitochondrial movement and inheritance in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Boldogh, Istvan R; Fehrenbacher, Kammy L; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Pon, Liza A

    2005-07-18

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that perform fundamental cellular functions including aerobic energy mobilization, fatty acid oxidation, amino acid metabolism, heme biosynthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondria cannot be synthesized de novo. Therefore, the inheritance of this organelle is an essential part of the cell cycle; that is, daughter cells that do not inherit mitochondria will not survive. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a facultative aerobe that can tolerate mitochondrial mutations that would be lethal in other organisms. Therefore, yeast has been used extensively to study inheritance and segregation of mitochondria. As a result, much of what we know regarding mitochondrial inheritance has been uncovered using yeast as a model system. Here, we describe the latest developments in mitochondrial motility and inheritance.

  20. Biofilm/Mat assays for budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Paul J

    2015-02-02

    Many microbial species form biofilms/mats under nutrient-limiting conditions, and fungal pathogens rely on this social behavior for virulence. In budding yeast, mat formation is dependent on the mucin-like flocculin Flo11, which promotes cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate adhesion in mats. The biofilm/mat assays described here allow the evaluation of the role of Flo11 in the formation of mats. Cells are grown on surfaces with different degrees of rigidity to assess their expansion and three-dimensional architecture, and the cells are also exposed to plastic surfaces to quantify their adherence. These assays are broadly applicable to studying biofilm/mat formation in microbial species.

  1. Cell polarization in budding and fission yeasts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sophie G; Arkowitz, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Polarization is a fundamental cellular property, which is essential for the function of numerous cell types. Over the past three to four decades, research using the best-established yeast systems in cell biological research, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (or budding yeast) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (or fission yeast), has brought to light fundamental principles governing the establishment and maintenance of a polarized, asymmetric state. These two organisms, though both ascomycetes, are evolutionarily very distant and exhibit distinct shapes and modes of growth. In this review, we compare and contrast the two systems. We first highlight common cell polarization pathways, detailing the contribution of Rho GTPases, the cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, lipids, and protein scaffolds. We then contrast the major differences between the two organisms, describing their distinct strategies in growth site selection and growth zone dimensions and compartmentalization, which may be the basis for their distinct shapes. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Decellularized Tooth Bud Scaffolds for Tooth Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Vazquez, B; Oreadi, D; Yelick, P C

    2017-01-01

    Whole tooth regeneration approaches currently are limited by our inability to bioengineer full-sized, living replacement teeth. Recently, decellularized organ scaffolds have shown promise for applications in regenerative medicine by providing a natural extracellular matrix environment that promotes cell attachment and tissue-specific differentiation leading to full-sized organ regeneration. We hypothesize that decellularized tooth buds (dTBs) created from unerupted porcine tooth buds (TBs) can be used to guide reseeded dental cell differentiation to form whole bioengineered teeth, thereby providing a potential off-the-shelf scaffold for whole tooth regeneration. Porcine TBs were harvested from discarded 6-mo-old pig jaws, and decellularized by successive sodium dodecyl sulfate/Triton-X cycles. Four types of replicate implants were used in this study: 1) acellular dTBs; 2) recellularized dTBs seeded with porcine dental epithelial cells, human dental pulp cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (recell-dTBs); 3) dTBs seeded with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 (dTB-BMPs); and 4) freshly isolated nondecellularized natural TBs (nTBs). Replicate samples were implanted into the mandibles of host Yucatan mini-pigs and grown for 3 or 6 mo. Harvested mandibles with implanted TB constructs were fixed in formalin, decalcified, embedded in paraffin, sectioned, and analyzed via histological methods. Micro-computed tomography (CT) analysis was performed on harvested 6-mo samples prior to decalcification. All harvested constructs exhibited a high degree of cellularity. Significant production of organized dentin and enamel-like tissues was observed in dTB-recell and nTB implants, but not in dTB or dTB-BMP implants. Micro-CT analyses of 6-mo implants showed the formation of organized, bioengineered teeth of comparable size to natural teeth. To our knowledge, these results are the first to describe the potential use of dTBs for functional whole tooth regeneration.

  3. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  4. The mother-bud neck as a signaling platform for the coordination between spindle position and cytokinesis in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Laura; Piatti, Simonetta

    2011-08-01

    During asymmetric cell division, spindle positioning is critical for ensuring the unequal inheritance of polarity factors. In budding yeast, the mother-bud neck determines the cleavage plane and a correct nuclear division between mother and daughter cell requires orientation of the mitotic spindle along the mother-bud axis. A surveillance device called the spindle position/orientation checkpoint (SPOC) oversees this process and delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the spindle is properly oriented along the division axis, thus ensuring genome stability. Cytoskeletal proteins called septins form a ring at the bud neck that is essential for cytokinesis. Furthermore, septins and septin-associated proteins are implicated in spindle positioning and SPOC. In this review, we discuss the emerging connections between septins and the SPOC and the role of the mother-bud neck as a signaling platform to couple proper chromosome segregation to cytokinesis.

  5. Effect of feeding different proportions of groundnut haulms (Arachis hypogaea) and cluster bean straw (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) on nutrient utilisation and serum biochemical parameters in dromedary camels.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Lokesh; Kumar, Roy Ashwani; Ghanshyam, Tiwari; Rajesh, Dhuria; Garg, Rajeev

    2012-10-01

    The effect of feeding different proportions of groundnut haulms (Arachis hypogaea) and cluster bean straw (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) on nutrient digestibility, nutritive value, nutrient intake and serum biochemical parameters was studied using nine male dromedary camels of Bikaneri breeds (637.5 kg average body weight; 8-9 years of age). Groundnut haulms (GNH) and cluster bean straw (CBS) were fed in one of three ratios, 75:25, 50:50 and 25:75 in treatments T(1), T(2) and T(3), respectively. In all treatments, concentrate mixture was fed as per requirement of the camels. The groundnut haulms were more nutritive as compared to the cluster bean straw. The nutrient digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein (CP), crude fibre and acid detergent fibre was better in T(1) than T(2) and T(3). Likewise, the CP, digestible crude protein and total digestible nutrient contents were significantly higher in T(1) followed by T(2) and T(3). There was non-significant affect on average daily gain of camels. However, dry matter intake, digestible crude protein intake and total digestible nutrients were better in T(1) as compared to T(2) and T(3). The total water intake per kilogram of dry matter intake (litres) was 2.98, 2.89 and 2.68, respectively, in T(1), T(2) and T(3). The camels in all the treatments were in positive nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus balance. The treatments had a significant effect on serum biochemical parameters like glucose, cholesterol, aspartate transaminase and creatinine. The results may conclude that feeding of higher proportion of groundnut haulms as compared to cluster bean straw has pronounced improvement in nutritional utilisation by the camels.

  6. A Statistical-Thermodynamic Model of Viral Budding

    PubMed Central

    Tzlil, Shelly; Deserno, Markus; Gelbart, William M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple statistical thermodynamic model for budding of viral nucleocapsids at the cell membrane. The membrane is modeled as a flexible lipid bilayer embedding linker (spike) proteins, which serve to anchor and thus wrap the membrane around the viral capsids. The free energy of a single bud is expressed as a sum of the bending energy of its membrane coat, the spike-mediated capsid-membrane adhesion energy, and the line energy associated with the bud's rim, all depending on the extent of wrapping (i.e., bud size), and density of spikes in the curved membrane. This self-energy is incorporated into a simple free energy functional for the many-bud system, allowing for different spike densities, and hence entropy, in the curved (budding) and planar membrane regions, as well as for the configurational entropy of the polydisperse bud population. The equilibrium spike densities in the coexisting, curved and planar, membrane regions are calculated as a function of the membrane bending energy and the spike-mediated adhesion energy, for different spike and nucleocapsid concentrations in the membrane plane, as well as for several values of the bud's rim energy. We show that complete budding (full wrapping of nucleocapsids) can only take place if the adhesion energy exceeds a certain, critical, bending free energy. Whenever budding takes place, the spike density in the mature virions is saturated, i.e., all spike adhesion sites are occupied. The rim energy plays an important role in determining the size distribution of buds. The fraction of fully wrapped buds increases as this energy increases, resulting eventually in an all-or-nothing mechanism, whereby nucleocapsids at the plasma membrane are either fully enveloped or completely naked (just touching the membrane). We also find that at low concentrations all capsids arriving at the membrane get tightly and fully enveloped. Beyond a certain concentration, corresponding approximately to a stoichiometric spike

  7. Inflammatory duodenal necrosis complicating gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Dina; Lee, Geraint J.; Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Drake, David

    2016-01-01

    Babies with gastroschisis have an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that can lead to short bowel syndrome, a long-term parenteral nutrition requirement, and its associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent duodenal ischemia and necrosis associated with gastroschisis in the absence of NEC totalis. PMID:27695214

  8. Transcriptome analysis of chestnut (Castanea sativa) tree buds suggests a putative role for epigenetic control of bud dormancy.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, María Estrella; Rodríguez, Roberto; Cañal, María Jesús; Toorop, Peter E

    2011-09-01

    Recent papers indicated that epigenetic control is involved in transitions in bud dormancy, purportedly controlling gene expression. The present study aimed to identify genes that are differentially expressed in dormant and non-dormant Castanea sativa buds. Two suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries were constructed to characterize the transcriptomes of dormant apical buds of C. sativa, and buds in which dormancy was released. A total of 512 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated in a forward and reverse subtractive hybridization experiment. Classification of these ESTs into functional groups demonstrated that dormant buds were predominantly characterized by genes associated with stress response, while non-dormant buds were characterized by genes associated with energy, protein synthesis and cellular components for development and growth. ESTs for a few genes involved in different forms of epigenetic modification were found in both libraries, suggesting a role for epigenetic control in bud dormancy different from that in growth. Genes encoding histone mono-ubiquitinase HUB2 and histone acetyltransferase GCN5L were associated with dormancy, while a gene encoding histone H3 kinase AUR3 was associated with growth. Real-time RT-PCR with a selection of genes involved in epigenetic modification and stress tolerance confirmed the expression of the majority of investigated genes in various stages of bud development, revealing a cyclical expression pattern concurring with the growth seasons for most genes. However, senescing leaves also showed an increased expression of several of the genes associated with dormancy, implying pleiotropy. Furthermore, a comparison between these subtraction cDNA libraries and the poplar bud dormancy transcriptome and arabidopsis transcriptomes for seed dormancy and non-dormancy indicated a common basis for dormancy in all three systems. Bud dormancy and non-dormancy in C. sativa were characterized by distinct sets of genes

  9. Exciting journey of 10 years from genomes to fields and markets: Some success stories of genomics-assisted breeding in chickpea, pigeonpea and groundnut.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    Legume crops such as chickpea, pigeonpea and groundnut, mostly grown in marginal environments, are the major source of nutrition and protein to the human population in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. These crops, however, have a low productivity, mainly due to their exposure to several biotic and abiotic stresses in the marginal environments. Until 2005, these crops had limited genomics resources and molecular breeding was very challenging. During the last decade (2005-2015), ICRISAT led demand-driven innovations in genome science and translated the massive genome information in breeding. For instance, large-scale genomic resources including draft genome assemblies, comprehensive genetic and physical maps, thousands of SSR markers, millions of SNPs, several high-throughput as well as low cost marker genotyping platforms have been developed in these crops. After mapping several breeding related traits, several success stories of translational genomics have become available in these legumes. These include development of superior lines with enhanced drought tolerance in chickpea, enhanced and pyramided resistance to Fusarium wilt and Ascochyta blight in chickpea, enhanced resistance to leaf rust in groundnut, improved oil quality in groundnut and utilization of markers for assessing purity of hybrids/parental lines in pigeonpea. Some of these stories together with future prospects have been discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Response surface methodology for studying the effect of processing conditions on some nutritional and textural properties of bambara groundnuts (Voandzei subterranea) during canning.

    PubMed

    Afoakwa, Emmanuel Ohene; Budu, Agnes Simpson; Merson, Alan Bullock

    2007-06-01

    The response surface methodology and central composite rotatable design for K=3 was used to study the combined effect of blanching, soaking and sodium hexametaphosphate salt concentration on moisture, ash, leached solids, phytates, tannins and hardness of bambara groundnut during canning. Regression models were developed to predict the effects of the processing parameters on the studied indices. Significant interactions were observed between all the factors with high regression coefficients (64.4-82.6%). Blanching and soaking of the seeds prior to canning led to increases in moisture content and leached solids, while significant decreases were observed for phytates, tannins and hardness of the canned bambara groundnuts. Increasing the concentration of sodium salt added during soaking caused significant (Pgroundnuts.

  11. Taste bud homeostasis in health, disease, and aging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian taste bud is an onion-shaped epithelial structure with 50-100 tightly packed cells, including taste receptor cells, supporting cells, and basal cells. Taste receptor cells detect nutrients and toxins in the oral cavity and transmit the sensory information to gustatory nerve endings in the buds. Supporting cells may play a role in the clearance of excess neurotransmitters after their release from taste receptor cells. Basal cells are precursor cells that differentiate into mature taste cells. Similar to other epithelial cells, taste cells turn over continuously, with an average life span of about 8-12 days. To maintain structural homeostasis in taste buds, new cells are generated to replace dying cells. Several recent studies using genetic lineage tracing methods have identified populations of progenitor/stem cells for taste buds, although contributions of these progenitor/stem cell populations to taste bud homeostasis have yet to be fully determined. Some regulatory factors of taste cell differentiation and degeneration have been identified, but our understanding of these aspects of taste bud homoeostasis remains limited. Many patients with various diseases develop taste disorders, including taste loss and taste distortion. Decline in taste function also occurs during aging. Recent studies suggest that disruption or alteration of taste bud homeostasis may contribute to taste dysfunction associated with disease and aging.

  12. Alterations of membrane curvature during influenza virus budding.

    PubMed

    Martyna, Agnieszka; Rossman, Jeremy

    2014-10-01

    Influenza A virus belongs to the Orthomyxoviridae family. It is an enveloped virus that contains a segmented and negative-sense RNA genome. Influenza A viruses cause annual epidemics and occasional major pandemics, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and have a significant financial impact on society. Assembly and budding of new viral particles are a complex and multi-step process involving several host and viral factors. Influenza viruses use lipid raft domains in the apical plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells as sites of budding. Two viral glycoproteins, haemagglutinin and neuraminidase, concentrate in lipid rafts, causing alterations in membrane curvature and initiation of the budding process. Matrix protein 1 (M1), which forms the inner structure of the virion, is then recruited to the site followed by incorporation of the viral ribonucleoproteins and matrix protein 2 (M2). M1 can alter membrane curvature and progress budding, whereas lipid raft-associated M2 stabilizes the site of budding, allowing for proper assembly of the virion. In the later stages of budding, M2 is localized to the neck of the budding virion at the lipid phase boundary, where it causes negative membrane curvature, leading to scission and virion release.

  13. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003-1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste.

  14. Taste Bud Homeostasis in Health, Disease, and Aging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian taste bud is an onion-shaped epithelial structure with 50–100 tightly packed cells, including taste receptor cells, supporting cells, and basal cells. Taste receptor cells detect nutrients and toxins in the oral cavity and transmit the sensory information to gustatory nerve endings in the buds. Supporting cells may play a role in the clearance of excess neurotransmitters after their release from taste receptor cells. Basal cells are precursor cells that differentiate into mature taste cells. Similar to other epithelial cells, taste cells turn over continuously, with an average life span of about 8–12 days. To maintain structural homeostasis in taste buds, new cells are generated to replace dying cells. Several recent studies using genetic lineage tracing methods have identified populations of progenitor/stem cells for taste buds, although contributions of these progenitor/stem cell populations to taste bud homeostasis have yet to be fully determined. Some regulatory factors of taste cell differentiation and degeneration have been identified, but our understanding of these aspects of taste bud homoeostasis remains limited. Many patients with various diseases develop taste disorders, including taste loss and taste distortion. Decline in taste function also occurs during aging. Recent studies suggest that disruption or alteration of taste bud homeostasis may contribute to taste dysfunction associated with disease and aging. PMID:24287552

  15. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003–1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste. PMID:25209263

  16. Multilineage communication regulates human liver bud development from pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Camp, J Gray; Sekine, Keisuke; Gerber, Tobias; Loeffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans; Gac, Malgorzata; Kanton, Sabina; Kageyama, Jorge; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Belicova, Lenka; Bickle, Marc; Barsacchi, Rico; Okuda, Ryo; Yoshizawa, Emi; Kimura, Masaki; Ayabe, Hiroaki; Taniguchi, Hideki; Takebe, Takanori; Treutlein, Barbara

    2017-06-22

    Conventional two-dimensional differentiation from pluripotency fails to recapitulate cell interactions occurring during organogenesis. Three-dimensional organoids generate complex organ-like tissues; however, it is unclear how heterotypic interactions affect lineage identity. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing to reconstruct hepatocyte-like lineage progression from pluripotency in two-dimensional culture. We then derive three-dimensional liver bud organoids by reconstituting hepatic, stromal, and endothelial interactions, and deconstruct heterogeneity during liver bud development. We find that liver bud hepatoblasts diverge from the two-dimensional lineage, and express epithelial migration signatures characteristic of organ budding. We benchmark three-dimensional liver buds against fetal and adult human liver single-cell RNA sequencing data, and find a striking correspondence between the three-dimensional liver bud and fetal liver cells. We use a receptor-ligand pairing analysis and a high-throughput inhibitor assay to interrogate signalling in liver buds, and show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) crosstalk potentiates endothelial network formation and hepatoblast differentiation. Our molecular dissection reveals interlineage communication regulating organoid development, and illuminates previously inaccessible aspects of human liver development.

  17. Characterization of Septin Ultrastructure in Budding Yeast Using Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Aurélie; Nogales, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Summary Septins are essential for the completion of cytokinesis. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, septins are located at the bud neck during mitosis and are closely connected to the inner plasma membrane. In vitro, yeast septins have been shown to self-assemble into a variety of filamentous structures, including rods, paired filaments, bundles and rings [1–3]. Using electron tomography of freeze-substituted section and cryo-electron tomography of frozen sections, we determined the three dimensional organization of the septin cytoskeleton in dividing budding yeast with molecular resolution [4,5]. Here we describe the detailed procedures used for our characterization of the septin cellular ultrastructure. PMID:26519309

  18. Very low dose gamma irradiation stimulates gaseous exchange and carboxylation efficiency, but inhibits vascular sap flow in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Sumedha; Singh, Bhupinder; Gupta, Vijay Kumar; Singhal, R K; Venu Babu, P

    2014-02-01

    An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of low dose gamma radiation on germination, plant growth, nitrogen and carbon fixation and carbon flow and release characteristics of groundnut. Dry seeds of groundnut variety Trombay groundnut 37A (TG 37A), a radio mutant type developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, India, were subjected to the pre-sowing treatment of gamma radiation within low to high dose physiological range, i.e., 0.0, 0.0082, 0.0164. 0.0328, 0.0656, 0.1312, 5, 25, 100, 500 Gray (Gy) from a cobalt source ((60)Co). Observations were recorded for the radiation effect on percentage germination, vigour, gas exchange attributes such as photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, chlorophyll content, root exudation in terms of (14)C release, vascular sap flow rate and activities of rate defining carbon and nitrogen assimilating enzymes such as ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco) and nitrate reductase (NR). Seed germination was increased by 10-25% at the lower doses up to 5 Gy while the improvement in plant vigour in the same dose range was much higher (22-84%) than the unirradiated control. For radiation exposure above 5 Gy, a dose-dependent decline in germination and plant vigour was measured. No significant effect was observed on the photosynthesis at radiation exposure below 5 Gy but above 5 Gy dose there was a decline in the photosynthetic rate. Stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, however, were only inhibited at a high dose of 500 Gy. Leaf rubisco activity and NR activities remained unaffected at all the investigated doses of gamma irradiation. Mean root exudation and sap flow rate of the irradiated plants, irrespective of the dose, was reduced over the unirradiated control more so in a dose-dependent manner. Results indicated that a very low dose of gamma radiation, in centigray to gray range, did not pose any threat and in fact stimulated metabolic functions in such a way to aid

  19. Interleukin-10 Is Produced by a Specific Subset of Taste Receptor Cells and Critical for Maintaining Structural Integrity of Mouse Taste Buds

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jinghua; Zhou, Minliang; Simon, Nirvine; Huang, Liquan

    2014-01-01

    Although inflammatory responses are a critical component in defense against pathogens, too much inflammation is harmful. Mechanisms have evolved to regulate inflammation, including modulation by the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Previously we have shown that taste buds express various molecules involved in innate immune responses, including the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Here, using a reporter mouse strain, we show that taste cells also express the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Remarkably, IL-10 is produced by only a specific subset of taste cells, which are different from the TNF-producing cells in mouse circumvallate and foliate taste buds: IL-10 expression was found exclusively in the G-protein gustducin-expressing bitter receptor cells, while TNF was found in sweet and umami receptor cells as reported previously. In contrast, IL-10R1, the ligand-binding subunit of the IL-10 receptor, is predominantly expressed by TNF-producing cells, suggesting a novel cellular hierarchy for regulating TNF production and effects in taste buds. In response to inflammatory challenges, taste cells can increase IL-10 expression both in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that taste buds use separate populations of taste receptor cells that coincide with sweet/umami and bitter taste reception to modulate local inflammatory responses, a phenomenon that has not been previously reported. Furthermore, IL-10 deficiency in mice leads to significant reductions in the number and size of taste buds, as well as in the number of taste receptor cells per taste bud, suggesting that IL-10 plays critical roles in maintaining structural integrity of the peripheral gustatory system. PMID:24523558

  20. Interleukin-10 is produced by a specific subset of taste receptor cells and critical for maintaining structural integrity of mouse taste buds.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Chai, Jinghua; Zhou, Minliang; Simon, Nirvine; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2014-02-12

    Although inflammatory responses are a critical component in defense against pathogens, too much inflammation is harmful. Mechanisms have evolved to regulate inflammation, including modulation by the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Previously we have shown that taste buds express various molecules involved in innate immune responses, including the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Here, using a reporter mouse strain, we show that taste cells also express the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Remarkably, IL-10 is produced by only a specific subset of taste cells, which are different from the TNF-producing cells in mouse circumvallate and foliate taste buds: IL-10 expression was found exclusively in the G-protein gustducin-expressing bitter receptor cells, while TNF was found in sweet and umami receptor cells as reported previously. In contrast, IL-10R1, the ligand-binding subunit of the IL-10 receptor, is predominantly expressed by TNF-producing cells, suggesting a novel cellular hierarchy for regulating TNF production and effects in taste buds. In response to inflammatory challenges, taste cells can increase IL-10 expression both in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that taste buds use separate populations of taste receptor cells that coincide with sweet/umami and bitter taste reception to modulate local inflammatory responses, a phenomenon that has not been previously reported. Furthermore, IL-10 deficiency in mice leads to significant reductions in the number and size of taste buds, as well as in the number of taste receptor cells per taste bud, suggesting that IL-10 plays critical roles in maintaining structural integrity of the peripheral gustatory system.

  1. Minimally invasive treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cebulski, Włodzimierz; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz W.

    2014-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis is a challenging complication that worsens prognosis in acute pancreatitis. For years, open necrosectomy has been the mainstay treatment option in infected pancreatic necrosis, although surgical debridement still results in high morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, many reports on minimally invasive treatment in infected pancreatic necrosis have been published. This paper presents a review of minimally invasive techniques and attempts to define their role in the management of infected pancreatic necrosis. PMID:25653725

  2. Micropropagation of Helleborus through axillary budding.

    PubMed

    Beruto, Margherita; Viglione, Serena; Bisignano, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Helleborus genus, belonging to the Ranunculaceae family, has 20 species of herbaceous perennial flowering plants. The commercial exploitation of this plant is dependent on the selection and propagation of appropriate lines. High propagation rate could be accomplished by using a suitable tissue culture method enabling the rapid introduction of valuable selections in the market. However, in vitro cultivation of Helleborus is still very difficult. Thereby the development of reliable in vitro propagation procedures is crucial for future production systems. Axillary buds cultured on agar-solidified Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 1 mg/L benzyladenine, 0.1 mg/L β-naphthoxyacetic acid, and 2 mg/L isopentenyl adenine develop shoots after 16 weeks of culture under 16 h light regime, 50-60 μmol/s/m(2), and 19 ± 1°C. The multiplication rate ranges from 1.4 to 2.1. However, the genotype and the number of subcultures affect the efficiency of the micropropagation process. The rooting of shoots is about 80% in solidified MS medium containing 1 mg/L 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 3 mg/L indole-3-butyric acid. The described protocol provides information which can contribute to the commercial production of Helleborus plants.

  3. Mechanical feedback stabilizes budding yeast morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavar, Samhita; Trogdon, Michael; Petzold, Linda; Campas, Otger

    Walled cells have the ability to remodel their shape while sustaining an internal turgor pressure that can reach values up to 10 atmospheres. This requires a tight and simultaneous regulation of cell wall assembly and mechanochemistry, but the underlying mechanisms by which this is achieved remain unclear. Using the growth of mating projections in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) as a motivating example, we have developed a theoretical description that couples the mechanics of cell wall expansion and assembly via a mechanical feedback. In the absence of a mechanical feedback, cell morphogenesis is inherently unstable. The presence of a mechanical feedback stabilizes changes in cell shape and growth, and provides a mechanism to prevent cell lysis in a wide range of conditions. We solve for the dynamics of the system and obtain the different dynamical regimes. In particular, we show that several parameters affect the stability of growth, including the strength of mechanical feedback in the system. Finally, we compare our results to existing experimental data.

  4. Bioengineered teeth from cultured rat tooth bud cells.

    PubMed

    Duailibi, M T; Duailibi, S E; Young, C S; Bartlett, J D; Vacanti, J P; Yelick, P C

    2004-07-01

    The recent bioengineering of complex tooth structures from pig tooth bud tissues suggests the potential for the regeneration of mammalian dental tissues. We have improved tooth bioengineering methods by comparing the utility of cultured rat tooth bud cells obtained from three- to seven-day post-natal (dpn) rats for tooth-tissue-engineering applications. Cell-seeded biodegradable scaffolds were grown in the omenta of adult rat hosts for 12 wks, then harvested. Analyses of 12-week implant tissues demonstrated that dissociated 4-dpn rat tooth bud cells seeded for 1 hr onto PGA or PLGA scaffolds generated bioengineered tooth tissues most reliably. We conclude that tooth-tissue-engineering methods can be used to generate both pig and rat tooth tissues. Furthermore, our ability to bioengineer tooth structures from cultured tooth bud cells suggests that dental epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells can be maintained in vitro for at least 6 days.

  5. Innervation of the undifferentiated limb bud in rabbit embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J; McCredie, J

    1982-01-01

    The concept that there are no nerves in the limb bud of mammalian embryos prior to differentiation has been re-examined. Rabbit embryos were collected at 260 and 290 hours gestation, which is prior to cartilage formation in the forelimb at 320 hours. Forelimb buds and adjacent neural tube were excised, fixed and embedded for light and electron microscopy. The limb buds were sectioned in two planes by serial 1 micrometer sections and inspected by light microscopy. Bundles of nerve fibres were seen within the proximal third of the limb bud, with distal ramification into adjacent zones of condensing mesenchyme. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of axons and associated immature Schwann cells. These results demonstrate the existence of an anatomical framework through which a neurotrophic influence might be brought to bear upon mesenchyme prior to early differentiation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:7130041

  6. Ubiquitin is part of the retrovirus budding machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaik, Akash; Chau, Vincent; Wills, John W.

    2000-11-01

    Retroviruses contain relatively large amounts of ubiquitin, but the significance of this finding has been unknown. Here, we show that drugs that are known to reduce the level of free ubiquitin in the cell dramatically reduced the release of Rous sarcoma virus, an avian retrovirus. This effect was suppressed by overexpressing ubiquitin and also by directly fusing ubiquitin to the C terminus of Gag, the viral protein that directs budding and particle release. The block to budding was found to be at the plasma membrane, and electron microscopy revealed that the reduced level of ubiquitin results in a failure of mature virus particles to separate from each other and from the plasma membrane during budding. These data indicate that ubiquitin is actually part of the budding machinery.

  7. Polarity-Driven Geometrical Cluster Growth Model of Budding Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Reniel B.; Lim, May T.

    We present a polarity-driven activator-inhibitor model of budding yeast in a two-dimensional medium wherein impeding metabolites secretion (or growth inhibitors) and growth directionality are determined by the local nutrient level. We found that colony size and morphological features varied with nutrient concentration. A branched-type morphology is associated with high impeding metabolite concentration together with a high fraction of distal budding, while opposite conditions (low impeding metabolite concentration, high fraction of proximal budding) promote Eden-type patterns. Increasing the anisotropy factor (or polarity) produced other spatial patterns akin to the electrical breakdown under varying electric field. Rapid changes in the colony morphology, which we conjecture to be equivalent to a transition from an inactive quiescent state to an active budding state, appeared when nutrients were limited.

  8. Studies on Cytokinin-Controlled Bud Formation in Moss Protonemata

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, H.; Kende, H.

    1968-01-01

    Application of cytokinins to moss protonemata of the proper physiological age causes bud formation on specific cells (caulonema). During the early stages of their development, buds revert to protonemal filaments if the cytokinin has been removed by washing the protonemata. This indicates that the hormone is not acting as a “trigger” but has to be present during a critical period of time until differentiation is stabilized. Autoradiographs of protonemata treated with a labeled cytokinin, benzyladenine-benzyl-7-14C, show a striking accumulation of the radioactivity in caulonema cells which are in the stage of bud formation, and in the buds themselves. Cells which did not react to the hormone contained very little radioactivity. The accumulation of benzyladenine in the “target cells” may be due to the presence of binding sites which, in turn, may distinguish responding cells from non-responding ones. Images PMID:16656847

  9. Oriented cell motility and division underlie early limb bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wyngaarden, Laurie A; Vogeli, Kevin M; Ciruna, Brian G; Wells, Mathew; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Hopyan, Sevan

    2010-08-01

    The vertebrate limb bud arises from lateral plate mesoderm and its overlying ectoderm. Despite progress regarding the genetic requirements for limb development, morphogenetic mechanisms that generate early outgrowth remain relatively undefined. We show by live imaging and lineage tracing in different vertebrate models that the lateral plate contributes mesoderm to the early limb bud through directional cell movement. The direction of cell motion, longitudinal cell axes and bias in cell division planes lie largely parallel to one another along the rostrocaudal (head-tail) axis in lateral plate mesoderm. Transition of these parameters from a rostrocaudal to a mediolateral (outward from the body wall) orientation accompanies early limb bud outgrowth. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Wnt5a acts as a chemoattractant in the emerging limb bud where it contributes to the establishment of cell polarity that is likely to underlie the oriented cell behaviours.

  10. Rapid evaporation-induced synthesis of monodisperse budded silica spheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongmin; He, Junhui

    2007-12-15

    Budded silica spheres have been synthesized by a novel rapid evaporation-induced self-assembly combined with the well-known Stöber method. The morphology of budded silica spheres were examined by transmission electron microscopy, and their mean size and size distribution were also estimated. Both the temperature of the sol-gel reaction and following post-treatment were found to play crucial roles in determining the surface morphology of obtained silica spheres and the yield of budded silica spheres. The possible formation mechanism was also proposed on the basis of experimental observations. The budded silica spheres would have higher surface areas than smooth silica spheres, and significant potentials for catalyst supports, building blocks of photonic crystals, and for constructing superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic surfaces.

  11. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, M.; Torigoe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takizawa, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Ono, F.

    2014-05-01

    Our studies on the tolerance of plants and animals against very high pressure of several GPa have been extended to a smaller sized fungus, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate, and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar. It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for longer than 12 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is a little weaker than that of tardigrades.

  12. Grapevine bud break prediction for cool winter climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nendel, Claas

    2010-05-01

    Statistical analysis of bud break data for grapevine ( Vitis vinifera L. cvs. Riesling and Müller-Thurgau) at 13 sites along the northern boundary of commercial grapevine production in Europe revealed that, for all investigated sites, the heat summation method for bud break prediction can be improved if the starting date for the accumulation of heat units is specifically determined. Using the coefficient of variance as a criterion, a global minimum for each site can be identified, marking the optimum starting date. Furthermore, it was shown that the application of a threshold temperature for the heat summation method does not lead to an improved prediction of bud break. Using site-specific parameters, bud break of grapevine can be predicted with an accuracy of ± 2.5 days. Using average parameters, the prediction accuracy is reduced to ± 4.5 days, highlighting the sensitivity of the heat summation method to the quality and the representativeness of the driving temperature data.

  13. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25911043

  14. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases.

  15. Longleaf pine bud development: influence of seedling nutrition

    Treesearch

    J. P. Barnett; D. P. Jackson; R. K. Dumroese

    2010-01-01

    A subset of seedlings from a larger study (Jackson and others 2006, 2007) were selected and evaluated for two growing seasons to relate bud development, and root-collar diameter (RCD), and height growth with three nursery fertilization rates. We chose seedlings in the 0.5 (lowest), 2.0 (mid-range), and 4.0 (highest) mg of nitrogen per seedling treatments. Buds moved...

  16. Impact of peritumoral and intratumoral budding in esophageal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Thies, Svenja; Guldener, Lars; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Zlobec, Inti; Koelzer, Viktor H; Lugli, Alessandro; Kröll, Dino; Seiler, Christian A; Feith, Marcus; Langer, Rupert

    2016-06-01

    Tumor budding has prognostic significance in many carcinomas and is defined as the presence of detached isolated single cells or small cell clusters up to 5 cells at the invasion front (peritumoral budding [PTB]) or within the tumor (intratumoral budding [ITB]). For esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs), there are currently only few data about the impact of this morphological feature. We investigated tumor budding in a large collective of 200 primarily resected EACs. Pancytokeratin staining was demonstrated to be superior to hematoxylin and eosin staining for the detection of buds with substantial to excellent interobserver agreement and used for subsequent analysis. PTB and ITB were scored across 10 high-power fields (HPFs). The median count of tumor buds was 130/10 HPFs for PTB (range, 2-593) and 80/10 HPFs for ITB (range, 1-656). PTB and ITB correlated significantly with each other (r = 0.9; P < .001). High PTB and ITB rates were seen in more advanced tumor categories (P < .001 each); tumors with lymph node metastases (P < .001/P = .002); and lymphatic, vascular, and perineural invasion and higher tumor grading (P < .001 each). Survival analysis showed an association with worse survival for high-grade ITB (P = .029) but not PTB (P = .385). However, in multivariate analysis, lymph node and resection status, but not ITB, were independent prognostic parameters. In conclusion, PTB and ITB can be observed in EAC to various degrees. High-grade budding is associated with aggressive tumor phenotype. Assessment of tumor budding, especially ITB, may provide additional prognostic information about tumor behavior and may be useful in specific cases for risk stratification of EAC patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  18. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education PMID:27047605

  19. Tumor Budding: The Name is EMT. Partial EMT.

    PubMed Central

    Grigore, Alexandru Dan; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Jia, Dongya; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Levine, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Tumor budding is a histological phenomenon encountered in various cancers, whereby individual malignant cells and/or small clusters of malignant cells are seen in the tumor stroma. Postulated to be mirror epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor budding has been associated with poor cancer outcomes. However, the vast heterogeneity in its exact definition, methodology of assessment, and patient stratification need to be resolved before it can be routinely used as a standardized prognostic feature. Here, we discuss the heterogeneity in defining and assessing tumor budding, its clinical significance across multiple cancer types, and its prospective implementation in clinical practice. Next, we review the emerging evidence about partial, rather than complete, epithelial-mesenchymal phenotype at the tumor bud level, and its connection with tumor proliferation, quiescence, and stemness. Finally, based on recent literature, indicating a co-expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in many tumor buds, we posit tumor budding to be a manifestation of this hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype displaying collective cell migration. PMID:27136592

  20. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Da-Long; Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape.

  1. Host cytoskeleton in respiratory syncytial virus assembly and budding.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Shadi; Gordon, James; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-09-26

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the major pathogens responsible for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in young children, the elderly, and the immunosuppressed. Currently, there are no antiviral drugs or vaccines available that effectively target RSV infections, proving a significant challenge in regards to prevention and treatment. An in-depth understanding of the host-virus interactions that underlie assembly and budding would inform new targets for antiviral development.Current research suggests that the polymerised form of actin, the filamentous or F-actin, plays a role in RSV assembly and budding. Treatment with cytochalasin D, which disrupts F-actin, has been shown to inhibit virus release. In addition, the actin cytoskeleton has been shown to interact with the RSV matrix (M) protein, which plays a central role in RSV assembly. For this reason, the interaction between these two components is hypothesised to facilitate the movement of viral components in the cytoplasm and to the budding site. Despite increases in our knowledge of RSV assembly and budding, M-actin interactions are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the current literature on the role of actin cytoskeleton during assembly and budding of RSV with the aim to integrate disparate studies to build a hypothetical model of the various molecular interactions between actin and RSV M protein that facilitate RSV assembly and budding.

  2. Tumor Budding: The Name is EMT. Partial EMT.

    PubMed

    Grigore, Alexandru Dan; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Jia, Dongya; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Levine, Herbert

    2016-04-29

    Tumor budding is a histological phenomenon encountered in various cancers, whereby individual malignant cells and/or small clusters of malignant cells are seen in the tumor stroma. Postulated to be mirror epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor budding has been associated with poor cancer outcomes. However, the vast heterogeneity in its exact definition, methodology of assessment, and patient stratification need to be resolved before it can be routinely used as a standardized prognostic feature. Here, we discuss the heterogeneity in defining and assessing tumor budding, its clinical significance across multiple cancer types, and its prospective implementation in clinical practice. Next, we review the emerging evidence about partial, rather than complete, epithelial-mesenchymal phenotype at the tumor bud level, and its connection with tumor proliferation, quiescence, and stemness. Finally, based on recent literature, indicating a co-expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in many tumor buds, we posit tumor budding to be a manifestation of this hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype displaying collective cell migration.

  3. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji; Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2007-02-01

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast.

  4. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape. PMID:27610363

  5. Early epithelial signaling center governs tooth budding morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Thesleff, Irma

    2016-01-01

    During organogenesis, cell fate specification and patterning are regulated by signaling centers, specialized clusters of morphogen-expressing cells. In many organs, initiation of development is marked by bud formation, but the cellular mechanisms involved are ill defined. Here, we use the mouse incisor tooth as a model to study budding morphogenesis. We show that a group of nonproliferative epithelial cells emerges in the early tooth primordium and identify these cells as a signaling center. Confocal live imaging of tissue explants revealed that although these cells reorganize dynamically, they do not reenter the cell cycle or contribute to the growing tooth bud. Instead, budding is driven by proliferation of the neighboring cells. We demonstrate that the activity of the ectodysplasin/Edar/nuclear factor κB pathway is restricted to the signaling center, and its inactivation leads to fewer quiescent cells and a smaller bud. These data functionally link the signaling center size to organ size and imply that the early signaling center is a prerequisite for budding morphogenesis. PMID:27621364

  6. Inflammation and taste disorders: mechanisms in taste buds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Zhou, Minliang; Brand, Joseph; Huang, Liquan

    2009-01-01

    Taste disorders, including taste distortion and taste loss, negatively impact general health and quality of life. To understand the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms, we set out to identify inflammation-related molecules in taste tissue and to assess their role in the development of taste dysfunctions. We found that 10 out of 12 mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs), type I and II interferon (IFN) receptors and their downstream signaling components are present in taste tissue. Some TLRs appear to be selectively or more abundantly expressed in taste buds than in non-gustatory lingual epithelium. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies against TLRs 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 confirmed the presence of these receptor proteins in taste bud cells, of which TLRs 2, 3 and 4 are expressed in the gustducin-expressing type II taste bud cells. Administration of TLR receptor ligands, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) that mimics bacterial or viral infection, activates the IFN signaling pathways, up-regulates the expression of IFN-inducible genes but down-regulates the expression of c-fos in taste buds. Finally, systemic administration of IFNs augments apoptosis of taste bud cells in mice. Taken together, these data suggest that TLR and IFN pathways function collaboratively in recognizing pathogens and mediating inflammatory responses in taste tissue. This process, however, may interfere with normal taste transduction and taste bud cell turnover and contributes to the development of taste disorders. PMID:19686199

  7. [Skin necrosis: report of eleven cases].

    PubMed

    Molgó, Montserrat N; Arriagada, Camila E; Salomone, Claudia B; Vera, Cristián K; Giesen, Laura F; Solar, Antonieta G; González, Sergio B

    2014-01-01

    Skin necrosis must be considered as a syndrome, because it is a clinical manifestation of different diseases. An early diagnosis is very important to choose the appropriate treatment. Therefore, its causes should be suspected and confirmed quickly. We report eleven patients with skin necrosis seen at our Department, caused by different etiologies: Warfarin-induced skin necrosis, loxoscelism, diabetic microangiopathy, ecthyma gangrenosum, disseminated intravascular coagulation, necrotizing vasculitis, paraneoplastic extensive necrotizing vasculitis, livedoid vasculopathy, necrotizing fasciitis, necrosis secondary to the use of vasoactive drugs and necrosis secondary to the use of cocaine. We also report the results of our literature review on the subject.

  8. Transgenics in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) expressing cry1AcF gene for resistance to Spodoptera litura (F.).

    PubMed

    Keshavareddy, G; Rohini, S; Ramu, S V; Sundaresha, S; Kumar, A R V; Kumar, P Ananda; Udayakumar, M

    2013-07-01

    Large number of primary transgenic events were generated in groundnut by an Agrobacterium mediated, in planta transformation method to assess the efficacy of cry1AcF against the Spodoptera litura. The amplification of required size fragment of 750 bp with npt II primers and 901 bp with cry1AcF gene primers confirmed the integration of the gene. The expression of the cry gene was ascertained by ELISA in T2 generation, and the maximum concentration of cry protein in transgenic plants reached approximately 0.82 μg/g FW. Further, Southern blot analysis of ten T2 transgenic plants proved that transgene had been integrated in the genome of all the plants and Northern analysis of the same plants demonstrated the active expression of cry1AcF gene. The highest mean % larval mortalities 80.0 and 85.0 with an average mean % larval mortalities 16.25 (n = 369) and 26.0 (n = 80) were recorded in T1 and T2 generations, respectively. Segregation analysis of the selected lines in the T3 generation demonstrated homozygous nature. This clearly proved that though there is considerable improvement in average mean % larval mortality in T2 generation, the cry1AcF gene was effective against S. litura only to some extent.

  9. Influence of varying levels of supplemental cassava root meal without or with groundnut cake on performance of growing Laisind cattle.

    PubMed

    Trung, Nguyen Thanh; Berg, Jan; Cuong, Vu Chi; Kjos, Nils Petter

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of supplementation of varying levels of cassava root meal (CRM, 300 and 1,000 g), without or with 700 g groundnut cake (GNC) on intake and performance of growing Laisind cattle fed with a basal diet of urea-treated rice straw (URTRS). Twenty-four male cattle of crossbred Laisind (50% Red Sindhi and 50 % local Yellow, both Bos indicus), from 15 to 17 months of age, 165-175 kg body weight, were used. They were assigned to a completely randomized block design in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement (two CRM levels and two GNC levels). Intake of URTRS (interaction, P < 0.01) and digestibility of neutral detergent fiber (interaction, P < 0.05) decreased as CRM level increased on the diets without GNC but was not affected by CRM level on the diets with GNC. The total dry matter intake (interaction, P < 0.05) and live weight gain (LWG) (interaction, P < 0.001) increased as CRM level increased on the diets with GNC, but no difference was observed on the diets without GNC. In conclusion, supplementation of 1,000 g CRM should be in combination with 700 g GNC to avoid the negative effects on URTRS intake and digestibility, therefore improving LWG of growing Laisind cattle fed on a URTRS-based diet.

  10. Use of microsatellite markers for the assessment of bambara groundnut breeding system and varietal purity before genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wai Kuan; Muchugi, Alice; Muthemba, Samuel; Kariba, Robert; Mavenkeni, Busiso Olga; Hendre, Prasad; Song, Bo; Van Deynze, Allen; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Maximizing the research output from a limited investment is often the major challenge for minor and underutilized crops. However, such crops may be tolerant to biotic and abiotic stresses and are adapted to local, marginal, and low-input environments. Their development through breeding will provide an important resource for future agricultural system resilience and diversification in the context of changing climates and the need to achieve food security. The African Orphan Crops Consortium recognizes the values of genomic resources in facilitating the improvement of such crops. Prior to beginning genome sequencing there is a need for an assessment of line varietal purity and to estimate any residual heterozygosity. Here we present an example from bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.), an underutilized drought tolerant African legume. Two released varieties from Zimbabwe, identified as potential genotypes for whole genome sequencing (WGS), were genotyped with 20 species-specific SSR markers. The results indicate that the cultivars are actually a mix of related inbred genotypes, and the analysis allowed a strategy of single plant selection to be used to generate non-heterogeneous DNA for WGS. The markers also confirmed very low levels of heterozygosity within individual plants. The application of a pre-screen using co-dominant microsatellite markers is expected to substantially improve the genome assembly, compared to a cultivar bulking approach that could have been adopted.

  11. Effect of feeding varying levels of groundnut haulms on feed intake and growth performance in broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ribadiya, N. K.; Savsani, H. H.; Patil, S. S.; Garg, D. D.; Gadariya, M. R.; Karangiya, V. K.; Gajera, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was carried out to evaluate groundnut haulms (GNH) as alternate feed source by its incorporation and assessment in terms of feed intake and growth performance in the diets of broilers. Materials and Methods: A total of 240 1-day-old Cobb-400 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments each with three replicates (n=60). Experimental Birds in group T1 were fed with conventional feed while birds in T2, T3, T4 were fed containing 2%, 4%, and 6% of GNH replacing maize and soyabean on iso-nitrogenous basis. Results: Feed intake increases significantly (p>0.05) with increasing level of GNH in the diets of experimental birds. Highest feed intake was recorded in T4 (6% GNH), followed by T3 (4% GNH) than T2 (2% GNH) and T1 (control). Birds fed GNH gained significantly (p<0.05) higher body weight than birds fed the control diet. Birds in T4 [6% GNH] gained highest body weight, followed by T3 (4% GNH) than T2 (2% GNH) and T1 (control). However, feed conversion ratio (FCR) remained non-significant for all treatment groups. Conclusion: On the basis of the results of this study, it is concluded that supplementation of GNH can successfully replace costly ingredients like maize and soybean meal in the diets of broiler birds up to the level of 6 percent of concentrate mixture without any harmful effects on feed intake, growth and FCR. PMID:27047062

  12. Enterobacter arachidis sp. nov., a plant-growth-promoting diazotrophic bacterium isolated from rhizosphere soil of groundnut.

    PubMed

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Poonguzhali, Selvaraj; Lee, Jung-Sook; Saravanan, Venkatakrishnan Sivaraj; Lee, Keun-Chul; Santhanakrishnan, Palani

    2010-07-01

    A methylotrophic nitrogen-fixing bacterial strain, Ah-143(T), isolated from the rhizosphere soil of field-grown groundnut was analysed by a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis combined with rpoB gene sequence analysis allocated strain Ah-143(T) to the family Enterobacteriaceae, with Enterobacter radicincitans and Enterobacter cowanii as the closest relatives. The strain is Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, aerobic and motile, having straight rod-shaped cells with a DNA G+C content of approximately 53.2 mol%. The strain utilizes methanol as a carbon source and the mxaF gene was closely related to the mxaF gene of members of the genus Methylobacterium. The fatty acid profile consisted of C(16 : 0), C(17 : 0) cyclo, C(18 : 1)omega7c, summed feature 2 (iso-C(16 : 1) I and/or C(14 : 0) 3-OH) and summed feature 3 (iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)omega7c) as the major components. DNA-DNA relatedness of strain Ah-143(T) with its close relatives was less than 20 %. On the basis of the phylogenetic analyses, DNA-DNA hybridization data, and unique physiological and biochemical characteristics, it is proposed that the strain represents a novel species of the genus Enterobacter and should be named Enterobacter arachidis sp. nov. The type strain is Ah-143(T) (=NCIMB 14469(T) =KCTC 22375(T)).

  13. Crosslinks in the cell wall of budding yeast control morphogenesis at the mother–bud neck

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Noelia; Reidy, Michael; Arroyo, Javier; Cabib, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Summary Previous work has shown that, in cla4Δ cells of budding yeast, where septin ring organization is compromised, the chitin ring at the mother–daughter neck becomes essential for prevention of neck widening and for cytokinesis. Here, we show that it is not the chitin ring per se, but its linkage to β(1-3)glucan that is required for control of neck growth. When in a cla4Δ background, crh1Δ crh2Δ mutants, in which the chitin ring is not connected to β(1-3)glucan, grew very slowly and showed wide and growing necks, elongated buds and swollen cells with large vacuoles. A similar behavior was elicited by inhibition of the Crh proteins. This aberrant morphology matched that of cla4Δ chs3Δ cells, which have no chitin at the neck. Thus, this is a clear case in which a specific chemical bond between two substances, chitin and glucan, is essential for the control of morphogenesis. This defines a new paradigm, in which chemistry regulates growth. PMID:23077181

  14. Studies of DNA damage and cell death in embryonic limb buds induced by teratogenic exposure to cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Manson, J M; Papa, L; Miller, M L; Boyd, C

    1982-01-01

    Many teratologic investigations have shown that certain types of chemical insults to the embryo (those altering replication, transcription, and translation) can cause excessive cell death in tissues destined to become malformed. Chemical carcinogens also induce cell death in target tissues, but the critical event is believed to be heritable alteration in the DNA of surviving cells. In the present study, an attempt was made to study the interaction between cell death and DNA damage in the initiation of birth defects. The pattern of DNA damage induced by cyclophosphamide was examined at time intervals before, during, and after the necrotic episode in mouse embryo limb buds. The alkaline elution assay was used to measure alkali-labile sites in single-strand DNA due to its adaptability to small tissue samples. An ip dose of 20 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide induced forelimb malformations in 85% of surviving mouse fetuses and 30% embryolethality when administered at 9 am on Day 11. As early as 5 hr after exposure, a slight excess of necrosis was observed in treated limbs by light microscopy, while at 24 hr, massive necrosis was evident. By 48 and 72 hr, excess necrosis was not observed in treated limbs. When alkaline elution analysis was conducted at prenecrotic (1-, and 5-hr), necrotic (24-hr), and postnecrotic (48-, and 72-hr) intervals, a trend toward increasing DNA damage in treated limbs with time was observed. The greatest differences in elution values occurred during the postnecrotic period. Although mean retention values were not significantly different, significantly increased variance was obtained in retention values of treated limbs at all time intervals other than 1 hr. This may reflect the actual in vivo situation where relatively few cells within a heterogeneous population of cells carry sublethal DNA damage into the postnecrotic period. These results suggest that not all limb bud cells affected by teratogenic exposure to cyclophosphamide die, but that some

  15. Targeting of regulated necrosis in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martin-Sanchez, Diego; Poveda, Jonay; Fontecha-Barriuso, Miguel; Ruiz-Andres, Olga; Sanchez-Niño, María Dolores; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanz, Ana Belén

    2017-06-21

    The term acute tubular necrosis was thought to represent a misnomer derived from morphological studies of human necropsies and necrosis was thought to represent an unregulated passive form of cell death which was not amenable to therapeutic manipulation. Recent advances have improved our understanding of cell death in acute kidney injury. First, apoptosis results in cell loss, but does not trigger an inflammatory response. However, clumsy attempts at interfering with apoptosis (e.g. certain caspase inhibitors) may trigger necrosis and, thus, inflammation-mediated kidney injury. Second, and most revolutionary, the concept of regulated necrosis emerged. Several modalities of regulated necrosis were described, such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, pyroptosis and mitochondria permeability transition regulated necrosis. Similar to apoptosis, regulated necrosis is modulated by specific molecules that behave as therapeutic targets. Contrary to apoptosis, regulated necrosis may be extremely pro-inflammatory and, importantly for kidney transplantation, immunogenic. Furthermore, regulated necrosis may trigger synchronized necrosis, in which all cells within a given tubule die in a synchronized manner. We now review the different modalities of regulated necrosis, the evidence for a role in diverse forms of kidney injury and the new opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Developing a biomimetic tooth bud model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elizabeth E; Zhang, Weibo; Schiele, Nathan R; Khademhosseini, Ali; Kuo, Catherine K; Yelick, Pamela C

    2017-01-08

    A long-term goal is to bioengineer, fully functional, living teeth for regenerative medicine and dentistry applications. Biologically based replacement teeth would avoid insufficiencies of the currently used dental implants. Using natural tooth development as a guide, a model was fabricated using post-natal porcine dental epithelial (pDE), porcine dental mesenchymal (pDM) progenitor cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) encapsulated within gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels. Previous publications have shown that post-natal DE and DM cells seeded onto synthetic scaffolds exhibited mineralized tooth crowns composed of dentin and enamel. However, these tooth structures were small and formed within the pores of the scaffolds. The present study shows that dental cell-encapsulated GelMA constructs can support mineralized dental tissue formation of predictable size and shape. Individually encapsulated pDE or pDM cell GelMA constructs were analysed to identify formulas that supported pDE and pDM cell attachment, spreading, metabolic activity, and neo-vasculature formation with co-seeded endothelial cells (HUVECs). GelMa constructs consisting of pDE-HUVECS in 3% GelMA and pDM-HUVECs within 5% GelMA supported dental cell differentiation and vascular mineralized dental tissue formation in vivo. These studies are the first to demonstrate the use of GelMA hydrogels to support the formation of post-natal dental progenitor cell-derived mineralized and functionally vascularized tissues of specified size and shape. These results introduce a novel three-dimensional biomimetic tooth bud model for eventual bioengineered tooth replacement teeth in humans. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The Roles of Bud-Site-Selection Proteins during Haploid Invasive Growth in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul J.; Sprague, George F.

    2002-01-01

    In haploid strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glucose depletion causes invasive growth, a foraging response that requires a change in budding pattern from axial to unipolar-distal. To begin to address how glucose influences budding pattern in the haploid cell, we examined the roles of bud-site-selection proteins in invasive growth. We found that proteins required for bipolar budding in diploid cells were required for haploid invasive growth. In particular, the Bud8p protein, which marks and directs bud emergence to the distal pole of diploid cells, was localized to the distal pole of haploid cells. In response to glucose limitation, Bud8p was required for the localization of the incipient bud site marker Bud2p to the distal pole. Three of the four known proteins required for axial budding, Bud3p, Bud4p, and Axl2p, were expressed and localized appropriately in glucose-limiting conditions. However, a fourth axial budding determinant, Axl1p, was absent in filamentous cells, and its abundance was controlled by glucose availability and the protein kinase Snf1p. In the bud8 mutant in glucose-limiting conditions, apical growth and bud site selection were uncoupled processes. Finally, we report that diploid cells starved for glucose also initiate the filamentous growth response. PMID:12221111

  18. Acute oesophageal necrosis (black oesophagus).

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Gallego, María Ángeles; Esgueva, Raquel; Martin-Fumadó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being found unconscious in his home. He had a history of alcoholism, multiple drug addictions, and type I diabetes mellitus. At admission, he had hyperglycaemia (550 mg/dL) with glucosuria and ketone bodies in the urine, along with septic shock refractory to bilateral alveolar infiltrates and severe respiratory failure. The patient died 24 hours post admission due to multiple organ failure, with diabetic ketoacidosis decompensated by possible respiratory infection in a patient with polytoxicomania. The autopsy confirmed the presence of acute bilateral bronchopneumonia, chronic pancreatitis, severe hepatic steatosis, and generalized congestive changes. At the oesophagus, acute oesophageal necrosis was evident.

  19. [Bud population dynamics of Phragmites australis in heterogeneous habitats of Northeast grassland, China].

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    To adapt ecological environment, typical clonal plants can occur continuously by means of buds. The changes in the bud bank and bud flow in the heterogeneous habitats become the foundation for deep understanding the characteristics of vegetative propagation. By sampling soil from the unit area, a comparative analysis was performed for rhizome bud population dynamics of Phragmites australis community in both meadow soil and saline-alkali soil habitats in meadow grassland of Northeast China. The one-age class rhizome buds formed in the current year were used as input, with the other age classes rhizome buds as output, counting the dormancy buds and death buds. The results showed that the storage, input, output, dormancy, death and the input rates of P. australis rhizome bud populations in meadow soil habitat were significantly higher than that in saline-alkali habitat. There was no significant difference in output rate between the two habitats. The dormant rate in saline-alkali habitat was significantly greater than that in meadow soil habitat. The death rates remained at relatively low levels in both, less than 2%. With the going of growing season, the input buds and input rate of bud bank increased in the two habitats, while the output buds remained relatively stable. The output rate increased first and decreased later, the dormancy buds and dormant rate decreased. Bud bank and bud flow were positively related to soil moisture, soil organic matter and soil available nitrogen content. However, they were negatively related to soil pH value and soil available phosphorus content. Bud bank and bud flow had a similar seasonal variation. Constantly for both habitats, P. australis populations generated new rhizome buds supplied to the bud bank and kept a stable output to maintain their vegetative propagation.

  20. Genetic analysis of the bipolar pattern of bud site selection in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Zahner, J E; Harkins, H A; Pringle, J R

    1996-01-01

    Previous analysis of the bipolar budding pattern of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has suggested that it depends on persistent positional signals that mark the region of the division site and the tip of the distal pole on a newborn daughter cell, as well as each previous division site on a mother cell. In an attempt to identify genes encoding components of these signals or proteins involved in positioning or responding to them, we identified 11 mutants with defects in bipolar but not in axial budding. Five mutants displaying a bipolar budding-specific randomization of budding pattern had mutations in four previously known genes (BUD2, BUD5, SPA2, and BNI1) and one novel gene (BUD6), respectively. As Bud2p and Bud5p are known to be required for both the axial and bipolar budding patterns, the alleles identified here probably encode proteins that have lost their ability to interact with the bipolar positional signals but have retained their ability to interact with the distinct positional signal used in axial budding. The function of Spa2p is not known, but previous work has shown that its intracellular localization is similar to that postulated for the bipolar positional signals. BNI1 was originally identified on the basis of genetic interaction with CDC12, which encodes one of the neck-filament-associated septin proteins, suggesting that these proteins may be involved in positioning the bipolar signals. One mutant with a heterogeneous budding pattern defines a second novel gene (BUD7). Two mutants budding almost exclusively from the proximal pole carry mutations in a fourth novel gene (BUD9). A bud8 bud9 double mutant also buds almost exclusively from the proximal pole, suggesting that Bud9p is involved in positioning the proximal pole signal rather than being itself a component of this signal. PMID:8657162

  1. Laminar cortical necrosis in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-10-01

    Laminar cortical necrosis, defined as focal or diffuse necrosis of one or more cortical lamina, represents an increasingly recognized neuropathological endpoint of vascular, endocrine, immunologic, metabolic, or toxic conditions, of which mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are the third most frequent after cerebral ischemia and hypoxia. To investigate the prevalence of laminar cortical necrosis in MIDs, types of MIDs associated with laminar cortical necrosis, and the morphological characteristics on imaging and autopsy. Medline literature review for the terms "laminar cortical necrosis", "cortical signal change", "mitochondrial" and all acronyms of syndromatic MIDs. Among 139 hits for "laminar cortical necrosis", 10 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria (7%). Among the ten hits five were case series and the other five single case reports. The syndromic MID most frequently associated with laminar cortical necrosis is the MELAS syndrome, but was also described in a single patient each with Leigh syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndrome, and mitochondrial spinocerebellar ataxia. The morphological and pathohistological features of laminar cortical necrosis in MIDs were not at variance from those in non-mitochondrial disorders. In MIDs laminar cortical necrosis represents the histopathological and imaging endpoint of a stroke-like lesion. Though laminar cortical necrosis may have a wide pathophysiological background the histological and imaging characteristics do not vary between the different underlying conditions.

  2. Heterogeneity of fish taste bud ultrastructure as demonstrated in the holosteans Amia calva and Lepisosteus oculatus.

    PubMed

    Reutter, K; Boudriot, F; Witt, M

    2000-09-29

    Taste buds are the peripheral sensory organs of the gustatory system. They occur in all taxa of vertebrates and are pear-shaped intra-epithelial organs of about 80 microm height and 50 microm width. Taste buds mainly consist of specialized epithelial cells, which synapse at their bases and therefore are secondary sensory cells. Taste buds have been described based on studies of teleostean species, but it turned out that the ultrastructure of teleostean taste buds may differ between distinct systematic groups and that this description is not representative of those taste buds in other main taxa of fishes, such as selachians, holosteans and dipnoans. Furthermore, it is not known how variable the micromorphologies of non-teleostean taste buds are. For this reason the taste buds of two holosteans, Lepisosteus oculatus and Amia calva, were investigated and compared. While in both species the taste buds are of the same shapes and sizes, the cellular components of their sensory epithelia differ: in Lepisosteus taste buds comprise two types of elongated light cells and one type of dark cells. In contrast, Amia taste buds contain only one type of light, but two types of dark elongated cells. Afferent synapses are common in the buds of both species, efferent synapses occur only in Lepisosteus taste buds. These differences show that even in the small group of holostean fishes the taste buds are differently organized. Consequently, a representative type of fish taste buds does not exist.

  3. Electron Tomography Reveals the Steps in Filovirus Budding

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Sonja; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Krähling, Verena; Riches, James D.; Becker, Stephan; Briggs, John A. G.

    2010-01-01

    The filoviruses, Marburg and Ebola, are non-segmented negative-strand RNA viruses causing severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality rates in humans and nonhuman primates. The sequence of events that leads to release of filovirus particles from cells is poorly understood. Two contrasting mechanisms have been proposed, one proceeding via a “submarine-like” budding with the helical nucleocapsid emerging parallel to the plasma membrane, and the other via perpendicular “rocket-like” protrusion. Here we have infected cells with Marburg virus under BSL-4 containment conditions, and reconstructed the sequence of steps in the budding process in three dimensions using electron tomography of plastic-embedded cells. We find that highly infectious filamentous particles are released at early stages in infection. Budding proceeds via lateral association of intracellular nucleocapsid along its whole length with the plasma membrane, followed by rapid envelopment initiated at one end of the nucleocapsid, leading to a protruding intermediate. Scission results in local membrane instability at the rear of the virus. After prolonged infection, increased vesiculation of the plasma membrane correlates with changes in shape and infectivity of released viruses. Our observations demonstrate a cellular determinant of virus shape. They reconcile the contrasting models of filovirus budding and allow us to describe the sequence of events taking place during budding and release of Marburg virus. We propose that this represents a general sequence of events also followed by other filamentous and rod-shaped viruses. PMID:20442788

  4. Multiple pathways influence mitochondrial inheritance in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Rebecca L; Okamoto, Koji; Shaw, Janet M

    2008-02-01

    Yeast mitochondria form a branched tubular network. Mitochondrial inheritance is tightly coupled with bud emergence, ensuring that daughter cells receive mitochondria from mother cells during division. Proteins reported to influence mitochondrial inheritance include the mitochondrial rho (Miro) GTPase Gem1p, Mmr1p, and Ypt11p. A synthetic genetic array (SGA) screen revealed interactions between gem1Delta and deletions of genes that affect mitochondrial function or inheritance, including mmr1Delta. Synthetic sickness of gem1Delta mmr1Delta double mutants correlated with defective mitochondrial inheritance by large buds. Additional studies demonstrated that GEM1, MMR1, and YPT11 each contribute to mitochondrial inheritance. Mitochondrial accumulation in buds caused by overexpression of either Mmr1p or Ypt11p did not depend on Gem1p, indicating these three proteins function independently. Physical linkage of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has led to speculation that distribution of these two organelles is coordinated. We show that yeast mitochondrial inheritance is not required for inheritance or spreading of cortical ER in the bud. Moreover, Ypt11p overexpression, but not Mmr1p overexpression, caused ER accumulation in the bud, revealing a potential role for Ypt11p in ER distribution. This study demonstrates that multiple pathways influence mitochondrial inheritance in yeast and that Miro GTPases have conserved roles in mitochondrial distribution.

  5. Are there efferent synapses in fish taste buds?

    PubMed

    Reutter, Klaus; Witt, Martin

    2004-12-01

    In fish, nerve fibers of taste buds are organized within the bud's nerve fiber plexus. It is located between the sensory epithelium consisting of light and dark elongated cells and the basal cells. It comprises the basal parts and processes of light and dark cells that intermingle with nerve fibers, which are the dendritic endings of the taste sensory neurons belonging to the cranial nerves VII, IX or X. Most of the synapses at the plexus are afferent; they have synaptic vesicles on the light (or dark) cells side, which is presynaptic. In contrast, the presumed efferent synapses may be rich in synaptic vesicles on the nerve fibers (presynaptic) side, whereas the cells (postsynaptic) side may contain a subsynaptic cistern; a flat compartment of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. This structure is regarded as a prerequisite of a typical efferent synapse, as occurring in cochlear and vestibular hair cells. In fish taste buds, efferent synapses are rare and were found only in a few species that belong to different taxa. The significance of efferent synapses in fish taste buds is not well understood, because efferent connections between the gustatory nuclei of the medulla with taste buds are not yet proved.

  6. Stromal Protein Ecm1 Regulates Ureteric Bud Patterning and Branching

    PubMed Central

    Paroly, Suneeta S.; Wang, Fengwei; Spraggon, Lee; Merregaert, Joseph; Batourina, Ekatherina; Tycko, Benjamin; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M.; Grimmond, Sean; Little, Melissa; Mendelsohn, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between the nephrogenic mesenchyme and the ureteric bud during kidney development are well documented. While recent studies have shed some light on the importance of the stroma during renal development, many of the signals generated in the stroma, the genetic pathways and interaction networks involving the stroma are yet to be identified. Our previous studies demonstrate that retinoids are crucial for branching of the ureteric bud and for patterning of the cortical stroma. In the present study we demonstrate that autocrine retinoic acid (RA) signaling in stromal cells is critical for their survival and patterning, and show that Extracellular matrix 1, Ecm1, a gene that in humans causes irritable bowel syndrome and lipoid proteinosis, is a novel RA-regulated target in the developing kidney, which is secreted from the cortical stromal cells surrounding the cap mesenchyme and ureteric bud. Our studies suggest that Ecm1 is required in the ureteric bud for regulating the distribution of Ret which is normally restricted to the tips, as inhibition of Ecm1 results in an expanded domain of Ret expression and reduced numbers of branches. We propose a model in which retinoid signaling in the stroma activates expression of Ecm1, which in turn down-regulates Ret expression in the ureteric bud cleft, where bifurcation normally occurs and normal branching progresses. PMID:24391906

  7. Analysis of the coding-complete genomic sequence of groundnut ringspot virus suggests a common ancestor with tomato chlorotic spot virus.

    PubMed

    de Breuil, Soledad; Cañizares, Joaquín; Blanca, José Miguel; Bejerman, Nicolás; Trucco, Verónica; Giolitti, Fabián; Ziarsolo, Peio; Lenardon, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) share biological and serological properties, so their identification is carried out by molecular methods. Their genomes consist of three segmented RNAs: L, M and S. The finding of a reassortant between these two viruses may complicate correct virus identification and requires the characterization of the complete genome. Therefore, we present for the first time the complete sequences of all the genes encoded by a GRSV isolate. The high level of sequence similarity between GRSV and TCSV (over 90 % identity) observed in the genes and proteins encoded in the M RNA support previous results indicating that these viruses probably have a common ancestor.

  8. Susceptibility of unprotected seeds and seeds of local bambara groundnut cultivars protected with insecticidal essential oils to infestation by Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Ajayi; Lale

    2000-01-15

    Ten local cultivars of bambara groundnut, Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdcourt obtained directly from farmers in Potiskum, Nigeria and from the Institute for Agricultural Research, Samaru, Nigeria were compared with three improved varieties developed at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria for their susceptibility to infestation by Callosobruchus maculatus (F.). Three cultivars (Maifarinhaneh, Angale and Bunmonu) with a susceptibility index (SI) of 3.06-3.71 were identified as slightly susceptible to C. maculatus; four cultivars (Bagantere, Bakingangala, Ole and Bakiyawa 1) and one improved variety (TVSU 1061) with an SI of 4.39-4.93 as moderately susceptible; and three cultivars (Bidi, Uzu and Dadinkowa 1) and two improved varieties (TVSU 702 and TVSU 751) with an SI of 5.00-5.34 as susceptible. Five of the cultivars were used to examine the ability of beetle populations to overcome varietal resistance over six successive generations. Development time was significantly longer but percentage of adults that emerged and susceptibility of bambara groundnuts were significantly lower in F(4), F(5) or F(6) generations than in the F(1) or F(2) generation. The efficacy of combining insecticidal essential oils obtained from clove, Syzgium aromaticum, West African black pepper (WABP), Piper guineense, and ginger, Zingiber officinale applied at the rate of 2 mg/20 g seed and six of the local bambara groundnut cultivars (Angale, Maifarinhaneh, Bakingangala, Bagantere, Bunmonu and Bidi) with differing susceptibilities to C. maculatus (F.) was also assessed during a 3-month storage period. The three essential oils significantly reduced the percentage of C. maculatus adults that emerged from the bambara groundnut cultivars in the F(1) generation and the number of adult offspring that developed in the cultivars during the 3-month storage period. The mean number of progeny that developed in untreated seeds and seeds treated with clove, WABP and ginger

  9. A Role for the Actin Cytoskeleton of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Bipolar Bud-Site Selection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shirley; Ayscough, Kathryn R.; Drubin, David G.

    1997-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells select bud sites according to one of two predetermined patterns. MATa and MATα cells bud in an axial pattern, and MATa/α cells bud in a bipolar pattern. These budding patterns are thought to depend on the placement of spatial cues at specific sites in the cell cortex. Because cytoskeletal elements play a role in organizing the cytoplasm and establishing distinct plasma membrane domains, they are well suited for positioning bud-site selection cues. Indeed, the septin-containing neck filaments are crucial for establishing the axial budding pattern characteristic of MATa and MATα cells. In this study, we determined the budding patterns of cells carrying mutations in the actin gene or in genes encoding actin-associated proteins: MATa/α cells were defective in the bipolar budding pattern, but MATa and MATα cells still exhibit a normal axial budding pattern. We also observed that MATa/α actin cytoskeleton mutant daughter cells correctly position their first bud at the distal pole of the cell, but mother cells position their buds randomly. The actin cytoskeleton therefore functions in generation of the bipolar budding pattern and is required specifically for proper selection of bud sites in mother MATa/α cells. These observations and the results of double mutant studies support the conclusion that different rules govern bud-site selection in mother and daughter MATa/α cells. A defective bipolar budding pattern did not preclude an sla2-6 mutant from undergoing pseudohyphal growth, highlighting the central role of daughter cell bud-site selection cues in the formation of pseudohyphae. Finally, by examining the budding patterns of mad2-1 mitotic checkpoint mutants treated with benomyl to depolymerize their microtubules, we confirmed and extended previous evidence indicating that microtubules do not function in axial or bipolar bud-site selection. PMID:9008707

  10. [Bilateral papillary necrosis during indinavir treatment].

    PubMed

    Iba-Ba, Josaphat; Yombi, Jean Cyr; Danse, Etienne; Van Beers, Benoît; Vandercam, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    Papillary necrosis results from ischemia of the renal medulla and papillae, induced by a variety of mechanisms. Papillary necrosis is a rare adverse effect of continuous protease-inhibitor therapy with indinavir. We describe the case of a patient who developed bilateral papillary necrosis. It was reversible after treatment interruption and increased hydration. This case shows the need to monitor kidney markers in patients under continuous treatment with indinavir.

  11. Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leong, Jo-Ann; Kurath, Gael

    2017-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a Rhabdovirus that causes significant disease in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and rainbow and steelhead trout (O. mykiss). IHNV causes necrosis of the haematopoietic tissues, and consequently it was named infectious haematopoietic necrosis. This virus is waterborne and may transmit horizontally and vertically through virus associated with seminal and ovarian fluids. The clinical signs of disease and diagnosis; pathology; pathophysiology; and control strategies against IHNV are discussed.

  12. Light Signaling in Bud Outgrowth and Branching in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Nathalie; Roman, Hanaé; Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Huché-Thélier, Lydie; Lothier, Jérémy; Demotes-Mainard, Sabine; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2014-01-01

    Branching determines the final shape of plants, which influences adaptation, survival and the visual quality of many species. It is an intricate process that includes bud outgrowth and shoot extension, and these in turn respond to environmental cues and light conditions. Light is a powerful environmental factor that impacts multiple processes throughout plant life. The molecular basis of the perception and transduction of the light signal within buds is poorly understood and undoubtedly requires to be further unravelled. This review is based on current knowledge on bud outgrowth-related mechanisms and light-mediated regulation of many physiological processes. It provides an extensive, though not exhaustive, overview of the findings related to this field. In parallel, it points to issues to be addressed in the near future. PMID:27135502

  13. General neck condition for the limit shape of budding vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pan; Du, Qiang; Tu, Z. C.

    2017-04-01

    The shape equation and linking conditions for a vesicle with two phase domains are derived. We refine the conjecture on the general neck condition for the limit shape of a budding vesicle proposed by Jülicher and Lipowsky [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 2964 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.70.2964; Phys. Rev. E 53, 2670 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.53.2670], and then we use the shape equation and linking conditions to prove that this conjecture holds not only for axisymmetric budding vesicles, but also for asymmetric ones. Our study reveals that the mean curvature at any point on the membrane segments adjacent to the neck satisfies the general neck condition for the limit shape of a budding vesicle when the length scale of the membrane segments is much larger than the characteristic size of the neck but still much smaller than the characteristic size of the vesicle.

  14. Budding and vesiculation induced by conical membrane inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Gompper, Gerhard

    2009-09-01

    Conical inclusions in a lipid bilayer generate an overall spontaneous curvature of the membrane that depends on concentration and geometry of the inclusions. Examples are integral and attached membrane proteins, viruses, and lipid domains. We propose an analytical model to study budding and vesiculation of the lipid bilayer membrane, which is based on the membrane bending energy and the translational entropy of the inclusions. If the inclusions are placed on a membrane with similar curvature radius, their repulsive membrane-mediated interaction is screened. Therefore, for high inclusion density the inclusions aggregate, induce bud formation, and finally vesiculation. Already with the bending energy alone our model allows the prediction of bud radii. However, in case the inclusions induce a single large vesicle to split into two smaller vesicles, bending energy alone predicts that the smaller vesicles have different sizes whereas the translational entropy favors the formation of equal-sized vesicles. Our results agree well with those of recent computer simulations.

  15. Supercooling Characteristics of Isolated Peach Flower Bud Primordia 1

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, C. B.

    1989-01-01

    The amount of unfrozen water in dormant peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch, cv Redhaven) flower buds, isolated primordia, and bud axes was determined during freezing using pulse nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Differential thermal analysis studies were conducted on whole buds and isolated primordia in the presence of ice nucleation. The results showed that some of the water in isolated primordia remained supercooled in the presence of ice nucleation. Although most tissue water froze (57.5%) following ice nucleation at −2.5°C, a considerable amount of water was found to supercool. In the presence of ice nucleation, increased hydration of isolated primordia resulted in the elimination of the supercooling characteristic. The structural integrity of isolated primordia appeared to be essential for supercooling. PMID:16666658

  16. Lipid Droplets Can Spontaneously Bud Off from a Symmetric Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, François; Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Forêt, Lionel

    2017-07-11

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are cytosolic organelles that protrude from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane under energy-rich conditions. How an LD buds off from the endoplasmic reticulum bilayer is still elusive. By using a continuous media description, we computed the morphology of a lipid droplet embedded in between two identical monolayers of a bilayer. We found that beyond a critical volume, the droplet morphology abruptly transits from a symmetrical elongated lens to a spherical protrusion. This budding transition does not require any energy-consuming machinery, or curvature-inducing agent, or intrinsic asymmetry of the bilayer; it is solely driven by the large interfacial energy of the LD, as opposed to the bilayer surface tension. This spontaneous budding mechanism gives key insights on cellular LD formation. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Budding yeast colony growth study based on circular granular cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprianti, Devi; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-08-01

    Yeast colony growth can be modelled by using circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. The bud growth angle can be set to regulate cell budding pattern. Cohesion force, contact force and Stokes force were adopted to accommodate the behaviour and interactions among cells. Simulation steps are divided into two steps, the explicit step is due to cell growing and implicit step for the cell rearrangement. Only in explicit step that time change was performed. In this study, we examine the influence of cell diameter growth time and reproduction time combination toward the growth of cell number and colony formation. We find a commutative relation between the cell diameter growth time and reproduction time to the specific growth rate. The greater value of the multiplication of the parameters, the smaller specific growth rate is obtained. It also shows a linear correlation between the specific growth rate and colony diameter growth rate.

  18. The Mechanism of Budding of Retroviruses From Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Pincetic, Andrew; Leis, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Retroviruses have evolved a mechanism for the release of particles from the cell membrane that appropriates cellular protein complexes, referred to as ESCRT-I, -II, -III, normally involved in the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies. Three different classes of late assembly (L) domains encoded in Gag, with core sequences of PPXY, PTAP, and YPXL, recruit different components of the ESCRT machinery to form a budding complex for virus release. Here, we highlight recent progress in identifying the role of different ESCRT complexes in facilitating budding, ubiquitination, and membrane targeting of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) and human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1). These findings show that retroviruses adopt parallel budding pathways by recruiting different host factors from common cellular machinery for particle release.

  19. EARLY BUD-BREAK1 (EBB1) defines a conserved mechanism for control of bud-break in woody perennials

    PubMed Central

    Busov, Victor; Carneros, Elena; Yakovlev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Bud-break is an environmentally and economically important trait in trees, shrubs and vines from temperate latitudes. Poor synchronization of bud-break timing with local climates can lead to frost injuries, susceptibility to pests and pathogens and poor crop yields in fruit trees and vines. The rapid climate changes outpace the adaptive capacities of plants to respond through natural selection. This is particularly true for trees which have long generation cycle and thus the adaptive changes are significantly delayed. Therefore, to devise appropriate breeding and conservation strategies, it is imperative to understand the molecular underpinnings that govern dormancy mechanisms. We have recently identified and characterized the poplar EARLY BUD-BREAK 1 (EBB1) gene. EBB1 is a positive regulator of bud-break and encodes a transcription factor from the AP2/ERF family. Here, using comparative and functional genomics approaches we show that EBB1 function in regulation of bud-break is likely conserved across wide range of woody perennial species with importance to forestry and agriculture. PMID:26317150

  20. EARLY BUD-BREAK1 (EBB1) defines a conserved mechanism for control of bud-break in woody perennials.

    PubMed

    Busov, Victor; Carneros, Elena; Yakovlev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Bud-break is an environmentally and economically important trait in trees, shrubs and vines from temperate latitudes. Poor synchronization of bud-break timing with local climates can lead to frost injuries, susceptibility to pests and pathogens and poor crop yields in fruit trees and vines. The rapid climate changes outpace the adaptive capacities of plants to respond through natural selection. This is particularly true for trees which have long generation cycle and thus the adaptive changes are significantly delayed. Therefore, to devise appropriate breeding and conservation strategies, it is imperative to understand the molecular underpinnings that govern dormancy mechanisms. We have recently identified and characterized the poplar EARLY BUD-BREAK 1 (EBB1) gene. EBB1 is a positive regulator of bud-break and encodes a transcription factor from the AP2/ERF family. Here, using comparative and functional genomics approaches we show that EBB1 function in regulation of bud-break is likely conserved across wide range of woody perennial species with importance to forestry and agriculture.

  1. Budding of Retroviruses Utilizing Divergent L Domains Requires Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Nana F.; Dussupt, Vincent; Sette, Paola; Rudd, Victoria; Nagashima, Kunio; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Chen, Chaoping; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) carrying PTAP and LYPXnL L domains ceased budding when the nucleocapsid (NC) domain was mutated, suggesting a role for NC in HIV-1 release. Here we investigated whether NC involvement in virus release is a property specific to HIV-1 or a general requirement of retroviruses. Specifically, we examined a possible role for NC in the budding of retroviruses relying on divergent L domains and structurally homologous NC domains that harbor diverse protein sequences. We found that NC is critical for the release of viruses utilizing the PTAP motif whether it functions within its native Gag in simian immunodeficiency virus cpzGAB2 (SIVcpzGAB2) or SIVsmmE543 or when it is transplanted into the heterologous Gag protein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). In both cases, virus release was severely diminished even though NC mutant Gag proteins retained the ability to assemble spherical particles. Moreover, budding-defective NC mutants, which displayed particles tethered to the plasma membrane, were triggered to release virus when access to the cell endocytic sorting complex required for transport pathway was restored (i.e., in trans expression of Nedd4.2s). We also examined the role of NC in the budding of EIAV, a retrovirus relying exclusively on the (L)YPXnL-type L domain. We found that EIAV late budding defects were rescued by overexpression of the isolated Alix Bro1 domain (Bro1). Bro1-mediated rescue of EIAV release required the wild-type NC. EIAV NC mutants lost interactions with Bro1 and failed to produce viruses despite retaining the ability to self-assemble. Together, our studies establish a role for NC in the budding of retroviruses harboring divergent L domains and evolutionarily diverse NC sequences, suggesting the utilization of a common conserved mechanism and/or cellular factor rather than a specific motif. PMID:22345468

  2. Project BudBurst: Citizen Science for All Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Brewer, C.; Havens, K.; Meymaris, K.

    2007-12-01

    Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of phenological (plant life cycle) events that raise awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. Project BudBurst launched a pilot program in the Spring of 2007. The goals of Project BudBurst were to 1) increase awareness of phenology as an area of scientific study; 2) Increase awareness of the impacts of changing climates on plants; and 3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. From April through mid-June 2007, this on-line educational and data-entry program, engaged participants of all ages and walks of life in recording the timing of the leafing and flowering of ~60 easily identifiable, broadly distributed wild and cultivated species found across the continent. We will report on the results of the pilot project and discuss plans to expand Project BudBurst as it becomes a year round event beginning in 2008. A broad consortium of collaborators, representing the Chicago Botanic Garden, Plant Conservation Alliance, ESRI, the USA-National Phenology Network, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, University of Arizona, University of Montana, University of California-Santa Barbara, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, came together to design and implement Project BudBurst with seed funding from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the National Phenology Network (through a RCN grant from the NSF), and the Plant Conservation Alliance.

  3. Project BudBurst: Citizen Science for All Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Brewer, C.; Havens, K.; Meymaris, K.

    2007-12-01

    Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of phenological (plant life cycle) events that raise awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. Project BudBurst launched a pilot program in the Spring of 2007. The goals of Project BudBurst were to 1) increase awareness of phenology as an area of scientific study; 2) Increase awareness of the impacts of changing climates on plants; and 3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. From April through mid-June 2007, this on-line educational and data-entry program, engaged participants of all ages and walks of life in recording the timing of the leafing and flowering of ~60 easily identifiable, broadly distributed wild and cultivated species found across the continent. We will report on the results of the pilot project and discuss plans to expand Project BudBurst as it becomes a year round event beginning in 2008. A broad consortium of collaborators, representing the Chicago Botanic Garden, Plant Conservation Alliance, ESRI, the USA-National Phenology Network, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, University of Arizona, University of Montana, University of California-Santa Barbara, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, came together to design and implement Project BudBurst with seed funding from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the National Phenology Network (through a RCN grant from the NSF), and the Plant Conservation Alliance.

  4. Role of the ectonucleotidase NTPDase2 in taste bud function

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Anderson, Catherine B.; Parnes, Jason; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Robson, Simon C.; Finger, Thomas E.; Kinnamon, Sue C.

    2013-01-01

    Taste buds are unusual in requiring ATP as a transmitter to activate sensory nerve fibers. In response to taste stimuli, taste cells release ATP, activating purinergic receptors containing the P2X2 and P2X3 subunits on taste nerves. In turn, the released ATP is hydrolyzed to ADP by a plasma membrane nucleoside triphosphate previously identified as nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-2 (NTPDase2). In this paper we investigate the role of this ectonucleotidase in the function of taste buds by examining gene-targeted Entpd2-null mice globally lacking NTPDase2. RT-PCR confirmed the absence of NTPDase2, and ATPase enzyme histochemistry reveals no reaction product in taste buds of knockout mice, suggesting that NTPDase2 is the dominant form in taste buds. RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry demonstrated that in knockout mice all cell types are present in taste buds, even those cells normally expressing NTPDase2. In addition, the overall number and size of taste buds are normal in Entpd2-null mice. Luciferin/luciferase assays of circumvallate tissue of knockout mice detected elevated levels of extracellular ATP. Electrophysiological recordings from two taste nerves, the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal, revealed depressed responses to all taste stimuli in Entpd2-null mice. Responses were more depressed in the glossopharyngeal nerve than in the chorda tympani nerve and involved all taste qualities; responses in the chorda tympani were more depressed to sweet and umami stimuli than to other qualities. We suggest that the excessive levels of extracellular ATP in the Entpd2-knockout animals desensitize the P2X receptors associated with nerve fibers, thereby depressing taste responses. PMID:23959882

  5. Role of ESCRT-I in Retroviral Budding

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Serrano, Juan; Zang, Trinity; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2003-01-01

    Retroviral late-budding (L) domains are required for the efficient release of nascent virions. The three known types of L domain, designated according to essential tetrapeptide motifs (PTAP, PPXY, or YPDL), each bind distinct cellular cofactors. We and others have demonstrated that recruitment of an ESCRT-I subunit, Tsg101, a component of the class E vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) machinery, is required for the budding of viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Ebola virus, that encode a PTAP-type L domain, but subsequent events remain undefined. In this study, we demonstrate that VPS28, a second component of ESCRT-I, binds to a sequence close to the Tsg101 C terminus and is therefore recruited to the plasma membrane by HIV-1 Gag. In addition, we show that Tsg101 exhibits a multimerization activity. Using a complementation assay in which Tsg101 is artificially recruited to sites of HIV-1 assembly, we demonstrate that the integrity of the VPS28 binding site within Tsg101 is required for particle budding. In addition, mutation of a putative leucine zipper or residues important for Tsg101 multimerization also impairs the ability of Tsg101 to support HIV-1 budding. A minimal multimerizing Tsg101 domain is a dominant negative inhibitor of PTAP-mediated HIV-1 budding but does not inhibit YPDL-type or PPXY-type L-domain function. Nevertheless, YDPL-type L-domain activity is inhibited by expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of the class E VPS ATPase VPS4. These results indicate that all three classes of retroviral L domains require a functioning class E VPS pathway in order to effect budding. However, the PTAP-type L domain appears to be unique in its requirement for an intact, or nearly intact, ESCRT-I complex. PMID:12663786

  6. Role of ESCRT-I in retroviral budding.

    PubMed

    Martin-Serrano, Juan; Zang, Trinity; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2003-04-01

    Retroviral late-budding (L) domains are required for the efficient release of nascent virions. The three known types of L domain, designated according to essential tetrapeptide motifs (PTAP, PPXY, or YPDL), each bind distinct cellular cofactors. We and others have demonstrated that recruitment of an ESCRT-I subunit, Tsg101, a component of the class E vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) machinery, is required for the budding of viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Ebola virus, that encode a PTAP-type L domain, but subsequent events remain undefined. In this study, we demonstrate that VPS28, a second component of ESCRT-I, binds to a sequence close to the Tsg101 C terminus and is therefore recruited to the plasma membrane by HIV-1 Gag. In addition, we show that Tsg101 exhibits a multimerization activity. Using a complementation assay in which Tsg101 is artificially recruited to sites of HIV-1 assembly, we demonstrate that the integrity of the VPS28 binding site within Tsg101 is required for particle budding. In addition, mutation of a putative leucine zipper or residues important for Tsg101 multimerization also impairs the ability of Tsg101 to support HIV-1 budding. A minimal multimerizing Tsg101 domain is a dominant negative inhibitor of PTAP-mediated HIV-1 budding but does not inhibit YPDL-type or PPXY-type L-domain function. Nevertheless, YDPL-type L-domain activity is inhibited by expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of the class E VPS ATPase VPS4. These results indicate that all three classes of retroviral L domains require a functioning class E VPS pathway in order to effect budding. However, the PTAP-type L domain appears to be unique in its requirement for an intact, or nearly intact, ESCRT-I complex.

  7. Budding of retroviruses utilizing divergent L domains requires nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    Bello, Nana F; Dussupt, Vincent; Sette, Paola; Rudd, Victoria; Nagashima, Kunio; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Chen, Chaoping; Montelaro, Ronald C; Hahn, Beatrice H; Bouamr, Fadila

    2012-04-01

    We recently reported that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) carrying PTAP and LYPX(n)L L domains ceased budding when the nucleocapsid (NC) domain was mutated, suggesting a role for NC in HIV-1 release. Here we investigated whether NC involvement in virus release is a property specific to HIV-1 or a general requirement of retroviruses. Specifically, we examined a possible role for NC in the budding of retroviruses relying on divergent L domains and structurally homologous NC domains that harbor diverse protein sequences. We found that NC is critical for the release of viruses utilizing the PTAP motif whether it functions within its native Gag in simian immunodeficiency virus cpzGAB2 (SIVcpzGAB2) or SIVsmmE543 or when it is transplanted into the heterologous Gag protein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). In both cases, virus release was severely diminished even though NC mutant Gag proteins retained the ability to assemble spherical particles. Moreover, budding-defective NC mutants, which displayed particles tethered to the plasma membrane, were triggered to release virus when access to the cell endocytic sorting complex required for transport pathway was restored (i.e., in trans expression of Nedd4.2s). We also examined the role of NC in the budding of EIAV, a retrovirus relying exclusively on the (L)YPX(n)L-type L domain. We found that EIAV late budding defects were rescued by overexpression of the isolated Alix Bro1 domain (Bro1). Bro1-mediated rescue of EIAV release required the wild-type NC. EIAV NC mutants lost interactions with Bro1 and failed to produce viruses despite retaining the ability to self-assemble. Together, our studies establish a role for NC in the budding of retroviruses harboring divergent L domains and evolutionarily diverse NC sequences, suggesting the utilization of a common conserved mechanism and/or cellular factor rather than a specific motif.

  8. Effect of alternating day and night temperature on short day-induced bud set and subsequent bud burst in long days in Norway spruce

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Jorunn E.; Lee, YeonKyeong; Junttila, Olavi

    2014-01-01

    Young seedlings of the conifer Norway spruce exhibit short day (SD)-induced cessation of apical growth and bud set. Although different, constant temperatures under SD are known to modulate timing of bud set and depth of dormancy with development of deeper dormancy under higher compared to lower temperature, systematic studies of effects of alternating day (DT) and night temperatures (NT) are limited. To shed light on this, seedlings of different provenances of Norway spruce were exposed to a wide range of DT-NT combinations during bud development, followed by transfer to forcing conditions of long days (LD) and 18°C, directly or after different periods of chilling. Although no specific effect of alternating DT/NT was found, the results demonstrate that the effects of DT under SD on bud set and subsequent bud break are significantly modified by NT in a complex way. The effects on bud break persisted after chilling. Since time to bud set correlated with the daily mean temperature under SD at DTs of 18 and 21°C, but not a DT of 15°C, time to bud set apparently also depend on the specific DT, implying that the effect of NT depends on the actual DT. Although higher temperature under SD generally results in later bud break after transfer to forcing conditions, the fastest bud flush was observed at intermediate NTs. This might be due to a bud break-hastening chilling effect of intermediate compared to higher temperatures, and delayed bud development to a stage where bud burst can occur, under lower temperatures. Also, time to bud burst in un-chilled seedlings decreased with increasing SD-duration, suggesting that bud development must reach a certain stage before the processes leading to bud burst are initiated. The present results also indicate that low temperature during bud development had a larger effect on the most southern compared to the most northern provenance studied. Decreasing time to bud burst was observed with increasing northern latitude of origin in un

  9. Project BudBurst: People, Plants, and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Ward, D.; Havens, K.; Gardiner, L. S.; Alaback, P.

    2010-12-01

    Providing opportunities for individuals to contribute to a better understanding of climate change is the hallmark of Project BudBurst (www.budburst.org). This highly successful, national citizen science program, now in its third year, is bringing climate change education outreach to thousands of individuals. Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of phenological (plant life cycle) events that raise awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. The goals of Project BudBurst are to 1) increase awareness of phenology as an area of scientific study; 2) Increase awareness of the impacts of changing climates on plants; and 3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. From its 2008 launch in February, this on-line educational and data-entry program, engaged participants of all ages and walks of life in recording the timing of the leafing and flowering of wild and cultivated species found across the continent. Thus far, thousands of participants from all 50 states have submitted data. Project BudBurst has been the subject of almost 200 media outlets including NPR, national and regional television broadcasts, and most of the major national and regional newspapers. This presentation will provide an overview of Project BudBurst and will report on the results of the 2009 field campaign and discuss plans to expand Project BudBurst in 2010 including the use of mobile phones applications for data collection and reporting from the field. Project BudBurst co managed by the National Ecological Observatory Network and

  10. Electrostatic Levitation of Plant Seeds and Flower Buds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liang; Wang, Hai-Peng; Li, Liu-Hui; Wei, Bing-Bo

    2012-06-01

    We report the electrostatic levitation of various kinds of seeds and flower buds. Coral berry and pepper near a spherical shape show a stable levitation state. The prolate ellipsoid soybean and flower buds are always “standing" in the free space with satisfactory levitation stability. For the irregular mushroom and wheat grain, the levitation state is characterized as a “top-heavy" posture. These special stable equilibrium states are proved by the analysis of surface charge distribution. The obtained saturation polarization charge of samples presents a good accordance with experimental data. The levitation ability is weighed by the factor m(inr+2)/(inrD2).

  11. Thermal inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gosting, L.; Gould, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A plaque assay was used to follow the inactivation kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in cell culture media at various temperatures. Inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a visceral organ slurry was compared with that in culture media.

  12. Nutritive Evaluation of the Bambara Groundnut Ci12 Landrace [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc. (Fabaceae)] Produced in Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Yao, Denis N'Dri; Kouassi, Kouakou Nestor; Erba, Daniela; Scazzina, Francesca; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Casiraghi, Maria Cristina

    2015-09-07

    The nutritional evaluation of the Bambara groundnut Ci12 landrace (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) seeds produced in Côte d'Ivoire shows a 19% content of protein, containing all the essential amino acids with tryptophan as the limiting amino acid, a total dietary fiber level of 10%, with a low soluble fraction content, and a fat content of 1.4%, with a high proportion of total unsaturated fatty acids (61%) of which 36% were n-6 fatty acids. This legume contains phosphorus, as the major mineral, followed by magnesium and calcium, and trace elements (iron, copper and zinc). It is characterized by the same amount of α-tocopherol and antioxidant capacity as common legumes. The high concentration of essential amino acids, n-6 fatty acids and minerals, mainly Fe, in the Ci12 landrace of Bambara groundnut indicates that this local legume has the potentiality to improve the nutritional status in Côte d'Ivoire and it could be regarded as a nutrient dense food.

  13. Nutritive Evaluation of the Bambara Groundnut Ci12 Landrace [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc. (Fabaceae)] Produced in Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    N’Dri Yao, Denis; Kouassi, Kouakou Nestor; Erba, Daniela; Scazzina, Francesca; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Casiraghi, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The nutritional evaluation of the Bambara groundnut Ci12 landrace (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) seeds produced in Côte d’Ivoire shows a 19% content of protein, containing all the essential amino acids with tryptophan as the limiting amino acid, a total dietary fiber level of 10%, with a low soluble fraction content, and a fat content of 1.4%, with a high proportion of total unsaturated fatty acids (61%) of which 36% were n-6 fatty acids. This legume contains phosphorus, as the major mineral, followed by magnesium and calcium, and trace elements (iron, copper and zinc). It is characterized by the same amount of α-tocopherol and antioxidant capacity as common legumes. The high concentration of essential amino acids, n-6 fatty acids and minerals, mainly Fe, in the Ci12 landrace of Bambara groundnut indicates that this local legume has the potentiality to improve the nutritional status in Côte d’Ivoire and it could be regarded as a nutrient dense food. PMID:26370971

  14. Mycotoxin Contamination in Stored Maize and Groundnuts Based on Storage Practices and Conditions in Subhumid Tropical Africa: The Case of Kilosa District, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Magembe, K S; Mwatawala, M W; Mamiro, D P

    2016-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the influence of storage practices on mycotoxin incidences in stored maize and groundnuts in Kilosa District, Eastern Central Tanzania. Factorial experiments were used to test the effects of processing, storage conditions, and protectants at 3-month intervals for 12 weeks. Temperature and relative humidity data were recorded by using data loggers. The differences among the treatment means were compared using Tukey's honestly significant difference test at 5% probability level. The log-linear model was used to determine the influence of weather on mycotoxin. Dried neem ( Azadirachta indica ) leaves significantly reduced fumonisin B1 (FB1) in stored maize. Levels of FB1 were significantly higher in maize heaped on the floor than in the other tested storage methods (P < 0.001). Similarly, aflatoxin levels were significantly higher in groundnuts stored in nylon bags than in the other tested methods (P < 0.001). The high concentration of mycotoxins at the study villages suggests that storage practices and weather conditions play major roles in mycotoxin production.

  15. Supplementations of Hyparrhenia rufa -dominated hay with groundnut cake- wheat bran mix: effects on feed intake, digestibility and nitrogen balance of Somali goats.

    PubMed

    Betsha, Simret; Melaku, Solomon

    2009-08-01

    A digestibility and nitrogen (N) balance experiment was conducted using twenty yearling male Somali goats weighing 23.4 +/- 2.02 (mean+/-SD). The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effects of supplementation with graded levels of mixture of groundnut cake and wheat bran at a ratio of 3:1 on DM basis on feed intake, apparent digestibility and N balance in Somali goats. The experimental design was a completely randomized design consisting of five animals in each treatment. The dietary treatments included ad libitum feeding of hay (T1, control), and daily supplementation with 200 (T2, low) 300 (T3, medium) and 400 g DM (T4, high) of the concentrate mix. Increased level of supplementation reduced (P < 0.001) daily hay DM intake. Digestibility of crude protein (CP) was higher (P < 0.001) for the supplemented goats. Urinary nitrogen, total nitrogen excretion and retention increased (P < 0.01) with the level of supplementation. It was concluded that supplementation with groundnut -wheat bran mixture promoted feed intake and digestibility of DM, CP, and N retention in Somali goats fed hay. However, supplementation at the medium level appeared to be more effective since it promoted similar N balance with the high level of supplementation.

  16. Back to the roots of regulated necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, our knowledge of how cells die by regulated pathways of necrosis has increased tremendously. In this issue, Distéfano et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201605110) provide yet another milestone in our understanding of regulated necrosis as they identify a ferroptosis-like cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:28108525

  17. Taste bud development and patterning in sighted and blind morphs of Astyanax mexicanus.

    PubMed

    Varatharasan, Nirupa; Croll, Roger P; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara

    2009-12-01

    In the blind cave-dwelling morph of A. mexicanus, the eye degenerates while other sensory systems, such as gustation, are expanded compared to their sighted (surface-dwelling) ancestor. This study compares the development of taste buds along the jaws of each morph. To determine whether cavefish have an altered onset or rate of taste bud development, we fluorescently labeled basal and receptor cells within taste buds over a developmental series. Our results show that taste bud number increases during development in both morphs. The rate of development is, however, accelerated in cavefish; a small difference in taste bud number exists at 5 dpf reaching threefold by 22 dpf. The expansion of taste buds in cavefish is, therefore, detectable after the onset of eye degeneration. This study provides important insights into the timing of taste bud expansion in cavefish as well as enhances our understanding of taste bud development in teleosts in general. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Extensive transcriptome changes during natural onset and release of vegetative bud dormancy in Populus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To survive winter conditions, axillary buds of poplar transition from paradormancy to endodormancy. Following sufficient chilling, endodormant axillary buds will transition from endodormancy to ecodormancy. We utilized the near whole genome NimbleGen poplar microarrays to follow transcriptome diff...

  19. Renal papillary necrosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, G; Qunibi, W Y; Grissom, R T; Tuma, S N; Ayus, J C

    1982-03-01

    The clinical and diagnostic features of renal papillary necrosis (RPN) of 27 patients were studied. Diabetes mellitus was the most frequent (56%) condition associated with RPN. Analgesic abuse, sickle hemoglobinopathy and urinary tract obstruction were present in 4 patients each; in 6 of these 12 patients these conditions were present as a coexistent disease with diabetes mellitus. There was evidence of an acute or chronic infection of the urinary tract in 18 patients, as a coexistent condition with another underlying disease that itself can cause RPN in 14 patients and as the only cause of RPN in another 4. Thus, the presence of more than one diagnostic condition which might be implicated in the causation of RPN was present in 15 patients or 55% of the cases in this series. When infection was excluded, six patients or 22% of the cases had two coexisting diseases, each of which has been implicated as a cause of RPN. This observation underlines the multifactorial nature of this entity and might explain why RPN is not encountered more frequently in each of the various primary diseases with which it has been associated. The average age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 53 years for women and 56 years for men. Only six of the patients were younger than 40 years, and three of these had sickle hemoglobinopathy. The diagnosis of RPN was based on x-ray findings in eight patients, on the histologic examination of papillary tissue in urine in one, and on autopsy findings in the rest. Papillary necrosis was bilateral in three-fourths of the cases. The clinical picture varied. Most of the patients (67%) presented with chills and fever. Flank pain and dysuria were present in 11 patients (41%). As a rule oliguria was rare and progressive uremia was uncommon. In cases diagnosed at post-mortem, the patients had succumbed to infection or to a primary severe extrarenal disorder with the possibility of RPN having been entertained clinically in only half these cases prior

  20. Geographic trend of bud hardiness response in Vitis riparia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major goal of grapevine breeding efforts for production outside of Mediterranean climates is the production of varieties that have cold tolerance phenotypes. Typically, grapevine breeders use midwinter bud hardiness measures as the descriptive phenotype for cold tolerance. Historical practices of...

  1. Intracellular and extracellular regulation of ureteric bud morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    DAVIES, JAMIE

    2001-01-01

    The urinary collecting duct system of the permanent kidney develops by growth and branching of an initially unbranched epithelial tubule, the ureteric bud. Formation of the ureteric bud as an outgrowth of the wolffian duct is induced by signalling molecules (such as GDNF) that emanate from the adjacent metanephrogenic mesenchyme. Once it has invaded the mesenchyme, growth and branching of the bud is controlled by a variety of molecules, such as the growth factors GDNF, HGF, TGFβ, activin, BMP-2, BMP-7, and matrix molecules such as heparan sulphate proteoglycans and laminins. These various influences are integrated by signal transduction systems inside ureteric bud cells, with the MAP kinase, protein kinase A and protein kinase C pathways appearing to play major roles. The mechanisms of morphogenetic change that produce branching remain largely obscure, but matrix metalloproteinases are known to be necessary for the process, and there is preliminary evidence for the involvement of the actin/myosin contractile cytoskeleton in creating branch points. PMID:11322719

  2. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Fumihisa; Shibata, Michiko; Torigoe, Motoki; Matsumoto, Yuta; Yamamoto, Shinsuke; Takizawa, Noboru; Hada, Yoshio; Mori, Yoshihisa; Takarabe, Kenichi

    2013-06-01

    In our previous studies on the tolerance of small plants and animals to the high hydrostatic pressure of 7.5 GPa, it was shown that all the living samples could be borne at this high pressure, which is more than one order of magnitude higher than the proteinic denaturation pressure. To make this inconsistency clear, we have extended these studies to a smaller sized fungus, budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate (PC72, Sumitomo 3M), and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar (PDA). It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for 12 and 24 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is weaker than that of tardigrades.

  3. Science Shorts: Project BudBurst--Analyzing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kimberly J.; Coskie, Tracy L.

    2008-01-01

    Project BudBurst is a national program intended to get students and other "citizen scientists" to participate in a real study about plants, the environment, and climate change. It also provides an excellent opportunity for students to build data-analysis skills. A collaboration of several agencies and universities, the program began last year and…

  4. Cryo Electron Tomography of Native HIV-1 Budding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Lars-Anders; de Marco, Alex; Oberwinkler, Heike; Habermann, Anja; Briggs, John A. G.; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Grünewald, Kay

    2010-01-01

    The structure of immature and mature HIV-1 particles has been analyzed in detail by cryo electron microscopy, while no such studies have been reported for cellular HIV-1 budding sites. Here, we established a system for studying HIV-1 virus-like particle assembly and release by cryo electron tomography of intact human cells. The lattice of the structural Gag protein in budding sites was indistinguishable from that of the released immature virion, suggesting that its organization is determined at the assembly site without major subsequent rearrangements. Besides the immature lattice, a previously not described Gag lattice was detected in some budding sites and released particles; this lattice was found at high frequencies in a subset of infected T-cells. It displays the same hexagonal symmetry and spacing in the MA-CA layer as the immature lattice, but lacks density corresponding to NC-RNA-p6. Buds and released particles carrying this lattice consistently lacked the viral ribonucleoprotein complex, suggesting that they correspond to aberrant products due to premature proteolytic activation. We hypothesize that cellular and/or viral factors normally control the onset of proteolytic maturation during assembly and release, and that this control has been lost in a subset of infected T-cells leading to formation of aberrant particles. PMID:21124872

  5. Teacher's Guide for Budding Twigs. Elementary Science Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Rose Lea; And Others

    This teaching guide supplements a science unit concerned with bud maturation recommended for use in fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms. The first section describes possible activities for children to explore, such as field study, collections, dissecting, and experiments. The second section offers a few brief suggestions for teaching the unit. The…

  6. Extending the dormant bud cryopreservation method to new tree species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In cryopreservation of germplasm, using dormant winter buds (DB) as source plant material is economically favorable over tissue culture options. Although the DB cryopreservation method has been known for many years, the approach is feasible only for cryopreserving a select number of temperate tree s...

  7. The Chilling Optimum of Idaho and Arizona Ponderosa Pine Buds

    Treesearch

    David L. Wenny; Daniel J. Swanson; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2002-01-01

    Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seedlings from Idaho (var. ponderosa) and Arizona (var. scopulorum) grown in a container nursery received optimum chilling [2,010 hr (84 days) of temperatures below 5°C]. While seedlings were in the greenhouse, days required for 50% of the population to break bud were similar for both seed sources...

  8. Mechanisms of Budding of Nanoscale Particles through Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Velasco, Enrique; Hagan, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the budding of a nanoscale particle through a lipid bilayer using molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and an elastic theory, with the aim of determining the extent to which equilibrium elasticity theory can describe the factors that control the mechanism and efficiency of budding. The particle is a smooth sphere which experiences attractive interactions to the lipid head groups. Depending on the parameters, we observe four classes of dynamical trajectories: particle adhesion to the membrane, stalled partially wrapped states, budding followed by scission, and membrane rupture. In most regions of parameter space we find that the elastic theory agrees nearly quantitatively with the simulated phase behavior as a function of adhesion strength, membrane bending rigidity, and particle radius. However, at parameter values near the transition between particle adhesion and budding, we observe long-lived partially wrapped states which are not captured by existing elastic theories. These states could constrain the accessible system parameters for those enveloped viruses or drug delivery vehicles which rely on exo- or endocytosis for membrane transport. PMID:22803595

  9. Project BudBurst: Citizen Science for All Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meymaris, K.; Henderson, S.; Alaback, P.; Havens, K.

    2008-12-01

    Providing opportunities for individuals to contribute to a better understanding of climate change is the hallmark of Project BudBurst (www.budburst.org). This highly successful, national citizen science program, now in its second year, is bringing climate change education outreach to thousands of individuals. Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of phenological (plant life cycle) events that raise awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. The goals of Project BudBurst are to 1) increase awareness of phenology as an area of scientific study; 2) Increase awareness of the impacts of changing climates on plants; and 3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. From its 2008 launch in February, this on-line educational and data-entry program, engaged participants of all ages and walks of life in recording the timing of the leafing and flowering of wild and cultivated species found across the continent. Thus far, participants from 49 states have submitted data that is being submitted to the USA National Phenology Network (www.usanpn.org) database. Project BudBurst has been the subject of almost 200 media outlets including NPR, national and regional television broadcasts, and most of the major national and regional newspapers. This presentation will provide an overview of Project Budburst and will report on the results of the 2008 field campaign and discuss plans to expand Project BudBurst in 2009. Project BudBurst is a Windows to the Universe Citizen Science program managed by the University

  10. Fire and nitrogen alter axillary bud number and activity in purple threeawn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Belowground accumulation of vegetative buds provides a reservoir of meristems that can be utilized following disturbance. Perennial grass bud banks are the primary source of nearly all tiller growth, yet understanding of fire and nitrogen effects on bud banks is limited. We tested effects of fire ...

  11. Possible role of catalase in post-dormancy bud break in grapevines.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Francisco J; Lira, Waldo

    2005-03-01

    Changes in the activity of catalase (Cat) and in the levels of H2O2 were followed throughout dormancy in buds of grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.). In grapevines grown in the Elqui valley in Chile, a region with warm-winters, the activity of Cat increased during the recess period of buds, reaching a maximum and thereafter decreased to less than one third of its maximal activity. Three isoforms of Cat were detected in extracts of buds by native PAGE analysis, and the extracted activity was inhibited competitively by hydrogen cyanamide (HC), a potent bud-break agent. Furthermore, HC applications to field-grown grapevines in addition to the expected effect on advancing bud break, reduced the Cat activity during bud dormancy. Similar reductions were observed during dormancy in buds of grapevines grown in the Central valley in Chile, a region with temperate winters, suggesting that HC and winter chilling inhibits the activity of the main H2O2 degrading enzyme in grape buds. A transient rise in H2O2 levels preceded the release of buds from endodormancy, moreover, the peak of H2O2 and the onset of bud break occurred earlier in HC treated than in control grapevines, suggesting the participation of H2O2 as a signal molecule in the release of endodormancy in grape buds. The relationship between Cat inhibition, rise in H2O2 levels and initiation of bud break are discussed.

  12. The Sprouting Potential of Dormant Buds on the Bole of Pole-Size Sugar Maple

    Treesearch

    Richard M. Godman; Gilbert A. Mattson

    1970-01-01

    A study of epicormic sprouting in pole-size sugar maples showed that all visible dormant buds on the bole were capable of producing epicormic shoots. The buds were induced to break dormancy by applying four methods of crown removal known to stimulate sprouting. The amount of crown removed determined the year that the buds broke dormancy; this may be accounted for by...

  13. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium.

    PubMed

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Klein, Ophir D; Barlow, Linda A

    2014-08-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation.

  14. Visible dormant buds as related to tree diameter and log position

    Treesearch

    H. Clay Smith

    1967-01-01

    Red oaks and yellow-poplars in a stand of second-growth cove hardwoods in West Virginia were studied to determine whether visible dormant buds are related to tree size or log position. No correlation was found between dormant buds and tree size, for either species; but yellow-poplars had a significantly greater number of buds on the upper log.

  15. Fire Season and Frequency Effects on Native Grass Bud Banks in the Northern Great Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Axillary buds, belowground meristematic tissue located on plant crowns, regulate productivity of perennial grasses. However, the impact of fire frequency and season-of-fire on quantity and viability of axillary buds is still unclear. We evaluated axillary bud populations of Bouteloua gracilis, Hes...

  16. Molecular events of apical bud formation in white spruce, Picea glauca.

    PubMed

    El Kayal, Walid; Allen, Carmen C G; Ju, Chelsea J-T; Adams, Eri; King-Jones, Susanne; Zaharia, L Irina; Abrams, Suzanne R; Cooke, Janice E K

    2011-03-01

    Bud formation is an adaptive trait that temperate forest trees have acquired to facilitate seasonal synchronization. We have characterized transcriptome-level changes that occur during bud formation of white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss], a primarily determinate species in which preformed stem units contained within the apical bud constitute most of next season's growth. Microarray analysis identified 4460 differentially expressed sequences in shoot tips during short day-induced bud formation. Cluster analysis revealed distinct temporal patterns of expression, and functional classification of genes in these clusters implied molecular processes that coincide with anatomical changes occurring in the developing bud. Comparing expression profiles in developing buds under long day and short day conditions identified possible photoperiod-responsive genes that may not be essential for bud development. Several genes putatively associated with hormone signalling were identified, and hormone quantification revealed distinct profiles for abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinins, auxin and their metabolites that can be related to morphological changes to the bud. Comparison of gene expression profiles during bud formation in different tissues revealed 108 genes that are differentially expressed only in developing buds and show greater transcript abundance in developing buds than other tissues. These findings provide a temporal roadmap of bud formation in white spruce.

  17. Greater bud outgrowth of Bromus inermis than Pascopyrum smithii under multiple environmental conditions

    Treesearch

    Jacqueline P. Ott; Jack L. Butler; Yuping Rong; Lan Xu

    2016-01-01

    Tiller recruitment of perennial grasses in mixed-grass prairie primarily occurs from belowground buds. Environmental conditions, such as temperature, soil moisture and grazing can affect bud outgrowth of both invasive and native perennial grasses. Differential bud outgrowth responses of native and invasive species to climate change and grazing could alter...

  18. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Klein, Ophir D.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation. PMID:24993944

  19. Anti-inflammatory triterpenes from the apical bud of Gardenia sootepensis.

    PubMed

    Youn, Ui Joung; Park, Eun-Jung; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Sripisut, Tawanun; Laphookhieo, Surat; Pezzuto, John M; Chang, Leng Chee

    2016-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the dichloromethane extract from the apical bud of Gardenia sootepenesis Hutch. (Rubiaceae) led to the isolation of four new cycloartane triterpenes, sootepins F-I (1-4), along with four known derivatives (5-8). The structures of the new compounds were determined by 1D and 2D NMR experiments and by comparison of the physicochemical data with published values. The isolates were evaluated for cancer chemopreventive potential based on their ability to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. Compounds 6-8 inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 8.3, 5.6, and 6.0μM, respectively; compounds 7 and 8 showed significant NO-inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 3.2 and 2.0μM, respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Growth control of budding yeast cells by oxygen-radical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ito, Masafumi; Takeda, Keigo; Hori, Masaru

    2013-09-01

    Microorganisms respond to stimuli or stresses such as chemicals, nutrition, pressure, heat and so on. Those stimuli lead to cell activation, inactivation or cell death, such as apoptosis and necrosis. Reactive oxygen species possibly affect cell growth as well as inactivation depending on stimuli. In this study, we investigated effects of oxygen-radical treatment on not only inactivation but also promoted/repressed cell growth of budding yeast by varying dose of atomic oxygen produced from an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source. Dose of atomic oxygen was estimated based on treatment time and oxygen flux. Cell growth was promoted with atomic oxygen between 0 and 2.1 ×1019 cm-2 dose of atomic oxygen. The treated cells were grown about 10 percent more proliferously than the control cells. Moreover, 64 percent of the treated cells to the control ones were inactivated at more than 4.2 ×1020 cm-2. These results, therefore, suggested that atomic-oxygen dose had a potential to control mitotic promotion and repression, and inactivation of yeast cell growth.

  1. Mapping Water Stress Incidence and Intensity, Optimal Plant Populations, and Cultivar Duration for African Groundnut Productivity Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Vadez, Vincent; Halilou, Oumarou; Hissene, Halime M.; Sibiry-Traore, Pierre; Sinclair, Thomas R.; Soltani, Afshin

    2017-01-01

    Groundnut production is limited in Sub-Saharan Africa and water deficit or “drought,” is often considered as the main yield-limiting factor. However, no comprehensive study has assessed the extent and intensity of “drought”-related yield decreases, nor has it explored avenues to enhance productivity. Hence, crop simulation modeling with SSM (Simple Simulation Modeling) was used to address these issues. To palliate the lack of reliable weather data as input to the model, the validity of weather data generated by Marksim, a weather generator, was tested. Marksim provided good weather representation across a large gradient of rainfall, representative of the region, and although rainfall generated by Marksim was above observations, run-off from Marksim data was also higher, and consequently simulations using observed or Marksim weather agreed closely across this gradient of weather conditions (root mean square of error = 99 g m-2; R2 = 0.81 for pod yield). More importantly, simulation of yield changes upon agronomic or genetic alterations in the model were equally predicted with Marksim weather. A 1° × 1° grid of weather data was generated. “Drought”-related yield reduction were limited to latitudes above 12–13° North in West Central Africa (WCA) and to the Eastern fringes of Tanzania and Mozambique in East South Africa (ESA). Simulation and experimental trials also showed that doubling the sowing density of Spanish cultivars from 20 to 40 plants m-2 would increase yield dramatically in both WCA and ESA. However, increasing density would require growers to invest in more seeds and likely additional labor. If these trade-offs cannot be alleviated, genetic improvement would then need to re-focus on a plant type that is adapted to the current low sowing density, like a runner rather than a bush plant type, which currently receives most of the genetic attention. Genetic improvement targeting “drought” adaptation should also be restricted to areas

  2. Retention of natural antioxidants of blends of groundnut and sunflower oils with minor oils during storage and frying.

    PubMed

    Sunil, L; Reddy, P Vanitha; Krishna, A G Gopala; Urooj, Asna

    2015-02-01

    Unrefined groundnut oil (GNO) and refined sunflower oil (SFO) were blended with four minor oils including laboratory refined red palmolein (RRPO), physically refined rice bran oil (RBO), unrefined sesame oil (SESO), and unrefined coconut oil (CNO) containing natural antioxidants viz., β-carotene, tocopherols, oryzanol and lignans. The five blends prepared were GNO + RRPO (80:20), GNO + RBO (80:20), GNO + SESO (80:20), SFO + RRPO (50:50) and SFO + CNO (60:40). Prepared blends contained saturated fatty acids (SFA) (16.7-53.3 %); monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) (16.0-45.5 %) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (29.2-37.8 %). GNO blends viz., GNO + RRPO, GNO + RBO and GNO + SESO contained β-carotene (10.7 mg/100 g), oryzanol (0.12 g/100 g) and lignans (0.35 g/100 g) respectively as natural antioxidants. SFO was enriched with β-carotene (28.7 mg/100 g) and medium chain fatty acids (34.2 %) by blending with RRPO and CNO respectively. The oil blends (200 ml) were packed and stored at 38 °C/90 % relative humidity (RH) and 27 °C/65 % RH and samples were withdrawn at fixed intervals for analysis. Freshly prepared blends were also investigated for their frying performance. During storage, GNO + RBO blend showed highest oxidative stability probably due to the presence of oryzanol in the order GNO + RBO > GNO + SESO > GNO + RRPO. During frying, the peroxide value of GNO blends with RBO (rich in oryzanol) and SESO (rich in lignans) was less while the free fatty acid value was less in SFO blends with RRPO and CNO. Hence, blending of natural antioxidants rich minor oils (RRPO, RBO and SESO) with the major vegetable oils (GNO and SFO) may preserve them by lowering their rate of oxidation during storage and frying.

  3. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-12-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved.

  4. Post-pancreatitis Fat Necrosis Mimicking Carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua P; Arnoletti, J Pablo; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Morgan, Desiree E

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can result in retroperitoneal fat necrosis, typically occurring in the peripancreatic region, with extension into the transverse mesocolon, omentum and mesenteric root. When evaluated with contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT), acute peripancreatic post necrotic collections typically become lower in attenuation over time, and often appear as homogeneous fluid collections. Saponification as a complication of fat necrosis in patients with acute pancreatitis is a well recognized clinical entity. While retroperitonal fat necrosis is commonly seen on CECT, saponification is not a prominent imaging feature. We present a case of acute pancreatitis complicated by extensive saponification of fat throughout the retroperitoneum and peritoneal lining, mimicking carcinomatosis.

  5. Experimental Papillary Necrosis of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Solez, K.; Miller, M.; Quarles, P. A.; Finer, P. M.; Heptinstall, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    To test the thesis that vasoconstriction plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of papillary necrosis caused by bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BEA), medullary plasma flow was determined in rats treated with BEA. Medullary blood flow was normal ½ to 1 hour after BEA treatment, and was actually elevated 6 hours after BEA. There was no increase in plasma levels of prostaglandins A and E, which would have been expected if there had been medullary ischemia. Pretreatment with reserpine, which inhibited the development of papillary necrosis, had little effect on medullary plasma flow. These observations do not support the notion that vasoconstriction is the mechanism by which BEA causes papillary necrosis. PMID:4472110

  6. A Genomic Study of the Bipolar Bud Site Selection Pattern in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Li; Snyder, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A genome-wide screen of 4168 homozygous diploid yeast deletion strains has been performed to identify nonessential genes that participate in the bipolar budding pattern. By examining bud scar patterns representing the sites of previous cell divisions, 127 mutants representing three different phenotypes were found: unipolar, axial-like, and random. From this screen, 11 functional classes of known genes were identified, including those involved in actin-cytoskeleton organization, general bud site selection, cell polarity, vesicular transport, cell wall synthesis, protein modification, transcription, nuclear function, translation, and other functions. Four characterized genes that were not known previously to participate in bud site selection were also found to be important for the haploid axial budding pattern. In addition to known genes, we found 22 novel genes (20 are designated BUD13-BUD32) important for bud site selection. Deletion of one resulted in unipolar budding exclusively from the proximal pole, suggesting that this gene plays an important role in diploid distal budding. Mutations in 20 other novel BUD genes produced a random budding phenotype and one produced an axial-like budding defect. Several of the novel Bud proteins were fused to green fluorescence protein; two proteins were found to localize to sites of polarized cell growth (i.e., the bud tip in small budded cells and the neck in cells undergoing cytokinesis), similar to that postulated for the bipolar signals and proteins that target cell division site tags to their proper location in the cell. Four others localized to the nucleus, suggesting that they play a role in gene expression. The bipolar distal marker Bud8 was localized in a number of mutants; many showed an altered Bud8-green fluorescence protein localization pattern. Through the genome-wide identification and analysis of different mutants involved in bipolar bud site selection, an integrated pathway for this process is presented in

  7. An International Reference Consensus Genetic Map with 897 Marker Loci Based on 11 Mapping Populations for Tetraploid Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manish K.; Moretzsohn, Márcio C.; Sujay, Venkataswamy; Qin, Hongde; Hong, Yanbin; Faye, Issa; Chen, Xiaoping; BhanuPrakash, Amindala; Shah, Trushar M.; Gowda, Makanahally V. C.; Nigam, Shyam N.; Liang, Xuanqiang; Hoisington, Dave A.; Guo, Baozhu; Bertioli, David J.; Rami, Jean-Francois; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2012-01-01

    Only a few genetic maps based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) and backcross (BC) populations have been developed for tetraploid groundnut. The marker density, however, is not very satisfactory especially in the context of large genome size (2800 Mb/1C) and 20 linkage groups (LGs). Therefore, using marker segregation data for 10 RILs and one BC population from the international groundnut community, with the help of common markers across different populations, a reference consensus genetic map has been developed. This map is comprised of 897 marker loci including 895 simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 2 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) loci distributed on 20 LGs (a01–a10 and b01–b10) spanning a map distance of 3, 863.6 cM with an average map density of 4.4 cM. The highest numbers of markers (70) were integrated on a01 and the least number of markers (21) on b09. The marker density, however, was lowest (6.4 cM) on a08 and highest (2.5 cM) on a01. The reference consensus map has been divided into 20 cM long 203 BINs. These BINs carry 1 (a10_02, a10_08 and a10_09) to 20 (a10_04) loci with an average of 4 marker loci per BIN. Although the polymorphism information content (PIC) value was available for 526 markers in 190 BINs, 36 and 111 BINs have at least one marker with >0.70 and >0.50 PIC values, respectively. This information will be useful for selecting highly informative and uniformly distributed markers for developing new genetic maps, background selection and diversity analysis. Most importantly, this reference consensus map will serve as a reliable reference for aligning new genetic and physical maps, performing QTL analysis in a multi-populations design, evaluating the genetic background effect on QTL expression, and serving other genetic and molecular breeding activities in groundnut. PMID:22815973

  8. Tumor budding is an independent adverse prognostic factor in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Kate; Li-Chang, Hector H; Kalloger, Steven E; Peixoto, Renata D; Webber, Douglas L; Owen, David A; Driman, David K; Kirsch, Richard; Serra, Stefano; Scudamore, Charles H; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F

    2015-04-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established adverse prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. However, the significance and diagnostic reproducibility of budding in pancreatic carcinoma requires further study. We aimed to assess the prognostic significance of tumor budding in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, determine its relationship with other clinicopathologic features, and assess interobserver variability in its diagnosis. Tumor budding was assessed in 192 archival cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) sections; tumor buds were defined as single cells or nonglandular clusters composed of <5 cells. The presence of budding was determined through assessment of all tumor-containing slides, and associations with clinicopathologic features and outcomes were analyzed. Six gastrointestinal pathologists participated in an interobserver variability study of 120 images of consecutive tumor slides stained with H&E and cytokeratin. Budding was present in 168 of 192 cases and was associated with decreased overall survival (P=0.001). On multivariable analysis, tumor budding was prognostically significantly independent of stage, grade, tumor size, nodal status, lymphovascular invasion, and perineural invasion. There was substantial agreement among pathologists in assessing the presence of tumor budding using both H&E (K=0.63) and cytokeratin (K=0.63) stains. The presence of tumor budding is an independent adverse prognostic factor in pancreatic ductal carcinoma. The assessment of budding with H&E is reliable and could be used to better risk stratify patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

  9. Labeling and analysis of chicken taste buds using molecular markers in oral epithelial sheets

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Prasangi; Wang, Zhonghou; Venkatesan, Nandakumar; Tehrani, Kayvan F.; Payne, Jason; Swetenburg, Raymond L.; Kawabata, Fuminori; Tabata, Shoji; Mortensen, Luke J.; Stice, Steven L.; Beckstead, Robert; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    In chickens, the sensory organs for taste are the taste buds in the oral cavity, of which there are ~240–360 in total number as estimated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). There is not an easy way to visualize all taste buds in chickens. Here, we report a highly efficient method for labeling chicken taste buds in oral epithelial sheets using the molecular markers Vimentin and α-Gustducin. Immediate tissue fixation following incubation with sub-epithelially injected proteases enabled us to peel off whole epithelial sheets, leaving the shape and integrity of the tissue intact. In the peeled epithelial sheets, taste buds labeled with antibodies against Vimentin and α-Gustducin were easily identified and counted under a light microscope and many more taste buds, patterned in rosette-like clusters, were found than previously reported with SEM. Broiler-type, female-line males have more taste buds than other groups and continue to increase the number of taste buds over stages after hatch. In addition to ovoid-shaped taste buds, big tube-shaped taste buds were observed in the chicken using 2-photon microscopy. Our protocol for labeling taste buds with molecular markers will factilitate future mechanistic studies on the development of chicken taste buds in association with their feeding behaviors. PMID:27853250

  10. Experimental evidence that ptarmigan regulate willow bud production to their own advantage.

    PubMed

    Christie, Katie S; Ruess, R W

    2015-07-01

    In some ecosystems, vertebrate herbivores increase the nutritional quality and biomass of their food source through repeated grazing, thereby manipulating their environment to support higher densities of animals. We tested whether ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus and L. muta) are capable of regulating the nutritional quality, abundance, and availability of feltleaf willow (Salix alaxensis) buds using a simulated browsing experiment and a feeding preference study with wild birds. Simulated ptarmigan browsing resulted in smaller buds, but greater numbers of buds per shoot. Furthermore, browsing altered the morphology of willow branches such that buds were at higher densities and closer to snow level compared to unbrowsed controls. Browsing increased the number of willows with accessible buds (buds within 50 cm of snow level) from 55 to 89%, and increased total accessible bud biomass from 113 ± 30 to 129 ± 50 mg/ramet. Browsing did not affect bud nitrogen or carbon concentration and slightly reduced protein precipitation capacity (tannins) in buds the following winter, indicating that ptarmigan browsing does not induce a defensive response in this species. When branches of broomed (previously browsed) and unbroomed willows were placed in the snow at equal heights, ptarmigan showed no preference for either type; however, they obtained more buds from broomed willows. Increased accessibility and density of willow buds caused by browsing has the potential to increase habitat carrying capacity, thereby supporting higher densities of ptarmigan.

  11. Membrane-elasticity model of Coatless vesicle budding induced by ESCRT complexes.

    PubMed

    Różycki, Bartosz; Boura, Evzen; Hurley, James H; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The formation of vesicles is essential for many biological processes, in particular for the trafficking of membrane proteins within cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) directs membrane budding away from the cytosol. Unlike other vesicle formation pathways, the ESCRT-mediated budding occurs without a protein coat. Here, we propose a minimal model of ESCRT-induced vesicle budding. Our model is based on recent experimental observations from direct fluorescence microscopy imaging that show ESCRT proteins colocalized only in the neck region of membrane buds. The model, cast in the framework of membrane elasticity theory, reproduces the experimentally observed vesicle morphologies with physically meaningful parameters. In this parameter range, the minimum energy configurations of the membrane are coatless buds with ESCRTs localized in the bud neck, consistent with experiment. The minimum energy configurations agree with those seen in the fluorescence images, with respect to both bud shapes and ESCRT protein localization. On the basis of our model, we identify distinct mechanistic pathways for the ESCRT-mediated budding process. The bud size is determined by membrane material parameters, explaining the narrow yet different bud size distributions in vitro and in vivo. Our membrane elasticity model thus sheds light on the energetics and possible mechanisms of ESCRT-induced membrane budding.

  12. Co-ordinated gene expression during phases of dormancy release in raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) buds.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Luca; Hancock, Robert D; Haupt, Sophie; Walker, Paul G; Pont, Simon D A; McNicol, Jim; Cardle, Linda; Morris, Jenny; Viola, Roberto; Brennan, Rex; Hedley, Peter E; Taylor, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Bud break in raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) is often poor and uneven, with many of the subapical buds remaining in a dormant state. In order to determine the dormancy status of raspberry buds, an empirical measure of bud burst in a growth-permissive environment following exposure to chilling (4 degrees C cold storage) was developed. For cv. Glen Ample, percentage bud burst in intact canes and isolated nodes was recorded after 14 d. Isolated nodes (a measure of endodormancy) achieved 100% bud burst after approximately 1500 h chilling whereas buds on intact plants (combined endo- and paradormancy) required an additional 1000 h chilling. A microarray approach was used to follow changes in gene expression that occurred during dormancy transition. The probes for the microarrays were obtained from endodormant and paradormant raspberry bud cDNA libraries. The expression profiles of 5300 clones from these libraries were subjected to principal component analysis to determine the most significant expression patterns. Sequence analysis of these clones, in many cases, enabled their functional categorization and the development of hypotheses concerning the mechanisms of bud dormancy release. Thus a set of novel candidates for key dormancy-related genes from raspberry buds have been identified. Bud dormancy is fundamental to the study of plant developmental processes and, in addition, its regulation is of significant economic importance to fruit and horticultural industries.

  13. Nuclear maspin expression: A biomarker for budding assessment in colorectal cancer specimens.

    PubMed

    Banias, Laura; Gurzu, Simona; Kovacs, Zsolt; Bara, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Jung, Ioan

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the maspin expression in colorectal carcinomas (CRC) and its possible role in quantification of the tumor budding. The tumor budding was prospectively quantified in 49 consecutive cases of patients that underwent surgical resection for CRC. The cases were divided in two groups: group A (n=23) - low budding (<5 tumor buds per high microscopic field) and group B (n=26) - high budding CRCs (≥5 buds). Maspin expression was evaluated in the tumor core and the buds from the hot spot area in 44 of the microsatellite stable adenocarcinomas. Its expression was quantified as negative, cytoplasmic only, nuclear only or mixed expression (cytoplasm and nucleus). Compared with group A, a higher pT (p <0.0001) and pN stage (p=0.0001) and infiltrating aspect at macroscopic evaluation (p=0.0081) was identified in group B. No correlation between the maspin expression in the tumore core and the budding grade was noted (p=0.14). Compared with the tumor core, the cytoplasm to nuclear translocation of maspin was more frequently observed in cases from group B than A (n=0.0063). For the colorectal carcinomas, the infiltrative aspect at macroscopic evaluation and nuclear maspin in the buds might be used as indicators of risk for lymph node metastases. Maspin nuclear expression in the buds may be helpful for a proper budding assessment and may serve as a negative prognostic factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Influences of polar auxin transport on polarity of adventitious bud formation in hybrid populas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Myung Won ); Hackett, W. )

    1989-04-01

    The role of auxin and cytokinin distribution of polar regeneration of adventitious bud has been investigated. Explants from leaf midvein were labelled with {sup 14}C-NAA and {sup 14}C-BA and the radioactivity in proximal, mid, and distal portions was counted after 24h and 48h. Explants showing polar regeneration of buds on the proximal end showed a clear polar distribution of {sup 14}CNAA. Auxin transport inhibitors (NPA, TIBA) eliminated polar distribution of auxin and reduced polarity of bud formation and the total number of buds formed, but did not reduce callus formation. Increased concentration of Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} decreased polarity of bud formation and increased the number of buds formed but did not affect the distribution of auxin of cytokinin. Some factor in addition to polar distribution of auxin or cytokinin-auxin ratio appears to influence the polarity of adventitious bud formation.

  15. Auxin flow-mediated competition between axillary buds to restore apical dominance

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Jozef; Medveďová, Zuzana; Kalousek, Petr; Matiješčuková, Natálie; Friml, Jiří; Reinöhl, Vilém; Procházka, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Apical dominance is one of the fundamental developmental phenomena in plant biology, which determines the overall architecture of aerial plant parts. Here we show apex decapitation activated competition for dominance in adjacent upper and lower axillary buds. A two-nodal-bud pea (Pisum sativum L.) was used as a model system to monitor and assess auxin flow, auxin transport channels, and dormancy and initiation status of axillary buds. Auxin flow was manipulated by lateral stem wounds or chemically by auxin efflux inhibitors 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 1-N-naphtylphtalamic acid (NPA), or protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) treatments, which served to interfere with axillary bud competition. Redirecting auxin flow to different points influenced which bud formed the outgrowing and dominant shoot. The obtained results proved that competition between upper and lower axillary buds as secondary auxin sources is based on the same auxin canalization principle that operates between the shoot apex and axillary bud. PMID:27824063

  16. Membrane budding and scission by the ESCRT machinery: it's all in the neck

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, James H.; Hanson, Phyllis I.

    2010-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) catalyze one of the most unusual membrane remodelling events in cell biology. ESCRT-I and ESCRT-II direct membrane budding away from the cytosol by stabilizing bud necks without coating the bud and without being consumed in the buds. ESCRT-III cleaves the bud necks from their cytosolic face. ESCRT-III-mediated membrane neck cleavage is crucial for many processes, including the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies, viral budding, cytokinesis, and probably autophagy. Recent studies of ultrastructures induced by ESCRT-III overexpression in cells and the in vitro reconstitution of the budding and scission reactions have led to breakthroughs in understanding these remarkable membrane reactions. PMID:20588296

  17. Cortical necrosis in a renal transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhardt, R.; Growcock, G.; Lasher, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    The /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA renogram is a well extabished noninvasive method for evaluating and following transplanted kidneys. The examination is useful in distinguishing rejection from acute tubular necrosis as well as demonstrating several less common complications such as vascular occlusion, urinary extravasation, obstruction, and lymphocele. A previously unreported condition involving a transplant kidney (i.e., renal cortical necrosis) is described which was diagnosed with renal scintigraphy in combination with sonography.

  18. Back to the roots of regulated necrosis.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Vladimir; Linkermann, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, our knowledge of how cells die by regulated pathways of necrosis has increased tremendously. In this issue, Distéfano et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201605110) provide yet another milestone in our understanding of regulated necrosis as they identify a ferroptosis-like cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2017 Todorov and Linkermann.

  19. Mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Christina R; Koolen, Pieter G; Anderson, Katarina E; Paul, Marek A; Tobias, Adam M; Lin, Samuel J; Lee, Bernard T

    2015-10-01

    Mastectomy skin necrosis represents a significant clinical morbidity after immediate breast reconstruction. In addition to aesthetic deformity, necrosis of the native mastectomy skin may require debridement, additional reconstruction, or prolonged wound care and potentially delay oncologic treatment. This study aims to evaluate patient and procedural characteristics to identify predictors of mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical breast reconstruction. A retrospective review was performed of all immediate microsurgical breast reconstructions performed at a single academic center. Patient records were queried for age, diabetes, active smoking, previous breast surgery, preoperative radiation, preoperative chemotherapy, body mass index, mastectomy type, mastectomy weight, flap type, autologous flap type, and postoperative mastectomy skin flap necrosis. There were 746 immediate autologous microsurgical flaps performed by three plastic surgeons at our institution during the study period. The incidence of mastectomy skin flap necrosis was 13.4%. Univariate analysis revealed a significantly higher incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis in patients with higher mastectomy weight (P < 0.001), higher autologous flap weight (P < 0.001), higher body mass index (0.002), and diabetes (P = 0.021). No significant association was found for age, smoking, prior breast surgery, preoperative chemotherapy or radiation, or mastectomy type. Multivariate analysis demonstrated statistically significant associations between mastectomy skin necrosis and both increasing mastectomy weight (odds ratio 1.348 per quartile increase, P = 0.009) and diabetes (odds ratio 2.356, P = 0.011). Increasing mastectomy weight and coexisting diabetes are significantly associated with postoperative mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical reconstruction. These characteristics should be considered during patient counseling, procedure selection, operative planning, and intraoperative tissue

  20. Intracellular serpins, firewalls and tissue necrosis.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Stefan J; Lomas, David A

    2008-02-01

    Luke and colleagues have recently attributed a new role to a member of the serpin superfamily of serine proteinase inhibitors. They have used Caenorhabditis elegans to show that an intracellular serpin is crucial for maintaining lysosomal integrity. We examine the role of this firewall in preventing necrosis and attempt to integrate this with current theories of stress-induced protein degradation. We discuss how mutant serpins cause disease either through polymerization or now, perhaps, by unleashing necrosis.

  1. [The effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha on hepatic necrosis in viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Si, C; Lang, Z

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) on hepatocyte necrosis in viral hepatitis, TNF alpha with or without D-galactosamine (D-Gal) was injected into the abdominal cavity of rats. No effect was observed after injection of TNF alpha alone. After injection of TNF alpha with D-Gal, the total bilirubin level in rat blood increased and hepatocyte necrosis appeared (P < 0.05). Moreover, anti-TNF alpha McAb blocked the effect of hepatocyte necrosis produced by D-Gal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). 130 samples of hepatic tissue were stained with anti-TNF alpha McAb by using ABC immunohistochemistry method. It was found that more severe the hepatocyte necrosis, more the positive cells expressing TNF alpha. There were more TNF alpha positive cells in the tissue of severe hepatitis. These results suggested that TNF alpha is a mediator in hepatocyte necrosis.

  2. Comprehensive assessment of tumour budding by cytokeratin staining in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Gregor; Koelzer, Viktor H; Dawson, Heather E; Berger, Martin D; Hädrich, Marion; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti

    2017-06-01

    Tumour budding in colorectal cancer (CRC) is a recognized prognostic parameter. The aim of this study was to address the use of cytokeratin immunostaining for the visualization and scoring of tumour buds. Ten hotspots (0.238 mm(2) ) of peritumoural budding (PTB) and intratumoural budding (ITB) were evaluated in surgical resections from 215 patients. The budding counts in the 10 densest regions anywhere in the tumour were combined into an overall tumour budding (OTB) score. The PTB, ITB and OTB hotspot with the maximum budding count was then evaluated. Finally, continuous and cut-off values of 10 buds per high-power field (HPF) (PTB10HPF ), five buds per HPF (ITB10HPF ) and eight buds per HPF (OTB10HPF ) were used to categorize budding counts into low-grade and high-grade scores. All budding scores were highly correlated. PTB and ITB counts were associated with many clinicopathological features, including tumour stage, lymph node and distant metastasis, venous and lymphovascular invasion, and disease-free survival (DFS) (all P < 0.05). Analyses of OTB counts recapitulated these associations, including a lower DFS with a greater number of tumour buds (P = 0.0309; hazard ratio 1.0332, 95% confidence interval 1.003-1.062). One OTB hotspot performed similarly to 10 OTB hotspots in terms of relationship with outcome. These statistical significances were largely lost when cut-offs were applied to PTB, ITB or OTB counts. An OTB count in a single hotspot on cytokeratin-stained CRC tissue sections is a fast and reliable prognostic scoring system for the assessment of tumour budding. This approach should be considered in future studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Twig pre-harvest temperature significantly influences effective cryopreservation of Vaccinium dormant buds.

    PubMed

    Jenderek, Maria M; Tanner, Justin D; Ambruzs, Barbara D; West, Mark; Postman, Joseph D; Hummer, Kim E

    2017-02-01

    Cryopreservation of temperate woody-plant material by dormant buds is less expensive than using shoot tips isolated from tissue cultured plants; however currently, dormant buds are used only for preservation of selected temperate tree and shrub species. Using dormant buds could be an efficient strategy for long-term preservation of blueberry (Vaccinium L.) genetic resources. In this study, viability of V. hybrid 'Northsky' (PI 554943) dormant buds was evaluated at 30 harvest dates over three consecutive fall/winter seasons to determine the optimal harvest time that promotes high post cryopreservation viability. Twigs with dormant buds were cut into 70 mm segments containing at least two nodes, desiccated, slowly cooled, stored in liquid nitrogen vapor and tested for post-cryopreservation regrowth. The highest regrowth of cryopreserved dormant buds was observed for buds harvested in mid-December and during the first half of January. Pearson's correlation coefficients were computed to evaluate the association between bud characteristics and viability at harvest date and logistic regression models were fit to test the ability of twig characteristics and temperatures to predict post cryopreservation bud viability. Post-cryopreservation viability was negatively correlated (p < 0.05) with average minimum, maximum and daily mean temperature preceding the bud harvest but was not correlated with the dormant bud initial and end moisture content, twig diameter, the number of dormant buds/cm of twig length and the number of days in desiccation. Regression tree analysis suggested post-cryopreservation viability to be between 52 and 80% for dormant buds harvested after a 10 day average maximum air temperature of <11.2 °C. Pre-harvest air temperature was a significant indicator of optimal dormant bud harvest time to produce adequate viability for long term preservation of blueberry genetic resources. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Patterns of bud-site selection in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae select bud sites in either of two distinct spatial patterns, known as axial (expressed by a and alpha cells) and bipolar (expressed by a/alpha cells). Fluorescence, time-lapse, and scanning electron microscopy have been used to obtain more precise descriptions of these patterns. From these descriptions, we conclude that in the axial pattern, the new bud forms directly adjacent to the division site in daughter cells and directly adjacent to the immediately preceding division site (bud site) in mother cells, with little influence from earlier sites. Thus, the division site appears to be marked by a spatial signal(s) that specifies the location of the new bud site and is transient in that it only lasts from one budding event to the next. Consistent with this conclusion, starvation and refeeding of axially budding cells results in the formation of new buds at nonaxial sites. In contrast, in bipolar budding cells, both poles are specified persistently as potential bud sites, as shown by the observations that a pole remains competent for budding even after several generations of nonuse and that the poles continue to be used for budding after starvation and refeeding. It appears that the specification of the two poles as potential bud sites occurs before a daughter cell forms its first bud, as a daughter can form this bud near either pole. However, there is a bias towards use of the pole distal to the division site. The strength of this bias varies from strain to strain, is affected by growth conditions, and diminishes in successive cell cycles. The first bud that forms near the distal pole appears to form at the very tip of the cell, whereas the first bud that forms near the pole proximal to the original division site (as marked by the birth scar) is generally somewhat offset from the tip and adjacent to (or overlapping) the birth scar. Subsequent buds can form near either pole and appear almost always to be adjacent either to

  5. Budding transition of asymmetric two-component lipid domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Jean; Komura, Shigeyuki; Andelman, David

    2016-09-01

    We propose a model that accounts for the budding transition of asymmetric two-component lipid domains, where the two monolayers (leaflets) have different average compositions controlled by independent chemical potentials. Assuming a coupling between the local curvature and local lipid composition in each of the leaflets, we discuss the morphology and thermodynamic behavior of asymmetric lipid domains. The membrane free-energy contains three contributions: the bending energy, the line tension, and a Landau free-energy for a lateral phase separation. Within a mean-field treatment, we obtain various phase diagrams containing fully budded, dimpled, and flat states as a function of the two leaflet compositions. The global phase behavior is analyzed, and depending on system parameters, the phase diagrams include one-phase, two-phase, and three-phase regions. In particular, we predict various phase coexistence regions between different morphologies of domains, which may be observed in multicomponent membranes or vesicles.

  6. Time-Lapse Fluorescence Microscopy of Budding Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Mendoza, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of green fluorescent protein (GFP) allowed visualization of a wide variety of processes within living cells. Thanks to the development of differently colored fluorophores, it is now possible to simultaneously follow distinct subcellular events at the single cell level. Here, we describe a basic method to visualize multiple events during cytokinesis by time-lapse fluorescence microscopy in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this organism, contraction of an actomyosin-based ring drives ingression of the plasma membrane at the mother-bud division site to partition the cytoplasm of the dividing cell. Simultaneous visualization of distinct cytokinesis steps in living cells, such as ring contraction and membrane ingression, will facilitate a complete understanding of the mechanisms of eukaryotic cell division.

  7. Nuclear envelope fission is linked to cytokinesis in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, J; Li, R

    2000-11-01

    We have investigated the relationship between nuclear envelope fission and cytokinesis during mitotic cell division in budding yeast. By carrying out time-lapse and optical sectioning video microscopy analysis of cells that express green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged nuclear envelope and actomyosin ring components, we found that nuclear division is temporally coupled to cytokinesis. Light and electron microscopy analysis also showed that nuclear envelope fission and the division of the nucleoplasm are severely delayed in cytokinesis mutants, resulting in discoupling between the nuclear division cycle and the budding cycle. These results suggest that homotypic membrane fusion may be activated by components or the mechanical action of cytokinetic structures and presents a mechanism for the equal partitioning of the nucleus and the temporal coordination of this event with chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  8. Cell Biology of Yeast Zygotes, from Genesis to Budding

    PubMed Central

    Tartakoff, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    The zygote is the essential intermediate that allows interchange of nuclear, mitochondrial and cytosolic determinants between cells. Zygote formation in S. cerevisiae is accomplished by mechanisms that are not characteristic of mitotic cells. These include shifting the axis of growth away from classical cortical landmarks, dramatically reorganizing the cell cortex, remodeling the cell wall in preparation for cell fusion, fusing with an adjacent partner, accomplishing nuclear fusion, orchestrating two steps of septin morphogenesis that account for a delay in fusion of mitochondria, and implementing new norms for bud site selection. This essay emphasizes the sequence of dependent relationships that account for this progression from cell encounters through to zygote budding. It briefly summarizes classical studies of signal transduction and polarity specification and then focuses on downstream events. PMID:25862405

  9. How to halve ploidy: lessons from budding yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Gary William; Sarkar, Sourav; Arumugam, Prakash

    2012-09-01

    Maintenance of ploidy in sexually reproducing organisms requires a specialized form of cell division called meiosis that generates genetically diverse haploid gametes from diploid germ cells. Meiotic cells halve their ploidy by undergoing two rounds of nuclear division (meiosis I and II) after a single round of DNA replication. Research in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) has shown that four major deviations from the mitotic cell cycle during meiosis are essential for halving ploidy. The deviations are (1) formation of a link between homologous chromosomes by crossover, (2) monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores during meiosis I, (3) protection of centromeric cohesion during meiosis I, and (4) suppression of DNA replication following exit from meiosis I. In this review we present the current understanding of the above four processes in budding yeast and examine the possible conservation of molecular mechanisms from yeast to humans.

  10. The protein machinery of vesicle budding and fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    A general protein machinery that buds and fuses transport vesicles is harnessed to generate the complex web of intracellular transport pathways critical for such diverse processes as cell growth, endocytosis, hormone release, and neurotransmission. With this appreciation, the challenge of understanding the precise molecular mechanisms of these many facets of cell biology has been reduced to a series of problems in protein structure and chemistry. PMID:8745395

  11. Development of the human tail bud and splanchnic mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryozo

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this paper was to shed some light on anorectal development from a viewpoint of the tail bud and splanchnic mesenchyme for better understanding of the morphogenesis of the human anorectum. Human embryos ranging from Carnegie stage 11 to 23 (CS 11 to 23) were adopted in this study. Seventeen embryos preserved at the Congenital Anomaly Research Center of Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine were histologically examined. The cloaca, extending caudally to the hindgut, was dramatically enlarged, particularly both its dorsal portion and membrane, that is, the cloacal membrane resulting from the development of the tailgut derived from the tail bud. The splanchnic mesenchyme surrounding the hindgut was spread out in the direction of the urorectal septum ventrally, suggesting that it participated in the formation of the septum. No fusion of the urorectal septum and the cloacal membrane was found. The splanchnic mesenchyme proliferated and developed into smooth muscle (circular and longitudinal) layers from cranial to caudal along the hindgut. The tail bud seems to cause both the adequate dilation of the dorsal cloaca and the elongation of the cloacal membrane; its dorsal portion in particular will be necessary for normal anorectal development. The splanchnic mesenchyme developed and descended toward the pectinate line and formed the internal sphincter muscle at the terminal bowel. © 2012 The Author. Congenital Anomalies © 2012 Japanese Teratology Society.

  12. Leptin's effect on taste bud calcium responses and transmitter secretion.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Tricia L; Corcoran, Alan; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-05-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone released by adipose tissue, acts on the hypothalamus to control cravings and appetite. Leptin also acts to decrease taste responses to sweet substances, though there is little detailed information regarding where leptin acts in the taste transduction cascade. The present study examined the effects of leptin on sweet-evoked responses and neuro transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Our results indicate that leptin moderately decreased sweet-evoked calcium mobilization in isolated mouse taste buds. We also employed Chinese hamster ovary biosensor cells to examine taste transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Leptin reduced ATP and increased serotonin release in response to sweet stimulation. However, leptin has no effect on bitter-evoked transmitter release, further showing that the action of leptin is sweet specific. Our results support those of previous studies, which state that leptin acts on taste tissue via the leptin receptor, most likely on Type II (Receptor) cells, but also possibly on Type III (Presynaptic) cells.

  13. Trichomes control flower bud shape by linking together young petals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiafu; Walford, Sally-Anne; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Llewellyn, Danny

    2016-06-20

    Trichomes are widespread in plants and develop from surface cells on different tissues(1). They have many forms and functions, from defensive spines to physical barriers that trap layers of air to insulate against desiccation, but there is growing evidence that trichomes can also have developmental roles in regulating flower structure(2,3). We report here that the trichomes on petals of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., are essential for correct flower bud shape through a mechanical entanglement of the trichomes on adjacent petals that anchor the edges to counter the opposing force generated by asymmetric expansion of overlapping petals. Silencing a master regulator of petal trichomes, GhMYB-MIXTA-Like10 (GhMYBML10), by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed petal trichome growth and resulted in flower buds forming into abnormal corkscrew shapes that exposed developing anthers and stigmas to desiccation damage. Artificially gluing petal edges together could partially restore correct bud shape and fertility. Such petal 'Velcro' is present in other Malvaceae and perhaps more broadly in other plant families, although it is not ubiquitous. This mechanism for physical association between separate organs to regulate flower shape and function is different from the usual organ shape control(4) exerted through cell-to-cell communication and differential cell expansion within floral tissues(5,6).

  14. Arenavirus budding: a common pathway with mechanistic differences.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Svenja; Ebihara, Hideki; Groseth, Allison

    2013-01-31

    The Arenaviridae is a diverse and growing family of viruses that includes several agents responsible for important human diseases. Despite the importance of this family for public health, particularly in Africa and South America, much of its biology remains poorly understood. However, in recent years significant progress has been made in this regard, particularly relating to the formation and release of new enveloped virions, which is an essential step in the viral lifecycle. While this process is mediated chiefly by the viral matrix protein Z, recent evidence suggests that for some viruses the nucleoprotein (NP) is also required to enhance the budding process. Here we highlight and compare the distinct budding mechanisms of different arenaviruses, concentrating on the role of the matrix protein Z, its known late domain sequences, and the involvement of cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway components. Finally we address the recently described roles for the nucleoprotein NP in budding and ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) incorporation, as well as discussing possible mechanisms related to its involvement.

  15. Mathematical model of the morphogenesis checkpoint in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ciliberto, Andrea; Novak, Bela; Tyson, John J.

    2003-01-01

    The morphogenesis checkpoint in budding yeast delays progression through the cell cycle in response to stimuli that prevent bud formation. Central to the checkpoint mechanism is Swe1 kinase: normally inactive, its activation halts cell cycle progression in G2. We propose a molecular network for Swe1 control, based on published observations of budding yeast and analogous control signals in fission yeast. The proposed Swe1 network is merged with a model of cyclin-dependent kinase regulation, converted into a set of differential equations and studied by numerical simulation. The simulations accurately reproduce the phenotypes of a dozen checkpoint mutants. Among other predictions, the model attributes a new role to Hsl1, a kinase known to play a role in Swe1 degradation: Hsl1 must also be indirectly responsible for potent inhibition of Swe1 activity. The model supports the idea that the morphogenesis checkpoint, like other checkpoints, raises the cell size threshold for progression from one phase of the cell cycle to the next. PMID:14691135

  16. Mathematical model of the morphogenesis checkpoint in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Ciliberto, Andrea; Novak, Bela; Tyson, John J

    2003-12-22

    The morphogenesis checkpoint in budding yeast delays progression through the cell cycle in response to stimuli that prevent bud formation. Central to the checkpoint mechanism is Swe1 kinase: normally inactive, its activation halts cell cycle progression in G2. We propose a molecular network for Swe1 control, based on published observations of budding yeast and analogous control signals in fission yeast. The proposed Swe1 network is merged with a model of cyclin-dependent kinase regulation, converted into a set of differential equations and studied by numerical simulation. The simulations accurately reproduce the phenotypes of a dozen checkpoint mutants. Among other predictions, the model attributes a new role to Hsl1, a kinase known to play a role in Swe1 degradation: Hsl1 must also be indirectly responsible for potent inhibition of Swe1 activity. The model supports the idea that the morphogenesis checkpoint, like other checkpoints, raises the cell size threshold for progression from one phase of the cell cycle to the next.

  17. The Inside-Out Mechanism of Dicers from Budding Yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, David E.; Nakanishi, Kotaro; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Bartel, David P.

    2011-09-20

    The Dicer ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzymes process long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct RNA interference. Here, we describe the structure and activity of a catalytically active fragment of Kluyveromyces polysporus Dcr1, which represents the noncanonical Dicers found in budding yeasts. The crystal structure revealed a homodimer resembling that of bacterial RNase III but extended by a unique N-terminal domain, and it identified additional catalytic residues conserved throughout eukaryotic RNase III enzymes. Biochemical analyses showed that Dcr1 dimers bind cooperatively along the dsRNA substrate such that the distance between consecutive active sites determines the length of the siRNA products. Thus, unlike canonical Dicers, which successively remove siRNA duplexes from the dsRNA termini, budding-yeast Dicers initiate processing in the interior and work outward. The distinct mechanism of budding-yeast Dicers establishes a paradigm for natural molecular rulers and imparts substrate preferences with ramifications for biological function.

  18. The Inside-Out Mechanism of Dicers from Budding Yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    D Weinberg; K Nakanishi; D Patel; D Bartel

    2011-12-31

    The Dicer ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzymes process long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct RNA interference. Here, we describe the structure and activity of a catalytically active fragment of Kluyveromyces polysporus Dcr1, which represents the noncanonical Dicers found in budding yeasts. The crystal structure revealed a homodimer resembling that of bacterial RNase III but extended by a unique N-terminal domain, and it identified additional catalytic residues conserved throughout eukaryotic RNase III enzymes. Biochemical analyses showed that Dcr1 dimers bind cooperatively along the dsRNA substrate such that the distance between consecutive active sites determines the length of the siRNA products. Thus, unlike canonical Dicers, which successively remove siRNA duplexes from the dsRNA termini, budding-yeast Dicers initiate processing in the interior and work outward. The distinct mechanism of budding-yeast Dicers establishes a paradigm for natural molecular rulers and imparts substrate preferences with ramifications for biological function.

  19. Lectins influence chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in limb bud mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Monsefi, Malihezaman; Ghasemi, Mansoureh

    2011-02-01

    The role of cell surface glycoproteins in cell behavior can be characterized by their interactions with plant lectins. This study was designed to identify the effects of lectins on chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in limb bud mesenchymal cells in vitro. Limb bud mesenchymal cells from mouse embryos were cultured in high-density micromass culture. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), concanavalin A (ConA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA) were added separately to the culture media. Cells were cultured for 5 or 9 days, and cell viability was assayed by neutral red on day 5. The micromasses were stained with alcian blue, alizarin red S and Von Kossa stains, and alkaline phosphatase assays were also done. Dolichos biflorus agglutinin induced an increase in chondrogenesis, calcium precipitation and proteoglycan production. ConA and PNA did not affect chondrocyte differentiation but induced chondrocytes to produce more proteoglycan. Wheat germ agglutinin reduced chondrification and ossification but induced mesenchymal cells to store lipid droplets. Ricinus communis agglutinin 1 was toxic and significantly reduced cell survival. In conclusion, DBA was the most effective inducer of ossification and chondrification. Wheat germ agglutinin induced adipogenesis instead. These assays showed that lectins play important roles in limb bud development.

  20. Automated Sensing of Douglas Fir Bud-Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintz, H. E.; Kruger, A.; Wagner, D. A.; Tenney, I. J.

    2011-12-01

    The timing of plant biological events such as budburst in the spring can have major impacts on plant productivity and ecosystem carbon balance. While research efforts that address the timing of events is gaining considerable momentum, the technology available for sensing and recording the timing of events is limited, especially for trees. Thus, researchers often perform manual measurements, which can be time-consuming and labor-intensive. This has resulted in efforts such as Project BudBurst, a network of professional and volunteer observers across the United States that monitor plants as seasons change. Access to forest trees can be difficult during periods of greatest interest, such as when buds open in the spring. For example, high elevation, snow, and melting snow during the spring hamper access to trees in alpine regions. Researchers at Oregon State University and The University of Iowa are developing instrumentation for automating sensing of budburst in Douglas firs. While the instrumentation targets Douglas firs, it can find application in studying budburst in other species. We present an initial bud-burst sensor that uses optical techniques to sense bud opening. An optical fiber illuminates a target bud with modulated light, a second fiber detects, and guides reflect light to a photodetector and signal processing electronics. Changes in the reflected light indicate the budburst. The instrumentation exploits advances in microelectronics, particularly miniaturization and low power consumption, and uses advanced signal processing techniques such as lock-in detection. The instrumentation records the reflected light every 15 minutes on high-capacity, non-volatile Flash media. Power consumption is very low and sensors have an extrapolated, continuous operating time more than 9 months, suggesting their deployment in the fall, and retrieval in the following spring. We believe the sensor will enable a caliber of research not yet achievable owing to the difficulty of

  1. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition correlates with tumor budding and predicts prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Yukiko; Yamada, Suguru; Koike, Masahiko; Kanda, Mitsuro; Fujii, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Goro; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nomoto, Shuji; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is considered to play an important role in cancer invasion. Tumor budding is a prognostic factor in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The aim of this study was to explore the correlation between EMT and tumor budding. Surgical specimens from 78 cases of ESCC resected without preoperative treatment between 2001 and 2013 were enrolled in the study. The mRNA expressions of E-cadherin and vimentin were measured in cancerous tissues using real-time PCR, and each tumor was classified into either epithelial or mesenchymal group. Tumor budding was evaluated in H&E-stained slides and divided into two groups; low-grade budding (<3) and high-grade budding (≥3). The 5-year survival rate in the epithelial group was significantly higher than that in the mesenchymal group (62.0% vs. 31.5%, P = 0.021). Survival rate of patients in the low-grade budding group was significantly higher than that of patients in the high-grade budding group (75.1% vs. 25.9%, P < 0.001). High-grade tumor budding was significantly associated with the mesenchymal group (P = 0.009). EMT was found to occur in ESCC and was significantly associated with tumor budding. Tumor budding was identified as a significant independent prognostic factor among the current population of ESCC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Tumour budding and the expression of cancer stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei-Ren; Gao, Fei; Li, Si-Yi; Yao, Kai-Tai

    2012-12-01

    To detect the prognostic significance of tumour budding and its expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Tumour budding was investigated in 105 patients with NPC by immunohistochemistry for pan-cytokeratin (AE1/AE3). The intensity of budding correlated strongly with T classification (P=0.008), lymphatic invasion (P<0.001), vascular invasion (P=0.029), lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001), and clinical stage (P=0.010). Univariate analysis revealed that patients with high budding grade had poorer survival than those with low grade (P=0.002). Multivariate analysis showed that tumour budding was an independent predictor of survival (P=0.001). Furthermore, budding cells showed high-level expression of the cancer stem cell (CSC) marker ALDH1. Budding cells with high-level ALDH1 expression contributed to several aggressive behaviours and poor survival (P=0.000).   We describe, for the first time, the presence of tumour budding and its correlation with aggressive tumour behaviour and poor patient survival in NPC. The degree of tumour budding could be a valuable predictive factor in NPC. In addition, we show, also for the first time, that budding cells in NPC might possess the invasive and metastatic properties of CSCs. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  3. Trehalose 6-phosphate is involved in triggering axillary bud outgrowth in garden pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Franziska; Barbier, Francois F; Feil, Regina; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Annunziata, Maria Grazia; Chabikwa, Tinashe G; Höfgen, Rainer; Stitt, Mark; Beveridge, Christine A; Lunn, John E

    2017-09-04

    Trehalose 6-phosphate (Tre6P) is a signal of sucrose availability in plants, and has been implicated in regulation of shoot branching by the abnormal branching phenotypes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays) mutants with altered Tre6P metabolism. Decapitation of garden pea (Pisum sativum) plants has been proposed to release the dormancy of axillary buds lower down the stem due to changes in sucrose supply, and we hypothesized that this response is mediated by Tre6P. Decapitation led to a rapid and sustained rise in Tre6P levels in axillary buds, coinciding with the onset of bud outgrowth. This response was suppressed by simultaneous defoliation that restricts the supply of sucrose to axillary buds in decapitated plants. Decapitation also led to a rise in amino acid levels in buds, but a fall in phosphoenolpyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate. Supplying sucrose to stem node explants in vitro triggered a concentration-dependent increase in the Tre6P content of the buds that was highly correlated with their rate of outgrowth. These data show that changes in bud Tre6P levels are correlated with initiation of bud outgrowth following decapitation, suggesting that Tre6P is involved in the release of bud dormancy by sucrose. Tre6P might also be linked to a reconfiguration of carbon and nitrogen metabolism to support the subsequent growth of the bud into a new shoot. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Subtle proteome differences identified between post-dormant vegetative and floral peach buds.

    PubMed

    Prassinos, Constantinos; Rigas, Stamatis; Kizis, Dimosthenis; Vlahou, Antonia; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis

    2011-05-01

    Proper development of deciduous tree species, including peach, is accomplished through an annual growth cycle. Freezing avoidance during winter is necessary for tree survival and is achieved by the enclosure of meristems in floral and vegetative buds. To elucidate the role of developmentally regulated protein networks in bud break, proteins of the two bud-types were extracted and analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Of the 1107 protein spots that were picked, 475 were identified and annotated assembling the peach bud proteome reference map. The majority of these proteins are involved in stress-response, detoxification, defense, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production. The protein profiles of both bud-types bear high similarity, whereas only 11 proteins were differentially expressed. These proteins were mainly involved in carbon-nitrogen homeostasis/metabolism and certain developmental processes to sustain rapid growth of the newly emerging organs. Among these are enzymes that differentially regulate the levels of H(2)O(2) between floral and vegetative buds, potentially promoting sequential bud-break. Distinct Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase (NDPK) variants in floral and vegetative buds were detected suggesting the potential role of NDPKs in H(2)O(2)-mediated signaling for post-dormant bud break. This study provides data towards a better understanding of dormancy release and bud break. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Belowground bud bank response to grazing under severe, short-term drought.

    PubMed

    VanderWeide, Benjamin L; Hartnett, David C

    2015-07-01

    While the effects of drought and grazing are often studied separately, these disturbances co-occur in grasslands worldwide and interactively influence population, community, and ecosystem processes. The effects of drought and grazing on the belowground bud bank may dictate the trajectory of community recovery because new shoots arise from belowground buds after disturbance in perennial grasslands. We therefore investigated the separate and interactive effects of severe drought and grazing on the belowground bud bank and aboveground vegetation in the tallgrass prairie of northeast Kansas, USA. Contrary to our expectations, we observed changes in community structure and declines in species richness both above and below ground in response to drought and grazing. We also hypothesized that drought would reduce bud bank density of all taxonomic groups, but found that grass bud and shoot densities remained constant across all drought and grazing treatment combinations. While sedge and forb bud and shoot densities were reduced by drought, only sedge bud density declined to a greater extent when grazed under drought conditions. Live rhizome biomass did not vary by treatment and was highly correlated with bud bank density, suggesting that bud demography is tightly linked to the production and senescence of rhizomes. Despite the effects of drought and grazing on aboveground net primary productivity and community structure, our work suggests that grasses stabilize tallgrass prairie plant communities because their rhizomes and associated buds persist through co-occurring disturbances.

  6. NAP1 acts with Clb1 to perform mitotic functions and to suppress polar bud growth in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    NAP1 is a 60-kD protein that interacts specifically with mitotic cyclins in budding yeast and frogs. We have examined the ability of the yeast mitotic cyclin Clb2 to function in cells that lack NAP1. Our results demonstrate that Clb2 is unable to carry out its full range of functions without NAP1, even though Clb2/p34CDC28-associated kinase activity rises to normal levels. In the absence of NAP1, Clb2 is unable to efficiently induce mitotic events, and cells undergo a prolonged delay at the short spindle stage with normal levels of Clb2/p34CDC28 kinase activity. NAP1 is also required for the ability of Clb2 to induce the switch from polar to isotropic bud growth. As a result, polar bud growth continues during mitosis, giving rise to highly elongated cells. Our experiments also suggest that NAP1 is required for the ability of the Clb2/p34CDC28 kinase complex to amplify its own production, and that NAP1 plays a role in regulation of microtubule dynamics during mitosis. Together, these results demonstrate that NAP1 is required for the normal function of the activated Clb2/p34CDC28 kinase complex, and provide a step towards understanding how cyclin- dependent kinase complexes induce specific events during the cell cycle. PMID:7622567

  7. Differentiation of Apical Bud Cells in a Newly Developed Apical Bud Transplantation Model Using GFP Transgenic Mice as Donor

    PubMed Central

    Sakagami, Ryuji; Yoshinaga, Yasunori; Okamura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Rodent mandibular incisors have a unique anatomical structure that allows teeth to grow throughout the lifetime of the rodent. This report presents a novel transplantation technique for studying the apical bud differentiation of rodent mandibular incisors. Incisal apical end tissue with green fluorescent protein from transgenic mouse was transplanted to wild type mice, and the development of the transplanted cells were immunohistologically observed for 12 weeks after the transplantation. Results indicate that the green fluorescent apical end tissue replaced the original tissue, and cells from the apical bud differentiated and extended toward the incisal edge direction. The immunostaining with podoplanin also showed that the characteristics of the green fluorescent tissue were identical to those of the original. The green fluorescent cells were only found in the labial side of the incisor up to 4 weeks. After 12 weeks, however, they were also found in the lingual side. Here the green fluorescent cementocyte-like cells were only present in the cementum close to the dentin surface. This study suggests that some of the cells that form the cellular cementum come from the apical tissue including the apical bud in rodent incisors. PMID:26978064

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of Gene Expression in Primate Taste Buds Reveals Links to Diverse Processes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Gao, Na; White, Evan; Echeverri, Fernando; Kalabat, Dalia; Soto, Hortensia; Laita, Bianca; Li, Cherry; Yeh, Shaoyang Anthony; Zoller, Mark; Zlotnik, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to unravel the mechanisms underlying taste sensation (gustation) have largely focused on rodents. Here we present the first comprehensive characterization of gene expression in primate taste buds. Our findings reveal unique new insights into the biology of taste buds. We generated a taste bud gene expression database using laser capture microdissection (LCM) procured fungiform (FG) and circumvallate (CV) taste buds from primates. We also used LCM to collect the top and bottom portions of CV taste buds. Affymetrix genome wide arrays were used to analyze gene expression in all samples. Known taste receptors are preferentially expressed in the top portion of taste buds. Genes associated with the cell cycle and stem cells are preferentially expressed in the bottom portion of taste buds, suggesting that precursor cells are located there. Several chemokines including CXCL14 and CXCL8 are among the highest expressed genes in taste buds, indicating that immune system related processes are active in taste buds. Several genes expressed specifically in endocrine glands including growth hormone releasing hormone and its receptor are also strongly expressed in taste buds, suggesting a link between metabolism and taste. Cell type-specific expression of transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in cell fate, including KIT, reveals the taste bud as an active site of cell regeneration, differentiation, and development. IKBKAP, a gene mutated in familial dysautonomia, a disease that results in loss of taste buds, is expressed in taste cells that communicate with afferent nerve fibers via synaptic transmission. This database highlights the power of LCM coupled with transcriptional profiling to dissect the molecular composition of normal tissues, represents the most comprehensive molecular analysis of primate taste buds to date, and provides a foundation for further studies in diverse aspects of taste biology. PMID:19636377

  9. Tumour budding is a reproducible index for risk stratification of patients with stage II colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y-H; Wu, L-C; Li, P-S; Wu, W-H; Yang, S-B; Xia, P; He, X-X; Xiao, L-B

    2014-04-01

    High-risk patients with Stage II colon cancer may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, but it is difficult to identify such a patient group. A robust and reproducible index would be helpful to select the subset of Stage II colon cancer patients at high risk. This study investigated the potential prognostic significance of tumour budding in Stage II colon cancer. In all, 135 Stage II colon cancer patients with known outcome were identified. The degree of tumour budding was assessed by two individual observers and was classified, according to the number of tumour buds in the area with the greatest budding intensity on haematoxylin and eosin slides, as high-grade budding (10 or more tumour buds) and low-grade budding (0-9 buds). Inter-observer agreement for two observers was assessed by using the kappa test. Progression-free and cancer-specific survivals were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression. The 5-year progression-free survival rates for patients with high-grade tumour budding (n = 36) and those with low-grade budding (n = 99) were 57.6% and 89.0% (P < 0.001). The 5-year cancer-specific survival rates were 66.7% vs 92.0% (P < 0.001). Cox regression analyses demonstrated tumour budding as an independent predictor of disease progression (hazard ratio 4.982, P < 0.001) and cancer-related death (hazard ratio 4.142, P = 0.003). The two observers agreed on the classification of tumour budding in 118 cases (87.4%) and the inter-observer agreement was good (κ = 0.692). Tumour budding is a strong and reproducible prognostic factor for adverse outcome in Stage II colon cancer, which may serve as a prognostic marker to identify patients with a high risk of recurrence who may benefit from adjuvant therapy. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Tumor budding, a novel prognostic indicator for predicting stage progression in T1 bladder cancers.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Keishiro; Kikuchi, Eiji; Mikami, Shuji; Ogihara, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-09-01

    Tumor budding has been defined as an isolated single cancer cell or a cluster composed of fewer than five cancer cells scattered in the stroma. It is a strong predictor for lymph node metastasis in T1 colorectal cancer. We introduced this concept to T1 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer and evaluated whether tumor budding could have a prognostic impact on the clinical outcome. We identified 121 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed T1 bladder cancer between 1994 and 2014 at Keio University Hospital. All slides were re-reviewed by a dedicated uropathologist. Budding foci were counted under ×200 magnification. When the number of budding foci was 10 or more, tumor budding was defined as positive. The relationship between tumor budding and clinical outcomes was assessed using a multivariate analysis. The median follow-up was 52 months. Tumor budding was positive in 21 patients (17.4%). Tumor budding was significantly associated with T1 substaging, tumor architecture and lymphovascular invasion. The 5-year progression-free survival rate in T1 bladder cancer patients with tumor budding was 53.8%, which was significantly lower than that in patients without tumor budding (88.4%, P = 0.001). A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that tumor budding was independently associated with stage progression (P = 0.002, hazard ratio = 4.90). In a subgroup of patients treated with bacillus Calmette-Guérin instillation (n = 88), tumor budding was also independently associated with stage progression (P = 0.003, hazard ratio = 5.65). Tumor budding may be a novel indicator for predicting stage progression in T1 bladder cancer, and would likely be easily introduced in clinical practice. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  11. Ice nucleation activity in various tissues of Rhododendron flower buds: their relevance to extraorgan freezing

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masaya; Ishikawa, Mikiko; Toyomasu, Takayuki; Aoki, Takayuki; Price, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Wintering flower buds of cold hardy Rhododendron japonicum cooled slowly to subfreezing temperatures are known to undergo extraorgan freezing, whose mechanisms remain obscure. We revisited this material to demonstrate why bud scales freeze first in spite of their lower water content, why florets remain deeply supercooled and how seasonal adaptive responses occur in regard to extraorgan freezing in flower buds. We determined ice nucleation activity (INA) of various flower bud tissues using a test tube-based assay. Irrespective of collection sites, outer and inner bud scales that function as ice sinks in extraorgan freezing had high INA levels whilst florets that remain supercooled and act as a water source lacked INA. The INA level of bud scales was not high in late August when flower bud formation was ending, but increased to reach the highest level in late October just before the first autumnal freeze. The results support the following hypothesis: the high INA in bud scales functions as the subfreezing sensor, ensuring the primary freezing in bud scales at warmer subzero temperatures, which likely allows the migration of floret water to the bud scales and accumulation of icicles within the bud scales. The low INA in the florets helps them remain unfrozen by deep supercooling. The INA in the bud scales was resistant to grinding and autoclaving at 121∘C for 15 min, implying the intrinsic nature of the INA rather than of microbial origin, whilst the INA in stem bark was autoclaving-labile. Anti-nucleation activity (ANA) was implicated in the leachate of autoclaved bud scales, which suppresses the INA at millimolar levels of concentration and likely differs from the colligative effects of the solutes. The tissue INA levels likely contribute to the establishment of freezing behaviors by ensuring the order of freezing in the tissues: from the primary freeze to the last tissue remaining unfrozen. PMID:25859249

  12. Polarized Growth Controls Cell Shape and Bipolar Bud Site Selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yi-Jun; Barral, Yves; Snyder, Michael

    2000-01-01

    We examined the relationship between polarized growth and division site selection, two fundamental processes important for proper development of eukaryotes. Diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exhibit an ellipsoidal shape and a specific division pattern (a bipolar budding pattern). We found that the polarity genes SPA2, PEA2, BUD6, and BNI1 participate in a crucial step of bud morphogenesis, apical growth. Deleting these genes results in round cells and diminishes bud elongation in mutants that exhibit pronounced apical growth. Examination of distribution of the polarized secretion marker Sec4 demonstrates that spa2Δ, pea2Δ, bud6Δ, and bni1Δ mutants fail to concentrate Sec4 at the bud tip during apical growth and at the division site during repolarization just prior to cytokinesis. Moreover, cell surface expansion is not confined to the distal tip of the bud in these mutants. In addition, we found that the p21-activated kinase homologue Ste20 is also important for both apical growth and bipolar bud site selection. We further examined how the duration of polarized growth affects bipolar bud site selection by using mutations in cell cycle regulators that control the timing of growth phases. The grr1Δ mutation enhances apical growth by stabilizing G1 cyclins and increases the distal-pole budding in diploids. Prolonging polarized growth phases by disrupting the G2/M cyclin gene CLB2 enhances the accuracy of bud site selection in wild-type, spa2Δ, and ste20Δ cells, whereas shortening the polarized growth phases by deleting SWE1 decreases the fidelity of bipolar budding. This study reports the identification of components required for apical growth and demonstrates the critical role of polarized growth in bipolar bud site selection. We propose that apical growth and repolarization at the site of cytokinesis are crucial for establishing spatial cues used by diploid yeast cells to position division planes. PMID:10866679

  13. [Dynamics of bud flow and bud bank of Phragmites communis population in dry land habitat of alkalinized meadow in the Songnen Plains of China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunfei; Wei, Chunyan; Zhang, Baotian; Liu, Bao

    2005-05-01

    In the dry land habitat of alkalinized meadow in Songnen Plains, the rhizomes of Phragmites communis population are distributed in different depths of one meter soil layer, which usually live for 6 years and a few for 7-9 years or even longer. Based on the investigation of their buds, a "bud flow" model of the population was established, and the method for estimating the dynamics of its bud bank storage, i.e., adding the input rate of 1st year age-class rhizome buds to the storage rate of other age-classes dormant buds in the bank, was put forward. The results showed that the input rate of the bud bank increased with plant growth seasons while the burgeoned output rate exhibited a decreasing trend, whereas the output rate of the dead remained at a low level on the whole. By the end of September in the early dormant period, the input rate of the bud bank was as 2.04 times as its output rate, and the dormant buds of each age-class manifested a steady burgeoned output. Quantitative analysis indicated that the burgeoned output rate of dormant buds increased by 11% each year. In another word, 11% of different age-classes dormant buds would germinate and form one-year class new rhizomes. The top of one-year class new rhizomes would develop to ramets in the next year, which would transport nutrients to nearby old-age rhizomes, and thus, maintain the vitality of old-age class rhizomes.

  14. Involvement of EARLY BUD-BREAK, an AP2/ERF Transcription Factor Gene, in Bud Break in Japanese Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) Lateral Flower Buds: Expression, Histone Modifications and Possible Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Anh Tuan, Pham; Bai, Songling; Saito, Takanori; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Akiko; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2016-05-01

    In the Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) 'Kosui', three developmental stages of lateral flower buds have been proposed to occur during ecodormancy to the flowering phase, i.e. rapid enlargement, sprouting and flowering. Here, we report an APETALA2/ethylene-responsive factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor gene, named pear EARLY BUD-BREAK (PpEBB), which was highly expressed during the rapid enlargement stage occurring prior to the onset of bud break in flower buds. Gene expression analysis revealed that PpEBB expression was dramatically increased during the rapid enlargement stage in three successive growing seasons. PpEBB transcript levels peaked 1 week prior to onset of bud break in 'Kosui' potted plants treated with hydrogen cyanamide or water under forcing conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR showed that higher levels of active histone modifications (trimethylation of the histone H3 tail at Lys4) in the 5'-upstream and start codon regions of the PpEBB gene were associated with the induced expression level of PpEBB during the rapid enlargement stage. In addition, we provide evidence that PpEBB may interact with and regulate pear four D-type cyclin (PpCYCD3) genes during bud break in 'Kosui' lateral flower buds. PpEBB significantly increased the promoter activities of four PpCYCD3 genes in a dual-luciferase assay using tobacco leaves. Taken together, our findings uncovered aspects of the bud break regulatory mechanism in the Japanese pear and provided further evidence that the EBB family plays an important role in bud break in perennial plants.

  15. Groundnut (Peanut) Oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut oil is valued worldwide, primarily as a cooking medium and food ingredient. This chapter provides timely summaries and discussions on the latest compositional, physical and nutritional data for peanut oil....

  16. Renal Papillary Necrosis: Role of Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Vaidehi K.

    2016-01-01

    Renal Papillary Necrosis (RPN) is idefined as Ischemic necrobiosis of the papilla in the medulla of the kidneys. Variety of etiological factors are recognized which cause papillary necrosis, such as analgesic nephropathy, diabetes mellitus, urinary obstruction and sickle cell haemoglobinopathy. The early diagnosis of RPN is important to improve prognosis and reduce morbidity. Radiological Imaging offers early diagnosis and can guide prompt treatment of papillary necrosis and can minimize a decline in renal function. Here we report three cases of RPN with typical imaging findings. One of them was diabetic and hypertensive female with recurrent Urinary tract Infections and other was a male with no known co-morbidity. Both of them were diagnosed to have renal papillary necrosis on CT scan and were managed operatively and conservatively, respectively. Third case was a healthy female being investigated to be renal donor for her son. Here RPN was an incidental finding and was treated conservatively. Thus CT scan could detect it pre-operatively and complications due to transplantation of a kidney with papillary necrosis were avoided. So, we want to emphasize the importance of Radiology, particularly CT scanning in detection of RPN and to guide early and prompt treatment. PMID:26894147

  17. The mode of origin of root buds and root sprouts in the clonal tree Sassafras albidum (Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Bosela, M; Ewers, F

    1997-11-01

    The developmental anatomy of root buds and root sprouts was examined in the clonal tree Sassafras albidum. Root samples from 13 clones that varied widely in age and vigor were sectioned and two types of buds were found, "additional" buds and "reparative" buds. Additional buds form during the early growth of uninjured roots and they perennate by growing outwards in concert with the vascular cambium such that bud traces are produced in the secondary xylem. Reparative buds form de novo in response to senescence, injuries, or other types of disturbance. Reparative buds were found on the roots of seven of the clones, whereas additional buds were found on the roots of all 13 clones. The reparative buds had originated in the proliferated pericycle, where they were subtended by sphaeroblasts, or spherical nodules of wood. Few of the reparative buds were vascularized and none were connected with the vasculature of their parent roots. In contrast, most of the additional buds were vascularized, and the leaf traces of several of the additional buds appeared to be contiguous with the conducting xylem of their parent roots. To determine whether both bud types were functional, 82 field-collected root sprouts and 44 incubation-induced sprouts were sectioned at the root-sprout junction and examined for evidence relating to their mode of origin. None of the sprouts were subtended by sphaeroblasts, but 98% were subtended by bud traces, which indicated that they had originated from additional buds. Although reparative buds were more common than additional buds on some of the root samples, they appear to be dysfunctional at sprouting. Additional buds, on the other hand, are able to sprout both as a normal part of clonal spread and from root cuttings.

  18. Reconstituting ring-rafts in bud-mimicking topography of model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Lee, In-Ho; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Park, Seung Chul; Oh, Soojung; Jordan, Luke R.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Byoungho; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-07-01

    During vesicular trafficking and release of enveloped viruses, the budding and fission processes dynamically remodel the donor cell membrane in a protein- or a lipid-mediated manner. In all cases, in addition to the generation or relief of the curvature stress, the buds recruit specific lipids and proteins from the donor membrane through restricted diffusion for the development of a ring-type raft domain of closed topology. Here, by reconstituting the bud topography in a model membrane, we demonstrate the preferential localization of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains in the collar band of the bud-neck interfaced with the donor membrane. The geometrical approach to the recapitulation of the dynamic membrane reorganization, resulting from the local radii of curvatures from nanometre-to-micrometre scales, offers important clues for understanding the active roles of the bud topography in the sorting and migration machinery of key signalling proteins involved in membrane budding.

  19. Tsg101 and the vacuolar protein sorting pathway are essential for HIV-1 budding.

    PubMed

    Garrus, J E; von Schwedler, U K; Pornillos, O W; Morham, S G; Zavitz, K H; Wang, H E; Wettstein, D A; Stray, K M; Côté, M; Rich, R L; Myszka, D G; Sundquist, W I

    2001-10-05

    Like other enveloped viruses, HIV-1 uses cellular machinery to bud from infected cells. We now show that Tsg101 protein, which functions in vacuolar protein sorting (Vps), is required for HIV-1 budding. The UEV domain of Tsg101 binds to an essential tetrapeptide (PTAP) motif within the p6 domain of the structural Gag protein and also to ubiquitin. Depletion of cellular Tsg101 by small interfering RNA arrests HIV-1 budding at a late stage, and budding is rescued by reintroduction of Tsg101. Dominant negative mutant Vps4 proteins that inhibit vacuolar protein sorting also arrest HIV-1 and MLV budding. These observations suggest that retroviruses bud by appropriating cellular machinery normally used in the Vps pathway to form multivesicular bodies.

  20. Fgf16 is essential for pectoral fin bud formation in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Ryohei; Kamei, Eriko; Hotta, Yuuhei; Konishi, Morichika; Miyake, Ayumi; Itoh, Nobuyuki . E-mail: itohnobu@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-08-18

    Zebrafish pectoral fin bud formation is an excellent model for studying morphogenesis. Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) and sonic hedgehog (shh) are essential for pectoral fin bud formation. We found that Fgf16 was expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) of fin buds. A knockdown of Fgf16 function resulted in no fin bud outgrowth. Fgf16 is required for cell proliferation and differentiation in the mesenchyme and the AER of the fin buds, respectively. Fgf16 functions downstream of Fgf10, a mesenchymal factor, signaling to induce the expression of Fgf4 and Fgf8 in the AER. Fgf16 in the AER and shh in the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) interact to induce and/or maintain each other's expression. These findings have revealed that Fgf16, a newly identified AER factor, plays a crucial role in pectoral fin bud outgrowth by mediating the interactions of AER-mesenchyme and AER-ZPA.

  1. Decline of wildcelery buds in the lower Detroit River, 1950-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Donald W.; Manny, Bruce A.

    1990-01-01

    American wildcelery buds (Vallisneria americana), an abundant food eaten by diving ducks (Aythini) during migrations, decreased in the lower Detroit River of the Great Lakes from 1950 to 1985. Bud densities decreased at 2 (-14 and -18 buds/mA?) of 5 locations and were similar at 3 (-2, +2, and +3 buds/mA?) of 5 locations. Net change in all 5 areas combined, however, was a decrease of 36,720,000 buds, a 72% decline. Estimated potential losses of waterfowl feeding days caused by the decreased bud densities were 147,000 for canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria), 241,000 for redhead ducks (A. americana), or 664,000 for lesser scaup (A. affinis). Thus, the decline of wildcelery in the Detroit River may have contributed to decreased use of Michigan migration routes by some waterfowl species between 1950 and 1985.

  2. Tumour budding with and without admixed inflammation: two different sides of the same coin?

    PubMed

    Max, Nicole; Harbaum, Lars; Pollheimer, Marion J; Lindtner, Richard A; Kornprat, Peter; Langner, Cord

    2016-02-16

    Tumour budding is an adverse prognostic indicator in colorectal cancer (CRC). Marked overall peritumoural inflammation has been associated with favourable outcome and may lead to the presence of isolated cancer cells due to destruction of invading cancer cell islets. We assessed the prognostic significance of tumour budding and peritumoural inflammation in a cohort of 381 patients with CRC applying univariate and multivariate analyses. Patients with high-grade budding and marked inflammation had a significantly better outcome compared with patients with high-grade budding and only mild inflammation. Outcome in these cases, however, was still worse compared with cases with low-grade budding, in which the extent of peritumoural inflammation had no further prognostic effect. Tumour budding proved to be a powerful prognostic variable in patients with CRC. Scattering of invading cancer cell islets by marked overall peritumoural inflammation seems to have a minor role.

  3. Reconstituting ring-rafts in bud-mimicking topography of model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Lee, In-Ho; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Park, Seung Chul; Oh, Soojung; Jordan, Luke R.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Byoungho; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-01-01

    During vesicular trafficking and release of enveloped viruses, the budding and fission processes dynamically remodel the donor cell membrane in a protein- or a lipid-mediated manner. In all cases, in addition to the generation or relief of the curvature stress, the buds recruit specific lipids and proteins from the donor membrane through restricted diffusion for the development of a ring-type raft domain of closed topology. Here, by reconstituting the bud topography in a model membrane, we demonstrate the preferential localization of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains in the collar band of the bud-neck interfaced with the donor membrane. The geometrical approach to the recapitulation of the dynamic membrane reorganization, resulting from the local radii of curvatures from nanometre-to-micrometre scales, offers important clues for understanding the active roles of the bud topography in the sorting and migration machinery of key signalling proteins involved in membrane budding. PMID:25058275

  4. [Eyelid necrosis caused by an hymenopteran insect bite].

    PubMed

    Offret, H; Porras, J; Labetoulle, M; Offret, O; Fabre, M

    2008-11-01

    We report a case report of extensive eyelid necrosis caused by an insect bite. A 39-year-old man had suffered ocular trauma from a hymenopteran insect in Tunisia. The patient presented with eyelid necrosis. Eyelid necrosis mechanisms following insect bites are discussed and other causes of eyelid necrosis are presented. Eyelid necrosis, often caused by vasoconstrictive medications or animal venoms, notably hymenopteran insect bites, can result in substantial eyelid injury.

  5. [Micrococcus sp.--the pathogen of leaf necrosis of horse-chestnuts (Aesculus L.) in Kiev].

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, L M; Makhinia, L V; Shcherbina, T N; Ogorodnik, L E

    2013-01-01

    A group of phytopathogenic bacteria was isolated from patterns of drying horse-chestnuts (Aesculus L.), which grow in Kyiv. The properties of slowly growing, highly aggressive microorganisms have been described in the paper. They grow up on the 8-10th day after sowing. The investigated microorganisms form very small (0.5-1 mm in diameter) colonies on the potato agar. Bacteria are protuberant, shining, smooth with flat edges, they are pale yellow, yellow, or pink. The bacteria are Gram-positive, spherical, are disposed in smears singly, in pairs, as accumulations, or netting. They are aerobes, do not form spores, are not mobile. They are inert in respect of different sources of carbon. They reduce nitrates, do not dilute gelatin, do not hydrolyze starch, do not release hydrogen sulphide and indole. The bacteria are catalase-positive, oxidase-negative. They do not cause potato and carrot rot. They lose quickly their viability under the laboratory conditions. The saturated acids C 14:0; C 15:0; C16:0; C18:0 have been revealed in the composition of cellular fatty acids. Microorganisms are identified as Micrococcus sp. Under artificial inoculation this highly aggressive pathogen causes drying of the horse-chestnut buds and necrosis, which occupies 1/3-1/2 of the leaf plate. A wide zone of chlorosis, surrounding necrosis, may occupy the whole leaf surface. The infected leaves use to twist up from the top (apex) or along a midrib and to dry.

  6. Sucrose is an early modulator of the key hormonal mechanisms controlling bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Lecerf, Marion; Perez-Garcia, Maria-Dolores; Barrière, Quentin; Rolčík, Jakub; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Lemoine, Remi; Porcheron, Benoît; Roman, Hanaé; Leduc, Nathalie; Le Gourrierec, José; Bertheloot, Jessica; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Sugar has only recently been identified as a key player in triggering bud outgrowth, while hormonal control of bud outgrowth is already well established. To get a better understanding of sugar control, the present study investigated how sugar availability modulates the hormonal network during bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida. Other plant models, for which mutants are available, were used when necessary. Buds were grown in vitro to manipulate available sugars. The temporal patterns of the hormonal regulatory network were assessed in parallel with bud outgrowth dynamics. Sucrose determined bud entrance into sustained growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Sustained growth was accompanied by sustained auxin production in buds, and sustained auxin export in a DR5::GUS-expressing pea line. Several events occurred ahead of sucrose-stimulated bud outgrowth. Sucrose upregulated early auxin synthesis genes (RhTAR1, RhYUC1) and the auxin efflux carrier gene RhPIN1, and promoted PIN1 abundance at the plasma membrane in a pPIN1::PIN1-GFP-expressing tomato line. Sucrose downregulated both RwMAX2, involved in the strigolactone-transduction pathway, and RhBRC1, a repressor of branching, at an early stage. The presence of sucrose also increased stem cytokinin content, but sucrose-promoted bud outgrowth was not related to that pathway. In these processes, several non-metabolizable sucrose analogues induced sustained bud outgrowth in R. hybrida, Pisum sativum, and Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that sucrose was involved in a signalling pathway. In conclusion, we identified potential hormonal candidates for bud outgrowth control by sugar. They are central to future investigations aimed at disentangling the processes that underlie regulation of bud outgrowth by sugar. PMID:25873679

  7. Model of human immunodeficiency virus budding and self-assembly: Role of the cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2008-11-01

    Budding from the plasma membrane of the host cell is an indispensable step in the life cycle of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which belongs to a large family of enveloped RNA viruses, retroviruses. Unlike regular enveloped viruses, retrovirus budding happens concurrently with the self-assembly of the main retrovirus protein subunits (called Gag protein after the name of the genetic material that codes for this protein: Group-specific AntiGen) into spherical virus capsids on the cell membrane. Led by this unique budding and assembly mechanism, we study the free energy profile of retrovirus budding, taking into account the Gag-Gag attraction energy and the membrane elastic energy. We find that if the Gag-Gag attraction is strong, budding always proceeds to completion. During early stage of budding, the zenith angle of partial budded capsids, α , increases with time as α∝t1/2 . However, if the Gag-Gag attraction is weak, a metastable state of partial budding appears. The zenith angle of these partially spherical capsids is given by α0≃(τ2/κσ)1/4 in a linear approximation, where κ and σ are the bending modulus and the surface tension of the membrane, and τ is a line tension of the capsid proportional to the strength of Gag-Gag attraction. Numerically, we find α0<0.3π without any approximations. Using experimental parameters, we show that HIV budding and assembly always proceed to completion in normal biological conditions. On the other hand, by changing Gag-Gag interaction strength or membrane rigidity, it is relatively easy to tune it back and forth between complete budding and partial budding. Our model agrees reasonably well with experiments observing partial budding of retroviruses including HIV.

  8. Comparison of chemoreceptions of terminal buds and pit organs of the carp, Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed

    Marui, T; Funakoshi, M

    1980-07-14

    Neural responses to several chemicals of the pit organs and terminal buds on the facial skin of the carp were compared electrophysiologically. Nerve inpulses from the pit organs were larger than those from the terminal buds. The pit organs were more sensitive to salts and especially acids than the terminal buds. The former did not respond to sucrose, silk worm pupa extract, betaine and amino acids except acidic ones. The latter, however, responded well to them.

  9. Identification of budding yeast using a fiber-optic imaging bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koschwanez, John; Holl, Mark; Marquardt, Brian; Dragavon, Joe; Burgess, Lloyd; Meldrum, Deirdre

    2004-05-01

    A successful imaging system has been designed and built for yeast pedigree analysis. The system uses a fiber-optic imaging bundle to recognize single yeast cells. Image processing software has been developed to accurately classify the cells as either budding or not budding a daughter cell. This system is intended to replace the body of a microscope for the detection of budding in a microfluidic system.

  10. Sucrose is an early modulator of the key hormonal mechanisms controlling bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida.

    PubMed

    Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Lecerf, Marion; Perez-Garcia, Maria-Dolores; Barrière, Quentin; Rolčík, Jakub; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Lemoine, Remi; Porcheron, Benoît; Roman, Hanaé; Leduc, Nathalie; Le Gourrierec, José; Bertheloot, Jessica; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-05-01

    Sugar has only recently been identified as a key player in triggering bud outgrowth, while hormonal control of bud outgrowth is already well established. To get a better understanding of sugar control, the present study investigated how sugar availability modulates the hormonal network during bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida. Other plant models, for which mutants are available, were used when necessary. Buds were grown in vitro to manipulate available sugars. The temporal patterns of the hormonal regulatory network were assessed in parallel with bud outgrowth dynamics. Sucrose determined bud entrance into sustained growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Sustained growth was accompanied by sustained auxin production in buds, and sustained auxin export in a DR5::GUS-expressing pea line. Several events occurred ahead of sucrose-stimulated bud outgrowth. Sucrose upregulated early auxin synthesis genes (RhTAR1, RhYUC1) and the auxin efflux carrier gene RhPIN1, and promoted PIN1 abundance at the plasma membrane in a pPIN1::PIN1-GFP-expressing tomato line. Sucrose downregulated both RwMAX2, involved in the strigolactone-transduction pathway, and RhBRC1, a repressor of branching, at an early stage. The presence of sucrose also increased stem cytokinin content, but sucrose-promoted bud outgrowth was not related to that pathway. In these processes, several non-metabolizable sucrose analogues induced sustained bud outgrowth in R. hybrida, Pisum sativum, and Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that sucrose was involved in a signalling pathway. In conclusion, we identified potential hormonal candidates for bud outgrowth control by sugar. They are central to future investigations aimed at disentangling the processes that underlie regulation of bud outgrowth by sugar. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Development and validation of multiresidue analytical method in cotton and groundnut oil for 87 pesticides using low temperature and dispersive cleanup on gas chromatography and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Suchi; Patel, Hemlatta K; Vaghela, Kiran M; Pathan, Firoz Khan; Gor, Hetal N; Patel, Anil R; Shah, Paresh G

    2016-01-01

    A method was developed and validated for the analysis of 87 pesticides in cotton and groundnut oil by GC with ECD and FPD detectors and LC-MS/MS. The extraction procedure based on QuEChERS followed by low-temperature freezing and dispersive cleanup steps was validated in two oil matrices for 87 pesticides of different classes. Linearity, expressed as coefficient of variation, was within the acceptable range. Of those tested, 77-83 and 77-89% pesticides showed recoveries within the acceptable range of 70-120% on LC-MS/MS in cottonseed oil and groundnut oil, respectively, at different spiking levels. In case of GC analysis, 63-65 and 53-82% pesticides showed recoveries within the acceptable range of 70-120% on GC in cottonseed oil and groundnut oil, respectively, at different spiking levels. The exceptions to these recoveries were the few organochlorines which consistently gave lower recoveries. Recovery factors can be employed while analysing these pesticides by this method as the results obtained were consistent in both oils. RSD was less than 20% for most of the pesticides. The calculated limit of quantitation (LOQ) for most of the pesticides satisfies the maximum residue level (MRL) requirements as per European Union (EU) guidelines and Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI).

  12. Spaceflight enhances cell aggregation and random budding in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Nielsen-Preiss, Sheila M; Woolley, Christine M; Barrila, Jennifer; Buchanan, Kent; McCracken, James; Inglis, Diane O; Searles, Stephen C; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A; Ott, C Mark; Wilson, James W; Pierson, Duane L; Stefanyshyn-Piper, Heidemarie M; Hyman, Linda E; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans-induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation), which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p.) infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the low fluid

  13. Spaceflight Enhances Cell Aggregation and Random Budding in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Christine M.; Barrila, Jennifer; Buchanan, Kent; McCracken, James; Inglis, Diane O.; Searles, Stephen C.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.; Ott, C. Mark; Wilson, James W.; Pierson, Duane L.; Stefanyshyn-Piper, Heidemarie M.; Hyman, Linda E.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans–induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation), which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p.) infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the low fluid

  14. Metabolite changes in conifer buds and needles during forced bud break in Norway spruce (Picea abies) and European silver fir (Abies alba)

    PubMed Central

    Dhuli, Priyanka; Rohloff, Jens; Strimbeck, G. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Environmental changes such as early spring and warm spells induce bud burst and photosynthetic processes in cold-acclimated coniferous trees and consequently, cellular metabolism in overwintering needles and buds. The purpose of the study was to examine metabolism in conifers under forced deacclimation (artificially induced spring) by exposing shoots of Picea abies (boreal species) and Abies alba (temperate species) to a greenhouse environment (22°C, 16/8 h D/N cycle) over a 9 weeks period. Each week, we scored bud opening and collected samples for GC/MS–based metabolite profiling. We detected a total of 169 assigned metabolites and 80 identified metabolites, comprising compounds such as mono- and disaccharides, Krebs cycle acids, amino acids, polyols, phenolics, and phosphorylated structures. Untargeted multivariate statistical analysis based on PCA and cluster analysis segregated samples by species, tissue type, and stage of tissue deacclimations. Similar patterns of metabolic regulation in both species were observed in buds (amino acids, Krebs cycle acids) and needles (hexoses, pentoses, and Krebs cycle acids). Based on correlation of bud opening score with compound levels, distinct metabolites could be associated with bud and shoot development, including amino acids, sugars, and acids with known osmolyte function, and secondary metabolites. This study has shed light on how elevated temperature affects metabolism in buds and needles of conifer species during the deacclimation phase, and contributes to the discussion about how phenological characters in conifers may respond to future global warming. PMID:25566281

  15. Analysis of Assembly and Budding of Lujo Virus

    PubMed Central

    Urata, Shuzo; Weyer, Jacqueline; Storm, Nadia; Miyazaki, Yukiko; van Vuren, Petrus Jansen; Paweska, Janusz Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    The recently identified arenavirus Lujo virus (LUJV) causes fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans. We analyzed its mechanism of viral release driven by matrix protein Z and the cell surface glycoprotein precursor GPC. The L domains in Z are required for efficient virus-like particle release, but Tsg101, ALIX/AIP1, and Vps4A/B are unnecessary for budding. LUJV GPC is cleaved by site 1 protease (S1P) at the RKLM motif, and treatment with the S1P inhibitor PF-429242 reduced LUJV production. PMID:26719243

  16. [Iridoid glycosides from buds of Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gui-qin; Yin, Zhi-feng; Liu, Yu-cui; Li, Hong-bo

    2011-10-01

    The study on the buds of Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum was carried out to look for anti-HBV constituents. The isolation and purification were performed by HPLC and chromatography on silica gel, polyamide and Sephadex LH-20 column. The structures were elucidated on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectral analysis. Six iridoid glycosides were identified as jasgranoside B (1), 6-O-methy-catalpol (2), deacetyl asperulosidic acid (3), aucubin (4), 8-dehydroxy shanzhiside (5), and loganin (6). Jasgranoside B (1) is a new compound. Compounds 2-6 were isolated from Jasminum officinale L. var. grandiflorum for the first time.

  17. γ-Lactam alkaloids from the flower buds of daylily.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Ohta, Tomoe; Yano, Mamiko; Tsujihata, Junichiro; Tsukioka, Junko; Ogawa, Keiko; Fukaya, Masashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Four new alkaloids, hemerocallisamines IV-VII, were isolated from the methanol extract of flower buds of daylily. The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The absolute stereochemistry of the hemerocallisamines IV-VI was elucidated by the application of the modified Mosher's method, HPLC analysis, and optical rotation. In the present study, the isolated alkaloids significantly inhibited the aggregation of Aβ42 in vitro. This is the first report about bioactive alkaloids with a γ-lactam ring from daylily. In addition, isolated nucleosides showed accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth under the non-fasting condition.

  18. UXO Detection and Characterization using new Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperikova, E.; Morrison, H. F.; Smith, J. T.; Becker, A.

    2006-05-01

    An optimally designed active electromagnetic system (AEM), Berkeley UXO Discriminator, BUD, has been developed for detection and characterization of UXO in the 20 mm to 150 mm size range. The system incorporates three orthogonal transmitters, and eight pairs of differenced receivers. The transmitter-receiver assembly together with the acquisition box, as well as the battery power and GPS receiver, is mounted on a small cart to assure system mobility. BUD not only detects the object itself but also quantitatively determines its size, shape, orientation, and metal content (ferrous or non-ferrous, mixed metals). Moreover, the principal polarizabilities and size of a metallic target can be determined from a single position of the BUD platform. The search for UXO is a two-step process. The object must first be detected and its location determined then the parameters of the object must be defined. A satisfactory classification scheme is one that determines the principal dipole polarizabilities of a target. While UXO objects have a single major polarizability (principal moment) coincident with the long axis of the object and two equal transverse polarizabilities, the scrap metal has all three principal moments entirely different. This description of the inherent polarizabilities of a target is a major advance in discriminating UXO from irregular scrap metal. Our results clearly show that BUD can resolve the intrinsic polarizabilities of a target and that there are very clear distinctions between symmetric intact UXO and irregular scrap metal. Target properties are determined by an inversion algorithm, which at any given time inverts the response to yield the location (x, y, z) of the target, its attitude and its principal polarizabilities (yielding an apparent aspect ratio). Signal-to-noise estimates (or measurements) are interpreted in this inversion to yield error estimates on the location, attitude and polarizabilities. This inversion at a succession of times provides

  19. Analyzing transcription dynamics during the budding yeast cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Leman, Adam R; Bristow, Sara L; Haase, Steven B

    2014-01-01

    Assaying global cell cycle-regulated transcription in budding yeast involves extracting RNA from a synchronous population and proper normalization of detected transcript levels. Here, we describe synchronization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell populations by centrifugal elutriation, followed by the isolation of RNA for microarray analysis. Further, we outline the computational methods required to directly compare RNA abundance from individual time points within an experiment and to compare independent experiments. Together, these methods describe the complete workflow necessary to observe RNA abundance during the cell cycle.

  20. Inhibition of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis and Bud Formation by Nalidixic Acid in Hyphomicrobium neptunium

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Ronald M.; Blackman, Marcia A.

    1973-01-01

    The relationship between chromosome replication and morphogenesis in the budding bacterium Hyphomicrobium neptunium has been investigated. Nalidixic acid was found to completely inhibit deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, but not ribonucleic acid synthesis. The antibiotic was bacteriostatic to the organism for the initial 5 h of exposure; thereafter it was bacteriocidal. Observation of inhibited cultures revealed cells that had produced abnormally long stalks, but no buds. These results indicate that bud formation is coupled to chromosome replication in H. neptunium. They do not exclude the possibilities that cross wall formation and bud separation may also be coupled to chromosome replication. Images PMID:4127631

  1. Dynamics of evolutionary competition between budding and lytic viral release strategies.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiulan; Zou, Xingfu

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we consider the evolutionary competition between budding and lytic viral release strategies, using a delay differential equation model with distributed delay. When antibody is not established, the dynamics of competition depends on the respective basic reproductive ratios of the two viruses. If the basic reproductive ratio of budding virus is greater than that of lytic virus and one, budding virus can survive. When antibody is established for both strains but the neutralization capacities are the same for both strains, consequence of the competition also depends only on the basic reproductive ratios of the budding and lytic viruses. Using two concrete forms of the viral production functions, we are also able to conclude that budding virus will outcompete if the rates of viral production, death rates of infected cells and neutralizing capacities of the antibodies are the same for budding and lytic viruses. In this case, budding strategy would have an evolutionary advantage. However, if the antibody neutralization capacity for the budding virus is larger than that for the lytic virus, the lytic virus can outcompete the budding virus provided that its reproductive ratio is very high. An explicit threshold is derived.

  2. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding.

    PubMed

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-06-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding "on-time" and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release.

  3. Structural basis of membrane budding by the nuclear egress complex of herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Bigalke, Janna M; Heldwein, Ekaterina E

    2015-12-02

    During nuclear egress, herpesvirus capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane forming perinuclear viral particles that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytoplasm. This unusual budding process is mediated by the nuclear egress complex (NEC) composed of two conserved viral proteins, UL31 and UL34. Earlier, we discovered that the herpesvirus nuclear egress complex (NEC) could bud synthetic membranes in vitro without the help of other proteins by forming a coat-like hexagonal scaffold inside the budding membrane. To understand the structural basis of NEC-mediated membrane budding, we determined the crystal structures of the NEC from two herpesviruses. The hexagonal lattice observed in the NEC crystals recapitulates the honeycomb coats within the budded vesicles. Perturbation of the oligomeric interfaces through mutagenesis blocks budding in vitro confirming that NEC oligomerization into a honeycomb lattice drives budding. The structure represents the first atomic-level view of an oligomeric array formed by a membrane-deforming protein, making possible the dissection of its unique budding mechanism and the design of inhibitors to block it. © 2015 The Authors.

  4. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding

    PubMed Central

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-01-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding “on-time” and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release. PMID:27280284

  5. Bud protection: a key trait for species sorting in a forest-savanna mosaic.

    PubMed

    Charles-Dominique, Tristan; Beckett, Heath; Midgley, Guy F; Bond, William J

    2015-09-01

    Contrasting fire regimes maintain patch mosaics of savanna, thicket and forest biomes in many African subtropical landscapes. Species dominating each biome are thus expected to display distinct fire-related traits, commonly thought to be bark related. Recent Australian savanna research suggests that bud position, not bark protection alone, determines fire resilience via resprouting. We tested first how bud position influences resprouting ability in 17 tree species. We then compared the effect of both bark-related protection and bud position on the distribution of 63 tree species in 253 transects in all three biomes. Tree species with buds positioned deep under bark had a higher proportion of post-fire aboveground shoot resprouting. Species with low bud protection occurred in fire-prone biomes only if they could root-sucker. The effect of bud protection was supported by a good relationship between species bud protection and distribution across a gradient of fire frequency. Bud protection and high bark production are required to survive frequent fires in savanna. Forests are fire refugia hosting species with little or no bud protection and thin bark. Root-suckering species occur in the three biomes, suggesting that fire is not the only factor filtering this functional type.

  6. β-Catenin signaling regulates temporally discrete phases of anterior taste bud development

    PubMed Central

    Thirumangalathu, Shoba; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    The sense of taste is mediated by multicellular taste buds located within taste papillae on the tongue. In mice, individual taste buds reside in fungiform papillae, which develop at mid-gestation as epithelial placodes in the anterior tongue. Taste placodes comprise taste bud precursor cells, which express the secreted factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) and give rise to taste bud cells that differentiate around birth. We showed previously that epithelial activation of β-catenin is the primary inductive signal for taste placode formation, followed by taste papilla morphogenesis and taste bud differentiation, but the degree to which these later elements were direct or indirect consequences of β-catenin signaling was not explored. Here, we define discrete spatiotemporal functions of β-catenin in fungiform taste bud development. Specifically, we show that early epithelial activation of β-catenin, before taste placodes form, diverts lingual epithelial cells from a taste bud fate. By contrast, β-catenin activation a day later within Shh+ placodes, expands taste bud precursors directly, but enlarges papillae indirectly. Further, placodal activation of β-catenin drives precocious differentiation of Type I glial-like taste cells, but not other taste cell types. Later activation of β-catenin within Shh+ precursors during papilla morphogenesis also expands taste bud precursors and accelerates Type I cell differentiation, but papilla size is no longer enhanced. Finally, although Shh regulates taste placode patterning, we find that it is dispensable for the accelerated Type I cell differentiation induced by β-catenin. PMID:26525674

  7. Aip3p/Bud6p, a yeast actin-interacting protein that is involved in morphogenesis and the selection of bipolar budding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Amberg, D C; Zahner, J E; Mulholland, J W; Pringle, J R; Botstein, D

    1997-01-01

    A search for Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins that interact with actin in the two-hybrid system and a screen for mutants that affect the bipolar budding pattern identified the same gene, AIP3/BUD6. This gene is not essential for mitotic growth but is necessary for normal morphogenesis. MATa/alpha daughter cells lacking Aip3p place their first buds normally at their distal poles but choose random sites for budding in subsequent cell cycles. This suggests that actin and associated proteins are involved in placing the bipolar positional marker at the division site but not at the distal tip of the daughter cell. In addition, although aip3 mutant cells are not obviously defective in the initial polarization of the cytoskeleton at the time of bud emergence, they appear to lose cytoskeletal polarity as the bud enlarges, resulting in the formation of cells that are larger and rounder than normal. aip3 mutant cells also show inefficient nuclear migration and nuclear division, defects in the organization of the secretory system, and abnormal septation, all defects that presumably reflect the involvement of Aip3p in the organization and/or function of the actin cytoskeleton. The sequence of Aip3p is novel but contains a predicted coiled-coil domain near its C terminus that may mediate the observed homo-oligomerization of the protein. Aip3p shows a distinctive localization pattern that correlates well with its likely sites of action: it appears at the presumptive bud site prior to bud emergence, remains near the tips of small bund, and forms a ring (or pair of rings) in the mother-bud neck that is detectable early in the cell cycle but becomes more prominent prior to cytokinesis. Surprisingly, the localization of Aip3p does not appear to require either polarized actin or the septin proteins of the neck filaments. Images PMID:9247651

  8. Colonic ischemic necrosis following therapeutic embolization.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, S S; Satchidanand, S; Wesp, E H

    1981-01-01

    Transcatheter embolization of the middle colic artery for diverticular bleeding was followed by ischemic necrosis in the transverse colon at the site of previous anastomosis and stricture formation. This is a potential complication of intra-arterial embolization for colonic bleeding.

  9. [Acral necrosis as a complication of urosepsis].

    PubMed

    Blarer, J; Pfister, D; Jandali, A R; Gutzeit, A; John, H; Horstmann, M

    2014-06-01

    Sepsis is the third most common cause of death in Germany. Every fourth patient with sepsis has urosepsis. Even if substantial therapeutic progress has been made, sepsis remains a severe condition with high morbidity and mortality that requires rapid interdisciplinary measures. Besides life-threatening complications, acral necrosis as presented here can occur as a result of disseminated intravascular coagulation and severe microcirculatory disorders.

  10. Infectious pancreatic necrosis: its detection and identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, K.

    1965-01-01

    Ultimate control of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) in hatcheries depends largely upon learning where the virus occurs. To detect the presence of virus either susceptible fish or susceptible fish cell cultures may be used as test systems. In modern virology, it is generally agreed that cell cultures are more convenient, are usually a much more sensitive test system, and allow more rapid determinations.

  11. Snapshot in surgery: intraperitoneal encapsulated fat necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Han Boon; Arab, Nahlah; Teo, Lynette; Lieske, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 66-year-old man with rectal cancer was found to have an incidental ring-like lesion in the left rectovesical pouch. Histology revealed an encapsulated fat necrosis. Intraperitoneal encapsulated fat necroses are postulated to be a result of infarcted epiploic appendages resulting in a free-floating lesion. PMID:25767714

  12. Excitotoxins in neuronal apoptosis and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Nicotera, P; Lipton, S A

    1999-06-01

    Neuronal loss is common to many neurodegenerative diseases. Although necrosis is a common histopathologic feature observed in neuropathologic conditions, evidence is increasing that apoptosis can significantly contribute to neuronal demise. The prevalence of either type of cell death, apoptosis or necrosis, and the relevance for the progression of disease is still unclear. The debate on the occurrence and prevalence of one or the other type of death in pathologic conditions such as stroke or neurotoxic injury may in part be resolved by the proposal that different types of cell death within a tissue reflect either partial or complete execution of a common death program. Apoptosis is an active process of cell destruction, characterized morphologically by cell shrinkage, chromatin aggregation with extensive genomic fragmentation, and nuclear pyknosis. In contrast, necrosis is characterized by cell swelling, linked to rapid energy loss, and generalized disruption of ionic and internal homeostasis. This swiftly leads to membrane lysis, release of intracellular constituents that evoke a local inflammatory reaction, edema, and injury to the surrounding tissue. During the past few years, our laboratories have studied the signals and mechanisms responsible for induction or prevention of apoptosis/necrosis in neuronal injury and this is the subject of this review.

  13. Oligodendroglial degeneration in distemper: apoptosis or necrosis?

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, M; Zurbriggen, A; Summerfield, A; Vandevelde, M; Griot, C

    1999-03-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a multifocal demyelinating disease in dogs. It was previously shown that the initial demyelinating lesions are directly virus induced since a correlation between the occurrence of demyelination and CDV replication in white matter cells was observed. During the course of infection oligodendrocytes undergo distinct morphological alterations, partly due to a restricted CDV infection of these cells, and eventually disappear from the lesions. This phenomenon has been described in vivo as well as in vitro. However, the reason for the morphological alterations and the following oligodendroglial depletion remained unclear. Since virus infection can induce cell death, it was investigated whether apoptosis or necrosis plays a role in the pathogenesis of demyelination in canine distemper. In brain tissue sections from dogs with acute distemper apoptotic cells were not detected within the demyelinating lesions using morphological and biochemical cell death criteria. In chronic distemper, apoptotic cells - presumably inflammatory cells - were seen within the perivascular cuffs. These in vivo findings were correlated to the in vitro situation using CDV-infected primary dog brain cell cultures as well as Vero cells. Infection with culture-adapted CDV lead to massive necrosis but not to apoptosis. After infection with virulent CDV neither apoptosis nor necrosis was a predominant feature in either culture system. These findings suggest that virus-induced demyelination in canine distemper is not the direct consequence of apoptosis or necrosis. It is speculated that another mechanism must be responsible for the observed morphological alterations of oligodendrocytes, ultimately leading to demyelination.

  14. Hepatic necrosis following halothane anesthesia in goats.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, T D; Raffe, M R; Cox, V S; Stevens, D L; O'Leary, T P

    1986-12-15

    One goat anesthetized with thiamylal sodium, xylazine, and halothane for repair of an abominal hernia, and 7 of 29 goats similarly anesthetized for an experiment unrelated to considerations of anesthesia, developed signs of hepatic failure within 24 hours of anesthesia. Affected goats had high values for serum aspartate transaminase and serum total bilirubin by 12 to 24 hours after induction of anesthesia. Necropsy of the 8 affected goats revealed centrilobular to massive hepatic necrosis (8 of 8), brain lesions consistent with hepatic encephalopathy (3 of 4), and acute renal tubular necrosis (6 of 6). Two unaffected goats had no hepatic necrosis. Causes of hepatic necrosis other than those related to anesthesia (eg, infectious agents, toxins) were ruled out by lack of supporting necropsy findings or were considered unlikely because of lack of opportunity for exposure. Hepatic lesions in these goats closely resembled those described in human beings with halothane-associated hepatic injury, although in both species these lesions are nonspecific at the gross and light microscopic levels. The pathogenesis of halothane-associated hepatic injury in goats, as in human beings, remains to be determined.

  15. Origin plasticity during budding yeast DNA replication in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gros, Julien; Devbhandari, Sujan; Remus, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The separation of DNA replication origin licensing and activation in the cell cycle is essential for genome stability across generations in eukaryotic cells. Pre-replicative complexes (pre-RCs) license origins by loading Mcm2-7 complexes in inactive form around DNA. During origin firing in S phase, replisomes assemble around the activated Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. Budding yeast pre-RCs have previously been reconstituted in vitro with purified proteins. Here, we show that reconstituted pre-RCs support replication of plasmid DNA in yeast cell extracts in a reaction that exhibits hallmarks of cellular replication initiation. Plasmid replication in vitro results in the generation of covalently closed circular daughter molecules, indicating that the system recapitulates the initiation, elongation, and termination stages of DNA replication. Unexpectedly, yeast origin DNA is not strictly required for DNA replication in vitro, as heterologous DNA sequences could support replication of plasmid molecules. Our findings support the notion that epigenetic mechanisms are important for determining replication origin sites in budding yeast, highlighting mechanistic principles of replication origin specification that are common among eukaryotes. PMID:24566988

  16. Budding Yeast: An Ideal Backdrop for In vivo Lipid Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pushpendra

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes are non-covalent assembly of lipids and proteins. Lipids play critical role in determining membrane physical properties and regulate the function of membrane associated proteins. Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers an exceptional advantage to understand the lipid-protein interactions since lipid metabolism and homeostasis are relatively simple and well characterized as compared to other eukaryotes. In addition, a vast array of genetic and cell biological tools are available to determine and understand the role of a particular lipid in various lipid metabolic disorders. Budding yeast has been instrumental in delineating mechanisms related to lipid metabolism, trafficking and their localization in different subcellular compartments at various cell cycle stages. Further, availability of tools and enormous potential for the development of useful reagents and novel technologies to localize a particular lipid in different subcellular compartments in yeast makes it a formidable system to carry out lipid biology. Taken together, yeast provides an outstanding backdrop to characterize lipid metabolic changes under various physiological conditions.

  17. Gene expression analysis of bud and leaf color in tea.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kang; Zhang, Yazhen; Wu, Liyun; Li, Hailin; Ruan, Li; Bai, Peixian; Zhang, Chengcai; Zhang, Fen; Xu, Liyi; Wang, Liyuan; Cheng, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Purple shoot tea attributing to the high anthocyanin accumulation is of great interest for its wide health benefits. To better understand potential mechanisms involved in purple buds and leaves formation in tea plants, we performed transcriptome analysis of six green or purple shoot tea individuals from a F1 population using the Illumina sequencing method. Totally 292 million RNA-Seq reads were obtained and assembled into 112,233 unigenes, with an average length of 759 bp and an N50 of 1081 bp. Moreover, totally 2193 unigenes showed significant differences in expression levels between green and purple tea samples, with 1143 up- and 1050 down-regulated in the purple teas. Further real time PCR analysis confirmed RNA-Seq results. Our study identified 28 differentially expressed transcriptional factors and A CsMYB gene was found to be highly similar to AtPAP1 in Arabidopsis. Further analysis of differentially expressed genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis and transportation showed that the late biosynthetic genes and genes involved in anthocyanin transportation were largely affected but the early biosynthetic genes were less or none affected. Overall, the identification of a large number of differentially expressed genes offers a global view of the potential mechanisms associated with purple buds and leaves formation, which will facilitate molecular breeding in tea plants.

  18. Inhibition of budding/release of porcine endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masumi; Fukuma, Aiko; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Yasuda, Jiro

    2014-08-01

    PERV is integrated into the genome of all pigs. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic and can productively infect human cell lines, whereas PERV-C is ecotropic. Recombinant PERV-A/C can infect human cells and exhibits high titer replication. Therefore, use of pigs for human xenotransplantation raises concerns about the risks of transfer of this infectious agent from donors to xenotransplantation recipients. To establish strategies to inhibit PERV production from cells, in the present study, we investigated the mechanism of PERV budding and anti-PERV activity of Tetherin/BST-2. The results showed that DN mutants of WWP-2, Tsg101, and Vps4A/B markedly reduced PERV production in human and porcine cell lines, suggesting that PERV budding uses these cellular factors and the cellular MVB sorting pathway as well as many other retroviruses. Moreover, PERV production was also reduced by human and porcine Tetherin/BST-2. These data are useful for developing strategies to inhibit PERV production and may reduce the risk of PERV infection in xenotransplantation. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Micropropagation of Hedychium coronarium J. Koenig through rhizome bud.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pritam; Behera, Shashikanta; Swain, Swasti S; Barik, Durga P; Naik, Soumendra K

    2013-10-01

    An optimized protocol was developed for in vitro plant regeneration of a medicinally important herb Hedychium coronarium J. Koenig using sprouted buds of rhizomes. The rhizomes with sprouted bud were inoculated on Murashige and Skoog (Physiol Plant 15:473-497, 1962) medium (MS) supplemented with either N(6)-benzyladenine (BA) alone (1.0-4.0 mg L(-1)) or in combination with 0.5 mg L(-1) naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). Of these combinations, MS supplemented with a combination of 2.0 mg L(-1) BA and 0.5 mg L(-1) NAA was most effective. In this medium, best shoots (3.6) and roots (4.0) regeneration was observed simultaneously with an average shoot and root length of 4.7 cm and 4.2 cm respectively. Regeneration of shoots and roots in the same medium at the same time (One step shoot and root regeneration) reduced the time for production of in vitro plantlets and eliminates the media cost of rooting. Cent-percent (100 %) success in plant establishment was observed in both gradual acclimatization process as well as when plants were directly transferred to outdoor in clay pots containing a mixture of garden soil and sand (2:1) without any sequential acclimatization stage.

  20. Signal transduction and information processing in mammalian taste buds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The molecular machinery for chemosensory transduction in taste buds has received considerable attention within the last decade. Consequently, we now know a great deal about sweet, bitter, and umami taste mechanisms and are gaining ground rapidly on salty and sour transduction. Sweet, bitter, and umami tastes are transduced by G-protein-coupled receptors. Salty taste may be transduced by epithelial Na channels similar to those found in renal tissues. Sour transduction appears to be initiated by intracellular acidification acting on acid-sensitive membrane proteins. Once a taste signal is generated in a taste cell, the subsequent steps involve secretion of neurotransmitters, including ATP and serotonin. It is now recognized that the cells responding to sweet, bitter, and umami taste stimuli do not possess synapses and instead secrete the neurotransmitter ATP via a novel mechanism not involving conventional vesicular exocytosis. ATP is believed to excite primary sensory afferent fibers that convey gustatory signals to the brain. In contrast, taste cells that do have synapses release serotonin in response to gustatory stimulation. The postsynaptic targets of serotonin have not yet been identified. Finally, ATP secreted from receptor cells also acts on neighboring taste cells to stimulate their release of serotonin. This suggests that there is important information processing and signal coding taking place in the mammalian taste bud after gustatory stimulation. PMID:17468883

  1. Budding Yeast: An Ideal Backdrop for In vivo Lipid Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes are non-covalent assembly of lipids and proteins. Lipids play critical role in determining membrane physical properties and regulate the function of membrane associated proteins. Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers an exceptional advantage to understand the lipid-protein interactions since lipid metabolism and homeostasis are relatively simple and well characterized as compared to other eukaryotes. In addition, a vast array of genetic and cell biological tools are available to determine and understand the role of a particular lipid in various lipid metabolic disorders. Budding yeast has been instrumental in delineating mechanisms related to lipid metabolism, trafficking and their localization in different subcellular compartments at various cell cycle stages. Further, availability of tools and enormous potential for the development of useful reagents and novel technologies to localize a particular lipid in different subcellular compartments in yeast makes it a formidable system to carry out lipid biology. Taken together, yeast provides an outstanding backdrop to characterize lipid metabolic changes under various physiological conditions. PMID:28119915

  2. Naumovozyma castellii: an alternative model for budding yeast molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Karademir Andersson, Ahu; Cohn, Marita

    2017-03-01

    Naumovozyma castellii (Saccharomyces castellii) is a member of the budding yeast family Saccharomycetaceae. It has been extensively used as a model organism for telomere biology research and has gained increasing interest as a budding yeast model for functional analyses owing to its amenability to genetic modifications. Owing to the suitable phylogenetic distance to S. cerevisiae, the whole genome sequence of N. castellii has provided unique data for comparative genomic studies, and it played a key role in the establishment of the timing of the whole genome duplication and the evolutionary events that took place in the subsequent genomic evolution of the Saccharomyces lineage. Here we summarize the historical background of its establishment as a laboratory yeast species, and the development of genetic and molecular tools and strains. We review the research performed on N. castellii, focusing on areas where it has significantly contributed to the discovery of new features of molecular biology and to the advancement of our understanding of molecular evolution. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Systematic identification of cell size regulators in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Soifer, Ilya; Barkai, Naama

    2014-01-01

    Cell size is determined by a complex interplay between growth and division, involving multiple cellular pathways. To identify systematically processes affecting size control in G1 in budding yeast, we imaged and analyzed the cell cycle of millions of individual cells representing 591 mutants implicated in size control. Quantitative metric distinguished mutants affecting the mechanism of size control from the majority of mutants that have a perturbed size due to indirect effects modulating cell growth. Overall, we identified 17 negative and dozens positive size control regulators, with the negative regulators forming a small network centered on elements of mitotic exit network. Some elements of the translation machinery affected size control with a notable distinction between the deletions of parts of small and large ribosomal subunit: parts of small ribosomal subunit tended to regulate size control, while parts of the large subunit affected cell growth. Analysis of small cells revealed additional size control mechanism that functions in G2/M, complementing the primary size control in G1. Our study provides new insights about size control mechanisms in budding yeast. PMID:25411401

  4. Replication-Associated Recombinational Repair: Lessons from Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Jaclyn N.; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Recombinational repair processes multiple types of DNA lesions. Though best understood in the repair of DNA breaks, recombinational repair is intimately linked to other situations encountered during replication. As DNA strands are decorated with many types of blocks that impede the replication machinery, a great number of genomic regions cannot be duplicated without the help of recombinational repair. This replication-associated recombinational repair employs both the core recombination proteins used for DNA break repair and the specialized factors that couple replication with repair. Studies from multiple organisms have provided insights into the roles of these specialized factors, with the findings in budding yeast being advanced through use of powerful genetics and methods for detecting DNA replication and repair intermediates. In this review, we summarize recent progress made in this organism, ranging from our understanding of the classical template switch mechanisms to gap filling and replication fork regression pathways. As many of the protein factors and biological principles uncovered in budding yeast are conserved in higher eukaryotes, these findings are crucial for stimulating studies in more complex organisms. PMID:27548223

  5. Morphological Characterization and Gene Expression Profiling during Bud Development in a Tropical Perennial, Litchi chinensis Sonn.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huifen; Li, Hua; Lai, Biao; Xia, Haoqiang; Wang, Huicong; Huang, Xuming

    2016-01-01

    Tropical evergreen perennials undergo recurrent flush growth, and their terminal buds alternate between growth and dormancy. In sharp contrast to the intensive studies on bud development in temperate deciduous trees, there is little information about bud development regulation in tropical trees. In this study, litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) was used as a model tropical perennial for morphological characterization and transcriptomic analysis of bud development. Litchi buds are naked with apical meristem embraced by rudimentary leaves, which are brown at dormant stage (Stage I). They swell and turn greenish as buds break (Stage II), and as growth accelerates, the rudimentary leaves elongate and open exposing the inner leaf primodia. With the outgrowth of the needle-like leaflets, bud growth reaches a maximum (Stage III). When leaflets expand, bud growth cease with the abortion of the rudimentary leaves at upper positions (Stage IV). Then buds turn brown and reenter dormant status. Budbreak occurs again when new leaves become hard green. Buds at four stages (Stage I to IV) were collected for respiration measurements and in-depth RNA sequencing. Respiration rate was the lowest at Stage I and highest at Stage II, decreasing toward growth cessation. RNA sequencing obtained over 5 Gb data from each of the bud samples and de novo assembly generated a total of 59,999 unigenes, 40,119 of which were annotated. Pair-wise comparison of gene expression between stages, gene profiling across stages, GO/KEGG enrichment analysis, and the expression patterns of 17 major genes highlighted by principal component (PC) analysis displayed significant changes in stress resistance, hormone signal pathways, circadian rhythm, photosynthesis, cell division, carbohydrate metabolism, programmed cell death during bud development, which might be under epigenetic control involving chromatin methylation. The qPCR results of 8 selected unigenes with high PC scores agreed with the RPKM values

  6. Morphological Characterization and Gene Expression Profiling during Bud Development in a Tropical Perennial, Litchi chinensis Sonn.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huifen; Li, Hua; Lai, Biao; Xia, Haoqiang; Wang, Huicong; Huang, Xuming

    2016-01-01

    Tropical evergreen perennials undergo recurrent flush growth, and their terminal buds alternate between growth and dormancy. In sharp contrast to the intensive studies on bud development in temperate deciduous trees, there is little information about bud development regulation in tropical trees. In this study, litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) was used as a model tropical perennial for morphological characterization and transcriptomic analysis of bud development. Litchi buds are naked with apical meristem embraced by rudimentary leaves, which are brown at dormant stage (Stage I). They swell and turn greenish as buds break (Stage II), and as growth accelerates, the rudimentary leaves elongate and open exposing the inner leaf primodia. With the outgrowth of the needle-like leaflets, bud growth reaches a maximum (Stage III). When leaflets expand, bud growth cease with the abortion of the rudimentary leaves at upper positions (Stage IV). Then buds turn brown and reenter dormant status. Budbreak occurs again when new leaves become hard green. Buds at four stages (Stage I to IV) were collected for respiration measurements and in-depth RNA sequencing. Respiration rate was the lowest at Stage I and highest at Stage II, decreasing toward growth cessation. RNA sequencing obtained over 5 Gb data from each of the bud samples and de novo assembly generated a total of 59,999 unigenes, 40,119 of which were annotated. Pair-wise comparison of gene expression between stages, gene profiling across stages, GO/KEGG enrichment analysis, and the expression patterns of 17 major genes highlighted by principal component (PC) analysis displayed significant changes in stress resistance, hormone signal pathways, circadian rhythm, photosynthesis, cell division, carbohydrate metabolism, programmed cell death during bud development, which might be under epigenetic control involving chromatin methylation. The qPCR results of 8 selected unigenes with high PC scores agreed with the RPKM values

  7. GATA6 Is a Crucial Regulator of Shh in the Limb Bud

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Ionescu, Andreia; Lassar, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    In the limb bud, patterning along the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis is controlled by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a signaling molecule secreted by the “Zone of Polarizing Activity”, an organizer tissue located in the posterior margin of the limb bud. We have found that the transcription factors GATA4 and GATA6, which are key regulators of cell identity, are expressed in an anterior to posterior gradient in the early limb bud, raising the possibility that GATA transcription factors may play an additional role in patterning this tissue. While both GATA4 and GATA6 are expressed in an A-P gradient in the forelimb buds, the hindlimb buds principally express GATA6 in an A-P gradient. Thus, to specifically examine the role of GATA6 in limb patterning we generated Prx1-Cre; GATA6fl/fl mice, which conditionally delete GATA6 from their developing limb buds. We found that these animals display ectopic expression of both Shh and its transcriptional targets specifically in the anterior mesenchyme of the hindlimb buds. Loss of GATA6 in the developing limbs results in the formation of preaxial polydactyly in the hindlimbs. Conversely, forced expression of GATA6 throughout the limb bud represses expression of Shh and results in hypomorphic limbs. We have found that GATA6 can bind to chromatin (isolated from limb buds) encoding either Shh or Gli1 regulatory elements that drive expression of these genes in this tissue, and demonstrated that GATA6 works synergistically with FOG co-factors to repress expression of luciferase reporters driven by these sequences. Most significantly, we have found that conditional loss of Shh in limb buds lacking GATA6 prevents development of hindlimb polydactyly in these compound mutant embryos, indicating that GATA6 expression in the anterior region of the limb bud blocks hindlimb polydactyly by repressing ectopic expression of Shh. PMID:24415953

  8. Tumour budding is a strong and independent prognostic factor in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Karamitopoulou, E; Zlobec, I; Born, D; Kondi-Pafiti, A; Lykoudis, P; Mellou, A; Gennatas, K; Gloor, B; Lugli, A

    2013-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive cancer that escapes detection and resists treatment. Tumour budding, defined as the presence of de-differentiated single tumour cells or small cell clusters at the invasive front of gastrointestinal carcinomas like colorectal, oesophageal, gastric and ampullary, is linked to adverse prognosis. Tumour budding has not yet been reported in PDAC. To assess the frequency and prognostic impact of tumour budding in PDAC. Whole-tissue sections of 117 PDACs with full clinico-pathological and follow-up information, including postoperative therapy, were stained using a pancytokeratin marker. Tumour budding was assessed in 10 high-power fields (HPFs) by two pathologists. High-grade budding was defined as an average of >10buds across 10HPFs. Measurements were correlated to patient and tumour characteristics. The study was performed according to the REMARK guidelines. Inter-observer agreement was considered strong (ICC=0.72). Low-grade budding was observed in 29.7% and high-grade budding in 70.3% cases. High-grade budding was linked to advanced pT classification (p=0.0463), lymphatic invasion (p=0.0192) and decreased disease-free (p=0.0005) and overall survival (p<0.0001). There was no association with pN, pM, R-status or blood vessel invasion. In multivariate analysis, the prognostic effect of tumour budding was independent of lymph node metastasis, lymphatic invasion and R-status (p<0.0001; HR (95% CI): 3.65 (2.1-6.4)). Our results show that high-grade tumour budding occurs frequently in PDAC and is a strong, independent and reproducible, highly unfavourable prognostic factor that could be used to guide future individualised therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Fate Map of the Murine Pancreas Buds Reveals a Multipotent Ventral Foregut Organ Progenitor

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Jesse R.; Guerrero-Zayas, Mara-Isel; Tremblay, Kimberly D.

    2012-01-01

    The definitive endoderm is the embryonic germ layer that gives rise to the budding endodermal organs including the thyroid, lung, liver and pancreas as well as the remainder of the gut tube. DiI fate mapping and whole embryo culture were used to determine the endodermal origin of the 9.5 days post coitum (dpc) dorsal and ventral pancreas buds. Our results demonstrate that the progenitors of each bud occupy distinct endodermal territories. Dorsal bud progenitors are located in the medial endoderm overlying somites 2–4 between the 2 and 11 somite stage (SS). The endoderm forming the ventral pancreas bud is found in 2 distinct regions. One territory originates from the left and right lateral endoderm caudal to the anterior intestinal portal by the 6 SS and the second domain is derived from the ventral midline of the endoderm lip (VMEL). Unlike the laterally located ventral foregut progenitors, the VMEL population harbors a multipotent progenitor that contributes to the thyroid bud, the rostral cap of the liver bud, ventral midline of the liver bud and the midline of the ventral pancreas bud in a temporally restricted manner. This data suggests that the midline of the 9.5 dpc thyroid, liver and ventral pancreas buds originates from the same progenitor population, demonstrating a developmental link between all three ventral foregut buds. Taken together, these data define the location of the dorsal and ventral pancreas progenitors in the prespecified endodermal sheet and should lead to insights into the inductive events required for pancreas specification. PMID:22815796

  10. Mode of vegetative reproduction of the bipolar budding yeast species Wickerhamomyces pijperi and related strains.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Yumi; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Limtong, Savitree; Nakase, Takashi

    2009-09-01

    To clarify the budding pattern of Wickerhamomyces pijperi, the vegetative cells were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The cells grew by bipolar budding, but cells that budded from the shoulder of a mother cell were occasionally observed. We examined the cell morphology and phylogeny of five strains of Wickerhamomyces sp. isolated in Thailand as well as seven W. pijperi and three Wickerhamomyces sp. strains that were preserved in culture collections. Phylogenetic analysis based on three different nucleotide sequences (D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA, the actin gene ACT1 and the elongation factor 2 gene EF2) indicated that all the strains belonged to the genus Wickerhamomyces and were neighbours of the type strain W. pijperi NBRC 1290(T). The strains fell into two groups in this analysis. The budding patterns of the strains were carefully observed by staining the bud scars, and these patterns were categorized into three groups: types I-III. Type I included cells that grew by bipolar budding and formed multiple scars, type III included cells that grew by multilateral budding and formed a single scar, and type II included cells that exhibited a mixture of type I and type III patterns. Among the 15 strains, 12 strains, including W. pijperi NBRC 1290(T), mainly exhibited type I or type II budding patterns; these strains belonged to group 1 of the phylogenetic analysis. The remaining three strains, which belonged to group 2, exhibited either type II or type III patterns. Thus the phylogenetic relationship and budding patterns are related. Moreover, some cells also exhibited budding characteristics that were intermediate between bipolar and multilateral budding.

  11. BudBurst Buddies: Introducing Young Citizen Scientists to Plants and Environmental Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D.; Gardiner, L. S.; Henderson, S.

    2011-12-01

    As part of Project BudBurst, the BudBurst Buddies recently moved to the National Ecological Network (NEON) as part of its Education and Public Engagement efforts. The BudBurst Buddies (www.budburstbuddies.org) were created to engage elementary school age children in the science of observing plants and the timing of phenological (life cycle) events. BudBurst Buddies is a part of the Project BudBurst national citizen science initiative (www.budburst.org), which allows individuals to engage in the scientific process, contributing to a better understanding of climate change while increasing public awareness of phenology and the impacts of climate change on plants. As a first step towards engaging the next generation of citizen scientists, BudBurst Buddies provides the opportunity for children to gain experience with scientific research and increases awareness of how plants change throughout the year. Hundreds of young students have participated in the inaugural year of BudBurst Buddies. Children can participate in BudBurst Buddies on their own, with their families, or in formal or informal education settings. The program was recently highlighted by education staff at the New York Hall of Science and numerous classrooms have been implementing this resource as part of their curriculum. Each child who participates creates a journal about a plant of his or her choosing, makes observations of the plant over the growing season and submits findings online, earning an official BudBurst Buddies certificate. An online storybook for kids tells how two children, Lily and Sage, observed plants in their neighborhood and became BudBurst Buddies. This presentation will provide an overview of the BudBurst Buddies resources including a new implementation guide and will also share feedback from the first year of implementation.

  12. Protein quality, hematological properties and nutritional status of albino rats fed complementary foods with fermented popcorn, African locust bean, and bambara groundnut flour blends

    PubMed Central

    Keshinro, Oluremi Olufunke

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine protein quality and hematological properties of infant diets formulated from local food materials. The food materials were obtained locally, fermented, and milled into flour. The flours were mixed as 70% popcorn and 30% African locust bean (FPA), 70% popcorn and 30% bambara groundnut (FPB), and 70% popcorn, 20% bambara groundnut, and 10% African locust bean (FPAB). Proximate analysis, protein quality, hematological properties, and anthropometric measurements of the animals fed with the formulations were investigated. The protein contents of the formulated diets were significantly higher than that of Cerelac (a commercial preparation) (15.75 ± 0.01 g/100 g) and ogi (traditional complementary food) (6.52 ± 0.31 g/100 g). The energy value of FPAB (464.94 ± 1.22 kcal) was higher than those of FPA (441.41 ± 3.05 kcal) and FPB (441.48 ± 3.05 kcal). The biological value (BV) of FPAB (60.20%) was the highest followed by FPB (44.24%) and FPA (41.15%); however, BV of the diets was higher than that of ogi (10.03%) but lower than that of Cerelac (70.43%). Net protein utilization (NPU) of the formulations was 41.16-60.20%, whereas true protein digestibility was 41.05-60.05%. Metabolizable energy (232.98 kcal) and digestible energy (83.69 kcal) of FPAB were the highest, whereas that of FPA had the lowest values. The protein digestibility values corrected for amino acid score of the diets (0.22-0.44) were lower than that of Cerelac (0.52), but higher than that of ogi (0.21). The growth patterns and hematological properties (packed cell volume, red blood cells, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular volume) of the formulated diets were higher than those of ogi, but lower than those of Cerelac. In conclusion, we established that the FPAB food sample was rated best in terms of protein quality over the other formulated diets. Therefore, a FPAB blend may be used as a

  13. Protein quality, hematological properties and nutritional status of albino rats fed complementary foods with fermented popcorn, African locust bean, and bambara groundnut flour blends.

    PubMed

    Ijarotimi, Oluwole Steve; Keshinro, Oluremi Olufunke

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine protein quality and hematological properties of infant diets formulated from local food materials. The food materials were obtained locally, fermented, and milled into flour. The flours were mixed as 70% popcorn and 30% African locust bean (FPA), 70% popcorn and 30% bambara groundnut (FPB), and 70% popcorn, 20% bambara groundnut, and 10% African locust bean (FPAB). Proximate analysis, protein quality, hematological properties, and anthropometric measurements of the animals fed with the formulations were investigated. The protein contents of the formulated diets were significantly higher than that of Cerelac (a commercial preparation) (15.75 ± 0.01 g/100 g) and ogi (traditional complementary food) (6.52 ± 0.31 g/100 g). The energy value of FPAB (464.94 ± 1.22 kcal) was higher than those of FPA (441.41 ± 3.05 kcal) and FPB (441.48 ± 3.05 kcal). The biological value (BV) of FPAB (60.20%) was the highest followed by FPB (44.24%) and FPA (41.15%); however, BV of the diets was higher than that of ogi (10.03%) but lower than that of Cerelac (70.43%). Net protein utilization (NPU) of the formulations was 41.16-60.20%, whereas true protein digestibility was 41.05-60.05%. Metabolizable energy (232.98 kcal) and digestible energy (83.69 kcal) of FPAB were the highest, whereas that of FPA had the lowest values. The protein digestibility values corrected for amino acid score of the diets (0.22-0.44) were lower than that of Cerelac (0.52), but higher than that of ogi (0.21). The growth patterns and hematological properties (packed cell volume, red blood cells, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular volume) of the formulated diets were higher than those of ogi, but lower than those of Cerelac. In conclusion, we established that the FPAB food sample was rated best in terms of protein quality over the other formulated diets. Therefore, a FPAB blend may be used as a

  14. Bud-bank and tiller dynamics of co-occurring C3 caespitose grasses in mixed-grass prairie.

    PubMed

    Ott, Jacqueline P; Hartnett, David C

    2015-09-01

    Tiller recruitment from the belowground bud bank of caespitose grasses influences their ability to monopolize local resources and, hence, their genet fitness. Differences in bud production and outgrowth among tiller types within a genet and among species may explain co-occurrence of caespitose grasses. This study aimed to characterize genet bud-bank and tiller production and dynamics in two co-occurring species and compare their vegetative reproductive strategies. Bud-bank and tiller dynamics of Hesperostipa comata and Nassella viridula, dominant C3 caespitose grasses in the northern mixed-grass prairie of North America, were assessed throughout an annual cycle. The two species showed similar strategies, maintaining polycyclic tillers and thus creating mixed-age genet bud banks comprising multiple bud cohorts produced in different years. Vegetative tillers produced the majority of buds, whereas flowering tillers contributed little to the bud bank. Buds lived for at least 2 yr and were maintained in multiple developmental stages throughout the year. Because bud longevity rarely exceeded tiller longevity, tiller longevity drove turnover within the bud bank. Tiller population dynamics, more than bud production per tiller, determined the differential contribution of tiller types to the bud bank. Nassella viridula had higher bud production per tiller, a consistent annual tiller recruitment density, and greater longevity of buds on senesced and flowering tillers than H. comata. Co-occurring C3 caespitose grasses had similar bud-bank and tiller dynamics contributing to genet persistence but differed in bud characteristics that could affect genet longevity and species coexistence. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  15. Development and growth of primordial shoots in Norway spruce buds before visible bud burst in relation to time and temperature in the field.

    PubMed

    Sutinen, Sirkka; Partanen, Jouni; Viherä-Aarnio, Anneli; Häkkinen, Risto

    2012-08-01

    The timing of bud development in ecodormancy is critical for trees in boreal and temperate regions with seasonally alternating climates. The development of vegetative buds and the growth of primordial shoots (the primordial shoot ratio) in Norway spruce were followed by the naked eye and at stereo and light microscopic levels in fresh-cut and fixed buds obtained by regular field samplings during the spring of 2007, 2008 and 2009. Buds were collected from 15 randomly selected trees (all 16 years old in 2007) of one southern Finnish half-sib family. The air temperature was recorded hourly throughout the observation period. In 2008 and 2009, initial events in the buds, seen as accumulation of lipid droplets in the cortex area, started in mid-March and were depleted in late April, simultaneously with the early development of vascular tissue and primordial needles. In mid-April 2007, however, the development of the buds was at least 10 days ahead as a result of warm spells in March and early April. Variation in the timing of different developmental phases within and among the sample trees was negligible. There was no clear one-to-one correspondence between the externally visible and the internal development of the buds. The dependence of the primordial shoot ratio on different types of temperature sum was studied by means of regression analysis. High coefficients of determination (R(2) ≈ 95%) were attained with several combinations of the starting time (beginning of the year/vernal equinox), the threshold value (from -3 to +5 °C), and the time step (hour/day) used in the temperature summation, i.e., the prediction power of the primordial shoot ratio models turned out to be high, but the parameter estimate values were not unambiguous. According to our results, temperature sums describe the growth of the primordial shoot inside the bud before bud burst. Thus, the results provide a realistic interpretation for the present phenological models of bud development that

  16. An actin-binding protein, CAP, is expressed in a subset of rat taste bud cells.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Y; Yasuoka, A; Asano-Miyoshi, M; Abe, K; Emori, Y

    2001-02-12

    Single cell cDNA libraries were constructed from taste bud cells of rat circumvallate papillae. Using three steps of screening, including differential hybridization, sequence analyses and in situ hybridization, a clone encoding a rat homolog of yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) was identified to be highly expressed in a subset of taste bud cells.

  17. Significance of phytohormones in Siberian larch-bud gall midge interaction

    Treesearch

    Rida M. Matrenina

    1991-01-01

    Interrelations of the bud gall midge and the Siberian larch are of scientific and practical interest because of the bud gall midge's role as a plant endoparasite. We know that attack by the gall midge sets off a reaction in the entire plant. Invasion by the insect results in a certain interaction between physiological mechanisms of the insect and the plant which...

  18. Generation of bioengineered feather buds on a reconstructed chick skin from dissociated epithelial and mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kentaro; Mitsui, Toshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    Various kinds of in vitro culture systems of tissues and organs have been developed, and applied to understand multicellular systems during embryonic organogenesis. In the research field of feather bud development, tissue recombination assays using an intact epithelial tissue and mesenchymal tissue/cells have contributed to our understanding the mechanisms of feather bud formation and development. However, there are few methods to generate a skin and its appendages from single cells of both epithelium and mesenchyme. In this study, we have developed a bioengineering method to reconstruct an embryonic dorsal skin after completely dissociating single epithelial and mesenchymal cells from chick skin. Multiple feather buds can form on the reconstructed skin in a single row in vitro. The bioengineered feather buds develop into long feather buds by transplantation onto a chorioallantoic membrane. The bioengineered bud sizes were similar to those of native embryo. The number of bioengineered buds was increased linearly with the initial contact length of epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers where the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions occur. In addition, the bioengineered bud formation was also disturbed by the inhibition of major signaling pathways including FGF (fibroblast growth factor), Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and BMP (bone morphogenetic protein). We expect that our bioengineering technique will motivate further extensive research on multicellular developmental systems, such as the formation and sizing of cutaneous appendages, and their regulatory mechanisms.

  19. Colonization of Dormant Walnut Buds by Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis Is Predictive of Subsequent Disease.

    PubMed

    Lindow, Steven; Olson, William; Buchner, Richard

    2014-11-01

    The potential role of walnut buds as a driver of walnut blight disease, caused by Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis, was addressed by quantifying its temporal dynamics in a large number of orchards in California. The abundance of X. arboricola pv. juglandis on individual dormant and developing buds and shoots of walnut trees varied by >10(6)-fold at any sample time and within a given tree. X. arboricola pv. juglandis population size in shoots was often no larger than that in the buds from which the shoots were derived but was strongly correlated with prior pathogen population sizes in buds. X. arboricola pv. juglandis populations on developing nuts were strongly related to that on the shoots on which they were borne. The incidence of disease of nuts in June was strongly correlated with the logarithm of the population size of X. arboricola pv. juglandis in dormant buds in March. Inoculum efficiency, the slope of this linear relationship, varied between years but was strongly related to the number of rain events following bud break in each year. Thus, inoculum of X. arboricola pv. juglandis present on dormant buds is the primary determinant of nut infections and the risk of disease can be predicted from both the numbers of X. arboricola pv. juglandis in buds and the incidence of early spring rain.

  20. Have NEC Coat, Will Travel: Structural Basis of Membrane Budding During Nuclear Egress in Herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Bigalke, J M; Heldwein, E E

    2017-01-01

    Herpesviruses are unusual among enveloped viruses because they bud twice yet acquire a single envelope. Furthermore, unlike other DNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus, herpesviruses do not exit it by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Instead, herpesviruses have a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. This makes them some of the very few known viruses that bud into the nuclear envelope. The envelope acquired during nuclear budding does not end up in the mature viral particle but instead allows the capsid to translocate from the nucleus into the cytosol. The viral nuclear egress complex (NEC) is a critical player in the nuclear egress, yet its function and mechanism have remained enigmatic. Recent studies have demonstrated that the NEC buds membranes without the help of other proteins by forming a honeycomb coat, which established the NEC as the first virally encoded budding machine that operates at the nuclear, as opposed to cytoplasmic, membrane. This review discusses our current understanding of the NEC budding mechanism, with the emphasis on studies that illuminated the structure of the NEC coat and its role in capsid budding during herpesvirus nuclear escape.

  1. Key stages in mammary gland development: the mammary end bud as a motile organ.

    PubMed

    Hinck, Lindsay; Silberstein, Gary B

    2005-01-01

    In the rodent, epithelial end buds define the tips of elongating mammary ducts. These highly motile structures undergo repeated dichotomous branching as they aggressively advance through fatty stroma and, turning to avoid other ducts, they finally cease growth leaving behind the open, tree-like framework on which secretory alveoli develop during pregnancy. This review identifies the motility of end buds as a unique developmental marker that represents the successful integration of systemic and local mammotrophic influences, and covers relevant advances in ductal growth regulation, extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, and cell adhesion in the inner end bud. An unexpected growth-promoting synergy between insulin-like growth factor-1 and progesterone, in which ducts elongate without forming new end buds, is described as well as evidence strongly supporting self-inhibition of ductal elongation by end-bud-secreted transforming growth factor-beta acting on stromal targets. The influence of the matrix metalloproteinase ECM-remodeling enzymes, notably matrix metalloproteinase-2, on end bud growth is discussed in the broader context of enzymes that regulate the polysaccharide-rich glycosaminoglycan elements of the ECM. Finally, a critical, motility-enabling role for the cellular architecture of the end bud is identified and the contribution of cadherins, the netrin/neogenin system, and ErbB2 to the structure and motility of end buds is discussed.

  2. Tumour budding is associated with hypoxia at the advancing front of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Righi, Alberto; Sarotto, Ivana; Casorzo, Laura; Cavalchini, Silvia; Frangipane, Elena; Risio, Mauro

    2015-06-01

    The tumour budding ability to predict cancer progression is felt to be worthy of investigation with regard to its biological properties. This study was aimed at evaluating the role of hypoxia and microvascularization in the morphogenesis of tumour budding in colorectal carcinoma. The immunohistochemical expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and carbonic anhydrase IX in cancer cells and CD105 in carcinoma-induced microvascularization were assessed in 479 colorectal cancers. Furthermore, MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase (MET) gene amplification was searched using fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). Carbonic anhydrase IX and HIF-1α overall scores differed significantly in low- compared to high-grade tumour budding cancers (P < 0.001), both in pT1 and in pT2-4 tumours. Intratumour analysis of budding foci showed a striking absence of carbonic anhydrase IX immunostain in detaching cells with respect to the surrounding microsectors. The mean microvessel density values were significantly higher in the low- compared to the high-grade tumour budding groups (P < 0.001). A similar copy number of MET gene was detected in the two groups. Our study shows that tumour budding is associated with hypoxia induced by hypovascularization at the advancing front of colorectal cancer and that budding cells express a HIF-1α-mediated hypoxic tumour phenotype. MET gene amplification is not related to tumour budding morphogenesis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Differential expression of carbohydrate metabolism genes during bud dormancy changes in leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Underground adventitious buds of leafy spurge undergo three well-defined phases of dormancy, para-, endo-, and ecodormancy, throughout the year. In this study, relationships between carbohydrate metabolism and bud dormancy were examined and real-time PCR was used to determine if shifts in carbohydra...

  4. Differential Expression of Carbohydrate Metabolism Genes Associated with Bud Dormancy Changes in Leafy Spurge (Euphorbia esula)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Underground adventitious buds of leafy spurge undergo three well-defined phases of dormancy, para-, endo-, and ecodormancy, throughout the year. In this study, relationships between carbohydrate metabolism and bud dormancy were examined and real-time PCR was used to determine if shifts in carbohydra...

  5. Size Does Matter: Staging of Silene latifolia Floral Buds for Transcriptome Studies

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Su San; Perlin, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Dioecious plants in the Caryophyllaceae family are susceptible to infection by members of the anthericolous smut fungi. In our studies of the Silene latifolia/Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae pathosystem, we were interested in characterizing the plant-pathogen interaction at the molecular level before and during teliosporogenesis. This takes place during floral bud development, and we hoped to capture the interaction by Illumina Next-Gen RNA-Sequencing. Using previous literature that documented the stages of the floral buds for S. latifolia, we examined the floral buds from plants grown and infected under growth chamber conditions, using the disserting microscope to determine the stage of floral buds based on the morphology. We compiled the information and determined the size of floral buds that correspond to the desired stages of development for tissue collection, for the purpose of RNA-sequencing. This offers a practical approach for researchers who require a large number of floral buds/tissue categorized by stages of development, ascertaining whether infected/uninfected buds are at comparable stages of development and whether this also holds true for male vs. female buds. We also document our experience in infecting the plants and some of the unusual morphologies we observed after infection. PMID:26378529

  6. Symplastic connection is required for bud outgrowth following dormancy in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers.

    PubMed

    Viola, Roberto; Pelloux, Jérôme; van der Ploeg, Anke; Gillespie, Trudi; Marquis, Nicola; Roberts, Alison G; Hancock, Robert D

    2007-08-01

    To gain greater insight into the mechanism of dormancy release in the potato tuber, an investigation into physiological and biochemical changes in tuber and bud tissues during the transition from bud dormancy (immediately after harvest) to active bud growth was undertaken. Within the tuber, a rapid shift from storage metabolism (starch synthesis) to reserve mobilization within days of detachment from the mother plant suggested transition from sink to source. Over the same period, a shift in the pattern of [U-(14)C]sucrose uptake by tuber discs from diffuse to punctate accumulation was consistent with a transition from phloem unloading to phloem loading within the tuber parenchyma. There were no gross differences in metabolic capacity between resting and actively growing tuber buds as determined by [U-(14)C]glucose labelling. However, marked differences in metabolite pools were observed with large increases in starch and sucrose, and the accumulation of several organic acids in growing buds. Carboxyfluorescein labelling of tubers clearly demonstrated strong symplastic connection in actively growing buds and symplastic isolation in resting buds. It is proposed that potato tubers rapidly undergo metabolic transitions consistent with bud outgrowth; however, growth is initially prevented by substrate limitation mediated via symplastic isolation.

  7. Apical bud toughness tests and tree sway movements to examine crown abrasion: preliminary results

    Treesearch

    Tyler Brannon; Wayne Clatterbuck

    2012-01-01

    Apical bud toughness differences were examined for several species to determine if crown abrasion affects shoot growth of determinate and indeterminate species during stand development. Determinate buds will set and harden after initial shoot elongation in the spring, while the indeterminate shoots form leaves from the apical meristem continuously based on the...

  8. New technique for more rapid cryopreservation of dormant vegetative tree buds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cryopreservation of dormant buds of temperate trees in liquid nitrogen can provide a safe backup of field germplasm collections. However the process requires several months of preparation before buds can be cryopreserved. Cryopreservation at the natural moisture content (MC) would greatly accelerate...

  9. Floral determination in the terminal bud of the short-day plant Pharbitis nil.

    PubMed

    Larkin, J C; Felsheim, R; Das, A

    1990-02-01

    Temporal and spatial aspects of floral determination in seedling terminal buds of the qualitative short-day plant Pharbitis nil were examined using a grafting assay. Floral determination in the terminal buds of 6-day-old P. nil seedlings is rapid; by 9 hr after the end of a 14-hr inductive dark period more than 50% of the induced terminal buds grafted onto uninduced stock plants produced a full complement of flower buds. When grafted at early times after the end of the dark period the terminal buds of induced plants produced three discrete populations of plants: plants with no flowers, plants with two axillary flowers at nodes 3 and 4 and a vegetative terminal shoot apex, and plants with five to seven flowers including a terminal flower. The temporal relationship among these populations of plants produced by apices grafted at different times indicates that under our conditions, the region of the terminal bud that will form the axillary buds at nodes 3 and 4 becomes florally determined prior to floral determination of the region of the terminal bud giving rise to the nodes above node 4.

  10. Proteomic study of 'Moncada' mandarin buds from on- versus off-crop trees.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Fambuena, Natalia; Mesejo, Carlos; Reig, Carmina; Agustí, Manuel; Tárraga, Susana; Lisón, Purificación; Iglesias, Domingo J; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; González-Mas, M Carmen

    2013-12-01

    A proteomic analysis of buds from mandarin trees with contrasting fruit load (on- and off-crop trees) was carried out during the onset of low-temperature induction. The aim of the study was to find out more about the molecular mechanism relating to alternate bearing in Citrus and its relationship with flowering. The 'Moncada' variety (Clementine 'Oroval'x'Kara' mandarin), displaying remarkable behaviour in alternate production, was used in this study. From 2D DIGE gel, 192 spots were isolated: 97 showed increased expression in the off-crop buds as compared to the on-crop buds, while 95 exhibited enhanced expression in the on-crop buds versus the off-crop buds. These spots were identified by MALDI-MS or LC-MS-MS. The largest groups of proteins up-expressed in the off-crop buds were the proteins involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and the proteins expressed in response to stimuli such as reactive oxygen species. The largest groups of proteins up-expressed in the on-crop buds were related to primary metabolism, oxidative stress and defence responses. Depending on their function, some of these proteins can stimulate the flowering, such as fructose-bisphosphate aldolase or leucine-rich repeat transmembrane protein kinase, while others can inhibit it, such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. Twenty-two other proteins with unknown functions were up-expressed in the on- or off-crop buds.

  11. 48 CFR 1419.202-70 - Acquisition screening and BUDS recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BUDS recommendations. 1419.202-70 Section 1419.202-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... screening and BUDS recommendations. (a) For open market acquisitions estimated to exceed the SAT, the DI... document the rationale for not accepting a SBS recommendation on DI Form 1886, under “Notes.” (See FAR...

  12. 48 CFR 1419.202-70 - Acquisition screening and BUDS recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BUDS recommendations. 1419.202-70 Section 1419.202-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... screening and BUDS recommendations. (a) For open market acquisitions estimated to exceed the SAT, the DI... document the rationale for not accepting a SBS recommendation on DI Form 1886, under “Notes.” (See FAR...

  13. 48 CFR 1419.202-70 - Acquisition screening and BUDS recommendations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BUDS recommendations. 1419.202-70 Section 1419.202-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... screening and BUDS recommendations. (a) For open market acquisitions estimated to exceed the SAT, the DI... document the rationale for not accepting a SBS recommendation on DI Form 1886, under “Notes.” (See FAR...

  14. Light controls shoot meristem organogenic activity and leaf primordia growth during bud burst in Rosa sp.

    PubMed

    Girault, Tiffanie; Bergougnoux, Veronique; Combes, Didier; Viemont, Jean-Daniel; Leduc, Nathalie

    2008-11-01

    Light controls bud burst in many plants, which subsequently affects their architecture. Nevertheless, very little is known about this photomorphogenic process. This study ascertains the effects of light on bud burst and on two of its components, i.e. growth of preformed leaves and meristem organogenesis in six cultivars from three Rosa species (R. hybrida L., R. chinensis L., R. wichurana L.). Defoliated plants were severed above the third basal bud and exposed, either to darkness or to different intensities of white light, to blue, red or to FR, at constant temperature. Bud bursting was inhibited in darkness in the six cultivars of Rosa, but not in Arabidopsis, tomato and poplar plants under the same condition. In all Rosa cultivars, bud burst, growth of preformed leaves and meristem organogenesis were triggered by blue and red lights, and extended by increasing light intensities. FR was inhibitory of bud burst. Partial shading experiments demonstrated that bud and not stem was the active site for light perception in bud burst.

  15. Effect of pretreatment methods of dormant pear buds on viability after cryopreservation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study aimed to develop alternatives for dormant bud cryopreservation by using several cryoprotectants on four pear cultivars with a view to improve the viability of the dormant buds. We used different cryoprotectants such as Honey, PVS2, PVS3, PVS4, Towill, IPBB-1 for cultivars: Talgarskaya Kra...

  16. Have NEC Coat, Will Travel: Structural Basis of Membrane Budding During Nuclear Egress in Herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bigalke, J.M.; Heldwein, E.E.

    2017-01-01

    Herpesviruses are unusual among enveloped viruses because they bud twice yet acquire a single envelope. Furthermore, unlike other DNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus, herpesviruses do not exit it by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Instead, herpesviruses have a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. This makes them some of the very few known viruses that bud into the nuclear envelope. The envelope acquired during nuclear budding does not end up in the mature viral particle but instead allows the capsid to translocate from the nucleus into the cytosol. The viral nuclear egress complex (NEC) is a critical player in the nuclear egress, yet its function and mechanism have remained enigmatic. Recent studies have demonstrated that the NEC buds membranes without the help of other proteins by forming a honeycomb coat, which established the NEC as the first virally encoded budding machine that operates at the nuclear, as opposed to cytoplasmic, membrane. This review discusses our current understanding of the NEC budding mechanism, with the emphasis on studies that illuminated the structure of the NEC coat and its role in capsid budding during herpesvirus nuclear escape. PMID:28057257

  17. Budding yeast dma proteins control septin dynamics and the spindle position checkpoint by promoting the recruitment of the Elm1 kinase to the bud neck.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Laura; Fraschini, Roberta; Boettcher, Barbara; Barral, Yves; Lucchini, Giovanna; Piatti, Simonetta

    2012-01-01

    The first step towards cytokinesis in budding yeast is the assembly of a septin ring at the future site of bud emergence. Integrity of this ring is crucial for cytokinesis, proper spindle positioning, and the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC). This checkpoint delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis as long as the anaphase spindle does not properly align with the division axis. SPOC signalling requires the Kin4 protein kinase and the Kin4-regulating Elm1 kinase, which also controls septin dynamics. Here, we show that the two redundant ubiquitin-ligases Dma1 and Dma2 control septin dynamics and the SPOC by promoting the efficient recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck. Indeed, dma1 dma2 mutant cells show reduced levels of Elm1 at the bud neck and Elm1-dependent activation of Kin4. Artificial recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck of the same cells is sufficient to re-establish a normal septin ring, proper spindle positioning, and a proficient SPOC response in dma1 dma2 cells. Altogether, our data indicate that septin dynamics and SPOC function are intimately linked and support the idea that integrity of the bud neck is crucial for SPOC signalling.

  18. Computational model of polarized actin cables and cytokinetic actin ring formation in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haosu; Bidone, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast actin cables and contractile ring are important for polarized growth and division, revealing basic aspects of cytoskeletal function. To study these formin-nucleated structures, we built a 3D computational model with actin filaments represented as beads connected by springs. Polymerization by formins at the bud tip and bud neck, crosslinking, severing, and myosin pulling, are included. Parameter values were estimated from prior experiments. The model generates actin cable structures and dynamics similar to those of wild type and formin deletion mutant cells. Simulations with increased polymerization rate result in long, wavy cables. Simulated pulling by type V myosin stretches actin cables. Increasing the affinity of actin filaments for the bud neck together with reduced myosin V pulling promotes the formation of a bundle of antiparallel filaments at the bud neck, which we suggest as a model for the assembly of actin filaments to the contractile ring. PMID:26538307

  19. Glucosinolate composition of young shoots and flower buds of capers (Capparis species) growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Musa

    2002-12-04

    The content and glucosinolate composition of young shoots and raw flower buds of Capparis spinosa var. spinosa and Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens at three different sizes (x 13 mm) were investigated by HPLC with UV detection. Samples were harvested in August 2001 in Turkey. Twelve different glucosinolates were identified in the young shoots and buds of both species. Total content of glucosinolates ranged from 6.55 micromol/g (large buds of C. spinosa) to 45.56 micromol/g (young shoots of C. ovata). The main glucosinolate was glucocapperin, which amounted to approximately 90% of the total glucosinolates. In both species the total glucosinolate content varied in dependence on the bud size, whereas a greater variability was given for buds from C. spinosa.

  20. Glyphosate effects on the gene expression of the apical bud in soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling-Xue; Jin, Long-Guo; Guo, Yong; Tao, Bo; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-08-09

    Glyphosate is a broad spectrum, non-selective herbicide which has been widely used for weed control. Much work has focused on elucidating the high accumulation of glyphosate in shoot apical bud (shoot apex). However, to date little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the sensitivity of shoot apical bud to glyphosate. Global gene expression profiling of the soybean apical bud response to glyphosate treatment was performed in this study. The results revealed that the glyphosate inhibited tryptophan biosynthesis of the shikimic acid pathway in the soybean apical bud, which was the target site of glyphosate. Glyphosate inhibited the expression of most of the target herbicide site genes. The promoter sequence analysis of key target genes revealed that light responsive elements were important regulators in glyphosate induction. These results will facilitate further studies of cloning genes and molecular mechanisms of glyphosate on soybean shoot apical bud. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The ureteric bud epithelium: morphogenesis and roles in metanephric kidney patterning.

    PubMed

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K; Yu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian metanephric kidney is composed of two epithelial components, the collecting duct system and the nephron epithelium, that differentiate from two different tissues -the ureteric bud epithelium and the nephron progenitors, respectively-of intermediate mesoderm origin. The collecting duct system is generated through reiterative ureteric bud branching morphogenesis, whereas the nephron epithelium is formed in a process termed nephrogenesis, which is initiated with the mesenchymal-epithelial transition of the nephron progenitors. Ureteric bud branching morphogenesis is regulated by nephron progenitors, and in return, the ureteric bud epithelium regulates nephrogenesis. The metanephric kidney is physiologically divided along the corticomedullary axis into subcompartments that are enriched with specific segments of these two epithelial structures. Here, we provide an overview of the major molecular and cellular processes underlying the morphogenesis and patterning of the ureteric bud epithelium and its roles in the cortico-medullary patterning of the metanephric kidney.

  2. Influenza virus budding from the tips of cellular microvilli in differentiated human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, Larissa; Heck, Sonja; Matrosovich, Tatyana; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Becker, Stephan; Matrosovich, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    The epithelium of conducting airways represents the main target for influenza virus in mammals. However, the peculiarities of virus interactions with differentiated airway epithelial cells remain largely unknown. Here, influenza virus budding was studied in differentiated cultures of human tracheobronchial epithelial cells using transmission electron microscopy. Budding of spherical and filamentous virions was observed on the apical surfaces of cells with no association with cilia and secretory granules. Quantitative analysis of the distribution of viral buds on the cell surface indicated that the tips of the microvilli represented a prominent site of influenza virus budding in the human airway epithelium. As the microvilli of differentiated cells are involved in many fundamental cell functions, these data will prompt further studies on the biological significance of microvilli-associated budding for virus replication, transmission and pathogenicity.

  3. Chirality-Induced Budding: A Raft-Mediated Mechanism for Endocytosis and Morphology of Caveolae?

    PubMed Central

    Sarasij, R. C.; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2007-01-01

    The formation of transport carriers (spherical vesicles and tubules) involves membrane budding, growth, and ultimately fission. We propose a mechanism of membrane budding, wherein the tilt and chirality of constituent molecules, confined to a patch of area A, induces buds of ∼50–100 nm that are comparable to vesicles involved in endocytosis. Because such chiral and tilted lipid molecules are likely to exist in “rafts”, we suggest the involvement of this mechanism in generating membrane buds in the clathrin and dynamin-independent, raft-component mediated endocytosis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. We argue that caveolae, permanent cell surface structures with characteristic morphology and enriched in raft constituents, are also likely to be formed by this mechanism. Thus, molecular chirality and tilt, and its expression over large spatial scales may be a common organizing principle in membrane budding of transport carriers. PMID:17237196

  4. Phenological bud bank development of Bouteloua gracilis, Hesperostipa comata, and Pascopyrum smithii during drought in the Northern Great Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vegetative reproduction in rangelands relies on tiller recruitment from belowground bud banks. Improved understanding of species-specific bud production and phenology would facilitate timing of aboveground management strategies. Twelve individual plants of the warm season grass (Bouteloua gracilis...

  5. Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Repiso-Jiménez, J B; Márquez, J; Sotillo, I; García-Bravo, B; Camacho, F

    1999-05-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn (SFN) is an uncommon disease that affects newborns who have suffered from tissue hypoxia during or following delivery. This disease appears during the first weeks of life. It consists of indurate, erythematous or purple-erythematous nodules and plaques in the skin. Histology of a biopsy specimen shows granulomatous necrosis in the subcutis with radial crystals in lipocytes and giant cells. Spontaneous resolution in a few weeks is usual, but the mobilization of calcium from the necrosed subcutis together with the action of some hormones may cause hypercalcemia and certain serious complications. A newborn female child developed SFN after dystocic delivery causing cerebral frontal lobe hemorrhage. The skin nodules resolved spontaneously in a few weeks and no complications were observed 1 year later.

  6. Imaging Manifestations of Mediastinal Fat Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Malay Y.; Martínez-Jiménez, Santiago; Rosado-de-Christenson, Melissa L.; Watson, Kenneth R.; Walker, Christopher M.; Kunin, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Mediastinal fat necrosis (MFN) or epipericardial fat necrosis, as it is commonly referred to in the literature, is a rare self-limiting cause of chest pain of unclear etiology. MFN affects previously healthy individuals who present with acute pleuritic chest pain. Characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings include a fat attenuation lesion with intrinsic and surrounding increased attenuation stranding. There is often associated thickening of the adjacent pericardium and/or pleural effusions. We present two cases of MFN manifesting as ovoid fat attenuation lesions demarcated by a soft tissue attenuation rim with intrinsic and surrounding soft tissue attenuation stranding and review the clinical and pathologic features of these lesions. Knowledge of the clinical presentation of patients with MFN and familiarity with the characteristic imaging findings of these lesions should allow radiologists to prospectively establish the correct diagnosis and suggest conservative management and follow-up. PMID:24369521

  7. Giant cell arteritis presenting as scalp necrosis.

    PubMed

    Maidana, Daniel E; Muñoz, Silvia; Acebes, Xènia; Llatjós, Roger; Jucglà, Anna; Alvarez, Alba

    2011-07-07

    The differential of scalp ulceration in older patients should include several causes, such as herpes zoster, irritant contact dermatitis, ulcerated skin tumors, postirradiation ulcers, microbial infections, pyoderma gangrenosum, and giant cell arteritis. Scalp necrosis associated with giant cell arteritis was first described in the 1940s. The presence of this dermatological sign within giant cell arteritis represents a severity marker of this disease, with a higher mean age at diagnosis, an elevated risk of vision loss and tongue gangrene, as well as overall higher mortality rates, in comparison to patients not presenting this manifestation. Even though scalp necrosis due to giant cell arteritis is exceptional, a high level of suspicion must be held for this clinical finding, in order to initiate prompt and proper treatment and avoid blindness.

  8. [Avascular necrosis of the femoral head].

    PubMed

    Porubský, Peter; Trč, Tomáš; Havlas, Vojtěch; Smetana, Pavel

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in adults is not common, but not too rare diseases. In orthopedic practice, it is one of the diseases that are causing implantation of hip replacement at a relatively early age. In the early detection and initiation of therapy can delay the implantation of prosthesis for several years, which is certainly more convenient for the patient and beneficial. This article is intended to acquaint the reader with the basic diagnostic procedures and therapy.

  9. Breaking-bud pollination: a new pollination process in partially opened flowers by small bees.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Futa; Ohsawa, Takeshi A

    2015-09-01

    Plant-pollinator interactions have usually been researched in flowers that have fully opened. However, some pollinators can visit flowers before full opening and contribute to fruit and seed sets. In this paper, we researched the pollination biology of flowers just starting to open in four field experiments. We observed the insect visitors to Lycoris sanguinea var. sanguinea for 3 years at five sites. These observations revealed that only small bees, Lasioglossum japonicum, often entered through tiny spaces between the tepals of 'breaking buds' (i.e. partially opened flowers) and collected pollen. We hypothesized that they can pollinate this species at the breaking-bud stage, when the stigma is located near the anthers. To measure the pollination effect of small bees at the breaking-bud stage, we bagged several breaking buds after small bees had visited them and examined whether these buds were pollinated. In bagging experiments, 30% of the breaking buds set fruit and seeds. Fruit-set ratios of the breaking buds did not differ significantly from those of the fully opened flowers, which had been visited by several insect species. We also counted the pollen grain numbers on the body of L. japonicum and on the anthers of randomly-selected and manipulated flowers. These experiments revealed that all of the captured bees had some pollen of target plants and that L. japonicum collected most of the pollen grains at the breaking-bud stage. Our results showed that the new pollination process, breaking-bud pollination, happened in breaking buds by L. japonicum, although there is no evidence to reveal that this is the most effective pollination method for L. sanguinea var. sanguinea. In principle, this new pollination process can occur in other flowering plants and our results are a major contribution to studies of plant-pollinator interactions.

  10. Novel Features of the Prenatal Horn Bud Development in Cattle (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Wiener, Dominique Judith; Wiedemar, Natalie; Welle, Monika Maria; Drögemüller, Cord

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the genetic background of horn growth in cattle has been studied extensively, little is known about the morphological changes in the developing fetal horn bud. In this study we histologically analyzed the development of horn buds of bovine fetuses between ~70 and ~268 days of pregnancy and compared them with biopsies taken from the frontal skin of the same fetuses. In addition we compared the samples from the wild type (horned) fetuses with samples taken from the horn bud region of age-matched genetically hornless (polled) fetuses. In summary, the horn bud with multiple layers of vacuolated keratinocytes is histologically visible early in fetal life already at around day 70 of gestation and can be easily differentiated from the much thinner epidermis of the frontal skin. However, at the gestation day (gd) 212 the epidermis above the horn bud shows a similar morphology to the epidermis of the frontal skin and the outstanding layers of vacuolated keratinocytes have disappeared. Immature hair follicles are seen in the frontal skin at gd 115 whereas hair follicles below the horn bud are not present until gd 155. Interestingly, thick nerve bundles appear in the dermis below the horn bud at gd 115. These nerve fibers grow in size over time and are prominent shortly before birth. Prominent nerve bundles are not present in the frontal skin of wild type or in polled fetuses at any time, indicating that the horn bud is a very sensitive area. The samples from the horn bud region from polled fetuses are histologically equivalent to samples taken from the frontal skin in horned species. This is the first study that presents unique histological data on bovine prenatal horn bud differentiation at different developmental stages which creates knowledge for a better understanding of recent molecular findings.

  11. Tumor budding is an independent predictor of outcome in AJCC/UICC stage II colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Betge, Johannes; Kornprat, Peter; Pollheimer, Marion J; Lindtner, Richard A; Schlemmer, Andrea; Rehak, Peter; Vieth, Michael; Langner, Cord

    2012-11-01

    In colorectal cancer, the morphology of the invasive tumor margin may reflect aggressiveness of tumor growth, thus providing important prognostic information. The tumor growth pattern according to Jass and the extent of tumor budding were analyzed in patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union for International Cancer Control (AJCC/UICC) stage II disease. Tumors of 120 randomly selected patients with AJCC/UICC stage II disease were retrospectively reviewed for tumor growth pattern (expanding vs. infiltrating) and the extent of tumor budding, with high-grade budding reflecting presence of 10 or more budding foci scattered at the invasive tumor margin. Progression-free and cancer-specific survivals were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. For multivariable analysis, Cox's proportional hazards regression models were performed. The infiltrating growth pattern was significantly associated with histological subtype and lymphovascular invasion, while high-grade budding was significantly associated with tumor grade and lymphovascular invasion. High-grade budding, but not the infiltrating growth pattern, was significantly associated with outcome in univariable analysis. Cox's proportional hazards regression models proved tumor budding to be an independent predictor of disease progression (hazard ratio 3.91, 95 % confidence interval 1.3-11.77; P = 0.02) and cancer-related death (hazard ratio 5.90, 95 % confidence interval 1.62-21.51; P = 0.007). The combination of infiltrating growth pattern and high-grade budding did not have a stronger prognostic significance than tumor budding alone. Tumor budding independently predicted patient outcome in patients with AJCC/UICC stage II colorectal cancer and may therefore be used for accurate prognostication, patient counseling, and design of clinical trials by using integrated multimodal therapy.

  12. BudBurst Buddies: A New Tool for Engaging the Youngest Citizen Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, L. S.; Henderson, S.; Ward, D.

    2010-12-01

    BudBurst Buddies (www.budburstbuddies.org) introduces elementary school age children to the science of observing plants and the timing of phenological (life cycle) events. BudBurst Buddies is a new part of the Project BudBurst national citizen science initiative (www.budburst.org), which allows individuals to engage in the scientific process, contributing to a better understanding of climate change while increasing public awareness of phenology and the impacts of climate change on plants. As a first step towards engaging the next generation of citizen scientists, BudBurst Buddies provides the opportunity for children to gain experience with scientific research and increases awareness of how plants change throughout the year. Children can participate in BudBurst Buddies on their own, with their families, or in formal or informal education settings. Each child who participates creates a journal about a plant of his or her choosing, makes observations of the plant over the growing season and submits findings online, earning an official BudBurst Buddies certificate. An online storybook for kids tells how two children, Lily and Sage, observed plants in their neighborhood and became BudBurst Buddies. This presentation will provide an overview of the BudBurst Buddies newly developed resources. BudBurst Buddies is a part of Project BudBurst, a national citizen science program coordinated by the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Chicago Botanic Garden. Funding for this resource was provided by NEON, NSF, NASA, and the National Geographic Education Foundation.

  13. Spatial Variability of Grapevine Bud Burst Percentage and Its Association with Soil Properties at Field Scale.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Hao, Xinmei; Kang, Shaozhong

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in precision viticulture with the development of global positioning system and geographical information system technologies. Limited information is available on spatial variation of bud behavior and its possible association with soil properties. The objective of this study was to investigate spatial variability of bud burst percentage and its association with soil properties based on 2-year experiments at a vineyard of arid northwest China. Geostatistical approach was used to describe the spatial variation in bud burst percentage within the vineyard. Partial least square regressions (PLSRs) of bud burst percentage with soil properties were used to evaluate the contribution of soil properties to overall spatial variability in bud burst percentage for the high, medium and low bud burst percentage groups. Within the vineyard, the coefficient of variation (CV) of bud burst percentage was 20% and 15% for 2012 and 2013 respectively. Bud burst percentage within the vineyard showed moderate spatial variability, and the overall spatial pattern of bud burst percentage was similar between the two years. Soil properties alone explained 31% and 37% of the total spatial variation respectively for the low group of 2012 and 2013, and 16% and 24% for the high group of 2012 and 2013 respectively. For the low group, the fraction of variations explained by soil properties was found similar between the two years, while there was substantial difference for the high group. The findings are expected to lay a good foundation for developing remedy measures in the areas with low bud burst percentage, thus in turn improving the overall grape yield and quality.

  14. Requirements for budding of paramyxovirus simian virus 5 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anthony P; Leser, George P; Waning, David L; Lamb, Robert A

    2002-04-01

    Enveloped viruses are released from infected cells after coalescence of viral components at cellular membranes and budding of membranes to release particles. For some negative-strand RNA viruses (e.g., vesicular stomatitis virus and Ebola virus), the viral matrix (M) protein contains all of the information needed for budding, since virus-like particles (VLPs) are efficiently released from cells when the M protein is expressed from cDNA. To investigate the requirements for budding of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5), its M protein was expressed in mammalian cells, and it was found that SV5 M protein alone could not induce vesicle budding and was not secreted from cells. Coexpression of M protein with the viral hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) or fusion (F) glycoproteins also failed to result in significant VLP release. It was found that M protein in the form of VLPs was only secreted from cells, with an efficiency comparable to authentic virus budding, when M protein was coexpressed with one of the two glycoproteins, HN or F, together with the nucleocapsid (NP) protein. The VLPs appeared similar morphologically to authentic virions by electron microscopy. CsCl density gradient centrifugation indicated that almost all of the NP protein in the cells had assembled into nucleocapsid-like structures. Deletion of the F and HN cytoplasmic tails indicated an important role of these cytoplasmic tails in VLP budding. Furthermore, truncation of the HN cytoplasmic tail was found to be inhibitory toward budding, since it prevented coexpressed wild-type (wt) F protein from directing VLP budding. Conversely, truncation of the F protein cytoplasmic tail was not inhibitory and did not affect the ability of coexpressed wt HN protein to direct the budding of particles. Taken together, these data suggest that multiple viral components, including assembled nucleocapsids, have important roles in the paramyxovirus budding process.

  15. Spatial Variability of Grapevine Bud Burst Percentage and Its Association with Soil Properties at Field Scale

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Hao, Xinmei; Kang, Shaozhong

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in precision viticulture with the development of global positioning system and geographical information system technologies. Limited information is available on spatial variation of bud behavior and its possible association with soil properties. The objective of this study was to investigate spatial variability of bud burst percentage and its association with soil properties based on 2-year experiments at a vineyard of arid northwest China. Geostatistical approach was used to describe the spatial variation in bud burst percentage within the vineyard. Partial least square regressions (PLSRs) of bud burst percentage with soil properties were used to evaluate the contribution of soil properties to overall spatial variability in bud burst percentage for the high, medium and low bud burst percentage groups. Within the vineyard, the coefficient of variation (CV) of bud burst percentage was 20% and 15% for 2012 and 2013 respectively. Bud burst percentage within the vineyard showed moderate spatial variability, and the overall spatial pattern of bud burst percentage was similar between the two years. Soil properties alone explained 31% and 37% of the total spatial variation respectively for the low group of 2012 and 2013, and 16% and 24% for the high group of 2012 and 2013 respectively. For the low group, the fraction of variations explained by soil properties was found similar between the two years, while there was substantial difference for the high group. The findings are expected to lay a good foundation for developing remedy measures in the areas with low bud burst percentage, thus in turn improving the overall grape yield and quality. PMID:27798692

  16. Phytase production by solid-state fermentation of groundnut oil cake by Aspergillus niger: A bioprocess optimization study for animal feedstock applications.

    PubMed

    Buddhiwant, Priyanka; Bhavsar, Kavita; Kumar, V Ravi; Khire, Jayant M

    2016-08-17

    This investigation deals with the use of agro-industrial waste, namely groundnut oil cake (GOC), for phytase production by the fungi Aspergillus niger NCIM 563. Plackett-Burman design (PBD) was used to evaluate the effect of 11 process variables and studies here showed that phytase production was significantly influenced by glucose, dextrin, distilled water, and MgSO4 · 7H2O. The use of response surface methodology (RSM) by Box-Behnken design (BBD) of experiments further enhanced the production by a remarkable 36.67-fold from the original finding of 15 IU/gds (grams of dry substrate) to 550 IU/gds. This is the highest solid-state fermentation (SSF) phytase production reported when compared to other microorganisms and in fact betters the best known by a factor of 2. Experiments carried out using dried fermented koji for phosphorus and mineral release and also thermal stability have shown the phytase to be as efficient as the liquid enzyme extract. Also, the enzyme, while exhibiting optimal activity under acidic conditions, was found to have significant activity in a broad range of pH values (1.5-6.5). The studies suggest the suitability of the koji supplemented with phytase produced in an SSF process by the "generally regarded as safe" (GRAS) microorganism A. niger as a cost-effective value-added livestock feed when compared to that obtained by submerged fermentation (SmF).

  17. Reducing age at first calving in N'Dama heifers using groundnut cake as a supplement to grazed natural pasture in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Tanner, J C; Little, D A; Holden, S J; Dampha, K

    1995-05-01

    N'Dama heifers, initially weighing 129 kg at approximately 30 months of age, were supplemented with 250, 500 or 1000 g/head/day groundnut cake for 3 or 6 months during the dry or dry and wet seasons. Highly significant improvements in rates of liveweight gain and reproductive performance were obtained. Supplementation during the dry season only, approximately trebled the proportion of animals calving within 2 years of the beginning of the trial (6 vs 20%, P < 0.05), while this increase was around eight-fold in the animals that continued to receive supplement during the wet season (6 vs 50%, P < 0.05). Conceptions occurred at an overall mean liveweight of 185 kg, and a "target" liveweight of 200 kg for the first conception of N'Dama heifers is proposed as the basis for husbandry recommendations concerning these animals. It is concluded that such intervention can reduce the usually observed age at first calving of village based N'Dama heifers by 12 months, in a fashion that is both practicable and financially advantageous.

  18. A comprehensive model to predict mitotic division in budding yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Yadav, Vikas; Sridhar, Shreyas; Sreekumar, Lakshmi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Ghosh, Santanu Kumar; Paul, Raja; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2015-01-01

    High-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division depends on a series of concerted interdependent interactions. Using a systems biology approach, we built a robust minimal computational model to comprehend mitotic events in dividing budding yeasts of two major phyla: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This model accurately reproduces experimental observations related to spindle alignment, nuclear migration, and microtubule (MT) dynamics during cell division in these yeasts. The model converges to the conclusion that biased nucleation of cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) is essential for directional nuclear migration. Two distinct pathways, based on the population of cMTs and cortical dyneins, differentiate nuclear migration and spindle orientation in these two phyla. In addition, the model accurately predicts the contribution of specific classes of MTs in chromosome segregation. Thus we present a model that offers a wider applicability to simulate the effects of perturbation of an event on the concerted process of the mitotic cell division. PMID:26310442

  19. Mitochondrial inheritance in budding yeasts: towards an integrated understanding.

    PubMed

    Solieri, Lisa

    2010-11-01

    Recent advances in yeast mitogenomics have significantly contributed to our understanding of the diversity of organization, structure and topology in the mitochondrial genome of budding yeasts. In parallel, new insights on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae highlighted an integrated scenario where recombination, replication and segregation of mtDNA are intricately linked to mitochondrial nucleoid (mt-nucleoid) structure and organelle sorting. In addition to this, recent discoveries of bifunctional roles of some mitochondrial proteins have interesting implications on mito-nuclear genome interactions and the relationship between mtDNA inheritance, yeast fitness and speciation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on yeast mitogenomics, mtDNA inheritance with regard to mt-nucleoid structure and organelle dynamics, and mito-nuclear genome interactions.

  20. Anisotropic stress orients remodelling of mammalian limb bud ectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Kimberly; Tao, Hirotaka; Liu, Haijiao; Wen, Jun; Sturgeon, Kendra; Sorfazlian, Natalie; Lazic, Savo; Burrows, Jeffrey T. A.; Wong, Michael D.; Li, Danyi; Deimling, Steven; Ciruna, Brian; Scott, Ian; Simmons, Craig; Henkelman, R. Mark; Williams, Trevor; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Sun, Yu; Hopyan, Sevan

    2016-01-01

    The physical forces that drive morphogenesis are not well characterized in vivo, especially among vertebrates. In the early limb bud, dorsal and ventral ectoderm converge to form the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. By live imaging mouse embryos, we show that prospective AER progenitors intercalate at the dorsoventral boundary and that ectoderm remodels by concomitant cell division and neighbour exchange. Mesodermal expansion and ectodermal tension together generate a dorsoventrally biased stress pattern that orients ectodermal remodelling. Polarized distribution of cortical actin reflects this stress pattern in a β-catenin- and Fgfr2-dependent manner. Intercalation of AER progenitors generates a tensile gradient that reorients resolution of multicellular rosettes on adjacent surfaces, a process facilitated by β-catenin-dependent attachment of cortex to membrane. Therefore, feedback between tissue stress pattern and cell intercalations remodels mammalian ectoderm. PMID:25893915