Science.gov

Sample records for group interaction parameters

  1. Including gauge-group parameters into the theory of interactions: an alternative mass-generating mechanism for gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Aldaya, V.; Lopez-Ruiz, F. F.; Sanchez-Sastre, E.

    2006-11-03

    We reformulate the gauge theory of interactions by introducing the gauge group parameters into the model. The dynamics of the new 'Goldstone-like' bosons is accomplished through a non-linear {sigma}-model Lagrangian. They are minimally coupled according to a proper prescription which provides mass terms to the intermediate vector bosons without spoiling gauge invariance. The present formalism is explicitly applied to the Standard Model of electroweak interactions.

  2. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  3. Deciphering interactions in moving animal groups.

    PubMed

    Gautrais, Jacques; Ginelli, Francesco; Fournier, Richard; Blanco, Stéphane; Soria, Marc; Chaté, Hugues; Theraulaz, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Collective motion phenomena in large groups of social organisms have long fascinated the observer, especially in cases, such as bird flocks or fish schools, where large-scale highly coordinated actions emerge in the absence of obvious leaders. However, the mechanisms involved in this self-organized behavior are still poorly understood, because the individual-level interactions underlying them remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the power of a bottom-up methodology to build models for animal group motion from data gathered at the individual scale. Using video tracks of fish shoal in a tank, we show how a careful, incremental analysis at the local scale allows for the determination of the stimulus/response function governing an individual's moving decisions. We find in particular that both positional and orientational effects are present, act upon the fish turning speed, and depend on the swimming speed, yielding a novel schooling model whose parameters are all estimated from data. Our approach also leads to identify a density-dependent effect that results in a behavioral change for the largest groups considered. This suggests that, in confined environment, the behavioral state of fish and their reaction patterns change with group size. We debate the applicability, beyond the particular case studied here, of this novel framework for deciphering interactions in moving animal groups.

  4. Systematic study of rapidity dispersion parameter in high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Swarnapratim; Haiduc, Maria; Neagu, Alina Tania; Firu, Elena

    2014-03-01

    A systematic study of rapidity dispersion parameter as a quantitative measure of clustering of particles has been carried out in the interactions of 16O, 28Si and 32S projectiles at 4.5 A GeV/c with heavy (AgBr) and light (CNO) groups of targets present in the nuclear emulsion. For all the interactions, the total ensemble of events has been divided into four overlapping multiplicity classes depending on the number of shower particles. For all the interactions and for each multiplicity class, the rapidity dispersion parameter values indicate the occurrence of clusterization during the multiparticle production at Dubna energy. The measured rapidity dispersion parameter values are found to decrease with the increase of average multiplicity for all the interactions. The dependence of rapidity dispersion parameter on the average multiplicity can be successfully described by a relation D(η) = a + b + c2. The experimental results have been compared with the results obtained from the analysis of Monte Carlo simulated (MC-RAND) events. MC-RAND events show weaker clusterization among the pions in comparison to the experimental data.

  5. Deciphering Interactions in Moving Animal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Gautrais, Jacques; Ginelli, Francesco; Fournier, Richard; Blanco, Stéphane; Soria, Marc; Chaté, Hugues; Theraulaz, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Collective motion phenomena in large groups of social organisms have long fascinated the observer, especially in cases, such as bird flocks or fish schools, where large-scale highly coordinated actions emerge in the absence of obvious leaders. However, the mechanisms involved in this self-organized behavior are still poorly understood, because the individual-level interactions underlying them remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the power of a bottom-up methodology to build models for animal group motion from data gathered at the individual scale. Using video tracks of fish shoal in a tank, we show how a careful, incremental analysis at the local scale allows for the determination of the stimulus/response function governing an individual's moving decisions. We find in particular that both positional and orientational effects are present, act upon the fish turning speed, and depend on the swimming speed, yielding a novel schooling model whose parameters are all estimated from data. Our approach also leads to identify a density-dependent effect that results in a behavioral change for the largest groups considered. This suggests that, in confined environment, the behavioral state of fish and their reaction patterns change with group size. We debate the applicability, beyond the particular case studied here, of this novel framework for deciphering interactions in moving animal groups. PMID:23028277

  6. Interaction-induced effects on Bose-Hubbard parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Mark; Sachdeva, Rashi; Benseny, Albert; Busch, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    We study the effects of repulsive on-site interactions on the broadening of the localized Wannier functions used for calculating the parameters to describe ultracold atoms in optical lattices. For this, we replace the common single-particle Wannier functions, which do not contain any information about the interactions, by two-particle Wannier functions obtained from an exact solution which takes the interactions into account. We then use these interaction-dependent basis functions to calculate the Bose-Hubbard model parameters, showing that they are substantially different both at low and high lattice depths from the ones calculated using single-particle Wannier functions. Our results suggest that density effects are not negligible for many parameter ranges and need to be taken into account in metrology experiments.

  7. Interactions Between Item Content And Group Membership on Achievement Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Robert L.; Harnisch, Delwyn L.

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the interaction of item content and group membership on achievement test items. Estimates of the parameters of the three parameter logistic model were obtained on the 46 item math test for the sample of eighth grade students (N = 2055) participating in the Illinois Inventory of Educational Progress,…

  8. Molybdenum disulfide and water interaction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiranian, Mohammad; Wu, Yanbin; Aluru, Narayana R.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the interaction between water and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is of crucial importance to investigate the physics of various applications involving MoS2 and water interfaces. An accurate force field is required to describe water and MoS2 interactions. In this work, water-MoS2 force field parameters are derived using the high-accuracy random phase approximation (RPA) method and validated by comparing to experiments. The parameters obtained from the RPA method result in water-MoS2 interface properties (solid-liquid work of adhesion) in good comparison to the experimental measurements. An accurate description of MoS2-water interaction will facilitate the study of MoS2 in applications such as DNA sequencing, sea water desalination, and power generation.

  9. Water interactions with hydrophobic groups: Assessment and recalibration of semiempirical molecular orbital methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, Antoine; Monard, Gérald; Ruiz-López, Manuel F.; Ingrosso, Francesca

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we present a study of the ability of different semiempirical methods to describe intermolecular interactions in water solution. In particular, we focus on methods based on the Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap approximation. Significant improvements of these methods have been reported in the literature in the past years regarding the description of non-covalent interactions. In particular, a broad range of methodologies has been developed to deal with the properties of hydrogen-bonded systems, with varying degrees of success. In contrast, the interactions between water and a molecule containing hydrophobic groups have been little analyzed. Indeed, by considering the potential energy surfaces obtained using different semiempirical Hamiltonians for the intermolecular interactions of model systems, we found that none of the available methods provides an entirely satisfactory description of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions in water. In addition, a vibrational analysis carried out in a model system for these interactions, a methane clathrate cluster, showed that some recent methods cannot be used to carry out studies of vibrational properties. Following a procedure established in our group [M. I. Bernal-Uruchurtu, M. T. C. Martins-Costa, C. Millot, and M. F. Ruiz-López, J. Comput. Chem. 21, 572 (2000); W. Harb, M. I. Bernal-Uruchurtu, and M. F. Ruiz-López, Theor. Chem. Acc. 112, 204 (2004)], we developed new parameters for the core-core interaction terms based on fitting potential energy curves obtained at the MP2 level for our model system. We investigated the transferability of the new parameters to describe a system, having both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, interacting with water. We found that only by introducing two different sets of parameters for hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydrogen atom types we are able to match the features of the ab initio calculated properties. Once this assumption is made, a good agreement with the

  10. Interactions of galaxies outside clusters and massive groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Jaswant K.; Chen, Xuelei

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the dependence of physical properties of galaxies on small- and large-scale density environment. The galaxy population consists of mainly passively evolving galaxies in comparatively low-density regions of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We adopt (i) local density, ρ _{20}, derived using adaptive smoothing kernel, (ii) projected distance, r_p, to the nearest neighbor galaxy and (iii) the morphology of the nearest neighbor galaxy as various definitions of environment parameters of every galaxy in our sample. In order to detect long-range interaction effects, we group galaxy interactions into four cases depending on morphology of the target and neighbor galaxies. This study builds upon an earlier study by Park and Choi (2009) by including improved definitions of target and neighbor galaxies, thus enabling us to better understand the effect of "the nearest neighbor" interaction on the galaxy. We report that the impact of interaction on galaxy properties is detectable at least up to the pair separation corresponding to the virial radius of (the neighbor) galaxies. This turns out to be mostly between 210 and 360 h^{-1}kpc for galaxies included in our study. We report that early type fraction for isolated galaxies with r_p > r_{vir,nei} is almost ignorant of the background density and has a very weak density dependence for closed pairs. Star formation activity of a galaxy is found to be crucially dependent on neighbor galaxy morphology. We find star formation activity parameters and structure parameters of galaxies to be independent of the large-scale background density. We also exhibit that changing the absolute magnitude of the neighbor galaxies does not affect significantly the star formation activity of those target galaxies whose morphology and luminosities are fixed.

  11. Quantifying Parameter Sensitivity, Interaction and Transferability in Hydrologically Enhanced Versions of Noah-LSM over Transition Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosero, Enrique; Yang, Zong-Liang; Wagener, Thorsten; Gulden, Lindsey E.; Yatheendradas, Soni; Niu, Guo-Yue

    2009-01-01

    We use sensitivity analysis to identify the parameters that are most responsible for shaping land surface model (LSM) simulations and to understand the complex interactions in three versions of the Noah LSM: the standard version (STD), a version enhanced with a simple groundwater module (GW), and version augmented by a dynamic phenology module (DV). We use warm season, high-frequency, near-surface states and turbulent fluxes collected over nine sites in the US Southern Great Plains. We quantify changes in the pattern of sensitive parameters, the amount and nature of the interaction between parameters, and the covariance structure of the distribution of behavioral parameter sets. Using Sobol s total and first-order sensitivity indexes, we show that very few parameters directly control the variance of the model output. Significant parameter interaction occurs so that not only the optimal parameter values differ between models, but the relationships between parameters change. GW decreases parameter interaction and appears to improve model realism, especially at wetter sites. DV increases parameter interaction and decreases identifiability, implying it is overparameterized and/or underconstrained. A case study at a wet site shows GW has two functional modes: one that mimics STD and a second in which GW improves model function by decoupling direct evaporation and baseflow. Unsupervised classification of the posterior distributions of behavioral parameter sets cannot group similar sites based solely on soil or vegetation type, helping to explain why transferability between sites and models is not straightforward. This evidence suggests a priori assignment of parameters should also consider climatic differences.

  12. Emergent Learning and Interactive Media Artworks: Parameters of Interaction for Novice Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawka, Marta; Larkin, Kevin; Danaher, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Emergent learning describes learning that occurs when participants interact and distribute knowledge, where learning is self-directed, and where the learning destination of the participants is largely unpredictable (Williams, Karousou, & Mackness, 2011). These notions of learning arise from the topologies of social networks and can be applied to…

  13. qPIPSA: Relating enzymatic kinetic parameters and interaction fields

    PubMed Central

    Gabdoulline, Razif R; Stein, Matthias; Wade, Rebecca C

    2007-01-01

    Background The simulation of metabolic networks in quantitative systems biology requires the assignment of enzymatic kinetic parameters. Experimentally determined values are often not available and therefore computational methods to estimate these parameters are needed. It is possible to use the three-dimensional structure of an enzyme to perform simulations of a reaction and derive kinetic parameters. However, this is computationally demanding and requires detailed knowledge of the enzyme mechanism. We have therefore sought to develop a general, simple and computationally efficient procedure to relate protein structural information to enzymatic kinetic parameters that allows consistency between the kinetic and structural information to be checked and estimation of kinetic constants for structurally and mechanistically similar enzymes. Results We describe qPIPSA: quantitative Protein Interaction Property Similarity Analysis. In this analysis, molecular interaction fields, for example, electrostatic potentials, are computed from the enzyme structures. Differences in molecular interaction fields between enzymes are then related to the ratios of their kinetic parameters. This procedure can be used to estimate unknown kinetic parameters when enzyme structural information is available and kinetic parameters have been measured for related enzymes or were obtained under different conditions. The detailed interaction of the enzyme with substrate or cofactors is not modeled and is assumed to be similar for all the proteins compared. The protein structure modeling protocol employed ensures that differences between models reflect genuine differences between the protein sequences, rather than random fluctuations in protein structure. Conclusion Provided that the experimental conditions and the protein structural models refer to the same protein state or conformation, correlations between interaction fields and kinetic parameters can be established for sets of related enzymes

  14. Nonparametric tests for interaction and group differences in a two-way layout.

    PubMed

    Fisher, A C; Wallenstein, S

    1991-01-01

    Nonparametric tests of group differences and interaction across strata are developed in which the null hypotheses for these tests are expressed as functions of rho i = P(X > Y) + 1/2P(X = Y), where X refers to a random observation from one group and Y refers to a random observation from the other group within stratum i. The estimator r of the parameter rho is shown to be a useful way to summarize and examine data for ordinal and continuous data.

  15. Effects of Ignoring Item Interaction on Item Parameter Estimation and Detection of Interacting Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Cheng-Te; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the effects of ignoring item interaction on item parameter estimation and the efficiency of using the local dependence index Q[subscript 3] and the SAS NLMIXED procedure to detect item interaction under the three-parameter logistic model and the generalized partial credit model. Through simulations, it was found that ignoring…

  16. Weak Interactions Group

    Science.gov Websites

    Weak Interactions Group UC Berkeley UC Berkeley Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab Nuclear Science Division at LBL Physics Division at LBL Phonebook A-Z Index Navigation Home Members Research Projects CUORE Design Concept Berkeley Projects People Publications Contact Links KamLAND Physics Impact Neutrino

  17. Environmental interactions in space exploration: Environmental interactions working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    1992-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Exploration Initiative, the possibility of designing and using systems on scales heretofore unattempted presents exciting new challenges in systems design and space science. The environments addressed by the Space Exploration Initiative include the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, as well as the varied plasma and field environments which will be encountered by humans and cargo enroute to these destinations. Systems designers will need to understand environmental interactions and be able to model these mechanisms from the earliest conceptual design stages through design completion. To the end of understanding environmental interactions and establishing robotic precursor mission requirements, an Environmental Interactions Working Group was established as part of the Robotic Missions Working Group. The working group is described, and its current activities are updated.

  18. T-Group and Therapy Group Communication: An Interaction Analysis of the Group Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, B. Aubrey

    1979-01-01

    Provides an insight into the group process of therapy and compares and contrasts the T-group process with therapy group process. The here-and-now orientation was present in T-group and therapy-group interaction. Greater relational conflict was present in the T-group. Members of the therapy group were much more defensive than members of the…

  19. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanbin; Aluru, Narayana R., E-mail: aluru@illinois.edu; Wagner, Lucas K.

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics andmore » ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.« less

  20. Interactive effects of dietary leucine and isoleucine on growth, blood parameters, and amino acid profile of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Han, Yuzhe; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Sun, Menglei; Si, Bin; Chen, Fei; Bao, Ning

    2017-10-01

    A 60-day feeding trial was conducted to assess the interactions of dietary leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (Ile) on Japanese flounder. Fish of 2.69 ± 0.04 g were fed experimental diets containing two levels of Leu (2.58 and 5.08% of diet) combined with three levels of Ile (1.44, 2.21, and 4.44% of diet), respectively. After the feeding trial, growth, proximate composition, muscle total amino acid profile, blood parameters, mucus lysozyme activity, and stress tolerance to freshwater were measured. Statistically significant (P < 0.05) interactive effects of Leu and Ile were found on growth parameters (final body weight, body weight gain, and special growth rate) of Japanese flounder. Antagonism was discovered in high dietary Leu groups, while stimulatory effects were obtained for increased dietary Ile in low Leu groups. Interactive effects of these two branched-chain amino acids were also found on hepatosomatic index of test fish. In addition, crude lipid content of fish whole body was significantly altered by various diets, with antagonism observed in low dietary Leu groups. Interactive effects also existed in muscle amino acid profiles for low fish meal diets, but no interactive impacts were observed on blood parameters. Furthermore, lysozyme activities and freshwater stress were significantly affected by different diets. And antagonism was found on lysozyme activities in low Leu groups. Moreover, high Leu and high Ile levels of diet significantly altered freshwater stress tolerance of Japanese flounder. These findings suggested that dietary Leu and Ile can effect interactively, and fish fed with diets containing 2.58% Leu with 4.44% Ile and 5.08% Leu with 1.44% Ile showed better growth performance.

  1. Modeling Interactions in Small Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heise, David R.

    2013-01-01

    A new theory of interaction within small groups posits that group members initiate actions when tension mounts between the affective meanings of their situational identities and impressions produced by recent events. Actors choose partners and behaviors so as to reduce the tensions. A computer model based on this theory, incorporating reciprocal…

  2. Interpretation of neutrino-matter interactions at low energies as contraction of gauge group of Electroweak Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, N. A., E-mail: gromov@dm.komisc.ru

    The very weak neutrino-matter interactions are explained with the help of the gauge group contraction of the standard Electroweak Model. The mathematical contraction procedure is connected with the energy dependence of the interaction cross section for neutrinos and corresponds to the limiting case of the Electroweak Model at low energies. Contraction parameter is connected with the universal Fermi constant of weak interactions and neutrino energy as j{sup 2}(s) = {radical}(G{sub F} s)

  3. Peer Groups as a Context for School Misconduct: The Moderating Role of Group Interactional Style.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wendy; Zarbatany, Lynne; Chen, Xinyin; Kinal, Megan; Boyko, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Peer group interactional style was examined as a moderator of the relation between peer group school misconduct and group members' school misconduct. Participants were 705 students (M age  = 11.59 years, SD = 1.37) in 148 peer groups. Children reported on their school misconduct in fall and spring. In the winter, group members were observed in a limited-resource task and a group conversation task, and negative and positive group interactional styles were assessed. Multilevel modeling indicated that membership in groups that were higher on school misconduct predicted greater school misconduct only when the groups were high on negative or low on positive interactional style. Results suggest that negative laughter and a coercive interactional style may intensify group effects on children's misconduct. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  4. The Development of Group Interaction Patterns: How Groups become Adaptive, Generative, and Transformative Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Manuel; Sessa, Valerie I.

    2007-01-01

    This article integrates the literature on group interaction process analysis and group learning, providing a framework for understanding how patterns of interaction develop. The model proposes how adaptive, generative, and transformative learning processes evolve and vary in their functionality. Environmental triggers for learning, the group's…

  5. Potential for the dynamics of pedestrians in a socially interacting group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanlungo, Francesco; Ikeda, Tetsushi; Kanda, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a simple potential to describe the dynamics of the relative motion of two pedestrians socially interacting in a walking group. We show that the proposed potential, based on basic empirical observations and theoretical considerations, can qualitatively describe the statistical properties of pedestrian behavior. In detail, we show that the two-dimensional probability distribution of the relative distance is determined by the proposed potential through a Boltzmann distribution. After calibrating the parameters of the model on the two-pedestrian group data, we apply the model to three-pedestrian groups, showing that it describes qualitatively and quantitatively well their behavior. In particular, the model predicts that three-pedestrian groups walk in a V-shaped formation and provides accurate values for the position of the three pedestrians. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the average walking velocity of three-person groups based on the velocity of two-person ones. Possible extensions to larger groups, along with alternative explanations of the social dynamics that may be implied by our model, are discussed at the end of the paper.

  6. Single functional group interactions with individual carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friddle, Raymond W.; Lemieux, Melburne C.; Cicero, Giancarlo; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Grossman, Jeffrey C.; Galli, Giulia; Noy, Aleksandr

    2007-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes display a consummate blend of materials properties that affect applications ranging from nanoelectronic circuits and biosensors to field emitters and membranes. These applications use the non-covalent interactions between the nanotubes and chemical functionalities, often involving a few molecules at a time. Despite their wide use, we still lack a fundamental understanding and molecular-level control of these interactions. We have used chemical force microscopy to measure the strength of the interactions of single chemical functional groups with the sidewalls of vapour-grown individual single-walled carbon nanotubes. Surprisingly, the interaction strength does not follow conventional trends of increasing polarity or hydrophobicity, and instead reflects the complex electronic interactions between the nanotube and the functional group. Ab initio calculations confirm the observed trends and predict binding force distributions for a single molecular contact that match the experimental results. Our analysis also reveals the important role of molecular linkage dynamics in determining interaction strength at the single functional group level.

  7. Group interaction and flight crew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foushee, H. Clayton; Helmreich, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The application of human-factors analysis to the performance of aircraft-operation tasks by the crew as a group is discussed in an introductory review and illustrated with anecdotal material. Topics addressed include the function of a group in the operational environment, the classification of group performance factors (input, process, and output parameters), input variables and the flight crew process, and the effect of process variables on performance. Consideration is given to aviation safety issues, techniques for altering group norms, ways of increasing crew effort and coordination, and the optimization of group composition.

  8. Audience Design through Social Interaction during Group Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Shane L.; Fay, Nicolas; Maybery, Murray

    2013-01-01

    This paper contrasts two accounts of audience design during multiparty communication: audience design as a strategic individual-level message adjustment or as a non-strategic interaction-level message adjustment. Using a non-interactive communication task, Experiment 1 showed that people distinguish between messages designed for oneself and messages designed for another person; consistent with strategic message design, messages designed for another person/s were longer (number of words) than those designed for oneself. However, audience size did not affect message length (messages designed for different sized audiences were similar in length). Using an interactive communication task Experiment 2 showed that as group size increased so too did communicative effort (number of words exchanged between interlocutors). Consistent with a non-strategic account, as group members were added more social interaction was necessary to coordinate the group's collective situation model. Experiment 3 validates and extends the production measures used in Experiment 1 and 2 using a comprehension task. Taken together, our results indicate that audience design arises as a non-strategic outcome of social interaction during group discussion. PMID:23437343

  9. Structural and interaction parameters of thermosensitive native α-elastin biohybrid microgel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaceanu, Andreea; Singh, Smriti; Demco, Dan E.; Möller, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The structural and water interaction parameters for native, α-elastin biohybrid microgel crosslinked with hydrophilic and hydrophobic crosslinkers are obtained from the volume phase transition temperature behaviour, 1H high-resolution magic-angle sample spinning transverse magnetization relaxation NMR, and modified Flory-Rehner swelling theory. Firstly, considering a homogeneous morphology the number of subchains in the biohybrid microgel, the residual water in deswollen state as a function of crosslink density and the temperature dependence of the Flory biopolymer-water interaction parameters are reported for the biohybrid microgels prepared with hydrophilic (PEG-DGE) and hydrophobic (BS3) crosslinkers. The Flory-Rehner classical approach is subsequently modified taking into account the heterogeneities observed by NMR transverse relaxation measurements. Two differently mobile regions are determined, a hydrophobic domain and a crosslinking domain with relative reduced mobility. For the first time, the influence of chain mobility on the Flory interaction parameter is investigated through a modified Flory state equation. The contributions of amino-acids located in the hydrophobic and crosslinking domains in the polypeptide sequence are separated while analyzing the biopolymer-water interaction.

  10. Bead-bead interaction parameters in dissipative particle dynamics: Relation to bead-size, solubility parameter, and surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Amitesh; McGrother, Simon

    2004-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is a mesoscale modeling method for simulating equilibrium and dynamical properties of polymers in solution. The basic idea has been around for several decades in the form of bead-spring models. A few years ago, Groot and Warren [J. Chem. Phys. 107, 4423 (1997)] established an important link between DPD and the Flory-Huggins χ-parameter theory for polymer solutions. We revisit the Groot-Warren theory and investigate the DPD interaction parameters as a function of bead size. In particular, we show a consistent scheme of computing the interfacial tension in a segregated binary mixture. Results for three systems chosen for illustration are in excellent agreement with experimental results. This opens the door for determining DPD interactions using interfacial tension as a fitting parameter.

  11. Interactive large-group teaching in a dermatology course.

    PubMed

    Ochsendorf, F R; Boehncke, W-H; Sommerlad, M; Kaufmann, R

    2006-12-01

    This is a prospective study to find out whether an interactive large-group case-based teaching approach combined with small-group bedside teaching improves student satisfaction and learning outcome in a practical dermatology course. During two consecutive terms a rotating system of large-group interactive case-study-method teaching with two tutors (one content expert, one process facilitator) and bedside teaching with randomly appointed tutors was evaluated with a nine-item questionnaire and multiple-choice test performed at the beginning and the end of the course (n = 204/231 students evaluable). The results of three different didactic approaches utilized over the prior year served as a control. The interactive course was rated significantly better (p < 0.0001) than the standard course with regard to all items. The aggregate mark given by the students for the whole course was 1.58-0.61 (mean +/- SD, range 1 (good)-5 (poor)). This was significantly better than the standard course (p < 0.0001) and not different from small-group teaching approaches. The mean test results in the final examination improved significantly (p < 0.01). The combination of large-group interactive teaching and small-group bedside teaching was well accepted, improved the learning outcome, was rated as good as a small-group didactic approach and needed fewer resources in terms of personnel.

  12. Inquiry and groups: student interactions in cooperative inquiry-based science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods-McConney, Amanda; Wosnitza, Marold; Sturrock, Keryn L.

    2016-03-01

    Science education research has recommended cooperative inquiry based science in the primary science context for more than two decades but after more than 20 years, student achievement in science has not substantially improved. This study, through direct observation and analysis, investigated content-related student interactions in an authentic inquiry based primary science class setting. Thirty-one upper primary students were videotaped working in cooperative inquiry based science activities. Cooperative talk and negotiation of the science content was analysed to identify any high-level group interactions. The data show that while all groups have incidences of high-level content-related group interactions, the frequency and duration of these interactions were limited. No specific pattern of preceding events was identified and no episodes of high-level content-related group interactions were immediately preceded by the teacher's interactions with the groups. This in situ study demonstrated that even without any kind of scaffolding, specific skills in knowing how to implement cooperative inquiry based science, high-level content-related group interactions did occur very briefly. Support for teachers to develop their knowledge and skills in facilitating cooperative inquiry based science learning is warranted to ensure that high-level content-related group interactions and the associated conceptual learning are not left to chance in science classrooms.

  13. Model parameters for representative wetland plant functional groups

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Amber S.; Kiniry, James R.; Mushet, David M.; Smith, Loren M.; McMurry, Scott T.; Attebury, Kelly; Lang, Megan; McCarty, Gregory W.; Shaffer, Jill A.; Effland, William R.; Johnson, Mari-Vaughn V.

    2017-01-01

    Wetlands provide a wide variety of ecosystem services including water quality remediation, biodiversity refugia, groundwater recharge, and floodwater storage. Realistic estimation of ecosystem service benefits associated with wetlands requires reasonable simulation of the hydrology of each site and realistic simulation of the upland and wetland plant growth cycles. Objectives of this study were to quantify leaf area index (LAI), light extinction coefficient (k), and plant nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) concentrations in natural stands of representative plant species for some major plant functional groups in the United States. Functional groups in this study were based on these parameters and plant growth types to enable process-based modeling. We collected data at four locations representing some of the main wetland regions of the United States. At each site, we collected on-the-ground measurements of fraction of light intercepted, LAI, and dry matter within the 2013–2015 growing seasons. Maximum LAI and k variables showed noticeable variations among sites and years, while overall averages and functional group averages give useful estimates for multisite simulation modeling. Variation within each species gives an indication of what can be expected in such natural ecosystems. For P and K, the concentrations from highest to lowest were spikerush (Eleocharis macrostachya), reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), smartweed (Polygonum spp.), cattail (Typha spp.), and hardstem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus). Spikerush had the highest N concentration, followed by smartweed, bulrush, reed canary grass, and then cattail. These parameters will be useful for the actual wetland species measured and for the wetland plant functional groups they represent. These parameters and the associated process-based models offer promise as valuable tools for evaluating environmental benefits of wetlands and for evaluating impacts of various agronomic practices in

  14. The Role of Seating Position in Group Interaction: A Review, with Applications for Group Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Jerald

    1976-01-01

    Experimental research relating seating position to group interaction was critically reviewed. Studies have found that persons in central seating positions were able to maintain eye contact with the most group members, thereby enhancing their ability to interact with the group and emerge as the leader. (Author)

  15. Group interaction in problem-based learning tutorials: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Azer, S A; Azer, D

    2015-11-01

    This review aimed at identifying studies on group interaction in problem-based learning (PBL) and elucidate methods used, factors affecting group interaction and the relationship between interaction and student's learning. PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and HighWire were searched (January 1999 to June 2013) using a combination of pre-specified search terms. The search words were also used in searching nine journals in dental and medical education. Also edited research books on PBL were searched. Both qualitative and descriptive studies of group interaction were selected and critically appraised. Finally, 42 of 10,606 papers were included (35 journal articles and seven from research books). The materials used in assessing group interaction varied depending on the methodology design. Forty-three percent of the studies used video recording to evaluate group interaction. Other studies used indirect approaches such as focus groups, interviews and questionnaires. Factors affecting group interactions were students' and tutors' perceptions, tutor's subject-matter expertise, training students, tutor's group dynamics. There was no conclusive evidence about the impact of interaction in PBL on learning. Most studies were from medicine (64%), and 35 papers were published in the last 10 years. The majority of studies were conducted in Europe, North America and Asia. Although there is a progressive increase in publications on PBL group interaction during the last 10 years, there are knowledge gaps and deficiencies in this area and most studies are lacking solid theoretical basis and are descriptive. There is a deficiency in the literature in this area from dentistry and other allied health disciplines. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Observations of Adolescent Peer Group Interactions as a Function of Within- and Between-Group Centrality Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Wendy E.; Dumas, Tara M.; Mahdy, Jasmine C.; Wolfe, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of adolescent (n = 258; M age = 15.45) peer group triads (n = 86) were analyzed to identify conversation and interaction styles as a function of within-group and between-group centrality status. Group members' discussions about hypothetical dilemmas were coded for agreements, disagreements, commands, and opinions. Interactions during…

  17. Persistence and Small Group Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Simon; And Others

    The effects of persistence on students' ability to interact and learn in cooperative learning groups was studied, and the effect of collaboration on students' attitudes toward their partners was assessed. Participants were 138 sixth graders in a midwestern public school. A computer-based lesson and posttest dealt with the advertising concepts of…

  18. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  19. Galaxy interactions in the Hickson Compact Group 88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosch, Noah

    2015-12-01

    I present observations of the Hickson Compact Group 88 (HCG88) obtained during the commissioning of a new 28-inch telescope at the Wise Observatory. This galaxy group was advertized to be non-interacting, or to be in a very early interaction stage, but this is not the case. The observations reported here were done using a `luminance' filter, essentially a very broad R filter, reaching a low surface brightness level of ≈26 mag arcsec-2. Additional observations were obtained in a narrow spectral band approximately centred on the rest-frame H α line from the group. Contrary to previous studies, my observations show that at least two of the major galaxies have had significant interactions in the past, although probably not between themselves. I report the discovery of a faint extended tail emerging from the brightest of the group galaxies, severe isophote twisting and possible outer shells around another galaxy, and map the H II regions in all the galaxies.

  20. Personalized Nutrition-Genes, Diet, and Related Interactive Parameters as Predictors of Cancer in Multiethnic Colorectal Cancer Families.

    PubMed

    Shiao, S Pamela K; Grayson, James; Lie, Amanda; Yu, Chong Ho

    2018-06-20

    To personalize nutrition, the purpose of this study was to examine five key genes in the folate metabolism pathway, and dietary parameters and related interactive parameters as predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC) by measuring the healthy eating index (HEI) in multiethnic families. The five genes included methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase ( MTHFR ) 677 and 1298, methionine synthase ( MTR ) 2756, methionine synthase reductase ( MTRR 66), and dihydrofolate reductase ( DHFR ) 19bp , and they were used to compute a total gene mutation score. We included 53 families, 53 CRC patients and 53 paired family friend members of diverse population groups in Southern California. We measured multidimensional data using the ensemble bootstrap forest method to identify variables of importance within domains of genetic, demographic, and dietary parameters to achieve dimension reduction. We then constructed predictive generalized regression (GR) modeling with a supervised machine learning validation procedure with the target variable (cancer status) being specified to validate the results to allow enhanced prediction and reproducibility. The results showed that the CRC group had increased total gene mutation scores compared to the family members ( p < 0.05). Using the Akaike's information criterion and Leave-One-Out cross validation GR methods, the HEI was interactive with thiamine (vitamin B1), which is a new finding for the literature. The natural food sources for thiamine include whole grains, legumes, and some meats and fish which HEI scoring included as part of healthy portions (versus limiting portions on salt, saturated fat and empty calories). Additional predictors included age, as well as gender and the interaction of MTHFR 677 with overweight status (measured by body mass index) in predicting CRC, with the cancer group having more men and overweight cases. The HEI score was significant when split at the median score of 77 into greater or less scores, confirmed through

  1. Reconstituting protein interaction networks using parameter-dependent domain-domain interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We can describe protein-protein interactions (PPIs) as sets of distinct domain-domain interactions (DDIs) that mediate the physical interactions between proteins. Experimental data confirm that DDIs are more consistent than their corresponding PPIs, lending support to the notion that analyses of DDIs may improve our understanding of PPIs and lead to further insights into cellular function, disease, and evolution. However, currently available experimental DDI data cover only a small fraction of all existing PPIs and, in the absence of structural data, determining which particular DDI mediates any given PPI is a challenge. Results We present two contributions to the field of domain interaction analysis. First, we introduce a novel computational strategy to merge domain annotation data from multiple databases. We show that when we merged yeast domain annotations from six annotation databases we increased the average number of domains per protein from 1.05 to 2.44, bringing it closer to the estimated average value of 3. Second, we introduce a novel computational method, parameter-dependent DDI selection (PADDS), which, given a set of PPIs, extracts a small set of domain pairs that can reconstruct the original set of protein interactions, while attempting to minimize false positives. Based on a set of PPIs from multiple organisms, our method extracted 27% more experimentally detected DDIs than existing computational approaches. Conclusions We have provided a method to merge domain annotation data from multiple sources, ensuring large and consistent domain annotation for any given organism. Moreover, we provided a method to extract a small set of DDIs from the underlying set of PPIs and we showed that, in contrast to existing approaches, our method was not biased towards DDIs with low or high occurrence counts. Finally, we used these two methods to highlight the influence of the underlying annotation density on the characteristics of extracted DDIs. Although

  2. Kinetic and temporospatial gait parameters in a heterogeneous group of dogs.

    PubMed

    Kano, Washington T; Rahal, Sheila C; Agostinho, Felipe S; Mesquita, Luciane R; Santos, Rogerio R; Monteiro, Frederico O B; Castilho, Maira S; Melchert, Alessandra

    2016-01-04

    A prime concern of the gait analysis in a heterogeneous group of dogs is the potential influence of factors such as individual body size, body mass, type of gait, and velocity. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate in a heterogeneous group of dogs a possible correlation of the stride frequency with kinetic and temporospatial variables, as well as the percentage of body weight distribution (%BWD), and compare symmetry index (SI) between trotting and walking dogs. Twenty-nine clinically healthy dogs moving in a controlled velocity were used. The dogs were organized into two groups based on duty factor. Group 1 comprised 15 walking dogs, aged from 9 months to 8 years and weighing about 22.3 kg. Group 2 had 14 trotting dogs, aged from 1 to 6 years and weighing about 6.5 kg. The kinetic data and temporospatial parameters were obtained using a pressure-sensing walkway. The velocity was 0.9-1.1 m/s. The peak vertical force (PVF), vertical impulse (VI), gait cycle time, stance time, swing time, stride length, and percentages of body weight distribution among the four limbs were determined. For each variable, the SIs were calculated. Pearson's coefficient was used to evaluate correlation between stride frequency and other variables, initially in each group and after including all animals. Except for the %BWD (approximately 60% for the forelimbs and 40% for the hind limbs), all other parameters differed between groups. Considering each Group individually a strong correlation was observed for most of the temporospatial parameters, but no significant correlation occurred between stride frequency and PVF, and stride frequency and %BWD. However, including all dogs a strong correlation was observed in all temporospatial parameters, and moderate correlation between stride frequency and VI, and weak correlation between stride frequency and PVF. There was no correlation between stride frequency and %BWD. Groups 1 and 2 did not differ statistically in SIs. In a heterogeneous group of

  3. Optimal recruitment strategies for groups of interacting walkers with leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-García, Ricardo; López, Cristóbal; Vazquez, Federico

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a model of interacting random walkers on a finite one-dimensional chain with absorbing boundaries or targets at the ends. Walkers are of two types: informed particles that move ballistically towards a given target and diffusing uninformed particles that are biased towards close informed individuals. This model mimics the dynamics of hierarchical groups of animals, where an informed individual tries to persuade and lead the movement of its conspecifics. We characterize the success of this persuasion by the first-passage probability of the uninformed particle to the target, and we interpret the speed of the informed particle as a strategic parameter that the particle can tune to maximize its success. We find that the success probability is nonmonotonic, reaching its maximum at an intermediate speed whose value increases with the diffusing rate of the uninformed particle. When two different groups of informed leaders traveling in opposite directions compete, usually the largest group is the most successful. However, the minority can reverse this situation and become the most probable winner by following two different strategies: increasing its attraction strength or adjusting its speed to an optimal value relative to the majority's speed.

  4. TROPIX plasma interactions group report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Joel L.; Chock, Ricaurte

    1993-10-01

    The purpose is to summarize the spacecraft charging analysis conducted by the plasma interactions group during the period from April 1993 to July 1993, on the proposed TROPIX spacecraft, and to make design recommendations which will limit the detrimental effects introduced by spacecraft charging. The recommendations were presented to the TROPIX study team at a Technical Review meeting held on 15 July 1993.

  5. TROPIX plasma interactions group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Joel L.; Chock, Ricaurte

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to summarize the spacecraft charging analysis conducted by the plasma interactions group during the period from April 1993 to July 1993, on the proposed TROPIX spacecraft, and to make design recommendations which will limit the detrimental effects introduced by spacecraft charging. The recommendations were presented to the TROPIX study team at a Technical Review meeting held on 15 July 1993.

  6. Dynamics of Conceptual Change in Small Group Science Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellows, Nancy J.

    This paper documents the dynamics of the social interactions within two small groups of sixth grade students as they solved problems and attempted to understand the concepts related to the nature of matter and molecular theory. Similarities and differences of social interactions between the two groups are compared, and interpretations presented…

  7. Student Talk and Opportunities for Mathematical Learning in Small Group Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Marcy B.; Kalinec, Crystal A.

    2012-01-01

    Small group interactions are an important tool for mathematical learning and yet researchers have neither examined small group talk across entire lessons nor have they focused on moments of mathematical learning in small groups. We examined such talk and identified kinds of interactions and connections between interactions and mathematical…

  8. From pairwise to group interactions in games of cyclic dominance.

    PubMed

    Szolnoki, Attila; Vukov, Jeromos; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-06-01

    We study the rock-paper-scissors game in structured populations, where the invasion rates determine individual payoffs that govern the process of strategy change. The traditional version of the game is recovered if the payoffs for each potential invasion stem from a single pairwise interaction. However, the transformation of invasion rates to payoffs also allows the usage of larger interaction ranges. In addition to the traditional pairwise interaction, we therefore consider simultaneous interactions with all nearest neighbors, as well as with all nearest and next-nearest neighbors, thus effectively going from single pair to group interactions in games of cyclic dominance. We show that differences in the interaction range affect not only the stationary fractions of strategies but also their relations of dominance. The transition from pairwise to group interactions can thus decelerate and even revert the direction of the invasion between the competing strategies. Like in evolutionary social dilemmas, in games of cyclic dominance, too, the indirect multipoint interactions that are due to group interactions hence play a pivotal role. Our results indicate that, in addition to the invasion rates, the interaction range is at least as important for the maintenance of biodiversity among cyclically competing strategies.

  9. Environmental interactions in Space Exploration: Announcement of the formation of an Environmental Interactions Working Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    1991-01-01

    With the advent of the Space Exploration Initiative, the possibility of designing and using systems on scales not heretofore attempted presents exciting new challenges in systems design and space science. The environments addressed by the Space Exploration Initiative include the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, as well as the varied plasma and field environments which will be encountered by humans and cargo enroute to these destinations. Systems designers will need to understand environmental interactions and be able to model these mechanisms from the earliest conceptual design stages through design completion. To the end of understanding environmental interactions and establishing robotic precursor mission requirements, an Environmental Interactions Working Group has been established as part of the Robotic Missions Working Group. The current paper describes the working group and gives an update of its current activities. Working group charter and operation are reviewed, background information on the environmental interactions and their characteristics is offered, and the current status of the group's activities is presented along with anticipations for the future.

  10. Is there an attractive interaction between two methyl groups?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Hong-Ying; Jiang, Li-Xia; Li, Qing-Zhong; Li, Wen-Zuo; Cheng, Jian-Bo

    2014-07-01

    A weak interaction was found between the two methyl groups in the complexes of XCH3-CH3BH2 (X = F, CN, NO2, HCO, and SOCH3), where the former methyl group acts as a Lewis acid and the latter one as a Lewis base. This directional interaction has small interaction energy, accompanied with some small changes in geometry and spectroscopy. Stronger Lewis acids FYH3 (Y = Si, Ge, and Sn) as well as Lewis bases CH3BeH and CH3MgH were compared. Dispersion energy is the major source of attraction and electrostatic contribution grows up to exceed dispersion energy for stronger interactions.

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions.

  12. Boundaries around Group Interaction: The Effect of Size and Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Eric S.

    The stimulus value of group boundaries was investigated in a field experiment. It was hypothesized that the size of a group and the status of its members would reduce the permeability of a boundary around an interacting group. Two or 4 interacting people of high or low status interrupted the traffic flow in a university hallway. Results indicate…

  13. Evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations: a review

    PubMed Central

    Perc, Matjaž; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Szolnoki, Attila; Floría, Luis M.; Moreno, Yamir

    2013-01-01

    Interactions among living organisms, from bacteria colonies to human societies, are inherently more complex than interactions among particles and non-living matter. Group interactions are a particularly important and widespread class, representative of which is the public goods game. In addition, methods of statistical physics have proved valuable for studying pattern formation, equilibrium selection and self-organization in evolutionary games. Here, we review recent advances in the study of evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on top of structured populations, including lattices, complex networks and coevolutionary models. We also compare these results with those obtained on well-mixed populations. The review particularly highlights that the study of the dynamics of group interactions, like several other important equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical processes in biological, economical and social sciences, benefits from the synergy between statistical physics, network science and evolutionary game theory. PMID:23303223

  14. Networked Interactive Video for Group Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eary, John

    2008-01-01

    The National Computing Centre (NCC) has developed an interactive video training system for the Scottish Police College to help train police supervisory officers in crowd control at major spectator events, such as football matches. This approach involves technology-enhanced training in a group-learning environment, and may have significant impact…

  15. Description of the Hexadecapole Deformation Parameter in the sdg Interacting Boson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-xin; Sun, Di; Wang, Jia-jun; Han, Qi-zhi

    1998-04-01

    The hexadecapole deformation parameter β4 of the rare-earth and actinide nuclei is investigated in the framework of the sdg interacing boson model. An explicit relation between the geometric hexadecapole deformation parameter β4 and the intrinsic deformation parameters epsilon4, epsilon2 are obtained. The deformation parameters β4 of the rare-earths and actinides are determined without any free parameter. The calculated results agree with experimental data well. It also shows that the SU(5) limit of the sdg interacting boson model can describe the β4 systematics as well as the SU(3) limit.

  16. Photon Interaction Parameters for Some Borate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Nisha; Kaur, Updesh; Singh, Tejbir

    2010-11-06

    Some photon interaction parameters of dosimetric interest such as mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number, electron density and KERMA relative to air have been computed in the wide energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV for some borate glasses viz. barium-lead borate, bismuth-borate, calcium-strontium borate, lead borate and zinc-borate glass. It has been observed that lead borate glass and barium-lead borate glass have maximum values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and KERMA relative to air. Hence, these borate glasses are suitable as gamma ray shielding material, packing of radioactive sources etc.

  17. Interaction rules underlying group decisions in homing pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Benjamin; Perna, Andrea; Biro, Dora; Sumpter, David J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Travelling in groups gives animals opportunities to share route information by following cues from each other's movement. The outcome of group navigation will depend on how individuals respond to each other within a flock, school, swarm or herd. Despite the abundance of modelling studies, only recently have researchers developed techniques to determine the interaction rules among real animals. Here, we use high-resolution GPS (global positioning system) tracking to study these interactions in pairs of pigeons flying home from a familiar site. Momentary changes in velocity indicate alignment with the neighbour's direction, as well as attraction or avoidance depending on distance. Responses were stronger when the neighbour was in front. From the flocking behaviour, we develop a model to predict features of group navigation. Specifically, we show that the interactions between pigeons stabilize a side-by-side configuration, promoting bidirectional information transfer and reducing the risk of separation. However, if one bird gets in front it will lead directional choices. Our model further predicts, and observations confirm, that a faster bird (as measured from solo flights) will fly slightly in front and thus dominate the choice of homing route. Our results explain how group decisions emerge from individual differences in homing flight behaviour. PMID:24068173

  18. High-Level Ab Initio Calculations of Intermolecular Interactions: Heavy Main-Group Element π-Interactions.

    PubMed

    Krasowska, Małgorzata; Schneider, Wolfgang B; Mehring, Michael; Auer, Alexander A

    2018-05-02

    This work reports high-level ab initio calculations and a detailed analysis on the nature of intermolecular interactions of heavy main-group element compounds and π systems. For this purpose we have chosen a set of benchmark molecules of the form MR 3 , in which M=As, Sb, or Bi, and R=CH 3 , OCH 3 , or Cl. Several methods for the description of weak intermolecular interactions are benchmarked including DFT-D, DFT-SAPT, MP2, and high-level coupled cluster methods in the DLPNO-CCSD(T) approximation. Using local energy decomposition (LED) and an analysis of the electron density, details of the nature of this interaction are unraveled. The results yield insight into the nature of dispersion and donor-acceptor interactions in this type of system, including systematic trends in the periodic table, and also provide a benchmark for dispersion interactions in heavy main-group element compounds. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Peer Groups as a Context for School Misconduct: The Moderating Role of Group Interactional Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Wendy; Zarbatany, Lynne; Chen, Xinyin; Kinal, Megan; Boyko, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Peer group interactional style was examined as a moderator of the relation between peer group school misconduct and group members' school misconduct. Participants were 705 students (M[subscript age] = 11.59 years, SD = 1.37) in 148 peer groups. Children reported on their school misconduct in fall and spring. In the winter, group members were…

  20. The influence of the nature of a substituent on the parameters of the intra- and intermolecular interactions in molecules of cross-conjugated ketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompaneets, V. V.; Vasilieva, I. A.

    2017-08-01

    We have quantitatively analyzed the vibronic parameters of two cross-conjugated δ-dimethylaminoketones. The presence of the -N(CH3)2, C=O, and -NO2 groups in the benzene ring has been shown to affect the manifestation of the vibronic parameters of characteristic bands that describe the state (vibrations, types of deformation upon excitation) of polyene systems with aromatic rings. Data on the influence of the nature of the substituent on the parameters of intra- and intermolecular interactions in the examined compounds have been presented.

  1. Thermodynamic characterization of the interaction between prefoldin and group II chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Sahlan, Muhamad; Zako, Tamotsu; Tai, Phan The; Ohtaki, Akashi; Noguchi, Keiichi; Maeda, Mizuo; Miyatake, Hideyuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Yohda, Masafumi

    2010-06-18

    Prefoldin (PFD) is a hexameric chaperone that captures a protein substrate and transfers it to a group II chaperonin (CPN) to complete protein folding. We have studied the interaction between PFD and CPN using those from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus strain KS-1 (T. KS-1). In this study, we determined the crystal structure of the T. KS-1 PFDbeta2 subunit and characterized the interactions between T. KS-1 CPNs (CPNalpha and CPNbeta) and T. KS-1 PFDs (PFDalpha1-beta1 and PFDalpha2-beta2). As predicted from its amino acid sequence, the PFDbeta2 subunit conforms to a structure similar to those of the PFDbeta1 subunit and the Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 PFDbeta subunit, with the exception of the tip of its coiled-coil domain, which is thought to be the CPN interaction site. The interactions between T. KS-1 CPNs and PFDs (CPNalpha and PFDalpha1-beta1; CPNalpha and PFDalpha2-beta2; CPNbeta and PFDalpha1-beta1; and CPNbeta and PFDalpha2-beta2) were analyzed using the Biacore T100 system at various temperatures ranging from 20 to 45 degrees C. The affinities between PFDs and CPNs increased with an increase in temperature. The thermodynamic parameters calculated from association constants showed that the interaction between PFD and CPN is entropy driven. Among the four combinations of PFD-CPN interactions, the entropy difference in binding between CPNbeta and PFDalpha2-beta2 was the largest, and affinity significantly increased at higher temperatures. Considering that expression of PFDalpha2-beta2 and CPNbeta subunit is induced upon heat shock, our results suggest that PFDalpha1-beta1 is a general PFD for T. KS-1 CPNs, whereas PFDalpha2-beta2 is specific for CPNbeta. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. H I in group interactions: HCG 44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kelley M.; Cluver, M. E.; Yahya, Sahba; Leisman, Lukas; Serra, Paolo; Lucero, Danielle M.; Passmoor, Sean S.; Carignan, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Extending deep observations of the neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) to the environment around galaxy groups can reveal a complex history of group interactions which is invisible to studies that focus on the stellar component. Hickson Compact Group 44 (HCG 44) is a nearby example, and we have combined H I data from the Karoo Array Telescope, Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, and Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey, in order to achieve high column density sensitivity (N _{H {I}}<2× 10^{18} cm-2) to the neutral gas over a large field of view beyond the compact group itself. We find that the giant H I tail north of HCG 44 contains 1.1 × 109 M⊙ of gas and extends 450 kpc from the compact group: twice as much mass and 33 per cent further than previously detected. However, the additional gas is still unable to account for the known H I deficiency of HCG 44. The tail likely formed through a strong tidal interaction and H I clouds in the tail have survived for 1 Gyr or more after being stripped. This has important implications for understanding the survival of neutral clouds in the intragroup and circumgroup medium, and we discuss their survival in the context of simulations of cold gas in hot haloes. HCG 44 is one of a growing number of galaxy groups found to have more extended H I in the intragroup and circumgroup medium than previously measured. Our results provide constraints for simulations on the properties of galaxy group haloes, and reveal a glimpse of what will be seen by future powerful H I telescopes and surveys.

  3. Automated optimization of water-water interaction parameters for a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Joseph C; Chiu, See-Wing; Kirby, Peter; Jakobsson, Eric; Pandit, Sagar A

    2014-02-13

    We have developed an automated parameter optimization software framework (ParOpt) that implements the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm and applied it to a coarse-grained polarizable water model. The model employs a tabulated, modified Morse potential with decoupled short- and long-range interactions incorporating four water molecules per interaction site. Polarizability is introduced by the addition of a harmonic angle term defined among three charged points within each bead. The target function for parameter optimization was based on the experimental density, surface tension, electric field permittivity, and diffusion coefficient. The model was validated by comparison of statistical quantities with experimental observation. We found very good performance of the optimization procedure and good agreement of the model with experiment.

  4. Evolution of cooperation on complex networks with synergistic and discounted group interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Aming; Wang, Long

    2015-06-01

    In the real world individuals often engage in group interactions and their payoffs are determined by many factors, including the typical nonlinear interactions, i.e., synergy and discounting. Previous literatures assume that individual payoffs are either synergistically enhanced or discounted with the additional cooperators. Such settings ignore the interplay of these two factors, which is in sharp contrast with the fact that they ubiquitously coexist. Here we investigate how the coexistence and periodical switching of synergistic and discounted group interactions affect the evolution of cooperation on various complex networks. We show that scale-free networks facilitate the emergence of cooperation in terms of fixation probability for group interactions. With nonlinear interactions the heterogeneity of the degree acts as a double-edged sword: below the neutral drift it is the best for cooperation while above the neutral drift it instead provides the least opportunity for cooperators to be fixed. The advantages of the heterogeneity fade as interactive attributes switch between synergy and discounting, which suggests that the heterogeneity of population structures cannot favor cooperators in group interactions even with simple nonlinear interactions. Nonetheless, scale-free networks always guarantee cooperators the fastest rate of fixation. Our work implies that even very simple nonlinear group interactions could greatly shape the fixation probability and fixation time of cooperators in structured populations indicated by complex networks.

  5. Evaluation of Mineral Content and Photon Interaction Parameters of Dental Enamel After Phosphoric Acid and Er:YAG Laser Treatment.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Huseyin; Gurbuz, Taskın; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmış; Ozdemir, Yuksel

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of laser and acid etching on the mineral content and photon interaction parameters of dental enamel in human teeth. The composition of dental enamel may vary, especially at the surface, depending on the reactions that occur during dental treatment. Forty maxillary premolars were divided randomly into 2 groups of 20 teeth. In the first group, half of teeth crowns were etched by using 37% phosphoric acid; in the second group, half of teeth crowns were etched by using an erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser. The remaining half crowns in each group were used as untreated controls. We characterized the calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and potassium (K) contents in each specimen by using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The total atomic cross-section ([Formula: see text]), effective atomic number ([Formula: see text]), and electron density (N e ) of the tooth samples were determined at photon energies of 22.1, 25, 59.5, and 88 keV by using a narrow beam transmission method. Data were analyzed statistically by using the Mann-Whitney U test. The mineral contents after Er:YAG laser and phosphoric acid etching did not differ significantly (p > 0.05), and no significant variation in [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], or N e was observed. Therefore, we conclude that the Er:YAG laser and phosphoric acid systems used in this study did not affect mineral composition or photon interaction parameters of dental enamel.

  6. Content-Related Interactions in Self-initiated Study Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Karen; Talanquer, Vicente

    2012-09-01

    The central goal of the present exploratory study was to investigate the nature of the content-related interactions in study groups independently organized by college organic chemistry students. We were particularly interested in the identification of the different factors that affected the emergence of opportunities for students to co-construct understanding and engage in higher levels of cognitive processing. Our results are based on the analysis of in situ observations of 34 self-initiated study sessions involving over a 100 students in three academic semesters. The investigation revealed three major types of social regulation processes, teaching, tutoring, and co-construction in the observed study sessions. However, the extent to which students engaged in each of them varied widely from one session to another. This variability was mostly determined by the specific composition of the study groups and the nature of the study tasks in which they were engaged. Decisions about how to organize the study session, the relative content knowledge and conceptual understanding expressed by the participants, as well as the cognitive level of the problems that guided group work had a strong impact on the nature of student interactions. Nevertheless, group talk in the observed study groups was mostly focused on low-level cognitive processes. The results of our work provide insights on how to better support students' productive engagement in study groups.

  7. Levels and interactions of plasma xanthine oxidase, catalase and liver function parameters in Nigerian children with Plasmodium falciparum infection.

    PubMed

    Iwalokun, B A; Bamiro, S B; Ogunledun, A

    2006-12-01

    Elevated plasma levels of xanthine oxidase and liver function parameters have been associated with inflammatory events in several human diseases. While xanthine oxidase provides in vitro protection against malaria, its pathophysiological functions in vivo and interactions with liver function parameters remain unclear. This study examined the interactions and plasma levels of xanthine oxidase (XO) and uric acid (UA), catalase (CAT) and liver function parameters GOT, GPT and bilirubin in asymptomatic (n=20), uncomplicated (n=32), and severe (n=18) falciparum malaria children aged 3-13 years. Compared to age-matched control (n=16), significant (p<0.05) elevation in xanthine oxidase by 100-550%, uric acid by 15.4-153.8%, GOT and GPT by 22.1-102.2%, and total bilirubin by 2.3-86% according to parasitaemia (geometric mean parasite density (GMPD)=850-87100 parasites/microL) was observed in the malarial children. Further comparison with control revealed higher CAT level (16.2+/-0.5 vs 14.6+/-0.4 U/L; p<0.05) lacking significant (p>0.05) correlation with XO, but lower CAT level (13.4-5.4 U/L) with improved correlations (r=-0.53 to -0.91; p<0.05) with XO among the asymptomatic and symptomatic malaria children studied. 75% of control, 45% of asymptomatic, 21.9% of uncomplicated, and none of severe malaria children had Hb level>11.0 g/dL. Multivariate analyses further revealed significant (p<0.05) correlations between liver function parameters and xanthine oxidase (r=0.57-0.64) only in the severe malaria group. We conclude that elevated levels of XO and liver enzymes are biochemical features of Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia in Nigerian children, with both parameters interacting differently to modulate the catalase response in asymptomatic and symptomatic falciparum malaria.

  8. Interacting Group of Galaxies Known as Stephan Quintet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-05

    This ultraviolet image from NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer is of the interacting group of galaxies known as Stephan Quintet NGC 7317, NGC 7318A, NGC 7318B, NGC 7319, NGC 7320, lower left. Of the five galaxies in this tightly packed group, NGC 7320 (the large spiral in the group) is probably a foreground galaxy and not associated with the other four. The spiral galaxy in the upper right is NGC 7331. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07905

  9. The Content and Interactivity of Health Support Group Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sandra; Barlow, Julie; Williams, Gareth

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the online contents and interactivity provided by health support group (HSG) websites representing a range of chronic diseases. Design: Survey of 80 HSG websites. Method: A checklist of website content was developed rating the level of information and advice, interactivity and online support provided by each HSG website. Each…

  10. The development and interaction of terrorist and fanatic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Erika T.

    2013-11-01

    Through the mathematical study of two models we quantify some of the theories of co-development and co-existence of focused groups in the social sciences. This work attempts to develop the mathematical framework behind the social sciences of community formation. By using well developed theories and concepts from ecology and epidemiology we hope to extend the theoretical framework of organizing and self-organizing social groups and communities, including terrorist groups. The main goal of our work is to gain insight into the role of recruitment and retention in the formation and survival of social organizations. Understanding the underlining mechanisms of the spread of ideologies under competition is a fundamental component of this work. Here contacts between core and non-core individuals extend beyond its physical meaning to include indirect interaction and spread of ideas through phone conversations, emails, media sources and other similar mean. This work focuses on the dynamics of formation of interest groups, either ideological, economical or ecological and thus we explore the questions such as, how do interest groups initiate and co-develop by interacting within a common environment and how do they sustain themselves? Our results show that building and maintaining the core group is essential for the existence and survival of an extreme ideology. Our research also indicates that in the absence of competitive ability (i.e., ability to take from the other core group or share prospective members) the social organization or group that is more committed to its group ideology and manages to strike the right balance between investment in recruitment and retention will prevail. Thus under no cross interaction between two social groups a single trade-off (of these efforts) can support only a single organization. The more efforts that an organization implements to recruit and retain its members the more effective it will be in transmitting the ideology to other vulnerable

  11. Single or functionalized fullerenes interacting with heme group

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Wallison Chaves; Diniz, Eduardo Moraes, E-mail: eduardo.diniz@ufma.br

    The heme group is responsible for iron transportation through the bloodstream, where iron participates in redox reactions, electron transfer, gases detection etc. The efficiency of such processes can be reduced if the whole heme molecule or even the iron is somehow altered from its original oxidation state, which can be caused by interactions with nanoparticles as fullerenes. To verify how such particles alter the geometry and electronic structure of heme molecule, here we report first principles calculations based on density functional theory of heme group interacting with single C{sub 60} fullerene or with C{sub 60} functionalized with small functional groupsmore » (−CH{sub 3}, −COOH, −NH{sub 2}, −OH). The calculations shown that the system heme + nanoparticle has a different spin state in comparison with heme group if the fullerene is functionalized. Also a functional group can provide a stronger binding between nanoparticle and heme molecule or inhibit the chemical bonding in comparison with single fullerene results. In addition heme molecule loses electrons to the nanoparticles and some systems exhibited a geometry distortion in heme group, depending on the binding energy. Furthermore, one find that such nanoparticles induce a formation of spin up states in heme group. Moreover, there exist modifications in density of states near the Fermi energy. Although of such changes in heme electronic structure and geometry, the iron atom remains in the heme group with the same oxidation state, so that processes that involve the iron might not be affected, only those that depend on the whole heme molecule.« less

  12. Effects of two successive parity-invariant point interactions on one-dimensional quantum transmission: Resonance conditions for the parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, Kohkichi, E-mail: kohkichi@tomakomai-ct.ac.jp; Nagasawa, Tomoaki, E-mail: nagasawa@tomakomai-ct.ac.jp; Takahashi, Rohta, E-mail: takahashi@tomakomai-ct.ac.jp

    We consider the scattering of a quantum particle by two independent, successive parity-invariant point interactions in one dimension. The parameter space for the two point interactions is given by the direct product of two tori, which is described by four parameters. By investigating the effects of the two point interactions on the transmission probability of plane wave, we obtain the conditions for the parameter space under which perfect resonant transmission occur. The resonance conditions are found to be described by symmetric and anti-symmetric relations between the parameters.

  13. Cooperation in group-structured populations with two layers of interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanling; Fu, Feng; Chen, Xiaojie; Xie, Guangming; Wang, Long

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in studying multiplex networks where individuals are structured in multiple network layers. Previous agent-based simulations of games on multiplex networks reveal rich dynamics arising from interdependency of interactions along each network layer, yet there is little known about analytical conditions for cooperation to evolve thereof. Here we aim to tackle this issue by calculating the evolutionary dynamics of cooperation in group-structured populations with two layers of interactions. In our model, an individual is engaged in two layers of group interactions simultaneously and uses unrelated strategies across layers. Evolutionary competition of individuals is determined by the total payoffs accrued from two layers of interactions. We also consider migration which allows individuals to move to a new group within each layer. An approach combining the coalescence theory with the theory of random walks is established to overcome the analytical difficulty upon local migration. We obtain the exact results for all “isotropic” migration patterns, particularly for migration tuned with varying ranges. When the two layers use one game, the optimal migration ranges are proved identical across layers and become smaller as the migration probability grows. PMID:26632251

  14. Rainfall or parameter uncertainty? The power of sensitivity analysis on grouped factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossent, Jiri; Pereira, Fernando; Bauwens, Willy

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological models are typically used to study and represent (a part of) the hydrological cycle. In general, the output of these models mostly depends on their input rainfall and parameter values. Both model parameters and input precipitation however, are characterized by uncertainties and, therefore, lead to uncertainty on the model output. Sensitivity analysis (SA) allows to assess and compare the importance of the different factors for this output uncertainty. Hereto, the rainfall uncertainty can be incorporated in the SA by representing it as a probabilistic multiplier. Such multiplier can be defined for the entire time series, or several of these factors can be determined for every recorded rainfall pulse or for hydrological independent storm events. As a consequence, the number of parameters included in the SA related to the rainfall uncertainty can be (much) lower or (much) higher than the number of model parameters. Although such analyses can yield interesting results, it remains challenging to determine which type of uncertainty will affect the model output most due to the different weight both types will have within the SA. In this study, we apply the variance based Sobol' sensitivity analysis method to two different hydrological simulators (NAM and HyMod) for four diverse watersheds. Besides the different number of model parameters (NAM: 11 parameters; HyMod: 5 parameters), the setup of our sensitivity and uncertainty analysis-combination is also varied by defining a variety of scenarios including diverse numbers of rainfall multipliers. To overcome the issue of the different number of factors and, thus, the different weights of the two types of uncertainty, we build on one of the advantageous properties of the Sobol' SA, i.e. treating grouped parameters as a single parameter. The latter results in a setup with a single factor for each uncertainty type and allows for a straightforward comparison of their importance. In general, the results show a clear

  15. Non-Abelian monopole in the parameter space of point-like interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ohya, Satoshi, E-mail: ohyasato@fjfi.cvut.cz

    2014-12-15

    We study non-Abelian geometric phase in N=2 supersymmetric quantum mechanics for a free particle on a circle with two point-like interactions at antipodal points. We show that non-Abelian Berry’s connection is that of SU(2) magnetic monopole discovered by Moody, Shapere and Wilczek in the context of adiabatic decoupling limit of diatomic molecule. - Highlights: • Supersymmetric quantum mechanics is an ideal playground for studying geometric phase. • We determine the parameter space of supersymmetric point-like interactions. • Berry’s connection is given by a Wu–Yang-like magnetic monopole in SU(2) Yang–Mills.

  16. Size-density scaling in protists and the links between consumer-resource interaction parameters.

    PubMed

    DeLong, John P; Vasseur, David A

    2012-11-01

    Recent work indicates that the interaction between body-size-dependent demographic processes can generate macroecological patterns such as the scaling of population density with body size. In this study, we evaluate this possibility for grazing protists and also test whether demographic parameters in these models are correlated after controlling for body size. We compiled data on the body-size dependence of consumer-resource interactions and population density for heterotrophic protists grazing algae in laboratory studies. We then used nested dynamic models to predict both the height and slope of the scaling relationship between population density and body size for these protists. We also controlled for consumer size and assessed links between model parameters. Finally, we used the models and the parameter estimates to assess the individual- and population-level dependence of resource use on body-size and prey-size selection. The predicted size-density scaling for all models matched closely to the observed scaling, and the simplest model was sufficient to predict the pattern. Variation around the mean size-density scaling relationship may be generated by variation in prey productivity and area of capture, but residuals are relatively insensitive to variation in prey size selection. After controlling for body size, many consumer-resource interaction parameters were correlated, and a positive correlation between residual prey size selection and conversion efficiency neutralizes the apparent fitness advantage of taking large prey. Our results indicate that widespread community-level patterns can be explained with simple population models that apply consistently across a range of sizes. They also indicate that the parameter space governing the dynamics and the steady states in these systems is structured such that some parts of the parameter space are unlikely to represent real systems. Finally, predator-prey size ratios represent a kind of conundrum, because they are

  17. Let's Face(book) It: Analyzing Interactions in Social Network Groups for Chemistry Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rap, Shelley; Blonder, Ron

    2016-02-01

    We examined how social network (SN) groups contribute to the learning of chemistry. The main goal was to determine whether chemistry learning could occur in the group discourse. The emphasis was on groups of students in the 11th and 12th grades who learn chemistry in preparation for their final external examination. A total of 1118 discourse events were tallied in the different groups. We analyzed the different events that were found in chemistry learning Facebook groups (CLFGs). The analysis revealed that seven types of interactions were observed in the CLFGs: The most common interaction (47 %) dealt with organizing learning (e.g., announcements regarding homework, the location of the next class); learning interactions were observed in 22 % of the posts, and links to learning materials and social interactions constituted about 20 % each. The learning events that were ascertained underwent a deeper examination and three different types of chemistry learning interactions were identified. This examination was based on the theoretical framework of the commognitive approach to learning (Sfard in Thinking as communicating. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2008), which will be explained. The identified learning interactions that were observed in the Facebook groups illustrate the potential of SNs to serve as an additional tool for teachers to advance their students' learning of chemistry.

  18. A state interaction spin-orbit coupling density matrix renormalization group method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2016-06-01

    We describe a state interaction spin-orbit (SISO) coupling method using density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) wavefunctions and the spin-orbit mean-field (SOMF) operator. We implement our DMRG-SISO scheme using a spin-adapted algorithm that computes transition density matrices between arbitrary matrix product states. To demonstrate the potential of the DMRG-SISO scheme we present accurate benchmark calculations for the zero-field splitting of the copper and gold atoms, comparing to earlier complete active space self-consistent-field and second-order complete active space perturbation theory results in the same basis. We also compute the effects of spin-orbit coupling on the spin-ladder of the iron-sulfur dimer complex [Fe2S2(SCH3)4]3-, determining the splitting of the lowest quartet and sextet states. We find that the magnitude of the zero-field splitting for the higher quartet and sextet states approaches a significant fraction of the Heisenberg exchange parameter.

  19. A state interaction spin-orbit coupling density matrix renormalization group method

    SciTech Connect

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    We describe a state interaction spin-orbit (SISO) coupling method using density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) wavefunctions and the spin-orbit mean-field (SOMF) operator. We implement our DMRG-SISO scheme using a spin-adapted algorithm that computes transition density matrices between arbitrary matrix product states. To demonstrate the potential of the DMRG-SISO scheme we present accurate benchmark calculations for the zero-field splitting of the copper and gold atoms, comparing to earlier complete active space self-consistent-field and second-order complete active space perturbation theory results in the same basis. We also compute the effects of spin-orbit coupling on the spin-ladder of the iron-sulfur dimer complex [Fe{submore » 2}S{sub 2}(SCH{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup 3−}, determining the splitting of the lowest quartet and sextet states. We find that the magnitude of the zero-field splitting for the higher quartet and sextet states approaches a significant fraction of the Heisenberg exchange parameter.« less

  20. New insights into the mechanism of interaction between CO2 and polymers from thermodynamic parameters obtained by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gabrienko, Anton A; Ewing, Andrew V; Chibiryaev, Andrey M; Agafontsev, Alexander M; Dubkov, Konstantin A; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2016-03-07

    This work reports new physical insights of the thermodynamic parameters and mechanisms of possible interactions occurring in polymers subjected to high-pressure CO2. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy has been used in situ to determine the thermodynamic parameters of the intermolecular interactions between CO2 and different functional groups of the polymers capable of specific interactions with sorbed CO2 molecules. Based on the measured ATR-FTIR spectra of the polymer samples subjected to high-pressure CO2 (30 bar) at different temperatures (300-340 K), it was possible to characterize polymer-polymer and CO2-polymer interactions. Particularly, the enthalpy and entropy of the formation of the specific non-covalent complexes between CO2 and the hydroxy (-OH), carbonyl (C[double bond, length as m-dash]O) and hydroxyimino ([double bond, length as m-dash]N-OH) functional groups of the polymer samples have been measured. Furthermore, the obtained spectroscopic results have provided an opportunity for the structure of these complexes to be proposed. An interesting phenomenon regarding the behavior of CO2/polymer systems has also been observed. It has been found that only for the polyketone, the value of enthalpy was negative indicating an exothermic process during the formation of the CO2-polymer non-covalent complexes. Conversely, for the polyoxime and polyalcohol samples there is a positive enthalpy determined. This is a result of the initial polymer-polymer interactions requiring more energy to break than is released during the formation of the CO2-polymer complex. The effect of increasing temperature to facilitate the breaking of the polymer-polymer interactions has also been observed. Hence, a mechanism for the formation of CO2-polymer complexes was suggested based on these results, which occurs via a two-step process: (1) the breaking of the existing polymer-polymer interactions followed by (2) the formation of new CO2-polymer non-covalent interactions.

  1. Group-Level Analysis on Multiplayer Game Collaboration: How Do the Individuals Shape the Group Interaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluemink, Johanna; Hamalainen, Raija; Manninen, Tony; Jarvela, Sanna

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to examine how small-group collaboration is shaped by individuals interacting in a virtual multiplayer game. The data were collected from a design experiment in which six randomly divided groups of four university students played a voice-enhanced game lasting about 1 h. The "eScape" game was a social action adventure…

  2. Students' Use of the Interactive Whiteboard during Physics Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm; Bungum, Berit

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) may facilitate collective meaning-making processes in group work in engineering education. In the case, first-year students attended group-work sessions as an organised part of a basic physics course at a Norwegian university college. Each student group was equipped with an…

  3. Sagittal spinopelvic parameters in children with achondroplasia: identification of 2 distinct groups.

    PubMed

    Karikari, Isaac O; Mehta, Ankit I; Solakoglu, Can; Bagley, Carlos A; Ain, Michael C; Gottfried, Oren N

    2012-07-01

    Spinopelvic parameters in children with achondroplasia have not been described. Because they observed a unique sagittal spinopelvic phenotype in some achondroplastic children with very horizontal sacrums, the authors sought to quantify the spinopelvic parameters in a pediatric patient population. A retrospective review was performed to identify all children (age range 1 month-10 years) with a diagnosis of achondroplasia between 2004 and 2009. Clinical and radiographic data were analyzed for age, sex, lumbar lordosis (LL), thoracic kyphosis (TK), thoracolumbar kyphosis (TLK), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), and pelvic incidence (PI). Differences among these variables were analyzed using a 2-tailed, unpaired Student t-test. Forty children, 23 males and 17 females, with achondroplasia were identified during the study period. The mean age was 2.6 years. Two groups of patients were identified based on PT (that is, negative or positive tilt and horizontal or not horizontal sacrum). A negative PT was identified in all children with an extremely horizontal sacrum. Seventeen children had a negative PT (mean -16.6°), and the mean parameters in this group were 65.4° for LL, 31.7° for TLK, 18.5° for TK, 43.3° for SS, and 26.4° for PI. Twenty-three children had a positive PT (mean 17.9°), and the mean parameters in this group were 53.4° for LL, 41.5° for TLK, 9.6° for TK, 30.8° for SS, and 43.8° for PI. A statistically significant difference was observed for LL (p = 0.01), TLK (p = 0.05), SS (p = 0.006), PT (p = 0.006), and PI (0.0002). Spinopelvic parameters in achondroplasia are potentially dichotomous. The future implications of this observation are not known and will need to be explored in future long-term studies that follow pediatric patients with achondroplasia through adulthood.

  4. Group Rumination: Social Interactions Around Music in People with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Sandra; Eerola, Tuomas; McFerran, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important roles that music serves in human society is the promotion of social relationships and group cohesion. In general, emotional experiences tend to be amplified in group settings through processes of social feedback. However, previous research has established that listening to sad music can intensify negative emotions in people with tendencies to rumination and depression. This study therefore investigated the phenomenon of ruminating with music, and the question of whether listening to sad music in group settings provides social benefits for emotionally vulnerable listeners, or whether it further exaggerates depressive tendencies. Participants recruited via online depression groups and mental health websites were surveyed as to music listening habits. Results revealed that people with depression were more likely to engage in “group rumination” using music, and that this behavior could be partially explained by a general tendency to ruminate using music. Both affective states and coping styles were found to be related to the affective outcomes of group interactions around music. These findings go some way toward clarifying the situations in which group interactions around music are able to provide important social benefits for those involved, and situations in which negative emotions can be amplified by the group context. PMID:28421014

  5. Group Treatment of Separated Parent and Child Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Harold E.; Leary, Joy D.; Briggs, Adam C.; Cox, Wendell H.; Shibano, Matsujiro

    2005-01-01

    Effective child-behavior management is an important characteristic in facilitating positive parent and child interaction. The current study examines the impact of a behavioral parent-training group methodology on problem behaviors and goals for a single mother and two young boys. Results indicate that the procedures were valuable for enhancing…

  6. Enthalpic parameters of interaction between diglycylglycine and polyatomic alcohols in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhevoi, I. N.; Badelin, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    Integral enthalpies of solution Δsol H m of diglycylglycine in aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethylene glycol, and 1,2-propylene glycol are measured via solution calorimetry. The experimental data are used to calculate the standard enthalpies of solution (Δsol H°) and transfer (Δtr H°) of the tripeptide from water to aqueous solutions of polyatomic alcohols. The enthalpic pairwise coefficients h xy of interactions between the tripeptide and polyatomic alcohol molecules are calculated using the McMillan-Mayer solution theory and are found to have positive values. The findings are discussed using the theory of estimating various types of interactions in ternary systems and the effect the structural features of interacting biomolecules have on the thermochemical parameters of diglycylglycine dissolution.

  7. Group-based strategy diffusion in multiplex networks with weighted values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianyong; Jiang, J. C.; Xiang, Leijun

    2017-03-01

    The information diffusion of multiplex social networks has received increasing interests in recent years. Actually, the multiplex networks are made of many communities, and it should be gotten more attention for the influences of community level diffusion, besides of individual level interactions. In view of this, this work explores strategy interactions and diffusion processes in multiplex networks with weighted values from a new perspective. Two different groups consisting of some agents with different influential strength are firstly built in each layer network, the authority and non-authority groups. The strategy interactions between different groups in intralayer and interlayer networks are performed to explore community level diffusion, by playing two classical strategy games, Prisoner's Dilemma and Snowdrift Game. The impact forces from the different groups and the reactive forces from individual agents are simultaneously taken into account in intralayer and interlayer interactions. This paper reveals and explains the evolutions of cooperation diffusion and the influences of interlayer interaction tight degrees in multiplex networks with weighted values. Some thresholds of critical parameters of interaction degrees and games parameters settings are also discussed in group-based strategy diffusion.

  8. Interactive effects of aging parameters of AA6056

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Kamran; Nekahi, Atiye

    2012-10-01

    The effect of thermomechanical treatment on the aging behavior of AA6056 aluminum alloy was modeled using response surface methodology (RSM). Two models were developed to predict the final yield stress (FYS) and elongation amounts as well as the optimum conditions of aging process. These were done based on the interactive effects of applied thermomechanical parameters. The optimum condition predicted by the model to attain the maximum strength was pre-aging at 80 °C for 15 h, followed by 70% cold work and subsequent final aging at 165 °C for 4 h, which resulted in the FYS of about 480 MPa. As for the elongation, the optimum condition was pre-aging at 80 °C for 15 h, followed by 30% cold work and final-aging at 165 °C for 4 h, which led to 21% elongation. To verify the suggested optimum conditions, the tests were carried out confirming the high accuracy (above 94%) of the RSM technique as well as the developed models. It is shown that the RSM can be used successfully to optimize the aging process, to determine the significance of aging parameters and to model the combination effect of process variables on the aging behavior of AA6056.

  9. Educational Software Employing Group Competition Using an Interactive Electronic Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otsuki, Yoko; Bandoh, Hirokazu; Kato, Naoki; Indurkhya, Bipin; Nakagawa, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a design of educational software employing group competition using a large interactive electronic whiteboard, and a report on its experimental use. Group competition and collaboration are useful methods to cultivate originality and communication skills. To share the same space, the same large screen, and face-to-face…

  10. Parametrization of free ion levels of four isoelectronic 4f2 systems: Insights into configuration interaction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Yau Yuen; Tanner, Peter A.

    2013-12-01

    The experimental free ion 4f2 energy level data sets comprising 12 or 13 J-multiplets of La+, Ce2+, Pr3+ and Nd4+ have been fitted by a semiempirical atomic Hamiltonian comprising 8, 10, or 12 freely-varying parameters. The root mean square errors were 16.1, 1.3, 0.3 and 0.3 cm-1, respectively for fits with 10 parameters. The fitted inter-electronic repulsion and magnetic parameters vary linearly with ionic charge, i, but better linear fits are obtained with (4-i)2, although the reason is unclear at present. The two-body configuration interaction parameters α and β exhibit a linear relation with [ΔE(bc)]-1, where ΔE(bc) is the energy difference between the 4f2 barycentre and that of the interacting configuration, namely 4f6p for La+, Ce2+, and Pr3+, and 5p54f3 for Nd4+. The linear fit provides the rationale for the negative value of α for the case of La+, where the interacting configuration is located below 4f2.

  11. Enhancing Peer Interaction during Guided Play in Finnish Integrated Special Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syrjämäki, Marja; Pihlaja, Päivi; Sajaniemi, Nina

    2018-01-01

    This article focused on the pedagogy that enhances peer interaction in integrated special groups. In Finland, most children identified as having special educational needs (SEN) attend day-care in mainstream kindergarten groups; the rest are in integrated or segregated early childhood special education (ECSE) groups in public day-care centres…

  12. Teaching as Interaction: Challenges in Transitioning Teachers' Instruction to Small Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tasha; Chapman-DeSousa, Brook

    2017-01-01

    Although small group instruction is often endorsed in teaching young children, teachers are rarely given explicit instruction on how to move instruction into small groups where effective adult-child interactions can take place. This study examines how 14 early childhood educators transitioned their instruction from whole to small group teaching…

  13. Parameter Estimation of Computationally Expensive Watershed Models Through Efficient Multi-objective Optimization and Interactive Decision Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Taimoor; Shoemaker, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Watershed model calibration is inherently a multi-criteria problem. Conflicting trade-offs exist between different quantifiable calibration criterions indicating the non-existence of a single optimal parameterization. Hence, many experts prefer a manual approach to calibration where the inherent multi-objective nature of the calibration problem is addressed through an interactive, subjective, time-intensive and complex decision making process. Multi-objective optimization can be used to efficiently identify multiple plausible calibration alternatives and assist calibration experts during the parameter estimation process. However, there are key challenges to the use of multi objective optimization in the parameter estimation process which include: 1) multi-objective optimization usually requires many model simulations, which is difficult for complex simulation models that are computationally expensive; and 2) selection of one from numerous calibration alternatives provided by multi-objective optimization is non-trivial. This study proposes a "Hybrid Automatic Manual Strategy" (HAMS) for watershed model calibration to specifically address the above-mentioned challenges. HAMS employs a 3-stage framework for parameter estimation. Stage 1 incorporates the use of an efficient surrogate multi-objective algorithm, GOMORS, for identification of numerous calibration alternatives within a limited simulation evaluation budget. The novelty of HAMS is embedded in Stages 2 and 3 where an interactive visual and metric based analytics framework is available as a decision support tool to choose a single calibration from the numerous alternatives identified in Stage 1. Stage 2 of HAMS provides a goodness-of-fit measure / metric based interactive framework for identification of a small subset (typically less than 10) of meaningful and diverse set of calibration alternatives from the numerous alternatives obtained in Stage 1. Stage 3 incorporates the use of an interactive visual

  14. Quantifying Functional Group Interactions that Determine Urea Effects on Nucleic Acid Helix Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Emily J.; Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Cha, Hyo Keun; McDevitt, Joseph L.; Merker, Wolf E.; Ritzer, Ryan; Muth, Gregory W.; Engelsgjerd, Samuel W.; Mangold, Kathryn E.; Thompson, Perry J.; Kerins, Michael J.; Record, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Urea destabilizes helical and folded conformations of nucleic acids and proteins, as well as protein-nucleic acid complexes. To understand these effects, extend previous characterizations of interactions of urea with protein functional groups, and thereby develop urea as a probe of conformational changes in protein and nucleic acid processes, we obtain chemical potential derivatives (μ23 = dμ2/dm3) quantifying interactions of urea (component 3) with nucleic acid bases, base analogs, nucleosides and nucleotide monophosphates (component 2) using osmometry and hexanol-water distribution assays. Dissection of these μ23 yields interaction potentials quantifying interactions of urea with unit surface areas of nucleic acid functional groups (heterocyclic aromatic ring, ring methyl, carbonyl and phosphate O, amino N, sugar (C,O)); urea interacts favorably with all these groups, relative to interactions with water. Interactions of urea with heterocyclic aromatic rings and attached methyl groups (as on thymine) are particularly favorable, as previously observed for urea-homocyclic aromatic ring interactions. Urea m-values determined for double helix formation by DNA dodecamers near 25°C are in the range 0.72 to 0.85 kcal mol−1 m−1 and exhibit little systematic dependence on nucleobase composition (17–42% GC). Interpretation of these results using the urea interaction potentials indicates that extensive (60–90%) stacking of nucleobases in the separated strands in the transition region is required to explain the m-value. Results for RNA and DNA dodecamers obtained at higher temperatures, and literature data, are consistent with this conclusion. This demonstrates the utility of urea as a quantitative probe of changes in surface area (ΔASA) in nucleic acid processes. PMID:23510511

  15. Ecophysiological interactions and water-related physicochemical parameters among freshwater stingrays.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A T; Araújo, M L G; Lemos, J R G; Santos, M Q C; Pantoja-Lima, J; Aride, P H R; Tavares-Dias, M; Marcon, J L

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare and correlate the ecology of neonates and young individuals of Potamotrygon wallacei, Potamotrygon motoro and Paratrygon aiereba with regard to their hematological profile and the physicochemical parameters of the water that they inhabit. Principal component analysis (PCA) on the complete blood count revealed total variation of 72.92%, thus demonstrating a differentiation system for oxygen demand. On the other hand, P. motoro was considered to be an intermediate species, given that its complete blood count characteristics interacted with both P. wallacei and with P. aiereba. The interaction among the biochemical variables was shown to total 64.67% of the factors. This allowed differentiation of P. wallacei from P. aiereba, while P. motoro maintained an intermediate position. These characteristics of differentiation within the preferred environment corroborate the PCA of the present study and confirm that these species can be differentiated through considering the complete blood count and biochemical parameters. The PCA on water properties showed 68.57% differentiation, mainly comprising the x axis (49.44%). It can be affirmed that P. motoro has the capacity to inhabit the preferential areas of P. wallacei and P. aiereba, as well as occupying localities in which other stingrays are not found. In conclusion, P. wallacei presents patterns differentiating it from P. aiereba, while P. motoro is a species that presents intermediate characteristics. The latter can be considered to be a more broadly distributed species regarding its ecophysiological characteristics.

  16. Communication and Collective Consensus Making in Animal Groups via Mechanical Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Várkonyi, Péter L.

    2011-06-01

    Mechanical constraints have a strong influence on the dynamics and structure of granular aggregations. The contact forces within dense suspensions of active particles may give rise to intriguing phenomena, including anomalous density fluctuations, long-range orientational ordering, and spontaneous pattern formation. Various authors have proposed that these physical phenomena contribute to the ability of animal groups to move coherently. Our systematic numerical simulations confirm that spontaneous interactions of elongated individuals can trigger oriented motion in small groups. They are, however, insufficient in larger ones, despite their significant imprint on the group's internal structure. It is also demonstrated that preferred directions of motion of a minority of group members can be communicated to others solely by mechanical interactions. These findings strengthen the link between pattern formation in active nematics and the collective decision making of social animals.

  17. ShinyKGode: an interactive application for ODE parameter inference using gradient matching.

    PubMed

    Wandy, Joe; Niu, Mu; Giurghita, Diana; Daly, Rónán; Rogers, Simon; Husmeier, Dirk

    2018-07-01

    Mathematical modelling based on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is widely used to describe the dynamics of biological systems, particularly in systems and pathway biology. Often the kinetic parameters of these ODE systems are unknown and have to be inferred from the data. Approximate parameter inference methods based on gradient matching (which do not require performing computationally expensive numerical integration of the ODEs) have been getting popular in recent years, but many implementations are difficult to run without expert knowledge. Here, we introduce ShinyKGode, an interactive web application to perform fast parameter inference on ODEs using gradient matching. ShinyKGode can be used to infer ODE parameters on simulated and observed data using gradient matching. Users can easily load their own models in Systems Biology Markup Language format, and a set of pre-defined ODE benchmark models are provided in the application. Inferred parameters are visualized alongside diagnostic plots to assess convergence. The R package for ShinyKGode can be installed through the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN). Installation instructions, as well as tutorial videos and source code are available at https://joewandy.github.io/shinyKGode. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Joking Culture: The Role of Repeated Humorous Interactions on Group Processes during Challenge Course Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, Erin; Siharath, Kassidy; Bell, Steven; Nguyen, Kim; Baker, Carla

    2011-01-01

    When groups form, they develop their own culture from the shared meaning created from their interactions. Humor is part of every social group, and when repeatedly referenced, it forms a joking culture. The joking culture of small groups influences group processes by smoothing group interaction, forming a collective identity, separating the group…

  19. Analysis of Feedback Processes in Online Group Interaction: A Methodological Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espasa, Anna; Guasch, Teresa; Alvarez, Ibis M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a methodological model to analyze students' group interaction to improve their essays in online learning environments, based on asynchronous and written communication. In these environments teacher and student scaffolds for discussion are essential to promote interaction. One of these scaffolds can be the…

  20. Group composition effects on aggressive interpack interactions of gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cassidy, Kira A.; MacNulty, Daniel R.; Stahler, Daniel R.; Smith, Douglas W.; Mech, L. David

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of characteristics that promote group success during intraspecific encounters is key to understanding the adaptive advantages of sociality for many group-living species. In addition, some individuals in a group may be more likely than others to influence intergroup conflicts, a relatively neglected idea in research on social animals. Here we use observations of aggressive interactions between wolf (Canis lupus) packs over an extended period and use pack characteristics to determine which groups had an advantage over their opponents. During 16 years of observation in Yellowstone National Park from 1995 to 2010, we documented 121 interpack aggressive interactions. We recorded pack sizes, compositions, and spatial orientation related to residency to determine their effects on the outcomes of interactions between packs. Relative pack size (RPS) improved the odds of a pack displacing its opponent. However, pack composition moderated the effect of RPS as packs with relatively more old members (>6.0 years old) or adult males had higher odds of winning despite a numerical disadvantage. The location of the interaction with respect to pack territories had no effect on the outcome of interpack interactions. Although the importance of RPS in successful territorial defense suggests the evolution and maintenance of group living may be at least partly due to larger packs’ success during interpack interactions, group composition is also an important factor, highlighting that some individuals are more valuable than others during interpack conflicts.

  1. Electronic polarizability and interaction parameter of gadolinium tungsten borate glasses with high WO{sub 3} content

    SciTech Connect

    Taki, Yukina; Shinozaki, Kenji; Honma, Tsuyoshi

    2014-12-15

    Glasses with the compositions of 25Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–xWO{sub 3}–(75−x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3} with x=25–65 were prepared by using a conventional melt quenching method, and their electronic polarizabilities, optical basicities Λ(n{sub o}), and interaction parameters A(n{sub o}) were estimated from density and refractive index measurements in order to clarify the feature of electronic polarizability and bonding states in the glasses with high WO{sub 3} contents. The optical basicity of the glasses increases monotonously with the substitution of WO{sub 3} for B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and contrary the interaction parameter decreases monotonously with increasing WO{sub 3} content. A good linear correlation was observed betweenmore » Λ(n{sub o}) and A(n{sub o}) and between the glass transition temperature and A(n{sub o}). It was proposed that Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide belongs to the category of basic oxide with a value of A(n{sub o})=0.044 Å{sup −3} as similar to WO{sub 3}. The relationship between the glass formation and electronic polarizability in the glasses was discussed, and it was proposed that the glasses with high WO{sub 3} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents would be a floppy network system consisting of mainly basic oxides. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the correlation between the optical basicity and interaction parameter in borate-based glasses. The data obtained in the present study for Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–WO{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses are locating in the correlation line for other borate glasses. These results shown in Fig. 8 clearly demonstrate that Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–WO{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses having a wide range of optical basicity and interaction parameter are regarded as glasses consisting of acidic and basic oxides. - Highlights: • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–WO{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses with high WO{sub 3} contents were prepared. • Electronic polarizability and interaction parameter were estimated. • Optical basicity

  2. Using Dialogic Talk to Teach Mathematics: The Case of Interactive Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Díez-Palomar, Javier; Olivé, Joan Cabré

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the types of interactions that take place within "Interactive Groups" when individuals come to a meaningful understanding of mathematics. We discuss the possibility for dialogic talk to unveil the process of learning, and we explore the role that tutors may play in making this process happen. We postulate that…

  3. Comparative studies on group III σ-hole and π-hole interactions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Zeng, Yanli; Zhang, Xueying; Meng, Lingpeng

    2016-05-30

    The σ-hole of M2 H6 (M = Al, Ga, In) and π-hole of MH3 (M = Al, Ga, In) were discovered and analyzed, the bimolecular complexes M2 H6 ···NH3 and MH3 ···N2 P2 F4 (M = Al, Ga, In) were constructed to carry out comparative studies on the group III σ-hole interactions and π-hole interactions. The two types of interactions are all partial-covalent interactions; the π-hole interactions are stronger than σ-hole interactions. The electrostatic energy is the largest contribution for forming the σ-hole and π-hole interaction, the polarization energy is also an important factor to form the M···N interaction. The electrostatic energy contributions to the interaction energy of the σ-hole interactions are somewhat greater than those of the π-hole interactions. However, the polarization contributions for the π-hole interactions are somewhat greater than those for the σ-hole interactions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dynamics of groups around interacting double ellipticals: Measuring dark matter haloes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, H.

    1990-01-01

    Binary galaxies, as binary stars, are important to measure masses, as suggested by Page (1952). Because three orbit parameters are measurable for galaxies at one instant of time, severe uncertainties remain in the orbit and mass determinations. These uncertainties can partly be overcome by statistical studies of selected samples and/or n-body simulations. Close double galaxies (and isolated galaxies) could also be useful to estimate dynamical masses if we can find test particles around them. Interacting elliptical pairs or dumb-bell galaxies are found with a large range, between 0-1200 km s(exp -1), of relative radial velocities. Standard 2-body orbit calculations, highly uncertain due to projection factors, suggest for the largest velocity differences very large galaxy masses, if the systems are bound and stationary. However, recent n-body simulations model these binaries as galaxies captured from hyperbolic orbits, requiring masses of order a few times 10(exp 11) solar maximum (Borne et al. 1988), but producing systems that are short lived. A different picture appears when we study observationally the dynamical mass of interacting double ellipticals using faint satellite galaxies. These satellites contribute little luminosity and, presumably, little mass to the system. The authors present results of two such groups, basically forming systems of test particles, around the dumb-bells NGC 4782/3 and IC 5049. They also briefly discuss the satellite group around the central dumb-bell in the cluster Sersic 40/6. Apparently, they detect large quantities of dark matter in the vicinity of these dumb-bell galaxies, because the system masses of approx. 4.5 times 10(exp 13) solar mass and 8 times 10(exp 13) solar mass for NGC 4782/3 and IC 5049, respectively, are quite high. Likewise, the mass of the Sersic 40/6 inner core is 7 times 10(exp 13) solar mass. The possibility that a common massive dark matter halo increases the merging times of these types of galaxies is

  5. Research of interaction between technological and material parameters during densification of sunflower hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Križan, Peter; Matúš, Miloš; Beniak, Juraj; Šooš, Ľubomír

    2018-01-01

    During the biomass densification can be recognized various technological variables and also material parameters which significantly influences the final solid biofuels (pellets) quality. In this paper, we will present the research findings concerning relationships between technological and material variables during densification of sunflower hulls. Sunflower hulls as an unused source is a typical product of agricultural industry in Slovakia and belongs to the group of herbaceous biomass. The main goal of presented experimental research is to determine the impact of compression pressure, compression temperature and material particle size distribution on final biofuels quality. Experimental research described in this paper was realized by single-axis densification, which was represented by experimental pressing stand. The impact of mentioned investigated variables on the final briquettes density and briquettes dilatation was determined. Mutual interactions of these variables on final briquettes quality are showing the importance of mentioned variables during the densification process. Impact of raw material particle size distribution on final biofuels quality was also proven by experimental research on semi-production pelleting plant.

  6. Cultural Differences in Social Interaction during Group Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabrenya, William K., Jr.; Barba, Lourdes

    Cross-cultural psychology has begun to analyze cultural differences on collectivism and the implications of these differences for social processes such as group productivity. This study examined natural social interaction during a problem-solving task that required discussion and the establishment of a consensus. The relationship of collectivist…

  7. Group Trust, Communication Media, and Interactivity: Toward an Integrated Model of Online Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Jianxia; Wang, Chuang; Zhou, Mingming; Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao; Lei, Saosan

    2018-01-01

    The present investigation examines the multidimensional relationships among several critical components in online collaborative learning, including group trust, communication media, and interactivity. Four hundred eleven university students from 103 groups in the United States responded survey items on online collaboration, interactivity,…

  8. Brain-to-Brain Synchrony Tracks Real-World Dynamic Group Interactions in the Classroom.

    PubMed

    Dikker, Suzanne; Wan, Lu; Davidesco, Ido; Kaggen, Lisa; Oostrik, Matthias; McClintock, James; Rowland, Jess; Michalareas, Georgios; Van Bavel, Jay J; Ding, Mingzhou; Poeppel, David

    2017-05-08

    The human brain has evolved for group living [1]. Yet we know so little about how it supports dynamic group interactions that the study of real-world social exchanges has been dubbed the "dark matter of social neuroscience" [2]. Recently, various studies have begun to approach this question by comparing brain responses of multiple individuals during a variety of (semi-naturalistic) tasks [3-15]. These experiments reveal how stimulus properties [13], individual differences [14], and contextual factors [15] may underpin similarities and differences in neural activity across people. However, most studies to date suffer from various limitations: they often lack direct face-to-face interaction between participants, are typically limited to dyads, do not investigate social dynamics across time, and, crucially, they rarely study social behavior under naturalistic circumstances. Here we extend such experimentation drastically, beyond dyads and beyond laboratory walls, to identify neural markers of group engagement during dynamic real-world group interactions. We used portable electroencephalogram (EEG) to simultaneously record brain activity from a class of 12 high school students over the course of a semester (11 classes) during regular classroom activities (Figures 1A-1C; Supplemental Experimental Procedures, section S1). A novel analysis technique to assess group-based neural coherence demonstrates that the extent to which brain activity is synchronized across students predicts both student class engagement and social dynamics. This suggests that brain-to-brain synchrony is a possible neural marker for dynamic social interactions, likely driven by shared attention mechanisms. This study validates a promising new method to investigate the neuroscience of group interactions in ecologically natural settings. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Predicting Drug-Target Interaction Networks Based on Functional Groups and Biological Features

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-He; Hu, Le-Le; Kong, Xiangyin; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2010-01-01

    Background Study of drug-target interaction networks is an important topic for drug development. It is both time-consuming and costly to determine compound-protein interactions or potential drug-target interactions by experiments alone. As a complement, the in silico prediction methods can provide us with very useful information in a timely manner. Methods/Principal Findings To realize this, drug compounds are encoded with functional groups and proteins encoded by biological features including biochemical and physicochemical properties. The optimal feature selection procedures are adopted by means of the mRMR (Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy) method. Instead of classifying the proteins as a whole family, target proteins are divided into four groups: enzymes, ion channels, G-protein- coupled receptors and nuclear receptors. Thus, four independent predictors are established using the Nearest Neighbor algorithm as their operation engine, with each to predict the interactions between drugs and one of the four protein groups. As a result, the overall success rates by the jackknife cross-validation tests achieved with the four predictors are 85.48%, 80.78%, 78.49%, and 85.66%, respectively. Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that the network prediction system thus established is quite promising and encouraging. PMID:20300175

  10. Discovery of interaction signatures in the Hickson Compact Group 88

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosch, Noah

    2015-08-01

    I describe new observations of the Hickson Compact Group 88 (HCG88) obtained during the commissioning of a new telescope at the Wise Observatory. The observations that reach low surface brightness levels reveal a diffuse, ~20-kpc long low-surface-brightness tail emerging from the brightest component (NGC 6878) to the NW, and possibly a morphological abnormally in component B (NGC 6977). The N6878 tail could explain the asymmetry in this galaxy’s optical rotation curve. These findings show that significant interactions, including possible galactic cannibalism, have taken place in at least two galaxies of this group, contrary to previous claims that HCG88 is in a very early stage of interaction. This work emphasizes the surprisingly interesting results that can be obtained from deep imaging of interesting targets.

  11. Graphical Interaction Analysis Impact on Groups Collaborating through Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fessakis, Georgios; Dimitracopoulou, Angelique; Palaiodimos, Aggelos

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research results regarding the impact of Interaction Analysis (IA) graphs on groups of students collaborating through online blogging according to a "learning by design" scenario. The IA graphs used are of two categories; the first category summarizes quantitatively the activity of the users for each blog,…

  12. The Spinel Explorer--Interactive Visual Analysis of Spinel Group Minerals.

    PubMed

    Luján Ganuza, María; Ferracutti, Gabriela; Gargiulo, María Florencia; Castro, Silvia Mabel; Bjerg, Ernesto; Gröller, Eduard; Matković, Krešimir

    2014-12-01

    Geologists usually deal with rocks that are up to several thousand million years old. They try to reconstruct the tectonic settings where these rocks were formed and the history of events that affected them through the geological time. The spinel group minerals provide useful information regarding the geological environment in which the host rocks were formed. They constitute excellent indicators of geological environments (tectonic settings) and are of invaluable help in the search for mineral deposits of economic interest. The current workflow requires the scientists to work with different applications to analyze spine data. They do use specific diagrams, but these are usually not interactive. The current workflow hinders domain experts to fully exploit the potentials of tediously and expensively collected data. In this paper, we introduce the Spinel Explorer-an interactive visual analysis application for spinel group minerals. The design of the Spinel Explorer and of the newly introduced interactions is a result of a careful study of geologists' tasks. The Spinel Explorer includes most of the diagrams commonly used for analyzing spinel group minerals, including 2D binary plots, ternary plots, and 3D Spinel prism plots. Besides specific plots, conventional information visualization views are also integrated in the Spinel Explorer. All views are interactive and linked. The Spinel Explorer supports conventional statistics commonly used in spinel minerals exploration. The statistics views and different data derivation techniques are fully integrated in the system. Besides the Spinel Explorer as newly proposed interactive exploration system, we also describe the identified analysis tasks, and propose a new workflow. We evaluate the Spinel Explorer using real-life data from two locations in Argentina: the Frontal Cordillera in Central Andes and Patagonia. We describe the new findings of the geologists which would have been much more difficult to achieve using the

  13. Effects of Within-Class Ability Grouping on Social Interaction, Achievement, and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Mohammad; Lazonder, Ard W.; De Jong, Ton

    2005-01-01

    This study examined how grouping arrangements affect students' achievement, social interaction, and motivation. Students of high, average and low ability were randomly assigned to homogeneous or heterogeneous ability groups. All groups attended the same plant biology course. The main results indicate that low-ability students achieve more and are…

  14. Group Contribution Methods for Phase Equilibrium Calculations.

    PubMed

    Gmehling, Jürgen; Constantinescu, Dana; Schmid, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    The development and design of chemical processes are carried out by solving the balance equations of a mathematical model for sections of or the whole chemical plant with the help of process simulators. For process simulation, besides kinetic data for the chemical reaction, various pure component and mixture properties are required. Because of the great importance of separation processes for a chemical plant in particular, a reliable knowledge of the phase equilibrium behavior is required. The phase equilibrium behavior can be calculated with the help of modern equations of state or g(E)-models using only binary parameters. But unfortunately, only a very small part of the experimental data for fitting the required binary model parameters is available, so very often these models cannot be applied directly. To solve this problem, powerful predictive thermodynamic models have been developed. Group contribution methods allow the prediction of the required phase equilibrium data using only a limited number of group interaction parameters. A prerequisite for fitting the required group interaction parameters is a comprehensive database. That is why for the development of powerful group contribution methods almost all published pure component properties, phase equilibrium data, excess properties, etc., were stored in computerized form in the Dortmund Data Bank. In this review, the present status, weaknesses, advantages and disadvantages, possible applications, and typical results of the different group contribution methods for the calculation of phase equilibria are presented.

  15. Bottom-up modeling approach for the quantitative estimation of parameters in pathogen-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Teresa; Timme, Sandra; Pollmächer, Johannes; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic fungal pathogens can cause bloodstream infection and severe sepsis upon entering the blood stream of the host. The early immune response in human blood comprises the elimination of pathogens by antimicrobial peptides and innate immune cells, such as neutrophils or monocytes. Mathematical modeling is a predictive method to examine these complex processes and to quantify the dynamics of pathogen-host interactions. Since model parameters are often not directly accessible from experiment, their estimation is required by calibrating model predictions with experimental data. Depending on the complexity of the mathematical model, parameter estimation can be associated with excessively high computational costs in terms of run time and memory. We apply a strategy for reliable parameter estimation where different modeling approaches with increasing complexity are used that build on one another. This bottom-up modeling approach is applied to an experimental human whole-blood infection assay for Candida albicans. Aiming for the quantification of the relative impact of different routes of the immune response against this human-pathogenic fungus, we start from a non-spatial state-based model (SBM), because this level of model complexity allows estimating a priori unknown transition rates between various system states by the global optimization method simulated annealing. Building on the non-spatial SBM, an agent-based model (ABM) is implemented that incorporates the migration of interacting cells in three-dimensional space. The ABM takes advantage of estimated parameters from the non-spatial SBM, leading to a decreased dimensionality of the parameter space. This space can be scanned using a local optimization approach, i.e., least-squares error estimation based on an adaptive regular grid search, to predict cell migration parameters that are not accessible in experiment. In the future, spatio-temporal simulations of whole-blood samples may enable timely

  16. Bottom-up modeling approach for the quantitative estimation of parameters in pathogen-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Teresa; Timme, Sandra; Pollmächer, Johannes; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic fungal pathogens can cause bloodstream infection and severe sepsis upon entering the blood stream of the host. The early immune response in human blood comprises the elimination of pathogens by antimicrobial peptides and innate immune cells, such as neutrophils or monocytes. Mathematical modeling is a predictive method to examine these complex processes and to quantify the dynamics of pathogen-host interactions. Since model parameters are often not directly accessible from experiment, their estimation is required by calibrating model predictions with experimental data. Depending on the complexity of the mathematical model, parameter estimation can be associated with excessively high computational costs in terms of run time and memory. We apply a strategy for reliable parameter estimation where different modeling approaches with increasing complexity are used that build on one another. This bottom-up modeling approach is applied to an experimental human whole-blood infection assay for Candida albicans. Aiming for the quantification of the relative impact of different routes of the immune response against this human-pathogenic fungus, we start from a non-spatial state-based model (SBM), because this level of model complexity allows estimating a priori unknown transition rates between various system states by the global optimization method simulated annealing. Building on the non-spatial SBM, an agent-based model (ABM) is implemented that incorporates the migration of interacting cells in three-dimensional space. The ABM takes advantage of estimated parameters from the non-spatial SBM, leading to a decreased dimensionality of the parameter space. This space can be scanned using a local optimization approach, i.e., least-squares error estimation based on an adaptive regular grid search, to predict cell migration parameters that are not accessible in experiment. In the future, spatio-temporal simulations of whole-blood samples may enable timely

  17. LEOrbit: A program to calculate parameters relevant to modeling Low Earth Orbit spacecraft-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, R.; Purschke, D.; Samson, J.

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the physics of interaction between satellites and the space environment is essential in planning and exploiting space missions. Several computer models have been developed over the years to study this interaction. In all cases, simulations are carried out in the reference frame of the spacecraft and effects such as charging, the formation of electrostatic sheaths and wakes are calculated for given conditions of the space environment. In this paper we present a program used to compute magnetic fields and a number of space plasma and space environment parameters relevant to Low Earth Orbits (LEO) spacecraft-plasma interaction modeling. Magnetic fields are obtained from the International Geophysical Reference Field (IGRF) and plasma parameters are obtained from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model. All parameters are computed in the spacecraft frame of reference as a function of its six Keplerian elements. They are presented in a format that can be used directly in most spacecraft-plasma interaction models. Catalogue identifier: AENY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 270308 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2323222 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 90. Computer: Non specific. Operating system: Non specific. RAM: 7.1 MB Classification: 19, 4.14. External routines: IRI, IGRF (included in the package). Nature of problem: Compute magnetic field components, direction of the sun, sun visibility factor and approximate plasma parameters in the reference frame of a Low Earth Orbit satellite. Solution method: Orbit integration, calls to IGRF and IRI libraries and transformation of coordinates from geocentric to spacecraft

  18. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli blood group A interactions intensify diarrheal severity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pardeep; Kuhlmann, F Matthew; Chakroborty, Subhra; Bourgeois, A Louis; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Tumala, Brunda; Vickers, Tim J; Sack, David A; DeNearing, Barbara; Harro, Clayton D; Wright, W Shea; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Ciorba, Matthew A; Santhanam, Srikanth; Porter, Chad K; Gutierrez, Ramiro L; Prouty, Michael G; Riddle, Mark S; Polino, Alexander; Sheikh, Alaullah; Donowitz, Mark; Fleckenstein, James M

    2018-05-17

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections are highly prevalent in developing countries where clinical presentations range from asymptomatic colonization to severe cholera-like illness. The molecular basis for these varied presentations, that may involve strain-specific virulence features as well as host factors, have not been elucidated. We demonstrate that when challenged with ETEC strain H10407, originally isolated from a case of cholera-like illness, blood group A human volunteers developed severe diarrhea more frequently than individuals from other blood groups. Interestingly, a diverse population of ETEC strains, including H10407, secrete a novel adhesin molecule, EtpA. As many bacterial adhesins also agglutinate red blood cells, we combined the use of glycan arrays, biolayer inferometry, and non-canonical amino acid labeling with hemagglutination studies to demonstrate that EtpA is a dominant ETEC blood group A specific lectin/hemagglutinin. Importantly, we also show that EtpA interacts specifically with glycans expressed on intestinal epithelial cells from blood group A individuals, and that EtpA-mediated bacterial-host interactions accelerate bacterial adhesion and the effective delivery both heat-labile and heat-stable toxins of ETEC. Collectively, these data provide additional insight into the complex molecular basis of severe ETEC diarrheal illness that may inform rational design of vaccines to protect those at highest risk.

  19. Exclusively visual analysis of classroom group interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Laura; Scherr, Rachel E.; Zickler, Todd; Mazur, Eric

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data only—without audio—as when using both visual and audio data to code. Also, interrater reliability is high when comparing use of visual and audio data to visual-only data. We see a small bias to code interactions as group discussion when visual and audio data are used compared with video-only data. This work establishes that meaningful educational observation can be made through visual information alone. Further, it suggests that after initial work to create a coding scheme and validate it in each environment, computer-automated visual coding could drastically increase the breadth of qualitative studies and allow for meaningful educational analysis on a far greater scale.

  20. Interaction in Group Oral Assessment: A Case Study of Higher- and Lower-Scoring Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Zhengdong

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the interactional work in which two groups of secondary ESL students engaged to achieve and sustain participation in group oral assessment, which is designed to assess a student's interactive communication skills in a school-based assessment context. The in-depth observation of the ways in which participants co-constructed…

  1. A new InterRidge Working Group : Biogeochemical Interactions at Deep-sea Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, N.; Boetius, A.; Tivey, M. K.; Luther, G. W.; German, C. R.; Wenzhoefer, F.; Charlou, J.; Seyfried, W. E.; Fortin, D.; Ferris, G.; Takai, K.; Baross, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    A new Working Group on `Biogeochemical Interactions at deep-sea vents' has been created at the initiative of the InterRidge programme. This interdisciplinary group comprises experts in chemistry, geochemistry, biogeochemistry, and microbial ecology addressing questions of biogeochemical interactions in different MOR and BAB environments. The past decade has raised major issues concerning the interactions between biotic and abiotic compartments of deep-sea hydrothermal environments and the role they play in the microbial turnover of C, S, N, Fe, fluxes from the geosphere to hydrosphere, the formation of biominerals, the functioning of vent ecosystems and life in extreme environments, the deep-biosphere, and the origin of life. Recent multidisciplinary studies have provided some new insights to these issues. Results of some of these studies will be presented here. They point out the variability and complexity of geobiological systems at vents in space and time and highlight the need for interactions across the fields of chemistry, geochemistry, biogeochemistry, and microbial ecology of hydrothermal environments. Limitation for advances in these fields include the availability of seafloor observation/experimentation time, and of underwater instrumentation allowing quantitative, in situ measurements of chemical and biological fluxes, as well as physical and chemical sensing and sampling along small scale gradients and repeated observation of study sites. The aim of this new Working Group is to strengthen the scientific exchange among chemists, geochemists, biogeochemists and microbial ecologists to favor collaboration in field studies including intercomparison of methods and planning of integrated experiments. The Biogeochemical Interactions working group will also foster development of underwater instrumentation for in situ biogeochemical measurements and microscale sampling, and promote exchange and collaboration with students and scientists of neighboring

  2. Dynamic Task Performance, Cohesion, and Communications in Human Groups.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Luis Felipe; Passino, Kevin M

    2016-10-01

    In the study of the behavior of human groups, it has been observed that there is a strong interaction between the cohesiveness of the group, its performance when the group has to solve a task, and the patterns of communication between the members of the group. Developing mathematical and computational tools for the analysis and design of task-solving groups that are not only cohesive but also perform well is of importance in social sciences, organizational management, and engineering. In this paper, we model a human group as a dynamical system whose behavior is driven by a task optimization process and the interaction between subsystems that represent the members of the group interconnected according to a given communication network. These interactions are described as attractions and repulsions among members. We show that the dynamics characterized by the proposed mathematical model are qualitatively consistent with those observed in real-human groups, where the key aspect is that the attraction patterns in the group and the commitment to solve the task are not static but change over time. Through a theoretical analysis of the system we provide conditions on the parameters that allow the group to have cohesive behaviors, and Monte Carlo simulations are used to study group dynamics for different sets of parameters, communication topologies, and tasks to solve.

  3. Energy dependence of radiation interaction parameters of some organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mohinder; Tondon, Akash; Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan

    2018-04-01

    Gamma rays interact with a material through photoelectric absorption, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering and Pair production in the intermediate energy range. The probability of occurrence of a particular type of process depends on the energy of incident gamma rays, atomic number of the material, scattering angle and geometrical conditions. Various radiological parameters for organic compounds, namely ethylene glycol (C2H6O2), propylene glycol (C3H8O2), glycerin (C3H8O3), isoamyl alcohol (C5H12O), butanone (C4H8O), acetophenone (C8H8O2), cyclohexanone (C6H10O), furfural (C5H4O2), benzaldehyde (C7H6O), cinnamaldehyde (C9H8O), glutaraldehyde (C5H8O2), aniline (C6H7N), benzyl amine (C6H7N), nitrobenzene (C6H5NO2), ethyl benzene (C8H10), ethyl formate (C3H6O2) and water (H2O) are presented at 81, 122, 356 and 511 keV energies employing NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in narrow-beam transmission geometry. The radiation interaction parameters such as mass attenuation, molar extinction and mass energy absorption coefficients, half value layer, total atomic and effective electronic cross-sections and CT number have been evaluated for these organic compounds. The general trend of values of mass attenuation coefficients, half value layer, molar extinction coefficients, total atomic and effective electronic cross-sections and mass energy absorption coefficients shows a decrease with increase in incident gamma photon energy. The values of CT number are found to increases linearly with increase of effective atomic number (Zeff). The variation in CT number around Zeff ≈ 3.3 shows the peak like structure with respect to water and the correlation between CT number and linear attenuation coefficient is about 0.99. Appropriate equations are fitted to these experimentally determined parameters for the organic compounds at incident photon energy ranging from 81 keV to 511 keV used in the present study. Experimental values are compared with the theoretical data obtained using Win

  4. New Frontiers in Analyzing Dynamic Group Interactions: Bridging Social and Computer Science.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Hung, Hayley; Keyton, Joann

    2017-10-01

    This special issue on advancing interdisciplinary collaboration between computer scientists and social scientists documents the joint results of the international Lorentz workshop, "Interdisciplinary Insights into Group and Team Dynamics," which took place in Leiden, The Netherlands, July 2016. An equal number of scholars from social and computer science participated in the workshop and contributed to the papers included in this special issue. In this introduction, we first identify interaction dynamics as the core of group and team models and review how scholars in social and computer science have typically approached behavioral interactions in groups and teams. Next, we identify key challenges for interdisciplinary collaboration between social and computer scientists, and we provide an overview of the different articles in this special issue aimed at addressing these challenges.

  5. Dual fermionic variables and renormalization group approach to junctions of strongly interacting quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Domenico; Nava, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Making a combined use of bosonization and fermionization techniques, we build nonlocal transformations between dual fermion operators, describing junctions of strongly interacting spinful one-dimensional quantum wires. Our approach allows for trading strongly interacting (in the original coordinates) fermionic Hamiltonians for weakly interacting (in the dual coordinates) ones. It enables us to generalize to the strongly interacting regime the fermionic renormalization group approach to weakly interacting junctions. As a result, on one hand, we are able to pertinently complement the information about the phase diagram of the junction obtained within the bosonization approach; on the other hand, we map out the full crossover of the conductance tensors between any two fixed points in the phase diagram connected by a renormalization group trajectory.

  6. Comprehensive Group Therapy of Obesity and Its Impact on Selected Anthropometric and Postural Parameters.

    PubMed

    Horák, Stanislav; Sovová, Eliška; Pastucha, Dalibor; Konečný, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Calabová, Naděžda; Janoutová, Jana; Janout, Vladimír

    2017-12-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease. This non-infectious epidemic has reached pandemic proportions in the 21 century. Posture is a dynamic process referring to an active maintenance of body movement segments against the action of external forces. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of comprehensive group therapy for obese persons on selected anthropometric and postural parameters. The study comprised 53 females with a mean age of 44.5 years (range 29–65 years, standard deviation 9.42 years, median 44 years), who completed a controlled weight loss programme. At the beginning and at the end of the programme, anthropometric parameters (Body Mass Index (BMI), weight and waist circumference) were measured and the posturography tests Limits of Stability (LOS) and Motor Control Test (MCT) were performed using the NeuroCom's SMART EquiTest system. The data were statistically analyzed using R software at a level of significance of 0.05. There were positive changes after the controlled weight loss programme in anthropometric parameters (BMI reduction, with p<0.001; waist circumference reduction, with p<0.001; and weight loss, with p<0.001), postural stability with statistically significant (p<0.05) improvements in both postural activity (LOS test parameters) and reactions (MCT parameters). The study showed a statistically significant effect of comprehensive group therapy for obesity in terms of reductions in waist circumference, body weight and BMI, and thus the overall reduction of both cardiovascular and metabolic risks, as well as improved postural skills (activity and reactions). Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017

  7. Distributed interactive communication in simulated space-dwelling groups.

    PubMed

    Brady, Joseph V; Hienz, Robert D; Hursh, Steven R; Ragusa, Leonard C; Rouse, Charles O; Gasior, Eric D

    2004-03-01

    This report describes the development and preliminary application of an experimental test bed for modeling human behavior in the context of a computer generated environment to analyze the effects of variations in communication modalities, incentives and stressful conditions. In addition to detailing the methodological development of a simulated task environment that provides for electronic monitoring and recording of individual and group behavior, the initial substantive findings from an experimental analysis of distributed interactive communication in simulated space dwelling groups are described. Crews of three members each (male and female) participated in simulated "planetary missions" based upon a synthetic scenario task that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic specimens with a range of grade values. The results of these preliminary studies showed clearly that cooperative and productive interactions were maintained between individually isolated and distributed individuals communicating and problem-solving effectively in a computer-generated "planetary" environment over extended time intervals without benefit of one another's physical presence. Studies on communication channel constraints confirmed the functional interchangeability between available modalities with the highest degree of interchangeability occurring between Audio and Text modes of communication. The effects of task-related incentives were determined by the conditions under which they were available with Positive Incentives effectively attenuating decrements in performance under stressful time pressure. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Computation of energy interaction parameters as well as electric dipole intensity parameters for the absorption spectral study of the interaction of Pr(III) with L-phenylalanine, L-glycine, L-alanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ in organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaienla, T.; Singh, Th. David; Singh, N. Rajmuhon; Devi, M. Indira

    2009-10-01

    Studying the absorption difference and comparative absorption spectra of the interaction of Pr(III) and Nd(III) with L-phenylalanine, L-glycine, L-alanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ in organic solvents, various energy interaction parameters like Slater-Condon ( FK), Racah ( Ek), Lande factor ( ξ4f), nephelauxetic ratio ( β), bonding ( b1/2), percentage-covalency ( δ) have been evaluated applying partial and multiple regression analysis. The values of oscillator strength ( P) and Judd-Ofelt electric dipole intensity parameter Tλ ( λ = 2, 4, 6) for different 4f-4f transitions have been computed. On analysis of the variation of the various energy interaction parameters as well as the changes in the oscillator strength ( P) and Tλ values reveal the mode of binding with different ligands.

  9. Non-dimensional groups in the description of finite-amplitude sound propagation through aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Several parameters, which have fairly transparent physical interpretations, appear in the analytic description of finite-amplitude sound propagation through aerosols. Typically, each of these parameters characterizes, in some sense, either the sound or the aerosol. It also turns out that fairly obvious combinations of these parameters yield non-dimensional groups which, in turn, characterize the nature of the acoustic-aerosol interaction. This theme is developed in order to illustrate how a quick examination of such parameters and groups can yield information about the nature of the processes involved, without the necessity of extensive mathematical analysis. This concept is developed primarily from the viewpoint of sound propagation through aerosols, although complimentary acoustic-aerosol interaction phenomena are briefly noted.

  10. Infant and Toddler Interactions with a New Infant in a Group Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessee, Peggy O.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigated young children's social interactions with a baby in a group care setting. Observations of young children as they responded to an infant revealed differences in comforting, sharing, and cooperation according to age and sex. Also, toddlers' social interactions with the infant increased after the infant reached 18 months of age, and…

  11. Social Anxiety, Acute Social Stress, and Reward Parameters Interact to Predict Risky Decision-Making among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jessica M.; Patel, Nilam; Daniele, Teresa; MacPherson, Laura; Lejuez, C.W.; Ernst, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Risk-taking behavior increases during adolescence, leading to potentially disastrous consequences. Social anxiety emerges in adolescence and may compound risk-taking propensity, particularly during stress and when reward potential is high. However, the manner in which social anxiety, stress, and reward parameters interact to impact adolescent risk-taking is unclear. To clarify this question, a community sample of 35 adolescents (15 to 18 yo), characterized as having high or low social anxiety, participated in a 2-day study, during each of which they were exposed to either a social stress or a control condition, while performing a risky decision-making task. The task manipulated, orthogonally, reward magnitude and probability across trials. Three findings emerged. First, reward magnitude had a greater impact on the rate of risky decisions in high social anxiety (HSA) than low social anxiety (LSA) adolescents. Second, reaction times (RTs) were similar during the social stress and the control conditions for the HSA group, whereas the LSA group’s RTs differed between conditions. Third, HSA adolescents showed the longest RTs on the most negative trials. These findings suggest that risk-taking in adolescents is modulated by context and reward parameters differentially as a function of social anxiety. PMID:25465884

  12. Impact of nonlinear effective interactions on group field theory quantum gravity condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pithis, Andreas G. A.; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Tomov, Petar

    2016-09-01

    We present the numerical analysis of effectively interacting group field theory models in the context of the group field theory quantum gravity condensate analog of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for real Bose-Einstein condensates including combinatorially local interaction terms. Thus, we go beyond the usually considered construction for free models. More precisely, considering such interactions in a weak regime, we find solutions for which the expectation value of the number operator N is finite, as in the free case. When tuning the interaction to the strongly nonlinear regime, however, we obtain solutions for which N grows and eventually blows up, which is reminiscent of what one observes for real Bose-Einstein condensates, where a strong interaction regime can only be realized at high density. This behavior suggests the breakdown of the Bogoliubov ansatz for quantum gravity condensates and the need for non-Fock representations to describe the system when the condensate constituents are strongly correlated. Furthermore, we study the expectation values of certain geometric operators imported from loop quantum gravity in the free and interacting cases. In particular, computing solutions around the nontrivial minima of the interaction potentials, one finds, already in the weakly interacting case, a nonvanishing condensate population for which the spectra are dominated by the lowest nontrivial configuration of the quantum geometry. This result indicates that the condensate may indeed consist of many smallest building blocks giving rise to an effectively continuous geometry, thus suggesting the interpretation of the condensate phase to correspond to a geometric phase.

  13. New Frontiers in Analyzing Dynamic Group Interactions: Bridging Social and Computer Science

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Hung, Hayley; Keyton, Joann

    2017-01-01

    This special issue on advancing interdisciplinary collaboration between computer scientists and social scientists documents the joint results of the international Lorentz workshop, “Interdisciplinary Insights into Group and Team Dynamics,” which took place in Leiden, The Netherlands, July 2016. An equal number of scholars from social and computer science participated in the workshop and contributed to the papers included in this special issue. In this introduction, we first identify interaction dynamics as the core of group and team models and review how scholars in social and computer science have typically approached behavioral interactions in groups and teams. Next, we identify key challenges for interdisciplinary collaboration between social and computer scientists, and we provide an overview of the different articles in this special issue aimed at addressing these challenges. PMID:29249891

  14. Contrasting Expectations of Individuals and Collectivists: Achieving Effective Group Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltman, John L.; Bush-Bacelis, Jean L.

    1995-01-01

    Techniques for training students of international business to understand collectivism and individualism, both as they affect classroom interaction and as they may affect intercultural relations in business, are presented. Tools are offered for adapting group projects given to individualists in individualist cultures to help them develop a…

  15. Thermodynamic curvature for a two-parameter spin model with frustration.

    PubMed

    Ruppeiner, George; Bellucci, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic models of realistic thermodynamic systems usually involve a number of parameters, not all of equal macroscopic relevance. We examine a decorated (1+3) Ising spin chain containing two microscopic parameters: a stiff parameter K mediating the long-range interactions, and a sloppy J operating within local spin groups. We show that K dominates the macroscopic behavior, with varying J having only a weak effect, except in regions where J brings about transitions between phases through its conditioning of the local spin groups with which K interacts. We calculate the heat capacity C(H), the magnetic susceptibility χ(T), and the thermodynamic curvature R. For large |J/K|, we identify four magnetic phases: ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, and two ferrimagnetic, according to the signs of K and J. We argue that for characterizing these phases, the strongest picture is offered by the thermodynamic geometric invariant R, proportional to the correlation length ξ. This picture has correspondences to other cases, such as fluids.

  16. Quantitative relations between interaction parameter, miscibility and function in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Long; Hu, Huawei; Ghasemi, Masoud; Wang, Tonghui; Collins, Brian A.; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Jiang, Kui; Carpenter, Joshua H.; Li, Hong; Li, Zhengke; McAfee, Terry; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Xiankai; Lai, Joshua Lin Yuk; Ma, Tingxuan; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Yan, He; Ade, Harald

    2018-03-01

    Although it is known that molecular interactions govern morphology formation and purity of mixed domains of conjugated polymer donors and small-molecule acceptors, and thus largely control the achievable performance of organic solar cells, quantifying interaction-function relations has remained elusive. Here, we first determine the temperature-dependent effective amorphous-amorphous interaction parameter, χaa(T), by mapping out the phase diagram of a model amorphous polymer:fullerene material system. We then establish a quantitative `constant-kink-saturation' relation between χaa and the fill factor in organic solar cells that is verified in detail in a model system and delineated across numerous high- and low-performing materials systems, including fullerene and non-fullerene acceptors. Our experimental and computational data reveal that a high fill factor is obtained only when χaa is large enough to lead to strong phase separation. Our work outlines a basis for using various miscibility tests and future simulation methods that will significantly reduce or eliminate trial-and-error approaches to material synthesis and device fabrication of functional semiconducting blends and organic blends in general.

  17. A model of interaction between anticorruption authority and corruption groups

    SciTech Connect

    Neverova, Elena G.; Malafeyef, Oleg A.

    The paper provides a model of interaction between anticorruption unit and corruption groups. The main policy functions of the anticorruption unit involve reducing corrupt practices in some entities through an optimal approach to resource allocation and effective anticorruption policy. We develop a model based on Markov decision-making process and use Howard’s policy-improvement algorithm for solving an optimal decision strategy. We examine the assumption that corruption groups retaliate against the anticorruption authority to protect themselves. This model was implemented through stochastic game.

  18. Asynchronous Group Review of EFL Writing: Interactions and Text Revisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeed, Murad Abdu; Ghazali, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    The current paper reports an empirical study of asynchronous online group review of argumentative essays among nine English as foreign language (EFL) Arab university learners joining English in their first, second, and third years at the institution. In investigating online interactions, commenting patterns, and how the students facilitate text…

  19. Evolutionary model selection and parameter estimation for protein-protein interaction network based on differential evolution algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H.

    2016-01-01

    Revealing the underlying evolutionary mechanism plays an important role in understanding protein interaction networks in the cell. While many evolutionary models have been proposed, the problem about applying these models to real network data, especially for differentiating which model can better describe evolutionary process for the observed network urgently remains as a challenge. The traditional way is to use a model with presumed parameters to generate a network, and then evaluate the fitness by summary statistics, which however cannot capture the complete network structures information and estimate parameter distribution. In this work we developed a novel method based on Approximate Bayesian Computation and modified Differential Evolution (ABC-DEP) that is capable of conducting model selection and parameter estimation simultaneously and detecting the underlying evolutionary mechanisms more accurately. We tested our method for its power in differentiating models and estimating parameters on the simulated data and found significant improvement in performance benchmark, as compared with a previous method. We further applied our method to real data of protein interaction networks in human and yeast. Our results show Duplication Attachment model as the predominant evolutionary mechanism for human PPI networks and Scale-Free model as the predominant mechanism for yeast PPI networks. PMID:26357273

  20. Group tele-immersion:enabling natural interactions between groups at distant sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Christine L.; Stewart, Corbin; Nashel, Andrew

    2005-08-01

    We present techniques and a system for synthesizing views for video teleconferencing between small groups. In place of replicating one-to-one systems for each pair of users, we create a single unified display of the remote group. Instead of performing dense 3D scene computation, we use more cameras and trade-off storage and hardware for computation. While it is expensive to directly capture a scene from all possible viewpoints, we have observed that the participants viewpoints usually remain at a constant height (eye level) during video teleconferencing. Therefore, we can restrict the possible viewpoint to be within a virtual plane without sacrificingmore » much of the realism, and in cloning so we significantly reduce the number of required cameras. Based on this observation, we have developed a technique that uses light-field style rendering to guarantee the quality of the synthesized views, using a linear array of cameras with a life-sized, projected display. Our full-duplex prototype system between Sandia National Laboratories, California and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been able to synthesize photo-realistic views at interactive rates, and has been used to video conference during regular meetings between the sites.« less

  1. Reevaluation of the role of the polar groups of collagen in the platelet-collagen interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, C. M.; Pifer, D. D.; Crofford, L. J.; Huch, K. M.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical modification of collagen is a tool for exploring the platelet-collagen interaction. Since collagen must polymerize prior to the initiation of platelet aggregation and secretion, modification must be shown to affect platelet-collagen interaction and not collagen-collagen interaction. To address this point, the authors carried out the following chemical modifications on soluble monomeric collagen and preformed fibrillar collagen in parallel: 1) N-and O-acetylation, 2) esterification of the carboxyl groups, 3) succinylation of the free amino groups, 4) esterification of succinylated collagen. Intrinsic viscosity studies of the modified soluble collagens were consistent with normal triple helix conformation. Electron microscopy revealed all modified fibrillar collagen to maintain a fibrillar structure. Platelet aggregation and secretion of 14C-serotonin and platelet factor 4 by soluble and fibrillar collagen, respectively, were studied in human platelet-rich plasma. Neutralization of polar groups by 1) totally abolished aggregation and secretion by both collagens, while blocking acidic groups 2) resulted in enhanced aggregation and secretion by both soluble and fibrillar collagen. Blockage of amino groups by 3) abolished aggregation and secretion by both collagens. Esterified succinylated collagen 4) caused aggregation and secretion at relatively high collagen concentrations. These data support the theory that positive groups of collagen are important in platelet-collagen interaction. Images Figure 1 PMID:6881287

  2. Dispersive charge transport due to strong charge dipole interactions of cyano-group in the cyano-carbazole based molecular glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dong Keun; Hong, Sung Mok; Lee, Cheol Eui; Kim, B.-S.; Jin, J.-I.

    2005-12-01

    Using the time of flight (ToF) method, we investigated the bipolar charge transport for two glass-forming molecules containing carbazole and cyano-carbazole moiety. The enhanced electron mobility was observed in the cyano-carbazole compound. From the numerical method based the Laplace formalism, the distribution of hole trapping energy was obtained for the carbazole compound. This result was compared with the exponential distribution extracted from dispersion parameter for the cyano-carbazole material. Considering charge-dipole interactions as a reason for the disordered trapping mechanism, we discussed dispersive charge transport induced by a strong dipolar (i.e. cyano) group by comparing the distributions of hole trapping sites for two compounds.

  3. An active site rearrangement within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme releases nonproductive interactions and allows formation of catalytic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Raghuvir N.; Van Schie, Sabine N.S.; Giambaşu, George; Dai, Qing; Yesselman, Joseph D.; York, Darrin; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biological catalysis hinges on the precise structural integrity of an active site that binds and transforms its substrates and meeting this requirement presents a unique challenge for RNA enzymes. Functional RNAs, including ribozymes, fold into their active conformations within rugged energy landscapes that often contain misfolded conformers. Here we uncover and characterize one such “off-pathway” species within an active site after overall folding of the ribozyme is complete. The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme (E) catalyzes cleavage of an oligonucleotide substrate (S) by an exogenous guanosine (G) cofactor. We tested whether specific catalytic interactions with G are present in the preceding E•S•G and E•G ground-state complexes. We monitored interactions with G via the effects of 2′- and 3′-deoxy (–H) and −amino (–NH2) substitutions on G binding. These and prior results reveal that G is bound in an inactive configuration within E•G, with the nucleophilic 3′-OH making a nonproductive interaction with an active site metal ion termed MA and with the adjacent 2′-OH making no interaction. Upon S binding, a rearrangement occurs that allows both –OH groups to contact a different active site metal ion, termed MC, to make what are likely to be their catalytic interactions. The reactive phosphoryl group on S promotes this change, presumably by repositioning the metal ions with respect to G. This conformational transition demonstrates local rearrangements within an otherwise folded RNA, underscoring RNA's difficulty in specifying a unique conformation and highlighting Nature's potential to use local transitions of RNA in complex function. PMID:26567314

  4. An active site rearrangement within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme releases nonproductive interactions and allows formation of catalytic interactions.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Raghuvir N; Van Schie, Sabine N S; Giambaşu, George; Dai, Qing; Yesselman, Joseph D; York, Darrin; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biological catalysis hinges on the precise structural integrity of an active site that binds and transforms its substrates and meeting this requirement presents a unique challenge for RNA enzymes. Functional RNAs, including ribozymes, fold into their active conformations within rugged energy landscapes that often contain misfolded conformers. Here we uncover and characterize one such "off-pathway" species within an active site after overall folding of the ribozyme is complete. The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme (E) catalyzes cleavage of an oligonucleotide substrate (S) by an exogenous guanosine (G) cofactor. We tested whether specific catalytic interactions with G are present in the preceding E•S•G and E•G ground-state complexes. We monitored interactions with G via the effects of 2'- and 3'-deoxy (-H) and -amino (-NH(2)) substitutions on G binding. These and prior results reveal that G is bound in an inactive configuration within E•G, with the nucleophilic 3'-OH making a nonproductive interaction with an active site metal ion termed MA and with the adjacent 2'-OH making no interaction. Upon S binding, a rearrangement occurs that allows both -OH groups to contact a different active site metal ion, termed M(C), to make what are likely to be their catalytic interactions. The reactive phosphoryl group on S promotes this change, presumably by repositioning the metal ions with respect to G. This conformational transition demonstrates local rearrangements within an otherwise folded RNA, underscoring RNA's difficulty in specifying a unique conformation and highlighting Nature's potential to use local transitions of RNA in complex function. © 2015 Sengupta et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Content-related interactions and methods of reasoning within self-initiated organic chemistry study groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Karen Jeanne

    2011-12-01

    Students often use study groups to prepare for class or exams; yet to date, we know very little about how these groups actually function. This study looked at the ways in which undergraduate organic chemistry students prepared for exams through self-initiated study groups. We sought to characterize the methods of social regulation, levels of content processing, and types of reasoning processes used by students within their groups. Our analysis showed that groups engaged in predominantly three types of interactions when discussing chemistry content: co-construction, teaching, and tutoring. Although each group engaged in each of these types of interactions at some point, their prevalence varied between groups and group members. Our analysis suggests that the types of interactions that were most common depended on the relative content knowledge of the group members as well as on the difficulty of the tasks in which they were engaged. Additionally, we were interested in characterizing the reasoning methods used by students within their study groups. We found that students used a combination of three content-relevant methods of reasoning: model-based reasoning, case-based reasoning, or rule-based reasoning, in conjunction with one chemically-irrelevant method of reasoning: symbol-based reasoning. The most common way for groups to reason was to use rules, whereas the least common way was for students to work from a model. In general, student reasoning correlated strongly to the subject matter to which students were paying attention, and was only weakly related to student interactions. Overall, results from this study may help instructors to construct appropriate tasks to guide what and how students study outside of the classroom. We found that students had a decidedly strategic approach in their study groups, relying heavily on material provided by their instructors, and using the reasoning strategies that resulted in the lowest levels of content processing. We suggest

  6. Effect of interactive group discussion among physicians to promote rational prescribing.

    PubMed

    Garjani, A; Salimnejad, M; Shamsmohamadi, M; Baghchevan, V; Vahidi, R G; Maleki-Dijazi, N; Rezazadeh, H

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of an educational intervention (interactive group discussion) on the prescribing behaviour of 51 general physicians from the north-west of Tabriz. Prescriptions were analysed pre-intervention and post-intervention (control and intervention groups) using a proforma with 8 indicators of correct prescribing. The mean number of drugs per prescription pre-intervention was 3.82. The percentage of prescriptions with antibiotics, corticosteroids and injections were 40.8%, 25.9% and 58.0%, respectively. Following the intervention there were slight but not significant changes in the indicators in both intervention and control groups compared with pre-intervention results.

  7. Are groups more rational than individuals? A review of interactive decision making in groups.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Tamar; Kausel, Edgar E; Kocher, Martin G

    2012-07-01

    Many decisions are interactive; the outcome of one party depends not only on its decisions or on acts of nature but also on the decisions of others. Standard game theory assumes that individuals are rational, self-interested decision makers-that is, decision makers are selfish, perfect calculators, and flawless executors of their strategies. A myriad of studies shows that these assumptions are problematic, at least when examining decisions made by individuals. In this article, we review the literature of the last 25 years on decision making by groups. Researchers have compared the strategic behavior of groups and individuals in many games: prisoner's dilemma, dictator, ultimatum, trust, centipede and principal-agent games, among others. Our review suggests that results are quite consistent in revealing that group decisions are closer to the game-theoretic assumption of rationality than individual decisions. Given that many real-world decisions are made by groups, it is possible to argue that standard game theory is a better descriptive model than previously believed by experimental researchers. We conclude by discussing future research avenues in this area. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:471-482. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1184 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Differences in Some Kinematic Parameters between Two Qualitatively Different Groups of Pole Vaulters.

    PubMed

    Gudelj, Ines; Babić, Vesna; Milat, Sanja; Čavala, Marijana; Zagorac, Siniša; Katić, Ratko

    2015-07-01

    The basic aim of this research was to determine the differences of kinematic parameters in two qualitatively different groups of young pole vaulters. With this purpose, a research was conducted in which the video records from a competition were acquired. The sample of entities (N = 71) consisted of successful vaults of 30 pole vaulters, whose attempts were recorded at the European Junior Championship in Novi Sad, held on 23-26th July 2009. The examinees performed the vaults as a part of the elimination competition for the finals, and during the final part of the competition. The age of examinees was from 17 to 19 years, and the span of their best results was from 4.70 to 5.30 meters. The kinematic analysis was conducted according to the standards of APAS procedure (Ariel Performance Analysis System, USA), determining 25 kinematic variables necessary for further analysis. The entities (vaults) were divided into two categories (qualitative classes) based on the expert knowledge. Group 1 consisted of successful vaults up to 4.90 m (N = 46), while group 2 consisted of successful vaults whose height was more than 4.90 m (N = 25). The discrimination analysis determined the parameters differentiating the vaults of different quantitative classes. Also, it was confirmed that the result efficiency in pole vault was primarily determined by the variables defined by motor abilities, as well as the indicators determining the vault performance technique.

  9. Weak Interactions Govern the Viscosity of Concentrated Antibody Solutions: High-Throughput Analysis Using the Diffusion Interaction Parameter

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Brian D.; Petry, Chris; Yadav, Sandeep; Demeule, Barthélemy; Ciaccio, Natalie; Moore, Jamie M.R.; Shire, Steven J.; Gokarn, Yatin R.

    2012-01-01

    Weak protein-protein interactions are thought to modulate the viscoelastic properties of concentrated antibody solutions. Predicting the viscoelastic behavior of concentrated antibodies from their dilute solution behavior is of significant interest and remains a challenge. Here, we show that the diffusion interaction parameter (kD), a component of the osmotic second virial coefficient (B2) that is amenable to high-throughput measurement in dilute solutions, correlates well with the viscosity of concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions. We measured the kD of 29 different mAbs (IgG1 and IgG4) in four different solvent conditions (low and high ion normality) and found a linear dependence between kD and the exponential coefficient that describes the viscosity concentration profiles (|R| ≥ 0.9). Through experimentally measured effective charge measurements, under low ion normality where the electroviscous effect can dominate, we show that the mAb solution viscosity is poorly correlated with the mAb net charge (|R| ≤ 0.6). With this large data set, our results provide compelling evidence in support of weak intermolecular interactions, in contrast to the notion that the electroviscous effect is important in governing the viscoelastic behavior of concentrated mAb solutions. Our approach is particularly applicable as a screening tool for selecting mAbs with desirable viscosity properties early during lead candidate selection. PMID:22828333

  10. Evaluating the Spatio-Temporal Factors that Structure Network Parameters of Plant-Herbivore Interactions

    PubMed Central

    López-Carretero, Antonio; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Boege, Karina; Rico-Gray, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dynamic nature of ecological interactions, most studies on species networks offer static representations of their structure, constraining our understanding of the ecological mechanisms involved in their spatio-temporal stability. This is the first study to evaluate plant-herbivore interaction networks on a small spatio-temporal scale. Specifically, we simultaneously assessed the effect of host plant availability, habitat complexity and seasonality on the structure of plant-herbivore networks in a coastal tropical ecosystem. Our results revealed that changes in the host plant community resulting from seasonality and habitat structure are reflected not only in the herbivore community, but also in the emergent properties (network parameters) of the plant-herbivore interaction network such as connectance, selectiveness and modularity. Habitat conditions and periods that are most stressful favored the presence of less selective and susceptible herbivore species, resulting in increased connectance within networks. In contrast, the high degree of selectivennes (i.e. interaction specialization) and modularity of the networks under less stressful conditions was promoted by the diversification in resource use by herbivores. By analyzing networks at a small spatio-temporal scale we identified the ecological factors structuring this network such as habitat complexity and seasonality. Our research offers new evidence on the role of abiotic and biotic factors in the variation of the properties of species interaction networks. PMID:25340790

  11. Structural Interface Parameters Are Discriminatory in Recognising Near-Native Poses of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Sony; Sankar, Kannan; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2014-01-01

    Interactions at the molecular level in the cellular environment play a very crucial role in maintaining the physiological functioning of the cell. These molecular interactions exist at varied levels viz. protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions or protein-small molecules interactions. Presently in the field, these interactions and their mechanisms mark intensively studied areas. Molecular interactions can also be studied computationally using the approach named as Molecular Docking. Molecular docking employs search algorithms to predict the possible conformations for interacting partners and then calculates interaction energies. However, docking proposes number of solutions as different docked poses and hence offers a serious challenge to identify the native (or near native) structures from the pool of these docked poses. Here, we propose a rigorous scoring scheme called DockScore which can be used to rank the docked poses and identify the best docked pose out of many as proposed by docking algorithm employed. The scoring identifies the optimal interactions between the two protein partners utilising various features of the putative interface like area, short contacts, conservation, spatial clustering and the presence of positively charged and hydrophobic residues. DockScore was first trained on a set of 30 protein-protein complexes to determine the weights for different parameters. Subsequently, we tested the scoring scheme on 30 different protein-protein complexes and native or near-native structure were assigned the top rank from a pool of docked poses in 26 of the tested cases. We tested the ability of DockScore to discriminate likely dimer interactions that differ substantially within a homologous family and also demonstrate that DOCKSCORE can distinguish correct pose for all 10 recent CAPRI targets. PMID:24498255

  12. Structural interface parameters are discriminatory in recognising near-native poses of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sony; Sankar, Kannan; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2014-01-01

    Interactions at the molecular level in the cellular environment play a very crucial role in maintaining the physiological functioning of the cell. These molecular interactions exist at varied levels viz. protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions or protein-small molecules interactions. Presently in the field, these interactions and their mechanisms mark intensively studied areas. Molecular interactions can also be studied computationally using the approach named as Molecular Docking. Molecular docking employs search algorithms to predict the possible conformations for interacting partners and then calculates interaction energies. However, docking proposes number of solutions as different docked poses and hence offers a serious challenge to identify the native (or near native) structures from the pool of these docked poses. Here, we propose a rigorous scoring scheme called DockScore which can be used to rank the docked poses and identify the best docked pose out of many as proposed by docking algorithm employed. The scoring identifies the optimal interactions between the two protein partners utilising various features of the putative interface like area, short contacts, conservation, spatial clustering and the presence of positively charged and hydrophobic residues. DockScore was first trained on a set of 30 protein-protein complexes to determine the weights for different parameters. Subsequently, we tested the scoring scheme on 30 different protein-protein complexes and native or near-native structure were assigned the top rank from a pool of docked poses in 26 of the tested cases. We tested the ability of DockScore to discriminate likely dimer interactions that differ substantially within a homologous family and also demonstrate that DOCKSCORE can distinguish correct pose for all 10 recent CAPRI targets.

  13. Representations of the quantum doubles of finite group algebras and spectral parameter dependent solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation

    SciTech Connect

    Dancer, K. A.; Isac, P. S.; Links, J.

    2006-10-15

    Quantum doubles of finite group algebras form a class of quasitriangular Hopf algebras that algebraically solve the Yang-Baxter equation. Each representation of the quantum double then gives a matrix solution of the Yang-Baxter equation. Such solutions do not depend on a spectral parameter, and to date there has been little investigation into extending these solutions such that they do depend on a spectral parameter. Here we first explicitly construct the matrix elements of the generators for all irreducible representations of quantum doubles of the dihedral groups D{sub n}. These results may be used to determine constant solutions of the Yang-Baxtermore » equation. We then discuss Baxterization ansaetze to obtain solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation with a spectral parameter and give several examples, including a new 21-vertex model. We also describe this approach in terms of minimal-dimensional representations of the quantum doubles of the alternating group A{sub 4} and the symmetric group S{sub 4}.« less

  14. Statistical Analysis of Human Body Movement and Group Interactions in Response to Music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, Frank; Leman, Marc; Lesaffre, Micheline; de Bruyn, Leen

    Quantification of time series that relate to physiological data is challenging for empirical music research. Up to now, most studies have focused on time-dependent responses of individual subjects in controlled environments. However, little is known about time-dependent responses of between-subject interactions in an ecological context. This paper provides new findings on the statistical analysis of group synchronicity in response to musical stimuli. Different statistical techniques were applied to time-dependent data obtained from an experiment on embodied listening in individual and group settings. Analysis of inter group synchronicity are described. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) and Cross Correlation Function (CCF) were found to be valid methods to estimate group coherence of the resulting movements. It was found that synchronicity of movements between individuals (human-human interactions) increases significantly in the social context. Moreover, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) revealed that the type of music is the predominant factor in both the individual and the social context.

  15. Individual and small group interactions in learning to teach with a hypermedia case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Mi-Lee Ahn

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the similarities and differences of individual and small group preservice teachers' interactions with a hypermedia case. Preservice teachers' interactions with a hypermedia case were defined in terms of their (1) goals and perception of accomplishments of the goals, (2) use of features of the hypermedia case, and (3) types of questions and conflicts raised. Two individuals and two small groups of three preservice teachers participated by interacting with the hypermedia case which was developed to illustrate conceptual change science teaching in an elementary classroom. Most of the previous studies in this area have addressed large group use of hypermedia cases, and this study attempted to address the gap in the literature related to different social contexts, individuals and small groups, from the constructivist perspective. The assumptions of symbolic interactionism guided data collection from think-alouds and interviews. These multiple sources of data were used to understand the participants' construction of knowledge; data were analyzed and interpreted by a process of analytic induction. The major assertion was that the preservice teachers perceived the hypermedia case to be like a tool to link theory and practice of teaching. Three sub-assertions, and several supporting categories, also emerged from the data. These findings indicated that group learning experiences with the hypermedia case were more valuable than those of individuals. In general, preservice teachers benefited from learning how to teach with the hypermedia case in both settings. However, the individuals were not as satisfied as those in small groups, and the members of small groups interacted more actively with the hypermedia case as well as with the peers. The results of this study suggest that effective use of hypermedia cases takes place in a community of learners where the learners share the context and can draw upon the resources afforded by the

  16. Getting a feel for parameters: using interactive parallel plots as a tool for parameter identification in the new rainfall-runoff model WALRUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Claudia; Torfs, Paul; Teuling, Ryan; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    Recently, we developed the Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS) to fill the gap between complex, spatially distributed models often used in lowland catchments and simple, parametric models which have mostly been developed for mountainous catchments (Brauer et al., 2014ab). This parametric rainfall-runoff model can be used all over the world in both freely draining lowland catchments and polders with controlled water levels. The open source model code is implemented in R and can be downloaded from www.github.com/ClaudiaBrauer/WALRUS. The structure and code of WALRUS are simple, which facilitates detailed investigation of the effect of parameters on all model variables. WALRUS contains only four parameters requiring calibration; they are intended to have a strong, qualitative relation with catchment characteristics. Parameter estimation remains a challenge, however. The model structure contains three main feedbacks: (1) between groundwater and surface water; (2) between saturated and unsaturated zone; (3) between catchment wetness and (quick/slow) flowroute division. These feedbacks represent essential rainfall-runoff processes in lowland catchments, but increase the risk of parameter dependence and equifinality. Therefore, model performance should not only be judged based on a comparison between modelled and observed discharges, but also based on the plausibility of the internal modelled variables. Here, we present a method to analyse the effect of parameter values on internal model states and fluxes in a qualitative and intuitive way using interactive parallel plotting. We applied WALRUS to ten Dutch catchments with different sizes, slopes and soil types and both freely draining and polder areas. The model was run with a large number of parameter sets, which were created using Latin Hypercube Sampling. The model output was characterised in terms of several signatures, both measures of goodness of fit and statistics of internal model variables (such as the

  17. Investigating the Interaction of Water Vapour with Aminopropyl Groups on the Surface of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paul, Geo; Musso, Giorgia Elena; Bottinelli, Emanuela; Cossi, Maurizio; Marchese, Leonardo; Berlier, Gloria

    2017-04-05

    The interaction of water molecules with the surface of hybrid silica-based mesoporous materials is studied by 29 Si, 1 H and 13 C solid-state NMR and IR spectroscopy, with the support of ab initio calculations. The surface of aminopropyl-grafted mesoporous silica nanoparticles is studied in the dehydrated state and upon interaction with controlled doses of water vapour. Former investigations described the interactions between aminopropyl and residual SiOH groups; the present study shows the presence of hydrogen-bonded species (SiOH to NH 2 ) and weakly interacting "free" aminopropyl chains with restricted mobility, together with a small amount of protonated NH 3 + groups. The concentration of the last-named species increased upon interaction with water, and this indicates reversible and fast proton exchange from water molecules to a fraction of the amino groups. Herein, this is discussed and explained for the first time, by a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Interaction dynamics between grouping principles in touch: phenomenological and psychophysical evidence.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Antonio; Mayas, Julia; Ballesteros, Soledad

    2018-05-24

    In two experiments, we investigated the interactions between the grouping principles of spatial proximity and texture similarity in touch. For that purpose, we adapted to touch two paradigms widely employed in vision. In Experiment 1, we used an experimental phenomenological task consisting of rating the strength of grouping in both acting alone and conjoined cooperative and competitive conditions. In Experiment 2, participants performed a psychophysical task in which an objective (in)correct response was defined by selectively attending to one grouping cue in different blocks of trials. The results showed that spatial proximity dominated over texture similarity when the two principles were conjoined in competition. In addition, the present results are compatible with an additive model of grouping effects as indicated by the greater grouping effect in the cooperative condition and the smaller grouping effect in the competitive condition relative to a.0cting alone grouping principles. The similarities and differences between vision and touch are discussed.

  19. Using video-annotation software to identify interactions in group therapies for schizophrenia: assessing reliability and associations with outcomes.

    PubMed

    Orfanos, Stavros; Akther, Syeda Ferhana; Abdul-Basit, Muhammad; McCabe, Rosemarie; Priebe, Stefan

    2017-02-10

    Research has shown that interactions in group therapies for people with schizophrenia are associated with a reduction in negative symptoms. However, it is unclear which specific interactions in groups are linked with these improvements. The aims of this exploratory study were to i) develop and test the reliability of using video-annotation software to measure interactions in group therapies in schizophrenia and ii) explore the relationship between interactions in group therapies for schizophrenia with clinically relevant changes in negative symptoms. Video-annotation software was used to annotate interactions from participants selected across nine video-recorded out-patient therapy groups (N = 81). Using the Individual Group Member Interpersonal Process Scale, interactions were coded from participants who demonstrated either a clinically significant improvement (N = 9) or no change (N = 8) in negative symptoms at the end of therapy. Interactions were measured from the first and last sessions of attendance (>25 h of therapy). Inter-rater reliability between two independent raters was measured. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to explore the association between the frequency of interactive behaviors and changes in negative symptoms, assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Of the 1275 statements that were annotated using ELAN, 1191 (93%) had sufficient audio and visual quality to be coded using the Individual Group Member Interpersonal Process Scale. Rater-agreement was high across all interaction categories (>95% average agreement). A higher frequency of self-initiated statements measured in the first session was associated with improvements in negative symptoms. The frequency of questions and giving advice measured in the first session of attendance was associated with improvements in negative symptoms; although this was only a trend. Video-annotation software can be used to reliably identify interactive behaviors in groups

  20. Identification of dominant interactions between climatic seasonality, catchment characteristics and agricultural activities on Budyko-type equation parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Wanqiu; Wang, Weiguang; Shao, Quanxi; Yong, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Quantifying precipitation (P) partition into evapotranspiration (E) and runoff (Q) is of great importance for global and regional water availability assessment. Budyko framework serves as a powerful tool to make simple and transparent estimation for the partition, using a single parameter, to characterize the shape of the Budyko curve for a "specific basin", where the single parameter reflects the overall effect by not only climatic seasonality, catchment characteristics (e.g., soil, topography and vegetation) but also agricultural activities (e.g., cultivation and irrigation). At the regional scale, these influencing factors are interconnected, and the interactions between them can also affect the single parameter of Budyko-type equations' estimating. Here we employ the multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) model to estimate the Budyko curve shape parameter (n in the Choudhury's equation, one form of the Budyko framework) of the selected 96 catchments across China using a data set of long-term averages for climatic seasonality, catchment characteristics and agricultural activities. Results show average storm depth (ASD), vegetation coverage (M), and seasonality index of precipitation (SI) are three statistically significant factors affecting the Budyko parameter. More importantly, four pairs of interactions are recognized by the MARS model as: The interaction between CA (percentage of cultivated land area to total catchment area) and ASD shows that the cultivation can weaken the reducing effect of high ASD (>46.78 mm) on the Budyko parameter estimating. Drought (represented by the value of Palmer drought severity index < -0.74) and uneven distribution of annual rainfall (represented by the value of coefficient of variation of precipitation > 0.23) tend to enhance the Budyko parameter reduction by large SI (>0.797). Low vegetation coverage (34.56%) is likely to intensify the rising effect on evapotranspiration ratio by IA (percentage of irrigation area to

  1. Cultural Awareness of Minority Groups: Some Implications for School-Community Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Jerry

    Interaction between minority groups and local schools can be improved through increased cultural awareness by schools. School districts' responsiveness to the dominant social influences of the local community, coupled with minorities' reluctance to participate in school affairs, has helped deprive minority children of exposure to the unique…

  2. Patterns of Computer-Mediated Interaction in Small Writing Groups Using Wikis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mimi; Zhu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Informed by sociocultural theory and guided especially by "collective scaffolding", this study investigated the nature of computer-mediated interaction of three groups of English as a Foreign Language students when they performed collaborative writing tasks using wikis. Nine college students from a Chinese university participated in the…

  3. Behavioral and biological interactions with small groups in confined microsocieties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Joseph V.

    1986-01-01

    Research on small group performance in confined microsocieties was focused upon the development of principles and procedures relevant to the selection and training of space mission personnel, upon the investigation of behavioral programming, preventive monitoring and corrective procedures to enhance space mission performance effectiveness, and upon the evaluation of behavioral and physiological countermeasures to the potentially disruptive effects of unfamiliar and stressful environments. An experimental microsociety environment was designed and developed for continuous residence of human volunteers over extended time periods. Studies were then undertaken to analyze experimentally: (1) conditions that sustain group cohesion and productivity and that prevent social fragmentation and performance deterioration, (2) motivational effects performance requirements, and (3) behavioral and physiological effects resulting from changes in group size and composition. The results show that both individual and group productivity can be enhanced under such conditions by the direct application of contingency management principles to designated high-value tasks. Similarly, group cohesiveness can be promoted and individual social isolation and/or alienation prevented by the application of contingency management principles to social interaction segments of the program.

  4. Patterns of Adult-Child Linguistic Interaction in Integrated Day Care Groups.

    PubMed

    Girolametto, Luigi; Hoaken, Lisa; Weitzman, Elaine; Lieshout, Riet van

    2000-04-01

    This study investigated the language input of eight childcare providers to children with developmental disabilities, including language delay, who were integrated into community day care centers. Structural and discourse features of the adults' language input was compared across two groups (integrated, typical) and two naturalistic day care contexts (book reading, play dough activity). The eight children with developmental disabilities and language delay were between 33-50 months of age; 32 normally developing peers ranged in age from 32-53 months of age. Adult-child interactions were transcribed and coded to yield estimates of structural indices (number of utterances, rate, mean length of utterances, ratio of different words to total words used (TTR) and discourse features (directive, interactive, language-modelling) of their language input. The language input addressed to the children with developmental disabilities was directive and not finely tuned to their expressive language levels. In turn, these children interacted infrequently with the adult or with the other children. Contextual comparisons indicated that the play dough activity promoted adult-child interaction that was less directive and more interaction-promoting than book reading, and that children interacted more frequently in the play-dough activity. Implications for speech-language pathologists include the need for collaborative consultation in integrated settings, modification of adult-child play contexts to promote interaction, and training childcare providers to use language input that promotes communication development.

  5. Team-oriented leadership: the interactive effects of leader group prototypicality, accountability, and team identification.

    PubMed

    Giessner, Steffen R; van Knippenberg, Daan; van Ginkel, Wendy; Sleebos, Ed

    2013-07-01

    We examined the interactive effects of leader group prototypicality, accountability, and team identification on team-oriented behavior of leaders, thus extending the social identity perspective on leadership to the study of leader behavior. An experimental study (N = 152) supported our hypothesis that leader accountability relates more strongly to team-oriented behavior for group nonprototypical leaders than for group prototypical leaders. A multisource field study with leaders (N = 64) and their followers (N = 209) indicated that this interactive effect is more pronounced for leaders who identify more strongly with their team. We discuss how these findings further develop the social identity analysis of leadership. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Interactions between a group of Golden Eagles and a herd of North American elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, Matt P.; Kochert, Michael N.

    2013-01-01

    Raptors are generally considered solitary predators (Schoener 1969), but occasionally they interact socially (Brown and Amadon 1968). Certain raptor species (e.g., Swallow-tailed Kites [Elanoides forficatus] and Swainson's Hawks [Buteo swainsoni]) concentrate in aggregations in response to localized, abundant food sources (Ellis et al. 1993). Many raptor species engage in group hunting (Ellis et al. 1993), and social foraging is a routine strategy for some species (e.g., Harris's Hawks [Parabuteo unicinctus]; Bednarz 1988, Ellis et al. 1993]. Raptors generally engage in group hunting to pursue elusive or large prey (Ellis et al. 1993). Occasionally individuals of conspecific raptors engage in play as a group sometimes involving chases of prey species (Palmer 1988). In this letter, we report interactions between a large group of Golden Eagles and a herd of adult and juvenile Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni) in late autumn.

  7. Marital Role Dynamics during Brief Group Psychotherapy: Assessment of Verbal Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silbergeld, Sam; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Examined impacts of brief group psychotherapy on the marital and sex roles of five volunteer couples. Results show interactional correlates of traditional marital and sex role variations are attenuated, that communication between spouses is improved, and that the therapeutic quality of verbal behavior is enhanced over the course of therapy.…

  8. Subjective evaluation of physical and mental workload interactions across different muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ranjana K; Agnew, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Both physical and mental demands, and their interactions, have been shown to increase biomechanical loading and physiological reactivity as well as impair task performance. Because these interactions have shown to be muscle-dependent, the aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the NASA Task Load Index (NASA TLX) and Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) to evaluate physical and mental workload during muscle-specific tasks. Twenty-four participants performed upper extremity and low back exertions at three physical workload levels in the absence and presence of a mental stressor. Outcome measures included RPE and NASA TLX (six sub-scales) ratings. The findings indicate that while both RPEs and NASA TLX ratings were sensitive to muscle-specific changes in physical demand, only an additional mental stressor and its interaction with either physical demand or muscle groups influenced the effort sub-scale and overall workload scores of the NASA TLX. While additional investigations in actual work settings are warranted, the NASA TLX shows promise in evaluating perceived workload that is sensitive not only to physical and mental demands but also sensitive in determining workload for tasks that employ different muscle groups.

  9. Genogroup IV and VI Canine Noroviruses Interact with Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (HuNV) are a significant cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. HuNV attaches to cell surface carbohydrate structures known as histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) prior to internalization, and HBGA polymorphism among human populations is closely linked to susceptibility to HuNV. Noroviruses are divided into 6 genogroups, with human strains grouped into genogroups I (GI), II, and IV. Canine norovirus (CNV) is a recently discovered pathogen in dogs, with strains classified into genogroups IV and VI. Whereas it is known that GI to GIII noroviruses bind to HBGAs and GV noroviruses recognize terminal sialic acid residues, the attachment factors for GIV and GVI noroviruses have not been reported. This study sought to determine the carbohydrate binding specificity of CNV and to compare it to the binding specificities of noroviruses from other genogroups. A panel of synthetic oligosaccharides were used to assess the binding specificity of CNV virus-like particles (VLPs) and identified α1,2-fucose as a key attachment factor. CNV VLP binding to canine saliva and tissue samples using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and immunohistochemistry confirmed that α1,2-fucose-containing H and A antigens of the HBGA family were recognized by CNV. Phenotyping studies demonstrated expression of these antigens in a population of dogs. The virus-ligand interaction was further characterized using blockade studies, cell lines expressing HBGAs, and enzymatic removal of candidate carbohydrates from tissue sections. Recognition of HBGAs by CNV provides new insights into the evolution of noroviruses and raises concerns regarding the potential for zoonotic transmission of CNV to humans. IMPORTANCE Infections with human norovirus cause acute gastroenteritis in millions of people each year worldwide. Noroviruses can also affect nonhuman species and are divided into 6 different groups based on their capsid sequences. Human noroviruses in genogroups

  10. Experimental Tests of Normative Group Influence and Representation Effects in Computer-Mediated Communication: When Interacting Via Computers Differs from Interacting With Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eun-Ju; Nass, Clifford

    2002-01-01

    Presents two experiments to address the questions of if and how normative social influence operates in anonymous computer-mediated communication and human-computer interaction. Finds that the perception of interaction partner (human vs. computer) moderated the group conformity effect such that the undergraduate student subjects expressed greater…

  11. Small-group, interactive education and the effect on asthma control by children and their families

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Wade T.A.; Gillespie, Cathy; Thomas, Nicola; Filuk, Shauna E.; McColm, Judy; Piwniuk, Michelle P.; Becker, Allan B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Effective approaches to education about asthma need to be identified. We evaluated the impact on asthma control by children and their caregivers of an intervention involving small-group, interactive education about asthma. Methods We randomly assigned children who visited an emergency department for an exacerbation of asthma (n = 398) to either of 2 groups. Children assigned to the control group followed the usual care recommended by their primary care physician. Those assigned to the intervention group participated in a small-group, interactive program of education about asthma. We examined changes in the number of visits to the emergency department during the year after the intervention. Results During the year after enrolment, children in the intervention group made significantly fewer visits to the emergency department (0.45 visits per child) compared with those in the control group (0.75 visits per child) (p = 0.004). The likelihood of a child in the intervention group requiring emergency care was reduced by 38% (relative risk [RR] 0.62, 95% confidence interval CI 0.48–0.81, p = 0.004). Fewer courses of oral corticosteroids (0.63 per child) were required by children in the intervention group than by those in the control group (0.85 per child) (p = 0.006). We observed significant improvements in the symptom domain of the questionnaire on pediatric asthma quality-of-life (p = 0.03) and the activity domain of the questionnaire on caregivers’ quality of life (p = 0.05). Parents of children in the intervention group missed less work because of their child’s asthma after participating in the educational program (p = 0.04). No impact on hospital admissions was observed. Interpretation Education about asthma, especially in a small-group, interactive format, improved clinically important outcomes and overall care of children with asthma. PMID:19687105

  12. Differential impact of student behaviours on group interaction and collaborative learning: medical students' and tutors' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Maha; Velan, Gary M; O'Sullivan, Anthony J; Balasooriya, Chinthaka

    2016-08-22

    Collaboration is of increasing importance in medical education and medical practice. Students' and tutors' perceptions about small group learning are valuable to inform the development of strategies to promote group dynamics and collaborative learning. This study investigated medical students' and tutors' views on competencies and behaviours which promote effective learning and interaction in small group settings. This study was conducted at UNSW Australia. Five focus group discussions were conducted with first and second year medical students and eight small group tutors were interviewed. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was conducted. Students and tutors identified a range of behaviours that influenced collaborative learning. The main themes that emerged included: respectfulness; dominance, strong opinions and openness; constructiveness of feedback; active listening and contribution; goal orientation; acceptance of roles and responsibilities; engagement and enthusiasm; preparedness; self- awareness and positive personal attributes. An important finding was that some of these student behaviours were found to have a differential impact on group interaction compared with collaborative learning. This information could be used to promote higher quality learning in small groups. This study has identified medical students' and tutors' perceptions regarding interactional behaviours in small groups, as well as behaviours which lead to more effective learning in those settings. This information could be used to promote learning in small groups.

  13. Interacting Effects Induced by Two Neighboring Pits Considering Relative Position Parameters and Pit Depth

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongfang; Gang, Tieqiang; Chen, Lijie

    2017-01-01

    For pre-corroded aluminum alloy 7075-T6, the interacting effects of two neighboring pits on the stress concentration are comprehensively analyzed by considering various relative position parameters (inclination angle θ and dimensionless spacing parameter λ) and pit depth (d) with the finite element method. According to the severity of the stress concentration, the critical corrosion regions, bearing high susceptibility to fatigue damage, are determined for intersecting and adjacent pits, respectively. A straightforward approach is accordingly proposed to conservatively estimate the combined stress concentration factor induced by two neighboring pits, and a concrete application example is presented. It is found that for intersecting pits, the normalized stress concentration factor Ktnor increases with the increase of θ and λ and always reaches its maximum at θ = 90°, yet for adjacent pits, Ktnor decreases with the increase of λ and the maximum value appears at a slight asymmetric location. The simulations reveal that Ktnor follows a linear and an exponential relationship with the dimensionless depth parameter Rd for intersecting and adjacent cases, respectively. PMID:28772758

  14. Interactive performance and focus groups with adolescents: the power of play.

    PubMed

    Norris, Anne E; Aroian, Karen J; Warren, Stefanie; Wirth, Jeff

    2012-12-01

    Conducting focus groups with adolescents can be challenging given their developmental needs, particularly with sensitive topics. These challenges include intense need for peer approval, declining social trust, short attention span, and reliance on concrete operations thinking. In this article, we describe an adaptation of interactive performance as an alternative to traditional focus group method. We used this method in a study of discrimination experienced by Muslims (ages 13-17) and of peer pressure to engage in sexual behavior experienced by Hispanic girls (ages 10-14). Recommendations for use of this method include using an interdisciplinary team, planning for large amounts of disclosure towards the end of the focus group, and considering the fit of this method to the study topic. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Interactive Performance and Focus Groups with Adolescents: The Power of Play

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Anne E.; Aroian, Karen J.; Warren, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Conducting focus groups with adolescents can be challenging given their developmental needs, particularly with sensitive topics. These challenges include intense need for peer approval, declining social trust, short attention span, and reliance on concrete operations thinking. In this article we describe an adaptation of interactive performance as an alternative to traditional focus group method. We used this method in a study of discrimination experienced by Muslims (ages 13-17) and of peer pressure to engage in sexual behavior experienced by Hispanic girls (ages 10-14). Recommendations for use of this method include using an interdisciplinary team, planning for large amounts of disclosure towards the end of the focus group, and considering the fit of this method to the study topic. PMID:22949032

  16. On the group theoretical approach to the Quantum Theory of an interacting spin-0 particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisticò, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We point out a difficulty that arises in extending the group theoretical approach that deductively establish the quantum theory of a free particle to the case of an interacting particle. Then we develop an approach which overcomes this difficulty. The result is a theory of an interacting particle where the standard theory is characterized by specific covariance properties related to the interaction.

  17. Seating Arrangement, Group Composition and Competition-driven Interaction: Effects on Students' Performance in Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Roxas, R. M.; Monterola, C.; Carreon-Monterola, S. L.

    2010-07-28

    We probe the effect of seating arrangement, group composition and group-based competition on students' performance in Physics using a teaching technique adopted from Mazur's peer instruction method. Ninety eight lectures, involving 2339 students, were conducted across nine learning institutions from February 2006 to June 2009. All the lectures were interspersed with student interaction opportunities (SIO), in which students work in groups to discuss and answer concept tests. Two individual assessments were administered before and after the SIO. The ratio of the post-assessment score to the pre-assessment score and the Hake factor were calculated to establish the improvement in student performance.more » Using actual assessment results and neural network (NN) modeling, an optimal seating arrangement for a class was determined based on student seating location. The NN model also provided a quantifiable method for sectioning students. Lastly, the study revealed that competition-driven interactions increase within-group cooperation and lead to higher improvement on the students' performance.« less

  18. Observation of Interactions in Adolescent Group Therapy: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Pujol, Eulàlia; Anguera, M. Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Group psychotherapy is a useful clinical practice for adolescents with mental health issues. Groups typically consist of young people of similar ages but with different personalities, and this results in a complex communication network. The goal of group psychoanalytic psychotherapy is to improve participants' mentalization abilities, facilitating interactions between peers and their therapist in a safe, containing environment. The main aim of this study was to analyze conversation turn-taking between a lead therapist, a co-therapist, and six adolescents over the course of 24 treatment sessions divided into four blocks over 8 months. We employed a mixed-methods design based on systematic observation, which we consider to be a mixed method itself, as the qualitative data collected in the initial observation phase is transformed into quantitative data and subsequently interpreted qualitatively with the aid of clinical vignettes. The observational methodology design was nomothetic, follow-up, and multidimensional. The choice of methodology is justified as we used an ad-hoc observation instrument combining a field format and a category system. Interobserver agreement was analyzed quantitatively by Cohen's kappa using the free QSEQ5 software program. Once we had confirmed the reliability of the data, these were analyzed by polar coordinate analysis, which is a powerful data reduction technique that provides a vector representation of relationships between categories. The results show significant relationships between the therapist and (1) the activation of turn-taking by the participants and the co-therapist and silence and (2) conversation-facilitating interventions and interventions designed to improve mentalization abilities. Detailed analysis of questions demonstrating interest in others showed how the communication changed from radial interactions stemming from the therapist at the beginning of therapy to circular interactions half way through. Repetition was found

  19. Materials cohesion and interaction forces.

    PubMed

    Rosenholm, Jarl B; Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Gornov, Evgeny

    2008-09-01

    The most important methods to determine the cohesive interactions of materials and adhesive interactions between different substances are reviewed. The term cohesion is generalized as representing the unifying interaction forces of a single material and adhesion forces between different substances due to attraction. The aim is to interlink a number of frequently used interaction parameters in order to promote the understanding of materials research executed within different scientific (Material, Colloid, Sol-Gel and Nano) communities. The modern interdisciplinary research requires a removal of the historical obstacles represented by widely differing nomenclature used for the same material properties. The interaction parameters of different models are reviewed and representative numerical values computed from tabulated thermodynamic and spectroscopic material constants. The results are compared with published values. The models are grouped to represent single and two component systems, respectively. The latter group includes models for films on substrates and work of adhesion between liquids and solids. In most cases rather rough approximations have been employed, mostly relating to van der Waals substances for which the gas state is common reference state. In order to improve the predictability of the key Hamaker constant, a novel model for interpreting the dielectric spectrum is presented. The interrelation between thermodynamic, electronic, spectroscopic and dielectric parameters is illustrated by model calculations on typical inorganic materials of current interest as model compounds. The ionic solids are represented by NaCl and KCl, while ZnO, FeO, Fe(2)O(3), Fe(3)O(4), Al(2)O(3), SiO(2), TiO(2), ZrO(2), SnO, SnO(2) represent ceramic oxides and semiconductors. The model compounds thus illustrate the effect of bond type (covalent or ionic) and valence (charge number and sign) of the constituent elements. However, since the focus is placed on a phenomenological

  20. Correlations between skin hydration parameters and corneocyte-derived parameters to characterize skin conditions.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Kyotani, Daiki; Honda, Tatsuya; Takano, Kenichi; Tamura, Toshiyasu; Mizutani, Taeko; Okano, Yuri

    2018-03-30

    Skin hydration is generally assessed using the parameters of skin surface water content (SWC) and trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL). To date, few studies have characterized skin conditions using correlations between skin hydration parameters and corneocyte parameters. The parameters SWC and TEWL allow the classification of skin conditions into four distinct Groups. The purpose of this study was to assess the characteristics of skin conditions classified by SWC and TEWL for correlations with parameters from corneocytes. A human volunteer test was conducted that measured SWC and TEWL. As corneocyte-derived parameters, the size and thick abrasion ratios, the ratio of sulfhydryl groups and disulfide bonds (SH/SS) and CP levels were analyzed. Volunteers were classified by their median SWC and TEWL values into 4 Groups: Group I (high SWC/low TEWL), Group II (high SWC/high TEWL), Group III (low SWC/low TEWL), and Group IV (low SWC/high TEWL). Group IV showed a significantly smaller size of corneocytes. Groups III and IV had significantly higher thick abrasion ratios and CP levels. Group I had a significantly lower SH/SS value. The SWC/TEWL value showed a decline in order from Group I to Group IV. Groups classified by their SWC and TEWL values showed characteristic skin conditions. We propose that the SWC and TEWL ratio is a comprehensive parameter to assess skin conditions. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Intramolecular interactions in polymethylenic chains with polar end groups: The spectroscopic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Alberto; Castiglioni, Chiara; Brambilla, Luigi; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2012-02-01

    We present a computational study based on DFT simulations of the infrared spectra of several short alkyl chains carrying polar end groups. The work aims to provide guidelines for the detection of marker bands signalling the occurrence of specific intramolecular interactions between the polar head and CH2 groups at different distances. In particular, the CH stretching region is investigated and new features assigned to normal modes localized on the CH2 groups nearest to the electron-withdrawing atom are identified. The study has been extended also to the rationalization of the experimental IR features shown by a 1-Chloroeicosane (C20H41Cl) sample.

  2. Teaching Self Awareness and Group Interaction: A Guide for Driver Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This teaching guide presents materials to help driver education teachers develop classroom discussions designed to raise students' consciousness of themselves, their interactions with others, and the resolution of traffic situations. Small group discussions in the recommended approach. To develop and maintain a conducive classroom atmosphere,…

  3. Analysis of stationary and dynamic factors affecting highway accident occurrence: A dynamic correlated grouped random parameters binary logit approach.

    PubMed

    Fountas, Grigorios; Sarwar, Md Tawfiq; Anastasopoulos, Panagiotis Ch; Blatt, Alan; Majka, Kevin

    2018-04-01

    Traditional accident analysis typically explores non-time-varying (stationary) factors that affect accident occurrence on roadway segments. However, the impact of time-varying (dynamic) factors is not thoroughly investigated. This paper seeks to simultaneously identify pre-crash stationary and dynamic factors of accident occurrence, while accounting for unobserved heterogeneity. Using highly disaggregate information for the potential dynamic factors, and aggregate data for the traditional stationary elements, a dynamic binary random parameters (mixed) logit framework is employed. With this approach, the dynamic nature of weather-related, and driving- and pavement-condition information is jointly investigated with traditional roadway geometric and traffic characteristics. To additionally account for the combined effect of the dynamic and stationary factors on the accident occurrence, the developed random parameters logit framework allows for possible correlations among the random parameters. The analysis is based on crash and non-crash observations between 2011 and 2013, drawn from urban and rural highway segments in the state of Washington. The findings show that the proposed methodological framework can account for both stationary and dynamic factors affecting accident occurrence probabilities, for panel effects, for unobserved heterogeneity through the use of random parameters, and for possible correlation among the latter. The comparative evaluation among the correlated grouped random parameters, the uncorrelated random parameters logit models, and their fixed parameters logit counterpart, demonstrate the potential of the random parameters modeling, in general, and the benefits of the correlated grouped random parameters approach, specifically, in terms of statistical fit and explanatory power. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Facility with the English language and problem-based learning group interaction: findings from an Arabic setting.

    PubMed

    Mpofu, D J; Lanphear, J; Stewart, T; Das, M; Ridding, P; Dunn, E

    1998-09-01

    The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), United Arab Emirates (UAE) University is in a unique position to explore issues related to English language proficiency and medical student performance. All students entering the FMHS have English as a second language. This study focused on the issues of students' proficiency in English as measured by the TOEFL test, student background factors and interaction in problem-based learning (PBL) groups. Using a modification of Bales Interaction Process Analysis, four problem-based learning groups were observed over four thematic units, to measure the degree of student interaction within PBL groups and to compare this to individual TOEFL scores and key background variables. The students' contributions correlated highly with TOEFL test results in the giving of information (range r = 0.67-0.74). The female students adhered to interacting in English during group sessions, whereas the male students were more likely to revert to using Arabic in elaborating unclear phenomena (p < 0.01). The educational level of the student's mother was highly predictive of TOEFL scores for the male students, but not for female students. Multivariate analysis was undertaken to analyse the relative contribution of the TOEFL, parental education and years of studying in English. The best predictor of students' contributions in PBL groups was identified as TOEFL scores. The study demonstrates the importance of facilitating a locally acceptable level of English proficiency prior to admission to the FMHS. However, it also highlights the importance of not focusing only on English proficiency but paying attention to additional factors in facilitating medical students in maximizing benefits from interactions in PBL settings.

  5. Modeling of Internet Influence on Group Emotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    Long-range interactions are introduced to a two-dimensional model of agents with time-dependent internal variables ei = 0, ±1 corresponding to valencies of agent emotions. Effects of spontaneous emotion emergence and emotional relaxation processes are taken into account. The valence of agent i depends on valencies of its four nearest neighbors but it is also influenced by long-range interactions corresponding to social relations developed for example by Internet contacts to a randomly chosen community. Two types of such interactions are considered. In the first model the community emotional influence depends only on the sign of its temporary emotion. When the coupling parameter approaches a critical value a phase transition takes place and as result for larger coupling constants the mean group emotion of all agents is nonzero over long time periods. In the second model the community influence is proportional to magnitude of community average emotion. The ordered emotional phase was here observed for a narrow set of system parameters.

  6. Chemical Interactions of Polyethylene Glycols (PEG) and Glycerol with Protein Functional Groups: Applications to PEG, Glycerol Effects on Protein Processes

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, DB; Shkel, Irina A; Phan, Noel M; Sternke, Matt; Lingeman, Emily; Cheng, Xian; Cheng, Lixue; O’Connor, Kevin; Record, M. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Here we obtain the data needed to predict chemical interactions of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) and glycerol with proteins and related organic compounds, and thereby interpret or predict chemical effects of PEGs on protein processes. To accomplish this we determine interactions of glycerol and tetraEG with >30 model compounds displaying the major C, N, and O functional groups of proteins. Analysis of these data yields coefficients (α-values) quantifying interactions of glycerol, tetraEG and PEG end (-CH2OH) and interior (-CH2OCH2-) groups with these groups, relative to interactions with water. TetraEG (strongly) and glycerol (weakly) interact favorably with aromatic C, amide N, and cationic N, but unfavorably with amide O, carboxylate O and salt ions. Strongly unfavorable O and salt anion interactions help make both small and large PEGs effective protein precipitants. Interactions of tetraEG and PEG interior groups with aliphatic C are quite favorable, while interactions of glycerol and PEG end groups with aliphatic C are not. Hence tetraEG and PEG 300 favor unfolding of the DNA-binding domain of lac repressor (lacDBD) while glycerol, di- and mono-ethylene glycol are stabilizers. Favorable interactions with aromatic and aliphatic C explain why PEG400 greatly increases the solubility of aromatic hydrocarbons and steroids. PEG400-steroid interactions are unusually favorable, presumably because of simultaneous interactions of multiple PEG interior groups with the fused ring system of the steroid. Using α-values reported here, chemical contributions to PEG m-values can be predicted or interpreted in terms of changes in water-accessible surface area (ΔASA), and separated from excluded volume effects. PMID:25962980

  7. Are You Still with Us? Managing Mobile Phone Use and Group Interaction in PBL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Gillian; Wiggins, Sally; Anderson, Tony

    2016-01-01

    As mobile phone technology becomes more advanced, so too does its presence in everyday life. Research has shown, for instance, that students are using their mobile phones in classroom settings, a practice that holds both potential advantages and disadvantages. In group work, these interactions may have consequences for group dynamics in that…

  8. Generating finite cyclic and dihedral groups using sequential insertion systems with interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod; Yosman, Ahmad Firdaus

    2017-04-01

    The operation of insertion has been studied extensively throughout the years for its impact in many areas of theoretical computer science such as DNA computing. First introduced as a generalization of the concatenation operation, many variants of insertion have been introduced, each with their own computational properties. In this paper, we introduce a new variant that enables the generation of some special types of groups called sequential insertion systems with interactions. We show that these new systems are able to generate all finite cyclic and dihedral groups.

  9. Renormalization-group equations of neutrino masses and flavor mixing parameters in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2018-05-01

    We borrow the general idea of renormalization-group equations (RGEs) to understand how neutrino masses and flavor mixing parameters evolve when neutrinos propagate in a medium, highlighting a meaningful possibility that the genuine flavor quantities in vacuum can be extrapolated from their matter-corrected counterparts to be measured in some realistic neutrino oscillation experiments. Taking the matter parameter a≡ 2√{2}{G}F{N}_eE to be an arbitrary scale-like variable with N e being the net electron number density and E being the neutrino beam energy, we derive a complete set of differential equations for the effective neutrino mixing matrix V and the effective neutrino masses {\\tilde{m}}_i (for i = 1 , 2 , 3). Given the standard parametrization of V , the RGEs for {{\\tilde{θ}}_{12}, {\\tilde{θ}}_{13}, {\\tilde{θ}}_{23}, \\tilde{δ}} in matter are formulated for the first time. We demonstrate some useful differential invariants which retain the same form from vacuum to matter, including the well-known Naumov and Toshev relations. The RGEs of the partial μ- τ asymmetries, the off-diagonal asymmetries and the sides of unitarity triangles of V are also obtained as a by-product.

  10. Behavioral Hypervolumes of Predator Groups and Predator-Predator Interactions Shape Prey Survival Rates and Selection on Prey Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Jonathan N.; Howell, Kimberly A.; Gladney, Shaniqua J.; Yang, Yusan; Lichtenstein, James L. L.; Spicer, Michelle Elise; Echeverri, Sebastian A.; Pinter-Wollman, Noa

    2017-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions often vary on the basis of the traits of the individual predators and prey involved. Here we examine whether the multidimensional behavioral diversity of predator groups shapes prey mortality rates and selection on prey behavior. We ran individual sea stars (Pisaster ochraceus) through three behavioral assays to characterize individuals’ behavioral phenotype along three axes. We then created groups that varied in the volume of behavioral space that they occupied. We further manipulated the ability of predators to interact with one another physically via the addition of barriers. Prey snails (Chlorostome funebralis) were also run through an assay to evaluate their predator avoidance behavior before their use in mesocosm experiments. We then subjected pools of prey to predator groups and recorded the number of prey consumed and their behavioral phenotypes. We found that predator-predator interactions changed survival selection on prey traits: when predators were prevented from interacting, more fearful snails had higher survival rates, whereas prey fearfulness had no effect on survival when predators were free to interact. We also found that groups of predators that occupied a larger volume in behavioral trait space consumed 35% more prey snails than homogeneous predator groups. Finally, we found that behavioral hypervolumes were better predictors of prey survival rates than single behavioral traits or other multivariate statistics (i.e., principal component analysis). Taken together, predator-predator interactions and multidimensional behavioral diversity determine prey survival rates and selection on prey traits in this system. PMID:28221831

  11. Behavioral Hypervolumes of Predator Groups and Predator-Predator Interactions Shape Prey Survival Rates and Selection on Prey Behavior.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Jonathan N; Howell, Kimberly A; Gladney, Shaniqua J; Yang, Yusan; Lichtenstein, James L L; Spicer, Michelle Elise; Echeverri, Sebastian A; Pinter-Wollman, Noa

    2017-03-01

    Predator-prey interactions often vary on the basis of the traits of the individual predators and prey involved. Here we examine whether the multidimensional behavioral diversity of predator groups shapes prey mortality rates and selection on prey behavior. We ran individual sea stars (Pisaster ochraceus) through three behavioral assays to characterize individuals' behavioral phenotype along three axes. We then created groups that varied in the volume of behavioral space that they occupied. We further manipulated the ability of predators to interact with one another physically via the addition of barriers. Prey snails (Chlorostome funebralis) were also run through an assay to evaluate their predator avoidance behavior before their use in mesocosm experiments. We then subjected pools of prey to predator groups and recorded the number of prey consumed and their behavioral phenotypes. We found that predator-predator interactions changed survival selection on prey traits: when predators were prevented from interacting, more fearful snails had higher survival rates, whereas prey fearfulness had no effect on survival when predators were free to interact. We also found that groups of predators that occupied a larger volume in behavioral trait space consumed 35% more prey snails than homogeneous predator groups. Finally, we found that behavioral hypervolumes were better predictors of prey survival rates than single behavioral traits or other multivariate statistics (i.e., principal component analysis). Taken together, predator-predator interactions and multidimensional behavioral diversity determine prey survival rates and selection on prey traits in this system.

  12. Social interaction with non-averse group-mates modifies a learned food aversion in single- and mixed-species groups of tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis and S. labiatus).

    PubMed

    Prescott, M J; Buchanan-Smith, H M; Smith, A C

    2005-04-01

    For social species, being a member of a cohesive group and performing activities as a coordinated unit appear to provide a mechanism for the efficient transmission of information about food. Social learning about food palatability was investigated in two captive primates, Saguinus fuscicollis and S. labiatus, which form stable and cohesive mixed-species groups in the wild. We explored whether an induced food aversion toward a preferred food is modified during and after social interaction with non-averse conspecifics or congeners. Sets of intra- and interspecific pairs were presented with two foods, one of which was considered distasteful by one of the pairs (the other was palatable), and their behavior was compared pre-interaction, during interaction, and post-interaction. For the aversely-conditioned individuals of both species, the change in social context corresponded to a change in their preference for the food that they considered unpalatable, regardless of whether they had interacted with a conspecific or congeneric pair, and the change in food preference was maintained post-interaction. In a control condition, in which averse individuals did not have the opportunity to interact with non-averse animals, S. fuscicollis sampled the preferred food, but not as quickly as when given the opportunity to interact. We conclude that the social learning demonstrated here may allow individual tamarins to track environmental change, such as fruit ripening, more efficiently than asocial learning alone, because social learners can more quickly and safely focus on appropriate behavior by sharing up-to-date foraging information. Furthermore, since the behavior of congeners, as well as conspecifics, acts to influence food choice in a more adaptive direction, social learning about food palatability may be an advantage of mixed-species group formation to tamarins of both species. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  13. Coaching Paraprofessionals to Promote Engagement and Social Interactions during Small Group Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Zimmerman, Kathleen N.; Chazin, Kate T.; Patel, Natasha M.; Morales, Vivian A.; Bennett, Brittany P.

    2017-01-01

    Paraprofessionals need adequate training and supports to assist young children with autism spectrum disorders to engage in appropriate social interactions during small group activities with their peers. In this study, we used in-situ coaching and brief post-session feedback to improve the use of environmental arrangement, prompting, and praise by…

  14. Coaching Paraprofessionals to Promote Engagement and Social Interactions during Small Group Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Zimmerman, Kathleen N.; Chazin, Kate T.; Patel, Natasha M.; Morales, Vivian A.; Bennett, Brittany P.

    2017-01-01

    Paraprofessionals need adequate training and supports to assist young children with autism spectrum disorders to engage in appropriate social interactions during small group activities with their peers. In this study, we used in situ coaching and brief post-session feedback to improve the use of environmental arrangement, prompting, and praise by…

  15. Non-Synonymous Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Physical Activity Interactions on Adiposity Parameters in Malaysian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zaharan, Nur Lisa; Muhamad, Nor Hanisah; Jalaludin, Muhammad Yazid; Su, Tin Tin; Mohamed, Zahurin; Mohamed, M N A; A Majid, Hazreen

    2018-01-01

    Several non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) have been shown to be associated with obesity. Little is known about their associations and interactions with physical activity (PA) in relation to adiposity parameters among adolescents in Malaysia. We examined whether (a) PA and (b) selected nsSNPs are associated with adiposity parameters and whether PA interacts with these nsSNPs on these outcomes in adolescents from the Malaysian Health and Adolescents Longitudinal Research Team study ( n  = 1,151). Body mass indices, waist-hip ratio, and percentage body fat (% BF) were obtained. PA was assessed using Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C). Five nsSNPs were included: beta-3 adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) rs4994, FABP2 rs1799883, GHRL rs696217, MC3R rs3827103, and vitamin D receptor rs2228570, individually and as combined genetic risk score (GRS). Associations and interactions between nsSNPs and PAQ-C scores were examined using generalized linear model. PAQ-C scores were associated with % BF (β = -0.44 [95% confidence interval -0.72, -0.16], p  = 0.002). The CC genotype of ADRB3 rs4994 (β = -0.16 [-0.28, -0.05], corrected p  = 0.01) and AA genotype of MC3R rs3827103 (β = -0.06 [-0.12, -0.00], p  = 0.02) were significantly associated with % BF compared to TT and GG genotypes, respectively. Significant interactions with PA were found between ADRB3 rs4994 (β = -0.05 [-0.10, -0.01], p  = 0.02) and combined GRS (β = -0.03 [-0.04, -0.01], p  = 0.01) for % BF. Higher PA score was associated with reduced % BF in Malaysian adolescents. Of the nsSNPs, ADRB3 rs4994 and MC3R rs3827103 were associated with % BF. Significant interactions with PA were found for ADRB3 rs4994 and combined GRS on % BF but not on measurements of weight or circumferences. Targeting body fat represent prospects for molecular studies and lifestyle intervention in this population.

  16. Group Interactions Among the Elderly and Group Therapy Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, M.; And Others

    Methods developed for investigating group processes and contents among four Senior Citizens' discussion groups are described. The process dimensions are boundary behaviors, subgrouping, normative behaviors, organizing, establishing personal significance, group and leader interchanges, self disclosures, conflict, support, and emotional atmosphere.…

  17. Social Interaction of Reading Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, John T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP) in Honolulu, Hawaii. Terms it an exceptional reading program illustrating how certain dynamics of social interaction may be essential for reading achievement. (FL)

  18. Social interaction in management group meetings: a case study of Finnish hospital.

    PubMed

    Laapotti, Tomi; Mikkola, Leena

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of management group meetings (MGMs) in hospital organization by examining the social interaction in these meetings. Design/methodology/approach - This case study approaches social interaction from a structuration point of view. Social network analysis and qualitative content analysis are applied. Findings - The findings show that MGMs are mainly forums for information sharing. Meetings are not held for problem solving or decision making, and operational coordinating is limited. Meeting interaction is very much focused on the chair, and most of the discussion takes place between the chair and one other member, not between members. The organizational structures are maintained and reproduced in the meeting interaction, and they appear to limit discussion. Meetings appear to fulfil their goals as a part of the organization's information structure and to some extent as an instrument for management. The significance of the relational side of MGMs was recognized. Research limitations/implications - The results of this study provide a basis for future research on hospital MGMs with wider datasets and other methodologies. Especially the relational role of MGMs needs more attention. Practical implications - The goals of MGMs should be reviewed and MG members should be made aware of meeting interaction structures. Originality/value - The paper provides new knowledge about interaction networks in hospital MGMs, and describes the complexity of the importance of MGMs for hospitals.

  19. Criticality triggers the emergence of collective intelligence in groups.

    PubMed

    De Vincenzo, Ilario; Giannoccaro, Ilaria; Carbone, Giuseppe; Grigolini, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    A spinlike model mimicking human behavior in groups is employed to investigate the dynamics of the decision-making process. Within the model, the temporal evolution of the state of systems is governed by a time-continuous Markov chain. The transition rates of the resulting master equation are defined in terms of the change of interaction energy between the neighboring agents (change of the level of conflict) and the change of a locally defined agent fitness. Three control parameters can be identified: (i) the social interaction strength βJ measured in units of social temperature, (ii) the level of confidence β^{'} that each individual has on his own expertise, and (iii) the level of knowledge p that identifies the expertise of each member. Based on these three parameters, the phase diagrams of the system show that a critical transition front exists where a sharp and concurrent change in fitness and consensus takes place. We show that at the critical front, the information leakage from the fitness landscape to the agents is maximized. This event triggers the emergence of the collective intelligence of the group, and in the end it leads to a dramatic improvement in the decision-making performance of the group. The effect of size M of the system is also investigated, showing that, depending on the value of the control parameters, increasing M may be either beneficial or detrimental.

  20. Criticality triggers the emergence of collective intelligence in groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vincenzo, Ilario; Giannoccaro, Ilaria; Carbone, Giuseppe; Grigolini, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    A spinlike model mimicking human behavior in groups is employed to investigate the dynamics of the decision-making process. Within the model, the temporal evolution of the state of systems is governed by a time-continuous Markov chain. The transition rates of the resulting master equation are defined in terms of the change of interaction energy between the neighboring agents (change of the level of conflict) and the change of a locally defined agent fitness. Three control parameters can be identified: (i) the social interaction strength β J measured in units of social temperature, (ii) the level of confidence β' that each individual has on his own expertise, and (iii) the level of knowledge p that identifies the expertise of each member. Based on these three parameters, the phase diagrams of the system show that a critical transition front exists where a sharp and concurrent change in fitness and consensus takes place. We show that at the critical front, the information leakage from the fitness landscape to the agents is maximized. This event triggers the emergence of the collective intelligence of the group, and in the end it leads to a dramatic improvement in the decision-making performance of the group. The effect of size M of the system is also investigated, showing that, depending on the value of the control parameters, increasing M may be either beneficial or detrimental.

  1. Observation of CH⋅⋅⋅π Interactions between Methyl and Carbonyl Groups in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Perras, Frédéric A; Marion, Dominique; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Bryce, David L; Plevin, Michael J

    2017-06-19

    Protein structure and function is dependent on myriad noncovalent interactions. Direct detection and characterization of these weak interactions in large biomolecules, such as proteins, is experimentally challenging. Herein, we report the first observation and measurement of long-range "through-space" scalar couplings between methyl and backbone carbonyl groups in proteins. These J couplings are indicative of the presence of noncovalent C-H⋅⋅⋅π hydrogen-bond-like interactions involving the amide π network. Experimentally detected scalar couplings were corroborated by a natural bond orbital analysis, which revealed the orbital nature of the interaction and the origins of the through-space J couplings. The experimental observation of this type of CH⋅⋅⋅π interaction adds a new dimension to the study of protein structure, function, and dynamics by NMR spectroscopy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Prejudiced interactions: implicit racial bias reduces predictive simulation during joint action with an out-group avatar.

    PubMed

    Sacheli, Lucia Maria; Christensen, Andrea; Giese, Martin A; Taubert, Nick; Pavone, Enea Francesco; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria; Candidi, Matteo

    2015-02-17

    During social interactions people automatically apply stereotypes in order to rapidly categorize others. Racial differences are among the most powerful cues that drive these categorizations and modulate our emotional and cognitive reactivity to others. We investigated whether implicit racial bias may also shape hand kinematics during the execution of realistic joint actions with virtual in- and out-group partners. Caucasian participants were required to perform synchronous imitative or complementary reach-to-grasp movements with avatars that had different skin color (white and black) but showed identical action kinematics. Results demonstrate that stronger visuo-motor interference (indexed here as hand kinematics differences between complementary and imitative actions) emerged: i) when participants were required to predict the partner's action goal in order to on-line adapt their own movements accordingly; ii) during interactions with the in-group partner, indicating the partner's racial membership modulates interactive behaviors. Importantly, the in-group/out-group effect positively correlated with the implicit racial bias of each participant. Thus visuo-motor interference during joint action, likely reflecting predictive embodied simulation of the partner's movements, is affected by cultural inter-individual differences.

  3. Functional renormalization group for the U (1 )-T56 tensorial group field theory with closure constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoche, Vincent; Ousmane Samary, Dine

    2017-02-01

    This paper is focused on the functional renormalization group applied to the T56 tensor model on the Abelian group U (1 ) with closure constraint. For the first time, we derive the flow equations for the couplings and mass parameters in a suitable truncation around the marginal interactions with respect to the perturbative power counting. For the second time, we study the behavior around the Gaussian fixed point, and show that the theory is nonasymptotically free. Finally, we discuss the UV completion of the theory. We show the existence of several nontrivial fixed points, study the behavior of the renormalization group flow around them, and point out evidence in favor of an asymptotically safe theory.

  4. Intermolecular interactions between imidazole derivatives intercalated in layered solids. Substituent group effect

    SciTech Connect

    González, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Rodríguez-Hernández, J.

    2013-08-15

    This study sheds light on the intermolecular interactions between imidazole derive molecules (2-methyl-imidazole, 2-ethyl-imidazole and benzimidazole) intercalated in T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layers to form a solid of formula unit T(ImD){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}]. These hybrid inorganic–organic solids were prepared by soft chemical routes and their crystal structures solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The involved imidazole derivative molecules were found coordinated through the pyridinic N atom to the axial positions for the metal T in the T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layer. In the interlayers region ligand molecules from neighboring layers remain stacked in a face-to-face configuration through dipole–dipole and quadrupole–quadrupole interactions. Thesemore » intermolecular interactions show a pronounced dependence on the substituent group and are responsible for an ImD-pillaring concatenation of adjacent layers. This is supported by the structural information and the recorded magnetic data in the 2–300 K temperature range. The samples containing Co and Ni are characterized by presence of spin–orbit coupling and pronounced temperature dependence for the effective magnetic moment except for 2-ethyl-imidazole related to the local distortion for the metal coordination environment. For this last one ligand a weak ferromagnetic ordering ascribed to a super-exchange interaction between T metals from neighboring layers through the ligands π–π interaction was detected. - Graphical abstract: In the interlayers region imidazole derivative molecules are oriented according to their dipolar and quadrupolar interactions and minimizing the steric impediment. Highlights: • Imidazole derivatives intercalation compounds. • Intermolecular interaction between intercalated imidazole derivatives. • Hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Pi–pi interactions and ferromagnetic coupling. • Dipolar and quadrupolar interactions between intercalated imidazole derivatives.« less

  5. Effects of sugar functional groups, hydrophobicity, and fluorination on carbohydrate-DNA stacking interactions in water.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Ricardo; Peñalver, Pablo; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Vengut-Climent, Empar; Mtashobya, Lewis; Cousin, Jonathan; Maldonado, Olivia S; Perez, Violaine; Reynes, Virginie; Aviñó, Anna; Eritja, Ramón; González, Carlos; Linclau, Bruno; Morales, Juan C

    2014-03-21

    Carbohydrate-aromatic interactions are highly relevant for many biological processes. Nevertheless, experimental data in aqueous solution relating structure and energetics for sugar-arene stacking interactions are very scarce. Here, we evaluate how structural variations in a monosaccharide including carboxyl, N-acetyl, fluorine, and methyl groups affect stacking interactions with aromatic DNA bases. We find small differences on stacking interaction among the natural carbohydrates examined. The presence of fluorine atoms within the pyranose ring slightly increases the interaction with the C-G DNA base pair. Carbohydrate hydrophobicity is the most determinant factor. However, gradual increase in hydrophobicity of the carbohydrate does not translate directly into a steady growth in stacking interaction. The energetics correlates better with the amount of apolar surface buried upon sugar stacking on top of the aromatic DNA base pair.

  6. Dynamical vanishing of the order parameter in a confined Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer Fermi gas after an interaction quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannibal, S.; Kettmann, P.; Croitoru, M. D.; Axt, V. M.; Kuhn, T.

    2018-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the Higgs mode in an ultracold confined Fermi gas after an interaction quench and find a dynamical vanishing of the superfluid order parameter. Our calculations are done within a microscopic density-matrix approach in the Bogoliubov-de Gennes framework which takes the three-dimensional cigar-shaped confinement explicitly into account. In this framework, we study the amplitude mode of the order parameter after interaction quenches starting on the BCS side of the BEC-BCS crossover close to the transition and ending in the BCS regime. We demonstrate the emergence of a dynamically vanishing superfluid order parameter in the spatiotemporal dynamics in a three-dimensional trap. Further, we show that the signal averaged over the whole trap mirrors the spatiotemporal behavior and allows us to systematically study the effects of the system size and aspect ratio on the observed dynamics. Our analysis enables us to connect the confinement-induced modifications of the dynamics to the pairing properties of the system. Finally, we demonstrate that the signature of the Higgs mode is contained in the dynamical signal of the condensate fraction, which, therefore, might provide a new experimental access to the nonadiabatic regime of the Higgs mode.

  7. Comparison of Elementary School Children's Interaction in Teacher-Led and Student-Led Small Groups. Abstract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Mary Anastole

    This study examined interaction among members in small groups under different leadership conditions: leadership by teacher, by untrained student, and by trained student. Small groups of low-income fifth- and sixth-grade students were videotaped as they discussed solutions to problem-solving stories. Analysis of the tapes shows that trained…

  8. Interactive Visual Analytics Approch for Exploration of Geochemical Model Simulations with Different Parameter Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatnieks, Janis; De Lucia, Marco; Sips, Mike; Dransch, Doris

    2015-04-01

    Many geoscience applications can benefit from testing many combinations of input parameters for geochemical simulation models. It is, however, a challenge to screen the input and output data from the model to identify the significant relationships between input parameters and output variables. For addressing this problem we propose a Visual Analytics approach that has been developed in an ongoing collaboration between computer science and geoscience researchers. Our Visual Analytics approach uses visualization methods of hierarchical horizontal axis, multi-factor stacked bar charts and interactive semi-automated filtering for input and output data together with automatic sensitivity analysis. This guides the users towards significant relationships. We implement our approach as an interactive data exploration tool. It is designed with flexibility in mind, so that a diverse set of tasks such as inverse modeling, sensitivity analysis and model parameter refinement can be supported. Here we demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by two examples for gas storage applications. For the first example our Visual Analytics approach enabled the analyst to observe how the element concentrations change around previously established baselines in response to thousands of different combinations of mineral phases. This supported combinatorial inverse modeling for interpreting observations about the chemical composition of the formation fluids at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage. The results indicate that, within the experimental error range, the formation fluid cannot be considered at local thermodynamical equilibrium with the mineral assemblage of the reservoir rock. This is a valuable insight from the predictive geochemical modeling for the Ketzin site. For the second example our approach supports sensitivity analysis for a reaction involving the reductive dissolution of pyrite with formation of pyrrothite in presence of gaseous hydrogen. We determine that this reaction

  9. Interactive psychoeducational group therapy in the treatment of authority problems in combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Lubin, H; Johnson, D R

    2000-07-01

    The use of Interactive Psychoeducational Group Therapy to ameliorate authority problems of veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder is described. Despite the common occurrence of authority problems in this population, and the degree of damage they have caused in family, work, and legal domains, they are rarely specifically targeted by treatment interventions. A conceptual framework linking psychological trauma with distortions in authority relations is presented, followed by the format, procedures, and case examples of this form of group therapy. By uncovering the distorted beliefs associated with traumatic schemas as they emerge in the group interaction, the group therapist can first help the clients question their assumptions about authority, and then explore more adaptive behaviors. The need to examine in greater detail the causes and impact of authority problems among clients with posttraumatic stress disorder is emphasized.

  10. Procedural justice climate and group power distance: an examination of cross-level interaction effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jixia; Mossholder, Kevin W; Peng, T K

    2007-05-01

    In this article, the authors extend research on the cross-level effects of procedural justice climate by theorizing and testing its interaction with group power distance. The results indicated that group power distance moderated the relationships between procedural justice climate and individual-level outcomes (organizational commitment and organization-directed citizenship behavior). More specifically, a larger group power distance was found to attenuate the positive cross-level effects of procedural justice climate. Implications for procedural justice climate research are discussed. 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  11. Neutrino oscillations and Non-Standard Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzan, Yasaman; Tórtola, Mariam

    2018-02-01

    Current neutrino experiments are measuring the neutrino mixing parameters with an unprecedented accuracy. The upcoming generation of neutrino experiments will be sensitive to subdominant oscillation effects that can give information on the yet-unknown neutrino parameters: the Dirac CP-violating phase, the mass ordering and the octant of θ_{23}. Determining the exact values of neutrino mass and mixing parameters is crucial to test neutrino models and flavor symmetries designed to predict these neutrino parameters. In the first part of this review, we summarize the current status of the neutrino oscillation parameter determination. We consider the most recent data from all solar experiments and the atmospheric data from Super-Kamiokande, IceCube and ANTARES. We also implement the data from the reactor neutrino experiments KamLAND, Daya Bay, RENO and Double Chooz as well as the long baseline neutrino data from MINOS, T2K and NOvA. If in addition to the standard interactions, neutrinos have subdominant yet-unknown Non-Standard Interactions (NSI) with matter fields, extracting the values of these parameters will suffer from new degeneracies and ambiguities. We review such effects and formulate the conditions on the NSI parameters under which the precision measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters can be distorted. Like standard weak interactions, the non-standard interaction can be categorized into two groups: Charged Current (CC) NSI and Neutral Current (NC) NSI. Our focus will be mainly on neutral current NSI because it is possible to build a class of models that give rise to sizeable NC NSI with discernible effects on neutrino oscillation. These models are based on new U(1) gauge symmetry with a gauge boson of mass ≲ 10 MeV. The UV complete model should be of course electroweak invariant which in general implies that along with neutrinos, charged fermions also acquire new interactions on which there are strong bounds. We enumerate the bounds that already

  12. The Quality of Teachers' Interactive Conversations with Preschool Children from Low-Income Families during Small-Group and Large-Group Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jennifer J.; de Groot Kim, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the quality of preschool teachers' interactive conversations with three- and four-year-olds in two Head Start classrooms serving children from low-income families in the United States. Over a period of 20?weeks, 10 bi-weekly observations of conversations (totaling 15?h per classroom) were conducted in one small-group (Play…

  13. Wilsonian Renormalization Group and the Lippmann-Schwinger Equation with a Multitude of Cutoff Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epelbaum, E.; Gegelia, J.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2018-03-01

    The Wilsonian renormalization group approach to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with a multitude of cutoff parameters is introduced. A system of integro-differential equations for the cutoff-dependent potential is obtained. As an illustration, a perturbative solution of these equations with two cutoff parameters for a simple case of an S-wave low-energy potential in the form of a Taylor series in momenta is obtained. The relevance of the obtained results for the effective field theory approach to nucleon-nucleon scattering is discussed. Supported in part by BMBF under Grant No. 05P2015 - NUSTAR R&D), DFG and NSFC through Funds Provided to the Sino- German CRC 110 “Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD”, National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11621131001, DFG Grant No. TRR110, the Georgian Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation (grant FR/417/6-100/14) and the CAS President’s International Fellowship Initiative (PIFI) under Grant No. 2017VMA0025

  14. Attaining insight into interactions between hydrologic model parameters and geophysical attributes for national-scale model parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, N.; Clark, M. P.; Newman, A. J.; Wood, A.; Gutmann, E. D.

    2017-12-01

    Estimating spatially distributed model parameters is a grand challenge for large domain hydrologic modeling, especially in the context of hydrologic model applications such as streamflow forecasting. Multi-scale Parameter Regionalization (MPR) is a promising technique that accounts for the effects of fine-scale geophysical attributes (e.g., soil texture, land cover, topography, climate) on model parameters and nonlinear scaling effects on model parameters. MPR computes model parameters with transfer functions (TFs) that relate geophysical attributes to model parameters at the native input data resolution and then scales them using scaling functions to the spatial resolution of the model implementation. One of the biggest challenges in the use of MPR is identification of TFs for each model parameter: both functional forms and geophysical predictors. TFs used to estimate the parameters of hydrologic models typically rely on previous studies or were derived in an ad-hoc, heuristic manner, potentially not utilizing maximum information content contained in the geophysical attributes for optimal parameter identification. Thus, it is necessary to first uncover relationships among geophysical attributes, model parameters, and hydrologic processes (i.e., hydrologic signatures) to obtain insight into which and to what extent geophysical attributes are related to model parameters. We perform multivariate statistical analysis on a large-sample catchment data set including various geophysical attributes as well as constrained VIC model parameters at 671 unimpaired basins over the CONUS. We first calibrate VIC model at each catchment to obtain constrained parameter sets. Additionally, parameter sets sampled during the calibration process are used for sensitivity analysis using various hydrologic signatures as objectives to understand the relationships among geophysical attributes, parameters, and hydrologic processes.

  15. Interventions en groupe et interactions. Actes du 3eme colloque d'orthophonie/logopedie (Neuchatel, 29-30 septembre, 1994) (Group Interventions and Interactions. Proceedings of the Colloquium on Speech Therapy (3rd, Neuchatel, Switzerland, September 29-30, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Py, Bernard, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Conference papers on group methods of speech therapy include: "Donnees nouvelles sur les competences du jeune enfant. Proposition de nouveaux concepts" (New Data on the Competences of the Young Child. Proposition of New Concepts) (Hubert Montagner); "Interactions sociales et apprentissages: quels savoirs en jeu" (Social Interactions and Teaching:…

  16. Peer Interactions among Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Group Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the children's positioning. Method: Group activities for…

  17. Effect of thermal history on Mossbauer signature and hyperfine interaction parameters of copper ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, K. B., E-mail: kunalbmodi2003@yahoo.com; Raval, P. Y.; Dulera, S. V.

    Two specimens of copper ferrite, CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, have been synthesized by double sintering ceramic technique with different thermal history i.e. slow cooled and quenched. X-ray diffractometry has confirmed single phase fcc spinel structure for slow cooled sample while tetragonal distortion is present in quenched sample. Mossbauer spectral analysis for slow-cooled copper ferrite reveals super position of two Zeeman split sextets along with paramagnetic singlet in the centre position corresponds to delafossite (CuFeO{sub 2}) phase that is completely absent in quenched sample. The hyperfine interaction parameters are highly influenced by heat treatment employed.

  18. Does a Case-Based Online Group Project Increase Students' Satisfaction with Interaction in Online Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Joon; Ngampornchai, Anchalee; Trail-Constant, Trudian; Abril, Andres; Srinivasan, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    Due to the realistic, complex natures of authentic cases involved in case-based learning, the use of group work has been encouraged and expected to enhance the quality of interaction among participants and to improve students' learning experiences. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the case-based online group work increased…

  19. Gene Environment Interactions and Predictors of Colorectal Cancer in Family-Based, Multi-Ethnic Groups.

    PubMed

    Shiao, S Pamela K; Grayson, James; Yu, Chong Ho; Wasek, Brandi; Bottiglieri, Teodoro

    2018-02-16

    For the personalization of polygenic/omics-based health care, the purpose of this study was to examine the gene-environment interactions and predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC) by including five key genes in the one-carbon metabolism pathways. In this proof-of-concept study, we included a total of 54 families and 108 participants, 54 CRC cases and 54 matched family friends representing four major racial ethnic groups in southern California (White, Asian, Hispanics, and Black). We used three phases of data analytics, including exploratory, family-based analyses adjusting for the dependence within the family for sharing genetic heritage, the ensemble method, and generalized regression models for predictive modeling with a machine learning validation procedure to validate the results for enhanced prediction and reproducibility. The results revealed that despite the family members sharing genetic heritage, the CRC group had greater combined gene polymorphism rates than the family controls ( p < 0.05), on MTHFR C677T , MTR A2756G , MTRR A66G, and DHFR 19 bp except MTHFR A1298C. Four racial groups presented different polymorphism rates for four genes (all p < 0.05) except MTHFR A1298C. Following the ensemble method, the most influential factors were identified, and the best predictive models were generated by using the generalized regression models, with Akaike's information criterion and leave-one-out cross validation methods. Body mass index (BMI) and gender were consistent predictors of CRC for both models when individual genes versus total polymorphism counts were used, and alcohol use was interactive with BMI status. Body mass index status was also interactive with both gender and MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism, and the exposure to environmental pollutants was an additional predictor. These results point to the important roles of environmental and modifiable factors in relation to gene-environment interactions in the prevention of CRC.

  20. Pancreatic cancer early detection: Expanding higher-risk group with clinical and metabolomics parameters

    PubMed Central

    Urayama, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth and fifth leading cause of cancer death for each gender in developed countries. With lack of effective treatment and screening scheme available for the general population, the mortality rate is expected to increase over the next several decades in contrast to the other major malignancies such as lung, breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. Endoscopic ultrasound, with its highest level of detection capacity of smaller pancreatic lesions, is the commonly employed and preferred clinical imaging-based PDAC detection method. Various molecular biomarkers have been investigated for characterization of the disease, but none are shown to be useful or validated for clinical utilization for early detection. As seen from studies of a small subset of familial or genetically high-risk PDAC groups, the higher yield and utility of imaging-based screening methods are demonstrated for these groups. Multiple recent studies on the unique cancer metabolism including PDAC, demonstrate the potential for utility of the metabolites as the discriminant markers for this disease. In order to generate an early PDAC detection screening strategy available for a wider population, we propose to expand the population of higher risk PDAC group with combination clinical and metabolomics parameters. PMID:25684935

  1. Mathematical model for cell competition: Predator-prey interactions at the interface between two groups of cells in monolayer tissue.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Seiya; Takamatsu, Atsuko; Ohsawa, Shizue; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2016-09-07

    The phenomenon of 'cell competition' has been implicated in the normal development and maintenance of organs, such as in the regulation of organ size and suppression of neoplastic development. In cell competition, one group of cells competes with another group through an interaction at their interface. Which cell group "wins" is governed by a certain relative fitness within the cells. However, this idea of cellular fitness has not been clearly defined. We construct two types of mathematical models to describe this phenomenon of cell competition by considering the interaction at the interface as a predator-prey type interaction in a monolayer tissue such as epithelium. Both of these models can reproduce several typical experimental observations involving systems of mutant cells (losers) and normal cells (winners). By analyzing one of the model and defining an index for the degree of fitness in groups of cells, we show that the fate of each group mainly depends on the relative carrying capacities of certain resources and the strength of the predator-prey interaction at the interface. This contradicts the classical hypothesis in which the relative proliferation rate determines the winner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimation of the solubility parameters of model plant surfaces and agrochemicals: a valuable tool for understanding plant surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most aerial plant parts are covered with a hydrophobic lipid-rich cuticle, which is the interface between the plant organs and the surrounding environment. Plant surfaces may have a high degree of hydrophobicity because of the combined effects of surface chemistry and roughness. The physical and chemical complexity of the plant cuticle limits the development of models that explain its internal structure and interactions with surface-applied agrochemicals. In this article we introduce a thermodynamic method for estimating the solubilities of model plant surface constituents and relating them to the effects of agrochemicals. Results Following the van Krevelen and Hoftyzer method, we calculated the solubility parameters of three model plant species and eight compounds that differ in hydrophobicity and polarity. In addition, intact tissues were examined by scanning electron microscopy and the surface free energy, polarity, solubility parameter and work of adhesion of each were calculated from contact angle measurements of three liquids with different polarities. By comparing the affinities between plant surface constituents and agrochemicals derived from (a) theoretical calculations and (b) contact angle measurements we were able to distinguish the physical effect of surface roughness from the effect of the chemical nature of the epicuticular waxes. A solubility parameter model for plant surfaces is proposed on the basis of an increasing gradient from the cuticular surface towards the underlying cell wall. Conclusions The procedure enabled us to predict the interactions among agrochemicals, plant surfaces, and cuticular and cell wall components, and promises to be a useful tool for improving our understanding of biological surface interactions. PMID:23151272

  3. Estimation of the solubility parameters of model plant surfaces and agrochemicals: a valuable tool for understanding plant surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Khayet, Mohamed; Fernández, Victoria

    2012-11-14

    Most aerial plant parts are covered with a hydrophobic lipid-rich cuticle, which is the interface between the plant organs and the surrounding environment. Plant surfaces may have a high degree of hydrophobicity because of the combined effects of surface chemistry and roughness. The physical and chemical complexity of the plant cuticle limits the development of models that explain its internal structure and interactions with surface-applied agrochemicals. In this article we introduce a thermodynamic method for estimating the solubilities of model plant surface constituents and relating them to the effects of agrochemicals. Following the van Krevelen and Hoftyzer method, we calculated the solubility parameters of three model plant species and eight compounds that differ in hydrophobicity and polarity. In addition, intact tissues were examined by scanning electron microscopy and the surface free energy, polarity, solubility parameter and work of adhesion of each were calculated from contact angle measurements of three liquids with different polarities. By comparing the affinities between plant surface constituents and agrochemicals derived from (a) theoretical calculations and (b) contact angle measurements we were able to distinguish the physical effect of surface roughness from the effect of the chemical nature of the epicuticular waxes. A solubility parameter model for plant surfaces is proposed on the basis of an increasing gradient from the cuticular surface towards the underlying cell wall. The procedure enabled us to predict the interactions among agrochemicals, plant surfaces, and cuticular and cell wall components, and promises to be a useful tool for improving our understanding of biological surface interactions.

  4. Tumor Mutational Load and Immune Parameters across Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Risk Groups.

    PubMed

    de Velasco, Guillermo; Miao, Diana; Voss, Martin H; Hakimi, A Ari; Hsieh, James J; Tannir, Nizar M; Tamboli, Pheroze; Appleman, Leonard J; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Choueiri, Toni K

    2016-10-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have better overall survival when treated with nivolumab, a cancer immunotherapy that targets the immune checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), rather than everolimus (a chemical inhibitor of mTOR and immunosuppressant). Poor-risk mRCC patients treated with nivolumab seemed to experience the greatest overall survival benefit, compared with patients with favorable or intermediate risk, in an analysis of the CheckMate-025 trial subgroup of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) prognostic risk groups. Here, we explore whether tumor mutational load and RNA expression of specific immune parameters could be segregated by prognostic MSKCC risk strata and explain the survival seen in the poor-risk group. We queried whole-exome transcriptome data in renal cell carcinoma patients (n = 54) included in The Cancer Genome Atlas who ultimately developed metastatic disease or were diagnosed with metastatic disease at presentation and did not receive immune checkpoint inhibitors. Nonsynonymous mutational load did not differ significantly by the MSKCC risk group, nor was the expression of cytolytic genes-granzyme A and perforin-or selected immune checkpoint molecules different across MSKCC risk groups. In conclusion, this analysis revealed that mutational load and expression of markers of an active tumor microenvironment did not correlate with MSKCC risk prognostic classification in mRCC. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(10); 820-2. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Long-Term Musical Group Interaction Has a Positive Influence on Empathy in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitch, Tal-Chen; Cross, Ian; Burnard, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Musical group interaction (MGI) is a complex social setting requiring certain cognitive skills that may also elicit shared psychological states. We argue that many MGI-specific features may also be important for emotional empathy, the ability to experience another person's emotional state. We thus hypothesized that long-term repeated participation…

  6. Does the Relative Strength of Grouping Principles Modulate the Interactions between them?

    PubMed

    Montoro, Pedro R; Luna, Dolores

    2015-06-05

    This study examines the influence of the relative strength of grouping principles on interactions between the intrinsic principle of proximity and the extrinsic principle of common region in the process of perceptual organization. Cooperation and competition between intrinsic and extrinsic principles were examined by presenting the principle either alone or conjoined with another principle. The relative grouping strength of the principles operating alone was varied in two different groups of participants so that it was similar for one group and very different for the other group. Results showed that, when principles acting alone had different strengths, the grouping effect of the strongest principle was similar to that of the cooperation condition, and the effect of the weakest principle was similar to that of competing conjoined principles. In contrast, when the strength of principles acting alone was similar, the effect of conjoined cooperating principles was greater than that of either principle acting alone. Moreover, the effect of conjoined competing principles was smaller than that of either principle operating alone. Results show that cooperation and competition between intrinsic and extrinsic principles are modulated by the relative grouping strength of principles acting alone. Furthermore, performance in these conditions could be predicted on the basis of performance in single-principle conditions.

  7. Social Interaction and Types of Play in Mixed-Age and Same-Age Groups in Early-Childhood Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umek, Ljubica Marjanovic; Lesnik, Petra

    This study compared the social interaction and types of symbolic play found in mixed-age and same-age preschool groups. The sample included 8 groups of 14 to 20 children, which were naturally formed and had been operating since the beginning of the school year. The four same-age groups included a group of 3- to 4-year-olds, a group of 4- to…

  8. Using Crystal Structure Groups to Understand Mössbauer parameters of Ferric Sulfates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Sklute, E. C.; Lane, M. D.; Bishop, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    A Mössbauer doublet assigned to ferric sulfate (Fe3D2) was identified in Paso Robles, Mars, spectra by Morris et al. (2006), who noted that its parameters are not diagnostic of any specific mineral because a number of different sulfates with varying parageneses might be responsible for this doublet. Work by Lane et al. (2008) used a multi-instrument approach based on Fe3+ sulfate spectra acquired with VNIR and midinfrared reflectance, mid-infrared emission and Mössbauer spectrometers to narrow down the possible ferric sulfate phases present at Paso Robles to ferricopiapite possibly mixed with other ferric sulfates such as butlerite, parabutlerite, fibroferrite, or metahomanite. Thus, we explore here the crystal-chemical rationale behind these interpretations of the Mössbauer results, using similarities and difference among mineral structures to explore which phases might have similar coordination polyhedra around the Fe atoms in sulfates. Work by Hawthorne et al. (2000) organizes the sulfate minerals into groups with analogous crystal structures. Mössbauer doublets assigned to ferric sulfates ubiquitously have isomer shifts (IS) of 0.40-53 mm/s so that IS is non-diagnostic. However, quadrupole splitting of doublets in these mineral groups has a wide range (0-1.4 mm/s) and the variation can be systematically correlated with different structure types. Members of the hydration series Fe2(SO4)3 · n H2O, which includes quenstedtite, coquimbite, paracoquimbite, kornelite, and lausenite have Mössbauer spectra that closely resemble singlets because of their near-zero QS. These minerals share structures involving finite clusters of sulfate tetrahedral and Fe octahedral or chains of depolymerized clusters, and all mineral species with these structures share similar Mössbauer parameters. At the other extreme, ferric sulfates with structures based on infinite sheets (hydrotalcite, alunite, jarosite), tend to have large electric field gradients at the nucleus of the Fe3

  9. Photo-physical and interactional behavior of two members of group B vitamins in different solvent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerhamidi, M. S.; Zare Haghighi, L.; Seyed Ahmadian, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, absorption and fluorescence spectra of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) and vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) were recorded in solvents with different polarity, at room temperature. These vitamins' photo-physical behavior depends strongly on the solvent's nature along with different attached groups in their structures. In order to investigate the solvent-solute interactions and environmental effect on spectral variations, linear solvation energy relationships concept, suggested by Kamlet and Taft was used. Solvatochromic method was also used for measuring the ground and excited state dipole moments of these vitamins. According to our experimental results, dipole moment of these groups of vitamins in excited state is larger than ground state. Furthermore, obtained photo-physical and interactional properties of used vitamins can give important information on how this group of vitamins behaves in biological systems.

  10. Contribution of the C-Terminal Region of a Group II Chaperonin to its Interaction with Prefoldin and Substrate Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zako, Tamotsu; Sahlan, Muhamad; Fujii, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Yohei Y; Tai, Phan The; Sakai, Kotaro; Maeda, Mizuo; Yohda, Masafumi

    2016-06-05

    Prefoldin is a molecular chaperone that captures an unfolded protein substrate and transfers it to a group II chaperonin. Previous studies have shown that the interaction sites for prefoldin are located in the helical protrusions of group II chaperonins. However, it does not exclude the possibility of the existence of other interaction sites. In this study, we constructed C-terminal truncation mutants of a group II chaperonin and examined the effects of these mutations on the chaperone's function and interaction with prefoldin. Whereas the mutants with up to 6 aa truncation from the C-terminus retained more than 90% chaperone activities for protecting citrate synthase from thermal aggregation and refolding of green fluorescent protein and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, the truncation mutants showed decreased affinities for prefoldin. Consequently, the truncation mutants showed reduced transfer efficiency of the denatured substrate protein from prefoldin and subsequent chaperonin-dependent refolding. The results clearly show that the C-terminal region of group II chaperonins contributes to their interactions with prefoldin, the transfer of the substrate protein from prefoldin and its refolding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enactment of Teacher Identity in Resolving Student Disagreements in Small Group Peer Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Bal Krishna

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a sequential analysis of the enactment of teacher identity in closing disagreements among students in small group peer interactions in an advanced academic writing class. In doing so, it discusses: (a) the micro-details of how oppositional stances and opinions are constructed, challenged and/or defended; (b) the sequential…

  12. Characterising Learning Interactions: A Study of University Students Solving Physics Problems in Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Maria; Danielsson, Anna T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore how a group of four university physics students addressed mechanics problems, in terms of student direction of attention, problem solving strategies and their establishment of and ways of interacting. Adapted from positioning theory, the concepts "positioning" and "storyline" are used to describe and to…

  13. Collective motion of groups of self-propelled particles following interacting leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdinandy, B.; Ozogány, K.; Vicsek, T.

    2017-08-01

    In order to keep their cohesiveness during locomotion gregarious animals must make collective decisions. Many species boast complex societies with multiple levels of communities. A common case is when two dominant levels exist, one corresponding to leaders and the other consisting of followers. In this paper we study the collective motion of such two-level assemblies of self-propelled particles. We present a model adapted from one originally proposed to describe the movement of cells resulting in a smoothly varying coherent motion. We shall use the terminology corresponding to large groups of some mammals where leaders and followers form a group called a harem. We study the emergence (self-organization) of sub-groups within a herd during locomotion by computer simulations. The resulting processes are compared with our prior observations of a Przewalski horse herd (Hortobágy, Hungary) which we use as results from a published case study. We find that the model reproduces key features of a herd composed of harems moving on open ground, including fights for followers between leaders and bachelor groups (group of leaders without followers). One of our findings, however, does not agree with the observations. While in our model the emerging group size distribution is normal, the group size distribution of the observed herd based on historical data have been found to follow lognormal distribution. We argue that this indicates that the formation (and the size) of the harems must involve a more complex social topology than simple spatial-distance based interactions.

  14. Structuring Collaboration in Mixed-Ability Groups to Promote Verbal Interaction, Learning, and Motivation of Average-Ability Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Mohammad; Lazonder, Ard W.; Jong, Ton de

    2007-01-01

    Average-ability students often do not take full advantage of learning in mixed-ability groups because they hardly engage in the group interaction. This study examined whether structuring collaboration by group roles and ground rules for helping behavior might help overcome this participatory inequality. In a plant biology course, heterogeneously…

  15. Problems of low-parameter equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, G. G.

    2017-11-01

    The paper focuses on the system approach to problems of low-parametric equations of state (EOS). It is a continuation of the investigations in the field of substantiated prognosis of properties on two levels, molecular and thermodynamic. Two sets of low-parameter EOS have been considered based on two very simple molecular-level models. The first one consists of EOS of van der Waals type (a modification of van der Waals EOS proposed for spheres). The main problem of these EOS is a weak connection with the micro-level, which raise many uncertainties. The second group of EOS has been derived by the author independently of the ideas of van der Waals based on the model of interacting point centers (IPC). All the parameters of the EOS have a meaning and are associated with the manifestation of attractive and repulsive forces. The relationship between them is found to be the control parameter of the thermodynamic level. In this case, EOS IPC passes into a one-parameter family. It is shown that many EOS of vdW-type can be included in the framework of the PC model. Simultaneously, all their parameters acquire a physical meaning.

  16. Henry's Constants of Persistent Organic Pollutants by a Group-Contribution Method Based on Scaled-Particle Theory.

    PubMed

    Razdan, Neil K; Koshy, David M; Prausnitz, John M

    2017-11-07

    A group-contribution method based on scaled-particle theory was developed to predict Henry's constants for six families of persistent organic pollutants: polychlorinated benzenes, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, polychlorinated naphthalenes, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers. The group-contribution model uses limited experimental data to obtain group-interaction parameters for an easy-to-use method to predict Henry's constants for systems where reliable experimental data are scarce. By using group-interaction parameters obtained from data reduction, scaled-particle theory gives the partial molar Gibbs energy of dissolution, Δg̅ 2 , allowing calculation of Henry's constant, H 2 , for more than 700 organic pollutants. The average deviation between predicted values of log H 2 and experiment is 4%. Application of an approximate van't Hoff equation gives the temperature dependence of Henry's constants for polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated naphthalenes, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the environmentally relevant range 0-40 °C.

  17. Social interactions in Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) and White Leghorn layers in stable groups and after re-grouping.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, J; Håkansson, J; Jensen, P

    2005-04-01

    Although social behaviour is a major factor affecting the coping of poultry in production environments little is known about how it has been affected by intensive selection processes in fowl. We attempted to clarify selection effects on overall repertoire and occurrence of different social behaviours as well as on aggressive responses to re-grouping with unfamiliar birds by comparing high-producing White Leghorn layers to wild type Red Junglefowl. In the first experiment we observed 8 stable mixed sex groups/breed each consisting of four 24-week-old birds previously familiar to each other. During 9 consecutive days, a wide range of social signals, sexual and aggressive interactions as well as spacing behaviour and activity were recorded over a 12-h photoperiod. In the second experiment, starting at 19 weeks of age, 16 single sex groups of three birds from each breed were formed by mixing unfamiliar individuals. Aggressive behaviours were recorded 0, 5, 24 and 48 h after re-grouping. Results from the stable groups indicated that the repertoire of social behaviours has been preserved during selection with few changes in frequencies and intensities. However, Leghorns showed a more cohesive spacing pattern than junglefowl. In the second experiment, aggressive activity was higher immediately and after 24 h following re-grouping in Leghorns, but there was a drop in the aggressiveness at 5 h to the same level as junglefowl. We suggest that this may indicate poorer social learning capacity with a weaker ability to cope with group disruptions compared to the ancestral breed.

  18. Effects of Professional Experience and Group Interaction on Information Requested in Analyzing IT Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Constance M.; Heagy, Cynthia D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of professional experience and group interaction on the information that information technology professionals and graduate accounting information system (AIS) students request when analyzing business cases related to information systems design and implementation. Understanding these effects can contribute to…

  19. Leaders' limitations and approaches to creating conditions for interaction and communication in parental groups: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Frykedal, Karin Forslund; Rosander, Michael; Barimani, Mia; Berlin, Anita

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and understand parental group (PG) leaders' experiences of creating conditions for interaction and communication. The data consisted of 10 interviews with 14 leaders. The transcribed interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed that the leaders' ambition was to create a parent-centred learning environment by establishing conditions for interaction and communication between the parents in the PGs. However, the leaders' experience was that their professional competencies were insufficient and that they lacked pedagogical tools to create constructive group discussions. Nevertheless, they found other ways to facilitate interactive processes. Based on their experience in the PG, the leaders constructed informal socio-emotional roles for themselves (e.g. caring role and personal role) and let their more formal task roles (e.g. professional role, group leader and consulting role) recede into the background, so as to remove the imbalance of power between the leaders and the parents. They believed this would make the parents feel more confident and make it easier for them to start communicating and interacting. This personal approach places them in a vulnerable position in the PG, in which it is easy for them to feel offended by parents' criticism, questioning or silence.

  20. Epistasis interaction of QTL effects as a genetic parameter influencing estimation of the genetic additive effect.

    PubMed

    Bocianowski, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Epistasis, an additive-by-additive interaction between quantitative trait loci, has been defined as a deviation from the sum of independent effects of individual genes. Epistasis between QTLs assayed in populations segregating for an entire genome has been found at a frequency close to that expected by chance alone. Recently, epistatic effects have been considered by many researchers as important for complex traits. In order to understand the genetic control of complex traits, it is necessary to clarify additive-by-additive interactions among genes. Herein we compare estimates of a parameter connected with the additive gene action calculated on the basis of two models: a model excluding epistasis and a model with additive-by-additive interaction effects. In this paper two data sets were analysed: 1) 150 barley doubled haploid lines derived from the Steptoe × Morex cross, and 2) 145 DH lines of barley obtained from the Harrington × TR306 cross. The results showed that in cases when the effect of epistasis was different from zero, the coefficient of determination was larger for the model with epistasis than for the one excluding epistasis. These results indicate that epistatic interaction plays an important role in controlling the expression of complex traits.

  1. A group contribution method for associating chain molecules based on the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT-γ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lymperiadis, Alexandros; Adjiman, Claire S.; Galindo, Amparo; Jackson, George

    2007-12-01

    A predictive group-contribution statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT-γ) is developed by extending the molecular-based SAFT-VR equation of state [A. Gil-Villegas et al. J. Chem. Phys. 106, 4168 (1997)] to treat heteronuclear molecules which are formed from fused segments of different types. Our models are thus a heteronuclear generalization of the standard models used within SAFT, comparable to the optimized potentials for the liquid state OPLS models commonly used in molecular simulation; an advantage of our SAFT-γ over simulation is that an algebraic description for the thermodynamic properties of the model molecules can be developed. In our SAFT-γ approach, each functional group in the molecule is modeled as a united-atom spherical (square-well) segment. The different groups are thus characterized by size (diameter), energy (well depth) and range parameters representing the dispersive interaction, and by shape factor parameters (which denote the extent to which each group contributes to the overall molecular properties). For associating groups a number of bonding sites are included on the segment: in this case the site types, the number of sites of each type, and the appropriate association energy and range parameters also have to be specified. A number of chemical families (n-alkanes, branched alkanes, n-alkylbenzenes, mono- and diunsaturated hydrocarbons, and n-alkan-1-ols) are treated in order to assess the quality of the SAFT-γ description of the vapor-liquid equilibria and to estimate the parameters of various functional groups. The group parameters for the functional groups present in these compounds (CH3, CH2, CH3CH, ACH, ACCH2, CH2, CH , and OH) together with the unlike energy parameters between groups of different types are obtained from an optimal description of the pure component phase equilibria. The approach is found to describe accurately the vapor-liquid equilibria with an overall %AAD of 3.60% for the vapor pressure and 0.86% for

  2. A group contribution method for associating chain molecules based on the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT-gamma).

    PubMed

    Lymperiadis, Alexandros; Adjiman, Claire S; Galindo, Amparo; Jackson, George

    2007-12-21

    A predictive group-contribution statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT-gamma) is developed by extending the molecular-based SAFT-VR equation of state [A. Gil-Villegas et al. J. Chem. Phys. 106, 4168 (1997)] to treat heteronuclear molecules which are formed from fused segments of different types. Our models are thus a heteronuclear generalization of the standard models used within SAFT, comparable to the optimized potentials for the liquid state OPLS models commonly used in molecular simulation; an advantage of our SAFT-gamma over simulation is that an algebraic description for the thermodynamic properties of the model molecules can be developed. In our SAFT-gamma approach, each functional group in the molecule is modeled as a united-atom spherical (square-well) segment. The different groups are thus characterized by size (diameter), energy (well depth) and range parameters representing the dispersive interaction, and by shape factor parameters (which denote the extent to which each group contributes to the overall molecular properties). For associating groups a number of bonding sites are included on the segment: in this case the site types, the number of sites of each type, and the appropriate association energy and range parameters also have to be specified. A number of chemical families (n-alkanes, branched alkanes, n-alkylbenzenes, mono- and diunsaturated hydrocarbons, and n-alkan-1-ols) are treated in order to assess the quality of the SAFT-gamma description of the vapor-liquid equilibria and to estimate the parameters of various functional groups. The group parameters for the functional groups present in these compounds (CH(3), CH(2), CH(3)CH, ACH, ACCH(2), CH(2)=, CH=, and OH) together with the unlike energy parameters between groups of different types are obtained from an optimal description of the pure component phase equilibria. The approach is found to describe accurately the vapor-liquid equilibria with an overall %AAD of 3.60% for the vapor

  3. Multipole-Based Force Fields from ab Initio Interaction Energies and the Need for Jointly Refitting All Intermolecular Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christian; Gedeck, Peter; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-03-12

    Distributed atomic multipole (MTP) moments promise significant improvements over point charges (PCs) in molecular force fields, as they (a) more realistically reproduce the ab initio electrostatic potential (ESP) and (b) allow to capture anisotropic atomic properties such as lone pairs, conjugated systems, and σ holes. The present work focuses on the question of whether multipolar electrostatics instead of PCs in standard force fields leads to quantitative improvements over point charges in reproducing intermolecular interactions. To this end, the interaction energies of two model systems, benzonitrile (BZN) and formamide (FAM) homodimers, are characterized over a wide range of dimer conformations. It is found that although with MTPs the monomer ab initio ESP can be captured better by about an order of magnitude compared to point charges (PCs), this does not directly translate into better describing ab initio interaction energies compared to PCs. Neither ESP-fitted MTPs nor refitted Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters alone demonstrate a clear superiority of atomic MTPs. We show that only if both electrostatic and LJ parameters are jointly optimized in standard, nonpolarizable force fields, atomic are MTPs clearly beneficial for reproducing ab initio dimerization energies. After an exhaustive exponent scan, we find that for both BZN and FAM, atomic MTPs and a 9-6 LJ potential can reproduce ab initio interaction energies with ∼30% (RMSD 0.13 vs 0.18 kcal/mol) less error than point charges (PCs) and a 12-6 LJ potential. We also find that the improvement due to using MTPs with a 9-6 LJ potential is considerably more pronounced than with a 12-6 LJ potential (≈ 10%; RMSD 0.19 versus 0.21 kcal/mol).

  4. Synchronization of multi-agent systems with metric-topological interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Chen, Guanrong

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid multi-agent systems model integrating the advantages of both metric interaction and topological interaction rules, called the metric-topological model, is developed. This model describes planar motions of mobile agents, where each agent can interact with all the agents within a circle of a constant radius, and can furthermore interact with some distant agents to reach a pre-assigned number of neighbors, if needed. Some sufficient conditions imposed only on system parameters and agent initial states are presented, which ensure achieving synchronization of the whole group of agents. It reveals the intrinsic relationships among the interaction range, the speed, the initial heading, and the density of the group. Moreover, robustness against variations of interaction range, density, and speed are investigated by comparing the motion patterns and performances of the hybrid metric-topological interaction model with the conventional metric-only and topological-only interaction models. Practically in all cases, the hybrid metric-topological interaction model has the best performance in the sense of achieving highest frequency of synchronization, fastest convergent rate, and smallest heading difference.

  5. Detecting higher-order interactions among the spiking events in a group of neurons.

    PubMed

    Martignon, L; Von Hasseln, H; Grün, S; Aertsen, A; Palm, G

    1995-06-01

    We propose a formal framework for the description of interactions among groups of neurons. This framework is not restricted to the common case of pair interactions, but also incorporates higher-order interactions, which cannot be reduced to lower-order ones. We derive quantitative measures to detect the presence of such interactions in experimental data, by statistical analysis of the frequency distribution of higher-order correlations in multiple neuron spike train data. Our first step is to represent a frequency distribution as a Markov field on the minimal graph it induces. We then show the invariance of this graph with regard to changes of state. Clearly, only linear Markov fields can be adequately represented by graphs. Higher-order interdependencies, which are reflected by the energy expansion of the distribution, require more complex graphical schemes, like constellations or assembly diagrams, which we introduce and discuss. The coefficients of the energy expansion not only point to the interactions among neurons but are also a measure of their strength. We investigate the statistical meaning of detected interactions in an information theoretic sense and propose minimum relative entropy approximations as null hypotheses for significance tests. We demonstrate the various steps of our method in the situation of an empirical frequency distribution on six neurons, extracted from data on simultaneous multineuron recordings from the frontal cortex of a behaving monkey and close with a brief outlook on future work.

  6. Older Adults Perceptions of Technology and Barriers to Interacting with Tablet Computers: A Focus Group Study.

    PubMed

    Vaportzis, Eleftheria; Clausen, Maria Giatsi; Gow, Alan J

    2017-10-04

    New technologies provide opportunities for the delivery of broad, flexible interventions with older adults. Focus groups were conducted to: (1) understand older adults' familiarity with, and barriers to, interacting with new technologies and tablets; and (2) utilize user-engagement in refining an intervention protocol. Eighteen older adults (65-76 years old; 83.3% female) who were novice tablet users participated in discussions about their perceptions of and barriers to interacting with tablets. We conducted three separate focus groups and used a generic qualitative design applying thematic analysis to analyse the data. The focus groups explored attitudes toward tablets and technology in general. We also explored the perceived advantages and disadvantages of using tablets, familiarity with, and barriers to interacting with tablets. In two of the focus groups, participants had previous computing experience (e.g., desktop), while in the other, participants had no previous computing experience. None of the participants had any previous experience with tablet computers. The themes that emerged were related to barriers (i.e., lack of instructions and guidance, lack of knowledge and confidence, health-related barriers, cost); disadvantages and concerns (i.e., too much and too complex technology, feelings of inadequacy, and comparison with younger generations, lack of social interaction and communication, negative features of tablets); advantages (i.e., positive features of tablets, accessing information, willingness to adopt technology); and skepticism about using tablets and technology in general. After brief exposure to tablets, participants emphasized the likelihood of using a tablet in the future. Our findings suggest that most of our participants were eager to adopt new technology and willing to learn using a tablet. However, they voiced apprehension about lack of, or lack of clarity in, instructions and support. Understanding older adults' perceptions of technology

  7. Young star clusters in the interacting galaxies of Hickson Compact Group 90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, J. A.; Sharples, R. M.; Cho, J.

    2015-03-01

    Deep images of Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) have been obtained using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. We report results for star clusters observed in the interacting pair of galaxies NGC 7174 and NGC 7176. We present magnitude and colour distributions for the observed cluster population and find that the majority of objects show colours similar to intermediate/old age (>1 Gyr) globular clusters. However, a significant population of blue star clusters are also observed which may have formed from the tidal interaction currently occurring between the two galaxies. We find luminosity function turnover magnitudes of m^{TO}g = 25.1 ± 0.1 and m^{TO}z = 24.3 ± 0.1 for the g and z bands, respectively, implying distances of Dg = 28.8 ± 2.6 Mpc and Dz = 34.7 ± 3.1 Mpc to these galaxies, using the globular cluster luminosity function method. Lastly, we determine a total cluster population of approximately NGC ≃ 212 ± 10 over all magnitudes and a low specific frequency of SN ˜ 0.6 ± 0.1 for this pair of interacting elliptical and spiral galaxies. The small globular cluster population is likely due to tidal interactions taking place between the two galaxies which may have stripped many progenitor clusters away and formed the diffuse light observed at the core of HCG 90.

  8. Empirical study on social groups in pedestrian evacuation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Krüchten, Cornelia; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Pedestrian crowds often include social groups, i.e. pedestrians that walk together because of social relationships. They show characteristic configurations and influence the dynamics of the entire crowd. In order to investigate the impact of social groups on evacuations we performed an empirical study with pupils. Several evacuation runs with groups of different sizes and different interactions were performed. New group parameters are introduced which allow to describe the dynamics of the groups and the configuration of the group members quantitatively. The analysis shows a possible decrease of evacuation times for large groups due to self-ordering effects. Social groups can be approximated as ellipses that orientate along their direction of motion. Furthermore, explicitly cooperative behaviour among group members leads to a stronger aggregation of group members and an intermittent way of evacuation.

  9. New porphyrins bearing positively charged peripheral groups linked by a sulfonamide group to meso-tetraphenylporphyrin: interactions with calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Manono, Janet; Marzilli, Patricia A; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2009-07-06

    New water-soluble cationic meso-tetraarylporphyrins (TArP, Ar = 4-C(6)H(4)) and some metal derivatives have been synthesized and characterized. One main goal was to assess if N-methylpyridinium (N-Mepy) groups must be directly attached to the porphyrin core for intercalative binding of porphyrins to DNA. The new porphyrins have the general formula, [T(R(2)R(1)NSO(2)Ar)P]X(4/8) (R(1) = CH(3) or H and R(2) = N-Mepy-n-CH(2) with n = 2, 3, or 4; or R(1) = R(2) = Et(3)NCH(2)CH(2)). Interactions of selected porphyrins and metalloporphyrins (Cu(II), Zn(II)) with calf thymus DNA were investigated by visible circular dichroism (CD), absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopies. The DNA-induced changes in the porphyrin Soret region (a positive induced CD feature and, at high DNA concentration, increases in the Soret band and fluorescence intensities) indicate that the new porphyrins interact with DNA in an outside, non-self-stacking binding mode. Several new metalloporphyrins did not increase DNA solution viscosity and thus do not intercalate, confirming the conclusion drawn from spectroscopic studies. Porphyrins known to intercalate typically bear two or more N-Mepy groups directly attached to the porphyrin ring, such as the prototypical meso-tetra(N-Mepy)porphyrin tetracation (TMpyP(4)). The distances between the nitrogens of the N-Mepy group are estimated to be approximately 11 A (cis) and 16 A (trans) for the relatively rigid TMpyP(4). For the new flexible porphyrin, [T(N-Mepy-4-CH(2)(CH(3))NSO(2)Ar)P]Cl(4), the distances between the nitrogens are estimated to be able to span the range from approximately 9 to approximately 25 A. Thus, the N-Mepy groups in the new porphyrins can adopt the same spacing as in known intercalators such as TMpyP(4). The absence of intercalation by the new porphyrins indicates that the propensity for the N-Mepy group to facilitate DNA intercalation of cationic porphyrins requires direct attachment of N-Mepy groups to the porphyrin core.

  10. Peer Groups and Substance Use: Examining the Direct and Interactive Effect of Leisure Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Bernburg, Jon Gunnar

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships among adolescent leisure activities, peer behavior, and substance use. We suggest that peer group interaction can have a differential effect on adolescent deviant behavior depending on the type of leisure pattern adolescents engage in. We analyze data from a representative national sample of Icelandic…

  11. Theoretical study on the interactions between chlordecone hydrate and acidic surface groups of activated carbon under basic pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Ferino-Pérez, Anthuan; Passé-Coutrin, Nady; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2018-05-01

    A theoretical study of the influence of acidic surface groups (SG) of activated carbon (AC) on chlordecone hydrate (CLDh) adsorption is presented, in order to help understanding the adsorption process under basic pH conditions. A seven rings aromatic system (coronene) with a functional group in the edge was used as a simplified model of AC to evaluate the influence of SG in the course of adsorption from aqueous solution at basic pH conditions. Two SG were modeled in their deprotonated form: carboxyl and hydroxyl (COO - and O - ), interacting with CLDh. In order to model the solvation process, all systems under study were calculated with up to three water molecules. Multiple Minima Hypersurface (MMH) methodology was employed to study the interactions of CLDh with SG on AC using PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian, to explore the potential energy surfaces of the systems and evaluate their thermodynamic association energies. The re-optimization of representative structures obtained from MMH was done using M06-2X Density Functional Theory. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) was used to characterize the interaction types. As result, the association of CLDh with acidic SG at basic pH conditions preferentially occurs between the two alcohol groups of CLDh with COO - and O - groups and by dispersive interactions of chlorine atoms of CLDh with the graphitic surface. On the other hand, the presence of covalent interactions between the negatively charged oxygen of SG and one hydrogen atom of CLDh alcohol groups (O - ⋯HO interactions) without water molecules, was confirmed by QTAIM study. It can be concluded that the interactions of CLDh with acidic SG of AC under basic pH conditions confirms the physical mechanisms of adsorption process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of excitons interaction with charge carriers on photovoltaic parameters in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głowienka, Damian; Szmytkowski, Jędrzej

    2018-03-01

    We report on theoretical analysis of excitons annihilation on charge carriers in organic solar cells. Numerical calculations based on transient one-dimensional drift-diffusion model have been carried out. An impact of three quantities (an annihilation rate constant, an exciton mobility and a recombination reduction factor) on current density and concentrations of charge carriers and excitons is investigated. Finally, we discuss the influence of excitons interaction with electrons and holes on four photovoltaic parameters (a short-circuit current, an open-circuit voltage, a fill factor and a power conversion efficiency). The conclusion is that the annihilation process visibly decreases the efficiency of organic photocells, if the annihilation rate constant is greater than 10-15m3s-1 .

  13. Mixed micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid and selected hydrophobic bile acids: interaction parameter, partition coefficient of nitrazepam and mixed micelles haemolytic potential.

    PubMed

    Poša, Mihalj; Tepavčević, Vesna

    2011-09-01

    The formation of mixed micelles built of 7,12-dioxolithocholic and the following hydrophobic bile acids was examined by conductometric method: cholic (C), deoxycholic (D), chenodeoxycholic (CD), 12-oxolithocholic (12-oxoL), 7-oxolithocholic (7-oxoL), ursodeoxycholic (UD) and hiodeoxycholic (HD). Interaction parameter (β) in the studied binary mixed micelles had negative value, suggesting synergism between micelle building units. Based on β value, the hydrophobic bile acids formed two groups: group I (C, D and CD) and group II (12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD and HD). Bile acids from group II had more negative β values than bile acids from group I. Also, bile acids from group II formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds in aggregates with both smaller (2) and higher (4) aggregation numbers, according to the analysis of their stereochemical (conformational) structures and possible structures of mixed micelles built of these bile acids and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. Haemolytic potential and partition coefficient of nitrazepam were higher in mixed micelles built of the more hydrophobic bile acids (C, D, CD) and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid than in micelles built only of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. On the other hand, these mixed micelles still had lower values of haemolytic potential than micelles built of C, D or CD. The mixed micelles that included bile acids: 12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD or HD did not significantly differ from the micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid, observing the values of their haemolytic potential. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of efficacy and moral outrage norms in creating the potential for international development activism through group-based interaction.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Emma F; McGarty, Craig A

    2009-03-01

    This paper adopts an intergroup perspective on helping as collective action to explore the ways to boost motivation amongst people in developed countries to join the effort to combat poverty and preventable disease in developing countries. Following van Zomeren, Spears, Leach, and Fischer's (2004) model of collective action, we investigated the role of norms about an emotional response (moral outrage) and beliefs about efficacy in motivating commitment to take action amongst members of advantaged groups. Norms about outrage and efficacy were harnessed to an opinion-based group identity (Bliuc, McGarty, Reynolds, & Muntele, 2007) and explored in the context of a novel group-based interaction method. Results showed that the group-based interaction boosted commitment to action especially when primed with an (injunctive) outrage norm. This norm stimulated a range of related effects including increased identification with the pro-international development opinion-based group, and higher efficacy beliefs. Results provide an intriguing instance of the power of group interaction (particularly where strengthened with emotion norms) to bolster commitment to positive social change.

  15. Variance of foot biomechanical parameters across age groups for the elderly people in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deselnicu, D. C.; Vasilescu, A. M.; Militaru, G.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results of a fieldwork study conducted in order to analyze major causal factors that influence the foot deformities and pathologies of elderly women in Romania. The study has an exploratory and descriptive nature and uses quantitative methodology. The sample consisted of 100 elderly women from Romania, ranging from 55 to over 75 years of age. The collected data was analyzed on multiple dimensions using a statistic analysis software program. The analysis of variance demonstrated significant differences across age groups in terms of several biomechanical parameters such as travel speed, toe off phase and support phase in the case of elderly women.

  16. Localization of prefoldin interaction sites in the hyperthermophilic group II chaperonin and correlations between binding rate and protein transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Zako, Tamotsu; Murase, Yosuke; Iizuka, Ryo; Yoshida, Takao; Kanzaki, Taro; Ide, Naoki; Maeda, Mizuo; Funatsu, Takashi; Yohda, Masafumi

    2006-11-17

    Prefoldin is a molecular chaperone that captures a protein-folding intermediate and transfers it to a group II chaperonin for correct folding. The manner by which prefoldin interacts with a group II chaperonin is poorly understood. Here, we have examined the prefoldin interaction site in the archaeal group II chaperonin, comparing the interaction of two Thermococcus chaperonins and their mutants with Pyrococcus prefoldin by surface plasmon resonance. We show that the mutations of Lys250 and Lys256 of Thermococcus alpha chaperonin residues to Glu residues increase the affinity to Pyrococcus prefoldin to the level of Thermococcus beta chaperonin and Pyrococcus chaperonin, indicating that their Glu250 and Glu256 residues of the helical protrusion region are responsible for relatively stronger binding to Pyrococcus prefoldin than Thermococcus alpha chaperonin. Since the putative chaperonin binding sites in the distal ends of Pyrococcus prefoldin are rich in basic residues, electrostatic interaction seems to be important for their interaction. The substrate protein transfer rate from prefoldin correlates well with its affinity for chaperonin.

  17. Electronic polarizability, optical basicity and interaction parameter for Nd2O3 doped lithium-zinc-phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algradee, M. A.; Sultan, M.; Samir, O. M.; Alwany, A. Elwhab B.

    2017-08-01

    The Nd3+-doped lithium-zinc-phosphate glasses were prepared by means of conventional melt quenching method. X-ray diffraction results confirmed the glassy nature of the studied glasses. The physical parameters such as the density, molar volume, ion concentration, polaron radius, inter-ionic distance, field strength and oxygen packing density were calculated using different formulae. The transmittance and reflectance spectra of glasses were recorded in the wavelength range 190-1200 nm. The values of optical band gap and Urbach energy were determined based on Mott-Davis model. The refractive indices for the studied glasses were evaluated from optical band gap values using different methods. The average electronic polarizability of the oxide ions, optical basicity and an interaction parameter were investigated from the calculated values of the refractive index and the optical band gap for the studied glasses. The variations in the different physical and optical properties of glasses with Nd2O3 content were discussed in terms of different parameters such as non-bridging oxygen and different concentrations of Nd cation in glass system.

  18. Ethnic diversity and value sharing: A longitudinal social network perspective on interactive group processes.

    PubMed

    Meeussen, Loes; Agneessens, Filip; Delvaux, Ellen; Phalet, Karen

    2018-04-01

    People often collaborate in groups that are increasingly diverse. As research predominantly investigated effects of diversity, the processes behind these effects remain understudied. We follow recent research that shows creating shared values is important for group functioning but seems hindered in high diversity groups - and use longitudinal social network analyses to study two interpersonal processes behind value sharing: creating relations between members or 'social bonding' (network tie formation and homophily) and sharing values - potentially through these relationships - or 'social norming' (network convergence and influence). We investigate these processes in small interactive groups with low and high ethnic diversity as they collaborate over time. In both low and high diversity groups, members showed social bonding and this creation of relations between members was not organized along ethnic lines. Low diversity groups also showed social norming: Members adjusted their relational values to others they liked and achievement values converged regardless of liking. In high diversity groups, however, there was no evidence for social norming. Thus, ethnic diversity seems to especially affect processes of social norming in groups, suggesting that targeted interventions should focus on facilitating social norming to stimulate value sharing in high diversity groups. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  19. Reconstructed historical land cover and biophysical parameters for studies of land-atmosphere interactions within the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steyaert, Louis T.; Knox, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 350 years, the eastern half of the United States experienced extensive land cover changes. These began with land clearing in the 1600s, continued with widespread deforestation, wetland drainage, and intensive land use by 1920, and then evolved to the present-day landscape of forest regrowth, intensive agriculture, urban expansion, and landscape fragmentation. Such changes alter biophysical properties that are key determinants of land-atmosphere interactions (water, energy, and carbon exchanges). To understand the potential implications of these land use transformations, we developed and analyzed 20-km land cover and biophysical parameter data sets for the eastern United States at 1650, 1850, 1920, and 1992 time slices. Our approach combined potential vegetation, county-level census data, soils data, resource statistics, a Landsat-derived land cover classification, and published historical information on land cover and land use. We reconstructed land use intensity maps for each time slice and characterized the land cover condition. We combined these land use data with a mutually consistent set of biophysical parameter classes, to characterize the historical diversity and distribution of land surface properties. Time series maps of land surface albedo, leaf area index, a deciduousness index, canopy height, surface roughness, and potential saturated soils in 1650, 1850, 1920, and 1992 illustrate the profound effects of land use change on biophysical properties of the land surface. Although much of the eastern forest has returned, the average biophysical parameters for recent landscapes remain markedly different from those of earlier periods. Understanding the consequences of these historical changes will require land-atmosphere interactions modeling experiments.

  20. Brief Report: Effects of Video-Based Group Instruction on Spontaneous Social Interaction of Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Plavnick, Joshua B; Dueñas, Ana D

    2018-06-01

    Four adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were taught to interact with peers by asking social questions or commenting about others during game play or group activities. Participants were shown a video model and then given an opportunity to perform the social behavior depicted in the model when playing a game with one another. All participants demonstrated an increase in both social interaction skills, replicating previous research on video-based group instruction for adolescents with ASD. The results suggest the procedure may be useful for teaching social skills that occur under natural conditions.

  1. Assessing the relative importance of parameter and forcing uncertainty and their interactions in conceptual hydrological model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mockler, E. M.; Chun, K. P.; Sapriza-Azuri, G.; Bruen, M.; Wheater, H. S.

    2016-11-01

    Predictions of river flow dynamics provide vital information for many aspects of water management including water resource planning, climate adaptation, and flood and drought assessments. Many of the subjective choices that modellers make including model and criteria selection can have a significant impact on the magnitude and distribution of the output uncertainty. Hydrological modellers are tasked with understanding and minimising the uncertainty surrounding streamflow predictions before communicating the overall uncertainty to decision makers. Parameter uncertainty in conceptual rainfall-runoff models has been widely investigated, and model structural uncertainty and forcing data have been receiving increasing attention. This study aimed to assess uncertainties in streamflow predictions due to forcing data and the identification of behavioural parameter sets in 31 Irish catchments. By combining stochastic rainfall ensembles and multiple parameter sets for three conceptual rainfall-runoff models, an analysis of variance model was used to decompose the total uncertainty in streamflow simulations into contributions from (i) forcing data, (ii) identification of model parameters and (iii) interactions between the two. The analysis illustrates that, for our subjective choices, hydrological model selection had a greater contribution to overall uncertainty, while performance criteria selection influenced the relative intra-annual uncertainties in streamflow predictions. Uncertainties in streamflow predictions due to the method of determining parameters were relatively lower for wetter catchments, and more evenly distributed throughout the year when the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of logarithmic values of flow (lnNSE) was the evaluation criterion.

  2. Developing force fields when experimental data is sparse: AMBER/GAFF-compatible parameters for inorganic and alkyl oxoanions.

    PubMed

    Kashefolgheta, Sadra; Vila Verde, Ana

    2017-08-09

    We present a set of Lennard-Jones parameters for classical, all-atom models of acetate and various alkylated and non-alkylated forms of sulfate, sulfonate and phosphate ions, optimized to reproduce their interactions with water and with the physiologically relevant sodium, ammonium and methylammonium cations. The parameters are internally consistent and are fully compatible with the Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF), the AMBER force field for proteins, the accompanying TIP3P water model and the sodium model of Joung and Cheatham. The parameters were developed primarily relying on experimental information - hydration free energies and solution activity derivatives at 0.5 m concentration - with ab initio, gas phase calculations being used for the cases where experimental information is missing. The ab initio parameterization scheme presented here is distinct from other approaches because it explicitly connects gas phase binding energies to intermolecular interactions in solution. We demonstrate that the original GAFF/AMBER parameters often overestimate anion-cation interactions, leading to an excessive number of contact ion pairs in solutions of carboxylate ions, and to aggregation in solutions of divalent ions. GAFF/AMBER parameters lead to excessive numbers of salt bridges in proteins and of contact ion pairs between sodium and acidic protein groups, issues that are resolved by using the optimized parameters presented here.

  3. Group contribution methodology based on the statistical associating fluid theory for heteronuclear molecules formed from Mie segments.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Vasileios; Lafitte, Thomas; Avendaño, Carlos; Adjiman, Claire S; Jackson, George; Müller, Erich A; Galindo, Amparo

    2014-02-07

    A generalization of the recent version of the statistical associating fluid theory for variable range Mie potentials [Lafitte et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 154504 (2013)] is formulated within the framework of a group contribution approach (SAFT-γ Mie). Molecules are represented as comprising distinct functional (chemical) groups based on a fused heteronuclear molecular model, where the interactions between segments are described with the Mie (generalized Lennard-Jonesium) potential of variable attractive and repulsive range. A key feature of the new theory is the accurate description of the monomeric group-group interactions by application of a high-temperature perturbation expansion up to third order. The capabilities of the SAFT-γ Mie approach are exemplified by studying the thermodynamic properties of two chemical families, the n-alkanes and the n-alkyl esters, by developing parameters for the methyl, methylene, and carboxylate functional groups (CH3, CH2, and COO). The approach is shown to describe accurately the fluid-phase behavior of the compounds considered with absolute average deviations of 1.20% and 0.42% for the vapor pressure and saturated liquid density, respectively, which represents a clear improvement over other existing SAFT-based group contribution approaches. The use of Mie potentials to describe the group-group interaction is shown to allow accurate simultaneous descriptions of the fluid-phase behavior and second-order thermodynamic derivative properties of the pure fluids based on a single set of group parameters. Furthermore, the application of the perturbation expansion to third order for the description of the reference monomeric fluid improves the predictions of the theory for the fluid-phase behavior of pure components in the near-critical region. The predictive capabilities of the approach stem from its formulation within a group-contribution formalism: predictions of the fluid-phase behavior and thermodynamic derivative properties of

  4. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in school-aged children with specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jessica; Marshall, Chloë R

    2011-01-01

    Parents play a critical role in their child's language development. Therefore, advising parents of a child with language difficulties on how to facilitate their child's language might benefit the child. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) has been developed specifically for this purpose. In PCIT, the speech-and-language therapist (SLT) works collaboratively with parents, altering interaction styles to make interaction more appropriate to their child's level of communicative needs. This study investigates the effectiveness of PCIT in 8-10-year-old children with specific language impairment (SLI) in the expressive domain. It aimed to identify whether PCIT had any significant impact on the following communication parameters of the child: verbal initiations, verbal and non-verbal responses, mean length of utterance (MLU), and proportion of child-to-parent utterances. Sixteen children with SLI and their parents were randomly assigned to two groups: treated or delayed treatment (control). The treated group took part in PCIT over a 4-week block, and then returned to the clinic for a final session after a 6-week consolidation period with no input from the therapist. The treated and control group were assessed in terms of the different communication parameters at three time points: pre-therapy, post-therapy (after the 4-week block) and at the final session (after the consolidation period), through video analysis. It was hypothesized that all communication parameters would significantly increase in the treated group over time and that no significant differences would be found in the control group. All the children in the treated group made language gains during spontaneous interactions with their parents. In comparison with the control group, PCIT had a positive effect on three of the five communication parameters: verbal initiations, MLU and the proportion of child-to-parent utterances. There was a marginal effect on verbal responses, and a trend towards such an effect

  5. Video Interaction Guidance in Collaborative Group Work: Impact on Primary School Pupils' Self-Esteem and Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musset, Matthew; Topping, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Video interaction guidance (VIG) is an increasingly recognised evidence-based intervention. VIG was used to enhance pupil responses during a group work programme. Fifteen primary-aged classes across a range of socio-economic status received regular group work over a year. A mixed methods repeated measures design involved nine experimental classes…

  6. Learning through Interactive Talk: A School-Based Mentor Teacher Study Group as a Context for Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, D.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a year-long study of collaborative professional learning in a mentor teacher study group connected to a large university teacher education program. It introduces a theoretical framework for considering the nature of interactive talk and its relationship to professional learning. Using examples of study group discourse, it…

  7. The Confluence of Technology and Narrative Approaches in Group Work: Techniques and Suggestions for Using Interactive E-Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberstroh, Shane; Trepal, Heather; Parr, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    This article illustrates procedures for using e-journals as a creative and adjunctive approach in group work. Incorporating e-mail based journaling as an ancillary form of group interaction allows members to communicate via written channels, and creates new ways for clients to relate in the group. This article outlines how leaders can use…

  8. Intramolecular cation-π interactions in protonated phenylalanine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fu, Weiqiang; Carr, Patrick J J; Lecours, Michael J; Burt, Michael; Marta, Rick A; Steinmetz, Vincent; Fillion, Eric; McMahon, Terrance B; Hopkins, W Scott

    2016-12-21

    The structures and properties of a series of phenylalanine (Phe) derivatives have been investigated in a joint computational and experimental infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) study. IRMPD spectra in the 1000-2000 cm -1 region show that protonation is localized on the amine group in all cases. Intramolecular cation-π interactions between the ammonium group and the phenyl ring heavily influence molecular geometries and properties such as gas phase basicity and proton affinity. By varying substituents on the phenyl ring, one can sensitively tune the cation-π interaction and, therefore, the molecular structure and properties. Variations in molecular structures and properties as a function of phenyl ring substitution are shown to correlate with substituent Hammett parameters.

  9. Direct interaction enables cross-talk between ionotropic and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Perroy, Julie; Raynaud, Fabrice; Homburger, Vincent; Rousset, Marie-Claude; Telley, Ludovic; Bockaert, Joël; Fagni, Laurent

    2008-03-14

    Functional interplay between ionotropic and metabotropic receptors frequently involves complex intracellular signaling cascades. The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu5a co-clusters with the ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in hippocampal neurons. In this study, we report that a more direct cross-talk can exist between these types of receptors. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer in living HEK293 cells, we demonstrate that mGlu5a and NMDA receptor clustering reflects the existence of direct physical interactions. Consequently, the mGlu5a receptor decreased NMDA receptor current, and reciprocally, the NMDA receptor strongly reduced the ability of the mGlu5a receptor to release intracellular calcium. We show that deletion of the C terminus of the mGlu5a receptor abolished both its interaction with the NMDA receptor and reciprocal inhibition of the receptors. This direct functional interaction implies a higher degree of target-effector specificity, timing, and subcellular localization of signaling than could ever be predicted with complex signaling pathways.

  10. TRIP-ID: A tool for a smart and interactive identification of Magic Formula tyre model parameters from experimental data acquired on track or test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farroni, Flavio; Lamberti, Raffaele; Mancinelli, Nicolò; Timpone, Francesco

    2018-03-01

    Tyres play a key role in ground vehicles' dynamics because they are responsible for traction, braking and cornering. A proper tyre-road interaction model is essential for a useful and reliable vehicle dynamics model. In the last two decades Pacejka's Magic Formula (MF) has become a standard in simulation field. This paper presents a Tool, called TRIP-ID (Tyre Road Interaction Parameters IDentification), developed to characterize and to identify with a high grade of accuracy and reliability MF micro-parameters from experimental data deriving from telemetry or from test rig. The tool guides interactively the user through the identification process on the basis of strong diagnostic considerations about the experimental data made evident by the tool itself. A motorsport application of the tool is shown as a case study.

  11. Older Adults Perceptions of Technology and Barriers to Interacting with Tablet Computers: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Vaportzis, Eleftheria; Giatsi Clausen, Maria; Gow, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: New technologies provide opportunities for the delivery of broad, flexible interventions with older adults. Focus groups were conducted to: (1) understand older adults' familiarity with, and barriers to, interacting with new technologies and tablets; and (2) utilize user-engagement in refining an intervention protocol. Methods: Eighteen older adults (65–76 years old; 83.3% female) who were novice tablet users participated in discussions about their perceptions of and barriers to interacting with tablets. We conducted three separate focus groups and used a generic qualitative design applying thematic analysis to analyse the data. The focus groups explored attitudes toward tablets and technology in general. We also explored the perceived advantages and disadvantages of using tablets, familiarity with, and barriers to interacting with tablets. In two of the focus groups, participants had previous computing experience (e.g., desktop), while in the other, participants had no previous computing experience. None of the participants had any previous experience with tablet computers. Results: The themes that emerged were related to barriers (i.e., lack of instructions and guidance, lack of knowledge and confidence, health-related barriers, cost); disadvantages and concerns (i.e., too much and too complex technology, feelings of inadequacy, and comparison with younger generations, lack of social interaction and communication, negative features of tablets); advantages (i.e., positive features of tablets, accessing information, willingness to adopt technology); and skepticism about using tablets and technology in general. After brief exposure to tablets, participants emphasized the likelihood of using a tablet in the future. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that most of our participants were eager to adopt new technology and willing to learn using a tablet. However, they voiced apprehension about lack of, or lack of clarity in, instructions and support

  12. Enhancing a cancer prevention and control curriculum through interactive group discussions.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, L P; Gadalla, S M; Hamilton, J G; Heckman-Stoddard, B M; Kent, E E; Lai, G Y; Lin, S W; Luhn, P; Faupel-Badger, J M

    2012-06-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This 4-week postgraduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g., epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new addition to the Principles course syllabus, which was exclusively a lecture-based format for over 20 years. In 2011, cancer prevention fellows and staff designed and implemented small group discussion sessions as part of the curriculum. The goals of these sessions were to foster an interactive environment, discuss concepts presented during the Principles course, exchange ideas, and enhance networking among the course participants and provide a teaching and leadership opportunity to current cancer prevention fellows. Overall, both the participants and facilitators who returned the evaluation forms (n=61/87 and 8/10, respectively) reported a high satisfaction with the experience for providing both an opportunity to explore course concepts in a greater detail and to network with colleagues. Participants (93%) and facilitators (100%) stated that they would like to see this component remain a part of the Principles course curriculum, and both groups provided recommendations for the 2012 program. The design, implementation, and evaluation of this initial discussion group component of the Principles course are described herein. The findings in this report will not only inform future discussion group sessions in the Principles course but may also be useful to others planning to incorporate group learning into large primarily lecture-based courses.

  13. Enhancing a Cancer Prevention and Control Curriculum through Interactive Group Discussions

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, L.P.; Gadalla, S.M.; Hamilton, J.G.; Heckman-Stoddard, B.M.; Kent, E.E.; Lai, G.Y.; Lin, S.W.; Luhn, P.; Faupel-Badger, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This four-week post-graduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g. epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new addition to the Principles course syllabus, which was exclusively a lecture-based format for over 20 years. In 2011, Cancer Prevention Fellows and staff designed and implemented small group discussion sessions as part of the curriculum. The goals of these sessions were to foster an interactive environment, discuss concepts presented during the Principles course, exchange ideas, and enhance networking amongst the course participants, and provide a teaching and leadership opportunity to current Cancer Prevention Fellows. Overall, both the participants and facilitators who returned the evaluation forms (n=61/87, and 8/10, respectively), reported high satisfaction with the experience for providing both an opportunity to explore course concepts in greater detail and to network with colleagues. Participants (93%) and facilitators (100%) stated they would like to see this component remain a part of the Principles course curriculum, and both groups provided recommendations for the 2012 program. The design, implementation, and evaluation of this initial discussion group component of the Principles course are described herein. The findings in this report will not only inform future discussion group sessions in the Principles course but may also be useful to others planning to incorporate group learning into large primarily lecture-based courses. PMID:22661264

  14. Tumor mutational load and immune parameters across metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (mRCC) risk groups

    PubMed Central

    de Velasco, Guillermo; Miao, Diana; Voss, Martin H.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Hsieh, James J.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Appleman, Leonard J.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have better overall survival when treated with nivolumab, a cancer immunotherapy that targets the immune checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), rather than everolimus (a chemical inhibitor of mTOR and immunosuppressant). Poor-risk mRCC patients treated with nivolumab seemed to experience the greatest overall survival benefit, compared to patients with favorable or intermediate-risk, in an analysis of the CheckMate-025 trial subgroup of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) prognostic risk groups. Here we explore whether tumor mutational load and RNA expression of specific immune parameters could be segregated by prognostic MSKCC risk strata and explain the survival seen in the poor-risk group. We queried whole exome transcriptome data in RCC patients (n = 54) included in The Cancer Genome Atlas that ultimately developed metastatic disease or were diagnosed with metastatic disease at presentation and did not receive immune checkpoint inhibitors. Nonsynonymous mutational load did not differ significantly by MSKCC risk group, nor was the expression of cytolytic genes –granzyme A and perforin – or selected immune checkpoint molecules different across MSKCC risk groups. In conclusion, this analysis found that mutational load and expression of markers of an active tumor microenvironment did not correlate with MSKCC risk prognostic classification in mRCC. PMID:27538576

  15. Health Care Professionals' Understandings of Cross-Cultural Interaction in End-of-Life Care: A Focus Group Study.

    PubMed

    Milberg, Anna; Torres, Sandra; Ågård, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    The academic debate on cross-cultural interaction within the context of end-of-life care takes for granted that this interaction is challenging. However, few empirical studies have actually focused on what health care professionals think about this interaction. This study aimed to explore health care professionals' understandings of cross-cultural interaction during end-of-life care. Sixty end-of-life care professionals were recruited from eleven care units in Sweden to take part in focus group interviews. These interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The health care professionals interviewed talked about cross-cultural interaction in end-of-life care as interaction that brings about uncertainty, stress and frustration even though they had limited experience of this type of interaction. The focus group discussions brought attention to four specific challenges that they expected to meet when they care for patients with migrant backgrounds since they took for granted that they would have an ethno-cultural background that is different to their own. These challenges had to do with communication barriers, 'unusual' emotional and pain expressions, the expectation that these patients' families would be 'different' and the anticipation that these patients and their families lack knowledge. At the core of the challenges in question is the idea that cross-cultural interaction means meeting "the unknown". In addition, the end-of-life care professionals interviewed talked about patients whose backgrounds they did not share in homogenizing terms. It is against this backdrop that they worried about their ability to provide end-of-life care that is individualized enough to meet the needs of these patients. The study suggests that end-of-life care professionals who regard cross-cultural interaction in this manner could face actual challenges when caring for patients whose backgrounds they regard as "the unknown" since they anticipate a variety of challenges

  16. Health Care Professionals’ Understandings of Cross-Cultural Interaction in End-of-Life Care: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Sandra; Ågård, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective The academic debate on cross-cultural interaction within the context of end-of-life care takes for granted that this interaction is challenging. However, few empirical studies have actually focused on what health care professionals think about this interaction. This study aimed to explore health care professionals’ understandings of cross-cultural interaction during end-of-life care. Methods Sixty end-of-life care professionals were recruited from eleven care units in Sweden to take part in focus group interviews. These interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The health care professionals interviewed talked about cross-cultural interaction in end-of-life care as interaction that brings about uncertainty, stress and frustration even though they had limited experience of this type of interaction. The focus group discussions brought attention to four specific challenges that they expected to meet when they care for patients with migrant backgrounds since they took for granted that they would have an ethno-cultural background that is different to their own. These challenges had to do with communication barriers, ‘unusual’ emotional and pain expressions, the expectation that these patients’ families would be ‘different’ and the anticipation that these patients and their families lack knowledge. At the core of the challenges in question is the idea that cross-cultural interaction means meeting “the unknown”. In addition, the end-of-life care professionals interviewed talked about patients whose backgrounds they did not share in homogenizing terms. It is against this backdrop that they worried about their ability to provide end-of-life care that is individualized enough to meet the needs of these patients. Conclusions The study suggests that end-of-life care professionals who regard cross-cultural interaction in this manner could face actual challenges when caring for patients whose backgrounds they regard as

  17. Measurements of the interaction of wave groups with shorter wind-generated waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Jacob S.; Long, Steven R.; Phillips, O. M.

    1992-01-01

    Fields of statistically steady wind-generated waves produced in a wind wave facility were perturbed by the injection of groups of longer, mechanically generated waves with various slopes. The time histories of the surface displacements were measured at four fetches in ensembles consisting of 100 realizations of each set of experimental conditions; the data were stored and analyzed digitally. Four distinct stages in the overall interaction are identified and characterized. The properties of the wave energy front are documented, and a preliminary discussion is given of the dynamic processes involved in its formation.

  18. Environmental Enrichments for a Group of Captive Macaws: Low Interaction Does Not Mean Low Behavioral Changes.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Jéssica; Maia, Caroline Marques; Santos, Eliana Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment has been widely used to improve conditions for nonhuman animals in captivity. However, there is no consensus about the best way to evaluate the success of enrichments. This study evaluated whether the proportion of time spent interacting with enrichments indicated the proportion of overall behavioral changes. Six environmental enrichments were introduced in succession to 16 captive macaws, and interaction of the animals with them as well as the behaviors of the group were recorded before and during the enrichments. All of the enrichments affected the proportions of time spent in different behaviors. Macaws interacted more with certain items (hibiscus and food tree) than with others (a toy or swings and stairs), but introduction of the enrichments that invoked the least interaction caused as many behavioral changes as those that invoked the most. Moreover, feeding behavior was only affected by the enrichment that invoked the least interaction, a change not detected by a general analysis of enrichment effects. In conclusion, little interaction with enrichment does not mean little change in behavior, and the effects of enrichments are more complex than previously considered.

  19. [Simple method for precognition of drug interaction between oral iron and phenolic hydroxyl group-containing drugs].

    PubMed

    Sunagane, Nobuyoshi; Yoshinobu, Etsuko; Murayama, Nobuko; Terawaki, Yasufumi; Kamimura, Naoki; Uruno, Tsutomu

    2005-02-01

    In the present study, we devised a simple method for detecting the drug interaction between oral iron preparations and phenolic hydroxyl group-containing drugs, using the coloring reaction as indicator, due to the formation of complexes or chelates. In the method, oral iron preparations and test drugs in amounts as much as single dose for adults were added to 10 ml of purified water to make sample suspensions for testing. Thirty minutes after mixing an oral iron suspension and a test drug suspension, the change of color in the mixture was observed macroscopically and graded as 0 to 3, with a marked color change judged as grade 3 and no color change as grade 0. Screening of 14 test drugs commonly used orally was carried out. When using sodium ferrous citrate preparations as oral iron, 5 were classified as grade 3, 2 as grade 2, 4 as grade 1, and 3 as grade 0, respectively. To verify usefulness of the method, the interactions suggested by screening were pharmacokinetically assessed by measuring serum concentrations of the drug in mice. When a levodopa or droxidopa preparation, judged as grade 3 in screening, was concomitantly administered with an iron preparation, a significant reduction in bioavailability of the test drug was observed, indicating possible drug interaction between the test drug and oral iron. Combined administration of an acetaminophen preparation, judged as grade 1, and oral iron preparation showed no influence on the bioavailability of the test drug, implying no detectable interactions between them. In conclusion, the simple method devised in the present study is useful for precognition of drug interactions between oral iron preparations and phenolic hydroxyl group-containing drugs, and the drugs with a higher grade in screening may induce drug interactions with oral iron.

  20. Interaction of cadmium with phosphate on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, P.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1997-08-01

    Interactions between different ions are of importance in understanding chemical processes in natural systems. In this study simultaneous adsorption of phosphate and cadmium on goethite is studied in detail. The charge distribution (CD)-multisite complexation (MUSIC) model has been successful in describing extended data sets of cadmium adsorption and phosphate adsorption on goethite. In this study, the parameters of this model for these two data sets were combined to describe a new data set of simultaneous adsorption of cadmium and phosphate on goethite. Attention is focused on the surface speciation of cadmium. With the extra information that can be obtained frommore » the interaction experiments, the cadmium adsorption model is refined. For a perfect description of the data, the singly coordinated surface groups at the 110 face of goethite were assumed to form both monodentate and bidentate surface species with cadmium. The CD-MUSIC model is able to describe data sets of both simultaneous and single adsorption of cadmium and phosphate with the same parameters. The model calculations confirmed the idea that only singly coordinated surface groups are reactive for specific ion binding.« less

  1. Impacts of Teacher-Child Managed Whole-Group Language and Literacy Instruction on the Depth of Preschoolers' Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tzu-Jung; Justice, Laura M.; Emery, Alyssa A.; Mashburn, Andrew J.; Pentimonti, Jill M.

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined the potential impacts of ongoing participation (twice weekly for 30 weeks) in teacher-child managed whole-group language and literacy instruction on prekindergarten children's social interaction with classmates. Teacher-child managed whole-group instruction that provides children with opportunities to engage…

  2. Increasing verbal interaction among elderly socially isolated mentally retarded adults: a group language training procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Kleitsch, E C; Whitman, T L; Santos, J

    1983-01-01

    The present study examined the effectiveness of a group language training procedure for directly increasing and generalizing the rate of verbal interaction among four elderly, socially isolated, moderately mentally retarded men. A withdrawal of treatment design was used to examine the effect of the procedure that used verbal prompts. behavioral rehearsal, and contingent social praise. Changes in behavior were examined in two generalization settings, one similar to the training environment (Generalization I) and the other arranged as part of the subjects' daily routine (Generalization II). Baseline data indicated no verbal interaction among the subjects. During treatment the training procedure increased the rate of subjects' verbal interactions not only in the training situation, but also in the two generalization settings. An analysis of the data obtained during the Generalization II situation indicated that subjects' verbal interaction increased not only among themselves, but with nonsubject peers present in this setting. Follow-up data showed that increases in rates of verbal interaction were maintained four months after the cessation of training. The implications of the results for program generalization and work with the language deficient individual is discussed. PMID:6885671

  3. A Guide to Analyzing Message-Response Sequences and Group Interaction Patterns in Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Allan

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a set of methods and a framework for evaluating, modeling, and predicting group interactions in computer-mediated communication. The method of sequential analysis is described along with specific software tools and techniques to facilitate the analysis of message-response sequences. In addition, the Dialogic Theory and its…

  4. Effectiveness of interactive discussion group in suicide risk assessment among general nurses in Taiwan: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yi-Yin; Yeh, Mei Chang; Huang, Lian-Hua; Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Been

    2014-11-01

    The evidence of suicide prevention training for nurses is scarce. Strategies to enhance general nurses' ability in suicide risk assessment are critical to develop effective training programs in general medical settings. This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of an interactive discussion group in a suicide prevention training program for general nurses. In this randomized study with two groups of pre-post study design, the sample was recruited from the Medical, Surgical, and Emergency/Intensive Care Sectors of a 2000-bed general hospital via stratified randomization. Among the 111 nurses, 57 participants randomly assigned to the control group received a two-hour baseline suicide gatekeeper lecture, and 54 participants assigning to the experimental group received an additional five-hour group discussion about suicide risk assessment skills. Using a case vignette, the nurses discussed and assessed suicide risk factors specified in a 10-item Chinese SAD PERSONS Scale during a group discussion intervention. The findings revealed that the nurses achieved significant and consistent improvements of risk identification and assessment after the intervention without influencing their mental health status for assessing suicide risks. The result suggested an effective approach of interactive group discussion for facilitating critical thinking and learning suicide risk assessment skills among general nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Group dynamics and social interaction in a South Asian online learning forum for faculty development of medical teachers.

    PubMed

    Anshu; Sharma, M; Burdick, W P; Singh, T

    2010-04-01

    Group dynamics of online medical faculty development programs have not been analyzed and reported in literature. Knowledge of the types of content of posted messages will help to understand group dynamics and promote participation in an asynchronous learning environment. This paper assesses group dynamics and social interactivity in an online learning environment for medical teachers in the South Asian context. Participants of a medical education fellowship program conducted by the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) Regional Institute at Christian Medical College, Ludhiana (CMCL) in India interact on a listserv called the Mentoring-Learning Web (ML-Web). Monthly topics for online discussion are chosen by fellows through a standard tool called "multi-voting". Fellows volunteer to moderate sessions and direct the pace of the discussion. We analyzed the content and process of the discussion of one particular month. The emails were categorized as those that reflected cognitive presence (dealing with construction and exploration of knowledge), teacher presence (dealing with instructional material and learning resources), and social presence, or were administrative in nature. Social emails were further classified as: affective, cohesive and interactive. Social emails constituted one-third of the total emails. Another one-quarter of the emails dealt with sharing of resources and teacher presence, while cognitive emails comprised 36.2% of the total. More than half of the social emails were affective, while a little less than one-third were cohesive. Social posts are an inevitable part of online learning. These posts promote bonding between learners and contribute to better interaction and collaboration in online learning. Moderators should be aware of their presence and use them as tools to promote interactivity.

  6. A maximum power point prediction method for group control of photovoltaic water pumping systems based on parameter identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Su, J. H.; Guo, L.; Chen, J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper puts forward a maximum power estimation method based on the photovoltaic array (PVA) model to solve the optimization problems about group control of the PV water pumping systems (PVWPS) at the maximum power point (MPP). This method uses the improved genetic algorithm (GA) for model parameters estimation and identification in view of multi P-V characteristic curves of a PVA model, and then corrects the identification results through least square method. On this basis, the irradiation level and operating temperature under any condition are able to estimate so an accurate PVA model is established and the MPP none-disturbance estimation is achieved. The simulation adopts the proposed GA to determine parameters, and the results verify the accuracy and practicability of the methods.

  7. Compost mixture influence of interactive physical parameters on microbial kinetics and substrate fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mohajer, Ardavan; Tremier, Anne; Barrington, Suzelle; Teglia, Cecile

    2010-01-01

    Composting is a feasible biological treatment for the recycling of wastewater sludge as a soil amendment. The process can be optimized by selecting an initial compost recipe with physical properties that enhance microbial activity. The present study measured the microbial O(2) uptake rate (OUR) in 16 sludge and wood residue mixtures to estimate the kinetics parameters of maximum growth rate mu(m) and rate of organic matter hydrolysis K(h), as well as the initial biodegradable organic matter fractions present. The starting mixtures consisted of a wide range of moisture content (MC), waste to bulking agent (BA) ratio (W/BA ratio) and BA particle size, which were placed in a laboratory respirometry apparatus to measure their OUR over 4 weeks. A microbial model based on the activated sludge process was used to calculate the kinetic parameters and was found to adequately reproduced OUR curves over time, except for the lag phase and peak OUR, which was not represented and generally over-estimated, respectively. The maximum growth rate mu(m), was found to have a quadratic relationship with MC and a negative association with BA particle size. As a result, increasing MC up to 50% and using a smaller BA particle size of 8-12 mm was seen to maximize mu(m). The rate of hydrolysis K(h) was found to have a linear association with both MC and BA particle size. The model also estimated the initial readily biodegradable organic matter fraction, MB(0), and the slower biodegradable matter requiring hydrolysis, MH(0). The sum of MB(0) and MH(0) was associated with MC, W/BA ratio and the interaction between these two parameters, suggesting that O(2) availability was a key factor in determining the value of these two fractions. The study reinforced the idea that optimization of the physical characteristics of a compost mixture requires a holistic approach. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Polymerase/DNA interactions and enzymatic activity: multi-parameter analysis with electro-switchable biosurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Andreas; Schräml, Michael; Strasser, Ralf; Daub, Herwin; Myers, Thomas; Heindl, Dieter; Rant, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The engineering of high-performance enzymes for future sequencing and PCR technologies as well as the development of many anticancer drugs requires a detailed analysis of DNA/RNA synthesis processes. However, due to the complex molecular interplay involved, real-time methodologies have not been available to obtain comprehensive information on both binding parameters and enzymatic activities. Here we introduce a chip-based method to investigate polymerases and their interactions with nucleic acids, which employs an electrical actuation of DNA templates on microelectrodes. Two measurement modes track both the dynamics of the induced switching process and the DNA extension simultaneously to quantitate binding kinetics, dissociation constants and thermodynamic energies. The high sensitivity of the method reveals previously unidentified tight binding states for Taq and Pol I (KF) DNA polymerases. Furthermore, the incorporation of label-free nucleotides can be followed in real-time and changes in the DNA polymerase conformation (finger closing) during enzymatic activity are observable.

  9. Group parent-child interaction therapy: A randomized control trial for the treatment of conduct problems in young children.

    PubMed

    Niec, Larissa N; Barnett, Miya L; Prewett, Matthew S; Shanley Chatham, Jenelle R

    2016-08-01

    Although efficacious interventions exist for childhood conduct problems, a majority of families in need of services do not receive them. To address problems of treatment access and adherence, innovative adaptations of current interventions are needed. This randomized control trial investigated the relative efficacy of a novel format of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT), a treatment for young children with conduct problems. Eighty-one families with 3- to 6-year-old children (71.6% boys, 85.2% White) with diagnoses of oppositional defiant or conduct disorder were randomized to individual PCIT (n = 42) or the novel format, Group PCIT. Parents completed standardized measures of children's conduct problems, parenting stress, and social support at intake, posttreatment, and 6-month follow-up. Therapist ratings, parent attendance, and homework completion provided measures of treatment adherence. Throughout treatment, parenting skills were assessed using the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System. Parents in both group and individual PCIT reported significant improvements from intake to posttreatment and follow-up in their children's conduct problems and adaptive functioning, as well as significant decreases in parenting stress. Parents in both treatment conditions also showed significant improvements in their parenting skills. There were no interactions between time and treatment format. Contrary to expectation, parents in Group PCIT did not experience greater social support or treatment adherence. Group PCIT was not inferior to individual PCIT and may be a valuable format to reach more families in need of services. Future work should explore the efficiency and sustainability of Group PCIT in community settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Group Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: A Randomized Control Trial for the Treatment of Conduct Problems in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Niec, Larissa N.; Barnett, Miya L.; Prewett, Matthew S.; Shanley, Jenelle

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although efficacious interventions exist for childhood conduct problems, a majority of families in need of services do not receive them. To address problems of treatment access and adherence, innovative adaptations of current interventions are needed. This randomized control trial investigated the relative efficacy of a novel format of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT), a treatment for young children with conduct problems. Methods Eighty-one families with three- to six-year-old children (71.6% male; 85.2% Caucasian) with diagnoses of oppositional defiant or conduct disorder were randomized to individual PCIT (n = 42) or the novel format, group PCIT. Parents completed standardized measures of children’s conduct problems, parenting stress, and social support at intake, posttreatment, and six-month follow-up. Therapist ratings, parent attendance, and homework completion provided measures of treatment adherence. Throughout treatment, parenting skills were assessed using the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System. Results Parents in both group and individual PCIT reported significant improvements from intake to posttreatment and follow-up in their children’s conduct problems and adaptive functioning, as well as significant decreases in parenting stress. Parents in both treatment conditions also showed significant improvements in their parenting skills. There were no interactions between time and treatment format. Contrary to expectation, parents in group PCIT did not experience greater social support or treatment adherence. Conclusions Group PCIT was not inferior to individual PCIT and may be a valuable format to reach more families in need of services. Future work should explore the efficiency and sustainability of group PCIT in community settings. PMID:27018531

  11. Probing the interactions of phenol with oxygenated functional groups on curved fullerene-like sheets in activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chun-Yang; Ng, Man-Fai; Goh, Bee-Min; Saunders, Martin; Hill, Nick; Jiang, Zhong-Tao; Balach, Juan; El-Harbawi, Mohanad

    2016-02-07

    The mechanism(s) of interactions of phenol with oxygenated functional groups (OH, COO and COOH) in nanopores of activated carbon (AC) is a contentious issue among researchers. This mechanism is of particular interest because a better understanding of the role of such groups in nanopores would essentially translate to advances in AC production and use, especially in regard to the treatment of organic-based wastewaters. We therefore attempt to shed more light on the subject by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations in which fullerene-like models integrating convex or concave structure, which simulate the eclectic porous structures on AC surface, are adopted. TEM analysis, EDS mapping and Boehm titration are also conducted on actual phenol-adsorbed AC. Our results suggest the widely-reported phenomenon of decreased phenol uptake on AC due to increased concentration of oxygenated functional groups is possibly attributed to the increased presence of the latter on the convex side of the curved carbon sheets. Such a system effectively inhibits phenol from getting direct contact with the carbon sheet, thus constraining any available π-π interaction, while the effect of groups acting on the concave part of the curved sheet does not impart the same detriment.

  12. When group members go against the grain: An ironic interactive effect of group identification and normative content on healthy eating.

    PubMed

    Banas, Kasia; Cruwys, Tegan; de Wit, John B F; Johnston, Marie; Haslam, S Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Three studies were conducted to examine the effect of group identification and normative content of social identities on healthy eating intentions and behaviour. In Study 1 (N = 87) Australian participants were shown images that portrayed a norm of healthy vs. unhealthy behaviour among Australians. Participants' choices from an online restaurant menu were used to calculate energy content as the dependent variable. In Study 2 (N = 117), female participants were assigned to a healthy or unhealthy norm condition. The dependent variable was the amount of food eaten in a taste test. Social group identification was measured in both studies. In Study 3 (N = 117), both American identification and healthiness norm were experimentally manipulated, and participants' choices from an online restaurant menu constituted the dependent variable. In all three studies, the healthiness norm presented interacted with participants' group identification to predict eating behaviour. Contrary to what would be predicted under the traditional normative social influence account, higher identifiers chose higher energy food from an online menu and ate more food in a taste test when presented with information about their in-group members behaving healthily. The exact psychological mechanism responsible for these results remains unclear, but the pattern of means can be interpreted as evidence of vicarious licensing, whereby participants feel less motivated to make healthy food choices after being presented with content suggesting that other in-group members are engaging in healthy behaviour. These results suggest a more complex interplay between group membership and norms than has previously been proposed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Transformational leadership and group interaction as climate antecedents: a social network analysis.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Dov; Tenne-Gazit, Orly

    2008-07-01

    In order to test the social mechanisms through which organizational climate emerges, this article introduces a model that combines transformational leadership and social interaction as antecedents of climate strength (i.e., the degree of within-unit agreement about climate perceptions). Despite their longstanding status as primary variables, both antecedents have received limited empirical research. The sample consisted of 45 platoons of infantry soldiers from 5 different brigades, using safety climate as the exemplar. Results indicate a partially mediated model between transformational leadership and climate strength, with density of group communication network as the mediating variable. In addition, the results showed independent effects for group centralization of the communication and friendship networks, which exerted incremental effects on climate strength over transformational leadership. Whereas centralization of the communication network was found to be negatively related to climate strength, centralization of the friendship network was positively related to it. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  14. Event reweighting with the NuWro neutrino interaction generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Luke; Stowell, Patrick; Sobczyk, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Event reweighting has been implemented in the NuWro neutrino event generator for a number of free theory parameters in the interaction model. Event reweighting is a key analysis technique, used to efficiently study the effect of neutrino interaction model uncertainties. This opens up the possibility for NuWro to be used as a primary event generator by experimental analysis groups. A preliminary model tuning to ANL and BNL data of quasi-elastic and single pion production events was performed to validate the reweighting engine.

  15. Mother-Toddler Interaction and Maternal Perception of Child Temperament in Two Ethnic Groups: Chinese-American and European-American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sheila; Freedman, Daniel G.

    A study was conducted to compare experiential features of mother/toddler interaction and maternal perception of toddler temperament in two ethnic groups: Chinese-Americans and European-Americans. Subjects were 16 mother/toddler dyads with five girls and three boys in each group matched for sex, age, and birth order. Caucasian mothers were…

  16. WWC Review of the Article "Culture and the Interaction of Student Ethnicity with Reward Structure in Group Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Culture and the Interaction of Student Ethnicity with Reward Structure in Group Learning" examined the effects of different reward systems used in group learning situations on the math skills of African-American and white students. The study analyzed data on 75 African-American and 57 white fourth- and fifth-grade students from urban…

  17. Role of Dispersive Fluorous Interaction in the Solvation Dynamics of the Perfluoro Group Containing Molecules.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Saptarsi; Chaterjee, Soumit; Halder, Ritaban; Jana, Biman; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2017-08-17

    Perfluoro group containing molecules possess an important self-aggregation property through the fluorous (F···F) interaction which makes them useful for diverse applications such as medicinal chemistry, separation techniques, polymer technology, and biology. In this article, we have investigated the solvation dynamics of coumarin-153 (C153) and coumarin-6H (C6H) in ethanol (ETH), 2-fluoroethanol (MFE), and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) using the femtosecond upconversion technique and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to understand the role of fluorous interaction between the solute and solvent molecules in the solvation dynamics of perfluoro group containing molecules. The femtosecond upconversion data show that the time scales of solvation dynamics of C6H in ETH, MFE, and TFE are approximately the same whereas the solvation dynamics of C153 in TFE is slow as compared to that of ETH and MFE. It has also been observed that the time scale of solvation dynamics of C6H in ETH and MFE is higher than that of C153 in the same solvents. MD simulation results show a qualitative agreement with the experimental data in terms of the time scale of the slow components of the solvation for all the systems. The experimental and simulation studies combined lead to the conclusion that the solvation dynamics of C6H in all solvents as well as C153 in ETH and MFE is mostly governed by the charge distribution of ester moieties (C═O and O) of dye molecules whereas the solvation of C153 in TFE is predominantly due to the dispersive fluorous interaction (F···F) between the perfluoro groups of the C153 and solvent molecules.

  18. Relational evolution of effectively interacting group field theory quantum gravity condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pithis, Andreas G. A.; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2017-03-01

    We study the impact of effective interactions onto relationally evolving group field theory (GFT) condensates based on real-valued fields. In a first step we show that a free condensate configuration in an isotropic restriction settles dynamically into a low-spin configuration of the quantum geometry. This goes hand in hand with the accelerated and exponential expansion of its volume, as well as the vanishing of its relative uncertainty which suggests the classicalization of the quantum geometry. The dynamics of the emergent space can then be given in terms of the classical Friedmann equations. In contrast to models based on complex-valued fields, solutions avoiding the singularity problem can only be found if the initial conditions are appropriately chosen. We then turn to the analysis of the influence of effective interactions on the dynamics by studying in particular the Thomas-Fermi regime. In this context, at the cost of fine-tuning, an epoch of inflationary expansion of quantum geometric origin can be implemented. Finally, and for the first time, we study anisotropic GFT condensate configurations and show that such systems tend to isotropize quickly as the value of the relational clock grows. This paves the way to a more systematic investigation of anisotropies in the context of GFT condensate cosmology.

  19. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrologicalmore » parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified accordingly to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using a Principal component analyses (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) –based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each S-class with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the methodology is applicable to other

  20. Majorana Kramers pairs in Rashba double nanowires with interactions and disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakurathi, Manisha; Simon, Pascal; Mandal, Ipsita; Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the effects of electron-electron interactions and disorder on a Rashba double-nanowire setup coupled to an s -wave superconductor, which has been recently proposed as a versatile platform to generate Kramers pairs of Majorana bound states in the absence of magnetic fields. We identify the regime of parameters for which these Kramers pairs are stable against interaction and disorder effects. We use bosonization, perturbative renormalization group, and replica techniques to derive the flow equations for various parameters of the model and evaluate the corresponding phase diagram with topological and disorder-dominated phases. We confirm aforementioned results by considering a more microscopic approach, which starts from the tunneling Hamiltonian between the three-dimensional s -wave superconductor and the nanowires. We find again that the interaction drives the system into the topological phase and, as the strength of the source term coming from the tunneling Hamiltonian increases, strong electron-electron interactions are required to reach the topological phase.

  1. Investigating the Evolution of Ingroup Favoritism Using a Minimal Group Interaction Paradigm: The Effects of Inter- and Intragroup Interdependence

    PubMed Central

    Quayle, Michael; Tredoux, Colin G.; Titlestad, Kim; Tooke, Larry

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of structural interdependencies between groups (especially inequality), and interdependencies between individuals on ingroup favoritism in minimal group situations. Previous research has attempted to determine whether ingroup favoritism is produced by categorization or intragroup interdependencies (reciprocation expectations), but recent literature suggests that it is not possible to tease these influences apart. We report two studies that investigate how ingroup favoritism evolves over time in social interaction. The levels of ingroup favoritism were affected by categorization and inequality, and the level of ingroup favoritism changed over time, increasing or decreasing depending on the nature of the initial intergroup structure. We conclude by providing two explanations for this change: emergent norms, and changes to the intergroup situation produced by interaction. Our experiments confirm the value of studying the evolution of minimal group behavior, especially for explaining why low status groups act to preserve intergroup inequalities. PMID:27851791

  2. Interaction between the helicases genetically linked to Fanconi anemia group J and Bloom's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suhasini, Avvaru N; Rawtani, Nina A; Wu, Yuliang; Sommers, Joshua A; Sharma, Sudha; Mosedale, Georgina; North, Phillip S; Cantor, Sharon B; Hickson, Ian D; Brosh, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) and Fanconi anemia (FA) are autosomal recessive disorders characterized by cancer and chromosomal instability. BS and FA group J arise from mutations in the BLM and FANCJ genes, respectively, which encode DNA helicases. In this work, FANCJ and BLM were found to interact physically and functionally in human cells and co-localize to nuclear foci in response to replication stress. The cellular level of BLM is strongly dependent upon FANCJ, and BLM is degraded by a proteasome-mediated pathway when FANCJ is depleted. FANCJ-deficient cells display increased sister chromatid exchange and sensitivity to replication stress. Expression of a FANCJ C-terminal fragment that interacts with BLM exerted a dominant negative effect on hydroxyurea resistance by interfering with the FANCJ–BLM interaction. FANCJ and BLM synergistically unwound a DNA duplex substrate with sugar phosphate backbone discontinuity, but not an ‘undamaged' duplex. Collectively, the results suggest that FANCJ catalytic activity and its effect on BLM protein stability contribute to preservation of genomic stability and a normal response to replication stress. PMID:21240188

  3. Repetition, response mobilization, and face: Analysis of group interactions with a 19-year-old with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Louick, Rebecca; White, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    This Conversation Analytic study examined the talk of an adolescent with Asperger syndrome (under previously used diagnostic criteria), Nathan, as he interacts with peers in a small group setting. We focused on Nathan's repetition aimed at pursuing response, and rely on analytical frameworks including response mobilization, face-work, and agreement preference. We found that while Nathan's repetitions resembled 'topic perseveration' previously described in the literature, they showed evidence of interactional awareness as they were employed when peers offered little or no response to his original utterance. However, we also found that while much of Nathan's talk was sophisticatedly structured, his repetition to pursue response eschewed interaction rituals that work to maintain social cohesion. As a result, Nathan's interactional priorities appeared mis-aligned with those of his peers, and failed to produce extended interactions in most cases. Readers will be able to describe features of conversational interaction, including response mobilization, agreement preference, and face work. They will understand the relevance of conversation analysis to the study of interaction in individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Lastly, they will be able to describe the conditions under which the subject used repetition within peer interactions, and the effects of his repetition on interaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimating Colloidal Contact Model Parameters Using Quasi-Static Compression Simulations.

    PubMed

    Bürger, Vincent; Briesen, Heiko

    2016-10-05

    For colloidal particles interacting in suspensions, clusters, or gels, contact models should attempt to include all physical phenomena experimentally observed. One critical point when formulating a contact model is to ensure that the interaction parameters can be easily obtained from experiments. Experimental determinations of contact parameters for particles either are based on bulk measurements for simulations on the macroscopic scale or require elaborate setups for obtaining tangential parameters such as using atomic force microscopy. However, on the colloidal scale, a simple method is required to obtain all interaction parameters simultaneously. This work demonstrates that quasi-static compression of a fractal-like particle network provides all the necessary information to obtain particle interaction parameters using a simple spring-based contact model. These springs provide resistances against all degrees of freedom associated with two-particle interactions, and include critical forces or moments where such springs break, indicating a bond-breakage event. A position-based cost function is introduced to show the identifiability of the two-particle contact parameters, and a discrete, nonlinear, and non-gradient-based global optimization method (simplex with simulated annealing, SIMPSA) is used to minimize the cost function calculated from deviations of particle positions. Results show that, in principle, all necessary contact parameters for an arbitrary particle network can be identified, although numerical efficiency as well as experimental noise must be addressed when applying this method. Such an approach lays the groundwork for identifying particle-contact parameters from a position-based particle analysis for a colloidal system using just one experiment. Spring constants also directly influence the time step of the discrete-element method, and a detailed knowledge of all necessary interaction parameters will help to improve the efficiency of colloidal

  5. Who is the competent physics student? A study of students' positions and social interaction in small-group discussions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Due, Karin

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students. The analysis was based on gender theory viewing gender both as a process and a discourse. Specifically discursive psychology analysis was used to examine how students position themselves and their peers within discourses of physics and gender. The results of the study reveal how images of physics and of "skilled physics student" were constructed in the context of the interviews. These discourses were reconstructed in the students' discussions and their social interactions within groups. Traditional gendered positions were reconstructed, for example with boys positioned as more competent in physics than girls. These positions were however also resisted and challenged.

  6. Dependence of the average spatial and energy characteristics of the hadron-lepton cascade on the strong interaction parameters at superhigh energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyadjian, N. G.; Dallakyan, P. Y.; Garyaka, A. P.; Mamidjanian, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    A method for calculating the average spatial and energy characteristics of hadron-lepton cascades in the atmosphere is described. The results of calculations for various strong interaction models of primary protons and nuclei are presented. The sensitivity of the experimentally observed extensive air showers (EAS) characteristics to variations of the elementary act parameters is analyzed.

  7. Group III impurities Si interstitials interaction caused by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, L.; Piro, A. M.; De Bastiani, R.; Grimaldi, M. G.; Rimini, E.

    2006-01-01

    The off-lattice displacement of substitutional impurities (B, Ga) in Si caused by irradiation with energetic light ion beams has been investigated. Samples have been prepared by solid phase epitaxy (SPE) of pre-amorphized Si subsequently implanted with B and Ga at a concentration of about 1 × 1020 at/cm3 confined in a 300 nm thick surface region. The off-lattice displacement of the impurities was induced at room temperature (RT) by irradiation with high energy (>600 keV) light ion beams (H, He) and detected by the channelling technique along different axes, using the 11B(p,α)8Be reaction and standard RBS, for B and Ga, respectively. The normalized channelling yield χ of the impurity signal increases with the ion fluence, indicating a progressive off-lattice displacement of the dopant during irradiation, until it saturates at χF < 1 suggesting a non-random displacement of the dopant. Although the precise value of χF depends on the channelling direction and dopant species, the off-lattice displacement rate, deduced from the χ versus interstitial fluence curve, only depends on the excess of Si self-interstitials (SiI) generated by the irradiating beam through a parameter σ that can be interpreted as an effective cross-section for the impurity-SiI interaction.

  8. Reciprocity phase in various 2×2 games by agents equipped with two-memory length strategy encouraged by grouping for interaction and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wakiyama, Motoya; Tanimoto, Jun

    2011-01-01

    This paper numerically investigates 2×2 games involving the Prisoner's Dilemma, Chicken, Hero, Leader, Stag Hunt, and Trivial Games in which agents have a strategy expressed by five-bit, two-memory length. Our motivation is to explore how grouping for game interaction and strategy adaptation influence ST reciprocity and R reciprocity (Tanimoto and Sagara, 2007a [Tanimoto, J., Sagara, H., 2007a. A study on emergence of coordinated alternating reciprocity in a 2×2 game with 2-memory length strategy. Biosystems 90(3), 728-737]. Enhanced R reciprocity is observed with the stronger grouping for game interaction when a relatively stronger grouping for strategy adaptation is assumed. On the other hand, enhanced ST reciprocity emerged with the stronger grouping for strategy adaptation when the relatively weaker grouping for game interaction is imposed. Our numerical experiment deals with those two groupings independently and dependently. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed…

  10. Relationship of biomedical science content acquisition performance to students' level of PBL group interaction: are students learning during PBL group?

    PubMed

    Romito, Laura M; Eckert, George J

    2011-05-01

    This study assessed biomedical science content acquisition from problem-based learning (PBL) and its relationship to students' level of group interaction. We hypothesized that learning in preparation for exams results primarily from individual study of post-case learning objectives and that outcomes would be unrelated to students' group involvement. During dental curricular years 1 and 2, student-generated biomedical learning issues (LIs) were identified from six randomly chosen PBL cases. Knowledge and application of case concepts were assessed with quizzes based on the identified LIs prior to dissemination of the learning objectives. Students and facilitators were surveyed on students' level of group involvement for the assessed LI topics. Year 1 students had significantly higher assessment scores (p=0.0001). For both student classes, means were significantly higher for the recall item (Q1) than for the application item (Q2). Q1 scores increased along with the student's reported role for Year 1 (p=0.04). However, there was no relationship between the student's reported role and Q1 for Year 2 (p=0.20). There was no relationship between the student's reported role and Q2 for Year 1 (p=0.09) or Year 2 (p=0.19). This suggests that students' level of group involvement on the biomedical learning issues did not significantly impact students' assessment performance.

  11. Kohn's theorem, Larmor's equivalence principle and the Newton-Hooke group

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, G.W., E-mail: gwg1@amtp.cam.ac.uk; Pope, C.N.; George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > We show that non-relativistic electrons moving in a magnetic field with trapping potential admits as relativity group the Newton-Hooke group. > We use this fact to give a group theoretic interpretation of Kohn's theorem and to obtain the spectrum. > We obtain the lightlike lift of the system exhibiting showing it coincides with the Nappi-Witten spacetime. - Abstract: We consider non-relativistic electrons, each of the same charge to mass ratio, moving in an external magnetic field with an interaction potential depending only on the mutual separations, possibly confined by a harmonic trapping potential. We show that the systemmore » admits a 'relativity group' which is a one-parameter family of deformations of the standard Galilei group to the Newton-Hooke group which is a Wigner-Inoenue contraction of the de Sitter group. This allows a group-theoretic interpretation of Kohn's theorem and related results. Larmor's theorem is used to show that the one-parameter family of deformations are all isomorphic. We study the 'Eisenhart' or 'lightlike' lift of the system, exhibiting it as a pp-wave. In the planar case, the Eisenhart lift is the Brdicka-Eardley-Nappi-Witten pp-wave solution of Einstein-Maxwell theory, which may also be regarded as a bi-invariant metric on the Cangemi-Jackiw group.« less

  12. Interaction Junk: User Interaction-Based Evaluation of Visual Analytic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Endert, Alexander; North, Chris

    2012-10-14

    With the growing need for visualization to aid users in understanding large, complex datasets, the ability for users to interact and explore these datasets is critical. As visual analytic systems have advanced to leverage powerful computational models and data analytics capabilities, the modes by which users engage and interact with the information are limited. Often, users are taxed with directly manipulating parameters of these models through traditional GUIs (e.g., using sliders to directly manipulate the value of a parameter). However, the purpose of user interaction in visual analytic systems is to enable visual data exploration – where users can focusmore » on their task, as opposed to the tool or system. As a result, users can engage freely in data exploration and decision-making, for the purpose of gaining insight. In this position paper, we discuss how evaluating visual analytic systems can be approached through user interaction analysis, where the goal is to minimize the cognitive translation between the visual metaphor and the mode of interaction (i.e., reducing the “Interactionjunk”). We motivate this concept through a discussion of traditional GUIs used in visual analytics for direct manipulation of model parameters, and the importance of designing interactions the support visual data exploration.« less

  13. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2014-10-29

    Here we present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  14. California Fault Parameters for the National Seismic Hazard Maps and Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wills, Chris J.; Weldon, Ray J.; Bryant, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes development of fault parameters for the 2007 update of the National Seismic Hazard Maps and the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP, 2007). These reference parameters are contained within a database intended to be a source of values for use by scientists interested in producing either seismic hazard or deformation models to better understand the current seismic hazards in California. These parameters include descriptions of the geometry and rates of movements of faults throughout the state. These values are intended to provide a starting point for development of more sophisticated deformation models which include known rates of movement on faults as well as geodetic measurements of crustal movement and the rates of movements of the tectonic plates. The values will be used in developing the next generation of the time-independent National Seismic Hazard Maps, and the time-dependant seismic hazard calculations being developed for the WGCEP. Due to the multiple uses of this information, development of these parameters has been coordinated between USGS, CGS and SCEC. SCEC provided the database development and editing tools, in consultation with USGS, Golden. This database has been implemented in Oracle and supports electronic access (e.g., for on-the-fly access). A GUI-based application has also been developed to aid in populating the database. Both the continually updated 'living' version of this database, as well as any locked-down official releases (e.g., used in a published model for calculating earthquake probabilities or seismic shaking hazards) are part of the USGS Quaternary Fault and Fold Database http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/qfaults/ . CGS has been primarily responsible for updating and editing of the fault parameters, with extensive input from USGS and SCEC scientists.

  15. Ultrasonic studies of intermolecular interactions in binary mixtures of 4-methoxy benzoin with various solvents: Excess molar functions of ultrasonic parameters at different concentrations and in different solvents.

    PubMed

    Thanuja, B; Nithya, G; Kanagam, Charles C

    2012-11-01

    Density (ρ), ultrasonic velocity (U), for the binary mixtures of 4-methoxy benzoin (4MB) with ethanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, benzene, and di-oxane were measured at 298K. The solute-solvent interactions and the effect of the polarity of the solvent on the type of intermolecular interactions are discussed here. From the above data, adiabatic compressibility (β), intermolecular free length (L(f)), acoustic impedance (Z), apparent molar volume (Ø), relative association (RA) have been calculated. Other useful parameters such as excess density, excess velocity and excess adiabatic compressibility have also been calculated. These parameters were used to study the nature and extent of intermolecular interactions between component molecules in the binary mixtures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Petrographic maturity parameters of a Devonian shale maturation series, Appalachian Basin, USA. ICCP Thermal Indices Working Group interlaboratory exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Araujo, Carla Viviane; Borrego, Angeles G.; Cardott, Brian; das Chagas, Renata Brenand A.; Flores, Deolinda; Goncalves, Paula; Hackley, Paul C.; Hower, James C.; Kern, Marcio Luciano; Kus, Jolanta; Mastalerz, Maria; Filho, João Graciano Mendonça; de Oliveira Mendonça, Joalice; Rego Menezes, Taissa; Newman, Jane; Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel; Sobrinho da Silva, Frederico; Viegas de Souza, Igor

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results of an interlaboratory exercise on organic matter optical maturity parameters using a natural maturation series comprised by three Devonian shale samples (Huron Member, Ohio Shale) from the Appalachian Basin, USA. This work was conducted by the Thermal Indices Working Group of the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology (ICCP) Commission II (Geological Applications of Organic Petrology). This study aimed to compare: 1. maturation predicted by different types of petrographic parameters (vitrinite reflectance and spectral fluorescence of telalginite), 2. reproducibility of the results for these maturation parameters obtained by different laboratories, and 3. improvements in the spectral fluorescence measurement obtained using modern detection systems in comparison with the results from historical round robin exercises.Mean random vitrinite reflectance measurements presented the highest level of reproducibility (group standard deviation 0.05) for low maturity and reproducibility diminished with increasing maturation (group standard deviation 0.12).Corrected fluorescence spectra, provided by 14 participants, showed a fair to good correspondence. Standard deviation of the mean values for spectral parameters was lowest for the low maturity sample but was also fairly low for higher maturity samples.A significant improvement in the reproducibility of corrected spectral fluorescence curves was obtained in the current exercise compared to a previous investigation of Toarcian organic matter spectra in a maturation series from the Paris Basin. This improvement is demonstrated by lower values of standard deviation and is interpreted to reflect better performance of newer photo-optical measuring systems.Fluorescence parameters measured here are in good agreement with vitrinite reflectance values for the least mature shale but indicate higher maturity than shown by vitrinite reflectance for the two more mature shales. This red shift in

  17. Measuring treatment process in cognitive-behavioral and interactional group therapies for adolescent substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Y; Blitz, C; Burleson, J A; Kadden, R M; Rounsaville, B J

    1998-07-01

    The state of the art for treatment efficacy studies now requires manual guided treatments and tests of therapist adherence. This report provides findings regarding adherence assessment of therapists participating in an investigation of treatment matching in adolescent substance abusers. The Group Sessions Rating Scale (GSRS), a group-therapy process measure, was studied to determine its appropriateness for assessing group treatment of adolescents with a) substance use disorders (SUD), b) interrater reliability, c) internal consistency, and d) ability to discriminate the active ingredients of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) from interactional therapy (IT). Interrater reliabilities were moderate to high, with those for CBT generally higher than those for IT. Internal consistency of CBT items was moderate, whereas those of IT were moderately high. Discriminability between the two treatment modalities was high. The frequency of active ingredients was generally therapy-specific: high for the relevant and low for the nonrelevant therapeutic modality items. The GSRS was found to be effective in the measurement of treatment process in adolescents with SUD.

  18. Interaction of bovine serum albumin with N-acyl amino acid based anionic surfactants: Effect of head-group hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Dey, Joykrishna

    2015-11-15

    The function of a protein depends upon its structure and surfactant molecules are known to alter protein structure. For this reason protein-surfactant interaction is important in biological, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. In the present work, interactions of a series of anionic surfactants having the same hydrocarbon chain length, but different amino acid head group, such as l-alanine, l-valine, l-leucine, and l-phenylalanine with the transport protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), were studied at low surfactant concentrations using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The results of fluorescence measurements suggest that the surfactant molecules bind simultaneously to the drug binding site I and II of the protein subdomain IIA and IIIA, respectively. The fluorescence as well as CD spectra suggest that the conformation of BSA goes to a more structured state upon surfactant binding at low concentrations. The binding constants of the surfactants were determined by the use of fluorescence as well as ITC measurements and were compared with that of the corresponding glycine-derived surfactant. The binding constant values clearly indicate a significant head-group effect on the BSA-surfactant interaction and the interaction is mainly hydrophobic in nature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Who Is the Competent Physics Student? A Study of Students' Positions and Social Interaction in Small-Group Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Due, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students.…

  20. Interaction between alkaline earth cations and oxo-ligands. DFT study of the affinity of the Ca2+ cation for carbonyl ligands.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Leonardo Moreira; Carneiro, José Walkimar de Mesquita; Romeiro, Gilberto Alves; Paes, Lilian Weitzel Coelho

    2011-02-01

    The affinity of the Ca(2+) ion for a set of substituted carbonyl ligands was analyzed with both the DFT (B3LYP/6-31+G(d)) and semi-empirical (PM6) methods. Two types of ligands were studied: a set of monosubstituted [O=CH(R)] and a set of disubstituted ligands [O=C(R)(2)] (R=H, F, Cl, Br, OH, OCH(3), CH(3), CN, NH(2) and NO(2)), with R either directly bound to the carbonyl carbon atom or to the para position of a phenyl ring. The interaction energy was calculated to quantify the affinity of the Ca(2+) cation for the ligands. Geometric and electronic parameters were correlated with the intensity of the metal-ligand interaction. The electronic nature of the substituent is the main parameter that determines the interaction energy. Donor groups make the interaction energy more negative (stabilizing the complex formed), while acceptor groups make the interaction energy less negative (destabilizing the complex formed).

  1. [Longitudinal analysis of nutrition parameters in a cohort of elderly people with and without dementia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Viadero, Carlos; Peña Sarabia, Nicolás; Jiménez-Sanz, Magdalena; Ordóñez-González, Javier; Verduga Vélez, Rosario; Crespo Santiago, Dámaso

    2016-01-01

    It is important to assess longitudinal nutritional parameters during the ageing process in order to determine body composition changes. This procedure is more relevant when dealing with institutionalised geriatric patients suffering from cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to assess the interactions, if any, between mental status and several nutritional parameters in a cohort of elderly people. A longitudinal prospective two years follow-up evaluation was performed on 301 elderly residents (233 females and 68 males) in a nursing home, of whom 51 of them fulfilled the clinical criteria for dementia. Both anthropometric and biochemical parameters were obtained annually, according to standard procedures. The dementia group had lower values when compared to the non-dementia group. Furthermore, nutritional values remained constant in the group with cognitive impairment (no significant differences were observed throughout the study period). BMI 24.5±4.9 vs 24.2±4.1; tricipital skinfold 15.0±6.0 vs 14.7±6.9; brachial circumference 25.9±3.3 vs 25.7±3.5, and albumin 3.7±0.3 vs 3.7±0.3. At the end of the study, the group without cognitive impairment showed lower values in all the parameters analysed when compared to the baseline ones, except for bicipital fold and plasma triglycerides. Our study shows that there are no variations in the elderly with cognitive impairment, as regards the nutritional, anthropometric and biochemist parameters analysed. On the contrary, the group with normal cognitive status showed a reduction in most of the parameters. Further studies analysing larger populations of elderly people and over longer periods of time will provide more information to improve our knowledge on this important issue. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Polycomb purification by in vivo biotinylation tagging reveals cohesin and Trithorax group proteins as interaction partners

    PubMed Central

    Strübbe, Gero; Popp, Christian; Schmidt, Alexander; Pauli, Andrea; Ringrose, Leonie; Beisel, Christian; Paro, Renato

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of specific gene expression patterns during cellular proliferation is crucial for the identity of every cell type and the development of tissues in multicellular organisms. Such a cellular memory function is conveyed by the complex interplay of the Polycomb and Trithorax groups of proteins (PcG/TrxG). These proteins exert their function at the level of chromatin by establishing and maintaining repressed (PcG) and active (TrxG) chromatin domains. Past studies indicated that a core PcG protein complex is potentially associated with cell type or even cell stage-specific sets of accessory proteins. In order to better understand the dynamic aspects underlying PcG composition and function we have established an inducible version of the biotinylation tagging approach to purify Polycomb and associated factors from Drosophila embryos. This system enabled fast and efficient isolation of Polycomb containing complexes under near physiological conditions, thereby preserving substoichiometric interactions. Novel interacting proteins were identified by highly sensitive mass spectrometric analysis. We found many TrxG related proteins, suggesting a previously unrecognized extent of molecular interaction of the two counteracting chromatin regulatory protein groups. Furthermore, our analysis revealed an association of PcG protein complexes with the cohesin complex and showed that Polycomb-dependent silencing of a transgenic reporter depends on cohesin function. PMID:21415365

  3. Molecular interactions in nanocellulose assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu

    2017-12-01

    The contribution of hydrogen bonds and the London dispersion force in the cohesion of cellulose is discussed in the light of the structure, spectroscopic data, empirical molecular-modelling parameters and thermodynamics data of analogue molecules. The hydrogen bond of cellulose is mainly electrostatic, and the stabilization energy in cellulose for each hydrogen bond is estimated to be between 17 and 30 kJ mol-1. On average, hydroxyl groups of cellulose form hydrogen bonds comparable to those of other simple alcohols. The London dispersion interaction may be estimated from empirical attraction terms in molecular modelling by simple integration over all components. Although this interaction extends to relatively large distances in colloidal systems, the short-range interaction is dominant for the cohesion of cellulose and is equivalent to a compression of 3 GPa. Trends of heat of vaporization of alkyl alcohols and alkanes suggests a stabilization by such hydroxyl group hydrogen bonding to be of the order of 24 kJ mol-1, whereas the London dispersion force contributes about 0.41 kJ mol-1 Da-1. The simple arithmetic sum of the energy is consistent with the experimental enthalpy of sublimation of small sugars, where the main part of the cohesive energy comes from hydrogen bonds. For cellulose, because of the reduced number of hydroxyl groups, the London dispersion force provides the main contribution to intermolecular cohesion. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `New horizons for cellulose nanotechnology'.

  4. Does the medium matter? The interaction of task type and technology on group performance and member reactions.

    PubMed

    Straus, S G; McGrath, J E

    1994-02-01

    The authors investigated the hypothesis that as group tasks pose greater requirements for member interdependence, communication media that transmit more social context cues will foster group performance and satisfaction. Seventy-two 3-person groups of undergraduate students worked in either computer-mediated or face-to-face meetings on 3 tasks with increasing levels of interdependence: an idea-generation task, an intellective task, and a judgment task. Results showed few differences between computer-mediated and face-to-face groups in the quality of the work completed but large differences in productivity favoring face-to-face groups. Analysis of productivity and of members' reactions supported the predicted interaction of tasks and media, with greater discrepancies between media conditions for tasks requiring higher levels of coordination. Results are discussed in terms of the implications of using computer-mediated communications systems for group work.

  5. Student use of a Learning Management System for group projects: A case study investigating interaction, collaboration, and knowledge construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonn, Steven D.

    Web-based Learning Management Systems (LMS) allow instructors and students to share instructional materials, make class announcements, submit and return course assignments, and communicate with each other online. Previous LMS-related research has focused on how these systems deliver and manage instructional content with little concern for how students' constructivist learning can be encouraged and facilitated. This study investigated how students use LMS to interact, collaborate, and construct knowledge within the context of a group project but without mediation by the instructor. The setting for this case study was students' use in one upper-level biology course of the local LMS within the context of a course-related group project, a mock National Institutes of Health grant proposal. Twenty-one groups (82 students) voluntarily elected to use the LMS, representing two-thirds of all students in the course. Students' peer-to-peer messages within the LMS, event logs, online surveys, focus group interviews, and instructor interviews were used in order to answer the study's overarching research question. The results indicate that students successfully used the LMS to interact and, to a significant extent, collaborate, but there was very little evidence of knowledge construction using the LMS technology. It is possible that the ease and availability of face-to-face meetings as well as problems and limitations with the technology were factors that influenced whether students' online basic interaction could be further distinguished as collaboration or knowledge construction. Despite these limitations, students found several tools and functions of the LMS useful for their online peer interaction and completion of their course project. Additionally, LMS designers and implementers are urged to consider previous literature on computer-supported collaborative learning environments in order to better facilitate independent group projects within these systems. Further research is

  6. [Frankfurt group social communication and interaction skills training for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders].

    PubMed

    Herbrecht, Evelyn; Poustka, Fritz

    2007-01-01

    Despite the recognition of the need for group-based training programmes for children and adolescents with autistic disorders, there are only very few specific German-speaking training programmes available. Since 2003, a structured group training programme on social skills for children and adolescents with high-functioning autism or Asperger syndrome has been developed and conducted at our department. The training programme focuses on the main deficits of those disorders. Thus, the primary goal is to improve communication and interaction skills. Participants are children and adolescents without significant cognitive and language delays. Principles of intervention include structured formats, combination of theoretical and practical elements, predictable rules, consideration of individual difficulties, and sequential and progressive learning. Techniques range from structured games, the training of affect recognition, group activities, role play, team discussions, and feedback to homework using a newly designed manual on our group-based social skill training programme and curriculum. Generally, three groups of 5-7 participants each and of different age range (children, adolescents) meet weekly/biweekly for 1-1.5 hours (excluding the holidays). Two trainers--who change during the programme--carry out each of the sessions. Trainers meet regularly with the parents to discuss experiences and to provide details of the programme. Acceptance by and satisfaction with the programme are high among participants, as is the mutual recognition of and tolerance of their respective problems. Both feedback from parents and trainers' clinical impressions indicate distinct improvement of verbalization and contact abilities. Participants seem to benefit particularly from role play. Qualtitative measures (impressions of the participants, their parents and their trainers with regard to change in behaviour skills) suggest mounting interaction, communication, and problem-solving skills during

  7. Parameter estimating state reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Parameter estimation is considered for systems whose entire state cannot be measured. Linear observers are designed to recover the unmeasured states to a sufficient accuracy to permit the estimation process. There are three distinct dynamics that must be accommodated in the system design: the dynamics of the plant, the dynamics of the observer, and the system updating of the parameter estimation. The latter two are designed to minimize interaction of the involved systems. These techniques are extended to weakly nonlinear systems. The application to a simulation of a space shuttle POGO system test is of particular interest. A nonlinear simulation of the system is developed, observers designed, and the parameters estimated.

  8. A modified Leslie-Gower predator-prey interaction model and parameter identifiability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Jai Prakash; Meghwani, Suraj S.; Thakur, Manoj; Abbas, Syed

    2018-01-01

    In this work, bifurcation and a systematic approach for estimation of identifiable parameters of a modified Leslie-Gower predator-prey system with Crowley-Martin functional response and prey refuge is discussed. Global asymptotic stability is discussed by applying fluctuation lemma. The system undergoes into Hopf bifurcation with respect to parameters intrinsic growth rate of predators (s) and prey reserve (m). The stability of Hopf bifurcation is also discussed by calculating Lyapunov number. The sensitivity analysis of the considered model system with respect to all variables is performed which also supports our theoretical study. To estimate the unknown parameter from the data, an optimization procedure (pseudo-random search algorithm) is adopted. System responses and phase plots for estimated parameters are also compared with true noise free data. It is found that the system dynamics with true set of parametric values is similar to the estimated parametric values. Numerical simulations are presented to substantiate the analytical findings.

  9. EvOligo: A Novel Software to Design and Group Libraries of Oligonucleotides Applicable for Nucleic Acid-Based Experiments.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Marek C; Kamel, Karol; Kurzynska-Kokorniak, Anna; Chmielewski, Marcin K; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2017-10-01

    Experimental methods based on DNA and RNA hybridization, such as multiplex polymerase chain reaction, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, or microarray analysis, require the use of mixtures of multiple oligonucleotides (primers or probes) in a single test tube. To provide an optimal reaction environment, minimal self- and cross-hybridization must be achieved among these oligonucleotides. To address this problem, we developed EvOligo, which is a software package that provides the means to design and group DNA and RNA molecules with defined lengths. EvOligo combines two modules. The first module performs oligonucleotide design, and the second module performs oligonucleotide grouping. The software applies a nearest-neighbor model of nucleic acid interactions coupled with a parallel evolutionary algorithm to construct individual oligonucleotides, and to group the molecules that are characterized by the weakest possible cross-interactions. To provide optimal solutions, the evolutionary algorithm sorts oligonucleotides into sets, preserves preselected parts of the oligonucleotides, and shapes their remaining parts. In addition, the oligonucleotide sets can be designed and grouped based on their melting temperatures. For the user's convenience, EvOligo is provided with a user-friendly graphical interface. EvOligo was used to design individual oligonucleotides, oligonucleotide pairs, and groups of oligonucleotide pairs that are characterized by the following parameters: (1) weaker cross-interactions between the non-complementary oligonucleotides and (2) more uniform ranges of the oligonucleotide pair melting temperatures than other available software products. In addition, in contrast to other grouping algorithms, EvOligo offers time-efficient sorting of paired and unpaired oligonucleotides based on various parameters defined by the user.

  10. Planning Robot-Control Parameters With Qualitative Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    Qualitative-reasoning planning algorithm helps to determine quantitative parameters controlling motion of robot. Algorithm regarded as performing search in multidimensional space of control parameters from starting point to goal region in which desired result of robotic manipulation achieved. Makes use of directed graph representing qualitative physical equations describing task, and interacts, at each sampling period, with history of quantitative control parameters and sensory data, to narrow search for reliable values of quantitative control parameters.

  11. Structure of p-shell nuclei using three-nucleon interactions evolved with the similarity renormalization group

    DOE PAGES

    Jurgenson, E. D.; Maris, P.; Furnstahl, R. J.; ...

    2013-05-13

    The similarity renormalization group (SRG) is used to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear structure calculations by decoupling low- and high-energy Hamiltonian matrix elements. The substantial contribution of both initial and SRG-induced three-nucleon forces requires their consistent evolution in a three-particle basis space before applying them to larger nuclei. While, in principle, the evolved Hamiltonians are unitarily equivalent, in practice the need for basis truncation introduces deviations, which must be monitored. Here we present benchmark no-core full configuration calculations with SRG-evolved interactions in p-shell nuclei over a wide range of softening. As a result, these calculations are used to assessmore » convergence properties, extrapolation techniques, and the dependence of energies, including four-body contributions, on the SRG resolution scale.« less

  12. Between-group competition elicits within-group cooperation in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majolo, Bonaventura; Maréchal, Laëtitia

    2017-02-01

    Aggressive interactions between groups are frequent in human societies and can bear significant fitness costs and benefits (e.g. death or access to resources). During between-group competitive interactions, more cohesive groups (i.e. groups formed by individuals who cooperate in group defence) should out-perform less cohesive groups, other factors being equal (e.g. group size). The cost/benefit of between-group competition are thought to have driven correlated evolution of traits that favour between-group aggression and within-group cooperation (e.g. parochial altruism). Our aim was to analyse whether the proximate relationship between between-group competition and within-group cooperation is found in 3-10 years old children and the developmental trajectory of such a relationship. We used a large cohort of children (n = 120) and tested whether simulated between-group competition increased within-group cooperation (i.e. how much of a resource children were giving to their group companions) in two experiments. We found greater within-group cooperation when groups of four children were competing with other groups then in the control condition (no between-group competition). Within-group cooperation increased with age. Our study suggests that parochial altruism and in-group/out-group biases emerge early during the course of human development.

  13. Between-group competition elicits within-group cooperation in children

    PubMed Central

    Majolo, Bonaventura; Maréchal, Laëtitia

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive interactions between groups are frequent in human societies and can bear significant fitness costs and benefits (e.g. death or access to resources). During between-group competitive interactions, more cohesive groups (i.e. groups formed by individuals who cooperate in group defence) should out-perform less cohesive groups, other factors being equal (e.g. group size). The cost/benefit of between-group competition are thought to have driven correlated evolution of traits that favour between-group aggression and within-group cooperation (e.g. parochial altruism). Our aim was to analyse whether the proximate relationship between between-group competition and within-group cooperation is found in 3–10 years old children and the developmental trajectory of such a relationship. We used a large cohort of children (n = 120) and tested whether simulated between-group competition increased within-group cooperation (i.e. how much of a resource children were giving to their group companions) in two experiments. We found greater within-group cooperation when groups of four children were competing with other groups then in the control condition (no between-group competition). Within-group cooperation increased with age. Our study suggests that parochial altruism and in-group/out-group biases emerge early during the course of human development. PMID:28233820

  14. Student perceptions of gamified audience response system interactions in large group lectures and via lecture capture technology.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Robin K; McCoy, Lise; Kinney, Marjorie; Schwartz, Frederic N

    2015-05-22

    Higher education students have positive attitudes about the use of audience response systems (ARS), but even technology-enhanced lessons can become tiresome if the pedagogical approach is exactly the same with each implementation. Gamification is the notion that gaming mechanics can be applied to routine activities. In this study, TurningPoint (TP) ARS interactions were gamified and implemented in 22 large group medical microbiology lectures throughout an integrated year 1 osteopathic medical school curriculum. A 32-item questionnaire was used to measure students' perceptions of the gamified TP interactions at the end of their first year. The survey instrument generated both Likert scale and open-ended response data that addressed game design and variety, engagement and learning features, use of TP questions after class, and any value of lecture capture technology for reviewing these interactive presentations. The Chi Square Test was used to analyze grouped responses to Likert scale questions. Responses to open-ended prompts were categorized using open-coding. Ninety-one students out of 106 (86 %) responded to the survey. A significant majority of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the games were engaging, and an effective learning tool. The questionnaire investigated the degree to which specific features of these interactions were engaging (nine items) and promoted learning (seven items). The most highly ranked engagement aspects were peer competition and focus on the activity (tied for highest ranking), and the most highly ranked learning aspect was applying theoretical knowledge to clinical scenarios. Another notable item was the variety of interactions, which ranked in the top three in both the engagement and learning categories. Open-ended comments shed light on how students use TP questions for exam preparation, and revealed engaging and non-engaging attributes of these interactive sessions for students who review them via lecture capture

  15. The Interaction between Group Processes and Personal Professional Trajectories in a Professional Development Community for Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadar, Linor L.; Brody, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the interaction between transformative processes in which a group of teacher educators became a professional development community (PDC) and the individual progress of these instructors through the professional development course on the topic of thinking education. Twelve teacher educators who participated in one of three…

  16. Time-dependent spectral analysis of interactions within groups of walking pedestrians and vertical structural motion using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocian, M.; Brownjohn, J. M. W.; Racic, V.; Hester, D.; Quattrone, A.; Gilbert, L.; Beasley, R.

    2018-05-01

    A multi-scale and multi-object interaction phenomena can arise when a group of walking pedestrians crosses a structure capable of exhibiting dynamic response. This is because each pedestrian is an autonomous dynamic system capable of displaying intricate behaviour affected by social, psychological, biomechanical and environmental factors, including adaptations to the structural motion. Despite a wealth of mathematical models attempting to describe and simulate coupled crowd-structure system, their applicability can generally be considered uncertain. This can be assigned to a number of assumptions made in their development and the scarcity or unavailability of data suitable for their validation, in particular those associated with pedestrian-pedestrian and pedestrian-structure interaction. To alleviate this problem, data on behaviour of individual pedestrians within groups of six walkers with different spatial arrangements are gathered simultaneously with data on dynamic structural response of a footbridge, from a series of measurements utilising wireless motion monitors. Unlike in previous studies on coordination of pedestrian behaviour, the collected data can serve as a proxy for pedestrian vertical force, which is of critical importance from the point of view of structural stability. A bivariate analysis framework is proposed and applied to these data, encompassing wavelet transform, synchronisation measures based on Shannon entropy and circular statistics. A topological pedestrian map is contrived showing the strength and directionality of between-subjects interactions. It is found that the coordination in pedestrians' vertical force depends on the spatial collocation within a group, but it is generally weak. The relationship between the bridge and pedestrian behaviour is also analysed, revealing stronger propensity for pedestrians to coordinate their force with the structural motion rather than with each other.

  17. Photometric Analysis and Physical Parameters for Six Mars-crossing and Ten Main-belt Asteroids from APT Observatory Group: 2017 April- September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aznar Macias, Amadeo; Cornea, R.; Suciu, O.

    2018-01-01

    Lightcurves of six Mars-crossing and eight main-belt asteroids were obtained at APT-Observatory Group from 2017 April to September. In addition, two more asteroids were captured in 2014 and 2015 during the EURONEAR project. Analysis of rotation period, lightcurve amplitude, and physical parameters (size and axis size relationship) are presented.

  18. WWC Quick Review of the Article "Culture and the Interaction of Student Ethnicity with Reward Structure in Group Learning" Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an updated WWC (What Works Clearinghouse) Review of the Article "Culture and the Interaction of Student Ethnicity with Reward Structure in Group Learning". The study examined the effects of different reward systems used in group learning situations on the math skills of African-American and White students. The…

  19. Modeling Group Interactions via Open Data Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-30

    data. The state-of-art search engines are designed to help general query-specific search and not suitable for finding disconnected online groups. The...groups, (2) developing innovative mathematical and statistical models and efficient algorithms that leverage existing search engines and employ

  20. Compact configurations within small evolving groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamon, G. A.

    Small virialized groups of galaxies are evolved with a gravitational N-body code, where the galaxies and a diffuse background are treated as single particles, but with mass and luminosity profiles attached, which enbles the estimation of parameters such as internal energies, half-mass radii, and the softened potential energies of interaction. The numerical treatment includes mergers, collisional stripping, tidal limitation by the mean-field of the background (evaluated using a combination of instantaneous and impulsive formulations), galaxy heating from collisons, and background heating from dynamical friction. The groups start out either as dense as appear the groups in Hickson's (1982) catalog, or as loose as appear those in Turner and Gott's (1976a) catalog, and they are simulated many times (usually 20) with different initial positions and velocities. Dense groups of galaxies with massive dark haloes coalesce into a single galaxy and lose their compact group appearance in approximately 3 group half-mass crossing times, while dense groups of galaxies without massive haloes survive the merger instability for 15 half-mass crossing times (in a more massive background to keep the same total group mass).

  1. Renormalization of Coulomb interactions in a system of two-dimensional tilted Dirac fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yu-Wen; Lee, Yu-Li

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the effects of long-ranged Coulomb interactions in a tilted Dirac semimetal in two dimensions by using the perturbative renormalization-group (RG) method. Depending on the magnitude of the tilting parameter, the undoped system can have either Fermi points (type I) or Fermi lines (type II). Previous studies usually performed the renormalization-group transformations by integrating out the modes with large momenta. This is problematic when the Fermi surface is open, like type-II Dirac fermions. In this work we study the effects of Coulomb interactions, following the spirit of Shankar [Rev. Mod. Phys. 66, 129 (1994), 10.1103/RevModPhys.66.129], by introducing a cutoff in the energy scale around the Fermi surface and integrating out the high-energy modes. For type-I Dirac fermions, our result is consistent with that of the previous work. On the other hand, we find that for type-II Dirac fermions, the magnitude of the tilting parameter increases monotonically with lowering energies. This implies the stability of type-II Dirac fermions in the presence of Coulomb interactions, in contrast with previous results. Furthermore, for type-II Dirac fermions, the velocities in different directions acquire different renormalization even if they have the same bare values. By taking into account the renormalization of the tilting parameter and the velocities due to the Coulomb interactions, we show that while the presence of a charged impurity leads only to charge redistribution around the impurity for type-I Dirac fermions, for type-II Dirac fermions, the impurity charge is completely screened, albeit with a very long screening length. The latter indicates that the temperature dependence of physical observables are essentially determined by the RG equations we derived. We illustrate this by calculating the temperature dependence of the compressibility and specific heat of the interacting tilted Dirac fermions.

  2. Analysis of the interaction mode between hyperthermophilic archaeal group II chaperonin and prefoldin using a platform of chaperonin oligomers of various subunit arrangements.

    PubMed

    Sahlan, Muhamad; Kanzaki, Taro; Zako, Tamotsu; Maeda, Mizuo; Yohda, Masafumi

    2010-09-01

    Prefoldin is a co-chaperone that captures an unfolded protein substrate and transfers it to the group II chaperonin for completion of protein folding. Group II chaperonin of a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus strain KS-1, interacts and cooperates with archaeal prefoldins. Although the interaction sites within chaperonin and prefoldin have been analyzed, the binding mode between jellyfish-like hexameric prefoldin and the double octameric ring group II chaperonin remains unclear. As prefoldin binds the chaperonin beta subunit more strongly than the alpha subunit, we analyzed the binding mode between prefoldin and chaperonin in the context of Thermococcus group II chaperonin complexes of various subunit compositions and arrangements. The oligomers exhibited various affinities for prefoldins according to the number and order of subunits. Binding affinity increased with the number of Cpnbeta subunits. Interestingly, chaperonin complexes containing two beta subunits adjacently exhibited stronger affinities than other chaperonin complexes containing the same number of beta subunits. The result suggests that all four beta tentacles of prefoldin interact with the helical protrusions of CPN in the PFD-CPN complex as the previously proposed model that two adjacent PFD beta subunits seem to interact with two CPN adjacent subunits. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Phase Behavior of Pyrene and Vinyl Polymers with Aromatic Side Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Kangovi, Gagan N.; Lee, Sangwoo

    The phase behavior and thermodynamic properties of mixtures of pyrene and model vinyl polymers with and without aromatic side groups are investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The melting temperature and associated heat of melting of the pyrene crystals in the mixtures are utilized to extract the effective interaction parameters χ and the composition of polymer-rich phases, respectively. The χ of pyrene mixed with polymers with aromatic side groups investigated in this study, polystyrene, poly(2-vinylpyridine), and poly(3-vinylanisole), is less than 0.5 at the melting point of the pyrene crystals, suggesting that pyrene and the polymers with aromatic sides groupsmore » are enthalpically compatible, likely due to aromatic π–π interactions. In contrast, the χ of pyrene mixed with poly(1,4-isoprene) or poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) is larger than 0.5. The DSC measurements also enable characterization of the composition of polymer-rich phases. Interestingly, the polymers with aromatic side groups are found to have more pronounced miscibility with pyrene at symmetric compositions.« less

  4. The assessment of body sway and the choice of the stability parameter(s).

    PubMed

    Raymakers, J A; Samson, M M; Verhaar, H J J

    2005-01-01

    This methodological study aims at comparison of the practical usefulness of several parameters of body sway derived from recordings of the center of pressure (CoP) with the aid of a static force platform as proposed in the literature. These included: mean displacement velocity, maximal range of movement along x- and y-co-ordinates, movement area, planar deviation, phase plane parameter of Riley and the parameters of the diffusion stabilogram according to Collins. They were compared in over 850 experiments in a group of young healthy subjects (n = 10, age 21-45 years), a group of elderly healthy (n = 38, age 61-78 years) and two groups of elderly subjects (n = 10 and n = 21, age 65-89 years) with stability problems under different conditions known to interfere with stability as compared to standing with open eyes fixing a visual anchoring point: closing the eyes, standing on plastic foam in stead of a firm surface and performing a cognitive task: the modified stroop test. A force platform (Kistler) was used and co-ordinates of the body's center of pressure were recorded during 60 s of quiet barefoot standing with a sampling frequency of 10 Hz. In general, the results show important overlapping among groups and test conditions. Mean displacement velocity shows the most consistent differences between test situations, health conditions and age ranges, but is not affected by an extra cognitive task in healthy old people. Mean maximal sideways sway range is different among groups and test conditions except for the cognitive task in young and elderly subjects. Standardised displacement parameters such as standard deviations of displacements and planar deviation discriminate less well than the actual range of motion or the velocity. The critical time interval derived from the diffusion stabilogram according to Collins et al. seems to add a specific type of information since it shows significant influence from addition of a cognitive task in old subjects standing on a firm

  5. Emergence of Fairness in Repeated Group Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Segbroeck, S.; Pacheco, J. M.; Lenaerts, T.; Santos, F. C.

    2012-04-01

    Often groups need to meet repeatedly before a decision is reached. Hence, most individual decisions will be contingent on decisions taken previously by others. In particular, the decision to cooperate or not will depend on one’s own assessment of what constitutes a fair group outcome. Making use of a repeated N-person prisoner’s dilemma, we show that reciprocation towards groups opens a window of opportunity for cooperation to thrive, leading populations to engage in dynamics involving both coordination and coexistence, and characterized by cycles of cooperation and defection. Furthermore, we show that this process leads to the emergence of fairness, whose level will depend on the dilemma at stake.

  6. Attending to Communication and Patterns of Interaction: Culturally Sensitive Mental Health Care for Groups of Urban, Ethnically Diverse, Impoverished, and Underserved Women.

    PubMed

    Molewyk Doornbos, Mary; Zandee, Gail Landheer; DeGroot, Joleen

    2014-07-01

    The United States is ethnically diverse. This diversity presents challenges to nurses, who, without empirical evidence to design culturally congruent interventions, may contribute to mental health care disparities. Using Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality, this study documented communication and interaction patterns of ethnically diverse, urban, impoverished, and underserved women. Using a community-based participatory research framework, 61 Black, Hispanic, and White women participated in focus groups around their experiences with anxiety/depression. Researchers recorded verbal communication, nonverbal behavior, and patterns of interaction. The women's communication and interaction patterns gave evidence of three themes that were evident across all focus groups and five subthemes that emerged along ethnic lines. The results suggest cultural universalities and cultural uniquenesses relative to the communication and interaction patterns of urban, ethnically diverse, impoverished, and underserved women that may assist in the design of culturally sensitive mental health care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. An Analysis of a Comprehensive Evaluation Model for Guided Group Interaction Techniques with Juvenile Delinquents. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Mitchell

    Reported are the first phase activities of a longitudinal project designed to evaluate the effectiveness of Guided Group Interaction (GGI) technique as a meaningful approach in the field of corrections. The main findings relate to the establishment of reliability for the main components of the Revised Behavior Scores System developed to assess the…

  8. Interactive plant functional group and water table effects on decomposition and extracellular enzyme activity in Sphagnum peatlands

    Treesearch

    Magdalena M. Wiedermann; Evan S. Kane; Lynette R. Potvin; Erik A. Lilleskov

    2017-01-01

    Peatland decomposition may be altered by hydrology and plant functional groups (PFGs), but exactly how the latter influences decomposition is unclear, as are potential interactions of these factors.We used a factorial mesocosm experiment with intact 1 m3 peat monoliths to explore how PFGs (sedges vs Ericaceae) and water table level individually...

  9. Development of non-bonded interaction parameters between graphene and water using particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Bejagam, Karteek K; Singh, Samrendra; Deshmukh, Sanket A

    2018-05-05

    New Lennard-Jones parameters have been developed to describe the interactions between atomistic model of graphene, represented by REBO potential, and five commonly used all-atom water models, namely SPC, SPC/E, SPC/Fw, SPC/Fd, and TIP3P/Fs by employing particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. These new parameters were optimized to reproduce the macroscopic contact angle of water on a graphene sheet. The calculated line tension was in the order of 10 -11 J/m for the droplets of all water models. Our molecular dynamics simulations indicate the preferential orientation of water molecules near graphene-water interface with one OH bond pointing toward the graphene surface. Detailed analysis of simulation trajectories reveals the presence of water molecules with ≤∼1, ∼2, and ∼4 hydrogen bonds at the surface of air-water interface, graphene-water interface, and bulk region of the water droplet, respectively. Presence of water molecules with ≤∼1 and ∼2 hydrogen bonds suggest the existence of water clusters of different sizes at these interfaces. The trends observed in the libration, bending, and stretching bands of the vibrational spectra are closely associated with these structural features of water. The inhomogeneity in hydrogen bond network of water at the air-water and graphene-water interface is manifested by broadening of the peaks in the libration band for water present at these interfaces. The stretching band for the molecules in water droplet shows a blue shift as compared to the pure bulk water, which conjecture the presence of weaker hydrogen bond network in a droplet. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Trace metals, melanin-based pigmentation and their interaction influence immune parameters in feral pigeons (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Chatelain, M; Gasparini, J; Frantz, A

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the effects of trace metals emitted by anthropogenic activities on wildlife is of great concern in urban ecology; yet, information on how they affect individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems remains scarce. In particular, trace metals may impact survival by altering the immune system response to parasites. Plumage melanin is assumed to influence the effects of trace metals on immunity owing to its ability to bind metal ions in feathers and its synthesis being coded by a pleiotropic gene. We thus hypothesized that trace metal exposure would interact with plumage colouration in shaping immune response. We experimentally investigated the interactive effect between exposure to an environmentally relevant range of zinc and/or lead and melanin-based plumage colouration on components of the immune system in feral pigeons (Columba livia). We found that zinc increased anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) IgY primary response maintenance, buffered the negative effect of lead on anti-KLH IgY secondary response maintenance and tended to increase T-cell mediated phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) skin response. Lead decreased the peak of the anti-KLH IgY secondary response. In addition, pheomelanic pigeons exhibited a higher secondary anti-KLH IgY response than did eumelanic ones. Finally, T-cell mediated PHA skin response decreased with increasing plumage eumelanin level of birds exposed to lead. Neither treatments nor plumage colouration correlated with endoparasite intensity. Overall, our study points out the effects of trace metals on some parameters of birds' immunity, independently from other confounding urbanization factors, and underlines the need to investigate their impacts on other life history traits and their consequences in the ecology and evolution of host-parasite interactions.

  11. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. GGOS and the EOP - the key role of SLR for a stable estimation of highly accurate Earth orientation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloßfeld, Mathis; Panzetta, Francesca; Müller, Horst; Gerstl, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The GGOS vision is to integrate geometric and gravimetric observation techniques to estimate consistent geodetic-geophysical parameters. In order to reach this goal, the common estimation of station coordinates, Stokes coefficients and Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) is necessary. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) provides the ability to study correlations between the different parameter groups since the observed satellite orbit dynamics are sensitive to the above mentioned geodetic parameters. To decrease the correlations, SLR observations to multiple satellites have to be combined. In this paper, we compare the estimated EOP of (i) single satellite SLR solutions and (ii) multi-satellite SLR solutions. Therefore, we jointly estimate station coordinates, EOP, Stokes coefficients and orbit parameters using different satellite constellations. A special focus in this investigation is put on the de-correlation of different geodetic parameter groups due to the combination of SLR observations. Besides SLR observations to spherical satellites (commonly used), we discuss the impact of SLR observations to non-spherical satellites such as, e.g., the JASON-2 satellite. The goal of this study is to discuss the existing parameter interactions and to present a strategy how to obtain reliable estimates of station coordinates, EOP, orbit parameter and Stokes coefficients in one common adjustment. Thereby, the benefits of a multi-satellite SLR solution are evaluated.

  13. Effectiveness of small-group interactive education vs. lecture-based information-only programs on motivation to change and lifestyle behaviours. A prospective controlled trial of rehabilitation inpatients.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Andrea; Ströbl, Veronika; Ellgring, Heiner; Faller, Hermann

    2011-02-01

    Although patient education may promote motivation to change health behaviours, the most effective method has not yet been determined. This prospective, controlled trial compared an interactive, patient-oriented group program with lectures providing only information. We evaluated motivational stages of change and self-reported behaviours in three domains (sports, diet, relaxation) at four times up to one year (60% complete data) among 753 German rehabilitation inpatients (mean age 50 years, 52% male) with orthopaedic (59%) or cardiologic disorders (10%) or diabetes mellitus (31%). We found improvements between baseline and follow up regarding each outcome (p<.001) in both groups. At the end of rehabilitation, participants of the interactive group, as compared to the lectures, showed more advanced motivation regarding diet (p<.10) and sports (p=.006). Interactive group patients reported healthier diets both after 3 months (p=0.013) and 12 months (p=0.047), more relaxation behaviours (p=.029) after 3 months and higher motivation for sports after 12 months (p=.08). The superior effectiveness of the interactive group was only partly confirmed. This short, 5-session interactive program may not be superior to lectures to induce major sustainable changes in motivation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Group Process: A Systematic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roark, Albert E.; Radl, Myrna C.

    1984-01-01

    Identifies components of group process and describes leader functions. Discusses personal elements, focus of interaction/psychological distance, group development, content, quality of interaction, and self-reflective/meaning attribution, illustrated by a case study of a group of persons (N=5) arrested for drunk driving. (JAC)

  15. Effects of ICT Group Work on Interactions and Social Acceptance of a Primary Pupil with Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lynda; Trushell, John; Woods, Pat

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain whether collaborative group work on a computer, facilitated by an adult, could provide a means for a primary schoolboy with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) -- moderately-highly affected in all areas of the "triad of impairments" -- to develop appropriate task-related interactions with his peers. Data were gathered…

  16. The Effect of WhatsApp Chat Group in Enhancing EFL Learners' Verbal Interaction outside Classroom Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minalla, Amir Abdalla

    2018-01-01

    This study was mainly conducted to examine the possibility of utilizing "WhatsApp Group" in enhancing EFL learners' verbal interaction. To do this experimental and descriptive methods were used to achieve the objective of this study. A questionnaire and pre- and post-test were adopted as tools for data collection. Samples of two groups…

  17. Interactions between selected bile salts and Triton X-100 or sodium lauryl ether sulfate.

    PubMed

    Cirin, Dejan M; Poša, Mihalj M; Krstonošić, Veljko S

    2011-12-29

    In order to develop colloidal drug carriers with desired properties, it is important to determine physico-chemical characteristics of these systems. Bile salt mixed micelles are extensively studied as novel drug delivery systems. The objective of the present investigation is to develop and characterize mixed micelles of nonionic (Triton X-100) or anionic (sodium lauryl ether sulfate) surfactant having oxyethylene groups in the polar head and following bile salts: cholate, deoxycholate and 7-oxodeoxycholate. The micellization behaviour of binary anionic-nonionic and anionic-anionic surfactant mixtures was investigated by conductivity and surface tension measurements. The results of the study have been analyzed using Clint's, Rubingh's, and Motomura's theories for mixed binary systems. The negative values of the interaction parameter indicate synergism between micelle building units. It was noticed that Triton X-100 and sodium lauryl ether sulfate generate the weakest synergistic interactions with sodium deoxycholate, while 7-oxodeoxycholate creates the strongest attractive interaction with investigated co-surfactants. It was concluded that increased synergistic interactions can be attributed to the larger number of hydrophilic groups at α side of the bile salts. Additionally, 7-oxo group of 7-oxodeoxycholate enhance attractive interactions with selected co-surfactants more than 7-hydroxyl group of sodium cholate.

  18. Interactions between selected bile salts and Triton X-100 or sodium lauryl ether sulfate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to develop colloidal drug carriers with desired properties, it is important to determine physico-chemical characteristics of these systems. Bile salt mixed micelles are extensively studied as novel drug delivery systems. The objective of the present investigation is to develop and characterize mixed micelles of nonionic (Triton X-100) or anionic (sodium lauryl ether sulfate) surfactant having oxyethylene groups in the polar head and following bile salts: cholate, deoxycholate and 7-oxodeoxycholate. Results The micellization behaviour of binary anionic-nonionic and anionic-anionic surfactant mixtures was investigated by conductivity and surface tension measurements. The results of the study have been analyzed using Clint's, Rubingh's, and Motomura's theories for mixed binary systems. The negative values of the interaction parameter indicate synergism between micelle building units. It was noticed that Triton X-100 and sodium lauryl ether sulfate generate the weakest synergistic interactions with sodium deoxycholate, while 7-oxodeoxycholate creates the strongest attractive interaction with investigated co-surfactants. Conclusion It was concluded that increased synergistic interactions can be attributed to the larger number of hydrophilic groups at α side of the bile salts. Additionally, 7-oxo group of 7-oxodeoxycholate enhance attractive interactions with selected co-surfactants more than 7-hydroxyl group of sodium cholate. PMID:22206681

  19. Specific effects of surface carboxyl groups on anionic polystyrene particles in their interactions with mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiue; Musyanovych, Anna; Röcker, Carlheinz; Landfester, Katharina; Mailänder, Volker; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    Nanoparticle uptake by living cells is governed by chemical interactions between functional groups on the nanoparticle as well as the receptors on cell surfaces. Here we have investigated the uptake of anionic polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles of ~100 nm diameter by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using spinning-disk confocal optical microscopy combined with a quantitative analysis of the fluorescence images. Two types of anionic PS nanoparticles with essentially identical sizes and ζ-potentials were employed in this study, carboxyl-functionalized nanoparticles (CPS) and plain PS nanoparticles, both coated with anionic detergent for stabilization. CPS nanoparticles were observed to internalize more rapidly and accumulate to a much higher level than plain PS nanoparticles. The relative importance of different uptake mechanisms for the two types of nanoparticles was investigated by using specific inhibitors. CPS nanoparticles were internalized mainly via the clathrin-mediated mechanism, whereas plain PS nanoparticles mainly utilized the macropinocytosis pathway. The pronounced difference in the internalization behavior of CPS and plain PS nanoparticles points to a specific interaction of the carboxyl group with receptors on the cell surface.

  20. Normal values and standardization of parameters in nuclear cardiology: Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group database.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Naoya; Kasai, Tokuo; Matsuo, Shinro; Kiso, Keisuke; Okuda, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    As a 2-year project of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group activity, normal myocardial imaging databases were accumulated and summarized. Stress-rest with gated and non-gated image sets were accumulated for myocardial perfusion imaging and could be used for perfusion defect scoring and normal left ventricular (LV) function analysis. For single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with multi-focal collimator design, databases of supine and prone positions and computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction were created. The CT-based correction provided similar perfusion patterns between genders. In phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT, a new approach for analyzing dyssynchrony, normal ranges of parameters for phase bandwidth, standard deviation and entropy were determined in four software programs. Although the results were not interchangeable, dependency on gender, ejection fraction and volumes were common characteristics of these parameters. Standardization of (123)I-MIBG sympathetic imaging was performed regarding heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR) using a calibration phantom method. The HMRs from any collimator types could be converted to the value with medium-energy comparable collimators. Appropriate quantification based on common normal databases and standard technology could play a pivotal role for clinical practice and researches.

  1. Group structure and group process for effective space station astronaut teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholas, J. M.; Kagan, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Space Station crews will encounter new problems, many derived from the social interaction of groups working in space for extended durations. Solutions to these problems must focus on the structure of groups and the interaction of individuals. A model of intervention is proposed to address problems of interpersonal relationships and emotional stress, and improve the morale, cohesiveness, and productivity of astronaut teams.

  2. Antagonistic and synergistic interactions among predators.

    PubMed

    Huxel, Gary R

    2007-08-01

    The structure and dynamics of food webs are largely dependent upon interactions among consumers and their resources. However, interspecific interactions such as intraguild predation and interference competition can also play a significant role in the stability of communities. The role of antagonistic/synergistic interactions among predators has been largely ignored in food web theory. These mechanisms influence predation rates, which is one of the key factors regulating food web structure and dynamics, thus ignoring them can potentially limit understanding of food webs. Using nonlinear models, it is shown that critical aspects of multiple predator food web dynamics are antagonistic/synergistic interactions among predators. The influence of antagonistic/synergistic interactions on coexistence of predators depended largely upon the parameter set used and the degree of feeding niche differentiation. In all cases when there was no effect of antagonism or synergism (a ( ij )=1.00), the predators coexisted. Using the stable parameter set, coexistence occurred across the range of antagonism/synergism used. However, using the chaotic parameter strong antagonism resulted in the extinction of one or both species, while strong synergism tended to coexistence. Whereas using the limit cycle parameter set, coexistence was strongly dependent on the degree of feeding niche overlap. Additionally increasing the degree of feeding specialization of the predators on the two prey species increased the amount of parameter space in which coexistence of the two predators occurred. Bifurcation analyses supported the general pattern of increased stability when the predator interaction was synergistic and decreased stability when it was antagonistic. Thus, synergistic interactions should be more common than antagonistic interactions in ecological systems.

  3. The Effect of Interactions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of APOA1/APOC3 with Food Group Intakes on the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Esfahani, Firoozeh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Daneshpour, Maryam S; Mottaghi, Azadeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of dietary food groups and genetic variants of APOA1/APOC3, relative to Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) risk in adults. In this matched nested case-control study, 414 MetS subjects and 414 controls were selected from among participants of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Dietary intake was assessed with the use of a valid and reliable semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), APOA1 (rs670, -75G>A and rs5069, +83C>T/APOC3 rs5128 C3238>G) were genotyped by the conventional polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. The mean (SD) of age was 40.7 (13) and 41.2 (13) years in male cases and controls versus 44.0 (11) and 44.0 (12) years in female case and controls. A significant interaction between intake quartiles of the sugar group and APOA1 combined group (GA+AA/CT+TT) SNPs was found; The ORs for these genotype carriers were (1, 0.44, 0.36, 0.23; P trend<0.001) in quartiles of intake, relative to other combined genotypes (P interaction=0.02). MetS risk appeared to be increased significantly in higher quartiles of sweet beverages and fish intakes in the GA+AA/CT+TT/CC genotypes of APOA1/APOC3 SNPs, compared to other genotypes (P interaction=0.01). The combined effect of genotypes of APOC3/APOA1 showed further decrease in MetS risk in higher quartiles of sugar group intakes (OR: 1, 0.24, 0.26, 0.14, P trend=0.001) relative to other combinations (P interaction=0.008). Results obtained demonstrate that some dietary food groups (sugar, fish, and sweet beverages) modulate the effect of APOA1/APOC3 SNPs in relation to MetS risk.

  4. Neurobehavioral Integrity of Chimpanzee Newborns: Comparisons across groups and across species reveal gene-environment interaction effects

    PubMed Central

    Bard, Kim A.; Brent, Linda; Lester, Barry; Worobey, John; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this article are to describe the neurobehavioral integrity of chimpanzee newborns, to investigate how early experiences affect the neurobehavioral organization of chimpanzees, and to explore species differences by comparing chimpanzee newborns to a group of typically developing human newborns. Neurobehavioral integrity related to orientation, motor performance, arousal, and state regulation of 55 chimpanzee (raised in four different settings) and 42 human newborns was measured with the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS) a semi-structured 25-minute interactive assessment. Thirty-eight chimpanzees were tested every other day from birth, and analyses revealed significant developmental changes in 19 of 27 NBAS scores. The cross-group and cross-species comparisons were conducted at 2 and 30 days of age. Among the 4 chimpanzee groups, significant differences were found in 23 of 24 NBAS scores. Surprisingly, the cross-species comparisons revealed that the human group was distinct in only 1 of 25 NBAS scores (the human group had significantly less muscle tone than all the chimpanzee groups). The human group was indistinguishable from at least one of the chimpanzee groups in the remaining 24 of 25 NBAS scores. The results of this study support the conclusion that the interplay between genes and environment, rather than genes alone or environment alone, accounts for phenotypic expressions of newborn neurobehavioral integrity in hominids. PMID:25110465

  5. Material parameter determination from scattering measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, A.; Park, A.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The electrical, macroscopic performance of isotropic material can generally be described through their constitutive scalar parameters, permittivity and permeability which are symbolically represented by epsilon and mu, respectively. These parameters relate the electric and magnetic flux densities to the electric and magnetic fields through the following relationships: (1) D=epsilonE; and (2) B=muH. It is through these parameters that the interaction of electromagnetic waves with material can be quantized in terms of reflection and transmission coefficients, and propagation and attenuation factors.

  6. Determination of the solubility parameter of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaohong; Wang, Qiang; Li, Xiaoping; Tang, Jun; Zhang, Zhengfang

    2015-11-01

    Thermodynamic properties of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM] BF4) were determined via inverse gas chromatography (IGC). Two groups of solvents with different chemical natures and polarities were used to obtain information about [BMIM] BF4-solvent interactions. The specific retention volume, molar heat of sorption, weight fraction activity coefficient, Flory-Huggins interaction parameter as well as solubility parameter were also determined in a temperature range of 333 - 373 K. The results showed that the selected solvents n-C10 to n-C12, carbon tetrachloride, cyclohexane and toluene were poor solvents for [BMIM] BF4, while dichloromethane, acetone, chloroform, methyl acetate, ethanol and methanol were favorite solvents for [BMIM] BF4. In addition, the solubility parameter of [ BMIM] BF4 was determined as 23.39 (J/cm3)0.5 by the extrapolation at 298 K. The experiment proved that IGC was a simple and accurate method to obtain the thermodynamic properties of ionic liquids. This study could be used as a reference to the application and research of the ionic liquids.

  7. Transferable tight binding model for strained group IV and III-V heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yaohua; Povolotskyi, Micheal; Kubis, Tillmann; Boykin, Timothy; Klimeck, Gerhard

    Modern semiconductor devices have reached critical device dimensions in the range of several nanometers. For reliable prediction of device performance, it is critical to have a numerical efficient model that are transferable to material interfaces. In this work, we present an empirical tight binding (ETB) model with transferable parameters for strained IV and III-V group semiconductors. The ETB model is numerically highly efficient as it make use of an orthogonal sp3d5s* basis set with nearest neighbor inter-atomic interactions. The ETB parameters are generated from HSE06 hybrid functional calculations. Band structures of strained group IV and III-V materials by ETB model are in good agreement with corresponding HSE06 calculations. Furthermore, the ETB model is applied to strained superlattices which consist of group IV and III-V elements. The ETB model turns out to be transferable to nano-scale hetero-structure. The ETB band structures agree with the corresponding HSE06 results in the whole Brillouin zone. The ETB band gaps of superlattices with common cations or common anions have discrepancies within 0.05eV.

  8. Any of them will do: In-group identification, out-group entitativity, and gang membership as predictors of group-based retribution.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Eduardo A; Wenborne, Lisa; Peers, Madeline; Alleyne, Emma; Ellis, Kirsty

    2015-05-01

    In non-gang populations, the degree of identification with an in-group and perceptions of out-group entitativity, the perception of an out-group as bonded or unified, are important contributors to group-based aggression or vicarious retribution. The link between these factors and group-based aggression, however, has not been examined in the context of street gangs. The current study assessed the relationship among in-group identification, perceptions of out-group entitativity, and the willingness to retaliate against members of rival groups who did not themselves attack the in-group among juvenile gang and non-gang members in London. Our results showed the predicted membership (gang/non-gang) × in-group identification × entitativity interaction. Decomposition of the three-way interaction by membership revealed a significant identification × entitativity interaction for gang, but not for non-gang members. More specifically, gang members who identify more strongly with their gang and perceived a rival group as high on entitativity were more willing to retaliate against any of them. In addition, entitativity was a significant predictor of group-based aggression after controlling for gender, in-group identification, and gang membership. Our results are consistent with socio-psychological theories of group-based aggression and support the proposal that such theories are applicable for understanding gang-related violence. Aggr. Behav. 41:242-252, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Determination of attenuation parameters and energy absorption build-up factor of amine group materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; More, Chaitali V.; Surung, Bharat S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2017-12-01

    We have computed radiological parameters of some C- H- N- O based amine group bio material in the energy range 122-1330 keV with the gamma ray count by narrow beam geometry. The NaI(Tl) detector with 8 K multichannel analyser was used having resolution 6.8% at 663 keV. The energy absorption buildup factor (EABF) was determined by using Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method up to penetration depth of 40 mfp at energy 0.015-15 MeV. The NIST XCOM data were compared with the experimental value and we observed (3-5%) difference. The comparative study of effective atomic number and effective electron density in the energy range 122-1330 keV using Gaussian fit for accuracy were performed. The amino acid has the highest EABF value at 0.1 MeV and the variation in EABF with penetration depth up to 1-40 mean free path (mfp). The calculated radiological data of biological material are applicable in medical physics and dosimetry.

  10. Pharmacokinetic interactions between rebamipide and selected nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rats.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Dustin L; Wood, Robert C; Wyatt, Jarrett E; Harirforoosh, Sam

    2014-03-12

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause gastrointestinal and renal side effects. Rebamipide is a mucoprotective agent that reduces gastrointenstinal side effects when administered concomitantly with NSAIDs. In this study, we investigated the pharmacokinetic drug interactions of rebamipide with two selected NSAIDs, celecoxib or diclofenac. Rats were randomly divided into five groups. Two groups received placebo and three groups were administered rebamipide (30 mg/kg) orally twice daily for two days. On day 3, the animals treated with placebo received celecoxib (40 mg/kg) or diclofenac (10mg/kg) and rats receiving rebamipide were administerd rebamipide followed by a single dose of placebo, celecoxib, or diclofenac. To investigate drug protein interactions, blank rat plasma was spiked with known concentrations of rebamipide, diclofenac plus rebamipide, or celecoxib plus rebamipide then dialyzed through a Rapid Equilibrium Dialysis device. AUC (139.70±24.97 μg h/mL), Cmax (42.99±2.98 μg/mL), and CLoral (0.08±0.02 L/h/kg) values of diclofenac in diclofenac plus rebamipide group altered when compared to those of diclofenac treated groups. Treatment with rebamipide showed no significant change in pharmacokinetic parameters of celecoxib treated rats. Cmax (7.80±1.22 μg/mL), AUC (56.46±7.30 μg h/mL), Vd/F (7.55±1.37 L/kg), and CLoral (0.58±0.09 L/h/kg) of rebamipide were significantly altered when diclofenac was co-administered with rebamipide. Pharmacokinetic parameters of rebamipide plus celecoxib group were not significantly different from those of rebamipide group. Plasma protein binding was not affected by concomitant administration of another drug. These results indicate alteration of pharmacokinetic parameters of both rebamipide and diclofenac when co-administered and cannot be explained by a variation in plasma protein binding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interaction between DNA and Drugs Having Protonable Basic Groups: Characterization through Affinity Constants, Drug Release Kinetics, and Conformational Changes

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, Liliana P.; Baena, Yolima; Manzo, Rubén H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the in vitro characterization of the interaction between the phosphate groups of DNA and the protonated species of drugs with basic groups through the determination of the affinity constants, the reversibility of the interaction, and the effect on the secondary structure of the macromolecule. Affinity constants of the counterionic condensation DNA–drug were in the order of 106. The negative electrokinetic potential of DNA decreased with the increase of the proportion of loading drugs. The drugs were slowly released from the DNA–drug complexes and had release kinetics consistent with the high degree of counterionic condensation. The circular dichroism profile of DNA was not modified by complexation with atenolol, lidocaine, or timolol, but was significantly altered by the more lipophilic drugs benzydamine and propranolol, revealing modifications in the secondary structure of the DNA. The in vitro characterization of such interactions provides a physicochemical basis that would contribute to identify the effects of this kind of drugs in cellular cultures, as well as side effects observed under their clinical use. Moreover, this methodology could also be projected to the fields of intracellular DNA transfection and the use of DNA as a carrier of active drugs. PMID:28054999

  12. Inferring interactions in complex microbial communities from nucleotide sequence data and environmental parameters

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yu; Sikorski, Johannes; Bonkowski, Michael; Fiore-Donno, Anna-Maria; Kandeler, Ellen; Marhan, Sven; Boeddinghaus, Runa S.; Solly, Emily F.; Schrumpf, Marion; Schöning, Ingo; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, Francois; Overmann, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Interactions occur between two or more organisms affecting each other. Interactions are decisive for the ecology of the organisms. Without direct experimental evidence the analysis of interactions is difficult. Correlation analyses that are based on co-occurrences are often used to approximate interaction. Here, we present a new mathematical model to estimate the interaction strengths between taxa, based on changes in their relative abundances across environmental gradients. PMID:28288199

  13. Attention parameters in visual search tasks in different age groups.

    PubMed

    Baranov-Krylov, I N; Kuznetsova, T G; Ratnikova, V K

    2009-06-01

    Attention processes were studied using a model based on visual searches for a specified element in grids of size 3 x 3 and 7 x 7 cm displayed on a monitor screen. Five age groups took part in the experimental studies: children of five and seven years, a group of 15-year-old adolescents, a group aged 20-35 years, and a group aged over 60 years; a total of 62 subjects took part. Statistical analysis showed that the latter three groups were not different from each other and were used as an adult control group for comparison with results from children. Five types of search were used: one difficult, in which the target was similar to the distractors, and four easy (for adults but not for children), involving seeking a red or a white element in an empty grid and seeking a target markedly different in shape or color from the distractors. The following measures were analyzed: search time, errors (false alarms and misses), and corrected search times allowing for errors. Children performed significantly worse on all measures: they found all types of search difficult, even the search for a single element. The larger number of false alarms (reactions to nonmeaningful signals) was evidence for a deficiency of inhibitory processes in children, these being controlled by the frontal lobes. The larger number of misses in children may be evidence of weakness of selective attention, which is controlled by the parietal and temporal areas of the cortex. These points may indicate that children have an immature attention system, though this would appear to mature completely by age 15 years.

  14. Improving estimation of kinetic parameters in dynamic force spectroscopy using cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2018-03-01

    Dynamic Force Spectroscopy (DFS) is a widely used technique to characterize the dissociation kinetics and interaction energy landscape of receptor-ligand complexes with single-molecule resolution. In an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM)-based DFS experiment, receptor-ligand complexes, sandwiched between an AFM tip and substrate, are ruptured at different stress rates by varying the speed at which the AFM-tip and substrate are pulled away from each other. The rupture events are grouped according to their pulling speeds, and the mean force and loading rate of each group are calculated. These data are subsequently fit to established models, and energy landscape parameters such as the intrinsic off-rate (koff) and the width of the potential energy barrier (xβ) are extracted. However, due to large uncertainties in determining mean forces and loading rates of the groups, errors in the estimated koff and xβ can be substantial. Here, we demonstrate that the accuracy of fitted parameters in a DFS experiment can be dramatically improved by sorting rupture events into groups using cluster analysis instead of sorting them according to their pulling speeds. We test different clustering algorithms including Gaussian mixture, logistic regression, and K-means clustering, under conditions that closely mimic DFS experiments. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we benchmark the performance of these clustering algorithms over a wide range of koff and xβ, under different levels of thermal noise, and as a function of both the number of unbinding events and the number of pulling speeds. Our results demonstrate that cluster analysis, particularly K-means clustering, is very effective in improving the accuracy of parameter estimation, particularly when the number of unbinding events are limited and not well separated into distinct groups. Cluster analysis is easy to implement, and our performance benchmarks serve as a guide in choosing an appropriate method for DFS data analysis.

  15. Working with Group-Tasks and Group Cohesiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwar, Khoirul

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at exploring the connection between the use of group task and group cohesiveness. This study is very important because the nature of the learner's success is largely determined by the values of cooperation, interaction, and understanding of the learning objectives together. Subjects of this study are 28 students on the course…

  16. Analysis of sagittal spinopelvic parameters in achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jae-Young; Suh, Seung-Woo; Modi, Hitesh N; Park, Jong-Woong; Park, Jung-Ho

    2011-08-15

    Prospective radiological analysis of patients with achondroplasia. To analyze sagittal spinal alignment and pelvic orientation in achondroplasia patients. Knowledge of sagittal spinopelvic parameters is important for the treatment of achondroplasia, because they differ from those of the normal population and can induce pain. The study and control groups were composed of 32 achondroplasia patients and 24 healthy volunteers, respectively. All underwent lateral radiography of the whole spine including hip joints. The radiographic parameters examined were sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence (PI), S1 overhang, thoracic kyphosis, T10-L2 kyphosis, lumbar lordosis (LL1, LL2), and sagittal balance. Statistical analysis was performed to identify significant differences between the two groups. In addition, correlations between parameters and symptoms were sought. Sagittal spinopelvic parameters, namely, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, S1 overhang, thoracic kyphosis, T10-L2 kyphosis, lumbar lordosis 1 and sagittal balance were found to be significantly different in the patient and control groups (P < 0.05). In addition, sagittal parameters were found to be related to each other in the patient group (P < 0.05), that is, PI was related to SS and pelvic tilt, and LL was related to thoracic kyphosis. Furthermore, in terms of relations between spinal and pelvic parameters, LL was related to SS and PI, and sagittal balance was related to SS and PI. Furthermore, LL and T10-L2 kyphosis were found to be related to pain (P < 0.05), whereas no other parameter was found to be related to VAS scores. Sagittal parameters and possible relationships between sagittal parameters and symptoms were found to be significantly different in achondroplasia patients and normal healthy controls. The present study shows that sagittal spinal and pelvic parameters can assist the treatment of spinal disorders in achondroplasia patients.

  17. The nature of the interaction of dimethylselenide with IIIA group element compounds.

    PubMed

    Madzhidov, Timur I; Chmutova, Galina A

    2013-05-16

    The first systematic theoretical study of the nature of intermolecular bonding of dimethylselenide as donor and IIIA group element halides as acceptors was made with the help of the approach of Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules. Density Functional Theory with "old" Sapporo triple-ζ basis sets was used to calculate geometry, thermodynamics, and wave function of Me2Se···AX3 complexes. The analysis of the electron density distribution and the Laplacian of the electron density allowed us to reveal and explain the tendencies in the influence of the central atom (A = B, Al, Ga, In) and halogen (X = F, Cl, Br, I) on the nature of Se···A bonding. Significant changes in properties of the selenium lone pair upon complexation were described by means of the analysis of the Laplacian of the charge density. Charge transfer characteristics and the contributions to it from electron localization and delocalization were analyzed in terms of localization and delocalization indexes. Common features of the complexation and differences in the nature of bonding were revealed. Performed analysis evidenced that gallium and indium halide complexes can be attributed to charge transfer-driven complexes; aluminum halides complexes seem to be mainly of an electrostatic nature. The nature of bonding in different boron halides essentially varies; these complexes are stabilized mainly by covalent Se···B interaction. In all the complexes under study covalence of the Se···A interaction is rather high.

  18. Breathing dynamics based parameter sensitivity analysis of hetero-polymeric DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Talukder, Srijeeta; Sen, Shrabani; Chaudhury, Pinaki, E-mail: pinakc@rediffmail.com

    We study the parameter sensitivity of hetero-polymeric DNA within the purview of DNA breathing dynamics. The degree of correlation between the mean bubble size and the model parameters is estimated for this purpose for three different DNA sequences. The analysis leads us to a better understanding of the sequence dependent nature of the breathing dynamics of hetero-polymeric DNA. Out of the 14 model parameters for DNA stability in the statistical Poland-Scheraga approach, the hydrogen bond interaction ε{sub hb}(AT) for an AT base pair and the ring factor ξ turn out to be the most sensitive parameters. In addition, the stackingmore » interaction ε{sub st}(TA-TA) for an TA-TA nearest neighbor pair of base-pairs is found to be the most sensitive one among all stacking interactions. Moreover, we also establish that the nature of stacking interaction has a deciding effect on the DNA breathing dynamics, not the number of times a particular stacking interaction appears in a sequence. We show that the sensitivity analysis can be used as an effective measure to guide a stochastic optimization technique to find the kinetic rate constants related to the dynamics as opposed to the case where the rate constants are measured using the conventional unbiased way of optimization.« less

  19. Factorial experimental design for the culture of human embryonic stem cells as aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors reveals the potential for interaction effects between bioprocess parameters.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Megan M; Meng, Guoliang; Rancourt, Derrick E; Gates, Ian D; Kallos, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Traditional optimization of culture parameters for the large-scale culture of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as aggregates is carried out in a stepwise manner whereby the effect of varying each culture parameter is investigated individually. However, as evidenced by the wide range of published protocols and culture performance indicators (growth rates, pluripotency marker expression, etc.), there is a lack of systematic investigation into the true effect of varying culture parameters especially with respect to potential interactions between culture variables. Here we describe the design and execution of a two-parameter, three-level (3(2)) factorial experiment resulting in nine conditions that were run in duplicate 125-mL stirred suspension bioreactors. The two parameters investigated here were inoculation density and agitation rate, which are easily controlled, but currently, poorly characterized. Cell readouts analyzed included fold expansion, maximum density, and exponential growth rate. Our results reveal that the choice of best case culture parameters was dependent on which cell property was chosen as the primary output variable. Subsequent statistical analyses via two-way analysis of variance indicated significant interaction effects between inoculation density and agitation rate specifically in the case of exponential growth rates. Results indicate that stepwise optimization has the potential to miss out on the true optimal case. In addition, choosing an optimum condition for a culture output of interest from the factorial design yielded similar results when repeated with the same cell line indicating reproducibility. We finally validated that human ESCs remain pluripotent in suspension culture as aggregates under our optimal conditions and maintain their differentiation capabilities as well as a stable karyotype and strong expression levels of specific human ESC markers over several passages in suspension bioreactors.

  20. Interaction of Low Frequency External Electric Fields and Pancreatic β-Cell: A Mathematical Modeling Approach to Identify the Influence of Excitation Parameters.

    PubMed

    Farashi, Sajjad; Sasanpour, Pezhman; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2018-05-24

    Purpose-Although the effect of electromagnetic fields on biological systems has attracted attraction in recent years, there has not been any conclusive result concerning the effects of interaction and the underlying mechanisms involved. Besides the complexity of biological systems, the parameters of the applied electromagnetic field have not been estimated in most of the experiments. Material and Method-In this study, we have used computational approach in order to find the excitation parameters of an external electric field which produces sensible effects in the function of insulin secretory machinery, whose failure triggers the diabetes disease. A mathematical model of the human β-cell has been used and the effects of external electric fields with different amplitudes, frequencies and wave shapes have been studied. Results-The results from our simulations show that the external electric field can influence the membrane electrical activity and perhaps the insulin secretion when its amplitude exceeds a threshold value. Furthermore, our simulations reveal that different waveforms have distinct effects on the β-cell membrane electrical activity and the characteristic features of the excitation like frequency would change the interaction mechanism. Conclusion-The results could help the researchers to investigate the possible role of the environmental electromagnetic fields on the promotion of diabetes disease.

  1. An interactive online approach to small-group student presentations and discussions.

    PubMed

    Thor, Der; Xiao, Nan; Zheng, Meixun; Ma, Ruidan; Yu, Xiao Xi

    2017-12-01

    Student presentations had been widely implemented across content areas, including health sciences education. However, due to various limitations, small-group student presentations in the classroom may not reach their full potential for student learning. To address challenges with presentations in the classroom, we redesigned the assignment by having students present and discuss online using VoiceThread, a cloud-based presentation and discussion tool. First-year students pursuing a Doctor of Dental Surgery degree were assigned into small groups to present physiology content and to discuss that content online. This assignment was similar to traditional student classroom presentations, with the exception that the entire assignment was conducted online. The primary purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the impact of the online format on the discussion quality. Another purpose of the study was to examine students' perceptions of using VoiceThread for presenting and learning, as well as the online interactions between the presenter and audience. Students posted a higher number of questions and comments than required by the assignment. The questions from students were also higher level questions, and the answers to these questions were more thorough compared with what we had previously observed in classroom presentations. The survey results showed that students preferred using VoiceThread for presenting, learning from other presentations, and discussing presentation content over performing this process in the classroom. Preliminary findings suggested that having dental students make presentations and hold discussions online might help address the challenges of student presentations in the classroom. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Derivation of Pitzer Interaction Parameters for an Aqueous Species Pair of Sodium and Iron(II)-Citrate Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J. H.; Nemer, M.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground repository for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. The WIPP is located in the Permian Delaware Basin near Carlsbad, New Mexico, U.S.A. The TRU waste includes, but is not limited to, iron-based alloys and the complexing agent, citric acid. Iron is also present from the steel used in the waste containers. The objective of this analysis is to derive the Pitzer activity coefficients for the pair of Na+ and FeCit- complex to expand current WIPP thermodynamic database. An aqueous model for the dissolution of Fe(OH)2(s) in a Na3Cit solution was fitted to the experimentally measured solubility data. The aqueous model consists of several chemical reactions and related Pitzer interaction parameters. Specifically, Pitzer interaction parameters for the Na+ and FeCit- pair (β(0), β(1), and Cφ) plus the stability constant for species of FeCit- were fitted to the experimental data. Anoxic gloveboxes were used to keep the oxygen level low (<1 ppm) throughout the experiments due to redox sensitivity. EQ3NR, a computer program for geochemical aqueous speciation-solubility calculations, packaged in EQ3/6 v.8.0a, calculates the aqueous speciation and saturation index using an aqueous model addressed in EQ3/6's database. The saturation index indicates how far the system is from equilibrium with respect to the solid of interest. Thus, the smaller the sum of squared saturation indices that the aqueous model calculates for the given number of experiments, the more closely the model attributes equilibrium to each individual experiment with respect to the solid of interest. The calculation of aqueous speciation and saturation indices was repeated by adjusting stability constant of FeCit-, β(0), β(1), and Cφ in the database until the values are found that make the sum of squared saturation indices the smallest for the given number of experiments. Results will be presented at the time of

  3. The Effects of Music and Group Stage on Group Leader and Member Behavior in Psychoeducational Groups for Children of Divorce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cercone, Kristin; DeLucia-Waack, Janice

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of music and group stage on group process and group leader and member behavior within 8-week psychoeducational groups for children of divorce. Audiotapes of group sessions were rated using the Interactional Process Analysis and the Group Sessions Ratings Scale. Both treatment groups were very similar in terms of…

  4. The interactions between ionic surfactants and phosphatidylcholine vesicles: Conductometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Tseng, Wen Liang

    2001-11-01

    The interaction between ionic surfactants and phosphatidylcholine vesicles, which are prepared without addition of buffer and salt, is investigated by conductivity measurements. On the basis of the vesicle acting as a trap of charge carriers, the bilayer/aqueous phase partition coefficient K and the surfactant/lipid molar ratio Re of nine surfactants are determined. The thermodynamic consistency is satisfied by the measured parameters. The effects of the alkyl chain length (C10-C16) and ionic head group are then studied. The inverse partition coefficient K-1 is linearly related to the critical micelle concentration. The solubilizing ability Reb is a consequence of the competition between the surfactant incorporation into the bilayer and the formation of micelles. Consequently, the K parameter rises whereas the Reb parameter declines as the chain length is increased. The influence due to addition of salt is also discussed.

  5. Learning and Decision Making in Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahimian, M. Amin

    2017-01-01

    Many important real-world decision-making problems involve group interactions among individuals with purely informational interactions. Such situations arise for example in jury deliberations, expert committees, medical diagnoses, etc. We model the purely informational interactions of group members, where they receive private information and act…

  6. Aging-related arterial-cardiac interaction in Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yoshiaki

    2009-11-01

    Vascular and cardiac aging is rapidly progressing among the Japanese population. A close relation exists between the artery and cardiac performance (arterial-cardiac interaction), but the relationships between age and these parameters have not been well examined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the changes of arterial-cardiac interaction with aging, using pulse wave velocity (PWV) as an indicator of atherosclerosis. The subjects comprised 595 adult men (mean age, 58.8 +/- 12.2 years) without any history of cardiovascular disease. After correlating PWV, cardiac structure, cardiac function, and blood pressure to age, subjects were divided into five age groups to compare changes in these parameters. Pulse wave velocity exhibited a strong positive correlation with age (r = 0.461, P < 0.01) and increased significantly over 55 years old, and left atrial dimension, relative wall thickness, systolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure correlated positively with age and increased similarly. Left ventricular volume correlated negatively with age and decreased similarly. These parameters significantly correlated with PWV. Aortic diameter (AoD) positively and EA ratio (E/A) negatively exhibited a correlation with age and revealed earlier change before PWV increase. Aortic diameter increased significantly over 45 years old and stayed flat, but E/A decreased linearly from the early period. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) increased in the early period and decreased over 75 years of age. Agerelated atherosclerotic close arterial-cardiac interaction exists between the vessels and cardiac performance, but AoD, E/A, and DBP change in early age independent of atherosclerosis.

  7. Thermodynamic Interactions between Polystyrene and Long-Chain Poly(n-Alkyl Acrylates) Derived from Plant Oils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Robertson, Megan L

    2015-06-10

    Vegetable oils and their fatty acids are promising sources for the derivation of polymers. Long-chain poly(n-alkyl acrylates) and poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) are readily derived from fatty acids through conversion of the carboxylic acid end-group to an acrylate or methacrylate group. The resulting polymers contain long alkyl side-chains with around 10-22 carbon atoms. Regardless of the monomer source, the presence of alkyl side-chains in poly(n-alkyl acrylates) and poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) provides a convenient mechanism for tuning their physical properties. The development of structured multicomponent materials, including block copolymers and blends, containing poly(n-alkyl acrylates) and poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) requires knowledge of the thermodynamic interactions governing their self-assembly, typically described by the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter χ. We have investigated the χ parameter between polystyrene and long-chain poly(n-alkyl acrylate) homopolymers and copolymers: specifically we have included poly(stearyl acrylate), poly(lauryl acrylate), and their random copolymers. Lauryl and stearyl acrylate were chosen as model alkyl acrylates derived from vegetable oils and have alkyl side-chain lengths of 12 and 18 carbon atoms, respectively. Polystyrene is included in this study as a model petroleum-sourced polymer, which has wide applicability in commercially relevant multicomponent polymeric materials. Two independent methods were employed to measure the χ parameter: cloud point measurements on binary blends and characterization of the order-disorder transition of triblock copolymers, which were in relatively good agreement with one another. The χ parameter was found to be independent of the alkyl side-chain length (n) for large values of n (i.e., n > 10). This behavior is in stark contrast to the n-dependence of the χ parameter predicted from solubility parameter theory. Our study complements prior work investigating the interactions between

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance g-tensors from state interaction spin-orbit coupling density matrix renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2018-05-01

    We present a state interaction spin-orbit coupling method to calculate electron paramagnetic resonance g-tensors from density matrix renormalization group wavefunctions. We apply the technique to compute g-tensors for the TiF3 and CuCl42 - complexes, a [2Fe-2S] model of the active center of ferredoxins, and a Mn4CaO5 model of the S2 state of the oxygen evolving complex. These calculations raise the prospects of determining g-tensors in multireference calculations with a large number of open shells.

  9. [Knowledge about the relationship through protagonist-director interactions in psychodrama groups].

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, Ildikó

    2005-01-01

    This report follows emotional behavior in two psychodrama groups from the "present moment" until "moment of contact" using the Consensus Rorschach method. In the analysis of verbal and nonverbal material of protagonist-director dyads the following patterns were distinguished: a) early relationship patterns; b) affective attunement; c) fit of knowledge about the relationship. The author describes the relationship between the concept of "present moment" in therapy and the role of eye contact. Eye contact produces emotional tension in the context of the "present moment". Moments of contact, however, require implicit and explicit knowledge about the relationship to be constructed simultaneously as well as development of affective interactions. Emotional impulses are stored in implicit memory, which has no immediate availability. However, therapy--including psychodrama--attaches words to behaviors that are beyond the verbal levels as well, and therefore it extends the domain of memory. This is the way in which non-symbolized emotional behavior (including eye contact) and the play's verbal level with symbolic representations of memories are interconnected.

  10. The interaction between cations and anionic groups inducing SHG enhancement in a series of apatite-like crystals: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Qun; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049; Department of Physics, School of Science, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832000

    2014-11-15

    It is an interesting topic to reveal the origin of the SHG intensity enhancement after substitution from alkali and alkali-earth metal atoms to cadmium in a series of apatite-like borates KSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}, Ca{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}F, Cd{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}F. Combined with the first-principles method, SHG-density method and real-space atom-cutting method, the electronic structure, the optical properties and the contribution of respective ion and ion groups have been investigated. Second harmonic generation (SHG) responses are mainly attributed to BO{sub 3} groups with π conjugated configuration and their alignment framework. The contributions of A site are more important inmore » CaBOF and CdBOF compounds than in KSrBO. It is also demonstrated that the strong covalent interactions between the boron–oxygen groups and the cadmium atoms contribute the enhancement of SHG responses after substitution from alkali and alkali-earth metal atoms. - graphical abstract: Combined with the first-principles method, SHG-density method and real-space atom-cutting method, the enhancement of SHG response are attributed to the interaction between cadmium and BO{sub 3} groups. - Highlights: • SHG response on a series of apatite-like borates was studied by a SHG-density method. • SHG responses are mainly attributed to BO{sub 3} groups and their alignment framework. • The contributions of A site are more important in CaBOF and CdBOF than in KSrBO. • Covalent interaction between BO and Cd is responsible for SHG of CdBOF.« less

  11. The Effect of Interactions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of APOA1/APOC3 with Food Group Intakes on the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Esfahani, Firoozeh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Daneshpour, Maryam S.; Mottaghi, Azadeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of dietary food groups and genetic variants of APOA1/APOC3, relative to Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) risk in adults. Methods: In this matched nested case-control study, 414 MetS subjects and 414 controls were selected from among participants of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Dietary intake was assessed with the use of a valid and reliable semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), APOA1 (rs670, −75G>A and rs5069, +83C>T/APOC3 rs5128 C3238>G) were genotyped by the conventional polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: The mean (SD) of age was 40.7 (13) and 41.2 (13) years in male cases and controls versus 44.0 (11) and 44.0 (12) years in female case and controls. A significant interaction between intake quartiles of the sugar group and APOA1 combined group (GA+AA/CT+TT) SNPs was found; The ORs for these genotype carriers were (1, 0.44, 0.36, 0.23; P trend<0.001) in quartiles of intake, relative to other combined genotypes (P interaction=0.02). MetS risk appeared to be increased significantly in higher quartiles of sweet beverages and fish intakes in the GA+AA/CT+TT/CC genotypes of APOA1/APOC3 SNPs, compared to other genotypes (P interaction=0.01). The combined effect of genotypes of APOC3/APOA1 showed further decrease in MetS risk in higher quartiles of sugar group intakes (OR: 1, 0.24, 0.26, 0.14, P trend=0.001) relative to other combinations (P interaction=0.008). Conclusion: Results obtained demonstrate that some dietary food groups (sugar, fish, and sweet beverages) modulate the effect of APOA1/APOC3 SNPs in relation to MetS risk. PMID:28496949

  12. Local and nonlocal order parameters in the Kitaev chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitov, Gennady Y.

    2018-02-01

    We have calculated order parameters for the phases of the Kitaev chain with interaction and dimerization at a special symmetric point applying the Jordan-Wigner and other duality transformations. We use string order parameters (SOPs) defined via the correlation functions of the Majorana string operators. The SOPs are mapped onto the local order parameters of some dual Hamiltonians and easily calculated. We have shown that the phase diagram of the interacting dimerized chain comprises the phases with the conventional local order as well as the phases with nonlocal SOPs. From the results for the critical indices, we infer the two-dimensional Ising universality class of criticality at the particular symmetry point where the model is exactly solvable.

  13. Brief Report: Effects of Video-Based Group Instruction on Spontaneous Social Interaction of Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plavnick, Joshua B.; Dueñas, Ana D.

    2018-01-01

    Four adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were taught to interact with peers by asking social questions or commenting about others during game play or group activities. Participants were shown a video model and then given an opportunity to perform the social behavior depicted in the model when playing a game with one another. All…

  14. The interaction between erectile dysfunction complaints and depression in men: a cross-sectional study about sleep, hormones and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Soterio-Pires, J H; Hirotsu, C; Kim, L J; Bittencourt, L; Tufik, S; Andersen, M L

    2017-03-01

    Depression (DEP) is one of the main disabling diseases and is considered a contributor factor for erectile dysfunction (ED). Both of these conditions may be associated with hormonal changes and sleep disturbances. We aimed to evaluate the interaction between ED complaints and depression symptoms on sleep parameters, hormone levels and quality of life in men. This was a cross-sectional study of 468 men aged 20-80 years. The participants were classified according to the presence of ED and/or DEP in groups of healthy individuals, ED, DEP and DEP with ED (DEP-ED). All participants completed questionnaires about sleep, clinical history and quality of life, and underwent polysomnography with blood collection the following morning. ED participants showed higher frequency of insomnia symptoms (65.5%), whereas DEP group had more complaints of difficulty in falling asleep and early morning awakening. In the polysomnography, all groups showed similar parameters. No differences were found in cortisol and total testosterone levels; however, free testosterone levels and the physiological domain of quality of life were lower in DEP-ED group. ED and DEP, as independent factors, negatively affected subjective sleep parameters. The interaction between these factors led to a low quality of life and was related to a decrease in free testosterone levels.

  15. Quantifying Additive Interactions of the Osmolyte Proline with Individual Functional Groups of Proteins: Comparisons with Urea and Glycine Betaine, Interpretation of m-Values

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Roger C.; Guinn, Emily J.; Capp, Michael W.; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Record, M. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To quantify interactions of the osmolyte L-proline with protein functional groups and predict its effects on protein processes, we use vapor pressure osmometry to determine chemical potential derivatives dµ2/dm3 = µ23 quantifying preferential interactions of proline (component 3) with 21 solutes (component 2) selected to display different combinations of aliphatic or aromatic C, amide, carboxylate, phosphate or hydroxyl O, and/or amide or cationic N surface. Solubility data yield µ23 values for 4 less-soluble solutes. Values of µ23 are dissected using an ASA-based analysis to test the hypothesis of additivity and obtain α-values (proline interaction potentials) for these eight surface types and three inorganic ions. Values of µ23 predicted from these α-values agree with experiment, demonstrating additivity. Molecular interpretation of α-values using the solute partitioning model yields partition coefficients (Kp) quantifying the local accumulation or exclusion of proline in the hydration water of each functional group. Interactions of proline with native protein surface and effects of proline on protein unfolding are predicted from α-values and ASA information and compared with experimental data, with results for glycine betaine and urea, and with predictions from transfer free energy analysis. We conclude that proline stabilizes proteins because of its unfavorable interactions with (exclusion from) amide oxygens and aliphatic hydrocarbon surface exposed in unfolding, and that proline is an effective in vivo osmolyte because of the osmolality increase resulting from its unfavorable interactions with anionic (carboxylate and phosphate) and amide oxygens and aliphatic hydrocarbon groups on the surface of cytoplasmic proteins and nucleic acids. PMID:23909383

  16. Renormalization group approach to symmetry protected topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nieuwenburg, Evert P. L.; Schnyder, Andreas P.; Chen, Wei

    2018-04-01

    A defining feature of a symmetry protected topological phase (SPT) in one dimension is the degeneracy of the Schmidt values for any given bipartition. For the system to go through a topological phase transition separating two SPTs, the Schmidt values must either split or cross at the critical point in order to change their degeneracies. A renormalization group (RG) approach based on this splitting or crossing is proposed, through which we obtain an RG flow that identifies the topological phase transitions in the parameter space. Our approach can be implemented numerically in an efficient manner, for example, using the matrix product state formalism, since only the largest first few Schmidt values need to be calculated with sufficient accuracy. Using several concrete models, we demonstrate that the critical points and fixed points of the RG flow coincide with the maxima and minima of the entanglement entropy, respectively, and the method can serve as a numerically efficient tool to analyze interacting SPTs in the parameter space.

  17. II ZWICKY 23 AND FAMILY: A GROUP IN INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, Elizabeth M. H.; Gallagher III, John S.; Cigan, Phillip J.

    2016-09-01

    II Zw 23 (UGC 3179) is a luminous (M{sub B}  ∼ −21) nearby compact narrow emission line starburst galaxy with blue optical colors and strong emission lines. We present a photometric and morphological study of II Zw 23 and its interacting companion, KPG103a, using data obtained with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope in combination with a WFPC2 image from the Hubble Space Telescope archives. II Zw 23 has a highly disturbed outer structure with long trails of debris that may be contributing material toward the production of tidal dwarfs. Its central regions appear disky, a structure that is consistent with themore » overall rotation pattern observed in the H α velocity field measured from Densepak observations obtained with WIYN. We find additional evidence for interaction in this system, including the discovery of a new tidal loop extending from an associated dwarf galaxy, which appears to be in the process of disrupting along its orbit. We also present H α equivalent widths and discuss the relative star formation rates across this interacting system.« less

  18. Inter- and Intrafamily Interaction in Multifamily Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Edward; DeGroot, Donald

    1981-01-01

    Studied how family members utilized the intrafamily interaction more than the interfamily mode. With the interfamily mode, either mothers or fathers tended to dominate. When dominant, mothers talked more to other mothers, while fathers talked mostly to children or fathers. Explored the possible significance of shifting parental dominance patterns.…

  19. Exploring the disruptive effects of psychopathy and aggression on group processes and group effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Baysinger, Michael A; Scherer, Kelly T; LeBreton, James M

    2014-01-01

    The present research examines the influence of implicit and explicit personality characteristics on group process and effectiveness. Individuals from 112 groups participated in 2 problem-solving tasks and completed measures of group process and effectiveness. Results indicated that groups characterized by higher levels of psychopathy and implicit aggression tended to have more dysfunctional interactions and negative perceptions of the group. In addition, task participation and negative socioemotional behaviors fully mediated the relationship between group personality traits and group commitment and cohesion, and negative socioemotional behaviors fully mediated the relationship between group personality and performance on both tasks. Implications of antisocial traits for group interactions and performance, as well as for future theory and research, are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Do Handheld Devices Facilitate Face-to-Face Collaboration? Handheld Devices with Large Shared Display Groupware to Facilitate Group Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Kao, L.-C.

    2007-01-01

    One-to-one computing environments change and improve classroom dynamics as individual students can bring handheld devices fitted with wireless communication capabilities into the classrooms. However, the screens of handheld devices, being designed for individual-user mobile application, limit promotion of interaction among groups of learners. This…

  1. Volume-energy parameters for heat transfer to supercritical fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumakawa, A.; Niino, M.; Hendricks, R. C.; Giarratano, P. J.; Arp, V. D.

    1986-01-01

    Reduced Nusselt numbers of supercritical fluids from different sources were grouped by several volume-energy parameters. A modified bulk expansion parameter was introduced based on a comparative analysis of data scatter. Heat transfer experiments on liquefied methane were conducted under near-critical conditions in order to confirm the usefulness of the parameters. It was experimentally revealed that heat transfer characteristics of near-critical methane are similar to those of hydrogen. It was shown that the modified bulk expansion parameter and the Gibbs-energy parameter grouped the heat transfer data of hydrogen, oxygen and methane including the present data on near-critical methane. It was also indicated that the effects of surface roughness on heat transfer were very important in grouping the data of high Reynolds numbers.

  2. A compilation of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics for application to geochemical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palandri, James L.; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2004-01-01

    Geochemical reaction path modeling is useful for rapidly assessing the extent of water-aqueous-gas interactions both in natural systems and in industrial processes. Modeling of some systems, such as those at low temperature with relatively high hydrologic flow rates, or those perturbed by the subsurface injection of industrial waste such as CO2 or H2S, must account for the relatively slow kinetics of mineral-gas-water interactions. We have therefore compiled parameters conforming to a general Arrhenius-type rate equation, for over 70 minerals, including phases from all the major classes of silicates, most carbonates, and many other non-silicates. The compiled dissolution rate constants range from -0.21 log moles m-2 s-1 for halite, to -17.44 log moles m-2 s-1 for kyanite, for conditions far from equilibrium, at 25 ?C, and pH near neutral. These data have been added to a computer code that simulates an infinitely well-stirred batch reactor, allowing computation of mass transfer as a function of time. Actual equilibration rates are expected to be much slower than those predicted by the selected computer code, primarily because actual geochemical processes commonly involve flow through porous or fractured media, wherein the development of concentration gradients in the aqueous phase near mineral surfaces, which results in decreased absolute chemical affinity and slower reaction rates. Further differences between observed and computed reaction rates may occur because of variables beyond the scope of most geochemical simulators, such as variation in grain size, aquifer heterogeneity, preferred fluid flow paths, primary and secondary mineral coatings, and secondary minerals that may lead to decreased porosity and clogged pore throats.

  3. [Pharmacokinetic interaction of pioglitazone hydrochloride and atorvastatin calcium in Beagle dogs].

    PubMed

    Chen, He-Li; Zhang, Wen-Ping; Yang, Fu-Ying; Wang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Wen-Cheng; Dang, Hong-Wan

    2013-05-01

    The object of this study is to investigate the pharmacokinetic interaction of pioglitazone hydrochloride and atorvastatin calcium in healthy adult Beagle dogs following single and multiple oral dose administration. A randomized, cross-over study was conducted with nine healthy adult Beagle dogs assigned to three groups. Each group was arranged to take atorvastatin calcium (A), pioglitazone hydrochloride (B), atorvastatin calcium and pioglitazone hydrochloride (C) orally in the first period, to take B, C, A in the second period, and to take C, A, B in the third period for 6 days respectively. The blood samples were collected at the first and the sixth day after the administration, plasma drug concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS, a one-week wash-out period was needed between each period. The pharmacokinetic parameters of drug combination group and the drug alone group were calculated by statistical moment method, calculation of C(max) and AUC(0-t) was done by using 90% confidence interval method of the bioequivalence and bioavailability degree module DAS 3.2.1 software statistics. Compared with the separate administration, the main pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max) and AUC(0-t)) of joint use of pioglitazone hydrochloride and atorvastatin calcium within 90% confidence intervals for bioequivalence statistics were unqualified, the mean t(max) with standard deviation used paired Wilcoxon test resulted P > 0.05. There was no significant difference within t1/2, CL(int), MRT, V/F. Pioglitazone hydrochloride and atorvastatin calcium had pharmacokinetic interaction in healthy adult Beagle dogs.

  4. Order-parameter model for unstable multilane traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubashevsky, Ihor A.; Mahnke, Reinhard

    2000-11-01

    We discuss a phenomenological approach to the description of unstable vehicle motion on multilane highways that explains in a simple way the observed sequence of the ``free flow <--> synchronized mode <--> jam'' phase transitions as well as the hysteresis in these transitions. We introduce a variable called an order parameter that accounts for possible correlations in the vehicle motion at different lanes. So, it is principally due to the ``many-body'' effects in the car interaction in contrast to such variables as the mean car density and velocity being actually the zeroth and first moments of the ``one-particle'' distribution function. Therefore, we regard the order parameter as an additional independent state variable of traffic flow. We assume that these correlations are due to a small group of ``fast'' drivers and by taking into account the general properties of the driver behavior we formulate a governing equation for the order parameter. In this context we analyze the instability of homogeneous traffic flow that manifested itself in the above-mentioned phase transitions and gave rise to the hysteresis in both of them. Besides, the jam is characterized by the vehicle flows at different lanes which are independent of one another. We specify a certain simplified model in order to study the general features of the car cluster self-formation under the ``free flow <--> synchronized motion'' phase transition. In particular, we show that the main local parameters of the developed cluster are determined by the state characteristics of vehicle motion only.

  5. Spectral Induced Polarization monitoring of the groundwater physico-chemical parameters daily variations for stream-groundwater interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jougnot, Damien; Camerlynck, Christian; Robain, Henri; Tallec, Gaëlle; Ribolzi, Olivier; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2017-04-01

    performed. Relating the daily fluctuations of the groundwater complex conductivity and the river physico-chemical parameters could therefore establish a new proxy to characterize stream-groundwater interactions. In parallel to the field measurements, laboratory experiments have been conducted on soil samples from the two sites. These measurements provide a better understanding of the complex conductivity signature of the samples submitted to saturation and pore water physico-chemical changes. This work is in progress but the first results already show that the method has a real interest for the monitoring of daily variations of the physico-chemistry properties of the groundwater and their relations to those of the stream.

  6. Group Processes in Helping Groups: Toward a Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Martin; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Analyzed 10 interaction dimensions of group behavior and three emotional atmosphere categories among old and young participants in 12 "support-discussion" groups. Results showed significant differences with respect to frequencies of boundary, self-disclosure, and support behaviors. In addition, the young showed signs of boredom more frequently.…

  7. Role of four-fermion interaction and impurity in the states of two-dimensional semi-Dirac materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing

    2018-03-28

    We study the effects of four-fermion interaction and impurity on the low-energy states of 2D semi-Dirac materials by virtue of the unbiased renormalization group approach. The coupled flow equations that govern the energy-dependent evolutions of all correlated interaction parameters are derived after taking into account one-loop corrections from the interplay between four-fermion interaction and impurity. Whether and how four-fermion interaction and impurity influence the low-energy properties of 2D semi-Dirac materials are discreetly explored and addressed attentively. After carrying out the standard renormalization group analysis, we find that both trivial insulating and nontrivial semimetal states are qualitatively stable against all four kinds of four-fermion interactions. However, while switching on both four-fermion interaction and impurity, certain insulator-semimetal phase transitions and the distance of Dirac nodal points can be respectively induced and modified due to their strong interplay and intimate competition. Moreover, several non-Fermi liquid behaviors that deviate from the conventional Fermi liquids are exhibited at the lowest-energy limit.

  8. Role of four-fermion interaction and impurity in the states of two-dimensional semi-Dirac materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing

    2018-03-01

    We study the effects of four-fermion interaction and impurity on the low-energy states of 2D semi-Dirac materials by virtue of the unbiased renormalization group approach. The coupled flow equations that govern the energy-dependent evolutions of all correlated interaction parameters are derived after taking into account one-loop corrections from the interplay between four-fermion interaction and impurity. Whether and how four-fermion interaction and impurity influence the low-energy properties of 2D semi-Dirac materials are discreetly explored and addressed attentively. After carrying out the standard renormalization group analysis, we find that both trivial insulating and nontrivial semimetal states are qualitatively stable against all four kinds of four-fermion interactions. However, while switching on both four-fermion interaction and impurity, certain insulator-semimetal phase transitions and the distance of Dirac nodal points can be respectively induced and modified due to their strong interplay and intimate competition. Moreover, several non-Fermi liquid behaviors that deviate from the conventional Fermi liquids are exhibited at the lowest-energy limit.

  9. Functional group interactions with single wall carbon NT studied by ab-initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicero, Giancarlo

    2005-03-01

    With the goal of designing functionalized nanotube materials, recent AFM measurements have succeeded in determining the force between individual chemical groups an single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) [1]. In order to rationalize and understand these experimental results, we have performed Density Functional Theory calculations for a number of structural arrangements of model tips functionalized with the same groups as those used experimentally. Our calculations include full geometry optimization of the composite SWCNT/tip system as well as `pulling-out' simulations to compute interaction forces. We considered (14x0), semi- conducting tubes, and AFM tips where modeled by a SiH3CH2-X molecule, with X- representing -CN, -CH3, -NH2 or -CH2OCH2. As X is varied, computed forces reproduce the same trend as that observed experimentally when n-doped SWCNT are considered; significantly different trends are observed for neutral and p-doped tubes. We propose that the polar solvent present in the experimental setup may be responsible for the n-doping of the nanotube suggested by our calculations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. [1] M.C. LeMieux et al, preprint

  10. Genetic variation in aggregation behaviour and interacting phenotypes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Anne-Sophie; Jeanson, Raphael; Pasquaretta, Cristian; Rebaudo, Francois; Sueur, Cedric; Mery, Frederic

    2016-03-30

    Aggregation behaviour is the tendency for animals to group together, which may have important consequences on individual fitness. We used a combination of experimental and simulation approaches to study how genetic variation and social environment interact to influence aggregation dynamics in Drosophila To do this, we used two different natural lines of Drosophila that arise from a polymorphism in the foraging gene (rovers and sitters). We placed groups of flies in a heated arena. Flies could freely move towards one of two small, cooler refuge areas. In groups of the same strain, sitters had a greater tendency to aggregate. The observed behavioural variation was based on only two parameters: the probability of entering a refuge and the likelihood of choosing a refuge based on the number of individuals present. We then directly addressed how different strains interact by mixing rovers and sitters within a group. Aggregation behaviour of each line was strongly affected by the presence of the other strain, without changing the decision rules used by each. Individuals obeying local rules shaped complex group dynamics via a constant feedback loop between the individual and the group. This study could help to identify the circumstances under which particular group compositions may improve individual fitness through underlying aggregation mechanisms under specific environmental conditions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Object grouping based on real-world regularities facilitates perception by reducing competitive interactions in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Daniel; Stein, Timo; Peelen, Marius V.

    2014-01-01

    In virtually every real-life situation humans are confronted with complex and cluttered visual environments that contain a multitude of objects. Because of the limited capacity of the visual system, objects compete for neural representation and cognitive processing resources. Previous work has shown that such attentional competition is partly object based, such that competition among elements is reduced when these elements perceptually group into an object based on low-level cues. Here, using functional MRI (fMRI) and behavioral measures, we show that the attentional benefit of grouping extends to higher-level grouping based on the relative position of objects as experienced in the real world. An fMRI study designed to measure competitive interactions among objects in human visual cortex revealed reduced neural competition between objects when these were presented in commonly experienced configurations, such as a lamp above a table, relative to the same objects presented in other configurations. In behavioral visual search studies, we then related this reduced neural competition to improved target detection when distracter objects were shown in regular configurations. Control studies showed that low-level grouping could not account for these results. We interpret these findings as reflecting the grouping of objects based on higher-level spatial-relational knowledge acquired through a lifetime of seeing objects in specific configurations. This interobject grouping effectively reduces the number of objects that compete for representation and thereby contributes to the efficiency of real-world perception. PMID:25024190

  12. Interacting 3-form dark energy models: Distinguishing interactions and avoiding the Little Sibling of the Big Rip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, João; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Kumar, K. Sravan; Marto, João; Tavakoli, Yaser

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we consider 3-form dark energy (DE) models with interactions in the dark sector. We aim to distinguish the phenomenological interactions that are defined through the dark matter (DM) and the DE energy densities. We do our analysis mainly in two stages. In the first stage, we identify the non-interacting 3-form DE model which generically leads to an abrupt late-time cosmological event which is known as the little sibling of the Big Rip (LSBR). We classify the interactions which can possibly avoid this late-time abrupt event. We also study the parameter space of the model that is consistent with the interaction between DM and DE energy densities at present as indicated by recent studies based on BAO and SDSS data. In the later stage, we observationally distinguish those interactions using the statefinder hierarchy parameters S3(1), S4(1), S3(1), S5(1). We also compute the growth factor parameter ɛ(z) for the various interactions we consider herein and use the composite null diagnostic (CND) S3(1), ɛ(z) } as a tool to characterise those interactions by measuring their departures from the concordance model. In addition, we make a preliminary analysis of our model in light of the recently released data by SDSS III on the measurement of the linear growth rate of structure.

  13. Steric parameters, molecular modeling and hydropathic interaction analysis of the pharmacology of para-substituted methcathinone analogues

    PubMed Central

    Sakloth, F; Kolanos, R; Mosier, P D; Bonano, J S; Banks, M L; Partilla, J S; Baumann, M H; Negus, S S; Glennon, R A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is growing concern over the abuse of certain psychostimulant methcathinone (MCAT) analogues. This study extends an initial quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) investigation that demonstrated important steric considerations of seven 4- (or para-)substituted analogues of MCAT. Specifically, the steric character (Taft's steric ES) of the 4-position substituent affected in vitro potency to induce monoamine release via dopamine and 5-HT transporters (DAT and SERT) and in vivo modulation of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). Here, we have assessed the effects of other steric properties of the 4-position substituents. Experimental Approach Definitive steric parameters that more explicitly focus on the volume, width and length of the MCAT 4-position substituents were assessed. In addition, homology models of human DAT and human SERT based upon the crystallized Drosophila DAT were constructed and docking studies were performed, followed by hydropathic interaction (HINT) analysis of the docking results. Key Results The potency of seven MCAT analogues at DAT was negatively correlated with the volume and maximal width of their 4-position substituents, whereas potency at SERT increased as substituent volume and length increased. SERT/DAT selectivity, as well as abuse-related drug effects in the ICSS procedure, also correlated with the same parameters. Docking solutions offered a means of visualizing these findings. Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that steric aspects of the 4-position substituents of MCAT analogues are key determinants of their action and selectivity, and that the hydrophobic nature of these substituents is involved in their potency at SERT. PMID:25522019

  14. Interactions between cauliflower and Rhizoctonia anastomosis groups with different levels of aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Pannecoucque, Joke; Höfte, Monica

    2009-01-01

    Background The soil borne fungus Rhizoctonia is one of the most important plant pathogenic fungi, with a wide host range and worldwide distribution. In cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis), several anastomosis groups (AGs) including both multinucleate R. solani and binucleate Rhizoctonia species have been identified showing different levels of aggressiveness. The infection and colonization process of Rhizoctonia during pathogenic interactions is well described. In contrast, insights into processes during interactions with weak aggressive or non-pathogenic isolates are limited. In this study the interaction of cauliflower with seven R. solani AGs and one binucleate Rhizoctonia AG differing in aggressiveness, was compared. Using microscopic and histopathological techniques, the early steps of the infection process, the colonization process and several host responses were studied. Results For aggressive Rhizoctonia AGs (R. solani AG 1-1B, AG 1-1C, AG 2-1, AG 2-2 IIIb and AG 4 HGII), a higher developmental rate was detected for several steps of the infection process, including directed growth along anticlinal cell walls and formation of T-shaped branches, infection cushion formation and stomatal penetration. Weak or non-aggressive AGs (R. solani AG 5, AG 3 and binucleate Rhizoctonia AG K) required more time, notwithstanding all AGs were able to penetrate cauliflower hypocotyls. Histopathological observations indicated that Rhizoctonia AGs provoked differential host responses and pectin degradation. We demonstrated the pronounced deposition of phenolic compounds and callose against weak and non-aggressive AGs which resulted in a delay or complete block of the host colonization. Degradation of pectic compounds was observed for all pathogenic AGs, except for AG 2-2 IIIb. Ranking the AGs based on infection rate, level of induced host responses and pectin degradation revealed a strong correlation with the disease severity caused by the AGs. Conclusion The

  15. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lauro Grotto, Rosapia; Guazzini, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: (1) they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious) emotions to combine into structured group patterns; (2) they have a certain degree of stability in time; (3) they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; (4) they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical “leadership” pattern, and in “cognitive” terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e., the group behaves “as if” it was assuming that). Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: (1) are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? (2) can these states be differentiated in structural terms? (3) to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical

  16. Identifying mechanical property parameters of planetary soil using in-situ data obtained from exploration rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liang; Gao, Haibo; Liu, Zhen; Deng, Zongquan; Liu, Guangjun

    2015-12-01

    Identifying the mechanical property parameters of planetary soil based on terramechanics models using in-situ data obtained from autonomous planetary exploration rovers is both an important scientific goal and essential for control strategy optimization and high-fidelity simulations of rovers. However, identifying all the terrain parameters is a challenging task because of the nonlinear and coupling nature of the involved functions. Three parameter identification methods are presented in this paper to serve different purposes based on an improved terramechanics model that takes into account the effects of slip, wheel lugs, etc. Parameter sensitivity and coupling of the equations are analyzed, and the parameters are grouped according to their sensitivity to the normal force, resistance moment and drawbar pull. An iterative identification method using the original integral model is developed first. In order to realize real-time identification, the model is then simplified by linearizing the normal and shearing stresses to derive decoupled closed-form analytical equations. Each equation contains one or two groups of soil parameters, making step-by-step identification of all the unknowns feasible. Experiments were performed using six different types of single-wheels as well as a four-wheeled rover moving on planetary soil simulant. All the unknown model parameters were identified using the measured data and compared with the values obtained by conventional experiments. It is verified that the proposed iterative identification method provides improved accuracy, making it suitable for scientific studies of soil properties, whereas the step-by-step identification methods based on simplified models require less calculation time, making them more suitable for real-time applications. The models have less than 10% margin of error comparing with the measured results when predicting the interaction forces and moments using the corresponding identified parameters.

  17. Interaction of antimicrobial preservatives with blow-fill-seal packs: correlating sorption with solubility parameters.

    PubMed

    Amin, Aeshna; Dare, Manish; Sangamwar, Abhay; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interaction of four commonly used ophthalmic antimicrobial preservatives [benzyl alcohol (BA), chlorbutol (CBL), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), and chlorhexidine gluconate (CG)] with Blow-Fill-Seal (BFS) packs. Effect of packaging material [low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP)], humidity (25% RH, 75% RH) and concentration (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mM BA/CBL in LDPE) was studied. BKC and CG gave negligible loss (<4%) in BFS packs over a period of 3 months. BA and CBL, however, gave marked losses in LDPE (ca. 70-90%) and PP (ca. 7-25%) packs. Humidity did not have any effect on the sorption loss of any preservative. Loss of BA switched from Case II to anomalous behavior with increasing initial concentration. A two-stage sorption behavior was inherent at all concentrations. Loss of CBL followed anomalous behavior with biphasic kinetics of loss. It was concluded that all the four preservatives were appropriate for use in PP BFS packs. However, only BKC and CG were amenable to be used in LDPE BFS packs. Lastly, an empirical expression consisting of the "solubility parameter distance" and "molar volume" of preservatives was developed to correlate the preservative loss in LDPE with the physicochemical properties of the preservatives.

  18. Insole-pressure distribution for normal children in different age groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-Cheng; Lyon, Roger; Thometz, John G; Curtin, Brian; Tarima, Serge; Tassone, Channing

    2011-09-01

    In measuring plantar pressures during gait, earlier methods have used a platform system that does not take into account the interactions feet have with orthotics and shoe wearing. The purpose of the study was to provide normal insole plantar pressure parameter data during stance phase using the Pedar pressure insole system. Twenty-nine normal children, age 6 to 16 years, were recruited and walked along the 25 m walkway at self-selected speeds. Patients were divided into 2 separate groups for statistical analysis--juniors (< 12 y old) and teenagers (> 13 y old). The pressure map was divided into 8 regions (masks) determined by anatomic landmarks and a total of 7 pressure parameters were analyzed of each mask. We did not detect significant differences in foot pressures between juniors and teenagers when regarding sex, or left and right feet for 7 parameters measured. This normative data will provide a basis with which to more accurately assess pediatric pathologic foot deformities and to distinguish dynamic foot deformities from anatomic foot deformities. THE LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II.

  19. Transitions of interaction outcomes in a uni-directional consumer-resource system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    A uni-directional consumer-resource system of two species is analyzed. Our aim is to understand the mechanisms that determine how the interaction outcomes depend on the context of the interaction; that is, on the model parameters. The dynamic behavior of the model is described and, in particular, it is demonstrated that no periodic orbits exist. Then the parameter (factor) space is shown to be divided into four regions, which correspond to the four forms of interaction outcomes; i.e. mutualism, commensalism, parasitism and amensalism. It is shown that the interaction outcomes of the system transition smoothly among these four forms when the parameters of the system are varied continuously. Varying each parameter individually or varying pairs of parameters can also lead to smooth transitions between the interaction outcomes. The analysis leads to both conditions for which each species achieves its maximal density, and situations in which periodic oscillations of the interaction outcomes emerge. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Trans-activation of the Tetrahymena group I intron ribozyme via a non-native RNA-RNA interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ikawa, Y; Shiraishi, H; Inoue, T

    1999-01-01

    The peripheral P2.1 domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron ribozyme has been shown to be non-essential for splicing. We found, however, that separately prepared P2.1 RNA efficiently accelerates the 3' splice-site-specific hydrolysis reaction of a mutant ribozyme lacking both P2.1 and its upstream region in trans. We report here the unusual properties of this trans-activation. Compensatory mutational analysis revealed that non-native long-range base-pairings between the loop region of P2.1 RNA and L5c region of the mutant ribozyme are needed for the activation in spite of the fact that P2.1 forms base-pairings with P9.1 in the Tetrahymena ribozyme. The trans -activation depends on the non-native RNA-RNA interaction together with the higher order structure of P2.1 RNA. This activation is unique among the known trans-activations that utilize native tertiary interactions or RNA chaperons. PMID:10075996

  1. Access to Space Interactive Design Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, John; Cutlip, William; Hametz, Mark

    2000-01-01

    The Access To Space (ATS) Group at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) supports the science and technology community at GSFC by facilitating frequent and affordable opportunities for access to space. Through partnerships established with access mode suppliers, the ATS Group has developed an interactive Mission Design web site. The ATS web site provides both the information and the tools necessary to assist mission planners in selecting and planning their ride to space. This includes the evaluation of single payloads vs. ride-sharing opportunities to reduce the cost of access to space. Features of this site include the following: (1) Mission Database. Our mission database contains a listing of missions ranging from proposed missions to manifested. Missions can be entered by our user community through data input tools. Data is then accessed by users through various search engines: orbit parameters, ride-share opportunities, spacecraft parameters, other mission notes, launch vehicle, and contact information. (2) Launch Vehicle Toolboxes. The launch vehicle toolboxes provide the user a full range of information on vehicle classes and individual configurations. Topics include: general information, environments, performance, payload interface, available volume, and launch sites.

  2. Optimal structure and parameter learning of Ising models

    DOE PAGES

    Lokhov, Andrey; Vuffray, Marc Denis; Misra, Sidhant; ...

    2018-03-16

    Reconstruction of the structure and parameters of an Ising model from binary samples is a problem of practical importance in a variety of disciplines, ranging from statistical physics and computational biology to image processing and machine learning. The focus of the research community shifted toward developing universal reconstruction algorithms that are both computationally efficient and require the minimal amount of expensive data. Here, we introduce a new method, interaction screening, which accurately estimates model parameters using local optimization problems. The algorithm provably achieves perfect graph structure recovery with an information-theoretically optimal number of samples, notably in the low-temperature regime, whichmore » is known to be the hardest for learning. Here, the efficacy of interaction screening is assessed through extensive numerical tests on synthetic Ising models of various topologies with different types of interactions, as well as on real data produced by a D-Wave quantum computer. Finally, this study shows that the interaction screening method is an exact, tractable, and optimal technique that universally solves the inverse Ising problem.« less

  3. Optimal structure and parameter learning of Ising models

    SciTech Connect

    Lokhov, Andrey; Vuffray, Marc Denis; Misra, Sidhant

    Reconstruction of the structure and parameters of an Ising model from binary samples is a problem of practical importance in a variety of disciplines, ranging from statistical physics and computational biology to image processing and machine learning. The focus of the research community shifted toward developing universal reconstruction algorithms that are both computationally efficient and require the minimal amount of expensive data. Here, we introduce a new method, interaction screening, which accurately estimates model parameters using local optimization problems. The algorithm provably achieves perfect graph structure recovery with an information-theoretically optimal number of samples, notably in the low-temperature regime, whichmore » is known to be the hardest for learning. Here, the efficacy of interaction screening is assessed through extensive numerical tests on synthetic Ising models of various topologies with different types of interactions, as well as on real data produced by a D-Wave quantum computer. Finally, this study shows that the interaction screening method is an exact, tractable, and optimal technique that universally solves the inverse Ising problem.« less

  4. Galaxy interactions in compact groups - II. Abundance and kinematic anomalies in HCG 91c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M.; Yun, Min S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.

    2015-07-01

    Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 91 (HCG 91) were observed with the WiFeS integral field spectrograph as part of our ongoing campaign targeting the ionized gas physics and kinematics inside star-forming members of compact groups. Here, we report the discovery of H II regions with abundance and kinematic offsets in the otherwise unremarkable star-forming spiral HCG 91c. The optical emission line analysis of this galaxy reveals that at least three H II regions harbour an oxygen abundance ˜0.15 dex lower than expected from their immediate surroundings and from the abundance gradient present in the inner regions of HCG 91c. The same star-forming regions are also associated with a small kinematic offset in the form of a lag of 5-10 km s-1 with respect to the local circular rotation of the gas. H I observations of HCG 91 from the Very Large Array and broad-band optical images from Pan-STARRS (Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System) suggest that HCG 91c is caught early in its interaction with the other members of HCG 91. We discuss different scenarios to explain the origin of the peculiar star-forming regions detected with WiFeS, and show that evidence points towards infalling and collapsing extraplanar gas clouds at the disc-halo interface, possibly as a consequence of long-range gravitational perturbations of HCG 91c from the other group members. As such, HCG 91c provides evidence that some of the perturbations possibly associated with the early phase of galaxy evolution in compact groups impact the star-forming disc locally, and on sub-kpc scales.

  5. Global investigation of composition and interaction networks in gut microbiomes of individuals belonging to diverse geographies and age-groups.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Deepak; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S

    2016-01-01

    Factors like ethnicity, diet and age of an individual have been hypothesized to play a role in determining the makeup of gut microbiome. In order to investigate the gut microbiome structure as well as the inter-microbial associations present therein, we have performed a comprehensive global comparative profiling of the structure (composition, relative heterogeneity and diversity) and the inter-microbial networks in the gut microbiomes of 399 individuals of eight different nationalities. The study identified certain geography-specific trends with respect to composition, intra-group heterogeneity and diversity of the gut microbiomes. Interestingly, the gut microbial association/mutual-exlusion networks were observed to exhibit several cross-geography trends. It was seen that though the composition of gut microbiomes of the American and European individuals were similar, there were distinct patterns in their microbial interaction networks. Amongst European gut-microbiomes, the co-occurrence network obtained for the Danish population was observed to be most dense. Distinct patterns were also observed within Chinese, Japanese and Indian datasets. While performing an age-wise comparison, it was observed that the microbial interactions increased with the age of individuals. Furthermore, certain bacterial groups were identified to be present only in the older age groups. The trends observed in gut microbial networks could be due to the inherent differences in the diet of individuals belonging to different nationalities. For example, the higher number of microbial associations in the Danish population as compared to the Spanish population, may be attributed to the evenly distributed diet of the later. This is in line with previously reported findings which indicate an increase in functional interdependency of microbes in individuals with higher nutritional status. To summarise, the present study identifies geography and age specific patterns in the composition as well as

  6. Density perturbation in the models reconstructed from jerk parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Srijita; Banerjee, Narayan

    2018-06-01

    The present work deals with the late time evolution of the linear density contrast in the dark energy models reconstructed from the jerk parameter. It is found that the non-interacting models are favoured compared to the models where an interaction is allowed in the dark sector.

  7. Visual exploration of parameter influence on phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Hess, Martin; Bremm, Sebastian; Weissgraeber, Stephanie; Hamacher, Kay; Goesele, Michael; Wiemeyer, Josef; von Landesberger, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships between organisms are frequently derived as phylogenetic trees inferred from multiple sequence alignments (MSAs). The MSA parameter space is exponentially large, so tens of thousands of potential trees can emerge for each dataset. A proposed visual-analytics approach can reveal the parameters' impact on the trees. Given input trees created with different parameter settings, it hierarchically clusters the trees according to their structural similarity. The most important clusters of similar trees are shown together with their parameters. This view offers interactive parameter exploration and automatic identification of relevant parameters. Biologists applied this approach to real data of 16S ribosomal RNA and protein sequences of ion channels. It revealed which parameters affected the tree structures. This led to a more reliable selection of the best trees.

  8. Theme-Oriented Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, R. Lynn; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes the three major influences on theme-oriented groups: theme-centered interactional, structured, and behavioral groups. Provides a comparison of the composition and structure of theme groups during the current decade. Summarizes the general principles thought to be important in the construction and development of theme-oriented groups.…

  9. AB0 blood groups and rhesus factor expression as prognostic parameters in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer - a retrospective multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Veronika; Polterauer, Stephan; Reinthaller, Alexander; Koelbl, Heinz; Achleitner, Regina; Berger, Astrid; Concin, Nicole

    2018-04-19

    AB0 blood groups and Rhesus factor expression have been associated with carcinogenesis, response to treatment and tumor progression in several malignancies. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that AB0 blood groups and Rhesus factor expression are associated with clinical outcome in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). AB0 blood groups and Rhesus factor expression were evaluated in a retrospective multicenter study including 518 patients with EOC. Their association with patients' survival was assessed using univariate and multivariable analyses. Neither AB0 blood groups nor Rhesus factor expression were associated with clinico-pathological parameters, recurrence-free, cancer-specific, or overall survival. In a subgroup of patients with high-grade serous adenocarcinoma, however, blood groups B and AB were associated with a better 5-year cancer-specific survival rate compared to blood groups A and 0 (60.3 ± 8.6% vs. 43.8 ± 3.6%, p = 0.04). Yet, this was not significant in multivariable analysis. AB0 blood groups and Rhesus factor expression are both neither associated with features of biologically aggressive disease nor clinical outcome in patients with EOC. Further investigation of the role of the blood group B antigen on cancer-specific survival in the subgroup of high-grade serous should be considered.

  10. A model for cross-cultural reciprocal interactions through mass media.

    PubMed

    González-Avella, Juan Carlos; Cosenza, Mario G; San Miguel, Maxi

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the problem of cross-cultural interactions through mass media in a model where two populations of social agents, each with its own internal dynamics, get information about each other through reciprocal global interactions. As the agent dynamics, we employ Axelrod's model for social influence. The global interaction fields correspond to the statistical mode of the states of the agents and represent mass media messages on the cultural trend originating in each population. Several phases are found in the collective behavior of either population depending on parameter values: two homogeneous phases, one having the state of the global field acting on that population, and the other consisting of a state different from that reached by the applied global field; and a disordered phase. In addition, the system displays nontrivial effects: (i) the emergence of a largest minority group of appreciable size sharing a state different from that of the applied global field; (ii) the appearance of localized ordered states for some values of parameters when the entire system is observed, consisting of one population in a homogeneous state and the other in a disordered state. This last situation can be considered as a social analogue to a chimera state arising in globally coupled populations of oscillators.

  11. The PRo3D View Planner - interactive simulation of Mars rover camera views to optimise capturing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traxler, Christoph; Ortner, Thomas; Hesina, Gerd; Barnes, Robert; Gupta, Sanjeev; Paar, Gerhard

    2017-04-01

    visualised. The parameters of the instrument's pan and tilt unit (PTU) can be altered via the user interface, or alternatively calculated by selecting a target point on the visualised DTM. In the 3D view, the visible region of the planetary surface, resulting from these settings and the camera field-of-view is visualised by a highlighted region with a red border, representing the instruments footprint. The camera view is simulated and rendered in a separate window and PTU parameters can be interactively adjusted, allowing viewpoints, directions, and the expected image to be visualised in real-time in order to allow users the fine-tuning of these settings. In this way, ideal viewpoints and PTU settings for various rover models and instruments can efficiently be defined, resulting in an optimum imagery of the regions of interest.

  12. Kinetics and binding sites for interaction of the prefoldin with a group II chaperonin: contiguous non-native substrate and chaperonin binding sites in the archaeal prefoldin.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Nomura, Tomoko; Zako, Tamotsu; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Iizuka, Ryo; Ueda, Hiroshi; Funatsu, Takashi; Leroux, Michel; Yohda, Masafumi

    2004-07-23

    Prefoldin is a jellyfish-shaped hexameric co-chaperone of the group II chaperonins. It captures a protein folding intermediate and transfers it to a group II chaperonin for completion of folding. The manner in which prefoldin interacts with its substrates and cooperates with the chaperonin is poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the interaction between a prefoldin and a chaperonin from hyperthermophilic archaea by immunoprecipitation, single molecule observation, and surface plasmon resonance. We demonstrate that Pyrococcus prefoldin interacts most tightly with its cognate chaperonin, and vice versa, suggesting species specificity in the interaction. Using truncation mutants, we uncovered by kinetic analyses that this interaction is multivalent in nature, consistent with multiple binding sites between the two chaperones. We present evidence that both N- and C-terminal regions of the prefoldin beta sub-unit are important for molecular chaperone activity and for the interaction with a chaperonin. Our data are consistent with substrate and chaperonin binding sites on prefoldin that are different but in close proximity, which suggests a possible handover mechanism of prefoldin substrates to the chaperonin.

  13. Ghost Dark Energy with Sign-changeable Interaction Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadeh, M. Abdollahi; Sheykhi, A.; Moradpour, H.

    2017-11-01

    Regarding the Veneziano ghost of QCD and its generalized form, we consider a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe filled by a pressureless matter and a dark energy component interacting with each other through a mutual sign-changeable interaction of positive coupling constant. Our study shows that, at the late time, for the deceleration parameter we have q → -1, while the equation of state parameter of the interacting ghost dark energy (GDE) does not cross the phantom line, namely ω D ≥ -1. We also extend our study to the generalized ghost dark energy (GGDE) model and show that, at late time, the equation of state parameter of the interacting GGDE also respects the phantom line in both flat and non-flat universes. Moreover, we find out that, unlike the non-flat universe, we have q → -1 at late time for flat FRW universe. In order to make the behavior of the underlying models more clear, the deceleration parameter q as well as the equation of state parameter w D for flat and closed universes have been plotted against the redshift parameter, z. All of the studied cases admit a transition in the expansion history of universe from a deceleration phase to an accelerated one around z ≈ 0.6.

  14. Stability of cooperation under image scoring in group interactions.

    PubMed

    Nax, Heinrich H; Perc, Matjaž; Szolnoki, Attila; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-07-15

    Image scoring sustains cooperation in the repeated two-player prisoner's dilemma through indirect reciprocity, even though defection is the uniquely dominant selfish behaviour in the one-shot game. Many real-world dilemma situations, however, firstly, take place in groups and, secondly, lack the necessary transparency to inform subjects reliably of others' individual past actions. Instead, there is revelation of information regarding groups, which allows for 'group scoring' but not for image scoring. Here, we study how sensitive the positive results related to image scoring are to information based on group scoring. We combine analytic results and computer simulations to specify the conditions for the emergence of cooperation. We show that under pure group scoring, that is, under the complete absence of image-scoring information, cooperation is unsustainable. Away from this extreme case, however, the necessary degree of image scoring relative to group scoring depends on the population size and is generally very small. We thus conclude that the positive results based on image scoring apply to a much broader range of informational settings that are relevant in the real world than previously assumed.

  15. The Role of Group Interaction in Collective Efficacy and CSCL Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shu-Ling; Hsu, Hsien-Yuan; Lin, Sunny S. J.; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Although research has identified the importance of interaction behaviors in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), very few attempts have been made to carry out in-depth analysis of interaction behaviors. This study thus applies both qualitative (e.g., content analyses, interviews) and quantitative methods in an attempt to investigate…

  16. Ages and structural and dynamical parameters of two globular clusters in the M81 group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Song; Wu, Zhenyu; Zhang, TianMeng; Zou, Hu; Zhou, Zhimin; Nie, Jundan; Zhou, Xu; Peng, Xiyang; Wang, Jiali; Wu, Jianghua; Du, Cuihua; Yuan, Qirong

    2017-07-01

    GC-1 and GC-2 are two globular clusters (GCs) in the remote halo of M81 and M82 in the M81 group discovered by Jang et al. using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. These two GCs were observed as part of the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) Multicolor Sky Survey using 14 intermediate-band filters covering a wavelength range of 4000-10 000 Å. We accurately determine these two clusters' ages and masses by comparing their spectral energy distributions (from 2267 to 20 000 Å, comprising photometric data in the near-ultraviolet of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, 14 BATC intermediate-band and Two Micron All Sky Survey near-infrared JHKs filters) with theoretical stellar population-synthesis models, resulting in ages of 15.50 ± 3.20 for GC-1 and 15.10 ± 2.70 Gyr for GC-2. The masses of GC-1 and GC-2 obtained here are 1.77-2.04 × 106 and 5.20-7.11 × 106 M⊙, respectively. In addition, the deep observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 on the HST are used to provide the surface brightness profiles of GC-1 and GC-2. The structural and dynamical parameters are derived from fitting the profiles to three different models; in particular, the internal velocity dispersions of GC-1 and GC-2 are derived, which can be compared with ones obtained based on spectral observations in the future. For the first time, in this paper, the rh versus MV diagram shows that GC-2 is an ultra-compact dwarf in the M81 group.

  17. Spatial trends in Pearson Type III statistical parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichty, R.W.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Spatial trends in the statistical parameters (mean, standard deviation, and skewness coefficient) of a Pearson Type III distribution of the logarithms of annual flood peaks for small rural basins (less than 90 km2) are delineated using a climate factor CT, (T=2-, 25-, and 100-yr recurrence intervals), which quantifies the effects of long-term climatic data (rainfall and pan evaporation) on observed T-yr floods. Maps showing trends in average parameter values demonstrate the geographically varying influence of climate on the magnitude of Pearson Type III statistical parameters. The spatial trends in variability of the parameter values characterize the sensitivity of statistical parameters to the interaction of basin-runoff characteristics (hydrology) and climate. -from Authors

  18. Theoretical study of γ-hexachlorocyclohexane and β-hexachlorocyclohexane isomers interaction with surface groups of activated carbon model.

    PubMed

    Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Durimel, Axelle; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises

    2014-06-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is employed in drinking water purification without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanism of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) onto it. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) is an organochlorinated contaminant present in water and soils of banana crops production zones of the Caribbean. The most relevant isomers of HCH are γ-HCH and β-HCH, both with great environmental persistence. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on HCH adsorption is done in order to help to understand the process and may lead to improve the AC selection process. A simplified AC model consisting of naphthalene with a functional group was used to assess the influence of SGs over the adsorption process. The Multiple Minima Hypersurface (MMH) methodology was employed to study γ-HCH and β-HCH interactions with different AC SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) under different hydration and pH conditions. The results obtained showed that association of HCH with SGs preferentially occurs between the axial protons of HCH and SG's oxygen atom, and the most favorable interactions occurring with charged SGs. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance HCH adsorption onto AC under neutral pH conditions. Finally, this work presents an inexpensive computer aided methodology for preselecting activated carbon SGs content for the removal of a given compound. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Differences of Tooth Colorimetric Parameters L*a*b* Depended on Age

    PubMed Central

    Krasniqi, Teuta Pustina; Lila-Krasniqi, Zana; Ajeti, Nexhmije; Shala, Kujtim; Bicaj, Teuta; Dula, Linda

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The study aimed to analyse differences in colourimetric parameters L*a*b*, depended on age. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this study were included 255 subjects with age interval from 20 to 49 years. The subjects were divided into three groups, as follows: in the younger group were 20 to 29 years of age, those in the middle group 30 to 39 years and older group 40 to 49 years. The overall number of analysed teeth in the intercanine sector of the maxilla was 2295. The colour of the teeth was measured using the spectrophotometer VITA Easyshade. RESULTS: The results for differences in the colourimetric parameters in relation with age were tested with Pearson Chi-square (χ2). For χ2 = 572, 87 and df = 124 there was a statistical significant difference between the ages P < 0.001. CONCLUSION: In this study, it was concluded that the parameter L* - Lightness was decreasing when age increased. In the age group, 20 to 29 years L* was 83.2, whereas in the older group of this investigation; 40 to 49 years was 79.4. In the youngest group, the parameter a* was - 0.7, whereas with increasing of age this parameter was -0.5. The values for parameter b* from the youngest to the older group were from 21.7 to 23.9. PMID:29104689

  20. A Global Sensitivity Analysis Method on Maximum Tsunami Wave Heights to Potential Seismic Source Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Luchuan

    2015-04-01

    A Global Sensitivity Analysis Method on Maximum Tsunami Wave Heights to Potential Seismic Source Parameters Luchuan Ren, Jianwei Tian, Mingli Hong Institute of Disaster Prevention, Sanhe, Heibei Province, 065201, P.R. China It is obvious that the uncertainties of the maximum tsunami wave heights in offshore area are partly from uncertainties of the potential seismic tsunami source parameters. A global sensitivity analysis method on the maximum tsunami wave heights to the potential seismic source parameters is put forward in this paper. The tsunami wave heights are calculated by COMCOT ( the Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami Model), on the assumption that an earthquake with magnitude MW8.0 occurred at the northern fault segment along the Manila Trench and triggered a tsunami in the South China Sea. We select the simulated results of maximum tsunami wave heights at specific sites in offshore area to verify the validity of the method proposed in this paper. For ranking importance order of the uncertainties of potential seismic source parameters (the earthquake's magnitude, the focal depth, the strike angle, dip angle and slip angle etc..) in generating uncertainties of the maximum tsunami wave heights, we chose Morris method to analyze the sensitivity of the maximum tsunami wave heights to the aforementioned parameters, and give several qualitative descriptions of nonlinear or linear effects of them on the maximum tsunami wave heights. We quantitatively analyze the sensitivity of the maximum tsunami wave heights to these parameters and the interaction effects among these parameters on the maximum tsunami wave heights by means of the extended FAST method afterward. The results shows that the maximum tsunami wave heights are very sensitive to the earthquake magnitude, followed successively by the epicenter location, the strike angle and dip angle, the interactions effect between the sensitive parameters are very obvious at specific site in offshore area, and there

  1. Moral foundations in an interacting neural networks society: A statistical mechanics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, R.; Susemihl, A.; Jericó, J. P.; Caticha, N.

    2014-04-01

    The moral foundations theory supports that people, across cultures, tend to consider a small number of dimensions when classifying issues on a moral basis. The data also show that the statistics of weights attributed to each moral dimension is related to self-declared political affiliation, which in turn has been connected to cognitive learning styles by the recent literature in neuroscience and psychology. Inspired by these data, we propose a simple statistical mechanics model with interacting neural networks classifying vectors and learning from members of their social neighbourhood about their average opinion on a large set of issues. The purpose of learning is to reduce dissension among agents when disagreeing. We consider a family of learning algorithms parametrized by δ, that represents the importance given to corroborating (same sign) opinions. We define an order parameter that quantifies the diversity of opinions in a group with homogeneous learning style. Using Monte Carlo simulations and a mean field approximation we find the relation between the order parameter and the learning parameter δ at a temperature we associate with the importance of social influence in a given group. In concordance with data, groups that rely more strongly on corroborating evidence sustain less opinion diversity. We discuss predictions of the model and propose possible experimental tests.

  2. Fruit traits and temporal abundance shape plant-frugivore interaction networks in a seasonal tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Robles, Michelle; Dáttilo, Wesley; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Andresen, Ellen

    2018-04-02

    Interactions between fleshy fruited plants and frugivores are crucial for the structuring and functioning of biotic communities, particularly in tropical forests where both groups are diverse and play different roles in network organization. However, it remains poorly understood how different groups of frugivore species and fruit traits contribute to network structure. We recorded interactions among 28 plant species and three groups of frugivores (birds, bats, and non-flying mammals) in a seasonal forest in Mexico to determine which species contribute more to network structure and evaluate the importance of each species. We also determined whether fruit abundance, water content, morphology traits, and fruiting phenology are related to network parameters: the number of interactions, species contribution to nestedness, and species strength. We found that plants did not depend on a single group of frugivores, but rather on one species of each group: the bird Pitangus sulphuratus, the bat Sturnira parvidens, and the non-flying mammal Procyon lotor. The abundance, size, and water content of the fruits were significantly related to the contribution to nestedness, number of interactions, and species strength index of plant species. Tree species and birds contributed mainly to the nested structure of the network. We show that the structure of plant-frugivore networks in this seasonal forest is non-random and that fruit traits (i.e., abundance, phenology, size, and water content) are important factors shaping plant-frugivore networks. Identification of the key species and their traits that maintain the complex structure of species interactions is therefore fundamental for the integral conservation of tropical forests.

  3. Spatially Correlated Gene Expression in Bacterial Groups: The Role of Lineage History, Spatial Gradients, and Cell-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Simon; Dal Co, Alma; Winkler, Annina R; Spriewald, Stefanie; Stecher, Bärbel; Ackermann, Martin

    2018-04-25

    Gene expression levels in clonal bacterial groups have been found to be spatially correlated. These correlations can partly be explained by the shared lineage history of nearby cells, although they could also arise from local cell-cell interactions. Here, we present a quantitative framework that allows us to disentangle the contributions of lineage history, long-range spatial gradients, and local cell-cell interactions to spatial correlations in gene expression. We study pathways involved in toxin production, SOS stress response, and metabolism in Escherichia coli microcolonies and find for all pathways that shared lineage history is the main cause of spatial correlations in gene expression levels. However, long-range spatial gradients and local cell-cell interactions also contributed to spatial correlations in SOS response, amino acid biosynthesis, and overall metabolic activity. Together, our data show that the phenotype of a cell is influenced by its lineage history and population context, raising the question of whether bacteria can arrange their activities in space to perform functions they cannot achieve alone. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental confounding in gene-environment interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Vanderweele, Tyler J; Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2013-07-01

    We show that, in the presence of uncontrolled environmental confounding, joint tests for the presence of a main genetic effect and gene-environment interaction will be biased if the genetic and environmental factors are correlated, even if there is no effect of either the genetic factor or the environmental factor on the disease. When environmental confounding is ignored, such tests will in fact reject the joint null of no genetic effect with a probability that tends to 1 as the sample size increases. This problem with the joint test vanishes under gene-environment independence, but it still persists if estimating the gene-environment interaction parameter itself is of interest. Uncontrolled environmental confounding will bias estimates of gene-environment interaction parameters even under gene-environment independence, but it will not do so if the unmeasured confounding variable itself does not interact with the genetic factor. Under gene-environment independence, if the interaction parameter without controlling for the environmental confounder is nonzero, then there is gene-environment interaction either between the genetic factor and the environmental factor of interest or between the genetic factor and the unmeasured environmental confounder. We evaluate several recently proposed joint tests in a simulation study and discuss the implications of these results for the conduct of gene-environment interaction studies.

  5. Stability of cooperation under image scoring in group interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nax, Heinrich H.; Perc, Matjaž; Szolnoki, Attila; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-07-01

    Image scoring sustains cooperation in the repeated two-player prisoner’s dilemma through indirect reciprocity, even though defection is the uniquely dominant selfish behaviour in the one-shot game. Many real-world dilemma situations, however, firstly, take place in groups and, secondly, lack the necessary transparency to inform subjects reliably of others’ individual past actions. Instead, there is revelation of information regarding groups, which allows for ‘group scoring’ but not for image scoring. Here, we study how sensitive the positive results related to image scoring are to information based on group scoring. We combine analytic results and computer simulations to specify the conditions for the emergence of cooperation. We show that under pure group scoring, that is, under the complete absence of image-scoring information, cooperation is unsustainable. Away from this extreme case, however, the necessary degree of image scoring relative to group scoring depends on the population size and is generally very small. We thus conclude that the positive results based on image scoring apply to a much broader range of informational settings that are relevant in the real world than previously assumed.

  6. New procedure for the determination of Hansen solubility parameters by means of inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Adamska, K; Bellinghausen, R; Voelkel, A

    2008-06-27

    The Hansen solubility parameter (HSP) seems to be a useful tool for the thermodynamic characterization of different materials. Unfortunately, estimation of the HSP values can cause some problems. In this work different procedures by using inverse gas chromatography have been presented for calculation of pharmaceutical excipients' solubility parameter. The new procedure proposed, based on the Lindvig et al. methodology, where experimental data of Flory-Huggins interaction parameter are used, can be a reasonable alternative for the estimation of HSP values. The advantage of this method is that the values of Flory-Huggins interaction parameter chi for all test solutes are used for further calculation, thus diverse interactions between test solute and material are taken into consideration.

  7. [Influence of antenatal acupuncture on cardiotocographic parameters and maternal circulation - a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Scharf, A; Staboulidou, I; Günter, H H; Wüstemann, M; Sohn, C

    2003-01-01

    of maternal relaxation seems to exert an influence on short-term alterations of the fetal activity (transient increase in terms of Fischer score) with reversibly increased uterine activity as detected by cardiotocography. Also, a slight reduction of the maternal blood pressure seems to be effected. The phenomena recorded in the control group (relaxation without supportive acupuncture treatment) revealed to be partially concordant (reversibly increased uterine activity, mild maternal reduction of systolic blood pressure) and partially discordant (persisting increase of Fischer score) as compared with the acupuncture group. Acupuncture seems not only to have a psychological, but also a short-term somatic effect with direct influence on maternal and fetal circulation parameters. Other established surveillance parameters and different points of acupuncture should be studied to further elucidate the underlying interaction as well as the duration of this effect.

  8. Interactive effects of an insecticide and a fungicide on different organism groups and ecosystem functioning in a stream detrital food web.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, Mohab; Bundschuh, Mirco; Goedkoop, Willem; McKie, Brendan G

    2017-05-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are often affected by cocktails of multiple pesticides targeting different organism groups. Prediction and evaluation of the ecosystem-level effects of these mixtures is complicated by the potential not only for interactions among the pesticides themselves, but also for the pesticides to alter biotic interactions across trophic levels. In a stream microcosm experiment, we investigated the effects of two pesticides targeting two organism groups (the insecticide lindane and fungicide azoxystrobin) on the functioning of a model stream detrital food web consisting of a detritivore (Ispoda: Asellus aquaticus) and microbes (an assemblage of fungal hyphomycetes) consuming leaf litter. We assessed how these pesticides interacted with the presence and absence of the detritivore to affect three indicators of ecosystem functioning - leaf decomposition, fungal biomass, fungal sporulation - as well as detritivore mortality. Leaf decomposition rates were more strongly impacted by the fungicide than the insecticide, reflecting especially negative effects on leaf processing by detritivores. This result most like reflects reduced fungal biomass and increased detritivore mortality under the fungicide treatment. Fungal sporulation was elevated by exposure to both the insecticide and fungicide, possibly representing a stress-induced increase in investment in propagule dispersal. Stressor interactions were apparent in the impacts of the combined pesticide treatment on fungal sporulation and detritivore mortality, which were reduced and elevated relative to the single stressor treatments, respectively. These results demonstrate the potential of trophic and multiple stressor interactions to modulate the ecosystem-level impacts of chemicals, highlighting important challenges in predicting, understanding and evaluating the impacts of multiple chemical stressors on more complex food webs in situ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Reconstruction of interaction rate in holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ankan

    2016-11-01

    The present work is based on the holographic dark energy model with Hubble horizon as the infrared cut-off. The interaction rate between dark energy and dark matter has been reconstructed for three different parameterizations of the deceleration parameter. Observational constraints on the model parameters have been obtained by maximum likelihood analysis using the observational Hubble parameter data (OHD), type Ia supernovab data (SNe), baryon acoustic oscillation data (BAO) and the distance prior of cosmic microwave background (CMB) namely the CMB shift parameter data (CMBShift). The interaction rate obtained in the present work remains always positive and increases with expansion. It is very similar to the result obtained by Sen and Pavon [1] where the interaction rate has been reconstructed for a parametrization of the dark energy equation of state. Tighter constraints on the interaction rate have been obtained in the present work as it is based on larger data sets. The nature of the dark energy equation of state parameter has also been studied for the present models. Though the reconstruction is done from different parametrizations, the overall nature of the interaction rate is very similar in all the cases. Different information criteria and the Bayesian evidence, which have been invoked in the context of model selection, show that the these models are at close proximity of each other.

  10. Reconstruction of interaction rate in holographic dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Ankan, E-mail: ankan_ju@iiserkol.ac.in

    2016-11-01

    The present work is based on the holographic dark energy model with Hubble horizon as the infrared cut-off. The interaction rate between dark energy and dark matter has been reconstructed for three different parameterizations of the deceleration parameter. Observational constraints on the model parameters have been obtained by maximum likelihood analysis using the observational Hubble parameter data (OHD), type Ia supernovab data (SNe), baryon acoustic oscillation data (BAO) and the distance prior of cosmic microwave background (CMB) namely the CMB shift parameter data (CMBShift). The interaction rate obtained in the present work remains always positive and increases with expansion. Itmore » is very similar to the result obtained by Sen and Pavon [1] where the interaction rate has been reconstructed for a parametrization of the dark energy equation of state. Tighter constraints on the interaction rate have been obtained in the present work as it is based on larger data sets. The nature of the dark energy equation of state parameter has also been studied for the present models. Though the reconstruction is done from different parametrizations, the overall nature of the interaction rate is very similar in all the cases. Different information criteria and the Bayesian evidence, which have been invoked in the context of model selection, show that the these models are at close proximity of each other.« less

  11. batman Interacts with polycomb and trithorax group genes and encodes a BTB/POZ protein that is included in a complex containing GAGA factor.

    PubMed

    Faucheux, M; Roignant, J-Y; Netter, S; Charollais, J; Antoniewski, C; Théodore, L

    2003-02-01

    Polycomb and trithorax group genes maintain the appropriate repressed or activated state of homeotic gene expression throughout Drosophila melanogaster development. We have previously identified the batman gene as a Polycomb group candidate since its function is necessary for the repression of Sex combs reduced. However, our present genetic analysis indicates functions of batman in both activation and repression of homeotic genes. The 127-amino-acid Batman protein is almost reduced to a BTB/POZ domain, an evolutionary conserved protein-protein interaction domain found in a large protein family. We show that this domain is involved in the interaction between Batman and the DNA binding GAGA factor encoded by the Trithorax-like gene. The GAGA factor and Batman codistribute on polytene chromosomes, coimmunoprecipitate from nuclear embryonic and larval extracts, and interact in the yeast two-hybrid assay. Batman, together with the GAGA factor, binds to MHS-70, a 70-bp fragment of the bithoraxoid Polycomb response element. This binding, like that of the GAGA factor, requires the presence of d(GA)n sequences. Together, our results suggest that batman belongs to a subset of the Polycomb/trithorax group of genes that includes Trithorax-like, whose products are involved in both activation and repression of homeotic genes.

  12. batman Interacts with Polycomb and trithorax Group Genes and Encodes a BTB/POZ Protein That Is Included in a Complex Containing GAGA Factor

    PubMed Central

    Faucheux, M.; Roignant, J.-Y.; Netter, S.; Charollais, J.; Antoniewski, C.; Théodore, L.

    2003-01-01

    Polycomb and trithorax group genes maintain the appropriate repressed or activated state of homeotic gene expression throughout Drosophila melanogaster development. We have previously identified the batman gene as a Polycomb group candidate since its function is necessary for the repression of Sex combs reduced. However, our present genetic analysis indicates functions of batman in both activation and repression of homeotic genes. The 127-amino-acid Batman protein is almost reduced to a BTB/POZ domain, an evolutionary conserved protein-protein interaction domain found in a large protein family. We show that this domain is involved in the interaction between Batman and the DNA binding GAGA factor encoded by the Trithorax-like gene. The GAGA factor and Batman codistribute on polytene chromosomes, coimmunoprecipitate from nuclear embryonic and larval extracts, and interact in the yeast two-hybrid assay. Batman, together with the GAGA factor, binds to MHS-70, a 70-bp fragment of the bithoraxoid Polycomb response element. This binding, like that of the GAGA factor, requires the presence of d(GA)n sequences. Together, our results suggest that batman belongs to a subset of the Polycomb/trithorax group of genes that includes Trithorax-like, whose products are involved in both activation and repression of homeotic genes. PMID:12556479

  13. Understanding how animal groups achieve coordinated movement

    PubMed Central

    Herbert-Read, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Moving animal groups display remarkable feats of coordination. This coordination is largely achieved when individuals adjust their movement in response to their neighbours' movements and positions. Recent advancements in automated tracking technologies, including computer vision and GPS, now allow researchers to gather large amounts of data on the movements and positions of individuals in groups. Furthermore, analytical techniques from fields such as statistical physics now allow us to identify the precise interaction rules used by animals on the move. These interaction rules differ not only between species, but also between individuals in the same group. These differences have wide-ranging implications, affecting how groups make collective decisions and driving the evolution of collective motion. Here, I describe how trajectory data can be used to infer how animals interact in moving groups. I give examples of the similarities and differences in the spatial and directional organisations of animal groups between species, and discuss the rules that animals use to achieve this organisation. I then explore how groups of the same species can exhibit different structures, and ask whether this results from individuals adapting their interaction rules. I then examine how the interaction rules between individuals in the same groups can also differ, and discuss how this can affect ecological and evolutionary processes. Finally, I suggest areas of future research. PMID:27707862

  14. Understanding how animal groups achieve coordinated movement.

    PubMed

    Herbert-Read, J E

    2016-10-01

    Moving animal groups display remarkable feats of coordination. This coordination is largely achieved when individuals adjust their movement in response to their neighbours' movements and positions. Recent advancements in automated tracking technologies, including computer vision and GPS, now allow researchers to gather large amounts of data on the movements and positions of individuals in groups. Furthermore, analytical techniques from fields such as statistical physics now allow us to identify the precise interaction rules used by animals on the move. These interaction rules differ not only between species, but also between individuals in the same group. These differences have wide-ranging implications, affecting how groups make collective decisions and driving the evolution of collective motion. Here, I describe how trajectory data can be used to infer how animals interact in moving groups. I give examples of the similarities and differences in the spatial and directional organisations of animal groups between species, and discuss the rules that animals use to achieve this organisation. I then explore how groups of the same species can exhibit different structures, and ask whether this results from individuals adapting their interaction rules. I then examine how the interaction rules between individuals in the same groups can also differ, and discuss how this can affect ecological and evolutionary processes. Finally, I suggest areas of future research. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Sequence memory based on coherent spin-interaction neural networks.

    PubMed

    Xia, Min; Wong, W K; Wang, Zhijie

    2014-12-01

    Sequence information processing, for instance, the sequence memory, plays an important role on many functions of brain. In the workings of the human brain, the steady-state period is alterable. However, in the existing sequence memory models using heteroassociations, the steady-state period cannot be changed in the sequence recall. In this work, a novel neural network model for sequence memory with controllable steady-state period based on coherent spininteraction is proposed. In the proposed model, neurons fire collectively in a phase-coherent manner, which lets a neuron group respond differently to different patterns and also lets different neuron groups respond differently to one pattern. The simulation results demonstrating the performance of the sequence memory are presented. By introducing a new coherent spin-interaction sequence memory model, the steady-state period can be controlled by dimension parameters and the overlap between the input pattern and the stored patterns. The sequence storage capacity is enlarged by coherent spin interaction compared with the existing sequence memory models. Furthermore, the sequence storage capacity has an exponential relationship to the dimension of the neural network.

  16. Pion emission in α-particle interactions with various targets of nuclear emulsion detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, A.; Abou-Moussa, Z.; Rashed, N.; M. Badawy, B.; A. Amer, H.; Osman, W.; M. El-Ashmawy, M.; Abdallah, N.

    2015-09-01

    The behavior of relativistic hadron multiplicity for 4He-nucleus interactions is investigated. The experiment is carried out at 2.1 A and 3.7 A GeV (Dubna energy) to search for the incident energy effect on the interactions inside different emulsion target nuclei. Data are presented in terms of the number of emitted relativistic hadrons in both forward and backward angular zones. The dependence on the target size is presented. For this purpose the statistical events are discriminated into groups according to the interactions with H, CNO, Em, and AgBr target nuclei. The separation of events, into the mentioned groups, is executed based on Glauber's multiple scattering theory approach. Features suggestive of a decay mechanism seem to be a characteristic of the backward emission of relativistic hadrons. The results strongly support the assumption that the relativistic hadrons may already be emitted during the de-excitation of the excited target nucleus, in a behavior like that of compound-nucleus disintegration. Regarding the limiting fragmentation hypothesis beyond 1 A GeV, the target size is the main parameter affecting the backward production of the relativistic hadron. The incident energy is a principal factor responsible for the forward relativistic hadron production, implying that this system of particle production is a creation system. However, the target size is an effective parameter as well as the projectile size considering the geometrical concept regarded in the nuclear fireball model. The data are analyzed in the framework of the FRITIOF model.

  17. Direct Determination of Site-Specific Noncovalent Interaction Strengths of Proteins from NMR-Derived Fast Side Chain Motional Parameters.

    PubMed

    Rajeshwar T, Rajitha; Krishnan, Marimuthu

    2017-05-25

    A novel approach to accurately determine residue-specific noncovalent interaction strengths (ξ) of proteins from NMR-measured fast side chain motional parameters (O axis 2 ) is presented. By probing the environmental sensitivity of side chain conformational energy surfaces of individual residues of a diverse set of proteins, the microscopic connections between ξ, O axis 2 , conformational entropy (S conf ), conformational barriers, and rotamer stabilities established here are found to be universal among proteins. The results reveal that side chain flexibility and conformational entropy of each residue decrease with increasing ξ and that for each residue type there exists a critical range of ξ, determined primarily by the mean side chain conformational barriers, within which flexibility of any residue can be reversibly tuned from highly flexible (with O axis 2 ∼ 0) to highly restricted (with O axis 2 ∼ 1) by increasing ξ by ∼3 kcal/mol. Beyond this critical range of ξ, both side chain flexibility and conformational entropy are insensitive to ξ. The interrelationships between conformational dynamics, conformational entropy, and noncovalent interactions of protein side chains established here open up new avenues to probe perturbation-induced (for example, ligand-binding, temperature, pressure) changes in fast side chain dynamics and thermodynamics of proteins by comparing their conformational energy surfaces in the native and perturbed states.

  18. A new study of iodine complexes of oxidized gum arabic: An interaction between iodine monochloride and aldehyde groups.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akbar; Ganie, Showkat Ali; Mazumdar, Nasreen

    2018-01-15

    Gum arabic, a plant polysaccharide was oxidized with periodate to produce aldehyde groups by the cleavage of diols present in the sugar units. The oxidized gum was then iodinated with iodine monochloride (ICl) and the interaction between electrophilic iodine, I + and reactive carbonyl groups of the modified gum was studied.Results of titrimetric estimation performed to determine the extent of oxidation and aldehyde content in the oxidized gum showed that degree of oxidation ranged between 19.68-50.19% which was observed to increase with periodate concentration; the corresponding aldehyde content was calculated to be 5.15-40.42%. Different strengths of ICl were used to iodinate the oxidized gum and the iodine content of the complexes varied from 6.11-11.72% as determined by iodometric titration. Structure elucidation of the iodine complexes conclusively established the attachment of ICl molecules to CHO groups. A reaction scheme has been proposed suggesting an electrophilic addition of the reagent to the aldehyde groups, a mechanism that was also supported by iodide ion release studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Group participants' experiences of a patient-directed group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Odgers-Jewell, Kate; Isenring, Elisabeth A; Thomas, Rae; Reidlinger, Dianne P

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals who participated in a group-based education program, including their motivators in relation to their diabetes management, and the perceived impact of group interactions on participants' experiences and motivation for self-management. Understanding individuals diagnosed with diabetes experiences of group-based education for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus may guide the development and facilitation of these programs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all individuals who participated in the intervention. Using thematic analysis underpinned by self-determination theory, we developed themes that explored participants' motivators in relation to diabetes management and the impact of group interactions on their experiences and motivation. The key themes included knowledge, experience, group interactions and motivation. Participants perceived that the group interactions facilitated further learning and increased motivation, achieved through normalization, peer identification or by talking with, and learning from the experience of others. The results support the use of patient-centred programs that prioritize group interactions over the didactic presentation of content, which may address relevant psychological needs of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and improve their motivation and health behaviours. Future group-based education programs may benefit from the use of self-determination theory as a framework for intervention design to enhance participant motivation.

  20. World Wide Web-based system for the calculation of substituent parameters and substituent similarity searches.

    PubMed

    Ertl, P

    1998-02-01

    Easy to use, interactive, and platform-independent WWW-based tools are ideal for development of chemical applications. By using the newly emerging Web technologies such as Java applets and sophisticated scripting, it is possible to deliver powerful molecular processing capabilities directly to the desk of synthetic organic chemists. In Novartis Crop Protection in Basel, a Web-based molecular modelling system has been in use since 1995. In this article two new modules of this system are presented: a program for interactive calculation of important hydrophobic, electronic, and steric properties of organic substituents, and a module for substituent similarity searches enabling the identification of bioisosteric functional groups. Various possible applications of calculated substituent parameters are also discussed, including automatic design of molecules with the desired properties and creation of targeted virtual combinatorial libraries.

  1. Inverse gas chromatographic determination of solubility parameters of excipients.

    PubMed

    Adamska, Katarzyna; Voelkel, Adam

    2005-11-04

    The principle aim of this work was an application of inverse gas chromatography (IGC) for the estimation of solubility parameter for pharmaceutical excipients. The retention data of number of test solutes were used to calculate Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (chi1,2infinity) and than solubility parameter (delta2), corrected solubility parameter (deltaT) and its components (deltad, deltap, deltah) by using different procedures. The influence of different values of test solutes solubility parameter (delta1) over calculated values was estimated. The solubility parameter values obtained for all excipients from the slope, from Guillet and co-workers' procedure are higher than that obtained from components according Voelkel and Janas procedure. It was found that solubility parameter's value of the test solutes influences, but not significantly, values of solubility parameter of excipients.

  2. Surface Peroneal Nerve Stimulation in Lower Limb Hemiparesis: Effect on Quantitative Gait Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Lynne R.; Taylor, Paul N.; Bailey, Stephanie Nogan; Gunzler, Douglas D.; Buurke, Jaap H.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Chae, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate possible mechanisms for functional improvement and compare ambulation training with surface peroneal nerve stimulation (PNS) versus usual care (UC) via quantitative gait analysis. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting Teaching hospital of academic medical center. Participants 110 chronic stroke survivors (> 12-wks post-stroke) with unilateral hemiparesis. Interventions Subjects were randomized to a surface PNS device or UC intervention. Subjects were treated for 12-wks and followed for 6-months post-treatment. Main Outcome Measures Spatiotemporal, kinematic, and kinetic parameters of gait. Results Cadence (F3,153=5.81, p=.012), stride length (F3,179=20.01, p<.001), walking speed (F3,167=18.2, p<.001), anterior posterior ground reaction force (F3,164=6.61, p=.004), peak hip power in pre-swing (F3,156=8.76, p<.001), and peak ankle power at push-off (F3,149=6.38, p=.005) all improved with respect to time. However, peak ankle DF in swing (F3,184=4.99, p=.031) worsened. In general, the greatest change for all parameters occurred during the treatment period. There was no significant treatment group by time interaction effects for any of the spatiotemporal, kinematic, or kinetic parameters. Conclusions Gait training with PNS and usual care was associated with improvements in peak hip power in pre-swing and peak ankle power at push-off, which may have resulted in improved cadence, stride length, and walking speed; however, there were no differences between treatment groups. Both treatment groups also experienced a decrease in peak ankle DF in swing, though the clinical implications of this finding are unclear. PMID:25802966

  3. Parameter Uncertainty on AGCM-simulated Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, F.

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the parameter uncertainty on tropical cyclone (TC) simulations in Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMs) using the Reed-Jablonowski TC test case, which is illustrated in Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). It examines the impact from 24 parameters across the physical parameterization schemes that represent the convection, turbulence, precipitation and cloud processes in AGCMs. The one-at-a-time (OAT) sensitivity analysis method first quantifies their relative importance on TC simulations and identifies the key parameters to the six different TC characteristics: intensity, precipitation, longwave cloud radiative forcing (LWCF), shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF), cloud liquid water path (LWP) and ice water path (IWP). Then, 8 physical parameters are chosen and perturbed using the Latin-Hypercube Sampling (LHS) method. The comparison between OAT ensemble run and LHS ensemble run shows that the simulated TC intensity is mainly affected by the parcel fractional mass entrainment rate in Zhang-McFarlane (ZM) deep convection scheme. The nonlinear interactive effect among different physical parameters is negligible on simulated TC intensity. In contrast, this nonlinear interactive effect plays a significant role in other simulated tropical cyclone characteristics (precipitation, LWCF, SWCF, LWP and IWP) and greatly enlarge their simulated uncertainties. The statistical emulator Extended Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (EMARS) is applied to characterize the response functions for nonlinear effect. Last, we find that the intensity uncertainty caused by physical parameters is in a degree comparable to uncertainty caused by model structure (e.g. grid) and initial conditions (e.g. sea surface temperature, atmospheric moisture). These findings suggest the importance of using the perturbed physics ensemble (PPE) method to revisit tropical cyclone prediction under climate change scenario.

  4. Effects of α-thalassaemia mutations on the haematological parameters of β-thalassaemia carriers.

    PubMed

    Saleh-Gohari, Nasrollah; Khademi Bami, Maryam; Nikbakht, Roya; Karimi-Maleh, Hassan

    2015-07-01

    Thalassaemia is a haemoglobin disorder caused by a reduction in, or a complete absence of, the production of α- or β-globin genes. Detection of β-thalassaemia carriers is the first step in the prenatal diagnosis of the disease and is based primarily on the differences between levels of blood cell indices. Since co-inheritance of β- and α-thalassaemia mutations modulates the haematological parameters of heterozygote β-thalassaemia indices, understanding the influence of this interaction is helpful for identification of disease carriers. To determine the effects of α-thalassaemia mutations on the haematological parameters of β-thalassaemia carriers. We used gap-PCR and amplification refractory mutation system techniques to find any α- and/or β-thalassaemia mutations in 270 subjects who were suspected to be thalassaemia carriers. The mean values of the haematological parameters in α, β-thalassaemia and β-thalassaemia carriers were compared. Significant differences in mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and HbA2 were found between the two groups. Patients who were α, β-thalassaemia carriers had higher mean values of MCV and MCH, whereas HbA2 levels were higher in simple β-thalassaemia. No marked differences were found in mean cell haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and Hb blood cell indices. The value of MCV, MCH and HbA2 were significantly different between α,β-thalassaemia and simple β-thalassaemia in men and women, but the mean values of Hb in the two groups differed markedly only in men. We conclude that co-inheritance of α- and β-thalassaemia mutations may result in misdiagnosis of β-thalassaemia carriers. Therefore, in genetic counselling of patients with a near-normal range of blood cell indices the possibility that they may carry α, β-thalassaemia mutations must be considered. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. IPO: a tool for automated optimization of XCMS parameters.

    PubMed

    Libiseller, Gunnar; Dvorzak, Michaela; Kleb, Ulrike; Gander, Edgar; Eisenberg, Tobias; Madeo, Frank; Neumann, Steffen; Trausinger, Gert; Sinner, Frank; Pieber, Thomas; Magnes, Christoph

    2015-04-16

    Untargeted metabolomics generates a huge amount of data. Software packages for automated data processing are crucial to successfully process these data. A variety of such software packages exist, but the outcome of data processing strongly depends on algorithm parameter settings. If they are not carefully chosen, suboptimal parameter settings can easily lead to biased results. Therefore, parameter settings also require optimization. Several parameter optimization approaches have already been proposed, but a software package for parameter optimization which is free of intricate experimental labeling steps, fast and widely applicable is still missing. We implemented the software package IPO ('Isotopologue Parameter Optimization') which is fast and free of labeling steps, and applicable to data from different kinds of samples and data from different methods of liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry and data from different instruments. IPO optimizes XCMS peak picking parameters by using natural, stable (13)C isotopic peaks to calculate a peak picking score. Retention time correction is optimized by minimizing relative retention time differences within peak groups. Grouping parameters are optimized by maximizing the number of peak groups that show one peak from each injection of a pooled sample. The different parameter settings are achieved by design of experiments, and the resulting scores are evaluated using response surface models. IPO was tested on three different data sets, each consisting of a training set and test set. IPO resulted in an increase of reliable groups (146% - 361%), a decrease of non-reliable groups (3% - 8%) and a decrease of the retention time deviation to one third. IPO was successfully applied to data derived from liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry from three studies with different sample types and different chromatographic methods and devices. We were also able to show the potential of IPO to

  6. Model parameter learning using Kullback-Leibler divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chungwei; Marks, Tim K.; Pajovic, Milutin; Watanabe, Shinji; Tung, Chih-kuan

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we address the following problem: For a given set of spin configurations whose probability distribution is of the Boltzmann type, how do we determine the model coupling parameters? We demonstrate that directly minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence is an efficient method. We test this method against the Ising and XY models on the one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) lattices, and provide two estimators to quantify the model quality. We apply this method to two types of problems. First, we apply it to the real-space renormalization group (RG). We find that the obtained RG flow is sufficiently good for determining the phase boundary (within 1% of the exact result) and the critical point, but not accurate enough for critical exponents. The proposed method provides a simple way to numerically estimate amplitudes of the interactions typically truncated in the real-space RG procedure. Second, we apply this method to the dynamical system composed of self-propelled particles, where we extract the parameter of a statistical model (a generalized XY model) from a dynamical system described by the Viscek model. We are able to obtain reasonable coupling values corresponding to different noise strengths of the Viscek model. Our method is thus able to provide quantitative analysis of dynamical systems composed of self-propelled particles.

  7. Spectroscopic study of interactions of lead (II) ions with dissolved organic matter: Evidence of preferential engagement of carboxylic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yujuan; Yan, Mingquan; Korshin, Gregory V.

    2017-09-01

    The speciation, bioavailability and transport of Pb(II) in the environment are strongly affected by dissolved organic matter (DOM). Despite the importance of these interactions, the nature of Pb(II)-DOM binding is insufficiently attested. This study addressed this deficiency using the method of differential absorbance spectroscopy in combination with the non-ideal competitive adsorption (NICA)-Donnan model. Differential absorbance data allowed quantifying the interactions between Pb(II) and DOM in a wide range of pH values, ionic strengths and Pb(II) concentrations at an environmentally relevant DOM concentration (5 mg L-1). Changes of the slopes of the log-transformed absorbance spectra of DOM in the range of wavelength 242-262 and 350-400 nm were found to be predictive of the extent of Pb(II) bound by DOM carboxylic groups and of the total amount of DOM-bound Pb(II), respectively. The results also demonstrated the preferential involvement of DOM carboxylic groups in Pb(II) binding. The spectroscopic data allowed optimizing selected Pb(II)-DOM complexation constants used in the NICA-Donnan Model. This resulted in a markedly improved performance of that model when it was applied to interpret previously published Pb(II)-fulvic acid datasets.

  8. Improvement of metabolic parameters in healthy older adult men following a fasting calorie restriction intervention.

    PubMed

    Teng, Nur Islami Mohd Fahmi; Shahar, Suzana; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Johari, Mohamad Hanapi; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-12-01

    Calorie restriction and intermittent fasting are two dietary interventions that can improve aging. Religious fasting also suggested having similar benefit; however, such studies are still scarce. Thus, this study aimed to determine the effect of fasting calorie restriction (FCR) on metabolic parameters and DNA damage among healthy older adult men. A randomized controlled study was done on men, aged 50-70 years in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Subjects were divided into two groups; FCR (reduction of 300-500 kcal/d combined with 2 days/week of Muslim Sunnah Fasting) and control. Assessment was ascertained at three time point; baseline, weeks 6 and 12. Blood samples were analyzed for lipid profile, DNA damage and malondialdehyde (MDA). The FCR group reduced their energy intake for approximately 18% upon completion of the study. A significant interaction effect was found in body weight, body mass index, fat percentage, fat mass, blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the ratio of total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p < 0.05). A significant improvement (p < 0.001) in total DNA rejoining cells and MDA (p < 0.05) was also observed in the FCR group. FCR improved metabolic parameters and DNA damage in healthy older adult men. Therefore, there is a need to further examine the mechanism of FCR.

  9. Magnetic End States in a Strongly Interacting One-Dimensional Topological Kondo Insulator

    DOE PAGES

    Lobos, Alejandro M.; Dobry, Ariel O.; Galitski, Victor

    2015-05-22

    Topological Kondo insulators are strongly correlated materials where itinerant electrons hybridize with localized spins, giving rise to a topologically nontrivial band structure. Here, we use nonperturbative bosonization and renormalization-group techniques to study theoretically a one-dimensional topological Kondo insulator, described as a Kondo-Heisenberg model, where the Heisenberg spin-1/2 chain is coupled to a Hubbard chain through a Kondo exchange interaction in the p-wave channel (i.e., a strongly correlated version of the prototypical Tamm-Schockley model).We derive and solve renormalization-group equations at two-loop order in the Kondo parameter, and find that, at half filling, the charge degrees of freedom in the Hubbard chainmore » acquire a Mott gap, even in the case of a noninteracting conduction band (Hubbard parameter U = 0). Furthermore, at low enough temperatures, the system maps onto a spin-1/2 ladder with local ferromagnetic interactions along the rungs, effectively locking the spin degrees of freedom into a spin-1 chain with frozen charge degrees of freedom. This structure behaves as a spin-1 Haldane chain, a prototypical interacting topological spin model, and features two magnetic spin-1/2 end states for chains with open boundary conditions. In conclusion, our analysis allows us to derive an insightful connection between topological Kondo insulators in one spatial dimension and the well-known physics of the Haldane chain, showing that the ground state of the former is qualitatively different from the predictions of the naive mean-field theory.« less

  10. [Determination of solubility parameters for asymmetrical dicationic ionic liquids by inverse gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Yang, Xuzhao; Wu, Jinchao; Song, Hao; Zou, Wenyuan

    2015-12-01

    Inverse gas chromatographic (IGC) technology was used to determine the solubility parameters of three asymmetrical dicationic ionic liquids ([ PyC5Pi] [ NTf2]2, [MpC5Pi] [NTf2]2 and [PyC6Pi] [NTf2]2) at 343.15-363.15 K. Five alkanes were applied as test probes including octane (n-C8) , decane (n-C10), dodecane (n-C12), tetradecane (n-C14), hexadecane (n-C16). Some thermodynamic parameters were obtained by IGC data analysis, such as the specific retention volumes of the solvents (V0(g)), the molar enthalpies of sorption (ΔHs(1)), the partial molar enthalpies of mixing at infinite dilution (ΔH∞91)), the molar enthalpies of vaporization (ΔH)v)), the activity coefficients at infinite dilution (Ω∞(1)), and Flory-Huggins interaction parameters (χ∞(12)) between ionic liquids and probes. The solubility parameters (δ2) of the three dicationic ionic liquids at room temperature (298.15 K) were 28.52-32.66 (J x cm(-3)) ½. The solubility parameters (δ2) of cationic structure with 4-methyl morpholine are bigger than those of the cationic structure with pyridine. The bigger the solubility parameter (δ2) is, the more the carbon numbers of linking group of the ionic liquids are. The results are of great importance to the study of the solution behavior and the applications of ionic liquid.

  11. Correlation between ocular parameters and amplitude of accommodation

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Lekha Mary; Kuriakose, Thomas; Sivanandam, Viswanathan; Venkatesan, Nithya; Thomas, Ravi; Muliyil, Jayaprakash

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To study the relationship between ocular parameters and amplitude of accommodation (AA) in the peri-presbyopic age group (35–50 years). Materials and Methods: Three hundred and sixteen right eyes of consecutive patients in the age group 35–50 years, who attended our outpatient clinic, were studied. Emmetropes, hypermetropes and myopes with best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20, J1 in both eyes were included. The AA was calculated by measuring the near point of accommodation. The axial length (AL), central anterior chamber depth (CACD) and lens thickness (LT) were also measured. Results: There was moderate correlation (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r = 0.56) between AL and AA as well as between CACD and AA (r = 0.53) in myopes in the age group 35–39 years. In the other age groups and the groups taken as a whole, there was no correlation. In hypermetropes and emmetropes, there was no correlation between AA and the above ocular parameters. No significant correlation existed between LT and AA across different age groups and refractive errors. Conclusion: There was no significant correlation between AA and ocular parameters like anterior chamber depth, AL and LT. PMID:20952831

  12. Exclusively Visual Analysis of Classroom Group Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Laura; Scherr, Rachel E.; Zickler, Todd; Mazur, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data…

  13. Cadmium, lead and mercury concentrations and their influence on morphological parameters in blood donors from different age groups from southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Janicka, Monika; Binkowski, Łukasz J; Błaszczyk, Martyna; Paluch, Joanna; Wojtaś, Włodzimierz; Massanyi, Peter; Stawarz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Due to industrial development, environmental contamination with metals increases which leads to higher human exposure via air, water and food. In order to evaluate the level of the present exposition, the concentrations of metals can be measured in such biological materials as human blood. In this study, we assessed the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) in blood samples from male blood donors from southern Poland (Europe) born in 1994 (n=30) and between 1947 and 1955 (n=30). Higher levels of Pb were seen in the group of older men (4.48 vs 2.48μg/L), whereas the Hg levels were lower (1.78 vs 4.28μg/L). Cd concentrations did not differ between age groups (0.56μg/L). The levels of Cd and Pb in older donors were significantly correlated (Spearman R 0.5135). We also observed a positive correlation between the number of red blood cells (RBC) and Hg concentrations in the older group (Spearman R 0.4271). Additionally, we noted numerous correlations among morphological parameters. Based on our results, we can state that metals influence the blood morphology and their concentrations in blood vary among age groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Consistent van der Waals radii for the whole main group.

    PubMed

    Mantina, Manjeera; Chamberlin, Adam C; Valero, Rosendo; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-05-14

    Atomic radii are not precisely defined but are nevertheless widely used parameters in modeling and understanding molecular structure and interactions. The van der Waals radii determined by Bondi from molecular crystals and data for gases are the most widely used values, but Bondi recommended radius values for only 28 of the 44 main-group elements in the periodic table. In the present Article, we present atomic radii for the other 16; these new radii were determined in a way designed to be compatible with Bondi's scale. The method chosen is a set of two-parameter correlations of Bondi's radii with repulsive-wall distances calculated by relativistic coupled-cluster electronic structure calculations. The newly determined radii (in A) are Be, 1.53; B, 1.92; Al, 1.84; Ca, 2.31; Ge, 2.11; Rb, 3.03; Sr, 2.49; Sb, 2.06; Cs, 3.43; Ba, 2.68; Bi, 2.07; Po, 1.97; At, 2.02; Rn, 2.20; Fr, 3.48; and Ra, 2.83.

  15. [Effects of radiation emitted from mobile phones on short- term heart rate variability parameters].

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Metin; Yılmaz, Derya; Güler, Inan; Akgüllü, Cağdaş

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the effects of radiation emitted from mobile phone (MP) on heart rate variability (HRV) which is accepted a non-invasive indicator of autonomic nervous system (ANS) were investigated with considering the deficiency of previous studies. A randomized controlled study has been designed and utilized with 30 young and healthy volunteers. During the experiment that had three periods, the electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration signals were recorded and MP was attached to subjects' right ear with a bone. Ten subjects selected randomly were exposed to high -level radiation during the second period (Experimental Group 1). Ten of others were exposed during the third period with maximum level radiation (Experimental Group 2). Ten records were also made while MP was closed as a control. Short -term HRV parameters were obtained and repeated measures ANOVA and suitable post-hoc tests applied to the results. According to the results of the repeated measures ANOVA; there were no significant main effects of groups. However, there were some significant differences in measuring time periods and groups*period interactions. The post-hoc tests showed that mean R to R interval and HF power are significantly changed by maximum radiation emitted from MP. Due to the radiation emitted from MPs at maximum power, some changes may occur in HRV parameters that are associated with increased parasympathetic activity. But, the level of these changes is similar to daily activities as excitement, and stand up.

  16. Effects of Genotype by Environment Interaction on Genetic Gain and Genetic Parameter Estimates in Red Tilapia (Oreochromis spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nguyen H.; Hamzah, Azhar; Thoa, Ngo P.

    2017-01-01

    The extent to which genetic gain achieved from selection programs under strictly controlled environments in the nucleus that can be expressed in commercial production systems is not well-documented in aquaculture species. The main aim of this paper was to assess the effects of genotype by environment interaction on genetic response and genetic parameters for four body traits (harvest weight, standard length, body depth, body width) and survival in Red tilapia (Oreochromis spp.). The growth and survival data were recorded on 19,916 individual fish from a pedigreed population undergoing three generations of selection for increased harvest weight in earthen ponds from 2010 to 2012 at the Aquaculture Extension Center, Department of Fisheries, Jitra in Kedah, Malaysia. The pedigree comprised a total of 224 sires and 262 dams, tracing back to the base population in 2009. A multivariate animal model was used to measure genetic response and estimate variance and covariance components. When the homologous body traits in freshwater pond and cage were treated as genetically distinct traits, the genetic correlations between the two environments were high (0.85–0.90) for harvest weight and square root of harvest weight but the estimates were of lower magnitudes for length, width and depth (0.63–0.79). The heritabilities estimated for the five traits studied differed between pond (0.02 to 0.22) and cage (0.07 to 0.68). The common full-sib effects were large, ranging from 0.23 to 0.59 in pond and 0.11 to 0.31 in cage across all traits. The direct and correlated responses for four body traits were generally greater in pond than in cage environments (0.011–1.561 vs. −0.033–0.567 genetic standard deviation units, respectively). Selection for increased harvest body weight resulted in positive genetic changes in survival rate in both pond and cage culture. In conclusion, the reduced selection response and the magnitude of the genetic parameter estimates in the production

  17. Interaction of NGC 2276 with the NGC 2300 group - Fabry-Perot observations of the H-alpha velocity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruendl, Robert A.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Davis, David S.; Mulchaey, John S.

    1993-01-01

    We report kinematic observations of H-alpha emission from the spiral galaxy NGC 2276 obtained with a Fabry-Perot Camera. The 'bow shock' appearance and enhanced star formation in NGC 2276 have been attributed by Mulchaey et al. (1993) to a ram-pressure interaction with the dense IGM detected in ROSAT observations of the NGC 2300 group of galaxies. Along the 'bow shock' limb of the galaxy, we observe strong H-alpha emission and significant kinematic perturbations located immediately interior to an abrupt decrease in the scale length of the optical disk. Although ram-pressure forces may be important in the evolution of the outer gaseous disk, the peculiar kinematics and the truncation in the stellar disk are difficult to explain in a ram-pressure model; a more likely cause is tidal interaction, probably with the elliptical galaxy NGC 2300.

  18. Effect of montelukast monotherapy on oxidative stress parameters and DNA damage in children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Dilek, Fatih; Ozkaya, Emin; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim; Yazici, Mebrure; Kesgin, Siddika; Gedik, Ahmet Hakan; Cakir, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    There is ample knowledge reported in the literature about the role of oxidative stress in asthma pathogenesis. It is also known that the interaction of reactive oxygen species with DNA may result in DNA strand breaks. The aim of this study was to investigate if montelukast monotherapy affects oxidative stress and DNA damage parameters in a population of pediatric asthma patients. Group I consisted of 31 newly diagnosed asthmatic patients not taking any medication, and group II consisted of 32 patients who had been treated with montelukast for at least 6 months. Forty healthy control subjects were also enrolled in the study. Plasma total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured to assess oxidative stress. DNA damage was assessed by means of alkaline comet assay. The patients in both group I and group II had statistically significant higher plasma TOS (13.1 ± 4 and 11.1 ± 4.1 μmol H2O2 equivalent/liter, respectively) and low TAS levels (1.4 ± 0.5 and 1.5 ± 0.5 mmol Trolox equivalent/liter, respectively) compared with the control group (TOS: 6.3 ± 3.5 μmol H2O2 equivalent/liter and TAS: 2.7 ± 0.6 mmol Trolox equivalent/liter; p < 0.05). DNA damage was 18.2 ± 1.0 arbitrary units (a.u.) in group I, 16.7 ± 8.2 a.u. in group II and 13.7 ± 3.4 a.u. in the control group. There were statistically significant differences only between group I and the control group (p < 0.05). According to the findings, montelukast therapy makes only minimal but not statistically significant improvement in all TOS, TAS and DNA damage parameters. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Coiled-coil destabilizing residues in the group A Streptococcus M1 protein are required for functional interaction.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Chelsea M; Buffalo, Cosmo Z; Valderrama, J Andrés; Henningham, Anna; Cole, Jason N; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-08-23

    The sequences of M proteins, the major surface-associated virulence factors of the widespread bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus, are antigenically variable but have in common a strong propensity to form coiled coils. Paradoxically, these sequences are also replete with coiled-coil destabilizing residues. These features are evident in the irregular coiled-coil structure and thermal instability of M proteins. We present an explanation for this paradox through studies of the B repeats of the medically important M1 protein. The B repeats are required for interaction of M1 with fibrinogen (Fg) and consequent proinflammatory activation. The B repeats sample multiple conformations, including intrinsically disordered, dissociated, as well as two alternate coiled-coil conformations: a Fg-nonbinding register 1 and a Fg-binding register 2. Stabilization of M1 in the Fg-nonbinding register 1 resulted in attenuation of Fg binding as expected, but counterintuitively, so did stabilization in the Fg-binding register 2. Strikingly, these register-stabilized M1 proteins gained the ability to bind Fg when they were destabilized by a chaotrope. These results indicate that M1 stability is antithetical to Fg interaction and that M1 conformational dynamics, as specified by destabilizing residues, are essential for interaction. A "capture-and-collapse" model of association accounts for these observations, in which M1 captures Fg through a dynamic conformation and then collapses into a register 2-coiled coil as a result of stabilization provided by binding energy. Our results support the general conclusion that destabilizing residues are evolutionarily conserved in M proteins to enable functional interactions necessary for pathogenesis.

  20. PubMed Interact: an Interactive Search Application for MEDLINE/PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul; Ackerman, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Online search and retrieval systems are important resources for medical literature research. Progressive Web 2.0 technologies provide opportunities to improve search strategies and user experience. Using PHP, Document Object Model (DOM) manipulation and Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax), PubMed Interact allows greater functionality so users can refine search parameters with ease and interact with the search results to retrieve and display relevant information and related articles. PMID:17238658