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Sample records for group interpersonal psychotherapy

  1. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy for Interpersonal Process Groups: A Behavioral Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoekstra, Renee

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an adaptation of Kohlenberg and Tsai's work, Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (1991), or FAP, to group psychotherapy. This author applied a behavioral rationale for interpersonal process groups by illustrating key points with a hypothetical client. Suggestions are also provided for starting groups, identifying goals, educating…

  2. Outcomes of specific interpersonal problems for binge eating disorder: comparing group psychodynamic interpersonal psychotherapy and group cognitive behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Balfour, Louise; Presniak, Michelle D; Bissada, Hany

    2012-04-01

    We assessed whether an attachment-based treatment, Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy (GPIP) had a greater impact compared to Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (GCBT) on Cold/Distant and Intrusive/Needy interpersonal problems. Ninety-five individuals with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) were randomized to GPIP or GCBT and assessed at pre-, post-, and six months post-treatment. Both therapies resulted in a significant decrease in all eight interpersonal problem subscales except the Nonassertive subscale. GPIP resulted in a greater reduction in the Cold/Distant subscale compared to GCBT, but no differences were found for changes in the Intrusive/Needy subscale. GPIP may be most relevant for those with BED who have Cold/Distant interpersonal problems and attachment avoidance.

  3. Benefits of Combining Massage Therapy with Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy in Prenatally Depressed Women

    PubMed Central

    Field, Tiffany; Deeds, Osvelia; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Gauler, Andy; Sullivan, Susan; Wilson, Donna; Nearing, Graciela

    2009-01-01

    One hundred twelve pregnant women who were diagnosed depressed were randomly assigned to a group who received group Interpersonal Psychotherapy or to a group who received both group Interpersonal Psychotherapy and massage therapy. The group Interpersonal Psychotherapy (one hour sessions) and massage therapy (30 minute sessions) were held once per week for six weeks. The data suggested that the group who received psychotherapy plus massage attended more sessions on average, and a greater percentage of that group completed the six-week program. The group who received both therapies also showed a greater decrease in depression, depressed affect and somatic-vegetative symptom scores on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), a greater decrease in anxiety scale (STAI) scores and a greater decrease in cortisol levels. The group therapy process appeared to be effective for both groups as suggested by the increased expression of both positive and negative affect and relatedness during the group therapy sessions. Thus, the data highlight the effectiveness of group Interpersonal Psychotherapy and particularly when combined with massage therapy for reducing prenatal depression. PMID:19761951

  4. Adapting group interpersonal psychotherapy for a developing country: experience in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    VERDELI, HELEN; CLOUGHERTY, KATHLEEN; BOLTON, PAUL; SPEELMAN, LIESBETH; LINCOLN, NDOGONI; BASS, JUDITH; NEUGEBAUER, RICHARD; WEISSMAN, MYRNA M

    2003-01-01

    The current prevalence of depressive symptoms in Southwest Uganda, an area greatly affected by the HIV epidemic, has been shown to be as high as 21%. Traditional healers have expressed inability to treat these symptoms. The lack of physicians and high cost of medication make the use of antidepressants unfeasible. Therefore, an evidence-based psychotherapy was considered a reasonable treatment option by a team of health researchers familiar with the local culture, who designed a randomized controlled clinical trial. Interpersonal psychotherapy in a group format (IPT-G) was selected because it was time limited, was described in a manual, and had evidence of efficacy from clinical trials. Moreover, its focus on interpersonal triggers of depression was considered compatible with the culture. This paper describes the process of adapting the psychotherapy manual and the training of the group leaders who undertook the first psychotherapy clinical trial in Africa. PMID:16946913

  5. "Depressia" in Post-Katrina New Orleans: Cultural and Contextual Adaptations to Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Tracy E.; Larrieu, Julie A.; Zeanah, Paula; Evenson, Amber; Valliere, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) affects a significant portion of women and has serious negative short- and long-term consequences for the woman, infant, and family. This article highlights the feasibility and acceptability of group interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-G), a manualized approach to PPD treatment, with a high risk and underserved sample of…

  6. "Depressia" in Post-Katrina New Orleans: Cultural and Contextual Adaptations to Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Tracy E.; Larrieu, Julie A.; Zeanah, Paula; Evenson, Amber; Valliere, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) affects a significant portion of women and has serious negative short- and long-term consequences for the woman, infant, and family. This article highlights the feasibility and acceptability of group interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-G), a manualized approach to PPD treatment, with a high risk and underserved sample of…

  7. Group interpersonal psychotherapy for low-income women with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Krupnick, Janice L; Green, Bonnie L; Stockton, Patricia; Miranda, Jeanne; Krause, Elizabeth; Mete, Mihriye

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of group interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for low-income women with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subsequent to interpersonal trauma. Non-treatment-seeking predominantly minority women were recruited in family planning and gynecology clinics. Individuals with interpersonal trauma histories (e.g., assault, abuse, and molestation) who met criteria for current PTSD (N=48) were randomly assigned to treatment or a wait list. Assessments were conducted at baseline, treatment termination, and 4-month follow-up; data analysis used a mixed-effects regression approach with an intent-to-treat sample. The results showed that IPT was significantly more effective than the wait list in reducing PTSD and depression symptom severity. IPT participants also had significantly lower scores than waitlist individuals on four interpersonal functioning subscales: Interpersonal Sensitivity, Need for Social Approval, Lack of Sociability, and Interpersonal Ambivalence.

  8. Group work is political work: a feminist perspective of interpersonal group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bender, A; Ewashen, C

    2000-01-01

    When practicing as group leaders, mental health nurses often incorporate Irvin Yalom's (1995, 1998) concepts of social microcosm and here-and-now. This article examines these concepts from a feminist perspective and offers an approach to group psychotherapy that processes gender issues and fosters collective consciousness-raising. A feminist perspective in group therapy challenges us to view the social microcosm as a reenactment of sociopolitical contexts and the here-and-now as a medium for developing personal and social responsibility. Therapy is not only about individual and interpersonal change in group members, but is an opportunity for healthy social change. Therapy becomes political work, raising the social consciousness of each participant as well as the group as a whole.

  9. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy for the Nonpurging Bulimic Individual: A Controlled Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilfrey, Denise E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) and group interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for binge eating among 56 women with nonpurging bulimia. At posttreatment, both CBT and IPT conditions showed significant improvement in reducing binge eating, compared to waiting-list condition. Binge eating remained significantly…

  10. The development and content of an interpersonal psychotherapy group for postnatal depression.

    PubMed

    Reay, Rebecca E; Mulcahy, Riannon; Wilkinson, Ross B; Owen, Cathy; Shadbolt, Bruce; Raphael, Beverley

    2012-04-01

    Postnatal depression (PND) usually causes distressing symptoms for sufferers and significant impairments in relationships. Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT-G) provides the experienced therapist with a brief, focused, and manualized approach to helping women recover from the debilitating effects of PND. This paper describes the background and development of IPT-G for PND. The evidence for the effectiveness of individual and group IPT formats with this population is summarized. The triad of theories underpinning IPT are discussed with an emphasis on the important role of attachment styles during the transition to parenthood. Its strengths, which include its unique package of targets, tactics, and techniques, are highlighted. The benefits and challenges of IPT-G are also explored, and the results of a randomized controlled trial are summarized. Finally, a case study illustrates how IPT-G specifically addresses the social role transitions, conflicts, losses, and social isolation that mothers commonly experience.

  11. Interpersonal psychotherapy for postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent and has a great impact on both mother and infant. There are empirically validated treatments for both postpartum depression and depression during pregnancy. Primary among these is Interpersonal Psychotherapy, which has been shown to be effective for postpartum women across the spectrum from mild to severe depression. At present, Interpersonal Psychotherapy is the best validated treatment for postpartum depression and should be considered first-line treatment, especially for depressed breastfeeding women. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Beyond the interpersonal circumplex in group psychotherapy: the structure and relationship to outcome of the Individual Group Member Interpersonal Process Scale.

    PubMed

    Soldz, S; Budman, S; Davis, M; Demby, A

    1993-07-01

    Development of a new scale to measure patient behavior in group psychotherapy, the Individual Group Member Interpersonal Process Scale (IGIPS), is described. This scale captures clinically important aspects of how patients act in group, including how they respond to the other group members. The IGIPS was applied to videotapes of the first four sessions of seven 15-session outpatient therapy groups (52 patients) in the Mental Health Department of a health maintenance organization. The scale was found to have five factors (Activity, Interpersonal Sensitivity, Comfort with Self, Self-Focus, and Psychological Mindedness). Patient behavior that was moderate on two IGIPS dimensions was connected with better outcome than was that of patients with more extreme behavior in either direction.

  13. Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy for depressed youth in IDP camps in Northern Uganda: adaptation and training.

    PubMed

    Verdeli, Helen; Clougherty, Kathleen; Onyango, Grace; Lewandowski, Eric; Speelman, Liesbeth; Betancourt, Teresa S; Neugebauer, Richard; Stein, Traci R; Bolton, Paul

    2008-07-01

    This article reviews the use of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) with depressed youth living in Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camps in North Uganda. This youth has been exposed to severe losses and disruptions in relationships with caregivers, family, and community members; limited access to formal education; exposure to malnutrition and infections; and pressure to prematurely assume adult family roles. The process of adaptation to the content and training of IPT for these youth is presented and illustrated with case examples.

  14. Treatment compliance among patients with personality disorders receiving group psychotherapy: what are the roles of interpersonal distress and cohesion?

    PubMed

    Ogrodniczuk, John S; Piper, William E; Joyce, Anthony S

    2006-01-01

    It is often assumed that patients with personality disorders have worse compliance in psychotherapy (i.e., attend fewer sessions) than patients without personality disorders. Such an assumption can have negative consequences for the treatment of patients with personality disorders. It also denies the presence of variability in session attendance among patients with personality disorders. Research that attempts to identify the factors that are associated with variability in session attendance among patients with personality disorders is needed. The present study examined the role of interpersonal distress as a predictor of session attendance for patients with personality disorders (n = 72) in two different forms of group psychotherapy (interpretive, supportive). The study also investigated whether patients' cohesion to their group mediated the effect of interpersonal distress on attendance. Findings indicated that interpersonal distress had a strong, direct association with attendance in supportive group therapy, but minimal association in interpretive group therapy. High levels of interpersonal distress were associated with higher attendance in supportive therapy. Furthermore, cohesion to the group accounted for about two-thirds of the effect of interpersonal distress on attendance in supportive group therapy, thus providing compelling evidence for its role as a mediator. Possible explanations and clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Local perceptions of the impact of group interpersonal psychotherapy in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, R E; Bolton, P A; Feighery, A; Bass, J; Hamba, C; Haroz, E; Stavrou, V; Ndogoni, L; Jean-Pierre, A; Verdeli, H

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated local perceptions of changes stemming from a long-standing Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT-G) program for the treatment of depression in rural Uganda. The study was conducted in a low-income, severely HIV/AIDS-affected area where in 2001 the prevalence of depression was estimated at 21% among adults. Data were collected using free-listing and key informant qualitative interviews. A convenience sample of 60 free-list respondents was selected from among IPT-G participants, their families, and other community members from 10 Ugandan villages. Twenty-two key informants and six IPT-G facilitators were also interviewed. Content analysis yielded five primary categories of change in the community related to the IPT-G program: (1) improved school attendance for children; (2) improved productivity; (3) improved sanitation in communities; (4) greater cohesion among community members; and (5) reduced conflict in families. Community members and IPT-G facilitators suggested that as depression remitted, IPT-G participants became more hopeful, motivated and productive. Results suggest that providing treatment for depression in communities with high depression prevalence rates may lead to positive changes in a range of non-mental health outcomes.

  16. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Postpartum Depression

    PubMed Central

    STUART, SCOTT; O’HARA, MICHAEL W.

    1995-01-01

    Postpartum depression is a frequent complication of childbirth. Postpartum depression is associated with disruptions in interpersonal relationships, and the puerperium is a period of major role transition. In contrast to other subtypes of depression, however, postpartum depression often is not treated with medication, which is relatively contraindicated for women who are breastfeeding. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) focuses specifically on the effects of depression on interpersonal functioning; this focus renders IPT a potentially useful psychosocial treatment for postpartum depression. The authors describe the use of IPT for the treatment of women with postpartum depression and present preliminary results from an open treatment trial of IPT. PMID:22700210

  17. Interpersonal learning is associated with improved self-esteem in group psychotherapy for women with binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Meagan E; Tasca, Giorgio A; Ritchie, Kerri; Balfour, Louise; Maxwell, Hilary; Bissada, Hany

    2014-03-01

    Yalom and Leszcz (2005) indicated that interpersonal learning is a key therapeutic factor in group psychotherapy. In this study, we conceptualized interpersonal learning as the convergence over time between an individual's and the group's perception of the individual's cohesion to the group. First, we developed parallel measures of: (a) an individual's self-rated cohesion to the group (Cohesion Questionnaire-Individual Version [CQ-I]), and (b) the group's rating of the individual's cohesion to the group (CQ-G) based on the original Cohesion Questionnaire (CQ; Piper, Marache, Lacroix, Richardsen, & Jones, 1983). Second, we used these parallel scales to assess differences between an individual's self-rating and the mean of the group's ratings of the individual's cohesion to the group. Women with binge eating disorder (N = 102) received Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy. Participants were assigned to homogeneously composed groups of either high or low attachment anxiety. Outcomes were measured pre- and post-treatment, and the CQ-I and CQ-G were administered every fourth group session. We found significant convergence over time between the CQ-I and mean CQ-G scale scores in both attachment anxiety conditions. Participants with higher attachment anxiety had lower individual self-ratings of cohesion and had greater discrepancies between the CQ-I and CG-G compared with those with lower attachment anxiety. There was a significant relationship between greater convergence in cohesion ratings and improved self-esteem at post-treatment. More accurate self-perceptions through feedback from group members may be a key factor in facilitating increased self-esteem in group therapy. Group therapists may facilitate such interpersonal learning, especially for those higher in attachment anxiety, by noting discrepancies and then encouraging convergence between an individual and the group in their perceptions of cohesion to the group.

  18. Interpersonal Change in Brief Supportive Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Richard N.; Muran, J. Christopher; Pinsker, Henry; Hellerstein, David; Winston, Arnold

    1999-01-01

    As a substudy of a manual-based outcome study of the Beth Israel Brief Psychotherapy Program, the authors studied the efficacy of supportive psychotherapy in personality change, with particular attention to changes that outlast the period of treatment. They examined results from the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP) at intake, 40th-session termination, and 6-month follow-up in the first 20 subjects randomized to the supportive group. Eight subjects (40%) dropped out, but their initial IIP scores did not differ from those of follow-up completers. Six of 10 subjects with complete 6-month follow-up data showed significant improvement in interpersonal problems (4 cases P < 0.001; 2 cases P < 0.05). In a case method design, using the IIP mapped to an interpersonal circumplex model, the authors graphically demonstrate lasting positive changes in interpersonal functioning in subjects treated with supportive psychotherapy. (The Journal of Psychotherapy Practice and Research 1999; 8:55–63) PMID:9888107

  19. Psychodynamic/interpersonal group psychotherapy for perfectionism: Evaluating the effectiveness of a short-term treatment.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Paul L; Mikail, Samuel F; Flett, Gordon L; Tasca, Giorgio A; Flynn, Carol A; Deng, Xiaolei; Kaldas, Janet; Chen, Chang

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to determine whether clinically significant improvement could be obtained using a psychodynamic/interpersonal group treatment based on a comprehensive conceptualization of perfectionism. A sample of 71 community-recruited perfectionistic individuals participated in the University of British Columbia Perfectionism Treatment Study. Eighteen of these participants were initially nonrandomly assigned to a waitlist control condition. All participants completed measures of perfectionism traits, perfectionistic self-presentation, and automatic perfectionistic thoughts, as well as measures of distress including depression, anxiety, and interpersonal problems at pretreatment, posttreatment, and at a 4-month follow-up. Multilevel modeling demonstrated that perfectionism levels decreased with large effect sizes and that these decreases were associated with reductions in distress measures. Clinically significant decreases were found in all perfectionism components, and posttreatment scores on most variables were significantly lower in the treatment condition versus the waitlist control condition. The findings suggest that psychodynamic/interpersonal group treatment is effective in treating components of perfectionism.

  20. Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, John C.; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2012-01-01

    The authors briefly describe the origins, theory, and development of interpersonal psychotherapy: its roots in clinical outcome research, its spread from major depression to other psychiatric disorders and its increasing dissemination as an empirically validated clinical intervention included in treatment guidelines. They attempt to forecast research, organizational and training issues the growing interpersonal psychotherapy community may face in the future. PMID:22331561

  1. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Frase, Lukas

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we will introduce interpersonal psychotherapy as an effective short-term treatment strategy in major depression. In IPT, a reciprocal relationship between interpersonal problems and depressive symptoms is regarded as important in the onset and as a maintaining factor of depressive disorders. Therefore, interpersonal problems are the main therapeutic targets of this approach. Four interpersonal problem areas are defined, which include interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, complicated bereavement, and interpersonal deficits. Patients are helped to break the interactions between depressive symptoms and their individual interpersonal difficulties. The goals are to achieve a reduction in depressive symptoms and an improvement in interpersonal functioning through improved communication, expression of affect, and proactive engagement with the current interpersonal network. The efficacy of this focused and structured psychotherapy in the treatment of acute unipolar major depressive disorder is summarized. This article outlines the background of interpersonal psychotherapy, the process of therapy, efficacy, and the expansion of the evidence base to different subgroups of depressed patients.

  2. A Randomized Depression Prevention Trial Comparing Interpersonal Psychotherapy--Adolescent Skills Training to Group Counseling in Schools.

    PubMed

    Young, Jami F; Benas, Jessica S; Schueler, Christie M; Gallop, Robert; Gillham, Jane E; Mufson, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Given the rise in depression disorders in adolescence, it is important to develop and study depression prevention programs for this age group. The current study examined the efficacy of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a group prevention program for adolescent depression, in comparison to group programs that are typically delivered in school settings. In this indicated prevention trial, 186 adolescents with elevated depression symptoms were randomized to receive IPT-AST delivered by research staff or group counseling (GC) delivered by school counselors. Hierarchical linear modeling examined differences in rates of change in depressive symptoms and overall functioning from baseline to the 6-month follow-up assessment. Cox regression compared rates of depression diagnoses. Adolescents in IPT-AST showed significantly greater improvements in self-reported depressive symptoms and evaluator-rated overall functioning than GC adolescents from baseline to the 6-month follow-up. However, there were no significant differences between the two conditions in onset of depression diagnoses. Although both intervention conditions demonstrated significant improvements in depressive symptoms and overall functioning, results indicate that IPT-AST has modest benefits over groups run by school counselors which were matched on frequency and duration of sessions. In particular, IPT-AST outperformed GC in reduction of depressive symptoms and improvements in overall functioning. These findings point to the clinical utility of this depression prevention program, at least in the short-term. Additional follow-up is needed to determine the long-term effects of IPT-AST, relative to GC, particularly in preventing depression onset.

  3. Interpersonal Psychotherapy with Pregnant Adolescents: Two Pilot Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lisa; Gur, Merav; Shanok, Arielle; Weissman, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the feasibility, acceptability and helpfulness of group Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT-PA) for depression in pregnant adolescents. Method: Two open clinical trials were conducted of IPT-PA delivered in group format in a New York City public school for pregnant girls. Study 1 tests IPT-PA for management of…

  4. Interpersonal Psychotherapy with Pregnant Adolescents: Two Pilot Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lisa; Gur, Merav; Shanok, Arielle; Weissman, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the feasibility, acceptability and helpfulness of group Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT-PA) for depression in pregnant adolescents. Method: Two open clinical trials were conducted of IPT-PA delivered in group format in a New York City public school for pregnant girls. Study 1 tests IPT-PA for management of…

  5. Is Exposure Necessary? A Randomized Clinical Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy for PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, John C.; Petkova, Eva; Neria, Yuval; Van Meter, Page E.; Zhao, Yihong; Hembree, Elizabeth; Lovell, Karina; Biyanova, Tatyana; Marshall, Randall D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to trauma reminders has been considered imperative in psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). No treatment benefits all patients, however. We tested Interpersonal Psychotherapy, which has demonstrated antidepressant efficacy and showed promise in pilot PTSD research, as a non-exposure-based, non-cognitive behavioral PTSD treatment. Methods A randomized, fourteen-week trial compared Interpersonal Psychotherapy; Prolonged Exposure, an exposure-based exemplar; and Relaxation Therapy, an active control psychotherapy. Subjects were 110 unmedicated patients having DSM-IV chronic PTSD and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) score >50. Randomization stratified for comorbid major depression. We hypothesized Interpersonal Psychotherapy would be no more than minimally inferior (CAPS difference <12.5 points) to Prolonged Exposure. Results All therapies had large within-group pre/post effect sizes (d=1.32–1.88). Response rates (>30% CAPS improvement) were: Interpersonal Psychotherapy 63%, Prolonged Exposure 47%, Relaxation Therapy 38% (n.s.). Interpersonal psychotherapy and Prolonged Exposure CAPS outcome differed by 5.5 points (n.s.); the null hypothesis of more than minimal Interpersonal Psychotherapy inferiority was rejected (p=0.035). Patients with comorbid major depression dropped out from Prolonged Exposure nine times more than non-depressed Prolonged Exposure patients. Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Prolonged Exposure improved quality of life and social functioning more than Relaxation Therapy. Conclusions This first controlled study of individual Interpersonal Psychotherapy for PTSD demonstrated non-inferiority to the “gold standard” PTSD treatment. Interpersonal Psychotherapy had (non-significantly) lower attrition and higher response rates than Prolonged Exposure. Contradicting a widespread clinical belief, PTSD treatment may not require cognitive behavioral exposure to trauma reminders. Moreover, as differential

  6. [Origins and description of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT)].

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Jean; Streit, Ursula

    2008-01-01

    Interpersonal Psychotherapy was developed in the years 1969-84, specifically at that time, for the treatment of depression (later called Major Depression). Today, its indications have been extended to numerous other clinical syndromes and situations. This article describes the empirical basis on which IPT was developed until it evolved to its current format. A description of the phases of treatment is presented and the four problem areas commonly encountered in IPT are more explicitly detailed. Several techniques utilized in the course of this treatment are enumerated and the strategy underlying their usage is explained. IPT is an evidence-based psychotherapy and a clarification is made about its specificity, compared to other commonly used forms of psychotherapy.

  7. Momentary assessment of interpersonal process in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Katherine M; Hopwood, Christopher J; Woody, Erik; Ethier, Nicole; Sadler, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate how a novel computer joystick coding method can illuminate the study of interpersonal processes in psychotherapy sessions, we applied it to Shostrom's (1966) well-known films in which a client, Gloria, had sessions with 3 prominent psychotherapists. The joystick method, which records interpersonal behavior as nearly continuous flows on the plane defined by the interpersonal dimensions of control and affiliation, provides an excellent sampling of variability in each person's interpersonal behavior across the session. More important, it yields extensive information about the temporal dynamics that interrelate clients' and therapists' behaviors. Gloria's 3 psychotherapy sessions were characterized using time-series statistical indices and graphical representations. Results demonstrated that patterns of within-person variability tended to be markedly asymmetric, with a predominant, set-point-like interpersonal style from which deviations mostly occurred in just 1 direction (e.g., occasional submissive departures from a modal dominant style). In addition, across each session, the therapist and client showed strongly cyclical variations in both control and affiliation, and these oscillations were entrained to different extents depending on the therapist. We interpreted different patterns of moment-to-moment complementarity of interpersonal behavior in terms of different therapeutic goals, such as fostering a positive alliance versus disconfirming the client's interpersonal expectations. We also showed how this method can be used to provide a more detailed analysis of specific shorter segments from each of the sessions. Finally, we compared our approach to alternative techniques, such as act-to-act lagged relations and dynamic systems and pointed to a variety of possible research and training applications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Group Psychotherapy in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Ívarsson, Ómar

    2015-10-01

    In this overview of group psychotherapy in Iceland, an attempt will be made to describe how it is practiced today, give some glimpses into its earlier history, and clarify seven issues: (1) the standing of group psychotherapy in Iceland, its previous history, and the theoretical orientation of dynamic group therapy in the country; (2) the role of group therapy in the health care system; (3) how training in group therapy is organized; (4) the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice; (5) which issues/processes can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Iceland; and (6) how important are group-related issues within the social background of the country; and (7) what group work holds for the future.

  9. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress.

  10. The Relation between Specific and General Dimensions of the Psychotherapy Process in Interpersonal Psychotherapy of Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounsaville, Bruce J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined relation between general dimensions of psychotherapy process, rated with the Vanderbilt Psychotherapy Process Scale (VPPS), and a manual-guided psychotherapy, Short-Term Interpersonal Psychotherapy of Depression (IPT). VPPS-rated dimensions of patients and therapist behaviors were significantly correlated with IPT competence ratings.…

  11. Interpersonal psychotherapy for postpartum depression: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Miniati, Mario; Callari, Antonio; Calugi, Simona; Rucci, Paola; Savino, Mario; Mauri, Mauro; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2014-08-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is a dynamically informed and present-focused psychotherapy originally conceived for patients with unipolar depression and subsequently modified for other disorders, including postpartum depression (PPD). The aim of this paper is to review the evidence on the efficacy of IPT for PPD. We conducted a systematic review of studies published between 1995 and April 2013 assessing the efficacy of IPT for PPD using PubMed and PsycINFO. We included the following: (i) articles that presented a combination of at least two of the established terms in the abstract, namely, interpersonal [all fields] and ("psychotherapy" [MeSH terms] or psychotherapy [all fields]) and (perinatal [all fields] or postpartum [all fields]) and ("depressive disorder" [MeSH terms] or ("depressive" [all fields] and "disorder" [all fields]) or depressive disorder [all fields] or "depression" [all fields] or depression [MeSH terms]); (ii) manuscripts in English; (iii) original articles; and (iv) prospective or retrospective observational studies (analytical or descriptive), experimental, or quasi-experimental. Exclusion criteria were as follows: (i) other study designs, such as case reports, case series, and reviews; (ii) non-original studies including editorials, book reviews, and letters to the editor; and (iii) studies not specifically designed and focused on IPT. We identified 11 clinical primary trials assessing the efficacy of IPT for PPD, including 3 trials with group interventions (G-IPT) and one that required the presence of the partner (PA-IPT). We also identified six studies interpersonal-psychotherapy-oriented preventive interventions for use in pregnancy. IPT studies showed overall clinical improvement in the most commonly used depression measures in postpartum depressed women (EPDS, HDRS, BDI) and often-full recovery in several cases of treated patients. Evidence from clinical trials indicates that, when administered in monotherapy (or in combination with

  12. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for PTSD: a case study.

    PubMed

    Rafaeli, Alexandra Klein; Markowitz, John C

    2011-01-01

    Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), a time-limited, evidence-based treatment, has shown efficacy in treating major depressive disorder and other psychiatric conditions. Interpersonal Psychotherapy focuses on the patient's current life events and social and interpersonal functioning for understanding and treating symptoms. This case report demonstrates the novel use of IPT as treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Preliminary evidence suggests IPT may relieve PTSD symptoms without focusing on exposure to trauma reminders. Thus IPT may offer an alternative for patients who refuse (or do not respond to) exposure-based approaches. Interpersonal Psychotherapy focuses on two problem areas that specifically affect patients with PTSD: interpersonal difficulties and affect dysregulation. This case report describes a pilot participant from a study comparing 14 weekly sessions of IPT to treatment with two other psychotherapies. We describe the session-by-session IPT protocol, illustrating how to formulate the case, help the patient identify and address problematic affects and interpersonal functioning, and to monitor treatment response.

  13. For whom does interpersonal psychotherapy work? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bernecker, Samantha L; Coyne, Alice E; Constantino, Michael J; Ravitz, Paula

    2017-08-01

    The efficacy of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) to treat depression and other disorders is well established, yet it remains unknown which patients will benefit more from IPT than another treatment. This review summarizes 46years of clinical trial research on patient characteristics that moderate the relative efficacy of IPT vs. different treatments. Across 57 studies from 33 trials comparing IPT to pharmacotherapy, another psychotherapy, or control, there were few consistent indicators of when IPT would be more or less effective than another treatment. However, IPT may be superior to school counseling for adolescents with elevated interpersonal conflict, and to minimal controls for patients with severe depression. Cognitive-behavioral therapy may outpace IPT for patients with avoidant personality disorder symptoms. There was some preliminary evidence that IPT is more beneficial than alternatives for patients in some age groups, African-American patients, and patients in an index episode of depression. The included studies suffered from several limitations and high risk of Type I and II error. Obstacles that may explain the difficulty in identifying consistent moderators, including low statistical power and heterogeneity in samples and treatments, are discussed. Possible remedies include within-subjects designs, manipulation of single treatment ingredients, and strategies for increasing power such as improving measurement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) for PTSD: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    RAFAELI, ALEXANDRA KLEIN; MARKOWITZ, JOHN C.

    2013-01-01

    Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), a time-limited, evidence-based treatment, has shown efficacy in treating major depressive disorder and other psychiatric conditions. Interpersonal Psychotherapy focuses on the patient’s current life events and social and interpersonal functioning for understanding and treating symptoms. This case report demonstrates the novel use of IPT as treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Preliminary evidence suggests IPT may relieve PTSD symptoms without focusing on exposure to trauma reminders. Thus IPT may offer an alternative for patients who refuse (or do not respond to) exposure-based approaches. Interpersonal Psychotherapy focuses on two problem areas that specifically affect patients with PTSD: interpersonal difficulties and affect dysregulation. This case report describes a pilot participant from a study comparing 14 weekly sessions of IPT to treatment with two other psychotherapies. We describe the session-by-session IPT protocol, illustrating how to formulate the case, help the patient identify and address problematic affects and interpersonal functioning, and to monitor treatment response. PMID:22032045

  15. Pretreatment and Process Predictors of Outcome in Interpersonal and Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Anja; Saelens, Brian E.; Stein, Richard I.; Mockus, Danyte S.; Welch, R. Robinson; Matt, Georg E.; Wilfley, Denise E.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined pretreatment and process predictors of individual nonresponse to psychological group treatment of binge eating disorder (BED). In a randomized trial, 162 overweight patients with BED were treated with either group cognitive-behavioral therapy or group interpersonal psychotherapy. Treatment nonresponse, which was defined…

  16. Pretreatment and Process Predictors of Outcome in Interpersonal and Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Anja; Saelens, Brian E.; Stein, Richard I.; Mockus, Danyte S.; Welch, R. Robinson; Matt, Georg E.; Wilfley, Denise E.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined pretreatment and process predictors of individual nonresponse to psychological group treatment of binge eating disorder (BED). In a randomized trial, 162 overweight patients with BED were treated with either group cognitive-behavioral therapy or group interpersonal psychotherapy. Treatment nonresponse, which was defined…

  17. Is Interpersonal Psychotherapy Infinitely Adaptable? A Compendium of the Multiple Modifications of IPT.

    PubMed

    Frank, Ellen; Ritchey, Fiona C; Levenson, Jessica C

    2014-01-01

    We employed standard literature search techniques and surveyed participants on the International Society for Interpersonal Psychotherapy listserve (isiptlist@googlegroups.com) to catalogue the multiple and highly creative ways in which Klerman's and Weissman's original concept of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has been modified to meet the needs of a vast range of patient populations. Focusing first on adaptations of the individual treatment model for subgroups of adult patients, we next describe further adaptations of four major off-shoots of IPT: interpersonal counseling (IPC), IPT for adolescents (IPT-A), group IPT (IPT-G) and most recently, brief IPT (IPT-B). We then discuss IPT "in-laws," those treatments that have married IPT with of other forms of psychotherapy for patients with bipolar disorder, panic symptomatology, and substance abuse. We conclude with that although there have been myriad successful adaptations of IPT, there remain some conditions for which IPT adaptations have not been found to be efficacious.

  18. Implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy in a Psychiatry Residency Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtmacher, Jonathan; Eisendrath, Stuart J.; Haller, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for depression is a brief, well researched treatment for acute major depression. This article describes the implementation of IPT as an evidence-based treatment for depression in a psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors tracked the implementation process over 5 years as interpersonal…

  19. Efficacy of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training: An Indicated Preventive Intervention for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jami F.; Mufson, Laura; Davies, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Background: Indicated interventions for adolescents with elevated depressive symptoms may help decrease rates of depression. The current study reports on the efficacy of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a group indicated preventive intervention. Methods: Forty-one adolescents with elevated depression symptoms were…

  20. Improvements in Interpersonal Functioning Following Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) with Adolescents and their Association with Change in Depression.

    PubMed

    Spence, Susan H; O'Shea, Gabrielle; Donovan, Caroline L

    2016-05-01

    This study adds to the body of evidence regarding the theoretical underpinnings of interpersonal psychotherapy and the mechanisms through which it impacts upon depression in adolescents. The aims were to determine whether the interpersonal constructs proposed to underpin interpersonal psychotherapy do indeed change in response to this therapy and whether such changes are associated with changes in depression in young people. Thirty-nine adolescents, aged 13-19 years, with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder, were randomly assigned in blocks to group or individual treatment. Assessments were conducted at pre and posttreatment, and 12-month follow-up. The results supported the hypotheses, with significant improvements in social skills, social functioning, and the quality of parent-adolescent relationships, and an increase in secure attachment style and decrease in insecure attachment style being evident following treatment. Benefits were maintained at 12-month follow-up. Adolescents who showed greater reductions in depressive symptoms over this period tended to also show greater improvement in parent reported social skills, quality of the parent-adolescent relationship, and attachment style from pretreatment to 12-month follow-up. The findings are consistent with the proposed underpinnings of interpersonal psychotherapy. Adolescents showed significant improvements in interpersonal functioning and changes in attachment style following treatment, and changes in social skills, parent-adolescent conflict and attachment style were associated with reductions in depression. As such, the results add to the body of knowledge regarding the construct validity of interpersonal psychotherapy as an intervention for depression in young people. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  1. Group Analytic Psychotherapy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Penna, Carla; Castanho, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    Group analytic practice in Brazil began quite early. Highly influenced by the Argentinean Pichon-Rivière, it enjoyed a major development from the 1950s to the early 1980s. Beginning in the 1970s, different factors undermined its development and eventually led to its steep decline. From the mid 1980s on, the number of people looking for either group analytic psychotherapy or group analytic training decreased considerably. Group analytic psychotherapy societies struggled to survive and most of them had to close their doors in the 1990s and the following decade. Psychiatric reform and the new public health system have stimulated a new demand for groups in Brazil. Developments in the public and not-for-profit sectors, combined with theoretical and practical research in universities, present promising new perspectives for group analytic psychotherapy in Brazil nowadays.

  2. Recent non-medication trials of interpersonal psychotherapy for depression.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Myrna M

    2007-02-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is a time-limited treatment described in a manual and tested in numerous clinical trials, with and without medication. Four recent clinical trials are reviewed in situations where medication as a first-line treatment for depression was not feasible (pregnancy, post partum, adolescence and in a developing country). The results show the efficacy of 12-16 wk of IPT compared to treatment as usual or no treatment in reducing depressive symptoms. The therapists providing the treatment included psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers as well as non-mental-health workers. We do not know if these patients might have done even better with medication, but each study showed a significant remission of symptoms of patients in IPT compared to controls. The use of efficacious, time-limited psychotherapy, which can be administered by non-medical personnel can be economical. An obstacle to providing evidence-based psychotherapies is the paucity of practitioners trained in them. Until the gap between training in psychotherapy and the research evidence in psychotherapy is bridged in training programmes, it will be difficult to provide patients with these treatments.

  3. [Interpersonal psychotherapy for work-related stress depressive disorders].

    PubMed

    Schramm, E; Berger, M

    2013-07-01

    In general work involves health promoting functions but can also have hazardous impacts on well-being. Due to a massive change in working conditions it has become increasingly more recognized that depressive disorders are highly prevalent at the workplace and that work stress belongs to the most common triggers of depressive disorders, particularly in men. It is relevant to differentiate between subjectively experienced burnout and clinical depression. The best investigated psychosocial work stressors include increased job demands in connection with low control possibilities and lack of gratification, interpersonal conflicts, role stress and social isolation. For the treatment of work-related clinical depression, an additional focus of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) of depression, namely "work-related stress and burnout experience" was conceptualized based on a vulnerability-stress model and the fact that work usually takes place in an interpersonal context. This new problem area focuses on role stress and conflicts at work and the reduction of stressful working conditions. Interpersonal psychotherapy has so far been useful for the treatment of depression due to problems at work; however, further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this newly designed problem area.

  4. Transpersonal Group Psychotherapy: Theory, Method, and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carlton F. "Perk"

    1998-01-01

    Transpersonal group psychotherapy is a carpet of theory, technique, and experiences woven from threads of contemporary psychology, mysticism, and a perennial philosophy many centuries old. Introduces the basic concepts of transpersonal group psychotherapy, proposes a model of transpersonal group psychotherapy, discusses the training of…

  5. Transpersonal Group Psychotherapy: Theory, Method, and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carlton F. "Perk"

    1998-01-01

    Transpersonal group psychotherapy is a carpet of theory, technique, and experiences woven from threads of contemporary psychology, mysticism, and a perennial philosophy many centuries old. Introduces the basic concepts of transpersonal group psychotherapy, proposes a model of transpersonal group psychotherapy, discusses the training of…

  6. Group Psychotherapy With Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Teicher, Joseph D.

    1966-01-01

    In working in a large general hospital with groups of disturbed adolescent patients from economically and emotionally deprived walks of life, therapists worked out a plan of outpatient group therapy that in general has had good results as measured by effective living and functioning in school, at home and with peers. Groups were limited to eight patients and meetings were held once a week with two co-therapists of different sexes. Therapists usually did not try to turn discussions in one direction or another. More active than in usual group work, the therapists did not hesitate to be didactic or educational as the topic or problem indicated. At termination of the group sessions, usually at the end of a school year as a natural time of leave-taking, the members who had benefited sufficiently faced the departure with little emotional wrench; those who had not were resentful, anxious, disappointed or relieved. PMID:18730009

  7. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A): an overview.

    PubMed

    Mufson, Laura; Sills, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the main principles of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and its adaptation for depressed adolescents (IPT-A). The work of IPT-A is put in the context of the significant problem of depression in adolescence and the other treatments and their efficacy in the treatment of adolescent depression. The paper also provides an overview of the approach and specific techniques to be used with adolescents. The efficacy and effectiveness data on IPT-A are presented briefly. IPT-A is an empirically supported psychotherapy for depressed, non-bipolar and non-psychotic adolescents. IPT-A is unique among evidence-based treatments in its demonstrated effectiveness when transported from a laboratory setting to a community setting (school-based health clinics) and delivered by community clinicians. Future studies are needed with other populations that include long-term follow-up of outcomes and are conducted by other investigator teams.

  8. An Analysis of Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, K. I.

    1972-01-01

    Although group psychotherapy as a concept has been in existence since the late 19th century, it is only since the 1930s that the concept has been used in the way we know it today. Since man functions in groups, it is logical to try and rehabilitate the maladjusted member of society by using a therapeutic group. This has an added benefit since it allows the therapist to treat many more people than is possible in individual therapy. This article describes the various types of group therapy now used. PMID:20468780

  9. Interpersonal factors associated with depression in adolescents: are these consistent with theories underpinning interpersonal psychotherapy?

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Gabrielle; Spence, Susan H; Donovan, Caroline L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether depressed adolescents differed from non-depressed adolescents in terms of constructs consistent with those that are proposed to underpin interpersonal psychotherapy. In particular, it was hypothesized that compared with non-depressed adolescents, depressed adolescents would demonstrate a greater number of negative life events associated with interpersonal loss and major life transitions, a more insecure attachment style and poorer communication skills, interpersonal relationships and social support. Thirty-one clinically diagnosed depressed adolescents were matched with 31 non-depressed adolescents on age, gender and socio-economic status. The 62 participants were aged between 12 and 19 years and comprised 18 male and 44 female adolescents. On a self-report questionnaire, depressed adolescents reported a greater number of negative interpersonal life events, a less secure attachment style and scored higher on all insecure attachment styles compared with the non-depressed adolescents. In addition, depressed adolescents demonstrated lower levels of social skill (on both adolescent and parent report), a poorer quality of relationship with parents (on both adolescent and parent report) and lower social competence (adolescent report only). Parents of depressed adolescents also reported more negative parental attitudes and behaviours towards their adolescent compared with parents of non-depressed adolescents. Thus, the results of this study are consistent with the constructs underlying interpersonal psychotherapy and suggest their usefulness in the assessment, conceptualization and treatment of adolescent depression. Clinical implications are discussed.

  10. Failures in interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT): factors related to treatment resistances.

    PubMed

    Ravitz, Paula; McBride, Carolina; Maunder, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is an effective treatment for depression across the lifespan and across cultures. However, even when delivered with fidelity, some patients drop out and others do not improve sufficiently. Attention to IPT treatment attrition, dropout, nonresponse, or failure can elucidate its limitations and the opportunities to improve its effectiveness. Studies of factors known to moderate and negatively predict IPT depression treatment response are reviewed along with recommended modifications to improve outcomes. Although the risk of treatment failure always exists, it is possible to enhance treatment effectiveness by attending to the therapeutic alliance, strategically addressing depression, and adapting IPT to patient characteristics. These include adding pharmacotherapy, extending the course of treatment, and targeting specific symptoms or interpersonal vulnerabilities. Case examples illustrate several of these points.

  11. Is Interpersonal Psychotherapy Infinitely Adaptable? A Compendium of the Multiple Modifications of IPT

    PubMed Central

    FRANK, ELLEN; RITCHEY, FIONA C.; LEVENSON, JESSICA C.

    2015-01-01

    We employed standard literature search techniques and surveyed participants on the International Society for Interpersonal Psychotherapy listserve (isipt-list@googlegroups.com) to catalogue the multiple and highly creative ways in which Klerman’s and Weissman’s original concept of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has been modified to meet the needs of a vast range of patient populations. Focusing first on adaptations of the individual treatment model for subgroups of adult patients, we next describe further adaptations of four major off-shoots of IPT: interpersonal counseling (IPC), IPT for adolescents (IPT-A), group IPT (IPT-G) and most recently, brief IPT (IPT-B). We then discuss IPT “in-laws,” those treatments that have married IPT with of other forms of psychotherapy for patients with bipolar disorder, panic symptomatology, and substance abuse. We conclude with that although there have been myriad successful adaptations of IPT, there remain some conditions for which IPT adaptations have not been found to be efficacious. PMID:26453344

  12. A Functional Analytic Approach to Group Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberghe, Luc

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a particular view on the use of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (FAP) in a group therapy format. This view is based on the author's experiences as a supervisor of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy Groups, including groups for women with depression and groups for chronic pain patients. The contexts in which this approach…

  13. A Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Women With Sexual Abuse Histories

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Nancy L.; Chaudron, Linda H.; Ward, Erin A.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Conwell, Yeates; O’Hara, Michael W.; Tu, Xin; Lu, Naiji; He, Hua; Stuart, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Many depressed women seen in community mental health centers (CMHCs) have histories of childhood sexual abuse and are economically disadvantaged. Randomized trials are needed to test the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions in this population and setting. This study compared interpersonal psychotherapy with usual care psychotherapy among women in a CMHC. Methods Among 1,100 women seeking treatment in a CMHC, 230 (21%) had major depression and histories of childhood sexual abuse. Seventy women with major depression and sexual abuse before age 18 were randomly assigned to interpersonal psychotherapy (N=37) or usual care psychotherapy (N=33). Staff clinicians provided all treatments. Participants were assessed at study entry and at ten, 24, and 36 weeks after random assignment. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine change over time. Results Compared with women assigned to usual care, women who received interpersonal psychotherapy had greater reductions in depressive symptoms (Hamilton Rating Scale, p=.05, d=.34; Beck Depression Inventory–II, p=.01, d=.29), posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (p=.04, d=.76), and shame (p=.002, d=.38). Interpersonal psychotherapy and usual care yielded comparable improvements in social and mental health–related functioning. Conclusions Interpersonal psychotherapy compared favorably to usual care psychotherapy in a CMHC in improving psychiatric symptoms and reducing shame among sexually abused women. However, there is a critical need for continued research to develop more effective treatments for the social and psychiatric sequelae of interpersonal trauma and socioeconomic disadvantage. PMID:21459988

  14. [Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for post traumatic stress disorder].

    PubMed

    Robertson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Amongst the many modifications and applications of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), its utilisation in the treatment of psychological trauma is amongst the most complex. Psychological trauma is usually defined as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in the Anglo-American literature. Despite the focus of the scientific literature on PTSD, psychological trauma engenders profound disturbances of mood, affect regulation, self-concept, interpersonal adjustment and a profound existential crisis in the lives of those afflicted. In the light of this, no one psychological therapy is positioned to 'treat'all aspects of psychological traumatic stress. Through its focus upon the individual and his or her experience of their interpersonal world, IPT provides scope for a psychological intervention which, whilst aiming at relief of distress, approaches issues not usually addressed in symptom focussed treatments. In this paper, I will attempt to outline the rationale for the use of IPT in psychological trauma and PTSD and then provide some evidence of its utility in the clinical setting.

  15. Adapting Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Older Adults at Risk for Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Heisel, Marnin J.; Talbot, Nancy L.; King, Deborah A.; Tu, Xin M.; Duberstein, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To pilot a psychological intervention adapted for older adults at-risk for suicide. Design A focused, uncontrolled, pre-to-post-treatment psychotherapy trial. All eligible participants were offered the study intervention. Setting Outpatient mental healthcare provided in the psychiatry department of an academic medical center in a mid-sized Canadian city. Participants Seventeen English-speaking adults 60 years or older, at- risk for suicide by virtue of current suicide ideation, death ideation, and/or recent self-injury. Intervention A 16-session course of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) adapted for older adults at-risk for suicide who were receiving medication and/or other standard psychiatric treatment for underlying mood disorders. Measurements Participants completed a demographics form, screens for cognitive impairment and alcohol misuse, a semi-structured diagnostic interview, and measures of primary (suicide ideation and death ideation), and secondary study outcomes (depressive symptom severity; social adjustment and support; psychological well-being), and psychotherapy process measures. Results Participants experienced significant reductions in suicide ideation, death ideation, and depressive symptom severity, and significant improvement in perceived meaning in life, social adjustment, perceived social support, and other psychological well-being variables. Conclusions Study participants experienced enhanced psychological well-being and reduced symptoms of depression and suicide ideation over the course of IPT adapted for older adults at-risk for suicide. Larger, controlled trials are needed to further evaluate the impact of this novel intervention and to test methods for translating and integrating focused interventions into standard clinical care with at-risk older adults. PMID:24840611

  16. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A): A Case Illustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Elisabeth Baerg; Mufson, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the treatment of a depressed adolescent (15 years of age) boy using Interpersonal Psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A). IPT-A is an empirically supported psychosocial intervention for adolescents suffering from a depressive episode. It is delivered as an individual psychotherapy with a minimum of parental…

  17. Interpersonal Psychotherapy with a Parenting Enhancement Adapted for In-Home Delivery in Early Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeber, Linda S.; Schwartz, Todd A.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Canuso, Regina; Lewis, Virginia; Matsuda, Yui

    2014-01-01

    Formidable barriers prevent low-income mothers from accessing evidence-based treatment for depressive symptoms that compromise their ability to provide sensitive, responsive parenting for their infant or toddler. interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), an evidence-based psychotherapy for depression, was tailored for in-home delivery to mothers…

  18. Interpersonal Psychotherapy with a Parenting Enhancement Adapted for In-Home Delivery in Early Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeber, Linda S.; Schwartz, Todd A.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Canuso, Regina; Lewis, Virginia; Matsuda, Yui

    2014-01-01

    Formidable barriers prevent low-income mothers from accessing evidence-based treatment for depressive symptoms that compromise their ability to provide sensitive, responsive parenting for their infant or toddler. interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), an evidence-based psychotherapy for depression, was tailored for in-home delivery to mothers…

  19. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A): A Case Illustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Elisabeth Baerg; Mufson, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the treatment of a depressed adolescent (15 years of age) boy using Interpersonal Psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A). IPT-A is an empirically supported psychosocial intervention for adolescents suffering from a depressive episode. It is delivered as an individual psychotherapy with a minimum of parental…

  20. Selection and Composition Criteria in Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the selection of members for and the composition of psychotherapy groups. Discusses viewpoints on inclusion-exclusion criteria as well as theories on group composition. (Author)

  1. Exploring Interpersonal Compatibility in Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyton, Joann

    This study investigated William Schutz's three-dimensional theory of interpersonal behavior and compatibility (FIRO) to determine its validity as a group measure of compatibility. Data were collected from 248 students enrolled in a multi-section course in small group communications at a large midwestern university. Subjects self-selected…

  2. Group Psychotherapy and Group Methods in Community Mental Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattison, E. Mansell

    An ad hoc committee of the American Group Psychotherapy Association (AGPA) was charged to investigate the use of group methods in Community mental health centers (CMHC), to assess the conceptual basis for the use of various group methods, to relate the use of group methods to group psychotherapy, and to evaluate trends in this area of mental…

  3. Interpersonal Mindfulness Informed by Functional Analytic Psychotherapy: Findings from a Pilot Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Sarah; Haworth, Kevin; Grow, Joel; Tsai, Mavis; Kohlenberg, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP; Kohlenberg & Tsai, 1991) aims to improve interpersonal relationships through skills intended to increase closeness and connection. The current trial assessed a brief mindfulness-based intervention informed by FAP, in which an interpersonal element was added to a traditional intrapersonal mindfulness…

  4. Change Processes in Residential Cognitive and Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Social Phobia: A Process-Outcome Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffart, Asle; Borge, Finn-Magnus; Sexton, Harold; Clark, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test cognitive and interpersonal models for improving social phobia. Eighty patients with social phobia were randomized to 10-week residential cognitive (RCT) or residential interpersonal psychotherapy (RIPT). They completed process measures every Thursday and a sub-outcome measure every Monday. The ratings were…

  5. Change Processes in Residential Cognitive and Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Social Phobia: A Process-Outcome Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffart, Asle; Borge, Finn-Magnus; Sexton, Harold; Clark, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test cognitive and interpersonal models for improving social phobia. Eighty patients with social phobia were randomized to 10-week residential cognitive (RCT) or residential interpersonal psychotherapy (RIPT). They completed process measures every Thursday and a sub-outcome measure every Monday. The ratings were…

  6. Individual psychotherapy as an adjunct to group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amaranto, E A; Bender, S S

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a form of combined psychotherapy in which the individual sessions are used as an adjunct to group therapy. Each group member is seen regularly in individual sessions to focus primarily on the member's ongoing group work. The individual sessions are scheduled on a rotating basis. Typically, each group member is seen in an individual session once every four weeks. Additional individual sessions are available only when immediate attention is appropriate and necessary. The group is viewed as the primary therapeutic component. A cost-effective therapeutic approach that uses both individual and group methods, this modality lends itself well to a clinic and to a private practice setting.

  7. Cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for early-onset chronic depression: a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Elisabeth; Zobel, Ingo; Dykierek, Petra; Kech, Sabine; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Külz, Anne; Berger, Mathias

    2011-03-01

    The only psychotherapy specifically designed and evaluated for the treatment of chronic depression, the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), has never been directly compared to another depression-specific psychological method. Thirty patients with early-onset chronic depression were randomized to 22 sessions of CBASP or Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) provided in 16 weeks. Primary outcome was the score on the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) assessed posttreatment by an independent blinded evaluator. Secondary endpoints were, among others, remission (HRSD≤8) rates and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The study included a prospective naturalistic 12-month follow-up. Intent-to-treat analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) revealed that there was no significant difference in posttreatment HRSD scores between the CBASP and the IPT condition, but in self-rated BDI scores. We found significantly higher remission rates in the CBASP (57%) as compared to the IPT (20%) group. One year posttreatment, no significant differences were found in the self-reported symptom level (BDI) using ANCOVA. The study used only a small sample size and no placebo control. The generalizability of the results may be limited to patients with a preference for psychological treatment. While the primary outcome was not significant, secondary measures showed relevant benefits of CBASP over IPT. We found preliminary evidence that in early-onset chronic depression, an approach specifically designed for this patient population was superior to a method originally developed for the treatment of acute depressive episodes. Long-term results suggest that chronically depressed patients may need extended treatment courses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Group psychotherapy and neuro-plasticity: an attachment theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Flores, Philip J

    2010-10-01

    This article selectively highlights relevant areas of neuroscience research which have direct application for attachment theory and group psychotherapy. Emerging evidence from the neurosciences is revealing that the developing brain of the infant, sculpted by the earliest attachment relationships, continues to be malleable in adulthood and can be profoundly influenced by ongoing relationships throughout one's lifespan. Advances in the neurosciences are also supporting the idea that strong attachment bonds and external interpersonal interactions that arise within the context of these attachments are registered as a person's neurophysiology and neurobiology. Attachment theory in particular provides a common language and conceptual framework from which the contributions from the neurosciences can be made applicable to group psychotherapy.

  9. Confidentiality and privileged communication in group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lasky, Gina B; Riva, Maria T

    2006-10-01

    The concept of confidentiality is fundamental to all forms of psychotherapy. The idea of protecting confidential material goes as far back as the Hippocratic Oath in ancient Greek history. Centuries later, authors continue to assert that "only by maintaining confidentiality can the essential groundwork of trust in treatment be developed" (Hough, 1992, p. 106). Others have even argued that without confidentiality, psychotherapy has no value (Epstein, Steingarten, Weinstein, & Nashel, 1977). Confidentiality in group psychotherapy is more complicated than in individual therapy because self-disclosure is at the core of group therapy and there are numerous people hearing the disclosures. Confidentiality in group therapy, once ignored in the literature on ethics, is gaining more attention as this modality becomes more widely practiced; so too is an acknowledgement that ethical dilemmas surrounding confidentiality in groups are commonplace. This article discusses the major considerations and dilemmas on confidentiality in group psychotherapy. We first review confidentiality broadly and discuss the ethical principles that are related to confidentiality. In the next section, we discuss the complexities of confidentiality in group psychotherapy. Finally, we review research on confidentiality in groups and describe common ethical dilemmas.

  10. Brief Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT-B): Overview and Review of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Holly A; Grote, Nancy K; Graham, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Brief Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT-B) is an eight-session adaption of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), an evidence-based psychotherapy for depression. The rationale for developing a briefer form of IPT rests on the paucity of empirical evidence linking increased therapy "dose" to enhanced therapeutic effects. The goal of IPT-B is to allow individuals who are unlikely to attend 16 sessions of psychotherapy-because of external or internal constraints-to receive the full benefits of IPT in fewer sessions. We provide an overview of IPT-B and describe the modifications made to standard IPT to adjust for the truncated time course. We then review the empirical evidence supporting this briefer model of IPT, including four open studies, one matched case-control study, and three randomized controlled trials. We conclude that IPT-B offers the dual advantages of rapid relief from suffering and decreased resource utilization.

  11. Innovative uses of psychodynamic group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Buchele, B J

    1994-01-01

    Psychodynamic group psychotherapy is gaining renewed attention as an effective form of treatment, due in part to increasing economic constraints that make other forms of treatment less accessible. The author highlights some innovative applications of both extended and time-limited groups. She also describes specific issues that can be addressed effectively in homogeneous time-limited group therapy.

  12. Psychotherapy Knowledge Translation and Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Using Best-Education Practices to Transform Mental Health Care in Canada and Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ravitz, Paula; Wondimagegn, Dawit; Pain, Clare; Araya, Mesfin; Alem, Atalay; Baheretibeb, Yonas; Hanlon, Charlotte; Fekadu, Abebaw; Park, Jamie; Fefergrad, Mark; Leszcz, Molyn

    2014-01-01

    Psychotherapies, such as Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), that have proven effective for treating mental disorders mostly lie dormant in consensus-treatment guidelines. Broadly disseminating these psychotherapies by training trainers and front-line health workers could close the gap between mental health needs and access to care. Research in continuing medical education and knowledge translation can inform the design of educational interventions to build capacity for providing psychotherapy to those who need it. This paper summarizes psychotherapy training recommendations that: adapt treatments to cultural and health organizational contexts; consider implementation barriers, including opportunity costs and mental health stigma; and engage local opinion leaders to use longitudinal, interactive, case-based teaching with reflection, skills-coaching, simulations, auditing and feedback. Community-based training projects in Northern Ontario, Canada and Ethiopia illustrate how best-education practices can be implemented to disseminate evidence-supported psychotherapies, such as IPT, to expand the therapeutic repertoire of health care workers and improve their patients' clinical outcomes.

  13. Interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A): a case illustration.

    PubMed

    Hall, Elisabeth Baerg; Mufson, Laura

    2009-07-01

    This article describes the treatment of a depressed adolescent (15 years of age) boy using Interpersonal Psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A). IPT-A is an empirically supported psychosocial intervention for adolescents suffering from a depressive episode. It is delivered as an individual psychotherapy with a minimum of parental involvement. The following case study illustrates the principal strategies and techniques of IPT-A.

  14. Using Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) in a Combined Psychotherapy/ Medication Research Protocol With Depressed Elders: A Descriptive Report With Case Vignettes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark D.; Wolfson, Lee; Frank, Ellen; Cornes, Cleon; Silberman, Rebecca; Ehrenpreis, Lin; Zaltman, Jean; Malloy, Julie; Reynolds Iii, Charles F.

    1998-01-01

    One hundred eighty subjects at least 60 years of age with recurrent unipolar major depression were recruited to participate in a depression treatment protocol. All patients received drug therapy with nortriptyline (NT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) with an experienced clinician. Acutely, 81% of subjects showed a full response to combined treatment. In the initial 127 subjects, the most common problem areas in therapy were role transition (41%), interpersonal disputes (34.5%), and grief (23%). Case vignettes are presented and discussed. The combination of IPT and NT showed a powerful antidepressant effect. IPT was readily adaptable to the needs of depressed elders. PMID:9407475

  15. The power of subtle interpersonal hostility in psychodynamic psychotherapy: a speech acts analysis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Timothy; Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M; Stiles, William B; Ordoñez, Tatiana; Heckman, Bernadette D

    2012-01-01

    This study compared participants' speech acts in low-hostile versus moderate-hostile interpersonal episodes in time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy. Sixty-two cases from the Vanderbilt II psychotherapy project were categorized as low or moderate in interpersonal hostility based on ratings of interpersonal process using Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (Benjamin, 1996). Representative episodes were coded using a taxonomy of speech acts (Stiles, 1992), and speech acts were compared across low- and moderate-hostile episodes. Therapists in moderate-hostility episodes used more interpretations and edifications, and fewer questions and reflections. Patients in moderate-hostility episodes used more disclosures and fewer edifications. Content coding showed that therapist interpretations with a self/intrapsychic self focus were more characteristic of moderate-hostility than low-hostility episodes, whereas the two types of episodes contained similar levels of interpretations focused on the patient's interpersonal relationships and the therapeutic relationship.

  16. Expressive Group Psychotherapy with the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szwabo, Peggy; Thale, Thomas T.

    Traditionally, the elderly have not been viewed as appropriate candidates for dynamic psychotherapy. To examine the effectiveness of a psycho-dynamically oriented group (focusing on the issues of aging, conflict resolution, and self-actualization) on 6 older adult participants, ages 63 to 87 years, systematic clinical observations of group…

  17. Does interpersonal behavior of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    PubMed Central

    Fincke, Janna I.; Möller, Heidi; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees’ interpersonal behavior on work involvement (WI) and compared their social behavior within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, and cognitive behavioral therapy training. Trainees from Sample 1 (N = 184) were asked to describe their interpersonal behavior in relation to their patients when filling out the Intrex, whereas trainees from Sample 2 (N = 135) were asked to describe the private relationship with a significant other. Results: Interpersonal affiliation in professional relationships significantly predicted the level of healing involvement, while stress involvement was predicted by interpersonal affiliation and interdependence in trainees’ relationships with their patients. Social behavior within professional relationships provided higher correlations with WI than private interpersonal behavior. Significant differences were found between private and professional relation settings in trainees’ interpersonal behavior with higher levels of affiliation and interdependence with significant others. Differences between therapeutic orientation and social behavior could only be found when comparing trainees’ level of interdependence with the particular relationship setting. Conclusion: Trainees’ interpersonal level of affiliation in professional relationships is a predictor for a successful psychotherapeutic development. Vice versa, controlling behavior in professional settings can be understood as a risk factor against psychotherapeutic growth. Both results strengthen an evidence-based approach for competence development during psychotherapy training. PMID:26106347

  18. Does interpersonal behavior of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    PubMed

    Fincke, Janna I; Möller, Heidi; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behavior on work involvement (WI) and compared their social behavior within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, and cognitive behavioral therapy training. Trainees from Sample 1 (N = 184) were asked to describe their interpersonal behavior in relation to their patients when filling out the Intrex, whereas trainees from Sample 2 (N = 135) were asked to describe the private relationship with a significant other. Interpersonal affiliation in professional relationships significantly predicted the level of healing involvement, while stress involvement was predicted by interpersonal affiliation and interdependence in trainees' relationships with their patients. Social behavior within professional relationships provided higher correlations with WI than private interpersonal behavior. Significant differences were found between private and professional relation settings in trainees' interpersonal behavior with higher levels of affiliation and interdependence with significant others. Differences between therapeutic orientation and social behavior could only be found when comparing trainees' level of interdependence with the particular relationship setting. Trainees' interpersonal level of affiliation in professional relationships is a predictor for a successful psychotherapeutic development. Vice versa, controlling behavior in professional settings can be understood as a risk factor against psychotherapeutic growth. Both results strengthen an evidence-based approach for competence development during psychotherapy training.

  19. A Model of Therapist Competencies for the Empirically Supported Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sburlati, Elizabeth S.; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Mufson, Laura H.; Schniering, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to treat adolescent depression, a number of empirically supported treatments (ESTs) have been developed from both the cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-A) frameworks. Research has shown that in order for these treatments to be implemented in routine clinical practice (RCP), effective therapist…

  20. Impact of Comorbid Anxiety in an Effectiveness Study of Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jami F.; Mufson, Laura; Davies, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of comorbid anxiety on treatment for adolescent depression in an effectiveness study of interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A). Method: A randomized clinical trial was conducted from April 1, 1999, through July 31, 2002. Sixty-three depressed adolescents, ages 12 to 18, received either IPT-A…

  1. Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training: Anxiety Outcomes and Impact of Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jami F.; Makover, Heather B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Mufson, Laura; Gallop, Robert J.; Benas, Jessica S.

    2012-01-01

    Given the frequent comorbidity of anxiety and depression, it is important to study the effects of depression interventions on anxiety and the impact of comorbid anxiety on depression outcomes. This article reports on pooled anxiety and depression data from two randomized trials of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a…

  2. An Interpersonal Psychotherapy Approach to Counseling Student Athletes: Clinical Implications of Athletic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heird, Emily Benton; Steinfeldt, Jesse A.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that disruptive circumstances in an athlete's career (temporary injury, permanent injury, retirement) can pose significant difficulties, especially if the athlete has developed a salient athletic identity at the expense of a multidimensional self-concept. The authors present an interpersonal psychotherapy approach to case…

  3. An Interpersonal Psychotherapy Approach to Counseling Student Athletes: Clinical Implications of Athletic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heird, Emily Benton; Steinfeldt, Jesse A.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that disruptive circumstances in an athlete's career (temporary injury, permanent injury, retirement) can pose significant difficulties, especially if the athlete has developed a salient athletic identity at the expense of a multidimensional self-concept. The authors present an interpersonal psychotherapy approach to case…

  4. Predictors of the Longitudinal Course of Postpartum Depression Following Interpersonal Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nylen, Kimberly J.; O'Hara, Michael W.; Brock, Rebecca; Moel, Joy; Gorman, Laura; Stuart, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We examined the course and predictors of postpartum depression in the 18 months following interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Method: We enrolled 120 community women with major depression in a 12-week randomized trial of individual IPT during the postpartum period (O'Hara, Stuart, Gorman, & Wenzel, 2000). At 6, 12, and 18 months…

  5. Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training: Anxiety Outcomes and Impact of Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jami F.; Makover, Heather B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Mufson, Laura; Gallop, Robert J.; Benas, Jessica S.

    2012-01-01

    Given the frequent comorbidity of anxiety and depression, it is important to study the effects of depression interventions on anxiety and the impact of comorbid anxiety on depression outcomes. This article reports on pooled anxiety and depression data from two randomized trials of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a…

  6. Predictors of the Longitudinal Course of Postpartum Depression Following Interpersonal Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nylen, Kimberly J.; O'Hara, Michael W.; Brock, Rebecca; Moel, Joy; Gorman, Laura; Stuart, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We examined the course and predictors of postpartum depression in the 18 months following interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Method: We enrolled 120 community women with major depression in a 12-week randomized trial of individual IPT during the postpartum period (O'Hara, Stuart, Gorman, & Wenzel, 2000). At 6, 12, and 18 months…

  7. A Model of Therapist Competencies for the Empirically Supported Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sburlati, Elizabeth S.; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Mufson, Laura H.; Schniering, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to treat adolescent depression, a number of empirically supported treatments (ESTs) have been developed from both the cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-A) frameworks. Research has shown that in order for these treatments to be implemented in routine clinical practice (RCP), effective therapist…

  8. CRITICAL REVIEW OF OUTCOME RESEARCH ON INTERPERSONAL PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR ANXIETY DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, John C.; Lipsitz, Joshua; Milrod, Barbara L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has demonstrated efficacy in treating mood and eating disorders. This article critically reviews outcome research testing IPT for anxiety disorders, a diagnostic area where cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has dominated research and treatment. Methods A literature search identified six open and five controlled trials of IPT for social anxiety disorder (SAD), panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Results Studies were generally small, underpowered, and sometimes methodologically compromised. Nonetheless, minimally adapted from its standard depression strategies, IPT for anxiety disorders yielded positive results in open trials for the three diagnoses. In controlled trials, IPT fared better than waiting list (N = 2), was equipotent to supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy (N = 1), but less efficacious than CBT for SAD (N = 1), and CBT for panic disorder (N = 1) in a methodologically complicated study. IPT equaled CBT in a group residential format (N = 1). Conclusions IPT shows some promise for anxiety disorders but has thus far shown no advantages in controlled trials relative to other therapies. Methodological and ecological issues have complicated testing of IPT for anxiety disorders, clouding some findings. The authors discuss difficulties of conducting non-CBT research in a CBT-dominated area, investigator bias, and the probable need to further modify IPT for anxiety disorders. Untested therapies deserve the fairest possible testing. Depression and Anxiety 00:1–10, 2014. PMID:24493661

  9. Attachment and group psychotherapy: introduction to a special section.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giorgio A

    2014-03-01

    The application of attachment theory to adult psychotherapy represents a growing area of research and practice. Despite the conceptual overlap between group therapeutic factors, attachment theory, and therapeutic tasks as outlined by Bowlby (1988), there is little research on attachment functioning in group therapy. Hence, there remain substantial questions about the role of attachment theory in understanding group therapy processes and outcomes. The three studies in this special section advance the research in some of these important areas, including showing that positive changes in self-reported attachment insecurity among clients persist long after group therapy ends; attachment anxiety affects the level and rate of interpersonal learning in groups; and change in attachment to the therapy group has an impact on longer term change in individual group members' attachment. Each article also examines the impact of these attachment concepts on treatment outcomes. Numerous areas remain to be explored when it comes to the implications of attachment theory for understanding and conducting group therapy, including the conceptual and practical overlap between attachment concepts such as security and exploration with group therapeutic factors such as cohesion and interpersonal learning. The articles in this special section begin to address some of these issues related to attachment theory and its implications for group therapists. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation Procedures for Training Psychotherapists in Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevron, Eve S.; And Others

    The training of psychotherapists has been an ongoing process in psychiatry and clinical psychology. Recently, however, a growing demand to operationalize competence criteria to enable independent evaluation of therapists' skills in specifically defined psychotherapies has occurred. To examine this phenomenon, evaluation procedures were developed…

  11. Combined treatment of borderline personality disorder with interpersonal psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy: predictors of response.

    PubMed

    Bellino, Silvio; Bozzatello, Paola; Bogetto, Filippo

    2015-03-30

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by affective instability, impulsive behaviors, and disturbed interpersonal relationships. A previous study of our group found that combined therapy with interpersonal psychotherapy adapted to BPD (IPT-BPD) and fluoxetine was superior to single pharmacotherapy in BPD patients. The aim of the present study was to examine what clinical factors predicted response to combined therapy in patients evaluated in the previous efficacy study. The subgroup of 27 patients allocated to combined therapy was analyzed. Patients were treated for 32 weeks with fluoxetine 20-40 mg/day plus IPT-BPD. Patients were assessed at baseline and week 32 with an interview for demographic and clinical variables, CGI-S, HDRS, HARS, SOFAS, BPDSI, and SAT-P. Statistical analysis was performed with multiple regression. The difference of CGI-S score between baseline and week 32 (∆CGI-S) was the dependent variable. Factors significantly and independently related to ∆CGI-S were the BPDSI total score and the items abandonment, affective instability, and identity. Patients with more severe BPD psychopathology and with a higher degree of core symptoms such as fear of abandonment, affective instability, and identity disturbance have a better chance to improve with combined therapy with fluoxetine and IPT-BPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Social difficulties influence group psychotherapy adherence in abused, suicidal African American women.

    PubMed

    Ilardi, Dawn L; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2009-12-01

    The social brain model emphasizes improving our understanding of the relational factors that influence treatment adherence. Consistent with this framework, which has been applied to medical adherence, it was hypothesized that insecure attachment styles, interpersonal hassles, and low levels of social support would explain group psychotherapy attendance. Results from 51 abused and suicidal low-income, African American women who attended at least 1 session of an empowerment group psychotherapy indicated that lower attendance was related to (a) insecure attachment styles (fearful) and (b) interpersonal hassles (perceived social differences, lack of social acceptability, social victimization). Perceived social support did not predict group therapy attendance. The value of addressing attachment styles and interpersonal factors to enhance treatment participation is underscored.

  13. Adverse Outcomes in Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roback, Howard B.

    2000-01-01

    Group forms of therapy have been growing at a rapid rate, in part because of their documented effectiveness and economic considerations such as managed care. It is therefore becoming increasingly important to assess the psychological risks of these interventions. The author provides an overview of the published literature and conference presentations on negative effects in adult outpatient groups. Although much of the literature on adverse outcomes in group therapy focuses on single risk factors (e.g., negative leader, group process, or patient characteristics), the author argues that an interactional model should be encouraged. Means of reducing casualties are also discussed, as well as methodological issues and research directions. PMID:10896735

  14. Interpersonal psychotherapy as augmentation treatment in depressed elderly responding poorly to antidepressant drugs: a case series.

    PubMed

    Scocco, Paolo; Frank, Ellen

    2002-01-01

    Medication is often the first choice in the treatment of depression, even though large numbers of depressed patients do not respond to antidepressant drugs or fail to achieve symptom remission or recovery. Generally, other drugs, rather than other therapeutic approaches such as psychotherapy, are used as augmentation treatment. This applies in particular to elderly patients. The aim of this work is to assess whether augmentation with interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) can bring about symptom remission in depressed elderly responding poorly to medication. Five cognitively intact patients aged over 60 and suffering from major depression were first treated for 6 weeks with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor compound. Owing to poor outcome, IPT was added to the treatment. IPT is a brief psychotherapy addressing the interpersonal problems linked to depression, and has been modified for use with elderly patients. All patients achieved symptom remission after a cycle of psychotherapy lasting a minimum of 16 and a maximum of 20 weekly sessions. The methodological limitations of this open study do not allow us to generalize from the positive outcomes. Further studies might confirm these initial observations and establish whether an equally satisfactory therapeutic response can be attained if medication is discontinued after the start of psychotherapy. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for major depression following perinatal loss: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer E; Price, Ann Back; Kao, Jennifer Chienwen; Fernandes, Karen; Stout, Robert; Gobin, Robyn L; Zlotnick, Caron

    2016-10-01

    This randomized controlled pilot trial examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an adapted interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for major depressive disorder (MDD) following perinatal loss (miscarriage, stillbirth, or early neonatal death). Fifty women who experienced a perinatal loss within the past 18 months, whose current depressive episode onset occurred during or after the loss, were randomized to the group IPT adapted for perinatal loss (the Group IPT for Major Depression Following Perinatal Loss manual developed for this study is available at no cost by contacting either of the first two authors) or to the group Coping with Depression (CWD), a cognitive behavioral treatment which did not focus on perinatal loss nor social support. Assessments occurred at baseline, treatment weeks 4 and 8, post-treatment, and 3 and 6 months after the end of treatment. IPT was feasible and acceptable in this population. Although some participants were initially hesitant to discuss their losses in a group (as occurred in IPT but not CWD), end of treatment satisfaction scores were significantly (p = 0.001) higher in IPT than in CWD. Confidence intervals around between-groups effect sizes favored IPT for reductions in depressive symptoms during treatment as well as for improvement in mode-specific targets (social support, grief symptoms) and recovery from a post-traumatic stress disorder over follow-up. This group IPT treatment adapted for MDD after perinatal loss is feasible, acceptable, and possibly efficacious.

  16. Changes in symptoms and interpersonal problems during the first 2 years of long-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Berghout, Caspar C; Zevalkink, Jolien; Katzko, Michael W; de Jong, Joop T

    2012-06-01

    Longitudinal measurements can provide important information regarding variations in developmental trajectories of patients in long-term treatment. The present study investigated changes in general symptoms, depression, anxiety, and interpersonal problems during the first 2 years of long-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy (PP) and psychoanalysis (PA). It was expected that interpersonal problems would diminish more slowly compared to symptomatic dysfunction. An accelerated longitudinal design with five consecutive measurement points across two cohorts of patients was used. Changes on the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-64 (IIP-64) were investigated during the first 2 years of long-term PP (n = 73) and PA (n = 40). Linear regression analysis was performed to model the different courses of improvement. After 2 years of treatment, patients in both groups still presented moderate to high levels of symptoms and interpersonal problems compared to non-clinical populations. As expected, interpersonal problems changed less rapidly. PP patients changed both with regard to symptomatic and interpersonal problems, whereas the only significant change in the PA group was on one of the symptomatic subscales. Slopes in the PA group and in PP group did not differ significantly from each other, except for the IIP-64 scale intrusive, with PP patients showing significantly more improvement than PA patients. The height of intake values of the outcome variables appeared to predict the speed of symptomatic recovery. Symptoms and interpersonal problems did not decrease notably within the first 2 years of psychoanalytic treatment. This is consistent with the idea that significant change takes time for patients with chronic mental disorders and personality pathology. In regular practice, it is advisable to monitor changes routinely in order to identify slow responders more

  17. Psychodrama: group psychotherapy through role playing.

    PubMed

    Kipper, D A

    1992-10-01

    The theory and the therapeutic procedure of classical psychodrama are described along with brief illustrations. Classical psychodrama and sociodrama stemmed from role theory, enactments, "tele," the reciprocity of choices, and the theory of spontaneity-robopathy and creativity. The discussion focuses on key concepts such as the therapeutic team, the structure of the session, transference and reality, countertransference, the here-and-now and the encounter, the group-as-a-whole, resistance and difficult clients, and affect and cognition. Also described are the neoclassical approaches of psychodrama, action methods, and clinical role playing, and the significance of the concept of behavioral simulation in group psychotherapy.

  18. Teaching Interpersonal Skills through Group Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrew, Linda G.; Lewis, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    Indicates the importance of interpersonal skills in the workplace and suggests that the business curricula offers many opportunities for incorporation of group activities. Offers steps for planning student group activities. (JOW)

  19. Adapting Interpersonal Psychotherapy for the Prevention of Excessive Weight Gain in Rural African American Girls

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Omni; Sbrocco, Tracy; Vannucci, Anna; Nelson, Beatrice; Jackson-Bowen, Darlene; Heimdal, James; Mirza, Nazrat; Wilfley, Denise E.; Osborn, Robyn; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Young, Jami F.; Waldron, Heather; Carter, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Objective To obtain focus group data regarding the perspectives of rural African American (AA) girls, parents/guardians, and community leaders on obesity, loss of control (LOC) eating, relationships, and interpersonal psychotherapy for the prevention of excessive weight gain (IPT-WG). Methods 7 focus groups (N = 50 participants) were moderated and the transcripts analyzed by Westat researchers using widely accepted methods of qualitative and thematic analysis. A session was held with experts in health disparities to elucidate themes. Results Participants understood LOC eating; however, they had culturally specific perceptions including usage of alternative terms. Relationships were highly valued, specifically those between mothers and daughters. IPT-WG program components generally resonated with participants, although modifications were recommended to respect parental roles. Experts interpreted focus group themes and discussed potential barriers and solutions to recruitment and participation. Conclusion Findings suggest that adapting IPT-WG may be acceptable to rural AA families. This research is the first step in developing a sustainable excessive weight gain and binge eating disorder prevention program for rural AA adolescents. PMID:23678135

  20. Adapting interpersonal psychotherapy for the prevention of excessive weight gain in rural African American girls.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Omni; Sbrocco, Tracy; Vannucci, Anna; Nelson, Beatrice; Jackson-Bowen, Darlene; Heimdal, James; Mirza, Nazrat; Wilfley, Denise E; Osborn, Robyn; Shomaker, Lauren B; Young, Jami F; Waldron, Heather; Carter, Michele; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2013-10-01

    To obtain focus group data regarding the perspectives of rural African American (AA) girls, parents/guardians, and community leaders on obesity, loss of control (LOC) eating, relationships, and interpersonal psychotherapy for the prevention of excessive weight gain (IPT-WG). 7 focus groups (N = 50 participants) were moderated and the transcripts analyzed by Westat researchers using widely accepted methods of qualitative and thematic analysis. A session was held with experts in health disparities to elucidate themes. Participants understood LOC eating; however, they had culturally specific perceptions including usage of alternative terms. Relationships were highly valued, specifically those between mothers and daughters. IPT-WG program components generally resonated with participants, although modifications were recommended to respect parental roles. Experts interpreted focus group themes and discussed potential barriers and solutions to recruitment and participation. Findings suggest that adapting IPT-WG may be acceptable to rural AA families. This research is the first step in developing a sustainable excessive weight gain and binge eating disorder prevention program for rural AA adolescents.

  1. Interpersonal psychotherapy-oriented program for Chinese pregnant women: delivery, content, and personal impact.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling-ling; Luo, Shu-yuan; Chan, Sally Wai-chi

    2012-09-01

    The interpersonal psychotherapy-oriented childbirth education program has the potential to promote social support and maternal role competence and prevent postpartum depression in Chinese women. The present study explored the perceptions of Chinese women about the delivery, content, and personal impact of the interpersonal psychotherapy-oriented childbirth education program. The study was conducted in a regional teaching hospital in China. The intervention was based on the principles of interpersonal psychotherapy, and consisted of two 90 min antenatal classes and a telephone follow up within 2 weeks after delivery. Ninety two women, pregnant for the first time, completed the program. The Program Satisfaction Questionnaires, with five open-ended questions, was used for the process evaluation (n = 83), and a one-on-one, in-depth interview was used for the outcome evaluation (n = 20). The findings suggested that the program could facilitate the participants' adjustment to motherhood, help to establish or improve their relationships, and enhance their perceived social support and maternal role competence. Future programs could be strengthened by lengthening the program and adding more interactive learning. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Psychotherapy with the hysterical personality: an interpersonal approach.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J D

    1984-08-01

    Personality disturbances are increasingly being defined in terms of person-environment transactions. Puzzling individual behavior may take on fresh significance when viewed within a broader system of forces (Andrews 1966, 1974; Carson 1969; Coyne 1976; Watzlawick et al. 1967). Psychotherapy, in particular, can usefully be viewed as a dyadic system in which both parties endeavor to define the relationship. The purpose of the present paper is to explore the interaction patterns associated with the hysterical personality from this perspective; and to identify relationships between these patterns and the therapeutic tactics which have proven most fruitful with hysterical patients. Since the bulk of clinical literature on hysteria is psychoanalytically based, the main emphasis of this paper will be on psychodynamic therapy. The smaller but growing body of material dealing with behavior therapy provides a fruitful basis for comparison and contrast. New case material will also be introduced to illustrate the main therapeutic principles discussed.

  3. Analysis of transference in Gestalt group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Frew, J E

    1990-04-01

    In Gestalt therapy, transference is viewed as a contact boundary disturbance which impairs the patient's ability to accurately perceive the present therapy situation. The boundary disturbances in Gestalt therapy most closely related to the analytic notion of transference are projection, introjection, and confluence. In Gestalt group psychotherapy, group members interfere with the process of need identification and satisfaction by distorting their contact with each other through projecting, introjecting, and being confluent. The Gestalt group therapist uses interventions directed to individuals and to the group to increase participants' awareness of these boundary disturbances and of the present contact opportunities available to them when these disturbances are resolved. In formulating interventions, the leader is mindful of the function of boundary disturbances to the group-as-a-whole as well as to individuals.

  4. Self psychology and its relationship to the practice of group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Berry, C E

    1991-10-01

    This article discusses self psychology as a theory of personality development and conceptual framework for diagnosing psychopathology. It seeks to show how specific components of this theory, including selfobjects, bipolar self, mirroring, tension arc, and nuclear self, can be compared with the "curative factors" of group psychotherapy, as presented by Yalom (1975). These include altruism, group cohesiveness, universality, interpersonal learning, guidance, and family reenactment. Existing literature is used to explain both theories and develop their synthesis.

  5. Sexual function in the postpartum period: effects of maternal depression and interpersonal psychotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Moel, Joy E; Buttner, Melissa M; O'Hara, Michael W; Stuart, Scott; Gorman, Laura

    2010-12-01

    Women's sexual functioning in the postpartum period is understudied given its potential impact on women's mental health and their relationships with their partners. The sexual functioning of women with postpartum depression (PPD) in particular is not well characterized. The goals of this study were to examine factors associated with the sexual functioning of postpartum women and to compare the long-term sexual functioning of depressed postpartum women treated with interpersonal psychotherapy with a group of postpartum women who had never been depressed. Depressed (120) and never depressed (56) postpartum women were enrolled. Self-report questionnaires and clinician-rated measures were completed at initial entry to study, immediately post-treatment, and at 6, 12, and 18 months post-treatment. Analyses revealed significant differences in sexual interest between depressed and never depressed postpartum women (t (171) = 11.82, p <0.001). Although sexual interest improved significantly following treatment for depression (t (104) = -3.18, p < 0.01), those women who fully recovered continued to experience less interest (F (2, 140) = 32.24, p < 0.0001) and less sexual satisfaction through 2 years postpartum than never depressed women. These findings suggest that differences in sexual functioning exist between depressed and never depressed postpartum women, even after depressed women are treated and have recovered from their depression. Clinicians should inquire about changes in sexual functioning when treating women with PPD.

  6. Interpersonal competencies: Responsiveness, technique, and training in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Professional practice in psychology is anchored in interpersonal or relational skills. These skills are essential to successful interactions with clients and their families, students, and colleagues. Expertise in these skills is desired and expected for the practicing psychologist. An important but little-studied aspect of interpersonal skills is what Stiles and colleagues (Stiles, Honos-Webb, & Surko, 1998; Stiles, 2009, 2013) have called appropriate responsiveness. In treatment relationships, appropriate responsiveness is the therapist's ability to achieve optimal benefit for the client by adjusting responses to the current state of the client and the interaction. This article was designed to clarify this aspect of responsiveness, showing its links to empathy, illustrating how responsiveness has been detected in controlled clinical trials, discussing how educators and supervisors have worked to enhance students' responsiveness, and considering how appropriate responsiveness has been assessed. The article also discusses the development of skills underlying appropriate responsiveness and the role of stable differences in talent in training of professional psychologists. Notwithstanding other pessimistic reports on psychologists' expertise, demonstrable expertise may exist in the effective, responsive use of these skills in treatment settings. Appropriate responsiveness may be a variety of executive functioning, organizing and guiding the use of many specific competencies. As such it may be a metacompetency, with implications for the design of competency schemes. Key to all of these considerations is the distinction between therapeutic techniques and their responsive use, which involves astute judgment as to when and how to utilize these responses to best effect in the treatment situation. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Factors of Group Psychotherapy for Adult Alcoholics: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jonathan K.

    Research on therapeutic factors of group psychotherapy for adult alcoholics is reviewed. The research in this area has focused on determining whether or not group psychotherapy is an effective treatment modality for alcoholics. This review examines therapeutic factors in three phases of treatment: (1) preadmission, (2) primary intervention, and…

  8. An experiential group model for psychotherapy supervision.

    PubMed

    Altfeld, D A

    1999-04-01

    This article presents an experiential group model of supervision constructed for both group and individual therapy presentations, emphasizing concepts from object relations theory and group-as-a-whole dynamics. It focuses on intrapsychic, interpersonal, and systems processes, and stresses the group aspect of the supervisory process. Its central thesis is that material presented in a group supervisory setting stimulates conscious and unconscious parallel processes in group members. Through here-and-now responses, associations, and interactions among the supervisory members, countertransference issues that have eluded the presenter can make themselves known and be worked through on emotional as well as cognitive levels. Selected excerpts from supervisory sessions demonstrate various attributes and strengths of the model.

  9. Interpersonal Psychotherapy With a Parenting Enhancement Adapted for In-Home Delivery in Early Head Start

    PubMed Central

    Beeber, Linda S.; Schwartz, Todd A.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Canuso, Regina; Lewis, Virginia; Matsuda, Yui

    2015-01-01

    Formidable barriers prevent low-income mothers from accessing evidence-based treatment for depressive symptoms that compromise their ability to provide sensitive, responsive parenting for their infant or toddler. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), an evidence-based psychotherapy for depression, was tailored for in-home delivery to mothers navigating economic hardship and other intense stressors, and for Latina mothers with limited English language proficiency. Psychiatric-mental health nurses delivered the adapted IPT in randomized clinical trials that were conducted in partnership with Early Head Start (EHS). The authors discuss the results of these studies and the impacts on EHS staff members and programs, and they provide additional implications for current early childhood-focused programs. PMID:26617430

  10. Group analytic psychotherapy (im)possibilities to research

    PubMed Central

    Vlastelica, Mirela

    2011-01-01

    In the course of group analytic psychotherapy, where we discovered the power of the therapeutic effects, there occurred the need of group analytic psychotherapy researches. Psychotherapeutic work in general, and group psychotherapy in particular, are hard to measure and put into some objective frames. Researches, i. e. measuring of changes in psychotherapy is a complex task, and there are large disagreements. For a long time, the empirical-descriptive method was the only way of research in the field of group psychotherapy. Problems of researches in group psychotherapy in general, and particularly in group analytic psychotherapy can be reviewed as methodology problems at first, especially due to unrepeatability of the therapeutic process. The basic polemics about measuring of changes in psychotherapy is based on the question whether a change is to be measured by means of open measuring of behaviour or whether it should be evaluated more finely by monitoring inner psychological dimensions. Following the therapy results up, besides providing additional information on the patient's improvement, strengthens the psychotherapist's self-respect, as well as his respectability and credibility as a scientist. PMID:25478094

  11. Developing partnership promotes peace: group psychotherapy experiences.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Robi

    2002-04-01

    Partnerships are often optimal processes for interpersonal growth. The ability to have and keep a partner in mind should, therefore, be thought about and learnt. Although reciprocity, some symmetry, and mutual give and take are important aspects of partnerships, this article emphasizes a partners ability to process difficulties for the other as an aid to growth. The containment and elaboration of distress in partnerships is discussed using three examples of such potential relationships. The emotional beginning of a partnership, whether starting from love, working relationship or from hate, is the focus of the article. Individual, dyadic, and group aspects as separation-individuation and containment processes are described as contributing to partnership-building. The ability of a therapy group to process splitting and projecting phenomena are discussed. Co-therapists seem to have to work through painful conflicts between themselves to develop the therapists' containment abilities inside a functional partnership. Supervision may help process these emotional hardships. Within families, mothers could contribute to a better processing of their sons violence shared through infant dreams, which represent an effort to cope with inner and outer aggression. Growth-promoting aspects of dream telling as potential partnerships in families and groups are discussed. Finally, partnership building between hating foes is exemplified by the efforts made by participants in Israeli and Palestinian peace dialogues. In groups, interpersonal development may be furthered by helping participants mutually contain and be contained, enabling partnership opportunities to grow after love and sympathy are over.

  12. Group Supervision in Psychotherapy. Main Findings from a Swedish Research Project on Psychotherapy Supervision in a Group Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogren, Marie-Louise; Sundin, Eva C.

    2009-01-01

    Psychotherapy supervision is considered crucial for psychotherapists in training. During the last decades, group supervision has been a frequently used format in many countries. Until recently, very few studies had evaluated the small-group format for training of beginner psychotherapists and psychotherapy supervisors. This article aims to…

  13. Using interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) to treat depression in older primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Post, Edward P; Miller, Mark D; Schulberg, Herbert C

    2008-03-01

    Depression in older adults is associated with substantial morbidity as well as mortality related to both suicide and nonsuicide causes. Lessening the burden of untreated depression in the elderly requires a flexible approach to treatment that incorporates the patient's life circumstances and treatment preferences. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is a time-limited, evidence-based psychosocial intervention used to treat depression either alone or in combination with medication. Familiarity with its features and use can assist geriatric clinicians in optimizing outcomes for their patients with depression.

  14. Interpersonal Group Therapy for Women Experiencing Bulimia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is a chronic disorder that results in a high degree of psychological impairment for many women. This article presents a description of Interpersonal Therapy for Group (IPT-G), an evidence-based approach for the treatment of BN. The author presents a rationale for the use of IPT-G, an outline of the group model, and provides…

  15. Interpersonal Group Therapy for Women Experiencing Bulimia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is a chronic disorder that results in a high degree of psychological impairment for many women. This article presents a description of Interpersonal Therapy for Group (IPT-G), an evidence-based approach for the treatment of BN. The author presents a rationale for the use of IPT-G, an outline of the group model, and provides…

  16. Toward an adaptation of interpersonal psychotherapy for Hispanic patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, John C; Patel, Sapana R; Balan, Ivan C; Bell, Michelle A; Blanco, Carlos; Yellow Horse Brave Heart, Maria; Sosa, Stephanie Buttacavoli; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2009-02-01

    Spanish-speaking individuals comprise a growing percentage of the United States population. They have greater difficulty than most in accessing and remaining in psychiatric treatments, including psychotherapy, their stated preference. The literature on cultural competence in treating Hispanic patients provides few details of psychotherapeutic adaptations. This article, based on interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) supervision for a low-socioeconomic sample of monolingual Spanish-speaking New York City patients, describes culturally specific psychotherapy. In conducting IPT for Spanish-speaking patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder, we reviewed cases in weekly supervision over 3 years (January 2005 to January 2008) to explore treatment themes and evaluate the congruence of IPT in addressing them. Important themes are illustrated by case example. Key themes include (1) the centrality of family, (2) conflicts due to migration and acculturation, (3) gender roles, (4) need to avoid humiliating or irrevocable social confrontation, and (5) equanimity in facing an unpredictable environment. IPT appears a compatible intervention, focusing on and adaptable to these important issues for Hispanic patients. Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  17. Psychotropic medication from an object relations theory perspective: an analysis of vignettes from group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fain, Dana Shindel; Sharon, Amos; Moscovici, Lucian; Schreiber, Shaul

    2008-07-01

    In this article we explore the content and dynamics of patients' verbalizations within a "living with medications" group. Patients' perceptions of their psychotropic medications are interpreted and classified within the framework of object relations theory. One's perception of the role of medication in one's life can serve as a gateway to one's inner world and the way that he or she perceives authority figures, peers, and oneself. We suggest that working through patients' relationships with their medications can help them to achieve better integration of internal object relations. Discussing patients' views about medications should therefore be seen as an important part of psychotherapy with many individuals. Such a discussion may enhance and improve efficacy of both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. It is of particular importance in group therapy, within milieu environments and with individuals reluctant to explicitly discuss interpersonal matters. Vignettes from the group sessions illustrate the way in which discussing medication advances group process.

  18. Feasibility of Providing Culturally Relevant, Brief Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Antenatal Depression in an Obstetrics Clinic: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grote, Nancy K.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Swartz, Holly A.; Frank, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To minimize barriers to care, ameliorate antenatal depression, and prevent postpartum depression, we conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility of providing brief interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-B) to depressed, pregnant patients on low incomes in an obstetrics and gynecological (OB/GYN) clinic. Method: Twelve pregnant,…

  19. Effectiveness Research: Transporting Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A) From the Lab to School-Based Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mufson, Laura H.; Dorta, Kristen Pollack; Olfson, Mark; Weissman, Myrna M.; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the process of modifying and transporting an evidence-based treatment, Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A), from a university setting to school-based health clinics. It addresses conceptual issues involved in the shift from efficacy to effectiveness research as well as operational issues specific to…

  20. Attachment as Moderator of Treatment Outcome in Major Depression: A Randomized Control Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Carolina; Atkinson, Leslie; Quilty, Lena C.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety and avoidance dimensions of adult attachment insecurity were tested as moderators of treatment outcome for interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Fifty-six participants with major depression were randomly assigned to these treatment conditions. Beck Depression Inventory-II, Six-Item Hamilton Rating Scale…

  1. Feasibility of Providing Culturally Relevant, Brief Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Antenatal Depression in an Obstetrics Clinic: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grote, Nancy K.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Swartz, Holly A.; Frank, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To minimize barriers to care, ameliorate antenatal depression, and prevent postpartum depression, we conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility of providing brief interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-B) to depressed, pregnant patients on low incomes in an obstetrics and gynecological (OB/GYN) clinic. Method: Twelve pregnant,…

  2. Group psychotherapy for persons with traumatic brain injury: management of frustration and substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Delmonico, R L; Hanley-Peterson, P; Englander, J

    1998-12-01

    Residual emotional and behavioral difficulties in individuals who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been well documented in the literature. The issues are complex, interdependent, and often include substance abuse, depression, anxiety, chronic suicidal or homicidal ideation, poor impulse control, and significant degrees of frustration and anger. Often, preexisting psychological conditions and poor coping strategies are exacerbated by the trauma. Emotional and behavioral difficulties can interfere with the neurorehabilitation process at all levels. In acute rehabilitation, these issues have traditionally been addressed on an individual basis. However, in postacute settings, an interpersonal group format can be effectively implemented. The majority of individuals with TBI have minimal funding for long-term cognitive and behavioral remediation; often the only avenue available is support groups. This article will describe group psychotherapy models used with individuals with acute or postacute TBI within a comprehensive rehabilitation center. Interdisciplinary treatment of frustration and substance abuse and a continuum of care will be emphasized. Education, social support, skills development, interpersonal process, and cognitive-behavioral approaches will also be discussed. The psychotherapy groups focus on treatment of substance abuse and frustration management through education, social support, and development of interpersonal skills. Practical considerations of running such groups are presented.

  3. A randomized clinical trial of cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Vos, S P F; Huibers, M J H; Diels, L; Arntz, A

    2012-12-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) seems to be as effective as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of major depression. Because the onset of panic attacks is often related to increased interpersonal life stress, IPT has the potential to also treat panic disorder. To date, a preliminary open trial yielded promising results but there have been no randomized controlled trials directly comparing CBT and IPT for panic disorder. This study aimed to directly compare the effects of CBT versus IPT for the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia. Ninety-one adult patients with a primary diagnosis of DSM-III or DSM-IV panic disorder with agoraphobia were randomized. Primary outcomes were panic attack frequency and an idiosyncratic behavioral test. Secondary outcomes were panic and agoraphobia severity, panic-related cognitions, interpersonal functioning and general psychopathology. Measures were taken at 0, 3 and 4 months (baseline, end of treatment and follow-up). Intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses on the primary outcomes indicated superior effects for CBT in treating panic disorder with agoraphobia. Per-protocol analyses emphasized the differences between treatments and yielded larger effect sizes. Reductions in the secondary outcomes were equal for both treatments, except for agoraphobic complaints and behavior and the credibility ratings of negative interpretations of bodily sensations, all of which decreased more in CBT. CBT is the preferred treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia compared to IPT. Mechanisms of change should be investigated further, along with long-term outcomes.

  4. Spiritually and Religiously Integrated Group Psychotherapy: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We systematically reviewed the research literature on spiritually and religiously integrated group psychotherapy to answer the following three questions: first, how are spirituality and religiosity defined; second, how are spiritual and religious factors characterized and integrated into group psychotherapy; and, third, what is the outcome of the group psychotherapies? We searched in two databases: PsycINFO and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria and checklists from standardized assessment tools were applied to the research literature. Qualitative and quantitative papers were included. In total, 8 articles were considered eligible for the review. Findings from the evaluation suggested that the concepts of spirituality and religiosity were poorly conceptualized and the way in which spiritual and religious factors were integrated into such group psychotherapies, which distinguished it from other types of group psychotherapies, was not fully conceptualized or understood either. However, clear and delimited conceptualization of spiritual and religious factors is crucial in order to be able to conclude the direct influences of spiritual or religious factors on outcomes. Implications for spiritually or religiously integrated group psychotherapy and conducting research in this field are propounded. PMID:24288557

  5. Three group psychotherapy settings with long-term adolescent inpatients: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Ghuman, H S; Sarles, R M

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe three types of group psychotherapy settings on an adolescent service. The group setting which included all patients on the unit and employed multiple therapists and several nursing staff provided better communication, cohesiveness, and greater opportunity for staff training. Small groups provided comparatively more time for patient participation, less distraction, and better disclosure. Mixing patients from different units resulted in objective and keener observations by patients, but hall meetings became increasingly necessary to work out interpersonal issues among patients from the same unit. These observations by staff were confirmed by a patient questionnaire.

  6. Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training: Effects on School and Social Functioning.

    PubMed

    Young, Jami F; Kranzler, Amy; Gallop, Robert; Mufson, Laura

    2012-12-12

    This paper reports on school and social functioning outcomes in a randomized depression prevention study that compared Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST) with usual school counseling (SC). Outcome analyses were performed utilizing hierarchical linear models and mixed model analysis of variance. IPT-AST adolescents had significantly greater improvements than SC adolescents in total social functioning and friend functioning during the intervention. IPT-AST adolescents also demonstrated improvements in school, dating, and family functioning and emotional engagement in school, although these improvements were not significantly greater than seen in SC adolescents. Finally, in the 18 months following the intervention, IPT-AST adolescents were less likely than SC adolescents to be asked to leave school for academic or behavioral reasons. These findings extend the potential range of impact of depression prevention programs such as IPT-AST and provide preliminary evidence of the benefits of these programs on school and social functioning.

  7. Brief Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Mothers Whose Children Are Receiving Psychiatric Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Holly A.; Frank, Ellen; Zuckoff, Allan; Cyranowski, Jill M.; Houck, Patricia R.; Cheng, Yu; Fleming, M.A. Dana; Grote, Nancy K.; Brent, David A.; Shear, M. Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Objective Depressed mothers of children with psychiatric illness struggle with both their own psychiatric disorder and the demands of caring for ill children. When maternal depression remains untreated, mothers suffer, and psychiatric illness in their offspring is less likely to improve. This randomized, controlled trial compared the interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed mothers (IPT-MOMS), a nine-session intervention based on standard interpersonal psychotherapy, to treatment as usual for depressed mothers with psychiatrically ill offspring. Method Forty-seven mothers meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depression were recruited from a pediatric mental health clinic where their school-age children were receiving psychiatric treatment and randomly assigned to IPT-MOMS (N=26) or treatment as usual (N=21). Mother-child pairs were assessed at three time points: baseline, 3-month follow-up, and 9-month follow-up. Child treatment was not determined by the study. Results Compared to subjects assigned to treatment as usual, subjects assigned to IPT-MOMS showed significantly lower levels of depression symptoms, as measured by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and higher levels of functioning, as measured by the Global Assessment of Functioning, at 3-month and 9-month follow-ups. Compared to the offspring of mothers receiving treatment as usual, the offspring of mothers assigned to IPT-MOMS showed significantly lower levels of depression as measured by the Children’s Depressive Inventory at the 9-month follow-up. Conclusions Assignment to IPT-MOMS was associated with reduced levels of maternal symptoms and improved functioning at the 3- and 9-month follow-ups compared to treatment as usual. Maternal improvement preceded improvement in offspring, suggesting that maternal changes may mediate child outcomes. PMID:18558645

  8. Psychotherapy for Bipolar II Disorder: The Role of Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Holly A.; Levenson, Jessica C.; Frank, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Although bipolar II disorder is a highly prevalent, chronic illness that is associated with burdensome psychosocial impairment, relatively little is known about the best ways to treat the disorder. Moreover, psychosocial interventions for the management of bipolar II disorder have been largely unexplored, leaving psychologists with few evidence-based recommendations for best treatment practices. In this article, we provide information about interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT), an empirically supported treatment for bipolar I disorder that has preliminary evidence supporting its efficacy in bipolar II disorder. After reviewing the phenomenology of bipolar II disorder and differentiating it from bipolar I disorder, we summarize the extant empirical support for using psychotherapy in the management of bipolar II disorder. We explore what is known about the role of psychotherapy in the management of bipolar II disorder as well as lacunae in the evidence base. Next, we introduce IPSRT and discuss how it has been adapted for use as a treatment for individuals suffering from bipolar II disorder. Specific strategies of the treatment are detailed, and preliminary evidence for the efficacy of IPSRT in bipolar II disorder is described. Finally, we present a case vignette demonstrating the use of IPSRT for an individual with bipolar II disorder. PMID:26612968

  9. Interpersonal microprocesses predict cognitive-emotional processing and the therapeutic alliance in psychotherapy for depression.

    PubMed

    Altenstein, David; Krieger, Tobias; Grosse Holtforth, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Interpersonal theories of psychotherapy hypothesize that the success of therapy depends on the therapist's and patient's dominant and affiliative behaviors as well as their interplay (complementarity). This study sought to investigate (a) how in-session interpersonal microprocesses predict postsession evaluations of the therapeutic alliance as well as cognitive-emotional processing and (b) how complementarity develops over the course of a therapy session. Twenty depressed patients were treated at a university-based outpatient clinic with a variant of cognitive therapy. One session was analyzed from each therapy's middle phase using a novel real-time rating procedure (joystick method) to assess the patients' and therapists' affiliative and dominant behaviors as well as their resulting complementarity over the course of the session. The therapeutic alliance and cognitive-emotional processing were assessed by self-reports directly after the respective session. As predicted, more emotional arousal was associated with deviations from complementarity, whereas a positive alliance was related to affiliative patient behavior. Moreover, marginally significant trends suggest that refraining from answering to the pull of patient hostility might benefit both the alliance as well as cognitive-emotional processing. Overall, multilevel growth modeling revealed a significant cubic trend of complementarity over the course of the session. Implications for future research and practice are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Patients' pre-treatment interpersonal problems as predictors of therapeutic alliance in long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ollila, Pekka; Knekt, Paul; Heinonen, Erkki; Lindfors, Olavi

    2016-07-30

    Information on how the patient's interpersonal problems predict alliance development during long-term therapy is lacking. The aim of this study was to explore how the patient's pre-treatment interpersonal problems predict the development of alliance in long-term psychotherapy. Altogether 128 adult outpatients experiencing mood or anxiety disorder were assigned to long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy in the Helsinki Psychotherapy Study. The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP) total score and the eight octant scores, assessed at baseline, were used as predictors. The trajectories of change in patient- and therapist-rated Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) were used as outcome measures at 7, 12, and 36 months of follow-up after baseline. Study of the changes by time showed that the patient-rated alliance was significantly improved by the 36-month follow-up, i.e. the most usual end-point of therapy, in persons with higher pre-treatment level of the IIP total score. Low total IIP score and low to moderate level of hostile type problems showed no slope of improvement of patient-rated alliance during follow-up. The therapist-rated alliance showed a similar course as the patient-rated alliance with the exception of a faster improvement for higher IIP scores. In conclusion, a higher level of patients' interpersonal problems predicted favorable alliance development.

  11. The Role of Interpersonal Connection, Personal Narrative, and Metacognition in Integrative Psychotherapy for Schizophrenia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jay A; Leonhardt, Bethany L

    2016-02-01

    The recovery movement has not only challenged traditional pessimism regarding schizophrenia but also presented opportunities for the possibilities for psychotherapy for people with the disorder. Though in the past psychotherapy models were often pitted against one another, recently there have been emergent reports of a range of integrative models sharing an emphasis on recovery and a number of conceptual elements. These shared elements include attention to the importance of interpersonal processes, personal narrative, and metacognition, with interest in their role in not only the disorder but also the processes by which people pursue recovery. This article explores one application of this framework in the psychotherapy of a woman with prolonged experience of schizophrenia and significant functional impairments.

  12. Brief Interpersonal Psychotherapy for depression during pregnancy in a low-income population: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lenze, Shannon N; Potts, Mary Anne

    2017-03-01

    Depression is common in low-income pregnant women, and treatments need to be fitted to meet their needs. We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing brief Interpersonal Psychotherapy (brief-IPT) to enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU) for perinatal depression in low-income women. The brief-IPT model is designed to better engage low-income women by utilizing an engagement session, providing flexible delivery of sessions, and pragmatic case management. Pregnant women, aged ≥18, between 12 and 30 weeks gestation were recruited from an urban prenatal clinic. Women scoring ≥10 on the Edinburgh Depression Scale and meeting depressive disorder criteria were randomized to either brief-IPT (n=21) or ETAU (n=21). We assessed treatment outcomes, acceptability, and feasibility of the intervention (measured by session attendance). Depression scores significantly decreased in both brief-IPT and ETAU. Brief-IPT participants reported significant improvements in social support satisfaction as compared to ETAU participants, even after controlling for concurrent depressive symptoms. Brief-IPT participants reported high satisfaction with the program. However, many participants did not participate in the full 9-session course of treatment (average sessions attended =6, range 0-17). Small sample size, use of self-report measures, and lack of an active psychotherapy control group limits interpretation of study results. Brief-IPT for perinatal depression is acceptable to low-income women and is helpful for improving depressive symptoms and social support. However, feasibility of the treatment was limited by relatively low session attendance in spite of efforts to maximize treatment engagement. Additional modifications to meet the needs of low-income women are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic moderation of interpersonal psychotherapy efficacy for low-income mothers with major depressive disorder: implications for differential susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cicchetti, Dante; Toth, Sheree L; Handley, Elizabeth D

    2015-02-01

    Genetic moderation of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) efficacy for economically disadvantaged women with major depressive disorder was examined. Specifically, we investigated whether genotypic variation in corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) and the linked polymorphic region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) moderated effects of IPT on depressive symptoms over time. We also tested genotype moderation of IPT mechanisms on social adjustment and perceived stress. Non-treatment-seeking urban women at or below the poverty level with infants were recruited from the community (N = 126; M age = 25.33 years, SD = 4.99; 54.0% African American, 22.2% Caucasian, and 23.8% Hispanic/biracial) and randomized to individual IPT or Enhanced Community Standard groups. The results revealed that changes in depressive symptoms over time depended on both intervention group and genotypes (5-HTTLPR and CRHR1). Moreover, multiple-group path analysis indicated that IPT improved depressive symptoms, increased social adjustment, and decreased perceived stress at posttreatment among women with the 0 copies of the CRHR1 TAT haplotype only. Finally, improved social adjustment at postintervention significantly mediated the effect of IPT on reduced depressive symptoms at 8 months postintervention for women with 0 copies of the TAT haplotype only. Post hoc analyses of 5-HTTLPR were indicative of differential susceptibility, albeit among African American women only.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of group psychotherapy for depression in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Siskind, Dan; Baingana, Florence; Kim, Jane

    2008-09-01

    Low and middle-income countries are increasingly acknowledging the potential health and economic benefits associated with treatment of depression. To aid countries in making resource-allocation decisions, there is a need for cost-effectiveness analysis of treatments for depression in developing countries. Although there are a limited number of studies from developing countries that report data on treatment efficacy and costs, these data can be leveraged to tailor mathematical models that are used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of depression treatments in specific settings. Using data from depression studies in the published literature, as well as two studies in Uganda, we developed a decision-analytic model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of group psychotherapy in the setting of Uganda. We developed a Markov cohort model of depression and evaluated the health benefits and costs associated with group psychotherapy with and without booster sessions for recurrent depressive episodes. We synthesized published data on the epidemiology of depression, treatment efficacy, and costs to parameterize our model, and used data from developing countries where available. Outcomes included quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALY), lifetime costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER). Costs were expressed in international dollars (I$) to facilitate comparisons across settings and studies. In Uganda, group psychotherapy without booster sessions decreased average number of depressive episodes by 6.2%, compared to no intervention; with booster sessions, reduction in number of episodes increased to 15.8%. Although group psychotherapy alone was less costly than psychotherapy with booster sessions, the ICER was higher, and therefore, group psychotherapy without booster sessions was dominated. The ICER associated with psychotherapy with booster sessions was I$ 1,150 per QALY, compared to no intervention. Although higher than previously published cost

  15. Positive Group Psychotherapy Modified for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasulo, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Mental health disorders are considerably more prevalent among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population, yet research on psychotherapy for people with dual diagnosis is scarce. However, there is mounting evidence to show that adults with a dual diagnosis can find help through group therapy and have more productive and…

  16. Positive Group Psychotherapy Modified for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasulo, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Mental health disorders are considerably more prevalent among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population, yet research on psychotherapy for people with dual diagnosis is scarce. However, there is mounting evidence to show that adults with a dual diagnosis can find help through group therapy and have more productive and…

  17. Group psychotherapy reduces illness intrusiveness in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Edworthy, Steven M; Dobkin, Patricia L; Clarke, Ann E; Da Costa, Deborah; Dritsa, Maria; Fortin, Paul R; Barr, Susan; Ensworth, Stephanie; Esdaile, John M; Beaulieu, André; Zummer, Michael; Senécal, Jean-Luc; Goulet, Jean-Richard; Choquette, Denis; Rich, Eric; Smith, Doug; Cividino, Alfred; Gladman, Dafna; Devins, Gerald M

    2003-05-01

    We investigated whether brief supportive-expressive group psychotherapy might reduce illness-induced interference with valued activities and interests (i.e., illness intrusiveness) among women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in relation to 3 life domains: (1) relationships and personal development (family relationships, other social relationships, self-expression), (2) intimacy (relationship with spouse, sex life), and/or (3) instrumental life (work, finances, active recreation). Women with SLE recruited from 9 rheumatology centers were randomly assigned to receive either usual care (n = 66) or a 12 week brief supportive-expressive group psychotherapy followed by 3 monthly booster sessions (n = 58). Standard instruments assessed disease activity and damage, illness intrusiveness, and psychological distress at 4 measurement occasions: (1) pretreatment, (2) posttreatment, (3) 6 month followup, and (4) 12 month followup. Analysis of covariance, controlling for disease activity and household income, indicated that women who received brief supportive-expressive group psychotherapy experienced significant reductions in illness intrusiveness for 2 of 3 domains: (1) relationships and personal development and (2) intimacy. Benefits were evident at 6 and 12 month followups. Brief supportive-expressive group psychotherapy facilitates adaptation to SLE by assisting women in reducing illness-induced disruptions into important domains of life experience.

  18. Genetic Moderation of Interpersonal Psychotherapy Efficacy for Low-Income Mothers with Major Depressive Disorder: Implications for Differential Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Cicchetti, Dante; Toth, Sheree L.; Handley, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic moderation of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) efficacy for economically disadvantaged women with major depressive disorder was examined. Specifically, we investigated whether genotypic variation in corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) and the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) moderated effects of IPT on depressive symptoms over time. We also tested genotype moderation of IPT mechanisms social adjustment and perceived stress. Non-treatment seeking urban women at or below the poverty level with infants were recruited from the community (N = 126; M age = 25.33; SD = 4.99; 54.0% African-American, 22.2% Caucasian, and 23.8% Hispanic/biracial) and randomized to individual IPT or enhanced community standard (ECS). Results revealed that changes in depressive symptoms over time depended on both intervention group and genotypes (5-HTTLPR and CRHR1). Moreover, multiple-group path analysis indicated that IPT improved depressive symptoms, increased social adjustment and decreased perceived stress at post-treatment among women with the 0 copies of the CRHR1 TAT haplotype only. Finally, improved social adjustment at post-intervention significantly mediated the effect of IPT on reduced depressive symptoms at 8 months post-intervention for women 0 copies of the TAT haplotype only. Post-hoc analyses of 5-HTTLPR were indicative of differential susceptibility, albeit among African-American women only. PMID:25640828

  19. Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training: Anxiety Outcomes and Impact of Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jami F.; Makover, Heather B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Mufson, Laura; Gallop, Robert; Benas, Jessica S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Given the frequent comorbidity of anxiety and depression, it is important to study the effects of depression interventions on anxiety and the impact of comorbid anxiety on depression outcomes. Method This paper reports on pooled anxiety and depression data from two randomized trials of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a depression prevention program. Ninety-eight adolescents were randomized to receive IPT-AST or school counseling (SC). Outcome and predictor analyses were performed utilizing hierarchical linear models. Results IPT-AST adolescents had significantly greater reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms than SC adolescents during the intervention. Baseline anxiety symptoms predicted change in depressive symptoms for adolescents in both intervention conditions, with adolescents low in baseline anxiety demonstrating more rapid change in depressive symptoms than adolescents high in baseline anxiety. Conclusions These findings indicate that IPT-AST is effective at decreasing both depressive and anxiety symptoms. For adolescents with comorbid symptoms of anxiety, there may be slower rates of change in depressive symptoms following prevention programs. PMID:22891881

  20. Interpersonal psychotherapy-adolescent skills training: anxiety outcomes and impact of comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Young, Jami F; Makover, Heather B; Cohen, Joseph R; Mufson, Laura; Gallop, Robert J; Benas, Jessica S

    2012-01-01

    Given the frequent comorbidity of anxiety and depression, it is important to study the effects of depression interventions on anxiety and the impact of comorbid anxiety on depression outcomes. This article reports on pooled anxiety and depression data from two randomized trials of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a depression prevention program. Ninety-eight adolescents were randomized to receive IPT-AST or school counseling (SC). Outcome and predictor analyses were performed utilizing hierarchical linear models. IPT-AST adolescents had significantly greater reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms than SC adolescents during the intervention. Baseline anxiety symptoms predicted change in depressive symptoms for adolescents in both intervention conditions, with adolescents low in baseline anxiety demonstrating more rapid change in depressive symptoms than adolescents high in baseline anxiety. These findings indicate that IPT-AST is effective at decreasing both depressive and anxiety symptoms. For adolescents with comorbid symptoms of anxiety, there may be slower rates of change in depressive symptoms following prevention programs.

  1. The State of the Art of Group Psychotherapy in Spain.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Taboada, Cristina; Amutio, Alberto; Elgorriaga, Edurne; Arnoso, Ainara

    2015-10-01

    (1) What is the history and the theoretical orientation of group therapy in Spain? (2) How is training organized? (3) What role does group psychotherapy play in the health system in Spain? (4) What is the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice in Spain? (5) What topics can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Spain? (6) How are group-related issues important within the social background of Spain? and (7) What does group work hold for the future? Although not even a century has passed since the birth of this discipline, there have already been many events associated with the management of power and knowledge, the development of a sense of community, and the evolution of the political and social life of our country. Group therapy training is still evolving and is properly supported and accredited by prestigious institutions. In the 2013 Symposium of the Spanish Society of Group Psychotherapy and Group Techniques (SEPTG), the need for joint group theories and techniques within the profession's activities was clearly highlighted. Further, the enthusiasm of group psychotherapists to open themselves to specific social perspectives (health, education, community prevention, organizations) is a way of encouraging society to untangle conscious and unconscious knots that are created in social interaction.

  2. Rates and predictors of referral for individual psychotherapy, group psychotherapy, and medications among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with PTSD.

    PubMed

    Mott, Juliette M; Barrera, Terri L; Hernandez, Caitlin; Graham, David P; Teng, Ellen J

    2014-04-01

    This study examined rates of referral for medication, individual psychotherapy, and group psychotherapy within a Veterans Affairs (VA) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specialty mental health clinic. Participants were 388 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who were referred for PTSD treatment following a mental health evaluation required for all new VA enrollees. The majority of the sample was referred for medication (79 %), with comparatively fewer referrals for individual (39 %) or group psychotherapy (24 %). Forty percent of participants were referred for combined medication and psychotherapy. Patient demographic and clinical characteristics were examined to determine whether these variables predicted referral type. Female veterans and those with lower clinician ratings of overall functioning were more likely to be referred for individual therapy. Group psychotherapy referrals were more common in veterans who were older, unemployed, identified as an ethnic minority, and had a comorbid anxiety disorder. There were no significant predictors of medication referral.

  3. Developmental cascade effects of interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed mothers: Longitudinal associations with toddler attachment, temperament, and maternal parenting efficacy.

    PubMed

    Handley, Elizabeth D; Michl-Petzing, Louisa C; Rogosch, Fred A; Cicchetti, Dante; Toth, Sheree L

    2017-05-01

    Using a developmental cascades framework, the current study investigated whether treating maternal depression via interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) may lead to more widespread positive adaptation for offspring and mothers including benefits to toddler attachment and temperament, and maternal parenting self-efficacy. The participants (N = 125 mother-child dyads; mean mother age at baseline = 25.43 years; 54.4% of mothers were African American; mean offspring age at baseline = 13.23 months) were from a randomized controlled trial of IPT for a sample of racially and ethnically diverse, socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers of infants. Mothers were randomized to IPT (n = 97) or an enhanced community standard control group (n = 28). The results of complier average causal effect modeling showed that engagement with IPT led to significant decreases in maternal depressive symptoms at posttreatment. Moreover, reductions in maternal depression posttreatment were associated with less toddler disorganized attachment characteristics, more adaptive maternal perceptions of toddler temperament, and improved maternal parenting efficacy 8 months following the completion of treatment. Our findings contribute to the emerging literature documenting the potential benefits to children of successfully treating maternal depression. Alleviating maternal depression appears to initiate a cascade of positive adaptation among both mothers and offspring, which may alter the well-documented risk trajectory for offspring of depressed mothers.

  4. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  5. Combined therapy with interpersonal psychotherapy adapted for borderline personality disorder: A two-years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bozzatello, Paola; Bellino, Silvio

    2016-06-30

    Few investigations evaluated the long-term effects of psychotherapies in borderline personality disorder (BPD). In a previous study, we compared efficacy of combination of fluoxetine and interpersonal psychotherapy adapted to BPD (IPT-BPD) versus single fluoxetine administered for 32 weeks. This study is aimed to investigate whether the results obtained with the addition of IPT-BPD persist during a follow-up period. Forty-four patients who completed the 32 weeks trial underwent 24 months of follow-up receiving fluoxetine 20-40 mg/day. Clinical Global Impression Severity (CGI-S), Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety (HDRS, HARS), Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS), Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P), and Borderline Personality Disorder Severity Index (BPDSI) were repeated at 6, 12, and 24 months. Statistical analysis was performed with the general linear model. Results showed that most of the differences between combined therapy and single pharmacotherapy at the end of the 32 weeks trial were maintained after 24 months follow-up. The addition of IPT-BPD to medication produced greater effects on BPD symptoms (impulsivity and interpersonal relationships) and quality of life (perception of psychological and social functioning) that endured after termination of psychotherapy. On the contrary, different effects on anxiety symptoms and affective instability were lost after 6 months.

  6. Outcomes in GroupPsychotherapy: Using Persuasion Theory to Increase Treatment Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Some research suggests that improvement in psychotherapy is related to the degree that a patient adopts his therapist's evaluative attitudes. This article was designed to pursue the possibility of predicting the outcomes of group psychotherapy using attitude theory. (Author)

  7. Amelioration of transference resistance: substitute therapists in milieu group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sperling, M B; Kibel, H D; Loutsch, E M

    1990-01-01

    Building upon Wolf's (1949) notion of the use of an alternate session in group psychotherapy, this paper suggests that an alternate therapist substituting for an absent regular therapist in milieu group psychotherapy can facilitate similar therapeutic benefits. The mechanism of this process of overcoming transference resistance is seen as twofold: (1) sessions with a substitute therapist allow patients to confront the infantilization often present in a milieu setting and experiment with more autonomous ego functioning. (2) Sessions with a substitute therapist create conditions which are apart from the ongoing process of the therapy group, thereby allowing for a therapeutic splitting process to develop wherein transference feelings about the regular therapist can be expressed to his or her "alter ego." Several case vignettes are presented in order to illustrate the clinical utility of a substitute therapist.

  8. Interpersonal psychotherapy versus treatment as usual for PTSD and depression among Sichuan earthquake survivors: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Without effective treatment, PTSD and depression can cause persistent disability in disaster-affected populations. Methods Our objective was to test the efficacy of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) delivered by trained local personnel compared with treatment as usual (TAU) for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) among adults affected by the Sichuan 2008 earthquake. A small randomized controlled trial of IPT + TAU versus TAU alone was delivered by local mental health personnel in Shifang, China. Between July 2011 and January 2012, 49 adults ≥ 18 years with PTSD, MDD or both were enrolled and randomized to 12 weekly sessions of IPT + TAU (27) or TAU (22) alone x 12 weeks. IPT was then offered to the TAU group. Unblinded follow up assessments were conducted at three and six months. IPT was a 12 session, weekly one hour treatment delivered by local personnel who were trained and supervised in IPT. TAU was continuation of prescribed psychotropic medication (if applicable) and crisis counseling, as needed. Main Outcome(s) and Measures (s): Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) PTSD diagnosis; Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) for MDD diagnosis. Secondary measures included PTSD/depression symptoms, interpersonal conflict/anger, social support, self-efficacy and functioning. Results Using an intent-to-treat analysis, 22 IPT + TAU and 19 TAU participants were compared at three months post-baseline. A significantly greater reduction of PTSD and MDD diagnoses was found in the IPT group (51.9%, 30.1%, respectively) versus the TAU group (3.4%, 3.4%, respectively). Despite the small sample, the estimates for time-by-condition analyses of target outcomes (2.37 for PTSD (p = .018) and 1.91 for MDD (p = .056)) indicate the improvement was better in the IPT + TAU condition versus the TAU group. Treatment gains were maintained at 6 months for the IPT group. A similar treatment response

  9. [Group psychotherapy in patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia].

    PubMed

    Scheibe, G; Albus, M; Walther, A U; Schmauss, M

    1993-07-01

    The one-year supportive group-psychotherapy (3 groups with 8-9 patients) was carried out once-weekly by two therapists in 26 patients who met the DSM-III-R criteria for panic disorder and agoraphobia. Patients filled in various ratings at the beginning and at the end of the therapy and a visual analog scale before as well as after each session. Twelve months after the end of the group-therapy the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE) was carried out. During the group-psychotherapy panic sensations, anxiety, nervousness and fears as well as psychosocial disability decreased. Duration of illness affected the reduction of panic sensations, anxiety, nervousness and fears during the first 6 months of the group-psychotherapy. Phobic fears and avoidance behavior mostly improved in patients with a duration of illness of more than 5 years and an additional depressive disorder. At the one-year follow-up 80% of panic patients without depressive disorder were symptom-free and reported better partner-relationships, more satisfaction, and a better social adjustment compared with panic patients with concomitant depressive disorders.

  10. Predictors of the longitudinal course of postpartum depression following interpersonal psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nylen, Kimberly J; O'Hara, Michael W; Brock, Rebecca; Moel, Joy; Gorman, Laura; Stuart, Scott

    2010-10-01

    We examined the course and predictors of postpartum depression in the 18 months following interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). We enrolled 120 community women with major depression in a 12-week randomized trial of individual IPT during the postpartum period (O'Hara, Stuart, Gorman, & Wenzel, 2000). At 6, 12, and 18 months posttreatment, women participated in clinical interviews to establish the course of depression over the previous 6 months. We used survival analyses to characterize recovery and recurrence in the follow-up and growth curve modeling techniques to identify predictors of change in depression during the follow-up period. Potential predictors included severity, chronicity, and personal history of depression. Of 35 women who recovered with acute treatment, 20 (57%) achieved sustained recovery during follow-up; average time to recurrence was 33.40 weeks (SD = 18.43 weeks). Over 80% of women who did not recover with acute treatment experienced recovery at some point during follow-up; average time to recovery was 28.60 weeks (SD = 17.51 weeks). Time depressed each month decreased over the follow-up period. Posttreatment depressive severity and length of the index episode predicted changes in depression over time. Posttreatment depression severity, personal history of depression, and weeks of treatment in the follow-up were significant predictors of time depressed during follow-up. IPT resulted in long-term benefits past the termination of acute treatment, even for women who did not initially recover. Though the vast majority of women who did not recover with acute treatment did recover during the follow-up period, continuation of IPT may accelerate the process. Copyright 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Effective Communication in Adolescent Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azima, Fern J.

    This paper defines a useful strategy for therapists working with adolescents which includes: (1) a general model of the group leader's responsibilities and (2) a cataloguing of some of the specific impediments for both adolescent peers and the therapist that prevent effective communication. The goal of the group therapy is to identify the specific…

  12. Working through a psychotherapy group's political cultures.

    PubMed

    Ettin, Mark F; Cohen, Bertram D

    2003-10-01

    Macropolitical evolution, starting with authoritarian monarchism, has moved through anarchistic transitions either to the totalitarianism of fascism and communism or to liberal and social democracy. We posit analogous micropolitical development in process-oriented therapy groups: "dependence" and "counterdependence" corresponding to monarchism and anarchism; and "independence" and "interdependence" to liberal and social democracy, respectively. Transition from counterdependence to independence and interdependence may be: (1) facilitated through group members' cooperative experience of rebellion, or (2) blocked by collective identification, the internalization of dystopian or utopian fantasies that coalesce as "group-self" perceptions. We explore how group therapists work clinically with and through these several "political cultures" in the service of group and self transformation.

  13. Mirror neurons: their implications for group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schermer, Victor L

    2010-10-01

    Recently discovered mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the brain register the actions and intentions of both the organism and others in the environment. As such, they may play a significant role in social behavior and groups. This paper considers the potential implications of mirror neurons and related neural networks for group therapists, proposing that mirror neurons and mirror systems provide "hard-wired" support for the group therapist's belief in the centrality of relationships in the treatment process and exploring their value in accounting for group-as-a-whole phenomena. Mirror neurons further confirm the holistic, social nature of perception, action, and intention as distinct from a stimulus-response behaviorism. The implications of mirror neurons and mirroring processes for the group therapist role, interventions, and training are also discussed.

  14. [Therapeutic factors of inpatient analytic group psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tschuschke, V; Catina, A; Beckh, T; Salvini, D

    1992-01-01

    Several change mechanisms, their interrelationship, and their relation to outcome as well as to long-term follow-ups have been investigated in an inpatient group therapy. Eight of initially ten patients finished a long-term group in an inpatient setting for severe neurotics and personality disorders. Successful patients were able to change significant behavior characteristics, to develop a higher cohesiveness towards the group and especially to use aspects of family reenactment in order to change internalized significant object representations. The results indicate that important changes occur early during the treatment. The contributing change mechanisms and their interdependency are described and discussed in detail.

  15. [Psychodynamic group psychotherapy with obese patients].

    PubMed

    Cognolato, S; Silvestri, A; Fiorellini Bernardis, A L; Santonastaso, P

    1996-03-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effectiveness of a short-term psychodynamic oriented group therapy with a selected sample of obese patients. We selected, from the patients referred to the Eating Disorders Consultation Service, 7 obese patients. Selection criteria were as follows: 1) aged between 20 and 40; 2) absence of severe organic disorders, as determining factors for the onset of obesity; 3) absence of severe psychiatric symptomatology. In addiction the selected subjects had to be sufficiently motivated to take up a psychological treatment. Subject underwent a clinical semi-structured interview and two questionnaires (SCL90 and TFEQ) were administered. Patients were re-evaluated at the end of the treatment and a two-years follow-up has been carried out. The group was conducted by a psychiatric and a psychologist, supervised by a group therapist. The group therapy lasted 6 months with 75' minutes weekly sessions. When the therapy was over all subjects showed an improved clinical picture: two of them had a remarkable weight reduction and one subject reached his ideal weight. The weight loss and maintenance at follow-up compared favorably with the results reported for other psychological treatments for obesity. The group setting, for its homogeneity, allowed great cohesiveness and let the members achieve, an increased emotional awareness of their self-image. This experience seem to confirm the effectiveness of a short-term group therapy in an institutional setting.

  16. Ten month outcome of cognitive behavioural therapy v. interpersonal psychotherapy in patients with major depression: a randomised trial of acute and maintenance psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mulder, R; Boden, J; Carter, J; Luty, S; Joyce, P

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) are the most studied psychotherapies for treatment of depression, but they are rarely directly compared particularly over the longer term. This study compares the outcomes of patients treated with CBT and IPT over 10 months and tests whether there are differential or general predictors of outcome. A single centre randomised controlled trial (RCT) of depressed outpatients treated with weekly CBT or IPT sessions for 16 weeks and then 24 weeks of maintenance CBT or IPT. The principle outcome was depression severity measured using the MADRS. Pre-specified predictors of response were in four domains: demographic depression, characteristics, comorbidity and personality. Data were analysed over 16 weeks and 40 weeks using general linear mixed effects regression models. CBT was significantly more effective than IPT in reducing depressive symptoms over the 10 month study largely because it appeared to work more quickly. There were no differential predictors of response to CBT v. IPT at 16 weeks or 40 weeks. Personality variables were most strongly associated with overall outcome at both 16 weeks and 40 weeks. The number of personality disorder symptoms and lower self-directness and reward dependence scores were associated with poorer outcome for both CBT and IPT at 40 weeks. CBT and IPT are effective treatments for major depression over the longer term. CBT may work more quickly. Personality variables are the most relevant predictors of outcome.

  17. Tele-Interpersonal Psychotherapy Acutely Reduces Depressive Symptoms in Depressed HIV-Infected Rural Persons: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy G; Heckman, Bernadette D; Anderson, Timothy; Lovejoy, Travis I; Markowitz, John C; Shen, Ye; Sutton, Mark

    2016-04-26

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive rural individuals carry a 1.3-times greater risk of a depressive diagnosis than their urban counterparts. This randomized clinical trial tested whether telephone-administered interpersonal psychotherapy (tele-IPT) acutely relieved depressive symptoms in 132 HIV-infected rural persons from 28 states diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV major depressive disorder (MDD), partially remitted MDD, or dysthymic disorder. Patients were randomized to either 9 sessions of one-on-one tele-IPT (n = 70) or standard care (SC; n = 62). A series of intent-to-treat (ITT), therapy completer, and sensitivity analyses assessed changes in depressive symptoms, interpersonal problems, and social support from pre- to postintervention. Across all analyses, tele-IPT patients reported significantly lower depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems than SC controls; 22% of tele-IPT patients were categorized as a priori "responders" who reported 50% or higher reductions in depressive symptoms compared to only 4% of SC controls in ITT analyses. Brief tele-IPT acutely decreased depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems in depressed rural people living with HIV.

  18. Gossip and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Medini, G; Rosenberg, E H

    1976-07-01

    Gossip, a phenomenon as old as history itself, is reflected upon in terms of its need-fulfilling functions for persons and social groups. It is seen as one of the sources of knowledge about life that has potentials for wisdom, and its interpersonal and intrapsychic functions are shown to have similarities to many salient functions of psychotherapy.

  19. Interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents adapted for self-injury (IPT-ASI): rationale, overview, and case summary.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Colleen M; Mufson, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), the intentional destruction of one's own body tissue without the conscious intent to die, is a significant health concern among adolescents, however, there are few psychosocial interventions designed to treat NSSI. The current paper describes an adaptation of Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A) to be used with adolescents who have symptoms of depression and are engaging in NSSI. Specifically, we describe the rationale for the adaptations made to IPT-A for self-injury (IPT-ASI), and a case vignette to illustrate the implementation of IPT-ASI. Non-suicidal self-injury is often triggered by interpersonal stressors, and IPT-ASI directly aims to help clients to improve their interpersonal relationships by increasing emotional awareness and understanding, and teaching communication and problem solving skills via supportive and didactic techniques. The case vignette demonstrates the successes and challenges of using IPT-ASI for an adolescent with moderate depression and NSSI behaviors who began treatment with much difficulty expressing her emotions.

  20. Yoga-based Psychotherapy Groups for Boys Exposed to Trauma in Urban Settings.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Monica; Brown-Elhillali, Abena Nyamekye; Held, April Rose; Ryce, Patrice Carlotta; Ofonedu, Mirian Ebere; Hoover, Daniel William; Ensor, Kaitlin Mary; Belcher, Harolyn Millicent Edith

    2016-01-01

    Children who experience abuse and neglect and are exposed to adverse life events are at risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. They may display variable internalizing and externalizing symptoms, such as posttraumatic stress, depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and aggression. Yoga may be able to regulate body-brain pathways that cause stress following traumatic experiences, thereby reducing adverse mental and physical sequelae. The objective of this preliminary study is to examine changes in functioning following meetings of a yoga-based psychotherapy group (YBPG) for boys with a history of interpersonal trauma exposure. The study was a prospective, intervention cohort study. The study occurred at an urban-based mental health center focusing on treatment of children exposed to interpersonal trauma in their communities and families. Participants were 10 boys, aged 8-12 y, who primarily were African-Americans (70%) and who had a history of trauma. The YBPG was a 12-wk, yoga-based, group therapy, integrated with mental health treatment that was trauma informed and evidence-based. Measures of attendance and interpersonal functioning-the Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale 2 (BERS-2) and patient satisfaction surveys-were collected. The pre- and post-YBPG, paired t test; Wilcoxon's signed rank test; and effect sizes were calculated to assess change in interpersonal functioning following the YBPG, as reported by the parents and children. The BERS-2 scores yielded clinically and statistically significant mean improvements on the parents' ratings of participants' (1) Interpersonal Strength, Intrapersonal Strength, and Family Involvement scores, with mean improvements on those subscales being 1.4 (P=.007), 1.9 (P=.012), and 1.4 (P=.045) points, respectively; and (2) Strength Index scores, with a mean improvement of 8.7 (P=.004). The effect size was in the large range. In addition to significant improvements posttreatment, the parents' mean rating score of

  1. The Relationship of Interpersonal Attraction and Attraction to Group in a Growth Group Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Nancy J.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the relationship of interpersonal attraction and attraction to groups. Students (N=56) participating in growth groups completed the Group Attitude Scale and individual rating scales early, midway, and late in the group. Data indicated an increasing relationship between interpersonal and group attraction throughout the life of the…

  2. Some Measures of Interpersonal Attraction and Group Cohesiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Lewis R.

    1992-01-01

    The computation and determination of the statistical significance of three coefficients of interpersonal attractiveness or cohesiveness in task-oriented or social groups are described. The approach is based on ratings made by each member of a group of all other group members. Experience using the technique is reviewed. (SLD)

  3. The Impact of Process Observers on Interpersonal Group Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Christopher; Harris, Rafael S.; Cassidy, Jennie M.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of including process observers (all master's-level trainees) and their notes on the outcome of interpersonal group therapy at a university counseling center was investigated. For a total of four groups, one method per group of delivering the notes to the participants was designated and assessed for perceived differences. A self-report…

  4. An eating disorder-specific model of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-ED): causal pathways and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Elizabeth; Van Buren, Dorothy J; Bishop, Monica; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Welch, Robinson; Wilfley, Denise E

    2010-06-01

    Several studies support the efficacy of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in the treatment of eating disorders. Treatment outcomes are likely to be augmented through a greater understanding, and hence treatment targeting, of the mechanisms whereby IPT induces therapeutic gains. To this end, the present paper seeks to develop a theoretical model of IPT in the context of eating disorders (IPT-ED). After providing a brief description of IPT, the IPT-ED model is presented and research supporting its theorized mechanisms is summarized. This model proposes that negative social evaluation plays a pivotal role as both a cause (via its detrimental impact on self evaluation and associated affect) and consequence of eating disorder symptoms. In the final section, key eating disorder constructs (namely, the developmental period of adolescence, clinical perfectionism, cognitive dysfunction, and affect regulation) are re-interpreted from the standpoint of negative social evaluation thereby further explicating IPT's efficacy as an intervention for individuals with an eating disorder.

  5. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy for depression on insomnia symptoms in a cohort of women with sexual abuse histories.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, Wilfred R; May, Pamela E; Perlis, Michael L; Ward, Erin A; Lu, Naiji; Talbot, Nancy L

    2009-12-01

    Insomnia frequently occurs with trauma exposure and depression, but can ameliorate with improvements in depression. Insomnia was assessed by the insomnia subscale of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression in 106 women with childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and major depression receiving interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in an uncontrolled pilot (n = 36) and an immediately subsequent randomized controlled trial (n = 70) comparing IPT to treatment as usual. Depression improved in each study and in both treatment conditions; insomnia had smaller, nonsignificant improvements. Overall, 95 women (90%) endorsed insomnia on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV at baseline and, of those, 90% endorsed insomnia following treatment. Despite improvements in depression, insomnia persists for most women with CSA.

  6. Attachment as moderator of treatment outcome in major depression: a randomized control trial of interpersonal psychotherapy versus cognitive behavior therapy.

    PubMed

    McBride, Carolina; Atkinson, Leslie; Quilty, Lena C; Bagby, R Michael

    2006-12-01

    Anxiety and avoidance dimensions of adult attachment insecurity were tested as moderators of treatment outcome for interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT). Fifty-six participants with major depression were randomly assigned to these treatment conditions. Beck Depression Inventory--II, Six-Item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores, and remission status served as outcome measures. Patients higher on attachment avoidance showed significantly greater reduction in depression severity and greater likelihood of symptom remission with CBT as compared with IPT, even after controlling for obsessive-compulsive and avoidant personality disorder symptoms. Results were replicated across treatment completers and intent-to-treat samples. These results suggest that it is important to consider the interaction between attachment insecurity and treatment type when comparing efficacy of treatments.

  7. Bridging the practitioner-scientist gap in group psychotherapy research.

    PubMed

    Lau, Mark A; Ogrodniczuk, John; Joyce, Anthony S; Sochting, Ingrid

    2010-04-01

    Bridging the practitioner-scientist gap requires a different clinical research paradigm: participatory research that encourages community agency-academic partnerships. In this context, clinicians help define priorities, determine the type of evidence that will have an impact on their practice (affecting the methods that are used to produce the evidence), and develop strategies for translating, implementing, and disseminating their findings into evidence-based practice. Within this paradigm, different roles are assumed by the partners, and sometimes these roles are blended. This paper will consider the perspectives of people who assume these different roles (clinician, researcher, and clinician-researcher) with group psychotherapy as the specific focus. Finally, the establishment of a practice-research network will be discussed as a potentially promising way to better engage group therapists in research.

  8. Therapeutic Alliance, Subsequent Change, and Moderators of the Alliance-Outcome Association in Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depression.

    PubMed

    Constantino, Michael J; Coyne, Alice E; Luukko, Emily K; Newkirk, Katie; Bernecker, Samantha L; Ravitz, Paula; McBride, Carolina

    2017-02-09

    The therapeutic alliance has historically emerged as a pantheoretical correlate of favorable psychotherapy outcomes. However, uncertainty remains about the direction of the alliance-outcome link, and whether it is affected by other contextual variables. The present study explored (a) if early alliance quality predicted subsequent symptom change while controlling for the effect of prior symptom change in interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for depression, and (b) whether baseline patient characteristics moderated the alliance-outcome relation (to help specify conditions under which alliance predicts change). Data derived from an open trial of 16 sessions of individual IPT delivered naturalistically to adult outpatients (N = 119) meeting criteria for major depression. Patients rated their sociodemographic, clinical, and interpersonal characteristics at baseline, their alliance with their therapist at Session 3, and their depressive symptoms at baseline, after every session, and at posttreatment. Data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. Results indicated that alliance quality did not predict subsequent depression change, controlling for prior depression change. However, a significant education by alliance interaction emerged in predicting quadratic depression change (γ = .0007, p = .03); patients with higher levels of education who reported good early alliances with their therapists had the most positively accelerated change trajectory (i.e., faster depression reduction), whereas patients with higher levels of education who reported poorer early alliances had the most negatively accelerated change trajectory (i.e., slower depression reduction). The findings may help clarify a specific condition under which alliance quality influences subsequent improvement in an evidence-based treatment for depression. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Multiple Family Group Therapy: An Interpersonal/Postmodern Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorngren, Jill M.; Kleist, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Multiple Family Group Therapy has been identified as a viable treatment model for a variety of client populations. A combination of family systems theories and therapeutic group factors provide the opportunity to explore multiple levels of intrapersonal and interpersonal relationships between families. This article depicts a Multiple Family Group…

  10. Reanalysis of efficacy of interpersonal psychotherapy for antepartum depression versus parenting education program: initial severity of depression as a predictor of treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Margaret G; Endicott, Jean; Goetz, Ray R; Segre, Lisa S

    2016-04-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is supported by substantial empirical evidence as a treatment for depression. Surprisingly, our recently reported randomized, single-blind, controlled clinical trial found no significant difference between interpersonal psychotherapy for antepartum depression (IPT-P) and a parenting education program (PEP) control condition for the treatment of prenatal depression. Because depression severity has been found to influence treatment response in antidepressant treatment trials, the current study reassessed IPT-P outcomes, limiting analyses to women with moderate depressive symptoms. For this reanalysis, 75 of the 110 study participants who met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder and scored ≥ 16 on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) from 2005 through 2011 were classified as moderately depressed. Linear mixed models were used to examine the longitudinal treatment response on the HDRS-17, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), and the Clinical Global Impressions Improvement (CGI-I) and Severity (CGI-S) scales. Although the longitudinal analysis did not reveal a significant interaction of treatment group and visit (ie, treatment response variation), the IPT-P group had significantly lower HDRS-17 and EPDS depression ratings than the PEP group at week 8 (respectively, P = .008 and P = .046); these scores remained low but lost significance versus those for the PEP group at week 12 due to attrition and smaller sample size. For the CGI ratings, the longitudinal analysis revealed significant interaction of treatment groups and visits for the CGI-I (P = .021) and CGI-S (P = .005) ratings. Post hoc analysis showed significant illness improvement and less illness severity for the IPT-P group as measured by the CGI ratings at weeks 8 (P = .007 and P = .003, respectively) and 12 (P = .003 and P = .012, respectively), whereas the PEP group remained relatively unchanged during the study. The results of this

  11. Group affective learning in training for psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Scharff, Jill Savege; Scharff, David E

    2017-03-04

    This paper describes The Group Affective Model, a method for teaching psychoanalytic concepts and their clinical application, using multi-channel teaching, process and review in group settings, and learning from experience in an open systems learning community for psychoanalysts and psychotherapists. This innovation arose in response to criticism of existing methods in psychoanalytic education that have subordinated the primary educational task to that of the training analysis. Noticing this split between education and training analysis, between cognition and affect, and between concepts of individual and group unconscious processes, we developed the Group Affective Model for teaching and learning psychoanalysis and psychotherapy in an open psychological space in which students and faculty experience individual and group processes of digestion, assimilation, and review, which demonstrate the concepts in action and make them available for internalization selectively. We discuss our philosophy and our educational stance. We describe our institution and our participants. We give examples of teaching situations that we have studied to provide some insight about assimilation and internalization of the concepts and clinical approaches being taught. We discuss the transferability of the Group Affective Model to other teaching settings and psychoanalytic training institutions and propose it as the fourth pillar of psychoanalytic training, next to analytic treatment, clinical supervision, and didactic seminars.

  12. Agreement in interpersonal perception as a predictor of group performance.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Vicenta; Andrés, Amara; Solanas, Antonio; Leiva, David

    2010-11-01

    The present work deals with quantifying group characteristics. Specifically, dyadic measures of interpersonal perceptions were used to forecast group performance. Forty-six groups of students, 24 of four and 22 of five people, were studied in a real educational assignment context and marks were gathered as an indicator of group performance. Our results show that dyadic measures of interpersonal perceptions account for final marks. By means of linear regression analysis, 85% and 85.6% of group performance, respectively, was explained for group sizes equal to four and five. Results found in the scientific literature based on the individualistic approach are no larger than 18%. The results of the present study support the utility of dyadic approaches for predicting group performance in social contexts.

  13. Relatedness, Group Work, and Outcome in Long-Term Inpatient Psychotherapy Groups

    PubMed Central

    MACKENZIE, K. ROY; TSCHUSCHKE, VOLKER

    1993-01-01

    Process and outcome measures were compared in two long-term groups. The measure "Relatedness" reflected an individual’s attachment to and comfort with the group, and "Group Work" indicated perception of the group as having a positive working climate. High Relatedness scores predicted better outcome at 18-month follow-up. Group Work scores were not related to outcome. Relatedness and Group Work scores were not correlated. Results replicate in a group psychotherapy population the importance, reported in individual therapy literature, of an early and sustained positive therapeutic alliance (Relatedness). However, a measure that is closely related to the concept of "working alliance" (Group Work) did not predict outcome. PMID:22700138

  14. Contributions of object relations theory and self psychology to relational psychology and group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schermer, V L

    2000-04-01

    Object relations theory and self psychology are psychoanalytic perspectives that are especially concerned with interpersonal relations and their mental representations. Object relations theory began as an intrapsychic "singleton" psychology with the work of Freud and Melanie Klein. It subsequently evolved into a multi-person psychology with the work of Bion on groups, as well as the clinical and theoretical contributions of Winnicott and Fairbairn. Kohutian self psychology, which emerged later, has been interested in the relations between the self and significant others as mirroring and idealizing "self-objects." Stolorow's "inter-subjective perspective" emerged from self psychology as a full-fledged multi-person point of view. This article considers the significance of contemporary object relations theory and self psychology as relational, multi-person perspectives in terms of their application to group psychotherapy, focusing upon the group-as-a-whole, projective identification, transitional space and object, and self/self-object relations as particularly useful constructs. A clinical vignette is provided.

  15. Collaborative Interpersonal Psychotherapy for HIV-Positive Women in Kenya: A Case Study From the Mental Health, HIV and Domestic Violence (MIND) Study.

    PubMed

    Opiyo, Elizabeth; Ongeri, Linnet; Rota, Grace; Verdeli, Helen; Neylan, Thomas; Meffert, Susan

    2016-08-01

    We examine the efficacy of nonspecialists delivering interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) to HIV-positive (HIV+) women. We describe a case in which local personnel without prior mental health training delivered IPT for the treatment of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder in an HIV+ woman who reported experiencing gender-based violence and was enrolled in HIV care at the Family AIDS, Care, Education and Services program in Kisumu, Kenya.

  16. Does Interpersonal Psychotherapy improve clinical care for adolescents with depression attending a rural child and adolescent mental health service? Study protocol for a cluster randomised feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Bearsley-Smith, Cate; Browne, Mark Oakley; Sellick, Ken; Villanueva, Elmer V; Chesters, Janice; Francis, Karen; Reddy, Prasuna

    2007-01-01

    Background Depression amongst adolescents is a costly societal problem. Little research documents the effectiveness of public mental health services in mapping this problem. Further, it is not clear whether usual care in such services can be improved via clinician training in a relevant evidence based intervention. One such intervention, found to be effective and easily learned amongst novice clinicians, is Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT). The study described in the current paper has two main objectives. First, it aims to investigate the impact on clinical care of implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents for the treatment of adolescent depression within a rural mental health service compared with Treatment as Usual (TAU). The second objective is to record the process and challenges (i.e. feasibility, acceptability, sustainability) associated with implementing and evaluating an evidence-based intervention within a community service. This paper outlines the study rationale and design for this community based research trial. Methods/design The study involves a cluster randomisation trial to be conducted within a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service in rural Australia. All clinicians in the service will be invited to participate. Participating clinicians will be randomised via block design at each of four sites to (a) training and delivery of IPT, or (b) TAU. The primary measure of impact on care will be a clinically significant change in depressive symptomatology, with secondary outcomes involving treatment satisfaction and changes in other symptomatology. Participating adolescents with significant depressive symptomatology, aged 12 to 18 years, will complete assessment measures at Weeks 0, 12 and 24 of treatment. They will also complete a depression inventory once a month during that period. This study aims to recruit 60 adolescent participants and their parent/guardian/s. A power analysis is not indicated as an intra-class correlation

  17. Predicting Optimal Outcomes in Cognitive Therapy or Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Individuals Using the Personalized Advantage Index Approach

    PubMed Central

    Huibers, Marcus J. H.; Cohen, Zachary D.; Lemmens, Lotte H. J. M.; Arntz, Arnoud; Peeters, Frenk P. M. L.; Cuijpers, Pim; DeRubeis, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although psychotherapies for depression produce equivalent outcomes, individual patients respond differently to different therapies. Predictors of outcome have been identified in the context of randomized trials, but this information has not been used to predict which treatment works best for the depressed individual. In this paper, we aim to replicate a recently developed treatment selection method, using data from an RCT comparing the effects of cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Methods 134 depressed patients completed the pre- and post-treatment BDI-II assessment. First, we identified baseline predictors and moderators. Second, individual treatment recommendations were generated by combining the identified predictors and moderators in an algorithm that produces the Personalized Advantage Index (PAI), a measure of the predicted advantage in one therapy compared to the other, using standard regression analyses and the leave-one-out cross-validation approach. Results We found five predictors (gender, employment status, anxiety, personality disorder and quality of life) and six moderators (somatic complaints, cognitive problems, paranoid symptoms, interpersonal self-sacrificing, attributional style and number of life events) of treatment outcome. The mean average PAI value was 8.9 BDI points, and 63% of the sample was predicted to have a clinically meaningful advantage in one of the therapies. Those who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment (either CT or IPT) had an observed mean end-BDI of 11.8, while those who received their predicted non-optimal treatment had an end-BDI of 17.8 (effect size for the difference = 0.51). Discussion Depressed patients who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment fared much better than those randomized to their predicted non-optimal treatment. The PAI provides a great opportunity for formal decision-making to improve individual patient outcomes in depression. Although

  18. Manifestations of interpersonal dependency and depressive subtypes in outpatient psychotherapy patients.

    PubMed

    Huprich, Steven; Rosen, Alexandra; Kiss, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between normative and pathological dependency and anaclitic and introjective depressive experiences among 71 patients participating in outpatient psychotherapy at a university-based psychology clinic. We examined the interrelationships among the Relationship Profile Test subscales, the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire subscales and the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Results indicated that destructive overdependence was positively correlated with anaclitic and introjective depression and negatively correlated with overall perceptions of mental health. Dysfunctional detachment was positively correlated with introjective depression and negatively correlated with generalized perceptions of one's own mental health. Healthy dependency was negatively correlated with introjective depression and positively correlated with mental health. These results not only support the construct validity of the Relationship Profile Test but also shed light on a link between depression, dependence and self-criticism.

  19. Assessment of Interpersonal Motivation in Transcripts (AIMIT): an inter- and intra-rater reliability study of a new method of detection of interpersonal motivational systems in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fassone, G; Valcella, F; Pallini, S; Scarcella, F; Tombolini, L; Ivaldi, A; Prunetti, E; Manaresi, F; Liotti, G

    2012-01-01

    Assessing Interpersonal Motivations in Transcripts (AIMIT) is a coding system aiming to systematically detect the activity of interpersonal motivational systems (IMS) in the therapeutic dialogue. An inter- and intra-rater reliability study has been conducted. Sixteen video-recorded psychotherapy sessions were selected and transcribed according to the AIMIT criteria. Sessions relate to 16 patients with an Axis II diagnosis, with a mean Global Assessment of Functioning of 51. For the intra-rater reliability evaluation, five sessions have been selected and assigned to five independent coders who where asked to make a first evaluation, and then a second independent one 14 days later. For the inter-rater reliability study, the sessions coded by the therapist-coder were jointly revised with another coder and finally classified as gold standard. The 16 standard sessions were sent to other evaluators for the independent coding. The agreement (κ) was estimated according to the following parameters for each coding unit: evaluation units supported by the 'codable' activation of one or more IMS; motivational interaction with reference to the ongoing relation between patient and therapist; an interaction between the patient and another person reported/narrated by the patient; detection of specific IMS: attachment (At), caregiving (CG), rank (Ra), sexuality (Se), peer cooperation (PC); and transitions from one IMS to another were also scored. The intra-rater agreement was evaluated through the parameters 'cod', 'At', 'CG', 'Ra', 'Se' and 'PC' described above. A total of 2443 coding units were analysed. For the nine parameters on which the agreement was calculated, eight ['coded (Cod)', 'ongoing relation (Rel)', 'narrated relation (Nar)', 'At', 'CG', 'Ra', 'Se' and 'PC'] have κ values comprised between 0.62 (CG) and 0.81 (Cod) and were therefore satisfactory. The scoring of 'transitions' showed agreement values slightly below desired cut-off (0.56). Intra-rater reliability was

  20. Predictors and moderators of response to enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for the treatment of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Zafra; Allen, Elizabeth; Bailey-Straebler, Suzanne; Basden, Shawnee; Murphy, Rebecca; O'Connor, Marianne E; Fairburn, Christopher G

    2016-09-01

    Consistent predictors, and more especially moderators, of response to psychological treatments for eating disorders have not been identified. The present exploratory study examined predictors and moderators of outcome in adult patients who took part in a randomised clinical trial comparing two leading treatments for these disorders, enhanced cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT-E) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Four potentially important findings emerged. Firstly, patients with a longer duration of disorder were less likely to benefit from either treatment. Second, across the two treatments the presence, at baseline, of higher levels of over-evaluation of the importance of shape predicted a less good treatment outcome. Third DSM-IV diagnosis did not predict treatment outcome. Fourth, with the exception of patients with baseline low self-esteem who achieved a better outcome with CBT-E, it was generally not possible to identify a subgroup of patients who would differentially benefit from one or other treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Community Norms and Human Rights: Supervising Haitian Colleagues on Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) With a Depressed and Abused Pregnant Woman.

    PubMed

    Verdeli, Helen; Therosme, Tatiana; Eustache, Eddy; Hilaire, Olissaint St; Joseph, Benissois; Sönmez, Cemile Ceren; Raviola, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    After the 2010 Haiti earthquake, Zanmi Lasante, a local health care organization, implemented a collaborative stepped-care model to address depression in community and primary care settings in rural Haiti. Specialized community health workers, the ajans santé, collaborate with local psychologists and primary care doctors to offer home-based evaluation, support, and follow-up. The services include brief interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and/or medication to persons who met locally defined criteria for depression. A cross-national (Haiti-United States) expert mental health team has been overseeing the program. The present IPT supervision case of a severely depressed, physically abused, and pregnant young woman illustrates the U.S.-based supervisor's internal struggle to reconcile awareness of and respect for local norms while maintaining a human rights-based framework. It also highlights the critical role of community health workers in addressing the mental health treatment gap in regions plagued by extreme poverty and adversity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Treating Depression to Remission in Older Adults: A Controlled Evaluation of Combined Escitalopram with Interpersonal Psychotherapy versus Escitalopram with Depression Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Charles F.; Dew, Mary Amanda; Martire, Lynn M.; Miller, Mark D.; Cyranowski, Jill M.; Lenze, Eric; Whyte, Ellen M.; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Karp, Jordan F.; Gildengers, Ariel; Szanto, Katalin; Dombrovski, Alexandre Y.; Andreescu, Carmen; Butters, Meryl A.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Houck, Patricia R.; Bensasi, Salem; Mazumdar, Sati; Stack, Jacqueline A.; Frank, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective More than half of older adults respond only partially to first-line antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a depression-specific psychotherapy, Interpersonal Psychotherapy—IPT, when used adjunctively with escitalopram, would lead to a higher rate of remission and faster resolution of symptoms in partial responders than escitalopram with depression care management (DCM). Method We conducted a 16-week randomized clinical trial of IPT and DCM in partial responders to escitalopram, enrolling 124 outpatients aged 60 and older. The primary outcome, remission, was defined as three consecutive weekly scores of ≤7 on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (17-item). We conducted Cox regression analyses of time to remission and logistic modeling for rates of remission. We tested group differences in Hamilton depression ratings over time via mixed-effects modeling. Results Remission rates for escitalopram with IPT and with DCM were similar in intention-to-treat (IPT versus DCM: 58 [95% CI: 46, 71] versus 45% [33,58]; p = 0.14) and completer analyses (IPT versus DCM: 58% [95% CI: 44,72] versus 43% [30, 57]; p = 0.20). Rapidity of symptom improvement did not differ in the two treatments. Conclusion No added advantage of IPT over DCM was shown. Depression care management is a clinically useful strategy to achieve full remission in about 50% of partial responders. PMID:20957693

  3. The group-as-a-whole-object relations model of group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, D; Stukenberg, K W; Saeks, S

    2001-01-01

    The authors review the theoretical basis of group psychotherapy performed at The Menninger Clinic and demonstrate how the theory has been put into practice on two different types of inpatient units. The fundamental elements of the theory and practice used can be traced to object relations theory as originally proposed by Melanie Klein. Her work with individuals was directly applied to working with groups by Ezriel and Bion, who focused on interpreting group tension. More modern approaches have reintegrated working with individual concerns while also attending to the group-as-a-whole. Historically, these principles have been applied to long-term group treatment. The authors apply the concepts from the group-as-a-whole literature to short- and medium-length inpatient groups with open membership. They offer clinical examples of the application of these principles in short-term inpatient settings in groups with open membership.

  4. Effect of adapted interpersonal psychotherapy versus health education on mood and eating in the laboratory among adolescent girls with loss of control eating.

    PubMed

    Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Crosby, Ross D; Vannucci, Anna; Kozlosky, Merel; Shomaker, Lauren B; Brady, Sheila M; Sbrocco, Tracy; Pickworth, Courtney K; Stephens, Mark; Young, Jami F; Olsen, Cara H; Kelly, Nichole R; Radin, Rachel; Cassidy, Omni; Wilfley, Denise E; Reynolds, James C; Yanovski, Jack A

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is aimed at improving negative affect that is purported to contribute to the development and maintenance of loss-of-control (LOC) eating. Although youth who report LOC over eating tend to consume more snack-foods than those without LOC, it is unknown if IPT impacts objective energy intake. To test if IPT improves mood and eating in the laboratory, we examined a sample of 88 girls with LOC eating who were randomized to either IPT (n = 46) or a standard-of-care health education (HE) group program. At baseline, and 6-month (follow-up 1) and 1-year (follow-up 2) following the initiation of the groups, girls consumed lunch from a multi-item meal with an instruction designed to model a LOC episode. Girls also reported mood state immediately before each meal. Girls in IPT experienced no significant changes in pre-meal state depressive affect, while girls in HE experienced a non-significant improvement by follow-up 1 and then returned to baseline by follow-up 2 (p < .04). We found no significant group difference for changes in total intake relative to girls' daily energy needs (p's ≥ .25). However, IPT reduced, while HE increased, the percentage of daily energy needs consumed from snack-foods by follow-up 2 (p = .04). Within-groups, HE increased their snack food intake from follow-up 1 to follow-up 2 (p = .01). In adolescent girls with LOC, IPT did not change total intake at the test meal and was associated with reduced snack-food intake. Data are required to determine if IPT effectively prevents excess weight gain in the longer-term. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:490-498). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of Adapted Interpersonal Psychotherapy vs. Health Education on Mood and Eating in the Laboratory among Adolescent Girls with Loss of Control Eating

    PubMed Central

    Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Crosby, Ross D.; Vannucci, Anna; Kozlosky, Merel; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Brady, Sheila M.; Sbrocco, Tracy; Pickworth, Courtney K.; Stephens, Mark; Young, Jami F.; Olsen, Cara; Kelly, Nichole R.; Radin, Rachel; Cassidy, Omni; Wilfley, Denise E.; Reynolds, James C.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is aimed at improving negative affect that is purported to contribute to the development and maintenance of loss-of-control (LOC) eating. Although youth who report LOC over eating tend to consume more snack-foods than those without LOC, it is unknown if IPT impacts objective energy intake. Methods To test if IPT improves mood and eating in the laboratory, we examined a sample of 88 girls with LOC eating who were randomized to either IPT (n=46) or a standard-of-care health education (HE) group program. At baseline, and 6-month (follow-up 1) and 1-year (follow-up 2) following the initiation of the groups, girls consumed lunch from a multi-item meal with an instruction designed to model a LOC episode. Girls also reported mood state immediately before each meal. Results Girls in IPT experienced no significant changes in pre-meal state depressive affect, while girls in HE experienced a non-significant improvement by follow-up 1 and then returned to baseline by follow-up 2 (p<.04). We found no significant group difference for changes in total intake relative to girls’ daily energy needs (p’s≥.25). However, IPT reduced, while HE increased, the percentage of daily energy needs consumed from snack-foods by follow-up 2 (p=.04). Within-groups, HE increased their snack food intake from follow-up 1 to follow-up 2 (p=.01). Conclusions In adolescent girls with LOC, IPT did not change total intake at the test meal and was associated with reduced snack-food intake. Data are required to determine if IPT effectively prevents excess weight gain in the longer-term. PMID:26790360

  6. The impact of personality disorder pathology on the effectiveness of Cognitive Therapy and Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    van Bronswijk, Suzanne C; Lemmens, Lotte H J M; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Huibers, Marcus J H; Arntz, Arnoud; Peeters, Frenk P M L

    2017-08-17

    Despite extensive research, there is no consensus how Personality Disorders (PD) and PD features affect outcome for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The present study evaluated the effects of PD (features) on treatment continuation and effectiveness in Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) for MDD. Depressed outpatients were randomized to CT (n=72) and IPT (n=74). Primary outcome was depression severity measured repeatedly with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) at baseline, three months, at the start of each therapy session, at post-treatment and monthly during five months follow-up. Comorbid PD and PD features did not affect dropout. Multilevel and Cox regression models indicated no negative effect of PD on BDI-II change and remission rates during treatment and follow-up, irrespective of the treatment received. For both therapies, higher dependent PD features predicted overall lower BDI-II scores during treatment, however this effect did not sustain through follow-up. Cluster A PD features moderated treatment outcome during treatment and follow-up: individuals with high cluster A PD features had greater BDI-II reductions over time in CT as compared to IPT. Not all therapists and participants were blind to the assessment of PD (features), and assessments were performed by one rater. Further research must investigate the state and trait dependent changes of PD and MDD over time. We found no negative impact of PD on the effectiveness and treatment retention of CT and IPT for MDD during treatment and follow-up. If replicated, cluster A PD features can be used to optimize treatment selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The 12th Curative Factor: Love as an Agent of Healing in Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemak, Fred; Epp, Lawrence R.

    1996-01-01

    Proposes love as a curative factor in group psychotherapy. Transference within a group may originate with needs and desires for love. By unmasking transference, subsequent healing may arise from a process of mourning in which group members recognize how their projection of past love onto other group members and onto the psychotherapist is…

  8. Personality disorder moderates outcome in short- and long-term group analytic psychotherapy: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, Steinar; Ruud, Torleif; Fjeldstad, Anette; Høglend, Per A

    2015-06-01

    In a randomized clinical trial, short- and long-term psychodynamic group psychotherapy (STG and LTG, respectively) schedules were equally effective for the 'typical' patient during a 3-year study period. Although several studies have reported good effects for patients with personality disorders (PD) in diverse forms of psychotherapy, the significance of treatment duration is unclear. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that PD patients would improve more during and after LTG than STG. A randomized, longitudinal, prospective study contrasting the outcomes during and after short- and long-term dynamic group psychotherapies. One hundred and sixty-seven outpatients with mood disorders, anxiety disorders, or PD were randomized to STG or LTG (respectively, 20 or 80 weekly sessions of 90 min each). Outcome measures are as follows: symptoms (SCL-90-R), interpersonal problems (IIP-C), and psychosocial functioning (GAF split version: GAF-Symptom and GAF-Function). PD pathology (number of PD criteria items) was selected a priori as a putative moderator of treatment effects. Change during the 3-year study period was assessed using linear mixed models. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT 00021417. Our hypothesis was supported, as patients with PD improved significantly more regarding all outcome variables in LTG than STG. For patients without PD, the rate of change was similar across 3 years; however, the rate of change in symptoms and interpersonal problems was higher in STG during the first 6 months. The effectiveness of LTG is higher for patients with co-morbid PD. Patients without PD do not appear to experience additional gain from LTG. Clinical implications: LTG demonstrates better effectiveness than STG for patients with personality disorder co-morbidity (PD). Patients without PD do not appear to experience additional gain from attending LTG. Correct initial allocation to treatment duration may prevent disruptive breaks in relationships and lead to both

  9. The Impact of Gestalt Group Psychotherapy on Parents' Perceptions of Children Identified as Problematic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Linda F.

    Gestalt therapy respects parents' perceptions of their children and does not attempt to train parents to become therapists for their children. To examine the impact of Gestalt group psychotherapy on parents' perceptions of children identified as problematic, an experimental group of 10 parents participated in 10 2-hour Gestalt sessions. A group of…

  10. A Place Called HOPE: Group Psychotherapy for Adolescents of Parents with HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunther, Marianne; Crandles, Sheila; Williams, Gillian; Swain, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Describes Project HOPE (New York), a psycho-social support program for noninfected children of HIV-positive parents, including the challenges of starting and implementing the program's psychotherapy group for grieving adolescents and clinical examples of group process and effective interventions in group leadership. Explicates the four stages in…

  11. A Place Called HOPE: Group Psychotherapy for Adolescents of Parents with HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunther, Marianne; Crandles, Sheila; Williams, Gillian; Swain, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Describes Project HOPE (New York), a psycho-social support program for noninfected children of HIV-positive parents, including the challenges of starting and implementing the program's psychotherapy group for grieving adolescents and clinical examples of group process and effective interventions in group leadership. Explicates the four stages in…

  12. Group psychotherapy in women with a history of sexual abuse: what did they find helpful?

    PubMed

    Sayın, Aslıhan; Candansayar, Selçuk; Welkin, Leyla

    2013-12-01

    To define the effects of group psychotherapy in women with a history of sexual abuse, to find possible predictors for dropout and treatment outcome rates and to find which therapeutic factors of group psychotherapy are perceived by group members to be most helpful. Sexual abuse of women is a global concern and causes many psychiatric and psychological sequelae. Group psychotherapy is one of the preferred treatment modalities. Prospective cohort study. Forty-seven women with a history of childhood and/or adulthood sexual abuse were recruited for weekly 12-session group psychotherapy. Subjects were given the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, the Clinician Administered Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Scale, the Dissociative Experiences Scale, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and the Group Therapeutic Factors Questionnaire. Re-evaluations were made after the 6th and 12th session and also at a six-month follow-up session. Group psychotherapy significantly reduced participants' levels of depression (screening/12th session mean scores, 22.45/11.10), anxiety (15.45/4.32) and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (42.27/9.32), and this decline became statistically significant at the 6th session and tended to persist at the six-month follow-up. Higher levels of dissociative symptoms at baseline were associated with less response to treatment, but higher levels of attendance at group sessions. Group members rated existential factors (41.40 ± 12.39), cohesiveness (37.42 ± 8.32) and universalism (37.56 ± 7.11) as the most helpful therapeutic factors. Group psychotherapy was significantly effective in reducing levels of depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in this sample of women. Dissociation had a significant effect on both treatment outcome and treatment adherence. For this sample of women, group psychotherapy was most helpful for reducing feelings of stigma, isolation and shame. Group psychotherapy can be

  13. Group Psychotherapy with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Adults: Evidence-Based Practice Applications.

    PubMed

    Heck, Nicholas C

    2017-03-01

    Although there are descriptions of transgender-affirmative group psychotherapy services in the literature, there is limited research on the topic. Mental health professionals who plan to offer such services should draw on evidence-based treatments, where appropriate, and have a working knowledge of current standards of care, practice guidelines, and counseling competencies. This article reviews and synthesizes the existing research and scholarship on this topic, placing an emphasis on group-specific competencies and intervention components that can be integrated into psychotherapy groups for transgender and gender nonconforming clients.

  14. A Single-Case Experimental Demonstration of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy with Two Clients with Severe Interpersonal Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshiro, Claudia Kami Bastos; Kanter, Jonathan; Meyer, Sonia Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is emerging as an effective psychotherapy for psychiatric clinical cases. However, there is little research demonstrating the process of change of FAP. The present study evaluated the introduction and withdrawal of FAP interventions on therapy-interfering verbal behaviors of two participants who were in…

  15. Psychotherapy Training: Residents' Perceptions and Experiences.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Jessica G; Dubin, William R; Combs, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    This survey examined actual training hours in psychotherapy modalities as reported by residents, residents' perceptions of training needs, and residents' perceptions of the importance of different aspects of psychotherapy training. A brief, voluntary, anonymous, Internet-based survey was developed. All 14 program directors for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited programs in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware provided email addresses for current categorical residents. The survey inquired about hours of time spent in various aspects of training, value assigned to aspects of training, residents' involvement in their own psychotherapy, and overall resident wellness. The survey was e-mailed to 328 residents. Of the 328 residents contacted, 133 (40.5%) responded. Median reported number of PGY 3 and 4 performed versus perceived ideal hours of supportive therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and psychodynamic therapy did not differ. Answers for clinical time utilizing these modalities ranged from "none or less than 1 h" per month to 20+ h per month. PGY 3 and 4 residents reported a median of "none or less than 1 h" per month performed of interpersonal, dialectical behavior therapy, couples/family/group, and child therapies but preferred more time using these therapies. Residents in all years of training preferred more hours of didactic instruction for all psychotherapies and for medication management. Residents ranked teaching modalities in the following order of importance: supervision, hours of psychotherapy performed, personal psychotherapy, readings, and didactic instruction. Residents engaged in their own psychotherapy were significantly more likely to rank the experiential aspects of psychotherapy training (personal psychotherapy, supervision, and hours performed) higher than residents not in psychotherapy. Current psychotherapy training for psychiatry residents is highly variable, but overall, residents want more

  16. Changes in personality functioning as a result of group psychotherapy with elements of individual psychotherapy in persons with neurotic and personality disorders - MMPI-2.

    PubMed

    Cyranka, Katarzyna; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Mielimąka, Michał; Sobański, Jerzy A; Smiatek-Mazgaj, Bogna; Klasa, Katarzyna; Dembińska, Edyta; Müldner-Nieckowski, Łukasz; Rodziński, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The study of group psychotherapy influence on the personality functioning of patients on treatment for neurotic disorders and selected personality disorders (F4-F6 under ICD-10). The study concerned 82 patients (61 women and 21 men) who underwent intensive short-term group psychotherapy in a day ward. A comprehensive assessment of the patients' personality functioning was carried out at the outset and the end of the psychotherapy utilising the MMPI-2 questionnaire. At the treatment outset the majority of the study patients demonstrated a considerable level of disorders in five MMPI-2 clinical scales (Depression, Hysteria, Psychopathic Deviate, Psychastenia, Schizophrenia) and moderate pathology in Hypochondria. In the Mania scale most patients obtained results comparable to the healthy population when the treatment commenced. Having undergone the psychotherapy treatment, the majority of the examined were observed to demonstrate positive changes in those areas of personality functioning which were classified as severe or moderate pathology. Short-term intensive comprehensive group psychotherapy with elements of individual psychotherapy leads to desirable changes in personality functioning.

  17. Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.

    PubMed

    Ekeblad, Annika; Falkenström, Fredrik; Andersson, Gerhard; Vestberg, Robert; Holmqvist, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons have been made, mostly in the United States. In this trial, we compared the two treatments in a small-town outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The patients had failed previous primary care treatment and had extensive Axis-II comorbidity. Outcome measures were reduction of depressive symptoms and attrition rate. Ninety-six psychiatric patients with MDD (DSM-IV) were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT (n = 48) or IPT (n = 48). A noninferiority design was used with the hypothesis that IPT would be noninferior to CBT. A three-point difference on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used as noninferiority margin. IPT passed the noninferiority test. In the ITT group, 53.5% (23/43) of the IPT patients and 51.0% (24/47) of the CBT patients were reliably improved, and 20.9% (9/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively, were recovered (last BDI score <10). The dropout rate was significantly higher in CBT (40%; 19/47) compared to IPT (19%; 8/43). Statistically controlling for antidepressant medication use did not change the results. IPT was noninferior to CBT in a sample of depressed psychiatric patients in a community-based outpatient clinic. CBT had significantly more dropouts than IPT, indicating that CBT may be experienced as too demanding. Since about half the patients did not recover, there is a need for further treatment development for these patients. The study should be considered an effectiveness trial, with strong external validity but some limitations in internal validity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Self-Disclosure and Outcome in Short-Term Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coche, Erich; Polikoff, Barbara

    1979-01-01

    Explores whether self-disclosure in group psychotherapy produces better group outcome. Although the expected positive relationship between the two variables was found, results also indicate a need for caution in postulating a link between self-disclosure and improvement. (BP)

  19. "Make Sure You Keep Our House Safe!" Thematic Analysis of a Children's Psychotherapy Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devi, Akasha; Fenn, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic thematic analysis of one particular latency-aged children's group and includes a discussion about potentially helpful outcomes measures. The impetus for our small, practice-based qualitative research project came from the two papers by Reid (1999) and Canham (2002) about children's psychotherapy groups,…

  20. "Make Sure You Keep Our House Safe!" Thematic Analysis of a Children's Psychotherapy Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devi, Akasha; Fenn, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic thematic analysis of one particular latency-aged children's group and includes a discussion about potentially helpful outcomes measures. The impetus for our small, practice-based qualitative research project came from the two papers by Reid (1999) and Canham (2002) about children's psychotherapy groups,…

  1. Targeting Binge Eating for the Prevention of Excessive Weight Gain: Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents at High-Risk for Adult Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Wilfley, Denise E.; Young, Jami F.; Mufson, Laura; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Glasofer, Deborah R.; Salaita, Christine G.

    2007-01-01

    The most prevalent disordered eating pattern described in overweight youth is loss of control (LOC) eating, during which individuals experience an inability to control the type or amount of food they consume. LOC eating is associated cross-sectionally with greater adiposity in children and adolescents, and appears to predispose youth to gain weight or body fat above that expected during normal growth, thus likely contributing to obesity in susceptible individuals. No prior studies have examined whether LOC eating can be decreased by interventions in children or adolescents without full-syndrome eating disorders, or whether programs reducing LOC eating prevent inappropriate weight gain attributable to LOC eating. Interpersonal psychotherapy, a form of therapy that was designed to treat depression and has been adapted for the treatment of eating disorders, has demonstrated efficacy in reducing binge eating episodes and inducing weight stabilization among adults diagnosed with binge eating disorder. In this paper, we propose a theoretical model of excessive weight gain in adolescents at high-risk for adult obesity who engage in LOC eating and associated overeating patterns. A rationale is provided for interpersonal psychotherapy as an intervention to slow the trajectory of weight gain in at-risk youth, with the aim of preventing or ameliorating obesity in adulthood. PMID:17557971

  2. Group psychotherapies for depression in persons with HIV: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Honagodu, Abhijit Ramanna; Krishna, Murali; Sundarachar, Rajesh; Lepping, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Studies investigating effectiveness of group psychotherapy intervention in depression in persons with HIV have showed varying results with differing effect sizes. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials of group psychotherapy in depression in persons with HIV has been conducted to present the best available evidence in relation to its effect on depressive symptomatology. Electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials. Selected studies were quality assessed and data extracted by two reviewers. If feasible, it was planned to conduct a meta-analysis to obtain a pooled effect size of group psychotherapeutic interventions on depressive symptoms. Odds ratio for drop out from group was calculated. The studies were assessed for their quality using the Quality Rating Scale and other parameters for quality assessment set out by COCHRANE. The quality of reporting of the trials was compared against the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) checklist for non-pharmacological studies (CONSORT-NPT). Four studies met the full inclusion criteria for systematic review. The trials included in the review examined group interventions based on the Cognitive behavioral therapy model against other therapeutic interventions or waiting list controls. In all four studies, group psychotherapy was an effective intervention for reducing depressive symptoms in persons with HIV in comparison to waiting list controls. The reported benefits from the group psychotherapy in comparison to active controls were less impressive. There were no statistically significant differences in drop outs at post treatments across group psychotherapy, wait list control, and other active interventions. The methodological quality of the studies varied. The quality of reporting of the studies was sub-optimal. The results of this systematic review support that group psychological interventions for depression in persons with HIV have a significant effect on depressive

  3. Effectiveness of group body psychotherapy for negative symptoms of schizophrenia: multicentre randomised controlled trial†

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, S.; Savill, M.; Wykes, T.; Bentall, R. P.; Reininghaus, U.; Lauber, C.; Bremner, S.; Eldridge, S.; Röhricht, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Negative symptoms of schizophrenia have a severe impact on functional outcomes and treatment options are limited. Arts therapies are currently recommended but more evidence is required. Aims To assess body psychotherapy as a treatment for negative symptoms compared with an active control (trial registration: ISRCTN84216587). Method Schizophrenia out-patients were randomised into a 20-session body psychotherapy or Pilates group. The primary outcome was negative symptoms at end of treatment. Secondary outcomes included psychopathology, functional, social and treatment satisfaction outcomes at treatment end and 6-months later. Results In total, 275 participants were randomised. The adjusted difference in negative symptoms was 0.03 (95% CI −1.11 to 1.17), indicating no benefit from body psychotherapy. Small improvements in expressive deficits and movement disorder symptoms were detected in favour of body psychotherapy. No other outcomes were significantly different. Conclusions Body psychotherapy does not have a clinically relevant beneficial effect in the treatment of patients with negative symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:27151073

  4. Change Mechanisms of Schema-Centered Group Psychotherapy with Personality Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Zorn, Peter; Ramseyer, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    Background This study addressed the temporal properties of personality disorders and their treatment by schema-centered group psychotherapy. It investigated the change mechanisms of psychotherapy using a novel method by which psychotherapy can be modeled explicitly in the temporal domain. Methodology and Findings 69 patients were assigned to a specific schema-centered behavioral group psychotherapy, 26 to social skills training as a control condition. The largest diagnostic subgroups were narcissistic and borderline personality disorder. Both treatments offered 30 group sessions of 100 min duration each, at a frequency of two sessions per week. Therapy process was described by components resulting from principal component analysis of patients' session-reports that were obtained after each session. These patient-assessed components were Clarification, Bond, Rejection, and Emotional Activation. The statistical approach focused on time-lagged associations of components using time-series panel analysis. This method provided a detailed quantitative representation of therapy process. It was found that Clarification played a core role in schema-centered psychotherapy, reducing rejection and regulating the emotion of patients. This was also a change mechanism linked to therapy outcome. Conclusions/Significance The introduced process-oriented methodology allowed to highlight the mechanisms by which psychotherapeutic treatment became effective. Additionally, process models depicted the actual patterns that differentiated specific diagnostic subgroups. Time-series analysis explores Granger causality, a non-experimental approximation of causality based on temporal sequences. This methodology, resting upon naturalistic data, can explicate mechanisms of action in psychotherapy research and illustrate the temporal patterns underlying personality disorders. PMID:22745811

  5. Group relationships in early and late sessions and improvement in interpersonal problems.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, Gianluca; Gullo, Salvatore; Di Fratello, Carla; Giordano, Cecilia; Kivlighan, Dennis M

    2016-07-01

    Groups are more effective when positive bonds are established and interpersonal conflicts resolved in early sessions and work is accomplished in later sessions. Previous research has provided mixed support for this group development model. We performed a test of this theoretical perspective using group members' (actors) and aggregated group members' (partners) perceptions of positive bonding, positive working, and negative group relationships measured early and late in interpersonal growth groups. Participants were 325 Italian graduate students randomly (within semester) assigned to 1 of 16 interpersonal growth groups. Groups met for 9 weeks with experienced psychologists using Yalom and Leszcz's (2005) interpersonal process model. Outcome was assessed pre- and posttreatment using the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, and group relationships were measured at Sessions 3 and 6 using the Group Questionnaire. As hypothesized, early measures of positive bonding and late measures of positive working, for both actors and partners, were positively related to improved interpersonal problems. Also as hypothesized, late measures of positive bonding and early measures of positive working, for both actors and partners, were negatively related to improved interpersonal problems. We also found that early actor and partner positive bonding and negative relationships interacted to predict changes in interpersonal problems. The findings are consistent with group development theory and suggest that group therapists focus on group-as-a-whole positive bonding relationships in early group sessions and on group-as-a-whole positive working relationships in later group sessions. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. [2-stage group psychotherapy with integrated autogenic training within the scope of a general integrated psychotherapy concept].

    PubMed

    Barolin, Gerhard S

    2003-01-01

    Group-therapy and autogenic training in combination show mutual potentiation. Our results have proved the hypothesis to be true and we have also been able to explain it by an analysis of the neurophysiological and psychological findings concerning both methods. Our "model" has proved to be very economical in time and can be easily applied. It needs basic psychotherapeutical education but no special additive schooling. It is particularly well employed in rehabilitation patients, elderly patients and geronto-rehabilitation patients. As numbers of such patients are steadily increasing, it could soon become highly important, and in the technically dominated medicine of today, the particularly communicative component that we postulate in integrated psychotherapy could also grow in importance. By combining the two methods, it is not method that is at the centre of our endeavours but the patient.

  7. Forensic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the role forensic psychotherapy has in the assessment and treatment of mentally disordered offender patients, and its role in the supervision of individual therapists, staff groups or whole organisations which contain and manage this patient population. Forensic psychotherapy has a valuable role to play in the management of mentally disordered forensic patients. As forensic services continue to develop in Australia and New Zealand and interest in this field continues to grow, then the future of forensic psychotherapy looks bright.

  8. Co-creating meaningful structures within long-term psychotherapy group culture.

    PubMed

    Gayle, Robin G

    2009-07-01

    Meaningful group structures are co-created within the long-term outpatient psychotherapy group through a hermeneutical interaction between structure and immediate experience of structure by individuals embedded in personal and collective contexts. Co-created meanings expand original group- and self-understandings and further evolve structures that are stable yet do not exist independently of the narratives and affects of the members who interact with them. Group structures do not reduce, expand, or dissolve but change in connection to the experiences and meaning attributions within the group. This intersubjective process mediates the emphasis within group theory on leader responsibility for culture building that risks overpromoting certain psychotherapeutic cultural intentions over others. Three examples of intersubjective hermeneutical interaction within long-term psychotherapy groups lend insight into global, cultural, and societal groups.

  9. Resistances in the first session of psychodrama psychotherapy group with adults.

    PubMed

    Drakulić, Aleksandra Mindoljević

    2010-06-01

    Resistance refers to all types of behaviour that oppose the exploration processes in the therapeutic process and inhibit work. Very common types of resistances, such as forgetting the time of session, being late, non-payment of sessions and such are found in every type of psychotherapy, including psychodrama psychotherapy. The attempt to break resistance in order to evoke changes could be dangerous as it represents the necessary defence mechanism and it is also a vital element of the person's functioning in therapy. In psychodrama, which is a type of action method of group psychotherapy, resistance can manifest through continuous verbalization of problems, in not wanting to act out the problem, the protagonist's typical non-verbal message or the most obvious manifestation: the absence of the protagonist. This paper will be on the typical resistance which the therapist has noticed during the first session of psychodrama psychotherapy, with a small group of adult clients. As the group was young and with undeveloped cohesiveness, resistance represented a certain balancing power for maintaining mental homeostasis of the group.

  10. Behavioral Management of Medical Compliance: Its Role in the History of Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Ben; Lightner, Jean

    Most histories of psychology and psychiatry attribute the first group psychotherapy to Joseph Pratt's 1905 class for tuberculosis patients. Pratt's actual treatment procedures are examined. They are shown to have consisted primarily of operant and social-learning techniques, aimed at increasing patient compliance with a demanding therapeutic…

  11. Group Psychotherapy for Women with a History of Incest: The Research Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marotta, Sylvia A.; Asner, Kimberly K.

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates the wide range of adequacy of current studies on group psychotherapy for women with incest histories. Because the studies differed in methodology and reporting, they were categorized and assessed by six criteria: design, sample, inclusion criteria, replicability, analysis, and outcome. Implications for both researchers and…

  12. Behavioral Management of Medical Compliance: Its Role in the History of Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Ben; Lightner, Jean

    Most histories of psychology and psychiatry attribute the first group psychotherapy to Joseph Pratt's 1905 class for tuberculosis patients. Pratt's actual treatment procedures are examined. They are shown to have consisted primarily of operant and social-learning techniques, aimed at increasing patient compliance with a demanding therapeutic…

  13. Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy in Treatment of Geriatric Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steuer, Joanne L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed whether depressed geriatric patients (N=33) would respond to group psychotherapy and, if they would respond differently to cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic modes. Results indicated that patients showed statistically and clinically significant reductions on observer-rated measures of depression and anxiety, as well as on self-report…

  14. Where Thanatos Meets Eros: Parallels between Death Education and Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillion, Judith M.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that research aimed at examining the effect of death education courses may be limited by the instructor's lack of awareness of the conditions necessary to promote change. Explores the parallels between death education and group psychotherapy and the factors inherent in seminar-type death education courses. (Author/JAC)

  15. Are Interpersonal Relationships Necessary for Developing Trust in Online Group Projects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Christine E.; Cameron, Bruce A.; Morgan, Kari; Williams, Karen C.

    2011-01-01

    Trust between group members has been suggested as an important part of small group work in online classrooms. Developing interpersonal relationships with group members may promote a sense of trust among them; however, research shows mixed results. The current study explored how students' perceptions of the importance of interpersonal relationships…

  16. A Novel Religious/Spiritual Group Psychotherapy Reduces Depressive Symptoms in a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Chida, Yoichi; Schrempft, Stephanie; Steptoe, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to examine the effect of the Happy Science doctrine-based group psychotherapy on depressive symptoms in 118 Japanese mental disorder outpatients. The treatment group (n = 58) took part in five 90-min sessions at one-week intervals, while the control group (n = 60) received standard care including medication. Depressive symptoms were assessed before the intervention, 5 weeks after the intervention, and at 3-month follow-up. Compared to the control group, the treatment group showed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms both at post-intervention and at 3-month follow-up. In conclusion, this group psychotherapy might be of benefit in treating depressive symptoms.

  17. [Narcissism dimension within an analytically oriented group psychotherapy of neurotic patients].

    PubMed

    Göth, N

    1991-08-01

    In relation to self-psychology narcissism-construct is important in analytic-oriented psychotherapy theoretical and practical and is more superior to emotional-relationship based conception by practical and living operalization opposite Roger's conception. We found based on variables-oriented multidimensional psychodiagnostical tests for neurotics in group-psychotherapy that questionnaires are suitable to diagnose narcissism in psychodynamical psychotherapy. Throughout on the one hand single scales of narcissism-states correlate with social desirability on the other hand are related to hypochondria, to psychastenic, depressive and schizoid tendencies. Through those patients having difficults to work reflexive and are attaining higher scores in narcissism-questionnaire opposite patients are optimal working, higher narcissism-scores are not condition for therapy success or unsuccess. In clusters of unsuccessful patients are reacting with defensive behaviour in group-psychotherapy in relation to higher narcissism-scores. Successful patients are more emotional-stable and additional more social-oriented and optimistic. These findings in study are therapy-valide with research-results in Psychoanalyse.

  18. Family group psychotherapy to support the disclosure of HIV status to children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Continisio, Grazia Isabella; Storace, Cinzia; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Mango, Carmela; Liguoro, Ilaria; Guarino, Alfredo; Officioso, Annunziata

    2013-06-01

    Disclosure of the HIV status to infected children is often delayed due to psychosocial problems in their families. We aimed at improving the quality of life in families of HIV-infected children, thus promoting disclosure of the HIV status to children by parents. Parents of 17 HIV-infected children (4.2-18 years) followed at our Center for pediatric HIV, unaware of their HIV status, were randomly assigned to the intervention group (8 monthly sessions of family group psychotherapy, FGP) or to the control group not receiving psychotherapy. Changes in the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB-I) and in the Short-Form State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Sf-STAI), as well as the HIV status disclosure to children by parents, were measured. Ten parents were assigned to the FGP group, while 7 parents to the controls. Psychological well-being increased in 70% of the FGP parents and none of the control group (p=0.017), while anxiety decreased in the FGP group but not in controls (60% vs. 0%, p=0.03). HIV disclosure took place for 6/10 children of the intervention group and for 1/7 of controls. Family group psychotherapy had a positive impact on the environment of HIV-infected children, promoting psychological well-being and the disclosure of the HIV status to children.

  19. The effect of telephone-based interpersonal psychotherapy for the treatment of postpartum depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Substantial data indicate potential health consequences of untreated postpartum depression (PPD) on the mother, infant, and family. Studies have evaluated interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) as treatment for PPD; however, the results are questionable due to methodological limitations. A comprehensive review of maternal treatment preferences suggests that mothers favor ‘talking therapy’ as a form of PPD treatment. Unfortunately, IPT is not widely available, especially in rural and remote areas. To improve access to care, telepsychiatry has been introduced, including the provision of therapy via the telephone. Methods/Design The purpose of this randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the effect of telephone-based IPT on the treatment of PPD. Stratification is based on self-reported history of depression and province. The target sample is 240 women. Currently, women from across Canada between 2 and 24 weeks postpartum are able to either self-identify as depressed and refer themselves to the trial or they may be referred by a health professional based on a score >12 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Following contact by the trial coordinator, a detailed study explanation is provided. Women who fulfill the eligibility criteria (including a positive diagnostic assessment for major depression) and consent to participate are randomized to either the control group (standard postpartum care) or intervention group (standard postpartum care plus 12 telephone-based IPT sessions within 12 to 16 weeks, provided by trained nurses). Blinded research nurses telephone participants at 12, 24, and 36 weeks post-randomization to assess for PPD and other outcomes including depressive symptomatology, anxiety, couple adjustment, attachment, and health service utilization. Results from this ongoing trial will: (1) develop the body of knowledge concerning the effect of telephone-based IPT as a treatment option for PPD; (2) advance our understanding of

  20. Internet-Delivered Interpersonal Psychotherapy Versus Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adults With Depressive Symptoms: Randomized Controlled Noninferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kylie; Bennett, Anthony; Mackinnon, Andrew; van Straten, Annemieke; Cuijpers, Pim; Christensen, Helen; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2013-01-01

    Background Face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) are both effective treatments for depressive disorders, but access is limited. Online CBT interventions have demonstrated efficacy in decreasing depressive symptoms and can facilitate the dissemination of therapies among the public. However, the efficacy of Internet-delivered IPT is as yet unknown. Objective This study examines whether IPT is effective, noninferior to, and as feasible as CBT when delivered online to spontaneous visitors of an online therapy website. Methods An automated, 3-arm, fully self-guided, online noninferiority trial compared 2 new treatments (IPT: n=620; CBT: n=610) to an active control treatment (MoodGYM: n=613) over a 4-week period in the general population. Outcomes were assessed using online self-report questionnaires, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D) and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8) completed immediately following treatment (posttest) and at 6-month follow-up. Results Completers analyses showed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms at posttest and follow-up for both CBT and IPT, and were noninferior to MoodGYM. Within-group effect sizes were medium to large for all groups. There were no differences in clinical significant change between the programs. Reliable change was shown at posttest and follow-up for all programs, with consistently higher rates for CBT. Participants allocated to IPT showed significantly lower treatment satisfaction compared to CBT and MoodGYM. There was a dropout rate of 1294/1843 (70%) at posttest, highest for MoodGYM. Intention-to-treat analyses confirmed these findings. Conclusions Despite a high dropout rate and lower satisfaction scores, this study suggests that Internet-delivered self-guided IPT is effective in reducing depressive symptoms, and may be noninferior to MoodGYM. The completion rates of IPT and CBT were higher than MoodGYM, indicating some

  1. Internet-delivered interpersonal psychotherapy versus internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depressive symptoms: randomized controlled noninferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Donker, Tara; Bennett, Kylie; Bennett, Anthony; Mackinnon, Andrew; van Straten, Annemieke; Cuijpers, Pim; Christensen, Helen; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2013-05-13

    Face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) are both effective treatments for depressive disorders, but access is limited. Online CBT interventions have demonstrated efficacy in decreasing depressive symptoms and can facilitate the dissemination of therapies among the public. However, the efficacy of Internet-delivered IPT is as yet unknown. This study examines whether IPT is effective, noninferior to, and as feasible as CBT when delivered online to spontaneous visitors of an online therapy website. An automated, 3-arm, fully self-guided, online noninferiority trial compared 2 new treatments (IPT: n=620; CBT: n=610) to an active control treatment (MoodGYM: n=613) over a 4-week period in the general population. Outcomes were assessed using online self-report questionnaires, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D) and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8) completed immediately following treatment (posttest) and at 6-month follow-up. Completers analyses showed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms at posttest and follow-up for both CBT and IPT, and were noninferior to MoodGYM. Within-group effect sizes were medium to large for all groups. There were no differences in clinical significant change between the programs. Reliable change was shown at posttest and follow-up for all programs, with consistently higher rates for CBT. Participants allocated to IPT showed significantly lower treatment satisfaction compared to CBT and MoodGYM. There was a dropout rate of 1294/1843 (70%) at posttest, highest for MoodGYM. Intention-to-treat analyses confirmed these findings. Despite a high dropout rate and lower satisfaction scores, this study suggests that Internet-delivered self-guided IPT is effective in reducing depressive symptoms, and may be noninferior to MoodGYM. The completion rates of IPT and CBT were higher than MoodGYM, indicating some progress in refining Internet-based self

  2. The effect of telephone-based interpersonal psychotherapy for the treatment of postpartum depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Ravitz, Paula; Grigoriadis, Sophie; Jovellanos, Melissa; Hodnett, Ellen; Ross, Lori; Zupancic, John

    2012-04-19

    Substantial data indicate potential health consequences of untreated postpartum depression (PPD) on the mother, infant, and family. Studies have evaluated interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) as treatment for PPD; however, the results are questionable due to methodological limitations. A comprehensive review of maternal treatment preferences suggests that mothers favor 'talking therapy' as a form of PPD treatment. Unfortunately, IPT is not widely available, especially in rural and remote areas. To improve access to care, telepsychiatry has been introduced, including the provision of therapy via the telephone. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the effect of telephone-based IPT on the treatment of PPD. Stratification is based on self-reported history of depression and province. The target sample is 240 women. Currently, women from across Canada between 2 and 24 weeks postpartum are able to either self-identify as depressed and refer themselves to the trial or they may be referred by a health professional based on a score >12 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Following contact by the trial coordinator, a detailed study explanation is provided. Women who fulfill the eligibility criteria (including a positive diagnostic assessment for major depression) and consent to participate are randomized to either the control group (standard postpartum care) or intervention group (standard postpartum care plus 12 telephone-based IPT sessions within 12 to 16 weeks, provided by trained nurses). Blinded research nurses telephone participants at 12, 24, and 36 weeks post-randomization to assess for PPD and other outcomes including depressive symptomatology, anxiety, couple adjustment, attachment, and health service utilization. Results from this ongoing trial will: (1) develop the body of knowledge concerning the effect of telephone-based IPT as a treatment option for PPD; (2) advance our understanding of training nurses to deliver IPT; (3

  3. Is group psychotherapy effective in older adults with depression? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Murali; Jauhari, Archana; Lepping, Peter; Turner, Jim; Crossley, David; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok

    2011-04-01

    Earlier reviews and meta-analyses have consistently concluded that psychological treatment of depression is effective in older adults. We conducted a systematic review randomised controlled trials of group psychotherapy to present the best available evidence in relation to its effectiveness in older adults with depressive disorders. Electronic databases were searched to identify randomised controlled trials. Selected studies were quality assessed and data extracted by two reviewers. Six trials met the inclusion criteria. The trials included in the review examined group interventions based on the cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) model with active therapeutic interventions or waiting list controls. Group psychotherapy is an effective intervention in older adults with depression in comparison to waiting list controls, the overall effect size is very modest (MD = -3.92, 95%CI: -6.18, -1.67). The reported benefits of group intervention in comparison to other active interventions did not reach statistical significance. The benefits of group psychotherapy were maintained at follow-up. The quality of the studies varied and studies were heterogeneous. Although quality of many studies was not optimal, the results of this meta analysis support the results of earlier meta analyses. Group cognitive behavioural therapy is effective in older adults with depression. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Clinical and no-clinical setting specificities in first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group.

    PubMed

    Drakulić, Aleksandra Mindoljević

    2011-03-01

    Modern history of short-term group psychotherapy dates back to the late 1950-ies. From then to present day, this psychotherapeutic method has been used in various forms, from dynamic-oriented to cognitive behavioural psychotherapies. Although it has always been considered rather controversial, due its cost-effectiveness, it has been capturing more and more popularity. This paper presents the specificities of first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group through session work with two examined groups: a group of 20 adult women who suffer from mild or moderate forms of unipolar depression and a group of 20 students of the School of Medicine in Zagreb without any psychiatric symptomatology. The results indicate the high importance of having structure in first psychodrama session, of relating it with the previously thoroughly conducted, initial, clinical, interviews, and of the clarity and focus in terms of determining the goals of therapy, especially in a clinical context. This study also confirmed assumptions regarding the need for different approaches of warming-up in psychodrama, both in the clinical and in non-clinical samples. A psychodrama psychotherapist should have good time managing skills and capability to convert the time available into an opportunity for directly boosting the group energy and work on therapeutic alliance.

  5. The negative effects of prejudice on interpersonal relationships within adolescent peer groups.

    PubMed

    Poteat, V Paul; Mereish, Ethan H; Birkett, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    Social development theories highlight the centrality of peer groups during adolescence and their role in socializing attitudes and behaviors. In this longitudinal study, we tested the effects of group-level prejudice on ensuing positive and negative interpersonal interactions among peers over a 7-month period. We used social network analysis to identify peer groups based on sociometric nominations, followed by multilevel modeling of the effects of sexual prejudice at the group level on interpersonal interactions among individuals in these groups. As hypothesized, the interpersonal interactions in peer groups with stronger group-level sexual prejudice were distinct from and poorer than those in groups with weaker group-level sexual prejudice. Moreover, longitudinal models indicated that adolescents in groups with stronger initial sexual prejudice reported worse interpersonal interactions with their peers seven months later. These findings provide a contextual understanding of prejudice and its negative effects on how adolescents come to relate with one another over time.

  6. Psychotherapy: The Powerful Placebo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Wallace

    1984-01-01

    Discusses research designs in which psychotherapy treatments are compared to placebo conditions, and suggests that chemotherapy and psychotherapy research efforts are complementary rather than analogous. Recommends the elimination of placebo groups in psychotherapy research. Discusses the negative connotation of psychotherapy as a placebo. (JAC)

  7. [Emotional and instrumental orientations in interpersonal attraction and their relationship to group norms in a group-work setting].

    PubMed

    Hatano, J

    1996-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between group norms and interpersonal attraction in group work setting. It may be assumed that interpersonal attraction, like group functions, has two conflictive orientations: instrumentality and emotionality. Relationship of the two orientations in interpersonal attraction to group norms was examined in two experiments. Results of Experiment 1, with 66 female university students, suggested that specific contents of group norms influenced both instrumental and emotional attraction. Experiment 2, with 60 female university students, indicated that emotional attraction had normative influence on task selection and goal setting. Conflicting dynamics of the two orientations in group-work setting are discussed.

  8. Integrative psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kozarić-Kovacić, Dragica

    2008-09-01

    The main purposes of the article are to present the history of integration in psychotherapy, the reasons of the development integrative approaches, and the approaches to integration in psychotherapy. Three approaches to integration in psychotherapy exist: theoretical integration, theoretical eclecticism, and common factors in different psychotherapeutic trends. In integrative psychotherapy, the basic epistemology, theory, and clinical practice are based on the phenomenology, field theory, holism, dialogue, and co-creation of dialogue in the therapeutic relationship. The main criticism is that integrative psychotherapy suffers from confusion and many unresolved controversies. It is difficult to theoretically and methodologically define the clinically applied model that is based on such a different epistemological and theoretical presumptions. Integrative psychotherapy is a synthesis of humanistic psychotherapy, object relations theory, and psychoanalytical self psychology. It focuses on the dynamics and potentials of human relationships, with a goal of changing the relations and understanding internal and external resistances. The process of integrative psychotherapy is primarily focused on the developmental-relational model and co-creation of psychotherapeutic relationship as a single interactive event, which is not unilateral, but rather a joint endeavor by both the therapist and the patient/client. The need for a relationship is an important human need and represents a process of attunement that occurs as a response to the need for a relationship, a unique interpersonal contact between two people. If this need is not met, it manifests with the different feelings and various defenses. To meet this need, we need to have another person with whom we can establish a sensitive, attuned relationship. Thus, the therapist becomes this person who tries to supplement what the person did not receive. Neuroscience can be a source of integration through different therapies. We

  9. Dreams and fantasies in psychodynamic group psychotherapy of psychotic patients.

    PubMed

    Restek-Petrović, Branka; Orešković-Krezler, Nataša; Grah, Majda; Mayer, Nina; Bogović, Anamarija; Mihanović, Mate

    2013-09-01

    Work with dreams in the group analysis represents an important part of the analytical work, with insight into unconscious experiences of the individual dreamer, and his transferrential relations with the therapist, other members of the group, and with the group as a whole. The way dreams are addressed varies from one therapist to another, and in line with that, members of the group have varying frequency of dreams. In groups of psychotic patients dreams are generally rarely discussed and interpreted by the group, with analysis mainly resting on the manifested content. This paper describes a long-term group of psychotic patients which, after sharing the dreams of several members and daydreams of one female patient, their interpretation and reception in the group achieved better cohesion and improved communication and interaction, i.e. created a group matrix. Furthermore, through the content of dreams in the group, traumatic war experiences of several of the group members were opened and discussed, which brought with it recollections of the traumatic life situations of other group members. In expressing a daydream, a female member of the group revealed the background for her behaviour which was earlier interpreted as a negative symptom of the illness.

  10. Social Climate Comparison of Mutual Help and Psychotherapy Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Paul A.; Rappaport, Julian

    In recent years, mutual help groups have been formed to address problems in substance abuse, chronic physical illness, mental illness, marital disruption, and child abuse. Despite the proliferation of these groups, little research has been conducted to assess their efficacy or what happens in them. The nature of mutual help groups (N=32) was…

  11. Early Dropout from Psychotherapy for Depression with Group- and Network-model Therapists

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gregory E; Ding, Victoria; Hubbard, Rebecca; Fishman, Paul; Ludman, Evette; Morales, Leo; Operskalski, Belinda; Savarino, James

    2013-01-01

    Administrative data were used to examine early dropout among 16,451 health plan members calling to request psychotherapy for depression. Compared to members referred to group-model therapists, those referred to network-model therapists were more likely to drop out before the initial visit (OR 2.33, 95% CI 2.17 – 2.50) but less likely to drop out after the first visit (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.43 – 0.48). These differences were unaffected by adjustment for neighborhood income and educational attainment, antidepressant use, or generosity of insurance coverage. Efforts to increase the effectiveness of psychotherapy may required different strategies in group- and network-model practice. PMID:21710256

  12. Relational Psychotherapy Mothers’ Group: A developmentally informed intervention for at-risk mothers

    PubMed Central

    Luthar, Suniya S.; Suchman, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    The Relational Psychotherapy Mothers’ Group (RPMG), a developmentally informed, supportive psychotherapy designed to serve heroin-addicted mothers with children up to 16 years of age, aims at addressing psychosocial vulnerabilities, and facilitating optimal parenting, among at-risk mothers. We present preliminary evidence on the efficacy of RPMG as an “add on” treatment in comparison with standard methadone counseling alone. At the end of the 24-week treatment period, mothers receiving RPMG plus standard methadone counseling demonstrated lower levels of risk for child maltreatment, greater involvement with their children, and more positive psychosocial adjustment than women who received methadone counseling alone. Children of RPMG participants also reflected fewer problems in multiple areas. At 6 months posttreatment, RPMG recipients continued to be at a relative advantage, although the magnitude of group differences was often attenuated. Notably, urinalyses indicated that RPMG mothers showed greater improvements in levels of opioid use over time than comparison mothers. PMID:10847626

  13. An Investigation of the Giving and Receiving of Interpersonal Feedback within the Human Relations Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Ron

    A study investigated the process of giving interpersonal feedback in two continuing human relations groups to determine (1) the proportion of feedback perceived as useful for personal and interpersonal development, (2) the relationship between giving feedback that is perceived as useful and receiving that feedback, and (3) the relationship between…

  14. Childhood Roles and the Interpersonal Circle: A Model for ACOA Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sandra A.

    1996-01-01

    Combining childhood roles and interpersonal theory produces a schematic model that includes all adult children of alcoholics, enhances understanding of the group dynamic, and suggests specific group treatment strategies. (Author)

  15. Promoting group psychotherapy in managed care: basic economic principles for the clinical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Gross, J M

    1997-10-01

    Knowledge of the basic economic factors underlying managed mental health care directly impacts the clinical practitioners' ability to make constructive changes in the system. To aid understanding this article introduces the managed care marketplace model, the interactive relationship between medical necessity and patient co-payment, and demand management economics. The author encourages practitioners to develop strategies to overcome specific economic obstacles that prevent the promotion of group psychotherapy.

  16. Improving Students' Interpersonal Skills through Experiential Small Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Kay Lesley; Hyde, Sarah J.; McPherson, Kerstin B. A.; Simpson, Maree D.

    2016-01-01

    Health professional students must be equipped with the skills necessary to interact with patients. Effective interpersonal skills are difficult to both learn and teach, requiring development, practise and evaluation in both educational and clinical settings. In professions such as physiotherapy, traditional approaches to teaching these skills have…

  17. Confidentiality dilemmas in group psychotherapy with substance-dependent physicians.

    PubMed

    Roback, H B; Moore, R F; Waterhouse, G J; Martin, P R

    1996-10-01

    The purposes of this article are 1) to review federal and state laws relevant to confidentiality in group therapy with impaired physicians and 2) to provide empirical data concerning the actual confidentiality practices and experiences of group therapists treating chemically impaired physicians. In the clinical research phase, 25 state medical societies identified 45 rehabilitation centers as those to which the societies preferentially referred chemically impaired physicians. Fifty-one group leaders from 33 of these rehabilitation centers completed the survey questionnaire employed in this project. Because of the risk of potentially irreversible social and professional injury, physician patients were exceedingly concerned about breaches of confidentiality. Co-members' infractions most often involved the violator sharing with close friends and family members the name and abuse history of a fellow physician. In contrast, transgressors rarely leaked information about a co-member's drug-related illegal behaviour. Chemically impaired physicians would feel safer in sharing secrets in group therapy if more jurisdictions adopted legislation making co-members liable for violating confidentiality. Currently the pertinent body of law is confusing and inconsistent and provides little protection to impaired physicians who enter group therapy. The authors propose ideas for model legislation.

  18. Group Psychotherapy in Israel: History and Main Trends.

    PubMed

    Raufman, Ravit; Nesher, Ronit; Weinberg, Haim

    2015-10-01

    In Israel, the sense of belonging carries special meaning for historical and contemporary reasons. Since its establishment, Israel, with a background of centuries of persecution of the Jews, has been subjected to a consistent threat of war and terror that makes it a traumatized society. On the one hand, this intensifies social cohesiveness, especially in times of war. Yet many of the threats pose existential, political, and ideological dilemmas. The trauma of the Holocaust coupled with the continuous existence of wars enhanced the development of special kinds of groups. No wonder group therapy in Israel flourishes, perhaps more than in any other Western country (Nuttman-Shwartz & Weinberg, 2002).

  19. Drug and psychotherapy interactions in depression.

    PubMed

    Covi, L; Lipman, R S; Alarcon, R D; Smith, V K

    1976-05-01

    The authors conducted a series of multiple regression analyses of data from depressed patients. They found that 8 factors consistently predicted treatment response: a lower initial level of distress, imipramine treatment, a positive attitude toward group psychotherapy, and a good employment history predicted lower posttreatment distress levels; estrogen maintenance treatment was related to better response to diazepam, and a low level of intelligence predicted better response to both diazepam and imipramine; and a low initial level of interpersonal sensitivity and a significant other's having an unfavorable attitude toward psychiatric treatment were associated with better response to group psychotherapy.

  20. Efficacy of group psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder: A meta-analysis of randomized-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Barkowski, Sarah; Schwartze, Dominique; Strauss, Bernhard; Burlingame, Gary M; Barth, Jürgen; Rosendahl, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Group psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder (SAD) is an established treatment supported by findings from primary studies and earlier meta-analyses. However, a comprehensive summary of the recent evidence is still pending. This meta-analysis investigates the efficacy of group psychotherapy for adult patients with SAD. A literature search identified 36 randomized-controlled trials examining 2171 patients. Available studies used mainly cognitive-behavioral group therapies (CBGT); therefore, quantitative analyses were done for CBGT. Medium to large positive effects emerged for wait list-controlled trials for specific symptomatology: g=0.84, 95% CI [0.72; 0.97] and general psychopathology: g=0.62, 95% CI [0.36; 0.89]. Group psychotherapy was also superior to common factor control conditions in alleviating symptoms of SAD, but not in improving general psychopathology. No differences appeared for direct comparisons of group psychotherapy and individual psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy. Hence, group psychotherapy for SAD is an efficacious treatment, equivalent to other treatment formats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Things I have learned: 45+ years of group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rutan, J Scott

    2014-10-01

    The noted humorist Dave Barry, in looking back over his life and thinking of things he had learned, said one of the things he learned was that "There is a very fine line between 'hobby' and 'mental illness'" (1998, p. 182). Following in Dave Barry's path, I would like to look back over the 45+ years I've been practicing group therapy and see if there is anything to be learned by what I have learned over those years.

  2. [The influence of self-improving based group psychotherapy in defense mechanisms for the clients with social anxiety disorder].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Xiao, Rang; Qiu, Chang-jian; Wu, Wei-li; Wang, Wei; Nie, Xiao-jing; Zhu, Chun-yan; Zhang, Wei

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the influence and therapeutic effect of self-improving based group psychotherapy which bases on pathopsychology mechanism of social anxiety disorder (SAD) in denfense mechanisms for the client with SAD. 70 psychotherapy clients and inpatients with SAD were involved in this group psychotherapy voluntarily. Every group had six to eight clients with SAD and two psychotherapists. Psychotherapy was conducted once a week with 2 to 2. 5 hours for a period of 8 weeks. The evaluation of the therapeutic effect contains the subjective perception of the clients with SAD, Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), and Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ). 65 clients with SAD completed the therapy. The clients reported self and social functions were improved after 8 weeks therapy. The total score of LSAS after the therapy was significantly lower than that of before the therapy (Z = -5.673, P=0.000). A significant decrease in immature defense machanism and in neurotic defense machanism were observed (Z = -4.866, -2.973; P=0.000, 0.003 respectively). And a trend of increasing the use of mature defense machanism was also observed (Z = -2.780, P=0.005). Self-improving based group psychotherapy can encourage the clients with SAD accept themselves and cure the social anxiety symptoms. And there was a increasing use of mature defense machanism. These imply the clinic application value of the studied group psychotherapy.

  3. A Study of the Responses of Individuals with Different Interpersonal Needs with Respect to Variant Forms of Training in Group and Interpersonal Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallegan, Marian Joyce

    To determine if opinion change might be dependent in part on the interpersonal needs of the participants of seven seminar sections, need level was measured by FIRO-B (Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation) in three areas: inclusion, control, and affection. Three nonresidential groups met weekly for 15 weeks; four residential groups met…

  4. In-patient, short-term group psychotherapy – a therapeutic option for Bundeswehr soldiers?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Peter; Kröger, Norbert; Willmund, Gerd; Ströhle, Andreas; Heinz, Andreas; Hahne, Hans Heiner

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study is to assess the efficacy of short-term group psychotherapy rooted in depth psychology for Bundeswehr soldiers suffering from depressive, neurotic, stress, or personality disorders. Method: 103 participants in the in-patient, closed group setting were evaluated prospectively and compared with a non-randomized waitlisted control group. Results: In all relevant SCL-90-R (Symptom-Check-List-90) and MMPI-K (Minnesota-Multiphasic-Personality-Inventory short-form) scales therapy resulted in significant improvements as compared with the initial values. The control group did not show any significant changes, the therapy group was significantly superior to the control group in the scales of MMPI-K and the GSI-Scale of the SCL-90-R. For soldiers with a stress-reactive disorder (F43), no differences in efficacy could be identified compared with the other diagnosis groups. Conclusion: The results were considered to indicate that in-patient, short-term group psychotherapy may, in combination with additional setting components, be helpful in improving psychological symptoms in German soldiers. The indication range of group therapy offered to Bundeswehr soldiers should be expanded to also include primary prophylaxis and the treatment of mental-health problems following deployments abroad, if applicable. PMID:19742280

  5. [Using the method of central relationship conflict topic in a study of the process and outcome of long-term inpatient group psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Strauss, B; Dauert, E; Gladewitz, J; Kaak, A; Kieselbach, S; Lammert, K; Struck, D

    1995-01-01

    Within a research project dealing with the process and outcome of inpatient group psychotherapy, the core conflictual relationship theme method (CCRT) was used to determine if the central basic interpersonal problems of patients differ in comparison of individual pre- and postreatment sessions, if the CCRT determined at the beginning of treatment is related to outcome, and if there is a similarity between the CCRT from individual and group sessions. Comparisons of the CRRT(-components) from the beginning and the end of treatment (related to 19 patients) indicated marked changes on the levels of wishes and responses from others as well as "formal" changes of the narratives (temporal relations as well as the objects mentioned). The second part of the study (n = 26) revealed differences between subgroups determined on the basis of differential outcome measures with respect to the structure of their conflicts. The similarity of the CCRT from group and individual sessions which was studied for nine patients appeared to be moderate. The study revealed that the CCRT might need some minor revisions but appears to be an important method to thoroughly describe the effects of psychotherapies.

  6. Subgrouping with psychiatric inpatients in group psychotherapy: linking dependency and counterdependency.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Neal

    2008-04-01

    Abstract A model of inpatient group psychotherapy that focuses on two frequently observed patient subgroups reflecting contrasting attitudes toward authority is presented. The counterdependent subgroup overly values autonomy, opposes unit restrictions, and rejects treatment. The dependent subgroup tends to accept the unit's treatment and structure but is overly passive. In this model these attitudes are addressed in order to help patients adapt to the unit and to facilitate discharge. The author describes a three-stage group designed to help patients achieve these goals.

  7. "Come on, Jack, tell us about yourself": the growth spurt of group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ettin, M F

    1989-01-01

    Group psychotherapy evidenced a growth spurt in the decade of the 1930s and prior to World War II. Following upon the pioneering efforts of the psychoeducators (Pratt, Marsh, Lazell) and the writings of the early analysts (Freud, Adler, Dreikurs, Burrow), the next wave of practitioners and theorizers popularized and expounded the use of the group treatment modality in hospitals, clinics, and private practice. A review of the seminal ideas and efforts of Jacob Moreno, Louis Wender, Paul Schilder, Lauretta Bender, Alexander Wolf, and Samuel Slavson continues the historical overview begun earlier in this journal (Ettin, 1988). In a continuing effort to call up the wisdom of the past in the service of the work of the present, the emphasis in this paper will be on practical application. Representative quotes will be embedded in the text to capture the tenor of the times, and special attention will be given to (1) theoretical underpinnings such as the proposed advantages, curative variables, and therapy goals of a group treatment; (2) the basic logistics of practice, including optimum group size, composition, membership and exclusion criteria, and length, frequency, and structure of the meetings; and (3) technical considerations, such as the role of the therapist and the techniques, procedures, and processes of the ongoing group endeavor, as well as the interface between individual and group sessions. In conclusion, it will be argued that group psychotherapy matured just in time to respond to the pressing need for efficient mental treatment mandated by the coming of the Second World War.

  8. Process-oriented dynamic group psychotherapy for depression as a teaching modality in a family medicine residency program- A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Eric P; McClaflin, Richard; Zonca, Rachel; Mikuni, Karen; Chung, Willard; Etnyre, Ethan; Faucette, Lindsey; Oates, David; Merrill, Chuck

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives This pilot study provides a description and evaluation of process-oriented dynamic group psychotherapy for depression as a teaching modality for family medicine residents. The main purpose of using this modality was to teach family medicine residents a variety of psychological clinical skills. A secondary benefit of this modality was to provide in-house, primary care treatment to depressed patients, although the efficacy of this was not evaluated in the present study. Methods A 10-item, self-report, Likert-type questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of family medicine residents who had participated in the program. Results Completed questionnaires were received from 100% of the family medicine resident participants. Responses to the questionnaires indicate that the residents felt they acquired a variety of clinical skills from the training modality, to include developing active listening and interviewing skills; methods to improve the doctor-patient relationship; increased skills in empathy, intuitive processes, and emotional support; a depth understanding of how intra-psychic conflicts and interpersonal problems contribute to depression; how to give effective feedback that promotes behavioral change; and how to place interventions at the appropriate level of change. Eighty-eight percent of residents indicated they would recommend this learning modality to a family medicine physician colleague. Conclusions The family medicine residents' responses to the questionnaires indicate that they perceived process-oriented dynamic group psychotherapy for depression as a constructive and beneficial modality for both patient care and learning a variety of clinical skills.

  9. Existential and psychopathological evaluation of group psychotherapy of neurotic and psychotic patients.

    PubMed

    Opalić, P

    1989-07-01

    General problems in researching group psychotherapy are reviewed, especially for those with similar theoretical and methodological approaches. The sample consisted of 100 subjects, 26 of whom were neurotic and 24 of whom were psychotic. They were treated in small groups, headed by the author (the experimental group). An equal number and the same categories of patient attended control psychiatric sessions (the control group). All subjects were tested twice. With three instruments: the semantic differential (with twelve existential categories, five general therapy, and three ego psychology categories), the Kotchen test, and MMPI (midiform). A discriminative analysis of tests and the repeated test data, statistically significant, revealed experiential changes in existential categories, such as "Freedom," "Sex," and "Love" amongst psychotics; and in the case of both psychotic and neurotic patients, treated in groups and compared with the controls, such categories as "Understanding among people." With the help of MMPI, a statistically significant reduction of hysteria in neurotic subjects was established, as well as the preventive effects of group psychotherapy regarding the emergence of psychopathy in psychotic patients. Correlation calculations indicated a greater discrimination in the perception of changes using existential categories in the experiencing of psychotic and depressive patients. Finally, the results obtained are discussed from the viewpoints of clinical experience, results obtained in similar research studies, and unanswered questions resulting from such research.

  10. Therapeutic alliance and cohesion variables as predictors of outcome in short-term group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Anthony S; Piper, William E; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2007-07-01

    The current study explored the relative ability of aggregate therapeutic alliance and cohesion variables to predict short-term group therapy outcome. Data were collected from a comparative trial of two forms of time-limited group psychotherapy for complicated grief (Piper, McCallum, Joyce, Rosie, & Ogrodniczuk, 2001). The therapeutic alliance and elements of the cohesion construct were measured from the perspectives of each patient and the group therapist at intervals during the groups; scores were aggregated across assessments. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses, adjusting for the effects of treatment approach (interpretive vs. supportive) and specific group membership, demonstrated that the patient-rated alliance was a consistent predictor of outcome. Two cohesion measures, reflecting other participants' (therapist, other members) views of the patient's "fit" with the group, also accounted for variation in outcome. Implications of the findings for research and clinical practice, and the limitations of the measurement approach taken in this study, are considered.

  11. Developing the group mind through functional subgrouping: linking systems-centered training (SCT) and interpersonal neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Gantt, Susan P; Agazarian, Yvonne M

    2010-10-01

    This article introduces the systems-centered concept of the "group mind" by linking systems-centered thinking and interpersonal neurobiology, building on Siegel's definition of mind as the process of regulating the flow of energy and information. Functional subgrouping, the systems-centered group method for resolving conflicts, discriminates and integrates the flow of energy and information within and between group members, subgroups, and the group-as-a-whole, thus potentiating survival, development, and transformation. This article uses the interpersonal neurobiological framework to discuss functional subgrouping as a tool for developing the group mind: considering how functional subgrouping facilitates emotional regulation, creates a secure relational context, and potentiates neural integration.

  12. [Effectiveness of intensive group psychotherapy in treatment of neurotic and personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Mielimąka, Michał; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Cyranka, Katarzyna; Sobański, Jerzy; Müldner-Nieckowski, Łukasz; Dembińska, Edyta; Smiatek-Mazgaj, Bogna; Klasa, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of intensive (150 - 210 sessions), short-term (10 - 14 weeks) group psychotherapy in the treatment of neurotic disorders, and selected personality disorders. The study involved 145 patients treated in day hospital due to neurotic disorders and selected personality disorders. The measurements were performed twice - at the beginning and at the end of hospitalization. The effectiveness of psychotherapy in the reduction of symptoms of neurotic disorders was measured with symptom checklist "0". The change in the severity of personality traits characteristic for neurotic disorders was examined using Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006. A significant reduction in symptoms of neurotic disorders was found in 84% of patients (85,7% women and 80,8% men). 70,3% of the examined patients obtained in the measurement at the end of treatment results indicating the level of severity of neurotic disorders symptoms below the cutoff point separating population of healthy individuals from patients. A significant reduction in the severity of personality traits characteristically occurring in patients suffering from neurotic disorders was found in 76% of patients (74.5% women and 78.7% men). 42.8% of the examined patients obtained in the measurement at the end of the treatment the value of neurotic personality traits index (X-KON) typical for healthy population. Intensive, short-term group psychotherapy with elements of individual therapy is an effective treatment for neurotic disorders. The majority of treated persons obtains a significant symptomatic improvement and a reduction in the severity of neurotic personality traits.

  13. Management of intense countertransference in group psychotherapy conducted in situations of civic conflict.

    PubMed

    Benson, Jarlath F; Moore, Robert; Kapur, Raman; Rice, Cecil A

    2005-01-01

    Conducting group psychotherapy in a situation of intractable conflict such as Northern Ireland activates turbulent emotional dilemmas within psychotherapists and group members alike. Professional practice and therapeutic zeal must struggle daily to survive the stark encounter with the reality of a regressive and primitive psychology and on occasion may succumb to atavistic tendencies, dragging relationships down to primitive levels and leaving connections broken. In this article, three group therapists describe their countertransference struggles when leading such groups. They meet in a psychosocial setting in which the risk to one's psyche parallels the risk to one's life and limb. The countertransference experienced here is dark, indeed identified by one author as not unlike Dante's Inferno. They describe how understanding their personal countertransference enables them to survive emotionally even though it may not always lead to the survival of their groups. The effect of those struggles also troubled the act of writing itself making cooperation difficult on occasion, a mirror of the external social matrix.

  14. Management of Intense Countertransference in Group Psychotherapy Conducted in Situations of Civic Conflict.

    PubMed

    Benson, Jarlath F; Moore, Robert; Kapur, Raman; Rice, Cecil A

    2005-01-01

    Conducting group psychotherapy in a situation of intractable conflict such as Northern Ireland activates turbulent emotional dilemmas within psychotherapists and group members alike. Professional practice and therapeutic zeal must struggle daily to survive the stark encounter with the reality of a regressive and primitive psychology and on occasion may succumb to atavistic tendencies, dragging relationships down to primitive levels and leaving connections broken. In this article, three group therapists describe their countertransference struggles when leading such groups. They meet in a psychosocial setting in which the risk to one's psyche parallels the risk to one's life and limb. The countertransference experienced here is dark, indeed identified by one author as not unlike Dante's Inferno. They describe how understanding their personal countertransference enables them to survive emotionally even though it may not always lead to the survival of their groups. The effect of those struggles also troubled the act of writing itself, making cooperation difficult on occasion, a mirror of the external social matrix.

  15. The individual psychoanalytic psychotherapy of schizophrenia: scientific and clinical approach through a clinical discussion group.

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, P. M.; Benedetti, G.

    1985-01-01

    Fifty individual psychotherapies of schizophrenic patients, supervised by a control group for fourteen years, are examined. 80 percent of the patients have shown important clinical progress and, in many cases, have been healed, especially those who continued therapy for more than two years and who had a deep and reciprocal emotional involvement with the therapist during and after treatment; there was a reduction by 70 percent of hospitalizations during this treatment and only one of these had a relapse. Other data confirm the efficacy of psychotherapy; however, to give a new instrument of scientific confirmation to this type of individual and subjective work, we tried to observe how the psychopathological and therapeutic mechanism of "symbiosis" induces personal dynamics in the therapist which are reflected in the control group. The psychopathological symbiotic disturbance of the patient, the therapeutic symbiotic relationship, and the way in which the group reacts to these permit the creation of a useful triangle, both for the therapist to understand his position toward the patient and to confirm or correct the subjective aspects of such a deep and emotional relationship. PMID:4049915

  16. Eroticism in group psychotherapy: psychoanalytic reflections on desire, agony, and ecstasy.

    PubMed

    Tylim, Isaac

    2003-10-01

    To fully understand the complexities of eroticism in groups, it may be necessary to review a conceptual differentiation of desire and its allies: agony and ecstasy. This article suggests that psychoanalytic group psychotherapy is made for neither agony nor ecstasy. Sexual excitement maybe; eroticism and desire, yes; agony and ecstasy, no. While agony or ecstasy imply a threat to the survival of the group, eroticism and desire reaffirm its existence. In this manner the group may be converted into a theater where desire may be celebrated, while the threat of being dissolved in the depths or exaltation of agony and ecstasy is elaborated and worked through: "Desire is desire only if it succeeds in postponing something".

  17. Increasing the Responsiveness of Alcoholics to Group Therapy: An Interpersonal Problem-Solving Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intagliata, James

    1979-01-01

    A structured approach to group therapy was added to an alcoholic treatment program previously offering only unstructured insight-oriented groups. Participants in the interpersonal problem-solving group therapy were generally very active in all sessions. Participants reported actively utilizing their learning after leaving the treatment program, a…

  18. Self-Perception and Interpersonal Behavior Changes in Marathon and Time-Extended Encounter Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Michael W.; Vestre, Norris D.

    1974-01-01

    College students (N=27) were assigned to a time-extended or a marathon group or a control condition to evaluate the effects of encounter experiences on self-perception and interpersonal behavior. Both experimental groups showed significantly greater changes in self-perceptions from pretest to posttest than the control group. (Author)

  19. Self-Perception and Interpersonal Behavior Changes in Marathon and Time-Extended Encounter Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Michael W.; Vestre, Norris D.

    1974-01-01

    College students (N=27) were assigned to a time-extended or a marathon group or a control condition to evaluate the effects of encounter experiences on self-perception and interpersonal behavior. Both experimental groups showed significantly greater changes in self-perceptions from pretest to posttest than the control group. (Author)

  20. Meaning-centered group psychotherapy for patients with advanced cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Gibson, Christopher; Pessin, Hayley; Poppito, Shannon; Nelson, Christian; Tomarken, Alexis; Timm, Anne Kosinski; Berg, Amy; Jacobson, Colleen; Sorger, Brooke; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives An increasingly important concern for clinicians who care for patients at the end of life is their spiritual well-being and sense of meaning and purpose in life. In response to the need for short-term interventions to address spiritual well-being, we developed Meaning Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP) to help patients with advanced cancer sustain or enhance a sense of meaning, peace and purpose in their lives, even as they approach the end of life. Methods Patients with advanced (stage III or IV) solid tumor cancers (N = 90) were randomly assigned to either MCGP or a supportive group psychotherapy (SGP). Patients were assessed before and after completing the 8-week intervention, and again 2 months after completion. Outcome assessment included measures of spiritual well-being, meaning, hopelessness, desire for death, optimism/pessimism, anxiety, depression and overall quality of life. Results MCGP resulted in significantly greater improvements in spiritual well-being and a sense of meaning. Treatment gains were even more substantial (based on effect size estimates) at the second follow-up assessment. Improvements in anxiety and desire for death were also significant (and increased over time). There was no significant improvement on any of these variables for patients participating in SGP. Conclusions MCGP appears to be a potentially beneficial intervention for patients’ emotional and spiritual suffering at the end of life. Further research, with larger samples, is clearly needed to better understand the potential benefits of this novel intervention. PMID:19274623

  1. Interpersonal psychotherapy for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder among HIV-positive women in Kisumu, Kenya: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Onu, Chinwe; Ongeri, Linnet; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig R; Neylan, Thomas C; Oyaro, Patrick; Rota, Grace; Otewa, Faith; Delucchi, Kevin L; Meffert, Susan M

    2016-02-03

    Mental disorders are the leading global cause of years lived with disability; the majority of this burden exists in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Over half of mental illness is attributable to depression and anxiety disorders, both of which have known treatments. While the scarcity of mental health care providers is recognized as a major contributor to the magnitude of untreated disorders in LMICs, studies in LMICs find that evidence-based treatments for depression and anxiety disorders, such as brief, structured psychotherapies, are feasible, acceptable and have strong efficacy when delivered by local non-specialist personnel. However, most mental health treatment studies using non-specialist providers in LMICs deploy traditional efficacy designs (T1) without the benefit of integrated mental health treatment models shown to succeed over vertical interventions or methods derived from new implementation science to speed policy change. Here, we describe an effectiveness-implementation hybrid study that evaluates non-specialist delivery of mental health treatment within an HIV clinic for HIV-positive (HIV+) women affected by gender- based violence (GBV) (HIV+ GBV+) in the Nyanza region of Kenya. In this effectiveness-implementation hybrid type I design, 200 HIV+ women with major depressive disorder (MDD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who are receiving care at a Family AIDS Care Education and Services (FACES)-supported clinic in Kisumu, Kenya will be randomized to: (1) interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) + treatment as usual (TAU) or (2) TAU, both delivered within the HIV clinic. IPT will consist of 12 weekly 60-minute individual IPT sessions, delivered by non-specialists trained to provide IPT. Primary effectiveness outcomes will include MDD and PTSD diagnosis on the Mini International Diagnostic Interview (MINI). Primary implementation outcomes will include treatment cost-benefit, acceptability, appropriateness, feasibility and fidelity of the

  2. The Negative Effects of Prejudice on Interpersonal Relationships within Adolescent Peer Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poteat, V. Paul; Mereish, Ethan H.; Birkett, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Social development theories highlight the centrality of peer groups during adolescence and their role in socializing attitudes and behaviors. In this longitudinal study, we tested the effects of group-level prejudice on ensuing positive and negative interpersonal interactions among peers over a 7-month period. We used social network analysis to…

  3. The Negative Effects of Prejudice on Interpersonal Relationships within Adolescent Peer Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poteat, V. Paul; Mereish, Ethan H.; Birkett, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Social development theories highlight the centrality of peer groups during adolescence and their role in socializing attitudes and behaviors. In this longitudinal study, we tested the effects of group-level prejudice on ensuing positive and negative interpersonal interactions among peers over a 7-month period. We used social network analysis to…

  4. Relational Psychotherapy Mothers' Group: a randomized clinical trial for substance abusing mothers.

    PubMed

    Luthar, Suniya S; Suchman, Nancy E; Altomare, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the effectiveness of the Relational Psychotherapy Mothers' Group (RPMG), a supportive parenting group intervention for substance abusing women. Sixty mothers receiving RPMG were compared to 67 women receiving recovery training (RT); both treatments supplemented treatment in the methadone clinics. At the end of the 6-month treatment period, RPMG mothers showed marginally significant improvement on child maltreatment (self-reported) and cocaine abuse based on urinalyses when compared with RT mothers; notably, children of RPMG mothers reported significantly greater improvement in emotional adjustment and depression than children of RT mothers. At 6 months follow-up, however, treatment gains were no longer apparent. Overall, the findings suggest that whereas supportive parenting interventions for substance abusing women do have some preventive potential, abrupt cessation of the therapeutic program could have deleterious consequences.

  5. The Effect of Spiritual and Religious Group Psychotherapy on Suicidal Ideation in Depressed Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Kazemi, Abdul Hassan; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud; Modabber, Raheleh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Suicide is a great economical, social and public health problem. It is prevalent worldwide and has a lot of negative effects on individuals, families and society. Depression is often prelude to Suicide. An important part of the treatment of the mentally ill patients is spiritual-religious psychotherapy which should be done after physical treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of spiritual and religious group psychotherapy on suicidal ideation in depressed patients. Methods: 51 depressed patients with suicidal ideation from Razi hospital (Tabriz, Iran) participated in this clinical trial. To collect Data questionnaire was used which included demographic and Beck Suicide Scale Ideation. Experimental group participated in 10 sessions of group psychotherapy. Each section lasted 1 hour. Two weeks after the last section post test was done. Statistical software SPSS ver 13 was used for data analysis. Results: Results of independent t-test revealed no difference between two groups in terms of suicidal ideation before intervention but after study there is a statistical difference. Also the results of ANCOVA test showed a significant relationship between spiritual group therapy and decrease in suicidal ideation, so that this intervention can make 57% of variance in suicidal ideation of experimental group. Conclusion: Regarding positive effect of spiritual and religious group psychotherapy on decreasing suicidal ideation of depressed patients, we suggest this intervention to be held in Psychiatric Wards and also more study on depression and other psychiatric patients with greater sample size would be helpful. PMID:25276756

  6. Group therapy for university students: A randomized control trial of dialectical behavior therapy and positive psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Uliaszek, Amanda A; Rashid, Tayyab; Williams, Gregory E; Gulamani, Tahira

    2016-02-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of two evidence-based group treatments for significant psychopathology in university students. Fifty-four treatment-seeking participants were randomized to a semester-long dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) or positive psychotherapy (PPT) group treatment. Mixed modeling was used to assess improvement over time and group differences on variables related to symptomatology, adapative/maladaptive skill usage, and well-being/acceptability factors. All symptom and skill variables improved over the course of treatment. There were no statistically significant differences in rate of change between groups. The DBT group evidenced nearly all medium to large effect sizes for all measures from pre-to post-treatment, with mostly small to medium effect sizes for the PPT group. There was a significant difference in acceptability between treatments, with the DBT group demonstrating significantly lower attrition rates, higher attendance, and higher overall therapeutic alliance. While both groups demonstrated efficacy in this population, the DBT group appeared to be a more acceptable and efficacious treatment for implementation. Results may specifically apply to group therapy as an adjunctive treatment because a majority of participants had concurrent individual therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Corrective interpersonal experience in psychodrama group therapy: a comprehensive process analysis of significant therapeutic events.

    PubMed

    McVea, Charmaine S; Gow, Kathryn; Lowe, Roger

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the process of resolving painful emotional experience during psychodrama group therapy, by examining significant therapeutic events within seven psychodrama enactments. A comprehensive process analysis of four resolved and three not-resolved cases identified five meta-processes which were linked to in-session resolution. One was a readiness to engage in the therapeutic process, which was influenced by client characteristics and the client's experience of the group; and four were therapeutic events: (1) re-experiencing with insight; (2) activating resourcefulness; (3) social atom repair with emotional release; and (4) integration. A corrective interpersonal experience (social atom repair) healed the sense of fragmentation and interpersonal disconnection associated with unresolved emotional pain, and emotional release was therapeutically helpful when located within the enactment of this new role relationship. Protagonists who experienced resolution reported important improvements in interpersonal functioning and sense of self which they attributed to this experience.

  8. Study protocol: Hybrid Type I cost-effectiveness and implementation study of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for men and women prisoners with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ted R.; Stout, Robert L.; Zlotnick, Caron; Cerbo, Louis A.; Andrade, Joel T.; Wiltsey-Stirman, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article describes the protocol for a Hybrid Type I cost-effectiveness and implementation study of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for men and women prisoners with major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal is to promote uptake of evidence-based treatments in criminal justice settings by conducting a randomized effectiveness study that collects implementation data, including a full cost-effectiveness analysis. Background More than 2.3 million people are incarcerated in the United States on any given day. MDD is the most common severe mental illness among incarcerated individuals. Despite the prevalence and consequences of MDD among incarcerated populations, this study will be the first fully-powered randomized trial of any treatment for MDD in an incarcerated population. Design Given the politically charged nature of the justice system, advantageous health outcomes are often not enough to get an intervention implemented in prisons. To increase the policy impact of this trial, we sought advice from prison providers and administrators about outcomes that would be persuasive to policy-makers and defensible to the public. In this trial, effectiveness questions will be answered using a randomized clinical trial design comparing IPT plus prison treatment as usual (TAU) to TAU alone, with outcomes including depressive symptoms (primary), suicidality, and in prison functioning (enrollment and completion of correctional programs; disciplinary and incident reports; aggression/victimization; social support). Implementation outcomes will include cost-effectiveness; feasibility and acceptability of IPT to clients, providers, and administrators; prison provider intervention fidelity, attitudes, and competencies; and barriers and facilitators of implementation assessed through surveys, interviews, and process notes. PMID:26845030

  9. Exploration of the patient-therapist relationship in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Høglend, Per

    2014-10-01

    Research from several domains indicates that genetic factors, childhood environment, and later interpersonal experiences are important sources of how patients relate to their therapists (transference). Transference work, a core specific technique in psychodynamic psychotherapy, focuses on exploring the patient-therapist relationship, with the idea that this may lead to improvement of the patients' relationships outside therapy. Many psychotherapy researchers hold the position that specific techniques do not contribute much to the outcome of psychotherapy. However, more than 30 studies have reported significant associations between transference work and outcome. These findings indicate that transference work interventions are indeed active ingredients (for better or worse). Naturalistic studies suggest that a high frequency of transference interventions may have negative effects. Randomized clinical trials indicate that transference-based treatments and alternative treatments work equally well with regard to symptom improvement. However, transference-based treatments appear to be much more effective with regard to interpersonal relations and other measures of personality functioning. The average between-groups effect size for the experimental studies listed in this article was large. Contrary to common clinical wisdom, transference interventions seem to be most important for (mainly female) patients with difficult interpersonal relationships and more severe personality pathology. Gain of insight may be a specific mechanism of change in dynamic psychotherapy, but only one treatment component study has linked transference work directly to gains in insight and subsequent improvement in interpersonal functioning. Research that examines how transference phenomena may be responded to in nondynamic therapies is scarce.

  10. Frustration, anger, and the significance of alter-ego transferences in group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stone, W N

    1995-07-01

    When working with narcissistically vulnerable and angry patients in group psychotherapy one must take into account the entire treatment context. Interaction takes place among the identified patient, the other members, the therapist, and the image of the group as a whole. In members' counter-reactions to the difficult person, group-destructive forces frequently are stimulated. The offending individual may flee, or the group may reach an impasse in which little growth occurs. In this communication, I have focused on alter-ego relationships and transferences as a way of understanding aspects of group formation and destruction. Angry patients may have intense wishes to be like others and to feel part of the human condition. They suffer from feeling alone. Disruption of an alter-ego relationship may result in rage. A self-psychological perspective in concert with knowledge of group dynamics enables the clinician to formulate ways of intervening in problematic group interactions. The therapist's capacity to attend to the vulnerabilities of the self of all persons involved in the group is often severely tested, particularly under circumstances of emotional contagion. Elucidation of twinship and alter-ego transferences may help stabilize difficult patients and enable them to restart their psychological growth.

  11. Disability and countertransference in group psychotherapy: connecting social oppression with the clinical frame.

    PubMed

    Watermeyer, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Psychoanalysis has paid limited attention to disability, and at times the approach has lacked political awareness. Over recent decades the international disability rights movement has argued that disabled people constitute an oppressed, systemically disadvantaged minority. Lately, a critical psychoanalytic view has connected disablist discrimination to universal unconscious conflicts evoked by impairment. Corresponding evocations emerge in the therapeutic frame, producing countertransference responses to the impaired body. Drawing on psychoanalytically oriented group psychotherapy with severely physically impaired adults, countertransference phenomena were studied in developing discussion on disability-related clinical work. The complex, uncertain role of psychoanalytic practice in combating oppression was also examined. Key issues include challenges to the traditional frame, the crossing of psychic boundaries, anxieties relating to not knowing, and the role of unconscious factors in marginalizing disabled experience.

  12. Efficacy of Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy for Cancer Survivors: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van der Spek, Nadia; Vos, Joël; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F.; Breitbart, William; Cuijpers, Pim; Holtmaat, Karen; Witte, Birgit I.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of meaning-centered group psychotherapy for cancer survivors (MCGP-CS) to improve personal meaning, compared to supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) and care as usual (CAU). Methods A total of 170 cancer survivors were randomly assigned to one of the three study arms: MCGP-CS (n = 57), SGP (n = 56), CAU (n = 57). Primary outcome measure was Personal Meaning Profile (total score PMP). Secondary outcome measures were subscales of the PMP, psychological well-being (SPWB), posttraumatic growth (PTGI), mental adjustment to cancer (MAC), optimism (LOT-R), hopelessness (BHS), psychological distress (anxiety and depression, HADS), and quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30). Outcome measures were assessed before randomization, post-intervention, after three and six months follow-up (FU). Results Linear mixed model analyses (intention-to-treat) showed significant differences between MCGP-CS, SGP and CAU on the total PMP score, and on (sub)scales of the PMP, SPWB, MAC, and HADS. Post-hoc analyses showed significantly stronger treatment effects of MCGP-CS compared to CAU on personal meaning (d=0.81), goal-orientedness (d=1.07), positive relations (d=0.59), purpose in life (d=0.69); fighting spirit (d=0.61) (post-intervention), helpless/hopeless (d=−0.87) (3 months FU); distress (d=−0.6) and depression (d=−0.38) (6 months FU). Significantly stronger effects of MCGP-CS compared to SGP were found on personal growth (d=0.57) (3 months FU), and environmental mastery (d=0.66) (6 months FU). Conclusions MCGP-CS is an effective intervention for cancer survivors to improve personal meaning, psychological well-being and mental adjustment to cancer in the short term, and to reduce psychological distress in the long run. PMID:28374663

  13. Mother-Infant Group Psychotherapy as an Intensive Treatment in Early Interaction among Mothers with Substance Abuse Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belt, Ritva; Punamaki, Raija-Leena

    2007-01-01

    In this article we present a novel method of outpatient care: brief, dynamic mother-infant group psychotherapy with mothers who have substance use problems. In this therapy, substance abuse treatment is part of mental health and parenting interventions. The focus is on preventing disturbance in the mother-infant relationship in this high-risk…

  14. Personal and Interpersonal Motivation for Group Projects: Replications of an Attributional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Sarah E.; Schreiber, James B.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of two replication studies using attribution theory to analyze personal and interpersonal motivation for collaborative projects. Undergraduate students responded to questionnaires containing hypothetical vignettes depicting success or failure outcomes due to ability or effort for dyads working on a group project. Dependent…

  15. [Group psychotherapy with an analytical orientation at the Tlatelolco clinic of neuropsychiatry].

    PubMed

    1977-01-01

    Since most of the patients who attend for psychiatric consultation at a clinic are little motivated for psychotherapy, analytic group therapy was attempted, with basis on studies on psychological genetics, on groups management, and on the theories of Freud, Klein and Bion. Several open groups were handled, with the following achievements: 1. A decrease in anxiety, and increase in the objective vision of reality and in increase in the ability to see past and present conflicts. 2. A greater tolerance to agressive and sexual instincts and to frustration. 3. A greater personal acceptance, ability to sublimate productively and elimination of clinical symptoms. Varying degrees of improvement, and lesser need for psychiatric medication and hospitalization were obtained. Several problems were encountered: a) Desertion of 30% of patients from the sessions, due to the disapearance of symptoms buth with no character changes (resistances). b) Temporary absence or habit of arriving late to the sessions (resistances). c) Overwhelming passivity. The groups were handled in cotherapy and the work was supervised with experienced therapists. To attempt solving the above mentioned problems a better selection of patients was made, complete clinical histories were elaborated, a battery of psychological tests was made, and diagnosis, dynamics and prognosis of each case were outlined; this allowed the evaluation of middle and long term treatment. It was suggested to change the technique to that of operative groups.

  16. Interpersonal processes of care survey: patient-reported measures for diverse groups.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Anita L; Nápoles-Springer, Anna M; Gregorich, Steven E; Santoyo-Olsson, Jasmine

    2007-06-01

    To create a patient-reported, multidimensional physician/patient interpersonal processes of care (IPC) instrument appropriate for patients from diverse racial/ethnic groups that allows reliable, valid, and unbiased comparisons across these groups. DATA SOURCE/DATA COLLECTION: Data were collected by telephone interview. The survey was administered in English and Spanish to adult general medicine patients, stratified by race/ethnicity and language (African Americans, English-speaking Latinos, Spanish-speaking Latinos, non-Latino whites) (N=1,664). In this cross-sectional study, items were designed to be appropriate for diverse ethnic groups based on focus groups, our prior framework, literature, and cognitive interviews. Multitrait scaling and confirmatory factor analysis were used to examine measurement invariance; we identified scales that allowed meaningful quantitative comparisons across four race/ethnic/language groups. The final instrument assesses several subdomains of communication, patient-centered decision making, and interpersonal style. It includes 29 items representing 12 first-order and seven second-order factors with equivalent meaning (metric invariance) across groups; 18 items (seven factors) allowed unbiased mean comparison across groups (scalar invariance). Final scales exhibited moderate to high reliability. The IPC survey can be used to describe disparities in interpersonal care, predict patient outcomes, and examine outcomes of quality improvement efforts to reduce health care disparities.

  17. A randomized, comparative pilot trial of family-based interpersonal psychotherapy for reducing psychosocial symptoms, disordered-eating, and excess weight gain in at-risk preadolescents with loss-of-control-eating.

    PubMed

    Shomaker, Lauren B; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Matherne, Camden E; Mehari, Rim D; Olsen, Cara H; Marwitz, Shannon E; Bakalar, Jennifer L; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M; Kelly, Nichole R; Schvey, Natasha A; Burke, Natasha L; Cassidy, Omni; Brady, Sheila M; Dietz, Laura J; Wilfley, Denise E; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2017-09-01

    Preadolescent loss-of-control-eating (LOC-eating) is a risk factor for excess weight gain and binge-eating-disorder. We evaluated feasibility and acceptability of a preventive family-based interpersonal psychotherapy (FB-IPT) program. FB-IPT was compared to family-based health education (FB-HE) to evaluate changes in children's psychosocial functioning, LOC-eating, and body mass. A randomized, controlled pilot trial was conducted with 29 children, 8 to 13 years who had overweight/obesity and LOC-eating. Youth-parent dyads were randomized to 12-week FB-IPT (n = 15) or FB-HE (n = 14) and evaluated at post-treatment, six-months, and one-year. Changes in child psychosocial functioning, LOC-eating, BMI, and adiposity by dual-energy-X-ray-absorptiometry were assessed. Missing follow-up data were multiply imputed. FB-IPT feasibility and acceptability were indicated by good attendance (83%) and perceived benefits to social interactions and eating. Follow-up assessments were completed by 73% FB-IPT and 86% FB-HE at post-treatment, 60% and 64% at six-months, and 47% and 57% at one-year. At post-treatment, children in FB-IPT reported greater decreases in depression (95% CI -7.23, -2.01, Cohen's d = 1.23) and anxiety (95% CI -6.08, -0.70, Cohen's d = .79) and less odds of LOC-eating (95% CI -3.93, -0.03, Cohen's d = .38) than FB-HE. At six-months, children in FB-IPT had greater reductions in disordered-eating attitudes (95% CI -0.72, -0.05, Cohen's d = .66) and at one-year, tended to have greater decreases in depressive symptoms (95% CI -8.82, 0.44, Cohen's d = .69) than FB-HE. There was no difference in BMI gain between the groups. Family-based approaches that address interpersonal and emotional underpinnings of LOC-eating in preadolescents with overweight/obesity show preliminary promise, particularly for reducing internalizing symptoms. Whether observed psychological benefits translate into sustained prevention of disordered-eating or excess

  18. Interest in a group psychotherapy program among Philippine breast cancer patients and its associated factors.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Dianne; Takahashi, Miyako; Kai, Ichiro

    2011-09-01

    A wide variety of psychosocial interventions are available for cancer patients, among which group psychotherapy (GPT) programs have made improvements in cancer patients' quality of life, coping abilities, and emotional distress. Few research data are available describing Philippine breast cancer patients' interest in GPT. This study aimed at enumerating the factors that determine Philippine breast cancer patients' interest in a GPT program. Patients recruited from the University of Santo Tomas Hospital Benavides Cancer Institute were asked to answer a survey questionnaire about their demographic, clinical, and psychosocial status, as well as whether they would be interested in joining GPT and why. Of 135 patients approached, 123 patients completed the survey. 104 (85%) women indicated interest in GPT. Patients were mostly interested because they wanted to learn coping skills (79%) and gain knowledge or information in dealing with cancer (69%). Patients said they were 'very interested' in learning about cancer recurrence (96%) and treatments (94%). Bivariate analysis showed that compared to the uninterested group, interested patients were younger, more likely to be married, and were more likely to have used complementary therapy for breast cancer. Logistic regression showed that married women were more likely to be interested in GPT (OR 3.30, CI 1.07-10.20). There is a potentially high interest in GPT among Philippine breast cancer patients. The attributes of Philippine patients interested in GPT are similar to and yet unique, compared to other populations. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. [Relational models and psychopathology of epileptics in a group-psychotherapy perspective (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bergonzi, P; Ferro, F M; Mazza, S; Zolo, P

    1976-01-01

    Epileptic patients show a large range of psychopathologic manifestations, both from a qualitative point of view (even with an exact reference to the nature and the site of lesion) and from a quantitative point of view (from the so-called characterial attitude to the psychotic developments). Perhaps all these alterations of psychiatric interest have a common denominator because, after all, they arise from the sum of two essential moments: the experience of the critical event on the one hand, and the interactive network between the patient and those who are present to his critical manifestations on the other. In particular this complex relational psychopathology needs several therapeutic interventions which are to be complementary and concordant so that they may give satisfactory results of psychosocial reinsertion. We think that the model of intervention to be preferred for its effectiveness is that drawn from group-psychotherapy tecniques: the model in which "psychoanalysis meets sociology (Foulkes) seems to be particularly specific to this problem because it concerns the microsocial and investigates (and, by means of the conduction, it resolves) distorted ways of communication and conflictual dynamic interactions. We followed some epileptics in the group-community of the neurological department of a general hospital (of course with other mental, not epileptic, patients). These preliminary studies lead us to point out the theoretical reasons and the practical justifications of such possible management of the psychological manifestations of epileptic patients.

  20. Dreams of deceased children and countertransference in the group psychotherapy of bereaved mothers: clinical illustration.

    PubMed

    Begovac, Branka; Begovac, Ivan

    2012-09-01

    This article presents, in the form of a clinical illustration, a therapeutic group of bereaved mothers with special reference to their dreams about their deceased children. The article presents descriptions of the emotions of these mothers and countertransference feelings, a topic that, to our knowledge, has not been frequently studied. The group was small, analytically oriented, slow-open, comprised of women bereaved by the death of a child, and conducted by a female therapist. Over more than three years, the group included 20 members in total. This article describes a number of dreams recorded during a period when the group included seven members. Dreams helped the group members access their emotional pain, helplessness, yearning for a relationship with the deceased, guilt, and feelings of survival guilt. The transference-countertransference relationships were characterized by holding. Countertransference feelings of helplessness predominated. The therapist and the group as a whole contained various emotions, allowing the group members to return to the normal mourning processes from the parallel encouragement of group development and interpersonal relationships.

  1. Group Climate, Cohesion, Alliance, and Empathy in Group Psychotherapy: Multilevel Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jennifer E.; Burlingame, Gary M.; Olsen, Joseph A.; Davies, D. Robert; Gleave, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the definitional and statistical overlap among 4 key group therapeutic relationship constructs--group climate, cohesion, alliance, and empathy--across member-member, member-group, and member-leader relationships. Three multilevel structural equation models were tested using self-report measures completed by 662 participants…

  2. [Psychotherapy: Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Meinlschmidt, Gunther; Tegethoff, Marion

    2017-08-01

    Background: The science and practice of psychotherapy is continuously developing. The goal of this article is to describe new impulses, guiding current advancements in the field. Methods: This paper provides a selective narrative review, synthesizing and condensing relevant literature identified through various sources, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and "Web of Science", as well as citation tracking, to elaborate key developments in the field of psychotherapy Results: We describe several dynamics: 1) Following up the so-called "third wave of cognitive behavioral therapy", new interventions arise that have at their core fostering interpersonal virtues, such as compassion, forgiveness, and gratitude; 2) Based on technological quantum leaps, new interventions arise that exploit current developments in the field of new media, information, and communication technologies, as well as brain imaging, such as digital interventions for mental disorders and new forms of neurofeedback; 3) Inspired by the field of positive psychology, there is a revival of the promotion of strength and resilience in therapeutic contexts; 4) In light of the new paradigm "precision medicine", the issue of differential and adaptive indication of psychotherapy, addressed with new methods, regains relevance and drives a new field of "precision psychotherapy". 5) Last but not least, the "embodied turn" opens the door for body psychotherapy to gain relevance in academic psychotherapy. Conclusion: These and further developments, such as the use of systemic and network approaches as well as machine learning techniques, outline the vivid activities in the field of psychotherapy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Effect of Group Positive Psychotherapy on Improvement of Life Satisfaction and The Quality of Life in Infertile Woman

    PubMed Central

    Seyedi Asl, Seyed Teymur; Sadeghi, Kheirollah; Bakhtiari, Mitra; Ahmadi, Seyed Mojtaba; Nazari Anamagh, Alireza; Khayatan, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive psychotherapy is one of the new approaches in psychology which is innovated for treating psychological disorders and enhancing positive emotions. The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of the group positive psychotherapy on elevation of life satisfaction and quality of life in infertile women. Materials and Methods In a randomized trial study, Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and clinical interview were used in a pre-test post-test control group design. After analyzing the result of the questionnaire, 36 infertile women who showed signs of mild to moderate depression were randomly placed into two following groups: control (n=18) and intervention (n=18). Before the treatment, the members of both groups answered BDI-II, Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) and 12 item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). The intervention group received six sessions of group positive psychotherapy, but the treatment of the control group began six weeks after the intervention group. Results The results showed that the life satisfaction scores of the intervention group were significantly elevated from 22.66 in pre-test to 26.13 in post-test (P<0.001), while this improvement was not significant in the control group (P=0.405). The difference between life satisfaction scores of the intervention and the control groups was also significant (F=8.92, P=0.006). However, no significant change in the quality of life level of the intervention and control groups was observed (P=0.136). Conclusion Thus it can be deduced from the findings that this treatment method could be introduced as solution to increase the life satisfaction in infertile women, but not as a treatment for elevating their quality of life (Registration Number: IRCT2013042810063N3). PMID:27123207

  4. Psychotherapy of Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Angelo; Gaetano, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, psychotherapy has gained increasing acceptance as a major treatment option for mood disorders. Empirically supported treatments for major depression include cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), behavioural therapy and, to a lesser extent, short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy. Meta-analytic evidence suggests that psychotherapy has a significant and clinically relevant, though not large, effect on chronic forms of depression. Psychotherapy with chronic patients should take into account several important differences between patients with chronic and acute depression (identification with their depressive illness, more severe social skill deficits, persistent sense of hopelessness, need of more time to adapt to better circumstances). Regarding adolescent depression, the effectiveness of IPT and CBT is empirically supported. Adolescents require appropriate modifications of treatment (developmental approach to psychotherapy, involvement of parents in therapy). The combination of psychotherapy and medication has recently attracted substantial interest; the available evidence suggests that combined treatment has small but significant advantages over each treatment modality alone, and may have a protective effect against depression relapse or recurrence. Psychobiological models overcoming a rigid brain-mind dichotomy may help the clinician give patients a clear rationale for the combination of psychological and pharmacological treatment. In recent years, evidence has accumulated regarding the effectiveness of psychological therapies (CBT, family-focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, psychoeducation) as an adjunct to medication in bipolar disorder. These therapies share several common elements and there is considerable overlap in their actual targets. Psychological interventions were found to be useful not only in the treatment of bipolar depressive episodes, but in all phases of the disorder. PMID

  5. Interpersonal and group processes in long-term spaceflight crews: perspectives from social and organizational psychology.

    PubMed

    Dion, Kenneth L

    2004-07-01

    The issues of interpersonal and group processes in long-term spacecrews from the perspectives of social and organizational psychology are considered here. A contrast between the Amundsen vs. Scott expeditions to the South Pole 90 yrs. ago highlights the importance of personnel selection and attention to interpersonal and group dynamics in expeditions to extreme and dangerous environments, such as long-term spaceflights today. Under the rubric of personnel selection, some further psychological "select-in" and "select-out" criteria are suggested, among them implicit measures of human motivation, intergroup attitudes ("implicit" and "explicit" measures of prejudice, social dominance orientation, and right-wing authoritarianism), attachment styles, and dispositional hardiness. The situational interview and the idea of "selection for teams," drawn from current advances in organizational psychology, are recommended for selecting members for future spacecrews. Under the rubrics of interpersonal and group processes, the social relations model is introduced as a technique for modeling and understanding interdependence among spacecrew members and partialling out variance in behavioral and perceptual data into actor/perceiver, partner/target, and relationship components. Group cohesion as a multidimensional construct is introduced, along with a consideration of the groupthink phenomenon and its controversial link to cohesion. Group composition issues are raised with examples concerning cultural heterogeneity and gender composition. Cultural value dimensions, especially power distance and individual-collectivism, should be taken into account at both societal and psychological levels in long-term space missions. Finally, intergroup processes and language issues in crews are addressed. The recategorization induction from the common ingroup identity model is recommended as a possible intervention for overcoming and inhibiting intergroup biases within spacecrews and between space

  6. Psychotherapy in pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michelle R; Sourkes, Barbara

    2006-07-01

    Psychotherapy for children who have life-threatening illness is unique in its challenges and rich in its rewards. Most of these children enter into psychotherapy because of the stress engendered by the illness rather than more general intrapsychic or interpersonal concerns. The facilitation of psychological adjustment is a common goal and brought about by managing anxiety related to great un-certainty and anticipatory grief. Siblings and other family members are incorporated into the work as they play a pivotal role in sustaining and strengthening emotional resources. Critical losses.around control, personal identity, and interpersonal relationships are common themes throughout the therapeutic process.

  7. The effect of positive group psychotherapy on self-esteem and state anger among adolescents at Korean immigrant churches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jin

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to describe participants' experiences and examine the effects of group therapy on self-esteem and state anger among the adolescent children of immigrants in the US. A quasi-experimental design and qualitative and quantitative methods were used. Group therapy was conducted for 8weeks. Thirty-three adolescents took part in the study. Quantitative results revealed that group therapy improved self-esteem (t=2.222. p<.05) but not state anger. However, qualitative results suggested that group therapy helped improve interpersonal relationships and communication skills, the forgiveness of others, and the management of anger. Furthermore, group therapy utilizing positive psychology strategies improved self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, and communication skills.

  8. Interpersonal counselling in general practice.

    PubMed

    Judd, Fiona; Weissman, Myrna; Davis, Julian; Hodgins, Gene; Piterman, Leon

    2004-05-01

    Interpersonal counselling (IPC) derives from interpersonal psycho-therapy (IPT) but is briefer in the number and duration of sessions and is particularly suited to the primary care setting. While depression and other psychological symptoms are not necessarily 'caused' by interpersonal problems, they do occur in a social and interpersonal context. Problem areas commonly associated with the onset of depression are unresolved grief, interpersonal disputes, role transition and interpersonal deficits such as social isolation. This article discusses IPC and how it can be used in the general practice setting. The structure of IPC is of a brief treatment of six sessions, each with an explicit focus: assessment, education about the interaction between interpersonal relationships and psychological symptoms, identifying current stress areas and helping the patient deal with these more positively and termination of the IPC relationship. Interpersonal counselling can be utilised general practice to reduce psychological symptoms, restore morale, improve self esteem and the quality of the patient's social adjustment and interpersonal relationships.

  9. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of meaning-centered group psychotherapy in cancer survivors: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meaning-focused coping may be at the core of adequate adjustment to life after cancer. Cancer survivors who experience their life as meaningful are better adjusted, have better quality of life and psychological functioning. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy for Cancer Survivors (MCGP-CS) was designed to help patients to sustain or enhance a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MCGP-CS. Methods/Design Survivors diagnosed with cancer in the last 5 years and treated with curative intent, are recruited via several hospitals in the Netherlands. After screening, 168 survivors are randomly assigned to one of the three study arms: 1. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP-CS) 2. Supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) 3. Care as usual (CAU). Baseline assessment takes place before randomisation, with follow up assessments post-intervention and at 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Primary outcome is meaning making (PMP, PTGI, SPWB). Secondary outcome measures address quality of life (EORTC-30), anxiety and depression (HADS), hopelessness (BHS), optimism (LOT-R), adjustment to cancer (MAC), and costs (TIC-P, EQ-5D, PRODISQ). Discussion Meaning-focused coping is key to adjustment to life after cancer, however, there is a lack of evidence based psychological interventions in this area. Many cancer survivors experience feelings of loneliness and alienation, and have a need for peer support, therefore a group method in particular, can be beneficial for sustaining or enhancing a sense of meaning. If this MCGP-CS is effective for cancer survivors, it can be implemented in the practice of psycho-oncology care. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register, NTR3571 PMID:24467861

  10. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of meaning-centered group psychotherapy in cancer survivors: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Spek, Nadia; Vos, Joël; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Breitbart, William; Cuijpers, Pim; Knipscheer-Kuipers, Kitty; Willemsen, Vincent; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; van Asperen, Christi J; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2014-01-28

    Meaning-focused coping may be at the core of adequate adjustment to life after cancer. Cancer survivors who experience their life as meaningful are better adjusted, have better quality of life and psychological functioning. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy for Cancer Survivors (MCGP-CS) was designed to help patients to sustain or enhance a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MCGP-CS. Survivors diagnosed with cancer in the last 5 years and treated with curative intent, are recruited via several hospitals in the Netherlands. After screening, 168 survivors are randomly assigned to one of the three study arms: 1. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP-CS) 2. Supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) 3. Care as usual (CAU). Baseline assessment takes place before randomisation, with follow up assessments post-intervention and at 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Primary outcome is meaning making (PMP, PTGI, SPWB). Secondary outcome measures address quality of life (EORTC-30), anxiety and depression (HADS), hopelessness (BHS), optimism (LOT-R), adjustment to cancer (MAC), and costs (TIC-P, EQ-5D, PRODISQ). Meaning-focused coping is key to adjustment to life after cancer, however, there is a lack of evidence based psychological interventions in this area. Many cancer survivors experience feelings of loneliness and alienation, and have a need for peer support, therefore a group method in particular, can be beneficial for sustaining or enhancing a sense of meaning. If this MCGP-CS is effective for cancer survivors, it can be implemented in the practice of psycho-oncology care. Netherlands Trial Register, NTR3571.

  11. Social Identification and Interpersonal Communication in Computer-Mediated Communication: What You Do versus Who You Are in Virtual Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zuoming; Walther, Joseph B.; Hancock, Jeffrey T.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of interpersonal communication and intergroup identification on members' evaluations of computer-mediated groups. Participants (N= 256) in 64 four-person groups interacted through synchronous computer chat. Subgroup assignments to minimal groups instilled significantly greater in-group versus out-group…

  12. Social Identification and Interpersonal Communication in Computer-Mediated Communication: What You Do versus Who You Are in Virtual Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zuoming; Walther, Joseph B.; Hancock, Jeffrey T.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of interpersonal communication and intergroup identification on members' evaluations of computer-mediated groups. Participants (N= 256) in 64 four-person groups interacted through synchronous computer chat. Subgroup assignments to minimal groups instilled significantly greater in-group versus out-group…

  13. Circumplex Scales of Intergroup Goals: an interpersonal circle model of goals for interactions between groups.

    PubMed

    Locke, Kenneth D

    2014-04-01

    Six studies (N = 1,682) used the Circumplex Scales of Intergroup Goals (CSIG)--an inventory based on the interpersonal circle-to assess individuals' agentic and communal goals for interactions between groups (nations in Studies 1-4, organizations in Study 5, political parties in Study 6). Noteworthy findings included the following: People with stronger unagentic-and-uncommunal goals perceived other groups as dangers, were wary of intergroup negotiations, and sanctioned authoritarianism and inequality. People with stronger agentic-and-uncommunal goals proudly identified with their country and compatriots, disapproved of nations unlike their own, and preferred the conservative candidate in a national election. People with stronger communal-and-unagentic goals identified with people beyond their ingroup, and wanted their group to resolve intergroup conflicts by behaving cooperatively rather than competitively or aggressively. By providing an encompassing framework capable of organizing and integrating these types of diverse findings, the circumplex model can facilitate cumulative scientific progress.

  14. A sociohistorical view of group psychotherapy in the United States: the ideology of individualism and self-liberation.

    PubMed

    van Schoor, E P

    2000-10-01

    A deep strain of individualism permeates American culture, rooted in the political-economic ideology of capitalism. The ideal of a self-governing individual is promoted, independent from social, historical, and cultural forces, whose thoughts and emotions are located within the construct of a masterful self, ready to be filled and expanded. This article traces the influence of self-liberatory ideology in American group psychotherapy through the religious revivalist and Mental Hygiene movements. The "progressivism" of pioneering group theorists is examined in terms of revisionist psychology and self-liberatory practice. Psychodrama and T-groups are demonstrated to be precursors to the encounter group movement in which the belief in self-liberation reached its zenith. Early group analytic approaches are seen to eschew transpersonal and group dynamic processes.

  15. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy: An Effective Intervention for Improving Psychological Well-Being in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Applebaum, Allison; Kulikowski, Julia; Lichtenthal, Wendy G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the efficacy of meaning-centered group psychotherapy (MCGP) to reduce psychological distress and improve spiritual well-being in patients with advanced or terminal cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced cancer (N = 253) were randomly assigned to manualized eight-session interventions of either MCGP or supportive group psychotherapy (SGP). Patients were assessed before and after completing the treatment and 2 months after treatment. The primary outcome measures were spiritual well-being and overall quality of life, with secondary outcome measures assessing depression, hopelessness, desire for hastened death, anxiety, and physical symptom distress. Results Hierarchical linear models that included a priori covariates and only participants who attended ≥ three sessions indicated a significant group × time interaction for most outcome variables. Specifically, patients receiving MCGP showed significantly greater improvement in spiritual well-being and quality of life and significantly greater reductions in depression, hopelessness, desire for hastened death, and physical symptom distress compared with those receiving SGP. No group differences were observed for changes in anxiety. Analyses that included all patients, regardless of whether they attended any treatment sessions (ie, intent-to-treat analyses), and no covariates still showed significant treatment effects (ie, greater benefit for patients receiving MCGP v SGP) for quality of life, depression, and hopelessness but not for other outcome variables. Conclusion This large randomized controlled study provides strong support for the efficacy of MCGP as a treatment for psychological and existential or spiritual distress in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:25646186

  16. A randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and a group version of cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy for chronically depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Johannes; Schultze, Martin; Heidenreich, Thomas; Schramm, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has recently been proposed as a treatment option for chronic depression. The cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (CBASP) is the only approach specifically developed to date for the treatment of chronically depressed patients. The efficacy of MBCT plus treatment-as-usual (TAU), and CBASP (group version) plus TAU, was compared to TAU alone in a prospective, bicenter, randomized controlled trial. One hundred and six patients with a current DSM-IV defined major depressive episode and persistent depressive symptoms for more than 2 years were randomized to TAU only (N = 35), or to TAU with additional 8-week group therapy of either 8 sessions of MBCT (n = 36) or CBASP (n = 35). The primary outcome measure was the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (24-item HAM-D, Hamilton, 1967) at the end of treatment. Secondary outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) and measures of social functioning and quality of life. In the overall sample as well as at 1 treatment site, MBCT was no more effective than TAU in reducing depressive symptoms, although it was significantly superior to TAU at the other treatment site. CBASP was significantly more effective than TAU in reducing depressive symptoms in the overall sample and at both treatment sites. Both treatments had only small to medium effects on social functioning and quality of life. Further studies should inquire whether the superiority of CBASP in this trial might be explained by the more active, problem-solving, and interpersonal focus of CBASP. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Effects of Mindfulness-Based versus Interpersonal Process Group Intervention on Psychological Well-Being with a Clinical University Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Ciara; Bond, Lynne A.; London, Miv

    2013-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study compared a group mindfulness-based intervention (MI) with an interpersonal process (IP) group intervention and a no-treatment (NT) control condition in reducing psychological distress among 112 students at 2 universities. At postintervention, IP and MI group participants exhibited significant reductions in anxiety,…

  18. Effects of Mindfulness-Based versus Interpersonal Process Group Intervention on Psychological Well-Being with a Clinical University Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Ciara; Bond, Lynne A.; London, Miv

    2013-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study compared a group mindfulness-based intervention (MI) with an interpersonal process (IP) group intervention and a no-treatment (NT) control condition in reducing psychological distress among 112 students at 2 universities. At postintervention, IP and MI group participants exhibited significant reductions in anxiety,…

  19. Group processes and process evaluations in a new treatment setting: inpatient group psychotherapy followed by internet-chat aftercare groups.

    PubMed

    Haug, Severin; Sedway, Jan; Kordy, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about processes characterizing therapeutic Internet-chat groups, which offer a novel way of providing group therapy over distances. In this study group processes and group evaluations were examined in a treatment setting where face-to-face inpatient groups are followed by chat aftercare groups. For a sample of 121 patients who participated in both treatment modalities, group processes and group evaluations were modeled using hierarchical linear modeling. The group evaluations followed a consistent upward course from the beginning of therapy until the end of chat aftercare. For the process measures Activity and Emotional Reactivity, the initial scores at the beginning of the chat groups were lower than at the end of the inpatient treatment, but higher than at admission. During chat aftercare, Activity and Emotional Reactivity scores increased less than during the inpatient phase, but on average Activity and Emotional Reactivity were higher during Internet-chat aftercare. The predictive value of the acquaintance of the therapist from inpatient treatment and the course of group evaluations during inpatient treatment on the course of group evaluations during chat aftercare were examined.

  20. Psychotherapy Research

    PubMed Central

    Høglend, Per

    1999-01-01

    The last decade has seen progress in psychotherapy research, despite the methodological complexity in this field. However, empirical research has influenced training and clinical practice to only a limited extent. This article is a brief evaluation of trends and some findings in modern psychotherapy research that may influence professional psychotherapy training and practice. PMID:10523428

  1. Community perceptions of risk factors for interpersonal violence in townships in Cape Town, South Africa: A focus group study.

    PubMed

    Makanga, Prestige Tatenda; Schuurman, Nadine; Randall, Ellen

    2017-10-01

    Interpersonal violence is a major contributor to the burden of disease globally, and in South Africa, it is the leading cause of injury. There is an emerging consensus that the development of actionable policy and effective prevention strategies for interpersonal violence requires an understanding of the contextual matters that elevate risk for interpersonal violence. The objective of this study was to explore community perceptions of risks for interpersonal violence in five townships in Cape Town, South Africa, with high rates of violence. Focus group discussions were conducted with community members to identify key factors in that contributed to being either a perpetrator or victim of interpersonal violence. The ecological framework was used to classify the risk factors as occurring at individual, relationship, community or society levels. Some of the risk factors identified included alcohol abuse, poverty, informality of settlements and cultural norms. Differences in how each of these risk factors are expressed and experienced in the five communities are also elucidated. This approach enabled the collection of contextual community-based data that can complement conventional surveillance data in the development of relevant community-level strategies for interpersonal violence prevention.

  2. A small-scale study comparing the impact of psycho-education and exploratory psychotherapy groups on newcomers to a group for people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Cheston, Richard; Jones, Roy

    2009-05-01

    The importance of providing emotional support to people newly diagnosed as having dementia is now widely recognised. However, the evidence base for this work is limited, so that it is difficult to draw conclusions either about whether this form of work is effective or which form of intervention might be most suitable for people with dementia. This study compared the effectiveness of exploratory psychotherapy and psycho-educational group interventions for new group members. Participants had received a diagnosis of Dementia of the Alzheimer's type or a similar form of dementia and had a mild level of cognitive impairment. Interventions occurred in ten, weekly sessions with participants attending either a psychotherapy or a psycho-educational group, each of which were facilitated by the same team of clinicians, and had the same amount of therapist contact. Data relating to levels of mood was collected at the start and at the end of the group intervention from eight participants in each arm of the study. Data collection occurred independently from the intervention by a researcher who was blind to the form of intervention. There was a significant interaction between mode of therapy and levels of depression and a borderline significant interaction between therapy type and levels of anxiety. However, once the low affect level of participants in the psycho-educational groups was controlled for, differences between the interventions were non-significant. Although the results that can be drawn from this study are limited, nevertheless it supports previous research indicating that a 10-week group psychotherapy intervention can be effective in reducing levels of depression for people with a mild level of dementia.

  3. Relationship-focused psychotherapies for eating disorders come of age.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giorgio A

    2016-06-01

    This is a commentary on 3 case studies of relationship-focused therapies for eating disorders. The 3 approaches vary along a number of dimensions, but nevertheless share important similarities especially related to the role played by variables such as interpersonal problems and affect dysregulation. I briefly review research on interpersonal- and attachment-based models of eating disorders that provide the evidence-base for theories of therapy that are relationship-focused. The Interpersonal Psychotherapy case presented by Tanofsky-Kraff, Shomaker, Young, and Wilfley (2016) illustrates how a group context can facilitate change in key role disputes and role transitions in an adolescent at risk of developing an eating disorder later in her life. The Integrative-Dynamic Therapy case presented by Richards, Shingleton, Goldman, Siegel, and Thompson-Brenner (2016) is a novel sequential combination of cognitive-behavioral therapy followed by dynamic psychotherapy for a young adult with bulimia nervosa that likely reflects what most clinicians do in everyday practice. The Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy case presented by Lunn, Poulsen, and Daniel (2016) of a patient with severe personality pathology demonstrates how treatments for eating disorders sometimes must address complex attachment dysfunction, self-organization, and therapist countertransference in order to provide a useful therapeutic experience. Relationship-focused theories and therapies for eating disorders have come a long way over the past decades, thus providing therapists with a wider range of approaches that can be truly personalized to their clients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Mindfulness-and body-psychotherapy-based group treatment of chronic tinnitus: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tinnitus, the perception of sound in absence of an external acoustic source, impairs the quality of life in 2% of the population. Since in most cases causal treatment is not possible, the majority of therapeutic attempts aim at developing and strengthening individual coping and habituation strategies. Therapeutic interventions that incorporate training in mindfulness meditation have become increasingly popular in the treatment of stress-related disorders. Here we conducted a randomized, controlled clinical study to investigate the efficacy of a specific mindfulness- and body-psychotherapy based program in patients suffering from chronic tinnitus. Methods Thirty-six patients were enrolled in this pilot study. The treatment was specifically developed for tinnitus patients and is based on mindfulness and body psychotherapy. Treatment was performed as group therapy at two training weekends that were separated by an interval of 7 weeks (eleven hours/weekend) and in four further two-hour sessions (week 2, 9, 18 and 22). Patients were randomized to receive treatment either immediately or after waiting time, which served as a control condition. The primary study outcome was the change in tinnitus complaints as measured by the German Version of the Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ). Results ANOVA testing for the primary outcome showed a significant interaction effect time by group (F = 7.4; df = 1,33; p = 0.010). Post hoc t-tests indicated an amelioration of TQ scores from baseline to week 9 in both groups (intervention group: t = 6.2; df = 17; p < 0.001; control group: t = 2.5; df = 16; p = 0.023), but the intervention group improved more than the control group. Groups differed at week 7 and 9, but not at week 24 as far as the TQ score was concerned. Conclusions Our results suggest that this mindfulness- and body-psychotherapy-based approach is feasible in the treatment of tinnitus and merits further evaluation in clinical studies

  5. Technology in psychotherapy: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Newman, Michelle G

    2004-02-01

    All indicators suggest that technology may be an inherent part of psychotherapy delivery in the next decade. This article serves as an introduction to a special issue of Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session devoted to technology in psychotherapy. Articles in this series feature self-help Internet sites, computer-administered psychotherapy, adjunctive palmtop computer psychotherapy, virtual reality psychotherapy, interactive voice messaging systems, biofeedback via ambulatory physiological monitoring, synchronous and asynchronous online support groups, and use of electronic mail by psychotherapists. As illustrated by many of the articles in this issue, technological advances may extend psychotherapy beyond the therapy hour and increase psychotherapy dissemination, client motivation, and compliance. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A Systematic Review of the Combined Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Psychotherapy for Depression

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Brandon, Anna R.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). However, after acute phase treatment and initial remission, relapse rates are significant. Strategies to prolong remission include continuation phase ECT, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or their combinations. This systematic review synthesizes extant data regarding the combined use of psychotherapy with ECT for the treatment of patients with severe MDD and offers the hypothesis that augmenting ECT with depression-specific psychotherapy represents a promising strategy for future investigation. Methods The authors performed two independent searches in PsychInfo (1806 – 2009) and MEDLINE (1948 – 2009) using combinations of the following search terms: Electroconvulsive Therapy (including ECT, ECT therapy, electroshock therapy, EST, shock therapy) and Psychotherapy (including cognitive behavioral, interpersonal, group, psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, individual, eclectic, and supportive). We included in this review a total of six articles (English language) that mentioned ECT and psychotherapy in the abstract, and provided a case report, series, or clinical trial. We examined the articles for data related to ECT and psychotherapy treatment characteristics, cohort characteristics, and therapeutic outcome. Results Although research over the past seven decades documenting the combined use of ECT and psychotherapy is limited, the available evidence suggests that testing this combination has promise and may confer additional, positive functional outcomes. Conclusions Significant methodological variability in ECT and psychotherapy procedures, heterogeneous patient cohorts, and inconsistent outcome measures prevent strong conclusions; however, existing research supports the need for future investigations of combined ECT and psychotherapy in well-designed, controlled clinical studies. Depression-specific psychotherapy approaches may need special

  7. GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR CRIMINAL OFFENDERS—A Program for Parolees Under Social-Psychological Coercion

    PubMed Central

    Labin, Albert; Eaton, Joseph W.

    1958-01-01

    Selected prisoners, most of them with severe character disorders, are permitted to serve the remaining portion of their sentence on parole in the community on condition that they be patients in psychotherapy at a psychiatric clinic created in 1953 for this purpose. Nearly all the patients begin without personal motivation for such treatment. Attendance has been attained because parole officers are assigned to the task of enforcing attendance. Coercion can bring these reluctant patients to expose themselves to treatment, but staff members then have the task to overcome hostility, combat extensive rationalizations, and transform an initially poor rapport into patient participation in working through major personality change. This clinic provides an interesting laboratory for the development of a psychiatric treatment program for adults who have not responded well to a great variety of forms of correctional care. PMID:13489509

  8. Factors associated with attrition from a randomized controlled trial of meaning-centered group psychotherapy for patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Allison J.; Lichtenthal, Wendy G.; Pessin, Hayley A.; Radomski, Julia N.; Gökbayrak, N. Simay; Katz, Aviva M.; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective The generalizability of palliative care intervention research is often limited by high rates of study attrition. This study examined factors associated with attrition from a randomized controlled trial comparing meaning-centered group psychotherapy (MCGP), an intervention designed to help advanced cancer patients sustain or enhance their sense of meaning to the supportive group psychotherapy (SGP), a standardized support group. Methods Patients with advanced solid tumor cancers (n = 153) were randomized to eight sessions of either the MCGP or SGP. They completed assessments of psychosocial, spiritual, and physical well-being pretreatment, midtreatment, and 2 months post-treatment. Attrition was assessed in terms of the percent of participants who failed to complete these assessments, and demographic, psychiatric, medical, and study-related correlates of attrition were examined for the participants in each of these categories. Results The rates of attrition at these time points were 28.1%, 17.7%, and 11.1%, respectively; 43.1% of the participants (66 of 153) completed the entire study. The most common reason for dropout was patients feeling too ill. Attrition rates did not vary significantly between study arms. The participants who dropped out pretreatment reported less financial concerns than post-treatment dropouts, and the participants who dropped out of the study midtreatment had poorer physical health than treatment completers. There were no other significant associations between attrition and any demographic, medical, psychiatric, or study-related variables. Conclusions These findings highlight the challenge of maintaining advanced cancer patients in longitudinal research and suggest the need to consider alternative approaches (e.g., telemedicine) for patients who might benefit from group interventions but are too ill to travel. PMID:21751295

  9. Spirituality and meaning in supportive care: spirituality- and meaning-centered group psychotherapy interventions in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, William

    2002-05-01

    Existential and spiritual issues are at the frontier of new clinical and research focus in palliative and supportive care of cancer patients. As concepts of adequate supportive care expand beyond a focus on pain and physical symptom control, existential and spiritual issues such as meaning, hope and spirituality in general have received increased attention from supportive care clinicians and clinical researchers. This paper reviews the topics of spirituality and end-of-life care, defines spirituality, and suggests measures of spirituality that deal with two of its main components: faith/religious beliefs and meaning/spiritual well-being. These two constructs of spirituality are reviewed in terms of their role in supportive care. Finally, a review of existing psychotherapeutic interventions for spiritual suffering are reviewed and a novel meaning-centered group psychotherapy for advanced cancer patients is described.

  10. Social support, posttraumatic cognitions, and PTSD: The influence of family, friends, and a close other in an interpersonal and non-interpersonal trauma group.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Matthew J; Eddinger, Jasmine; Henschel, Aisling V; Dodson, Thomas S; Tran, Han N; Beck, J Gayle

    2015-10-01

    Research has suggested that social support can shape posttraumatic cognitions and PTSD. However, research has yet to compare the influence of separate domains of support on posttraumatic cognitions. Multiple-group path analysis was used to examine a model in a sample of 170 victims of intimate partner violence and 208 motor vehicle accident victims in which support from friends, family, and a close other were each predicted to influence posttraumatic cognitions, which were in turn predicted to influence PTSD. Analyses revealed that support from family and friends were each negatively correlated with posttraumatic cognitions, which in turn were positively associated with PTSD. Social support from a close other was not associated with posttraumatic cognitions. No significant differences in the model were found between trauma groups. Findings identify which relationships are likely to influence posttraumatic cognitions and are discussed with regard to interpersonal processes in the development and maintenance of PTSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychotherapy for panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Shear, M K; Weiner, K

    1997-01-01

    Although medications and panic-focused cognitive behavior therapy are considered standard treatments for panic disorder, other types of psychotherapy may also be helpful. Many patients with panic disorder have some residual underlying vulnerability, as suggested by the continued occurrence of symptoms. These patients may benefit from a more broad-based psychotherapy, as might those in whom comorbid symptoms occur. Some patients are unable or choose not to participate in a structured prescriptive treatment requiring homework. Our psychotherapeutic approach to treating panic disorder, called emotion-focused treatment, targets identifying and managing negative emotions, especially as they relate to common psychological themes of fear of separation, fear of constriction, and the need for interpersonal control.

  12. The power of the spoken word in life, psychiatry, and psychoanalysis--a contribution to interpersonal psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Lothane, Zvi

    2007-09-01

    Starting with a 1890 essay by Freud, the author goes in search of an interpersonal psychology native to Freud's psychoanalytic method and to in psychoanalysis and the interpersonal method in psychiatry. This derives from the basic interpersonal nature of the human situation in the lives of individuals and social groups. Psychiatry, the healing of the soul, and psychotherapy, therapy of the soul, are examined from the perspective of the communication model, based on the essential interpersonal function of language and the spoken word: persons addressing speeches to themselves and to others in relations, between family members, others in society, and the professionals who serve them. The communicational model is also applied in examining psychiatric disorders and psychiatric diagnoses, as well as psychodynamic formulas, which leads to a reformulation of the psychoanalytic therapy as a process. A plea is entered to define psychoanalysis as an interpersonal discipline, in analogy to Sullivan's interpersonal psychiatry.

  13. Interpersonal problem areas and alexithymia in adolescent girls with loss of control eating.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sarah Shafer; Elliott, Camden; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M; Shomaker, Lauren B; Hannallah, Louise; Field, Sara E; Young, Jami F; Sbrocco, Tracy; Wilfley, Denise E; Yanovski, Jack A; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the links among interpersonal problem areas, depression, and alexithymia in adolescent girls at high risk for excessive weight gain and binge eating disorder. Participants were 56 girls (Mage = 14.30, SD = 1.56; 53% non-Hispanic White) with a body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) between the 75th and 97th percentiles (MBMI z = 1.57, SD = 0.32). By design, all participants reported loss of control eating patterns in the past month. Adolescents were individually interviewed prior to participating in a group interpersonal psychotherapy obesity and eating disorder prevention program, termed IPT for the prevention of excessive weight gain (IPT-WG). Participants' interpersonal problem areas were coded by trained raters. Participants also completed questionnaires assessing depression and alexithymia. Primary interpersonal problem areas were categorized as interpersonal deficits [as defined in the eating disorders (ED) literature] (n = 29), role disputes (n = 22), or role transitions (n = 5). Girls with interpersonal deficits-ED had greater depressive symptoms and alexithymia than girls with role disputes (p's ≤ 0.01). However, girls with role transitions did not differ from girls with interpersonal deficits-ED or role disputes. Interpersonal problem area had an indirect association with depression via alexithymia; interpersonal deficits-ED were related to greater alexithymia, which in turn, was related to greater depressive symptoms (p = 0.01). Among girls at risk for excess weight gain and eating disorders, those with interpersonal deficits-ED appear to have greater distress as compared to girls with role disputes or role transitions. Future research is required to elucidate the impact of interpersonal problem areas on psychotherapy outcomes. © 2013.

  14. Interpersonal Problem Areas and Alexithymia in Adolescent Girls with Loss of Control Eating

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Sarah Shafer; Elliott, Camden; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Hannallah, Louise; Field, Sara E.; Young, Jami F.; Sbrocco, Tracy; Wilfley, Denise E.; Yanovski, Jack A.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the links among interpersonal problem areas, depression, and alexithymia in adolescent girls at high-risk for excessive weight gain and binge eating disorder. Participants were 56 girls (Mage = 14.30, SD = 1.56; 53% non-Hispanic White) with a body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) between the 75th and 97th percentiles (MBMI-z = 1.57, SD = 0.32). By design, all participants reported loss of control eating patterns in the past month. Adolescents were individually interviewed prior to participating in a group interpersonal psychotherapy obesity and eating disorder prevention program, termed IPT for the prevention of excessive weight gain (IPT-WG). Participants’ interpersonal problem areas were coded by trained raters. Participants also completed questionnaires assessing depression and alexithymia. Primary interpersonal problem areas were categorized as interpersonal deficits (as defined in the eating disorders (ED) literature) (n = 29), role disputes (n = 22), or role transitions (n = 5). Girls with interpersonal deficits-ED had greater depressive symptoms and alexithymia than girls with role disputes (ps ≤ 0.01). However, girls with role transitions did not differ from girls with interpersonal deficits-ED or role disputes. Interpersonal problem area had an indirect association with depression via alexithymia; interpersonal deficits-ED were related to greater alexithymia, which in turn, was related to greater depressive symptoms (p = 0.01). Among girls at-risk for excess weight gain and eating disorders, those with interpersonal deficits-ED appear to have greater distress as compared to girls with role disputes or role transitions. Future research is required to elucidate the impact of interpersonal problem areas on psychotherapy outcomes. PMID:24139852

  15. The Psychotherapy Process with Adolescents: A First Pilot Study and Preliminary Comparisons between Different Therapeutic Modalities Using the "Adolescent Psychotherapy Q-Set"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bychkova, Tetyana; Hillman, Saul; Midgley, Nick; Schneider, Celeste

    2011-01-01

    An innovative methodology is presented for describing the therapeutic processes involved in five types of adolescent treatments: psychoanalysis, psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy, mentalisation-based treatment and interpersonal psychotherapy. Using the "Adolescent Psychotherapy Q-Set" (APQ), 18 experienced clinicians…

  16. The Psychotherapy Process with Adolescents: A First Pilot Study and Preliminary Comparisons between Different Therapeutic Modalities Using the "Adolescent Psychotherapy Q-Set"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bychkova, Tetyana; Hillman, Saul; Midgley, Nick; Schneider, Celeste

    2011-01-01

    An innovative methodology is presented for describing the therapeutic processes involved in five types of adolescent treatments: psychoanalysis, psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy, mentalisation-based treatment and interpersonal psychotherapy. Using the "Adolescent Psychotherapy Q-Set" (APQ), 18 experienced clinicians…

  17. Power Politics of Family Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Carl A.

    It is postulated that the standard framework for psychotherapy, a cooperative transference neurosis, does not validly carry over to the successful psychotherapy of a two-generation family group. In many disturbed families, the necessary and sufficient dynamics for change must be initiated, controlled, and augmented by a group dynamic power-play,…

  18. Shape of the self-concept clarity change during group psychotherapy predicts the outcome: an empirical validation of the theoretical model of the self-concept change

    PubMed Central

    Styła, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-Concept Clarity (SCC) describes the extent to which the schemas of the self are internally integrated, well defined, and temporally stable. This article presents a theoretical model that describes how different shapes of SCC change (especially stable increase and “V” shape) observed in the course of psychotherapy are related to the therapy outcome. Linking the concept of Jean Piaget and the dynamic systems theory, the study postulates that a stable SCC increase is needed for the participants with a rather healthy personality structure, while SCC change characterized by a “V” shape or fluctuations is optimal for more disturbed patients. Method: Correlational study in a naturalistic setting with repeated measurements (M = 5.8) was conducted on the sample of 85 patients diagnosed with neurosis and personality disorders receiving intensive eclectic group psychotherapy under routine inpatient conditions. Participants filled in the Self-Concept Clarity Scale (SCCS), Symptoms' Questionnaire KS-II, and Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006 at the beginning and at the end of the course of psychotherapy. The SCCS was also administered every 2 weeks during psychotherapy. Results: As hypothesized, among the relatively healthiest group of patients the stable SCC increase was related to positive treatment outcome, while more disturbed patients benefited from the fluctuations and “V” shape of SCC change. Conclusions: The findings support the idea that for different personality dispositions either a monotonic increase or transient destabilization of SCC is a sign of a good treatment prognosis. PMID:26579001

  19. Shape of the self-concept clarity change during group psychotherapy predicts the outcome: an empirical validation of the theoretical model of the self-concept change.

    PubMed

    Styła, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    Self-Concept Clarity (SCC) describes the extent to which the schemas of the self are internally integrated, well defined, and temporally stable. This article presents a theoretical model that describes how different shapes of SCC change (especially stable increase and "V" shape) observed in the course of psychotherapy are related to the therapy outcome. Linking the concept of Jean Piaget and the dynamic systems theory, the study postulates that a stable SCC increase is needed for the participants with a rather healthy personality structure, while SCC change characterized by a "V" shape or fluctuations is optimal for more disturbed patients. Correlational study in a naturalistic setting with repeated measurements (M = 5.8) was conducted on the sample of 85 patients diagnosed with neurosis and personality disorders receiving intensive eclectic group psychotherapy under routine inpatient conditions. Participants filled in the Self-Concept Clarity Scale (SCCS), Symptoms' Questionnaire KS-II, and Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006 at the beginning and at the end of the course of psychotherapy. The SCCS was also administered every 2 weeks during psychotherapy. As hypothesized, among the relatively healthiest group of patients the stable SCC increase was related to positive treatment outcome, while more disturbed patients benefited from the fluctuations and "V" shape of SCC change. The findings support the idea that for different personality dispositions either a monotonic increase or transient destabilization of SCC is a sign of a good treatment prognosis.

  20. [Reality of treatment in psychotherapy: Results of a survey of German psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Laux, G; Sander, K; Artmann, S; Dreher, J; Lenz, J; Hauth, I

    2015-05-01

    Since the introduction of the qualification as specialist for psychiatry and psychotherapy, in addition to psychopharmacotherapy psychotherapy is an integral component of the treatment of mentally ill people. A survey was carried out to evaluate the reality of clinical routine use of psychotherapy in German psychiatric hospitals. Between October 2011 and March 2012 German hospitals of psychiatry and psychotherapy were contacted by the head organization, the conference of national directors (Bundesdirektorenkonferenz), to participate in a survey regarding the application of psychotherapy in the real clinical world of daily treatment. With an anonymous questionnaire, data were requested as either a printed form or online version. Data from 25 psychiatric hospitals in the year 2010 could be analysed (average number of beds 300 of which 53 were for psychosomatic/psychotherapeutic patients) and a total of 87,000 inpatients were treated whereby 34 % were diagnosed as F1 addictive disorders and 24 % as F3 affective disorders. More than 80 % of the hospitals applied group therapies of relaxation, cognitive behavior therapy, social competence training and specific techniques, such as dialectic-behavior therapy. As individual treatment methods, patients with depressive disorders were treated with cognitive behavior therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy or psychodynamic therapy in more than 50 % of the cases. Relaxation techniques were offered in most cases by the nursing staff, behavior therapy by psychologists and physicians and psychodynamic therapy mainly by psychiatrists.

  1. Interpersonal sensitivity, coping ways and automatic thoughts of nursing students before and after a cognitive-behavioral group counseling program.

    PubMed

    Hiçdurmaz, Duygu; Öz, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide optimal professional care to patients, nurses must possess a positive self-image and professional identity. High interpersonal sensitivity, coping problems and dysfunctional automatic thoughts can prevent nursing students to be self-confident and successful nurses. Helping nursing students experiencing interpersonal sensitivity problems via cognitive-behavioral counseling strategies can contribute to shape good nurses. This study aims to evaluate interpersonal sensitivity, ways of coping and automatic thoughts of nursing students before and after a cognitive behavioral group counseling program. An intervention study with 43 nursing students. Measurements were done before the counseling program, at the end of the program and 4.5months after the program. The students were chosen from a faculty of nursing in Turkey. 43 second and third year nursing students who were experiencing interpersonal sensitivity problems constituted the sample. Brief Symptom Inventory, Ways of Coping Inventory and Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire were used for data collection. The students' scores of "interpersonal sensitivity", "hopeless" and "submissive" copings and "automatic thoughts" were significantly lower at the end of and 4.5months after the program than the scores before the program (Interpersonal sensitivity F=52.903, p=0.001; hopeless approach F=19.213, p=0.001; submissive approach F=4.326, p=0.016; automatic thoughts F=45.471, p=0.001). Scores of "self-confident", "optimistic" and "seeking social support" copings were higher at the end of and 4.5months after the program than the scores before the program (Self confident F=11.640, p=0.001; optimistic F=10.860, p=0.001; seeking social support F=10.411, p=0.001). This program helped the students to have better results at interpersonal sensitivity, ways of coping and automatic thoughts at the end of and 4.5 months after the program. We have reached the aim of the study. We suggest that such counseling programs

  2. Brief Psychotherapy for Maternal Depression: Impact on Mothers and Children.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Holly A; Cyranowski, Jill M; Cheng, Yu; Zuckoff, Allan; Brent, David A; Markowitz, John C; Martin, Stacy; Amole, Marlissa C; Ritchey, Fiona; Frank, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    Two-generation studies demonstrate that treating maternal depression benefits school-age children. Although mothers prefer psychotherapy to medication, little is known about how psychotherapy for maternal depression affects offspring, especially in very high-risk families in which both mothers and children concurrently meet syndromal criteria for psychiatric disorders. This trial evaluated the effects of 2 brief psychotherapies for maternal depression on very high-risk families. Mothers with major depressive disorder were randomly assigned to 9 sessions of either brief interpersonal psychotherapy for mothers (IPT-MOMS; n = 85) or brief supportive psychotherapy (BSP; n = 83). Independent assessors evaluated mothers and their children, ages 7 to 18 years, diagnosed with at least 1 internalizing disorder, every 3 months over the course of 1 year. Symptoms and functioning of mothers and children improved significantly over time, with no between-group differences. However, children of mothers assigned to BSP had more outpatient mental health visits and were more likely to receive antidepressant medication. Mothers reported greater satisfaction with IPT-MOMS than BSP. Improvement in mothers' depressive symptoms was associated with improvement in child functioning in time-lagged fashion, with children improving 3 to 6 months after mothers improved. Antidepressant medication use and number of mental health visits received by children did not affect outcomes. IPT-MOMS and BSP demonstrated comparable beneficial effects on maternal depression. Children's functioning improved following maternal improvement, independent of youths' treatment. Children of mothers randomized to IPT-MOMS, compared with BSP, achieved comparable outcomes despite less follow-up treatment. Observation of lagged association between maternal improvement and change in child functioning should influence treatment planning for families. Clinical trial registration information-Psychotherapy for Depressed

  3. The level of emotional intelligence for patients with bronchial asthma and a group psychotherapy plan in 7 steps.

    PubMed

    Ropoteanu, Andreea-Corina

    2011-01-01

    Strong emotions, either positive or negative, as well as vulnerability to stress are often major factors in triggering, maintaining and emphasizing the symptoms of bronchial asthma. On a group of 99 patients suffering from moderately and severely persistent allergic bronchial asthma for more than 2 years, I applied a situational test of emotional intelligence, the NEO PI-R personality test provided by D&D Consultants and I also elaborated a psychosocial test form of asthma by which I evaluated the frequency of physical symptoms, the intensity of negative emotional symptoms arisen during or subsequent to the crisis and the level of the patients' quality of life. I have presumed first that if the level of the emotional intelligence grew, this fact would have a significant positive influence on controlling the negative emotional symptoms arisen during or subsequent to the crisis and on patients' quality of life. This was invalidated, the correlations between the mentioned variables being insignificant. Secondly, I have presumed the existence of positive significant correlations between the emotional intelligence coefficient and the personality dimensions: extraversion, openness, conscientiousness and a negative significant correlation between the emotional intelligence coefficient and the dimension neuroticism. This presumption was totally confirmed. Finally, we proposed a group psychotherapy plan in 7 steps for asthmatic patients that has as main objectives to improve symptoms and therefore the patients' quality of life.

  4. [Inpatient psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Spitzer, C; Rullkötter, N; Dally, A

    2016-01-01

    In German-speaking countries inpatient psychotherapy plays a major role in the mental healthcare system. Due to its characteristic features, i. e. multiprofessionalism, multimodality and method integration, the inpatient approach represents a unique and independent type of psychotherapy. In order to be helpful, the manifold verbal and non-verbal methods need to be embedded into an overall treatment plan. Additionally, the therapeutic milieu of the hospital represents an important effective factor and its organization requires a more active construction. The indications for inpatient psychotherapy are not only based on the mental disorder but also on illness, setting and healthcare system-related criteria. In integrative concepts, the multiprofessional team is a key component with many functions. The effectiveness of psychotherapeutic hospital treatment has been proven by meta-analysis studies; however, 20-30% of patients do not benefit from inpatient psychotherapy and almost 13% drop-out prematurely.

  5. A comparative study on the effectiveness of positive psychotherapy and group cognitive-behavioral therapy for the patients suffering from major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Asgharipoor, Negar; Asgharnejad Farid, Aliasghar; Arshadi, Hamidreza; Sahebi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this experimental study is evaluating the effectiveness of two different approaches towards the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD): Positive-oriented psychotherapy and group cognitive-behavior therapy. Eighteen out-patients suffering from major depression were randomly divided into two groups to be treated according to either of these two approaches. Both groups undertook the treatments for 12 weeks. All the subjects were tested by Beck Depression Inventory, Subjective Wellbeing Scale, Oxford test of Happiness, and the scale of Subjective Units of Distress before and after the treatments. The results show significant differences between the two groups in terms of the variables of happiness and mental distress, suggesting that effectiveness of positive psychotherapy is more than cognitive-behavioral therapy in increasing happiness. These two approaches were significantly different in neither decreasing the acuteness of depression symptoms nor increasing subjective wellbeing. As a whole, the results of this comparative study indicate that positive psychotherapy is more effective in increasing happiness among MDD patients.

  6. Doing Anger Differently: Two Controlled Trials of Percussion Group Psychotherapy for Adolescent Reactive Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Michael; Startup, Mike

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates efficacy and effectiveness of "Doing Anger Differently" (DAD), a group treatment for reactively aggressive 12-15 year old males. DAD uses percussion exercises to aid treatment. Study 1 compared a ten-week treatment with a waitlist control at pre, post and 6 month (treatment group only) follow-up. Study 2 replicated Study 1,…

  7. Doing Anger Differently: Two Controlled Trials of Percussion Group Psychotherapy for Adolescent Reactive Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Michael; Startup, Mike

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates efficacy and effectiveness of "Doing Anger Differently" (DAD), a group treatment for reactively aggressive 12-15 year old males. DAD uses percussion exercises to aid treatment. Study 1 compared a ten-week treatment with a waitlist control at pre, post and 6 month (treatment group only) follow-up. Study 2 replicated Study 1,…

  8. [Group psychotherapy. Operative groups at the Instituto del servico de seguridad Social de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE)].

    PubMed

    Margolis, J

    1977-01-01

    An operational group is defined; how operational groups theory was applied at an ISSSTE clinic is described. It is underlined how operational groups promote change around the corerstone of a "task". The vicissitudes of an operational group with four psychiatrists who worked in community psychiatry at the ISSSTE, are described.

  9. European Psychiatric Association Guidance on psychotherapy in chronic depression across Europe.

    PubMed

    Jobst, A; Brakemeier, E-L; Buchheim, A; Caspar, F; Cuijpers, P; Ebmeier, K P; Falkai, P; Jan van der Gaag, R; Gaebel, W; Herpertz, S; Kurimay, T; Sabaß, L; Schnell, K; Schramm, E; Torrent, C; Wasserman, D; Wiersma, J; Padberg, F

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic depression (CD) by definition respond less well to standard forms of psychotherapy and are more likely to be high utilizers of psychiatric resources. Therefore, the aim of this guidance paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of current psychotherapy for CD. The evidence of efficacy is critically reviewed and recommendations for clinical applications and research are given. We performed a systematic literature search to identify studies on psychotherapy in CD, evaluated the retrieved documents and developed evidence tables and recommendations through a consensus process among experts and stakeholders. We developed 5 recommendations which may help providers to select psychotherapeutic treatment options for this patient group. The EPA considers both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy to be effective in CD and recommends both approaches. The best effect is achieved by combined treatment with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, which should therefore be the treatment of choice. The EPA recommends psychotherapy with an interpersonal focus (e.g. the Cognitive Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy [CBASP]) for the treatment of CD and a personalized approach based on the patient's preferences. The DSM-5 nomenclature of persistent depressive disorder (PDD), which includes CD subtypes, has been an important step towards a more differentiated treatment and understanding of these complex affective disorders. Apart from dysthymia, ICD-10 still does not provide a separate entity for a chronic course of depression. The differences between patients with acute episodic depression and those with CD need to be considered in the planning of treatment. Specific psychotherapeutic treatment options are recommended for patients with CD. Patients with chronic forms of depression should be offered tailored psychotherapeutic treatments that address their specific needs and deficits. Combination treatment with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy is the first

  10. Group psychotherapy in an acute inpatient setting: techniques that nourish self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Kurek-Ovshinsky, C

    1991-01-01

    This article describes a conceptual model and reparative techniques used in group therapy in a 15-bed acute inpatient psychiatric unit located in a 340-bed metropolitan trauma center. The group meets daily for 1 hr. The population reflects patients suffering from chronic mental illness and polysubstance abuse and those adapting to such complex medical problems as AIDS, spinal cord injuries, burns, and so forth. Using Roy and Roberts's (1981) adaptive modes of self-concept and interdependency, I describe how narcissism, the psychic structure designed to protect, repair, and restore the wounded self-esteem (Stolorow & Lachman, 1980), sustains group adaptations at the pregroup level. Lonergon (1980) described the pregroup phase as "parallel talk." It is similar to "parallel play" and generally reflects the developmental arrest or adaptive regression of individual group members. At this stage, group membership consists of a collection of individuals who use each other as an audience to whom they can express their narcissistic needs. Often, repeated blows to the patient's self-esteem result in a pervasive sense of powerlessness and helplessness. Patients gradually lose touch with their "real self" and become increasingly dependent on external cues to determine their feelings and behavior. The adaptive narcissistic need to depend on other people to feel whole suggests that group therapy can be a powerful tool in treating patients who suffer profound wounds to the self-esteem, prevalent in the population described. The reparative techniques used by the group therapist to initiate group involvement require the ability to tolerate and value a continuous pregroup phase. The patient with narcissistic behavior both craves and undermines attempts at group involvement.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Video self-portraits: a novel approach to group psychotherapy with young adults.

    PubMed

    Cox, E; Lothstein, L M

    1989-04-01

    A group therapy model was formulated for exploring the intersubjective processes of adolescents and young adults whose group bonds had been fragmented by their severe emotional illnesses. The model involved having adolescents and young adults who were psychiatric inpatients make video self-portraits; that is, videotapes which focused on various aspects of their emotional pathology. These tapes were then presented before a larger group of nine patients for discussion. The video team method is shown to aid in self-disclosure and facilitate the working through of severe emotional conflicts in this age group. It is an especially useful method with more severely disturbed patients for whom narcissistic self pathology is a prominent feature.

  12. The Coup: Activist Students Takeover of a Psychotherapy Group in a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskowitz, Joel A.; Defries, Zira

    1973-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to show the difference in the course of treatment of two successive groups of university students which functioned significantly differently in the manner and degree to which they examined defenses and manifested transference problems. (Author)

  13. Positive psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Martin E P; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C

    2006-11-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported them to be "life-changing." Delivered on the Web, positive psychology exercises relieved depressive symptoms for at least 6 months compared with placebo interventions, the effects of which lasted less than a week. In severe depression, the effects of these Web exercises were particularly striking. This address reports two preliminary studies: In the first, PPT delivered to groups significantly decreased levels of mild-to-moderate depression through 1-year follow-up. In the second, PPT delivered to individuals produced higher remission rates than did treatment as usual and treatment as usual plus medication among outpatients with major depressive disorder. Together, these studies suggest that treatments for depression may usefully be supplemented by exercises that explicitly increase positive emotion, engagement, and meaning. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. [Latent classes of personality disorders: group comparisons and course of psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Lange, Julia; Schöttke, Henning

    2013-09-01

    Using latent class analysis the Personality Disorder Screening (PDS) classifies patients into 4 groups: personality disordered (PD) patients (PDS+), healthy patients (PDS -) and 2 hybrid classes with exaggerated personality styles (histrionic/dependent and avoidant/obsessive-compulsive). The present study investigated if the PDS groups differ concerning sociodemographic and clinical variables, psychological distress and treatment outcome. We analyzed the PDS response patterns of 555 outpatients. PDS+ group membership is associated with typical PD characteristics, chronic depression and a high level of general psychological distress. Patients of both hybrid classes are found to show average psychological distress. The treatment was effective for all patients. Membership in the histrionic/dependent hybrid class is associated with early drop out from outpatient therapy.

  15. Youth psychotherapy outcomes in usual care and predictors of outcome group membership.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ashley M; Jensen-Doss, Amanda

    2017-02-01

    Improving mental health services for youth in usual care (UC) is one of the most critical issues in mental health services research. Identification of change groups in UC (e.g., recovery, improvement, no response, deterioration) can help researchers gain a richer understanding of UC and facilitate efforts to tailor UC to individuals who may not be responding well to treatment. This study used the reliable change index (RCI; Jacobson & Truax, 1991) to examine change groups within youth UC on two parent report outcome measures-symptom severity and functioning-using a large, naturalistic sample of youth (N = 672) treated in UC served at four clinics operating under a large county-wide public mental health authority. Results indicated that the majority of youth exhibited no reliable change. Furthermore, findings revealed low concordance between how youth were classified on both outcome measures. Multinomial logistic regression was used to predict group membership from an expanded set of youth demographic and clinical variables. Findings indicated that baseline problem severity and lower baseline functioning generally predicted higher likelihood of being classified into a more positive change group. Older age predicted increased likelihood of being in a more positive change group, while diagnosis of an internalizing disorder or serious mental illness (SMI) both predicted greater likelihood of falling into a more negative change group. Overall, these results suggest the importance of a more nuanced understanding of change in UC, as well as work aimed at identifying targets for improvement for youth who are not responding well. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Time-limited group psychotherapy for patients with personality disorders: outcomes and dropouts.

    PubMed

    Budman, S H; Demby, A; Soldz, S; Merry, J

    1996-07-01

    This study reports on the time-limited (18-month long) group therapy of 49 outpatients, most of whom were diagnosed with DSM-III-R, Axis II personality disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 1987). Although many patients did not complete the full course of treatment, those who did experienced many areas of change. Completers reported substantial changes in self-esteem, symptomatology, and diagnosability on Axis II. This type of group treatment appears to be a promising mode of intervention for those with personality disorders.

  17. Promising psychotherapies for personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Hadjipavlou, George; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2010-04-01

    To provide a narrative review of recent research on the psychotherapeutic treatment of patients with personality disorders (PDs). We conducted PubMed and PsycINFO searches of recently published articles that reported on the treatment outcomes of psychotherapies for PDs. Our focus was on studies that used randomized controlled trial (RCT) methodology. The search period was from January 2006 to June 2009. The effectiveness of various psychotherapy treatment packages for PDs is well supported by favourable results from RCTs. Beneficial effects of psychotherapy included reduced symptomatology, improved social and interpersonal functioning, reduced frequency of maladaptive behaviours, and decreased hospitalization. Equivalent effects among the interventions we compared were common. Many of the treatments studied required only limited training by therapists. Most studies were focused on treating patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Some findings were suggestive of psychotherapy being cost-effective; however, few studies actually included formal cost analyses. Only one study included follow-up of treated patients beyond 1-year posttreatment. There is strong support for the use of psychotherapy to treat patients with PDs. However, most of the evidence is limited to BPD. The findings of recent studies hold promise for training and practice. Future research should attend to identification of appropriate patient-treatment matches, elucidation of active treatment ingredients, and illumination of factors that are common among treatments that account for their equivalent effects.

  18. Dreams of Deceased Children and Countertransference in the Group Psychotherapy of Bereaved Mothers: Clinical Illustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begovac, Branka; Begovac, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents, in the form of a clinical illustration, a therapeutic group of bereaved mothers with special reference to their dreams about their deceased children. The article presents descriptions of the emotions of these mothers and countertransference feelings, a topic that, to our knowledge, has not been frequently studied. The group…

  19. Lazarus and Group Psychotherapy: AIDS in the Era of Protease Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gushue, George V.; Brazaitis, Sarah J.

    2003-01-01

    A new class of medications, protease inhibitors, has dramatically improved the health of many people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). This development has had a major impact on the lives of those affected by HIV/AIDS. This article considers how a group is affected by the larger systems of…

  20. Problem-Solving in Retarded Adolescents and Young Adults: Findings of a Group Psychotherapy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyder, Dietrich W.; And Others

    To compare differences in skills and self concept among mentally handicapped young adults, and to show the significance of the admission age and quality of special educational opportunities, a study was made involving 27 persons who had attended regular and/or special education classes. The educational experiences of the groups were organized in…

  1. Dreams of Deceased Children and Countertransference in the Group Psychotherapy of Bereaved Mothers: Clinical Illustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begovac, Branka; Begovac, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents, in the form of a clinical illustration, a therapeutic group of bereaved mothers with special reference to their dreams about their deceased children. The article presents descriptions of the emotions of these mothers and countertransference feelings, a topic that, to our knowledge, has not been frequently studied. The group…

  2. Lazarus and Group Psychotherapy: AIDS in the Era of Protease Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gushue, George V.; Brazaitis, Sarah J.

    2003-01-01

    A new class of medications, protease inhibitors, has dramatically improved the health of many people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). This development has had a major impact on the lives of those affected by HIV/AIDS. This article considers how a group is affected by the larger systems of…

  3. Targeting the Psychosexual Challenges Faced by Couples with Breast Cancer: Can Couples Group Psychotherapy Help?

    PubMed Central

    Lagana, Luciana; Fobair, Patricia; Spiegel, David

    2016-01-01

    The need for the psychosexual rehabilitation of breast cancer survivors and their intimate partners is underscored by the high prevalence of multiple psychosexual difficulties encountered by this patient population. Concerns about health, sexuality, and emotional distress are common among women with breast cancer and are often related to the side effects of cancer treatment. Additionally, both intimate relationship problems and partners’ distress are likely to influence patients’ psychosexual health. A clearer understanding of these complex clinical issues is needed in order to implement effective psychosexual rehabilitation interventions. In this article, we extended the use of the manualized and empirically validated Supportive-Expressive Group Therapy (SEGT) model to target the specific psychosexual needs of couples with breast (as well as other types of) cancer. In view of the pertinent literature in this area and based on our clinical experience utilizing this group therapy model with different patient populations, we have discussed how clinicians involved in the psychosexual care of oncology patients could apply such a model within a couples group therapy format. PMID:27239398

  4. Cancer and the experience of meaning: a group psychotherapy program for people with cancer.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, M; Breitbart, W

    2000-01-01

    Cancer illness affects people in many ways, physical, financial, and existential. In this paper, we describe a proposed group intervention for individuals with advanced disease who want help finding a sense of meaning at this critical juncture in their lives. This intervention has a brief, semi-structured format, and is informed by the work of Viktor Frankl, empirical findings in the area of meaning and trauma, and the empirical findings of other group interventions for cancer patients. Individual sessions focus on different aspects of meaning, including responsibility to others, creativity, transcendence, and ascertaining one's values and priorities. Having goals on which to focus and feeling like part of a larger whole are critically important to the ability to find meaning and cope with terminal illness. Such goals may be generated by a number of sources, including connectedness with others, or a sense of the temporal continuity of one's own life despite the disruption posed by severe illness. Didactic discussions and experiential exercises help to facilitate exploration of these various elements in group members' lives. The finite structure of the intervention may also highlight these issues, as people who are faced with similar issues work together in a limited time frame in order to accomplish the goals they set out for themselves.

  5. Personality Theory and Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Joen; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This group of articles discusses various aspects of Gestalt Therapy including its major contributions, role in psychotherapy, and contributions of Gestalt psychology in general. There is some discussion of the philosophical background of Gestalt therapy along with Gestalt theory of emotion. A case study and an annotated bibliography are included…

  6. What Makes Psychotherapy Humanistic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisdale, John R.

    Based on an earlier list of characteristics, ten assertions were derived about the nature of psychotherapy upon which it was believed that humanistic therapists would agree. These assertions were then submitted to three groups of therapists (111 returns) listed in the "National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology":…

  7. Structured group psychotherapy in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: results of an open multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Alexandra; Richter, Harald; Peters, Julia; Alm, Barbara; Sobanski, Esther; Colla, Michael; Münzebrock, Mirka; Scheel, Corinna; Jacob, Christian; Perlov, Evgeniy; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Hesslinger, Bernd

    2007-12-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a serious mental disorder that often persists in adulthood. In a pilot study, a structured skills training group program for adult ADHD led to significant symptomatic improvements. The present study evaluated the program's effectiveness, feasibility, and patient acceptability in a multicenter setting. Seventy-two adult ADHD patients were assigned to 13 two-hour weekly sessions at 4 different therapy sites. The therapy was well tolerated and led to significant improvements of ADHD, depressive symptoms, and personal health status (p < 0.001). The factors treatment site and medication did not contribute to the overall improvement. Patients regarded the program topics "behavioral analyses," "mindfulness," and "emotion regulation" as the most helpful. In this multicenter study, the therapy program showed therapist-independent effects and seemed to be disorder-specific. This warrants the effort of organizing further controlled studies.

  8. Equifinality in Functional Analytic Psychotherapy: Different Strokes for Different Folks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Sabrina M.; Dalto, Georgia; Follette, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is an interpersonal behavior therapy that relies on a therapist's ability to contingently respond to in-session client behavior. Valued behavior change in clients results from the therapist shaping more effective client interpersonal behaviors by providing effective social reinforcement when these behaviors…

  9. "A randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and a group version of cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy for chronically depressed patients": Correction to Michalak et al. (2015).

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Reports an error in "A randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and a group version of cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy for chronically depressed patients" by Johannes Michalak, Martin Schultze, Thomas Heidenreich and Elisabeth Schramm (Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 2015[Oct], Vol 83[5], 951-963). In the article there was an error in the Method section in the Statistical Analysis subsection. The last sentence in the seventh paragraph should read "A remitter was defined as a participant with a HAM-D score of 8 or less at posttreatment." (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-36864-001.) Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has recently been proposed as a treatment option for chronic depression. The cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (CBASP) is the only approach specifically developed to date for the treatment of chronically depressed patients. The efficacy of MBCT plus treatment-as-usual (TAU), and CBASP (group version) plus TAU, was compared to TAU alone in a prospective, bicenter, randomized controlled trial. One hundred and six patients with a current DSM-IV defined major depressive episode and persistent depressive symptoms for more than 2 years were randomized to TAU only (N = 35), or to TAU with additional 8-week group therapy of either 8 sessions of MBCT (n = 36) or CBASP (n = 35). The primary outcome measure was the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (24-item HAM-D, Hamilton, 1967) at the end of treatment. Secondary outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) and measures of social functioning and quality of life. In the overall sample as well as at 1 treatment site, MBCT was no more effective than TAU in reducing depressive symptoms, although it was significantly superior to TAU at the other treatment site. CBASP was significantly more effective than TAU in reducing depressive

  10. Brief Psychotherapy for Maternal Depression: Impact on Mothers and Children

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Holly A.; Cyranowski, Jill M.; Cheng, Yu; Zuckoff, Allan; Brent, David A.; Markowitz, John C.; Martin, Stacy; Amole, Marlissa C.; Ritchey, Fiona; Frank, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Two-generation studies demonstrate that treating maternal depression benefits school-age children. Although mothers prefer psychotherapy to medication, little is known about how psychotherapy for maternal depression affects offspring, especially in very high-risk families wherein both mothers and children concurrently meet syndromal criteria for psychiatric disorders. This trial evaluated effects of two brief psychotherapies for maternal depression on very high-risk families. Method Mothers with major depressive disorder were randomly assigned to nine sessions of either brief interpersonal psychotherapy for mothers (IPT-MOMS; n=85) or brief supportive psychotherapy (BSP; n=83). Independent assessors evaluated mothers and their children, ages 7-18, diagnosed with at least one internalizing disorder, every three months over one year. Results Symptoms and functioning of mothers and children improved significantly over time, with no between-group differences. However, children of mothers assigned to BSP had more outpatient mental health visits and were more likely to receive antidepressant medication. Mothers reported greater satisfaction with IPT-MOMS than BSP. Improvement in mothers’ depressive symptoms was associated with improvement in child functioning in time-lagged fashion, with children improving 3-6 months after mothers improved. Antidepressant medication use and number of mental health visits received by children did not affect outcomes. Conclusion IPT-MOMS and BSP demonstrated comparable beneficial effects on maternal depression. Children's functioning improved following maternal improvement, independent of youth's treatment. Children of mothers randomized to IPT-MOMS, compared to BSP, achieved comparable outcomes despite less follow-up treatment. Observation of lagged association between maternal improvement and change in child functioning should influence treatment planning for families. PMID:27238068

  11. [Attitudes toward psychotherapy in the general population].

    PubMed

    Petrowski, Katja; Hessel, Aike; Körner, Annett; Weidner, Kerstin; Brähler, Elmar; Hinz, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Attitudes towards psychotherapy are important predictors for the acceptance and usage of psychotherapy. A survey examined attitudes towards psychotherapy in a sample representative of the German population including 2089 persons between 14 to 92 years of age. Two thirds of the sample indicated a positive attitude towards psychotherapy. Men as well as individuals with lower education reported a more negative attitude towards psychotherapy than women and persons with higher educational level. Education had a medium effect size (d=0.44). Individuals with somatoform symptoms did not indicate a more negative attitude towards psychotherapy than the general population. Even though the majority of the population has a more positive attitude towards psychotherapy, this positive attitude does not apply for all groups of the -population.

  12. Positive Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported…

  13. Positive Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported…

  14. The cost-effectiveness of psychotherapy for the major psychiatric diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Susan G

    2014-09-01

    Psychotherapy is an effective and often highly cost-effective medical intervention for many serious psychiatric conditions. Psychotherapy can also lead to savings in other medical and societal costs. It is at times the firstline and most important treatment and at other times augments the efficacy of psychotropic medication. Many patients are in need of more prolonged and intensive psychotherapy, including those with personality disorders and those with chronic complex psychiatric conditions often with severe anxiety and depression. Many patients with serious and complex psychiatric illness have experienced severe early life trauma in an atmosphere in which family members or caretakers themselves have serious psychiatric disorders. Children and adolescents with learning disabilities and those with severe psychiatric disorders can also require more than brief treatment. Other diagnostic groups for whom psychotherapy is effective and cost-effective include patients with schizophrenia, anxiety disorders (including posttraumatic stress disorder), depression, and substance abuse. In addition, psychotherapy for the medically ill with concomitant psychiatric illness often lowers medical costs, improves recovery from medical illness, and at times even prolongs life compared to similar patients not given psychotherapy. While "cost-effective" treatments can yield savings in healthcare costs, disability claims, and other societal costs, "cost-effective" by no means translates to "cheap" but instead describes treatments that are clinically effective and provided at a cost that is considered reasonable given the benefit they provide, even if the treatments increase direct expenses. In the current insurance climate in which Mental Health Parity is the law, insurers nonetheless often use their own non-research and non-clinically based medical necessity guidelines to subvert it and limit access to appropriate psychotherapeutic treatments. Many patients, especially those who need

  15. Treating Patients Who Strain the Research Psychotherapy Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, John C.; Kaplowitz, Matthew; Suh, Eun-Jung; Meehan, Kevin; Neria, Yuval; Jonker, Hanske; Rafaeli, Alexandra; Lovell, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of psychotherapy require diagnostic homogeneity, which implies a convergence of clinical presentations. Yet research study patients present diversely, and patients who do not fit a treatment paradigm may greatly complicate delivery of the study psychotherapy. The research literature has not addressed this issue. Methods The authors use case illustrations of three psychotherapies – Prolonged Exposure, Relaxation Therapy, and Interpersonal Psychotherapy – from an ongoing psychotherapy outcome trial of posttraumatic stress disorder to describe psychotherapeutic responses to complex, “atypical” patients who strain standard treatment paradigms. Results Therapists required flexibility, and occasionally deviations from strict protocol, in treating heterodox patients. Conclusions Such heterogeneity of presentation may have implications for psychotherapy outcome in research trials. Despite lack of discussion in the literature, many trials may face such issues. PMID:22759936

  16. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of psychotherapies for depression in children and adolescents: A systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinyu; Hetrick, Sarah E; Cuijpers, Pim; Qin, Bin; Barth, Jürgen; Whittington, Craig J; Cohen, David; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Liu, Yiyun; Michael, Kurt D; Zhang, Yuqing; Weisz, John R; Xie, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Previous meta-analyses of psychotherapies for child and adolescent depression were limited because of the small number of trials with direct comparisons between two treatments. A network meta-analysis, a novel approach that integrates direct and indirect evidence from randomized controlled studies, was undertaken to investigate the comparative efficacy and acceptability of psychotherapies for depression in children and adolescents. Systematic searches resulted in 52 studies (total N=3805) of nine psychotherapies and four control conditions. We assessed the efficacy at post-treatment and at follow-up, as well as the acceptability (all-cause discontinuation) of psychotherapies and control conditions. At post-treatment, only interpersonal therapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) were significantly more effective than most control conditions (standardized mean differences, SMDs ranged from −0.47 to −0.96). Also, IPT and CBT were more beneficial than play therapy. Only psychodynamic therapy and play therapy were not significantly superior to waitlist. At follow-up, IPT and CBT were significantly more effective than most control conditions (SMDs ranged from −0.26 to −1.05), although only IPT retained this superiority at both short-term and long-term follow-up. In addition, IPT and CBT were more beneficial than problem-solving therapy. Waitlist was significantly inferior to other control conditions. With regard to acceptability, IPT and problem-solving therapy had significantly fewer all-cause discontinuations than cognitive therapy and CBT (ORs ranged from 0.06 to 0.33). These data suggest that IPT and CBT should be considered as the best available psychotherapies for depression in children and adolescents. However, several alternative psychotherapies are understudied in this age group. Waitlist may inflate the effect of psychotherapies, so that psychological placebo or treatment-as-usual may be preferable as a control condition in psychotherapy

  17. Enhancing Women's Lives: The Role of Support Groups among Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Spiegel, David

    1999-01-01

    Reviews research indicating that group psychotherapy is an effective adjunctive therapy to medical treatment for women with breast cancer. States that Supportive-Expressive group therapy has been effective in assisting patients in reducing anxiety related to death and dying, strengthening interpersonal relationships, and improving the quality of…

  18. Enhancing Women's Lives: The Role of Support Groups among Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Spiegel, David

    1999-01-01

    Reviews research indicating that group psychotherapy is an effective adjunctive therapy to medical treatment for women with breast cancer. States that Supportive-Expressive group therapy has been effective in assisting patients in reducing anxiety related to death and dying, strengthening interpersonal relationships, and improving the quality of…

  19. Feedback versus no feedback in improving patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT): protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous feedback on patient improvement and the therapeutic alliance may reduce the number of dropouts and increase patient outcome. There are, however, only three published randomized trials on the effect of feedback on the treatment of eating disorders, showing inconclusive results, and there are no randomized trials on the effect of feedback in group therapy. Accordingly the current randomized clinical trial, initiated in September 2012 at the outpatient clinic for eating disorders at Stolpegaard Psychotherapy Centre, aims to investigate the impact of continuous feedback on attendance and outcome in group psychotherapy. Methods/design The hypothesis is that continuous feedback to both patient and therapist on treatment progress and alliance will increase attendance and treatment outcome. The trial is set up using a randomized design with a minimum of 128 patients allocated to either an experimental or control group at a ratio of 1:1. The experimental group will receive standard treatment (systemic and narrative group psychotherapy) with feedback intervention, whereas the control group will receive standard treatment only. The participants are diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or an eating disorder not otherwise specified, according to the DSM-IV. In the experimental group feedback to the participants, based on the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Group Session Rating Scale (GSRS), is actively added to standard treatment. The ORS assesses areas of life functioning known to change as a result of therapeutic intervention. The GSRS assesses key dimensions of effective therapeutic relationships. In the control group, the patients fill out the Outcome Rating Scale only, and feedback is not provided. The primary outcome is the rate of attendance to treatment sessions. The secondary outcome is the severity of eating disorder symptoms. Exploratory outcomes are the level of psychological and social functioning, and suicide or self

  20. Interpersonal Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Michael A.; Richardson, Michael J.; Shockley, Kevin; Ramenzoni, Verónica C.

    2010-01-01

    We present the perspective that interpersonal movement coordination results from establishing interpersonal synergies. Interpersonal synergies are higher-order control systems formed by coupling movement system degrees of freedom of two (or more) actors. Characteristic features of synergies identified in studies of intrapersonal coordination – dimensional compression and reciprocal compensation – are revealed in studies of interpersonal coordination that applied the uncontrolled manifold approach and principal component analysis to interpersonal movement tasks. Broader implications of the interpersonal synergy approach for movement science include an expanded notion of mechanism and an emphasis on interaction-dominant dynamics. PMID:21716606

  1. Drug Dependence--A Comparative Study to Discover Significant Factors Relating to Interpersonal and Intrafamilial Relationships Prevalent in a Group of Trainees at Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Patricia M.

    This thesis is an analysis of data concerning drug usage among three groups of young soldiers and isolates significant factors relating to characteristic interpersonal and intrafamilial relationships prevalent in these groups. Those soldiers dependent on drugs all came from families that they considered disharmonious. The following variables…

  2. The Effect of Group Participation in a Recreation Program on Perceptual-Motor Skills and Interpersonal Values of Potentially Delinquent Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasley, Kevin R.

    Effects of group participation in a recreation program emphasizing perceptual motor skills and interpersonal values of potentially delinquent boys were examined and compared to the same effects in a group of normal boys participating in a separate but similar program. The boys ranged in age from 12 to 18 years. Perceptual motor skills measured…

  3. "New beginnings" in South African shelters for the homeless: piloting of a group psychotherapy intervention for high-risk mother-infant dyads.

    PubMed

    Bain, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The New Beginnings program was developed at the Anna Freud Centre and originally piloted in Her Majesty Prisons in the United Kingdom. This study aimed to explore the use of this manualized parent-infant psychotherapy group model in an African setting with high-risk mother-infant dyads, and describes the implementation and investigation of this 12-week group psychotherapy intervention in two Johannesburg shelters for homeless women. The measures used to investigate treatment efficacy were the Parent Development Interview (A. Slade, J.L. Aber, I. Bresgi, B. Berger, & M. Kaplan,), the Emotional Availability Scales (Z. Biringen, J.L. Robinson, & R.N. Emde,), the Kessler-10 (R.C. Kessler et al.,), and the Griffiths Scales of Mental Development (D. Luiz et al., . At pretesting, infants exhibited delays in a number of developmental areas, and mothers showed high levels of depression and generally low capacities for reflective function. While significant shifts in the mothers' capacities for reflective function were not found in the treatment condition, significant shifts were found in the infants' speech abilities and in the mothers' abilities to structure their interactions with their infants. This suggests that the program enabled mothers to become more sensitized to their infants' needs in interaction and that communication between mother and infant increased. The number of sessions attended by the dyads correlated with improvements made by the mothers and their infants.

  4. Using standardized patient with immediate feedback and group discussion to teach interpersonal and communication skills to advanced practice nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lin, Esther Ching-Lan; Chen, Shiah-Lian; Chao, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yueh-Chih

    2013-06-01

    Interpersonal and communication skills (IPCS) are essential for advanced practice nursing (APN) in our increasingly complex healthcare system. The Standardized Patient (SP) is a promising innovative pedagogy in medical and healthcare education; however, its effectiveness for teaching IPCS to graduate nursing students remains unclear. We examined the effectiveness of using SP with SP feedback and group discussion to teach IPCS in graduate nursing education. Randomized-controlled study. First-year APN students in Taiwan. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental (SP assessments with SP feedback and group discussion) or control (SP assessments only) group. There were two outcome indicators: IPCS and student learning satisfaction (SLS). The IPCS were assessed before and after the study in interviews with the SPs. SLS was measured when the study ended. All participants expressed high SLS (94.44%) and showed significant (p ≤ 0.025) improvements on IPCS total scores, interviewing, and counseling. However, there were no significant differences between groups. Qualitative feedback from encounters with SPs is described. Using SPs to teach IPCS to APN students produced a high SLS. The students learned and significantly improved their IPCS by interviewing SPs, but future studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of SP feedback and group discussions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Descriptive Study of a Select Group of Learning Disabled Children: Their Family Backgrounds, Attentional Patterns and Interpersonal Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willing, Kathlene R.

    The study examined the family backgrounds, attentional patterns, and interpersonal styles of 20 Canadian learning disabled (LD students (10-22 years old). Using the Test for Attentional and Interpersonal Styles and a questionnaire, 94 family members, including the 20 Ss, were interviewed. Although no strong familial patterns of import were…

  6. Interpersonal Relationship Styles in Marathon Group Therapy: A Study with Illicit Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Bridges, Ned

    1983-01-01

    Assessed how illegal drug users (N=12) related to one another during a 16-hour unstructured group marathon. Interaction analysis supported the effectiveness of the marathon group. Members and facilitators were able to relate to each other by confronting significant behaviors and receiving feedback about ways to cope with personal problems. (JAC)

  7. Interpersonal Groups or Computers? A Study of Career Maturity and Career Decidedness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaize, David L.; Myrick, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of a computer assisted guidance program (DISCOVER), a small group guidance intervention (Vocational Exploration Group), and a combined approach on career maturity and decidedness in 120 high school students. All three interventions were significantly helpful to students. (JAC)

  8. Interpersonal Relationship Styles in Marathon Group Therapy: A Study with Illicit Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Bridges, Ned

    1983-01-01

    Assessed how illegal drug users (N=12) related to one another during a 16-hour unstructured group marathon. Interaction analysis supported the effectiveness of the marathon group. Members and facilitators were able to relate to each other by confronting significant behaviors and receiving feedback about ways to cope with personal problems. (JAC)

  9. [Dropout behavior during inpatient psychotherapy ].

    PubMed

    Martens, Ute; Rempel, Irene; Zipfel, Stephan; Enck, Paul; Teufel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Dropouts result in far-reaching consequences for the individual patient, fellow patients, therapists, and the clinic. This study was aimed at early identification of patients with a dropout risk. Data from patients of the Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy of the Medical University Clinic of Tübingen (Germany) were analyzed retrospectively in a case-control study (matched). Differences in the results of various questionnaires (SCL-90-R, IIP-D, SF-36) regarding reasons for dropout and sociodemographic data were analyzed. A total of 59 dropouts, 50 females and 9 males, were included. They were split into 28 early dropouts and 31 late dropouts. The data were compared between early and late dropouts and control group. Early dropouts were significantly younger than late dropouts; they tended to live with their parents or on their own, and suffered more frequently from eating disorders. Late dropouts lived together with partners and suffered from somatoform disorders more frequently than early dropouts. The reasons given for dropout did not differ between the groups. No differences between dropouts and the controls were found with respect to psychopathology (SCL- 90-R) and quality of life (SF-36). Late dropouts did show significantly lower scores on the scale "autocracy/dominance" than the controls (IIP). Therapy dropout is a multifactorial occurrence. It is generally not predictable, though it may be predicted with different instruments on the basis of a diagnosis, especially with respect to interpersonal behavior patterns. In further studies, targeted interventions should be developed and tested which enable procedures to minimize the risk of dropout and to achieve complete treatment according to patients' intentions.

  10. Religiosity, authoritarianism, and attitudes toward psychotherapy in later life.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Joseph C; Midlarsky, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study explores whether intrinsic religiosity in older adults is associated with attitudes toward psychotherapy (perceived need, stigma tolerance, interpersonal openness, and confidence in mental health practitioners) when controlling for authoritarianism. Interviews were conducted with a sample of 307 community-residing adults aged 65–82. Data were collected from 164 Black and 142 White older adults about their intrinsic religiosity, authoritarianism, and mental health help-seeking attitudes. Intrinsic religiosity was associated with stigma tolerance and interpersonal openness after controlling for authoritarianism. Intrinsic religiosity and authoritarianism appear to be independently related to psychotherapy attitudes. Religious older adults may prefer to seek help in religious contexts, while the association of authoritarianism to less favorable psychotherapy attitudes toward psychotherapy may be explained by a fear of external perspectives. Results on the whole reinforce the importance of including religiousness and authoritarianism in models of mental health help-seeking.

  11. [Group psychotherapy. Experience with a changing process at a clinic of the Instituto del Servicio de Seguridad Social de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE)].

    PubMed

    Velasco de Ongay, M E

    1977-01-01

    The problems of an ISSSTE clinic were approached within the general systems theory and it was observed that within the group there existed forces to maintain the status-quo and forces towards change; to produce the latter the group was handled during 20 hours with a slightly directive technique. The goals were to improve interpersonal relationships, to increase communication, to make known to individuals their attitudes within a group and make them sensitive to problems they shared with others. The results were good, the status-quo was broken and change started occurring.

  12. Interpersonal subtypes in social phobia: diagnostic and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Cain, Nicole M; Pincus, Aaron L; Grosse Holtforth, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Interpersonal assessment may provide a clinically useful way to identify subtypes of social phobia. In this study, we examined evidence for interpersonal subtypes in a sample of 77 socially phobic outpatients. A cluster analysis based on the dimensions of dominance and love on the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Circumplex Scales (Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 1990) found 2 interpersonal subtypes of socially phobic patients. These subtypes did not differ on pretreatment global symptom severity as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis, 1993) or diagnostic comorbidity but did exhibit differential responses to outpatient psychotherapy. Overall, friendly-submissive social phobia patients had significantly lower scores on measures of social anxiety and significantly higher scores on measures of well-being and satisfaction at posttreatment than cold-submissive social phobia patients. We discuss the results in terms of interpersonal theory and the clinical relevance of assessment of interpersonal functioning prior to beginning psychotherapy with socially phobic patients.

  13. Treatment preferences of psychotherapy patients with chronic PTSD.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, John C; Meehan, Kevin B; Petkova, Eva; Zhao, Yihong; Van Meter, Page E; Neria, Yuval; Pessin, Hayley; Nazia, Yasmin

    2016-03-01

    Patient treatment preference may moderate treatment effect in major depressive disorder (MDD) studies. Little research has addressed preference in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); almost none has assessed actual patients' PTSD psychotherapy preferences. From a 14-week trial of chronic PTSD comparing prolonged exposure, relaxation therapy, and interpersonal psychotherapy, we report treatment preferences of the 110 randomized patients, explore preference correlates, and assess effects on treatment outcome. Patients recruited between 2008 and 2013 with chronic DSM-IV PTSD (Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale [CAPS] score ≥ 50) received balanced, scripted psychotherapy descriptions prerandomization and indicated their preferences. Analyses assessed relationships of treatment attitudes to demographic and clinical factors. We hypothesized that patients randomized to preferred treatments would have better outcomes, and to unwanted treatment worse outcomes. Eighty-seven patients (79%) voiced treatment preferences or disinclinations: 29 (26%) preferred prolonged exposure, 29 (26%) preferred relaxation therapy, and 56 (50%) preferred interpersonal psychotherapy (Cochran Q = 18.46, P < .001), whereas 29 (26%) were disinclined to prolonged exposure, 18 (16%) to relaxation therapy, and 3 (3%) to interpersonal psychotherapy (Cochran Q = 22.71, P < .001). Several baseline clinical variables correlated with treatment preferences. Overall, treatment preference/disinclination did not predict change in CAPS score, treatment response, or dropout. Comorbidly depressed patients receiving unwanted treatment had worse final CAPS scores. These exploratory findings are the first relating patients' PTSD psychotherapy preferences to outcome. Despite explanations emphasizing prolonged exposure's greater empirical support, patients significantly preferred interpersonal psychotherapy. Preference subtly affected psychotherapy outcome; depression appeared an important moderator of the effect

  14. Increasing the Academic Achievement of Middle School Students Exposed to Domestic Violence through Interpersonal-Cognitive Group Counseling and Parenting Education (Project REAL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Deborah

    Project REAL (Relationship skills, Education on violence prevention, Academics, Leadership and decision-making skills) was a practicum designed to increase the academic achievement of middle school students exposed to domestic violence. Eleven students and their parents participated in a 12-week interpersonal-cognitive counseling group and its…

  15. Interpersonal, Nonverbal, and Small Group Communication: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1981 (Vol. 42 Nos. 1 through 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 32 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: (1) the analysis of conversational sequencing in group systems; (2) the effects of hearing aids on interpersonal perceptions; (3) styles of communication between…

  16. Interpersonal Process Group Counseling for Educationally Marginalized Youth: The MAGNIFY Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaten, Christopher D.; Elison, Zachary M.

    2015-01-01

    Youth mental health is an area of profound disparity between the demand and supply of services, particularly in schools that serve students at risk of school dropout. This article describes the conceptual foundations and implementation of "MAGNIFY", a program that provides free group counseling to small alternative schools with students…

  17. Social Psychotherapy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Heloisa J; Marra, Marlene M; Knobel, Anna M

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the practice of sociodrama, a method created by J. L. Moreno in the 1930s, and the Brazilian contemporary socio-psychodrama. In 1970, after the Fifth International Congress of Psychodrama was held in Brazil, group psychotherapy began to flourish both in private practice and hospital clinical settings. Twenty years later, the Brazilian health care system added group work as a reimbursable mental health procedure to improve social health policies. In this context, socio-psychodrama became a key resource for social health promotion within groups. Some specific conceptual contributions by Brazilians on sociodrama are also noteworthy.

  18. Patient interpersonal impacts and the early therapeutic alliance in interpersonal therapy for depression.

    PubMed

    Constantino, Michael J; Schwaiger, Elizabeth M; Smith, Julianna Z; DeGeorge, Joan; McBride, Carolina; Ravitz, Paula; Zuroff, David C

    2010-09-01

    The therapeutic alliance consistently predicts positive psychotherapy outcomes. Thus, it is important to uncover factors that relate to alliance development. The goal of this study was to examine the association between patient interpersonal characteristics and alliance quality in interpersonal therapy for depression. Data derive from a subsample (n = 74) of a larger naturalistic database of outpatients treated at a mood disorders clinic of a university-affiliated psychiatric hospital. Following Session 3 of treatment, therapists completed the Impact Message Inventory (Kiesler & Schmidt, 1993) to assess patients' interpersonal impacts on them. Also following Session 3, patients completed the Working Alliance Inventory (Horvath & Greenberg, 1989) to assess alliance quality. As predicted, patients' affiliative interpersonal impacts, as perceived by their therapists, were positively associated with alliance quality, controlling for baseline depression severity. Although unrelated to the initial hypotheses, patients concurrently taking psychotropic medications reported better alliances than patients receiving psychotherapy only.

  19. Attraction to psychotherapy: influences of therapist status and therapist-patient age similarity.

    PubMed

    Lasky, R G; Salomone, P R

    1977-04-01

    Therapist-patient age similarity and therapist status were examined in relation to interpersonal attraction in the psychotherapy dyad. Psychiatric inpatients who comprised three age groupings were assigned randomly to one of four audiovisual treatments that depicted a dyadic psychotherapy situation (N = 60). For each treatment, therapist age and status were differentially presented on color slides with the same accompanying audiotape. Results indicated that age similarity was significantly (p less than .05) more relevant for the younger patients, whereas therapist status had greater significance for older patients. There were several significant interactions that concerned therapist-patient age similarity and therapist status effects on psychotherapeutic attraction. These results suggest that therapist-patient matching on age and/or therapist status should be considered carefully as a potential influence on therapeutic outcome.

  20. Do Comorbid Anxiety Disorders Moderate the Effects of Psychotherapy for Bipolar Disorder? Results From STEP-BD

    PubMed Central

    Deckersbach, Thilo; Peters, Amy T.; Sylvia, Louisa; Urdahl, Anna; Magalhães, Pedro V.S.; Otto, Michael W.; Frank, Ellen; Miklowitz, David J.; Berk, Michael; Kinrys, Gustavo; Nierenberg, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Objective At least 50% of individuals with bipolar disorder have a lifetime anxiety disorder. Individuals with both bipolar disorder and a co-occurring anxiety disorder experience longer illness duration, greater illness severity, and poorer treatment response. The study explored whether comorbid lifetime anxiety in bipolar patients moderates psychotherapy treatment outcome. Method In the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program randomized controlled trial of psychotherapy for bipolar depression, participants received up to 30 sessions of intensive psychotherapy (family-focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, or cognitive-behavioral therapy) or collaborative care, a three-session comparison treatment, plus pharmacotherapy. Using the number needed to treat, we computed effect sizes to analyze the relationship between lifetime anxiety disorders and rates of recovery across treatment groups after 1 year. Results A total of 269 patients (113 women) with a comorbid lifetime anxiety disorder (N=177) or without a comorbid lifetime anxiety disorder (N=92) were included in the analysis. Participants with a lifetime anxiety disorder were more likely to recover with psychotherapy than with collaborative care (66% compared with 49% recovered over 1 year; number needed to treat=5.88, small to medium effect). For patients without a lifetime anxiety disorder, there was no difference between rates of recovery in psychotherapy compared with collaborative care (64% compared with 62% recovered; number needed to treat=50, small effect). Participants with one lifetime anxiety disorder were likely to benefit from intensive psychotherapy compared with collaborative care (84% compared with 53% recovered; number needed to treat=3.22, medium to large effect), whereas patients with multiple anxiety disorders exhibited no difference in response to the two treatments (54% compared with 46% recovered; number needed to treat=12.5, small effect). Conclusions Depressed patients

  1. [Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT)].

    PubMed

    Bottai, T; Biloa-Tang, M; Christophe, S; Dupuy, C; Jacquesy, L; Kochman, F; Meynard, J-A; Papeta, D; Rahioui, H; Adida, M; Fakra, E; Kaladjian, A; Pringuey, D; Azorin, J-M

    2010-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is common, recurrent, often severe and debiliting disorder. All types of bipolar disorder have a common determinant: depressive episode. It is justify to propose a psychotherapy which shown efficacy in depression. Howewer, perturbations in circadian rhythms have been implicated in the genesis of each episode of the illness. Biological circadian dysregulation can be encouraged by alteration of time-givers (Zeitgebers) or occurrence of time-disturbers (Zeitstörers). Addition of social rhythm therapy to interpersonal psychotherapy leads to create a new psychotherapy adaptated to bipolar disorders: InterPersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy (IPSRT). IPSRT, in combinaison with medication, has demonstrated efficacy as a treatment for bipolar disorders. IPSRT combines psychoeducation, behavioral strategy to regularize daily routines and interpersonal psychotherapy which help patients cope better with the multiple psychosocial and relationship problems associated with this chronic disorder. The main issues of this psychotherapy are: to take the history of the patient's illness and review of medication, to help patient for "grief for the lost healthy self" translated in the french version in "acceptance of a long-term medical condition", to give the sick role, to examinate the current relationships and changes proximal to the emergence of mood symptoms in the four problem areas (unresolved grief, interpersonal disputes, role transitions, role déficits), to examinate and increase daily routines and social rhythms. French version of IPSRT called TIPARS (with few differences), a time-limited psychotherapy, in 24 sessions during approximatively 6 months, is conducted in three phases. In the initial phase, the therapist takes a thorough history of previous episodes and their interpersonal context and a review of previous medication, provides psychoeducation, evaluates social rhythms, introduces the Social Rhythm Metric, identifies the patient's main interpersonal

  2. The Bhagavad Gita and contemporary psychotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Subhash C.; Madabushi, Jayakrishna; Kolli, Venkata; Bhatia, Shashi K.; Madaan, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    The Bhagavad Gita is based on a discourse between Lord Krishna and Arjuna at the inception of the Kurukshetra war and elucidates many psychotherapeutic principles. In this article, we discuss some of the parallels between the Gita and contemporary psychotherapies. We initially discuss similarities between psychodynamic theories of drives and psychic structures, and the concept of three gunas. Arjuna under duress exhibits elements of distorted thinking. Lord Krishna helps remedy this through a process akin to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). We ascertain the analogies between the principles of Gita and CBT, grief emancipation, role transition, self-esteem, and motivation enhancement, as well as interpersonal and supportive psychotherapies. We advocate the pragmatic application of age old wisdom of the Gita to enhance the efficacy of psychotherapeutic interventions for patients from Indian subcontinent and to add value to the art of western psychotherapies. PMID:23858274

  3. Achieving Full Scope of Practice Readiness Using Evidence for Psychotherapy Teaching in Web and Hybrid Approaches in Psychiatric Mental Health Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Kathleen T

    2017-01-12

    Radical changes in role, education, and practice have affected how education of advance practice nurses and practice deliverables occur. This article examines the effects of distance education upon the teaching/learning of psychotherapy in integrating Web-based technology and platforms. With the advent and proliferation of online programs of study, the question begs: How do distance-linked programs successfully introduce, practice, and supervise one-to-one and group psychotherapy training? By employing evidence-based education strategies, technology, and strong interpersonal skills and evidence-based therapies, a charter Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Doctor of Nursing Practice program paved an innovative and successful path. In that program, they prepared their students for full scope of practice, upon graduation, inclusive of psychotherapy as well as the other highly demanding and compressed requirements of the 3-year program. This article explores that journey and its recommendations for application derived from this 2010 cohort. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Interpersonal frontopolar neural synchronization in group communication: An exploration toward fNIRS hyperscanning of natural interactions.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Takayuki; Sasaki, Yukako; Sakaki, Kohei; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-06-01

    Research of interpersonal neural synchronization (INS) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) hyperscanning is an expanding nascent field. This field still requires the accumulation of findings and establishment of analytic standards. In this study, we therefore intend to extend fNIRS-based INS research in three directions: (1) verifying the enhancement of frontopolar INS by natural and unstructured verbal communication involving more than two individuals; (2) examining timescale dependence of the INS modulation; and (3) evaluating the effects of artifact reduction methods in capturing INS. We conducted an fNIRS hyperscanning study while 12 groups of four subjects were engaged in cooperative verbal communication. Corresponding to the three objectives, our analyses of the data (1) confirmed communication-enhanced frontopolar INS, as expected from the region's roles in social communication; (2) revealed the timescale dependency in the INS modulation, suggesting the merit of evaluating INS in fine timescale bins; and (3) determined that removal of the skin blood flow component engenders substantial improvement in sensitivity to communication-enhanced INS and segregation from artifactual synchronization, and that caution for artifact reduction preprocessing is needed to avoid excessive removal of the neural fluctuation component. Accordingly, this study provides a prospective technical basis for future hyperscanning studies during daily communicative activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrating Psychotherapy Research with Public Health and Public Policy Goals for Incarcerated Women and other Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I review my research applying interpersonal treatments and interpersonal principles from psychotherapy for major depression and substance use to broader public health goals for incarcerated women and other vulnerable populations. A public health focus has led me to expand the boundaries of psychotherapy research to include partners such as prisons, parole officers, and bachelor's level providers; behaviors like risky sex; service delivery challenges; and ultimately to research with an eye toward informing policy and advocacy. A public health perspective provides context and rationale for conducting sound psychotherapy research; the combination of public health and psychotherapy-specific perspectives can lead to novel research. PMID:24188727

  6. Integrating psychotherapy research with public health and public policy goals for incarcerated women and other vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I review my research applying interpersonal treatments and interpersonal principles from psychotherapy for major depression and substance use to broader public health goals for incarcerated women and other vulnerable populations. A public health focus has led me to expand the boundaries of psychotherapy research to include partners such as prisons, parole officers, and bachelor's level providers; behaviors like risky sex; service delivery challenges; and ultimately to research with an eye toward informing policy and advocacy. A public health perspective provides context and rationale for conducting sound psychotherapy research; the combination of public health and psychotherapy-specific perspectives can lead to novel research.

  7. Interpersonal problems and personality: using three factor solutions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michelle J; Linden, Paul D

    2003-10-01

    Attempting to bridge the gap between psychotherapy research on interpersonal discord and personality research on factors of normal and abnormal personality, the present study uses personality factors to predict interpersonal problems. Eysenck's P-E-N (Psychoticism-Extraversion-Neuroticism) model of personality and its correspondent index, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised is used as a schema from which to conceptualize and measure personality. Horowitz's Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, which includes six problems commonly reported by psychotherapy patients at intake (hard to be assertive, hard to be submissive, hard to be intimate, hard to be sociable, too controlling, and too responsible), was used as an index of interpersonal distress. Hierarchical multiple regression, in which the most significant predictor was entered into the equation first, indicate significant prediction of various problems by the personality factors considered here. Results are discussed in the context of interpersonal theory.

  8. Psychotherapy for Bipolar Disorder in Adults: A Review of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Holly A; Swanson, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Although pharmacotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for bipolar disorder, medication offers only partial relief for patients. Treatment with pharmacologic interventions alone is associated with disappointingly low rates of remission, high rates of recurrence, residual symptoms, and psychosocial impairment. Bipolar-specific therapy is increasingly recommended as an essential component of illness management. This review summarizes the available data on psychotherapy for adults with bipolar disorder. We conducted a search of the literature for outcome studies published between 1995 and 2013 and identified 35 reports of 28 randomized controlled trials testing individual or group psychosocial interventions for adults with bipolar disorder. These reports include systematic trials investigating the efficacy and effectiveness of individual psychoeducation, group psychoeducation, individual cognitive-behavioral therapy, group cognitive-behavioral therapy, family therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, and integrated care management. The evidence demonstrates that bipolar disorder-specific psychotherapies, when added to medication for the treatment of bipolar disorder, consistently show advantages over medication alone on measures of symptom burden and risk of relapse. Whether delivered in a group or individual format, those who receive bipolar disorder-specific psychotherapy fare better than those who do not. Psychotherapeutic strategies common to most bipolar disorder-specific interventions are identified.

  9. Psychotherapy for Bipolar Disorder in Adults: A Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Holly A.; Swanson, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Although pharmacotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for bipolar disorder, medication offers only partial relief for patients. Treatment with pharmacologic interventions alone is associated with disappointingly low rates of remission, high rates of recurrence, residual symptoms, and psychosocial impairment. Bipolar-specific therapy is increasingly recommended as an essential component of illness management. This review summarizes the available data on psychotherapy for adults with bipolar disorder. We conducted a search of the literature for outcome studies published between 1995 and 2013 and identified 35 reports of 28 randomized controlled trials testing individual or group psychosocial interventions for adults with bipolar disorder. These reports include systematic trials investigating the efficacy and effectiveness of individual psychoeducation, group psychoeducation, individual cognitive-behavioral therapy, group cognitive-behavioral therapy, family therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, and integrated care management. The evidence demonstrates that bipolar disorder-specific psychotherapies, when added to medication for the treatment of bipolar disorder, consistently show advantages over medication alone on measures of symptom burden and risk of relapse. Whether delivered in a group or individual format, those who receive bipolar disorder-specific psychotherapy fare better than those who do not. Psychotherapeutic strategies common to most bipolar disorder-specific interventions are identified. PMID:26279641

  10. Effects of Group Psychotherapy, Individual Counseling, Methylphenidate, and Placebo in the Treatment of Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Alexandra; Jans, Thomas; Graf, Erika; Matthies, Swantje; Borel, Patricia; Colla, Michael; Gentschow, Laura; Langner, Daina; Jacob, Christian; Groß-Lesch, Silke; Sobanski, Esther; Alm, Barbara; Schumacher-Stien, Martina; Roesler, Michael; Retz, Wolfgang; Retz-Junginger, Petra; Kis, Bernhard; Abdel-Hamid, Mona; Heinrich, Viola; Huss, Michael; Kornmann, Catherine; Bürger, Arne; Perlov, Evgeniy; Ihorst, Gabriele; Schlander, Michael; Berger, Mathias; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2015-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with high prevalence in adulthood. There is a recognized need to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy in adult ADHD. To evaluate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral group psychotherapy (GPT) compared with individual clinical management (CM) and that of methylphenidate hydrochloride compared with placebo. Prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial of 18- to 58-year-old outpatients with ADHD from 7 German study centers. Patients were recruited between January 2007 and August 2010, treatment was finalized in August 2011, and final follow-up assessments occurred in March 2013. Sessions of GPT and CM were held weekly for the first 12 weeks and monthly thereafter (9 months). Patients received either methylphenidate or placebo for 1 year. The primary outcome was the change in the ADHD Index of the Conners Adult ADHD Rating Scale from baseline to the end of the 3-month intensive treatment (blinded observer ratings). Secondary outcomes included ADHD ratings after 1 year, blinded observer ratings using the Clinical Global Impression Scale, and self-ratings of depression. Among 1480 prescreened patients, 518 were assessed for eligibility, 433 were centrally randomized, and 419 were analyzed as randomized. After 3 months, the ADHD Index all-group baseline mean of 20.6 improved to adjusted means of 17.6 for GPT and 16.5 for CM, with no significant difference between groups. Methylphenidate (adjusted mean, 16.2) was superior to placebo (adjusted mean, 17.9) (difference, -1.7; 97.5% CI, -3.0 to -0.4; P = .003). After 1 year, treatment effects remained essentially stable. Descriptive analyses showed that methylphenidate was superior to placebo in patients assigned to GPT (difference, -1.7; 95% CI, -3.2 to -0.1; P = .04) or CM (difference, -1.7; 95% CI, -3.3 to -0.2; P = .03). Regarding depression, no significant differences were found. In contrast, GPT was superior to CM for all

  11. The Effectiveness of Short- and Long-Term Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy on Self-Concept: Three Years Follow-Up of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, Steinar; Fjeldstad, Anette; Ruud, Torleif; Marble, Alice; Klungsøyr, Ole; Ulberg, Randi; Høglend, Per A

    2015-07-01

    We compared differences in self-concept change across three years after short-(STG) and long-term (LTG) psychodynamic group psychotherapy, in a mixed sample of outpatients. Self-concept was assessed at baseline and three years later, using the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior Questionnaire. Vector scores Affiliation and Autonomy were primary, and the eight cluster scores-self-free, self-affirm, self-love, self-protect, self-control, self-blame, self-attack, and self-neglect-were secondary outcome measures. Within group univariate analyses showed change in LTG across three years on the vector scores Affiliation and Autonomy, while STG only changed on Autonomy. Comparisons between STG and LTG demonstrated a significantly larger improvement in Affiliation in LTG than in STG. This difference was explained by a higher improvement in the cluster scores of self-blame, self-attack, and self-neglect in LTG, dimensions that weight negatively on the Affiliation score. Patients with more serious self-neglect and harsh, punitive self-attack/self-blame may profit more in long-term than in short-term groups.

  12. Personality, Interpersonal, and Motivational Predictors of the Working Alliance in Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Partner Violent Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Casey T.; Murphy, Christopher M.; Musser, Peter H.; Remington, Nancy A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the working alliance predicts treatment outcome for partner violent men. This study examined the influence of personality and interpersonal characteristics, motivational readiness to change, and demographic factors on working alliance formation among a sample of men (N = 107) participating in a…

  13. Personality, Interpersonal, and Motivational Predictors of the Working Alliance in Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Partner Violent Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Casey T.; Murphy, Christopher M.; Musser, Peter H.; Remington, Nancy A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the working alliance predicts treatment outcome for partner violent men. This study examined the influence of personality and interpersonal characteristics, motivational readiness to change, and demographic factors on working alliance formation among a sample of men (N = 107) participating in a…

  14. The Challenge of Developing a Universal Case Conceptualization for Functional Analytic Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonow, Jordan T.; Maragakis, Alexandros; Follette, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) targets a client's interpersonal behavior for change with the goal of improving his or her quality of life. One question guiding FAP case conceptualization is, "What interpersonal behavioral repertoires will allow a specific client to function optimally?" Previous FAP writings have suggested that a therapist…

  15. Intimacy Is a Transdiagnostic Problem for Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Functional Analytical Psychotherapy Is a Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetterneck, Chad T.; Hart, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Problems with intimacy and interpersonal issues are exhibited across most psychiatric disorders. However, most of the targets in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy are primarily intrapersonal in nature, with few directly involved in interpersonal functioning and effective intimacy. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) provides a behavioral basis for…

  16. Therapist's interpersonal style and therapy benefit as the determinants of personality self-reports in clients.

    PubMed

    Hadziahmetović, Nina; Alispahić, Sabina; Tuce, Đenita; Hasanbegović-Anić, Enedina

    2016-02-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM. In (counter)transference relationship therapist's interpersonal style, implying the perceived relation of therapist to a client (patient) in terms of control, autonomy, care and positive feedback, has been shown to be important. The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between therapist's interpersonal style and clients' personality self-reports. Within therapist's interpersonal style, preliminary validation of the Therapist's Interpersonal Style Scale has been conducted, which included double translation method, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, as well as the reliability tests of the derived components. This research was conducted on a group of 206 clients, attending one of the four psychotherapy modalities: psychoanalysis, gestalt therapy, cognitive-behavioral and systemic family therapy. Beside Therapist's Interpersonal Style Scale, Big Five Questionnaire and Therapy Benefit Scale were administered, showing good internal consistency. Principal component analysis of therapist's interpersonal style singled out two components Supportive Autonomy and Ignoring Control, explaining 42% of variance. Two-factor model of the therapist's styles was better fitted in confirmatory factor analysis than the original 4-factor model. Structural model showing indirect and direct effects of therapist's interpersonal styles on self-reports in clients indicates good fitness (χ²(12) = 8.932, p = 0.709; goodness-of-fit index = 0.989), with Ignoring Control having direct effect on Stability, Supportive Autonomy on Therapy Benefit, and Therapy Benefit on Plasticity. The results of this study indicate the importance of further research on therapist's interpersonal style, as well as further validation of the instrument that measures this construct. Besides, a client's perception that the therapy is being helpful could instigate more explorative and approach-oriented behavior, what indirectly might contribute to a client's stability.

  17. Oxytocin and Interpersonal Relationships.

    PubMed

    Patin, Alexandra; Scheele, Dirk; Hurlemann, Rene

    2017-08-16

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has emerged as a potent modulator of diverse aspects of interpersonal relationships. OT appears to work in close interaction with several other neurotransmitter networks, including the dopaminergic reward circuit, and to be dependent on sex-specific hormonal influences. In this chapter, we focus on four main domains of OT and interpersonal relationships, including (1) the protective effect of OT on an individual's ability to withstand stress (i.e., stress buffering), (2) the effect of OT on emotion recognition and empathy, (3) OT's ability to enhance social synchrony and cooperation among individuals, and (4) the effect of OT on an individual's perception of social touch. We then illustrate the connection between OT and loneliness while grieving the loss of a loved one. We finish by discussing the clinical potential of OT, focusing on its potential role as an adjunct to psychotherapy, its enhancement through sex-specific hormonal influences, and the difficulties that present themselves when considering OT as a therapy. Overall, we argue that OT continues to hold strong therapeutic promise, but that it is strongly dependent on internal and external influences, for instance the patient's personal past experiences and interaction with the therapist in order to provide the best possible therapy.

  18. Interpersonal Skill Standards: Preventing the Proliferation of Competent Jerks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelon, Stephen; Druckman, Leora

    1993-01-01

    Explains the need for interpersonal skill standards to ensure that employees' interpersonal skills are as appropriate as their technical skills. Highlights include using groups to define interpersonal skill standards; how to derive interpersonal skill standards by consensus; and an example of interpersonal skill standards for doctors. (LRW)

  19. Assessment of patient interpersonal behavior: Development and validation of a rating scale.

    PubMed

    Richtberg, Samantha; Jakob, Marion; Höfling, Volkmar; Weck, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Patient in-session interpersonal behavior, as part of the therapeutic alliance, is an important aspect of the psychotherapy process and impacts treatment outcome. In the present study, the development and validation of a rating scale of patient in-session interpersonal behavior is described. A 10-item rating scale, the Assessment Form of Patient Interpersonal Behavior (AFPIB), was developed using an inductive procedure. The AFPIB was then validated in a sample of patients with hypochondriasis (N = 30), by having two independent raters assess patients' interpersonal behaviors shown in videotaped psychotherapy sessions (N = 60). The AFPIB demonstrated good reliability and validity. Thus, the AFPIB seems to be a promising rating scale for the assessment of patient interpersonal behavior shown in psychotherapy sessions.

  20. A pilot, quasi-experimental, mixed methods investigation into the efficacy of a group psychotherapy intervention for caregivers of outpatients with cancer: the COPE study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Rathi; Tan, Joyce Yi Siang; Griva, Konstadina; Lim, Haikel Asyraf; Ng, Hui Ying; Chua, Joanne; Lim, Siew Eng; Kua, Ee Heok

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite the rising trend of cancer prevalence and increase in family caregiving, little attention has been paid to the efficacy of psychosocial interventions among Asian caregiver samples, particularly support groups, given the benefits that have been shown in studies on Western populations. This trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot 4-week group psychotherapy for Singaporean family caregivers of patients receiving outpatient care. Methods and analysis Facilitated by a clinical psychologist, this intervention is primarily based on the brief integrative psychological therapy with a supportive-expressive intent. Participants will be recruited while they are accompanying their care recipients for outpatient consultations. Since this is a pilot study, a sample size of 120 participants is targeted on the basis of sample sizes of previous studies. The study adopts a quasi-experimental design, as participants are assigned the intervention or control arms based on their availability to attend the intervention. A mixed methods approach is used to evaluate the outcomes of the intervention. A self-administered battery of tests is completed at four time points: baseline, postintervention and follow-up at 1-month and 2-month postinterventions; semi-structured interviews are conducted at baseline and post-intervention. Primary outcomes are quality of life and anxious and depressive symptoms; secondary outcomes are stress and basic psychological needs. Analysis using analysis of covariance would be conducted to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. Ethics and dissemination This study protocol has ethics approval from the National Healthcare Group Domain Specific Review Board (NHG DSRB Ref: 2013/00662). Written informed consent is obtained from every participant. Results will be disseminated through journals and conferences, and will be particularly relevant for clinicians intending to implement similar support groups to address the

  1. [Is psychotherapy what we call "psychotherapy"?].

    PubMed

    Watzlawick, P

    1989-01-01

    "It is the theory that determines what we can observe", Einstein claimed as early as 50 years ago. His statement is valid also for psychotherapy: The basic assumptions of any school of psychotherapy regarding the nature of man and of change determine what seems to be possible or impossible (and therefore "wrong"). The paper examines the practical consequences of these assumptions from the point of view of modern constructivism.

  2. Culture and demoralization in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, John M; Gostoli, Sara

    2013-01-01

    In most societies, members of a culture have attempted to help each other in times of trouble with various types of healing methods. Demoralization - an individual experience related to a group phenomenon - responds to certain elements shared by all psychotherapies. This article has three objectives: (1) to review the theoretical background leading to our current views on culture and demoralization in psychotherapy, (2) to discuss the methodological challenges faced in the cross-cultural study of demoralization and psychotherapy, and (3) to describe the clinical applications and research prospects of this area of inquiry. Demoralization follows a shattering of the individual's assumptive world and it is different from homeostatic responses to a stressful situation or from depressive disorders. Only a few comparative studies of this construct across cultures have been undertaken. The presentation of distress may vary widely from culture to culture and even within the same culture. To avoid 'category fallacy', it is important to understand the idioms of distress peculiar to a cultural group. A cultural psychiatrist or psychotherapist would have to identify patient's values and sentiments, reconstruct his/her personal and collective ambient worlds, and only then study demoralization. The limitations of our current diagnostic systems have resulted in methodological challenges. Cultural clinicians should consider using a combination of both 'clinimetric' and 'perspectivistic' approaches in order to arrive at a diagnosis and identify the appropriate intervention. The presenting problem has to be understood in the context of the patient's individual, social and cultural background, and patients unfamiliar with Western-type psychotherapies have to be prepared to guide their own expectations before the former are used. Future research should identify the gaps in knowledge on the effectiveness of cultural psychotherapy at reversing or preventing demoralization. Copyright

  3. Interpersonal circumplex.

    PubMed

    Leary, T

    1996-04-01

    The social and intellectual climate of the late 1940s and early 1950s in America helped nourish humanistic, person-centered views of human behavior. During that time, psychologists such as Gordon Allport, Abraham Maslow, David McClelland, Harry Murray, and Carl Rogers emphasized the positive growth potential in human character. The psychiatrist Harry Stack Sullivan proposed that personality can best be understood within the context of interpersonal transactions, and he provided a practical, street-smart understanding of psychiatric symptoms that was quite an advance over the traditional medical and psychoanalytic viewpoints. These ideas, along with the concept of dimensionalizing traits rather than categorizing them, inspired my colleagues and I to conduct our cooperative work on the interpersonal circumplex, which culminated in the publication of my monograph. Interpersonal Diagnosis of Personality (Leary, 1957).

  4. Prescribing Brief Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schuyler, Dean

    2000-01-01

    Brief psychotherapy has demonstrated its effectiveness in treating emotional disorders and helping with problems that typically present to primary care physicians. Because practitioners receive little instruction about this treatment option and often have erroneous preconceived ideas about it, psychotherapy remains underprescribed. Effective brief therapy enables the patient to problem-solve, facilitates the relationship with the provider, and ultimately clarifies the patient's situation. Referral of appropriate patients for psychotherapy will enhance the effectiveness of the doctor in primary care. PMID:15014662

  5. Understanding processes of change: How some patients reveal more than others – and some groups of therapists less – about what matters in psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    DeRubeis, Robert J.; Gelfand, Lois A.; German, Ramaris E.; Fournier, Jay C.; Forand, Nicholas R.

    2014-01-01

    We identify difficulties researchers encounter in psychotherapy process-outcome investigations, and we describe several limitations of the popular “variance accounted for” approach to understanding the effects of psychotherapy. Using data simulations, we show how the expected correlation between an excellent measure of therapy quality and outcome would be surprisingly small (approximately .25) under conditions likely to be common in psychotherapy research. Even when we modeled conditions designed to increase the likelihood that strong process-outcome relationships would be observed, we found that the expected correlations were still only in the modest range (.38 – .51). We discuss the implications of our analysis for the interpretation of process-outcome findings as well as for design considerations in future investigations. PMID:24219275

  6. [Psychotherapy and efficacy].

    PubMed

    Papp, Barbara; Péley, Bernadette

    2015-01-25

    Evaluation of the efficacy in psychotherapy dates back to the beginnings of psychotherapy itself. However, it is not an easy task to undertake efficacy evaluation because it is expensive and several methodological difficulties may be also present. The authors discuss some questions related efficacy evaluation in psychotherapy, including criteria for selecting the cases and the actual target of evaluation. In addition, the authors analyze the narrative psychological content analysis method which includes the analysis of psychological features and their changes of texts written by the patient about him- or herself. They conclude that this method can open novel perspectives in psychotherapy.

  7. NON-DIRECTIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lloyd F.

    1950-01-01

    Psychotherapy is a word to describe an age-old process. It would be better not to speak of psychotherapy, but of psychotherapies. Specialists are not the only ones who act as psychotherapists, since every human being fills this role at one time or another. Besides this, no two persons follow an identical approach. Finally, all therapists change technique constantly. The kinds of psychotherapy must therefore approach infinity. Some physicians appear to assume that only one type of psychotherapy may claim a scientific basis. Although Freud first put psychotherapy on a scientific path, there is no reason to say that Freud must be the last in this field. Over the past few years a new trend has started in psychotherapy which deserves close study. This new trend challenges some old beliefs and gives a new tool to help patients of some types. It is called non-directive or client-centered psychotherapy. This therapy does not try to solve the patient's problems for him, but rather establishes the conditions under which a patient can work out his own salvation. Each year non-directive psychotherapy grows in importance. Much can be learned from the method. PMID:14778014

  8. Attachment theory: a biological basis for psychotherapy?

    PubMed

    Holmes, J

    1993-10-01

    John Bowlby bemoaned the separation between the biological and psychological approaches in psychiatry, and hoped that attachment theory, which brings together psychoanalysis and the science of ethology, would help bridge the rift between them. Recent findings in developmental psychology have delineated features of parent-infant interaction, especially responsiveness, attunement, and modulation of affect, which lead to either secure or insecure attachment. Similar principles can be applied to the relationship between psychotherapist and patient--the provision of a secure base, the emergence of a shared narrative ('autobiographical competence'), the processing of affect, coping with loss--these are common to most effective psychotherapies and provide the basis for a new interpersonal paradigm within psychotherapy. Attachment theory suggests they rest on a sound ethological and hence biological foundation.

  9. Effectiveness of a School-Based Group Psychotherapy Program for War-Exposed Adolescents: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, Christopher M.; Saltzman, William R.; Poppleton, Landon; Burlingame, Gary M.; Pasalic, Alma; Durakovic, Elvira; Music, Mirjana; Campara, Nihada; Dapo, Nermin; Arslanagic, Berina; Steinberg, Alan M.; Pynoos, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The study assesses the comparative efficacy of a classroom-based psycho-education and skills intervention and a school-based trauma- and grief-focused group treatment of a three-tiered mental health program for adolescents exposed to severe war-trauma, traumatic bereavement, and postwar adversity. The two-tier approach, combined with…

  10. Effectiveness of a School-Based Group Psychotherapy Program for War-Exposed Adolescents: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, Christopher M.; Saltzman, William R.; Poppleton, Landon; Burlingame, Gary M.; Pasalic, Alma; Durakovic, Elvira; Music, Mirjana; Campara, Nihada; Dapo, Nermin; Arslanagic, Berina; Steinberg, Alan M.; Pynoos, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The study assesses the comparative efficacy of a classroom-based psycho-education and skills intervention and a school-based trauma- and grief-focused group treatment of a three-tiered mental health program for adolescents exposed to severe war-trauma, traumatic bereavement, and postwar adversity. The two-tier approach, combined with…

  11. Positive Narrative Group Psychotherapy: the use of traditional fairy tales to enhance psychological well-being and growth.

    PubMed

    Ruini, Chiara; Masoni, Licia; Ottolini, Fedra; Ferrari, Silvia

    Oral narrative strategies have rarely been applied in the positive psychology domain. Traditional folk and fairy tales are concerned with several concepts that are now scientifically investigated by research on positive psychology, such as resilience, self-realization, personal growth and meaning in life. The aim of this pilot study was to apply a new narrative approach based on fairy tales (Märchen, tales of magic, rise tales) told, discussed, and written in a group context for the purpose of promoting psychological well-being and growth. A group intervention consisting of 7 sessions was delivered to 21 women who reported adjustment disorder. The group was conducted by a folklorist and a clinical psychologist. Each session consisted of an introduction to a number of themes recurring in fairy tales as well as references to the social uses of narratives, followed by a discussion with the participants. In two concluding workshops, participants were asked to work as a group to write their own original fairy tale. Assessment pre- and post-intervention was performed with the Ryff Psychological Well-being Scale, the Kellner Symptom Questionnaire and 2 subscales of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (Appreciation of Life and personal strengths). Participants reported increased personal growth, self-acceptance, and an enhanced sense of appreciation of life and personal strengths, together with decreased levels of anxiety. This pilot investigation suggests the feasibility and positive effect of a group intervention based on narrative strategies for promoting well-being and growth in stressed women. Considering its promising results, clinical implications and possible further applications are discussed.

  12. [The limits and power of psychotherapy: a critical reading].

    PubMed

    Lalli, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    The psychotherapy has been founded as "scientific" discipline since the separation from philosophy and mainly religion. During the last two decades, the increasing frequency of groups that hide sectarian and religious aims behind the psychotherapy denomination, forces two tasks. On one hand we must propose the foundations of the psychotherapeutic process and the methods to evaluate its effects. On the other hand we must highlight that in these groups some procedures and behaviours are the opposit of the psychotherapy principles. In such cases we can talk of "denied psychotherapy".

  13. Changes in sexual behavior of HIV-infected older adults enrolled in a clinical trial of standalone group psychotherapies targeting depression.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, Travis I; Heckman, Timothy G; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Hansen, Nathan B; Kochman, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    By 2015, one-half of all HIV-positive persons in the U.S. will be 50-plus years of age, and as many as 30 % of older adults living with HIV/AIDS continue to engage in unprotected sexual intercourse. Contemporary positive prevention models often include mental health treatment as a key component of HIV prevention interventions. This secondary data analysis characterized longitudinal patterns of sexual behavior in HIV-positive older adults enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of group mental health interventions and assessed the efficacy of psychosocial treatments that targeted depression to reduce sexual risk behavior. Participants were 295 HIV-positive adults ≥50 years of age experiencing mild to severe depressive symptoms, randomized to one of three study conditions: a 12-session coping improvement group intervention, a 12-session interpersonal support group intervention, or individual therapy upon request. Approximately one-fifth of participants reported one or more occasions of unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse with HIV-negative sexual partners or persons of unknown HIV serostatus over the study period. Changes in sexual behavior did not vary by intervention condition, indicating that standalone treatments that target and reduce depression may be insufficient to reduce sexual risk behavior in depressed HIV-positive older adults.

  14. Changes in sexual behavior of HIV-infected older adults enrolled in a clinical trial of standalone group psychotherapies targeting depression

    PubMed Central

    Lovejoy, Travis I.; Heckman, Timothy G.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Kochman, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    By 2015, one-half of all HIV-positive persons in the U.S. will be 50-plus years of age, and as many as 30% of older adults living with HIV/AIDS continue to engage in unprotected sexual intercourse. Contemporary positive prevention models often include mental health treatment as a key component of HIV prevention interventions. This secondary data analysis characterized longitudinal patterns of sexual behavior in HIV-positive older adults enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of group mental health interventions and assessed the efficacy of psychosocial treatments that targeted depression to reduce sexual risk behavior. Participants were 295 HIV-positive adults ≥ 50 years of age experiencing mild to severe depressive symptoms, randomized to one of three study conditions: a 12-session coping improvement group intervention, a 12-session interpersonal support group intervention, or individual therapy upon request. Approximately one-fifth of participants reported one or more occasions of unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse with HIV-negative sexual partners or persons of unknown HIV serostatus over the study period. Changes in sexual behavior did not vary by intervention condition, indicating that standalone treatments that target and reduce depression may be insufficient to reduce sexual risk behavior in depressed HIV-positive older adults. PMID:24668254

  15. Interpersonal Theory and Depressed Adolescents: An Overview of Method and Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellin, Elizabeth Anne

    In an attempt of fill the gap in theoretical and empirical information available for treatment of adolescent depression, interpersonal therapy for adolescents (IPT-A) was developed. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is a brief, time-limited therapy originally developed for use with adults diagnosed with major depression. Several outcome studies…

  16. Should psychotherapy consider reincarnation?

    PubMed

    Peres, Julio F P

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing recognition of the need to take into account the cultural environment and belief systems of psychotherapy patients because these values reflect basic assumptions about man's nature and the cognitive references used to cope with psychological difficulties. Currently accepted psychotherapeutic approaches take no account of the belief in life after death held by most of the world's population. The World Values Survey (http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org) showed that there are large numbers of reincarnationists around the world, and whatever the reasons for believing in reincarnation, psychotherapeutic approaches should not ignore this significant group of people. Respect for patient opinions and subjective realities is a therapeutic need and an ethical duty, even though therapists may not share the same beliefs. Guidelines are suggested for professionals to develop collaborative models that help patients mobilize their intrinsic intelligence to find solutions to their complaints.

  17. Group training in interpersonal problem-solving skills for workplace adaptation of adolescents and adults with Asperger syndrome: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bonete, Saray; Calero, María Dolores; Fernández-Parra, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Adults with Asperger syndrome show persistent difficulties in social situations which psychosocial treatments may address. Despite the multiple studies focusing on social skills interventions, only some have focused specifically on problem-solving skills and have not targeted workplace adaptation training in the adult population. This study describes preliminary data from a group format manual-based intervention, the Interpersonal Problem-Solving for Workplace Adaptation Programme, aimed at improving the cognitive and metacognitive process of social problem-solving skills focusing on typical social situations in the workplace based on mediation as the main strategy. A total of 50 adults with Asperger syndrome received the programme and were compared with a control group of typical development. The feasibility and effectiveness of the treatment were explored. Participants were assessed at pre-treatment and post-treatment on a task of social problem-solving skills and two secondary measures of socialisation and work profile using self- and caregiver-report. Using a variety of methods, the results showed that scores were significantly higher at post-treatment in the social problem-solving task and socialisation skills based on reports by parents. Differences in comparison to the control group had decreased after treatment. The treatment was acceptable to families and subject adherence was high. The Interpersonal Problem-Solving for Workplace Adaptation Programme appears to be a feasible training programme. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. A pilot, quasi-experimental, mixed methods investigation into the efficacy of a group psychotherapy intervention for caregivers of outpatients with cancer: the COPE study protocol.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, Rathi; Tan, Joyce Yi Siang; Griva, Konstadina; Lim, Haikel Asyraf; Ng, Hui Ying; Chua, Joanne; Lim, Siew Eng; Kua, Ee Heok

    2015-11-19

    Despite the rising trend of cancer prevalence and increase in family caregiving, little attention has been paid to the efficacy of psychosocial interventions among Asian caregiver samples, particularly support groups, given the benefits that have been shown in studies on Western populations. This trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot 4-week group psychotherapy for Singaporean family caregivers of patients receiving outpatient care. Facilitated by a clinical psychologist, this intervention is primarily based on the brief integrative psychological therapy with a supportive-expressive intent. Participants will be recruited while they are accompanying their care recipients for outpatient consultations. Since this is a pilot study, a sample size of 120 participants is targeted on the basis of sample sizes of previous studies. The study adopts a quasi-experimental design, as participants are assigned the intervention or control arms based on their availability to attend the intervention. A mixed methods approach is used to evaluate the outcomes of the intervention. A self-administered battery of tests is completed at four time points: baseline, postintervention and follow-up at 1-month and 2-month postinterventions; semi-structured interviews are conducted at baseline and post-intervention. Primary outcomes are quality of life and anxious and depressive symptoms; secondary outcomes are stress and basic psychological needs. Analysis using analysis of covariance would be conducted to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. This study protocol has ethics approval from the National Healthcare Group Domain Specific Review Board (NHG DSRB Ref: 2013/00662). Written informed consent is obtained from every participant. Results will be disseminated through journals and conferences, and will be particularly relevant for clinicians intending to implement similar support groups to address the psychosocial concerns of caregivers, as well as for researchers

  19. Comparison of Verbal Reinforcement with Information Feedback in Analogue Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Michael R.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty Ss were assigned randomly to one of two experimental analogue psychotherapy groups and a control group. Two different psychotherapy techniques were used and were significantly effective in improving self-ratings of self-concept. However, these techniques were differentially effective in improving social skills as measured by behavioral…

  20. Psychotherapy in Caribbean Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefley, Harriet P.; Bestman, Evalina W.

    Caribbean mental health professionals are concerned with the types of psychotherapy that are relevant to the needs of their clients, and with the uses of psychotherapy in a political context. They appear to be divided into two schools: one seeking to promote in clients a change from a traditional world view to a modern one, and the other seeking…

  1. The Play of Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews the role of play within psychotherapy. She does not discuss the formal play therapy especially popular for young children, nor play from the Jungian perspective that encourages the use of the sand tray with adults. Instead, she focuses on the informal use of play during psychotherapy as it is orchestrated intuitively. Because…

  2. Psychotherapy and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BUCKLEY, PETER F.; LYS, CHRISTINE

    1996-01-01

    Psychotherapy for patients with schizophrenia, although almost universally practiced in some form with clinical management of schizophrenia, has not been the present focus of such rigorous scientific inquiry as has been afforded to other current treatment modalities. This review highlights areas of potential progress and opportunities for clearer definition of psychotherapies for schizophrenia. PMID:22700288

  3. Interpersonal Communications Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buel, Sue; Hosford, Charles

    The major purpose of an interpersonal communications workshop is to provide participants the opportunity to acquire knowledge and practice skills in face-to-face communication, individual communicating style, group and organizational factors which affect communication, and continued improvement of individual communication skills. The exercises in…

  4. Interpersonal Subtypes of Anxiety Disorder Patients: Relationship to Assessment and Treatment Variables.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Seth R; Hilsenroth, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    We attempted to replicate earlier findings of interpersonal subtypes in patients with anxiety disorder (Psychotherapy. 2011;48:304-310) and examine whether these subtypes are characterized by different types of pathology and respond differently to treatment. Interpersonal problems were measured by the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (Inventory of Interpersonal Problems Manual. San Antonio, TX: Psychological Cooperation; 2000) in a sample of 31 patients with anxiety disorder. Results demonstrated the existence of 4 interpersonal subtypes. The subtypes did not differ in severity of anxiety and global levels of symptoms at pretreatment or in Reliable Change Index of anxiety symptoms over the course of treatment. However, they were significantly different in terms of overall interpersonal problems (p = 0.004). Regarding treatment variables, half of the patients in the nonassertive cluster discontinued treatment prematurely. The number of psychotherapy sessions attended was significantly different across the 4 clusters (p = 0.04), with socially avoidant patients attending significantly greater number of sessions.

  5. [The importance of transference in Junguian psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Scotillo, Irene Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Transference is an absolutely natural and spontaneous process which cannot be developed in an artificial and voluntary manner by the therapist. Transference is carried out in a subjective interpersonal relation consisting of a patient and an analyst. Jung will say he feels happy when transference takes place calmly or runs virtually unnoticed and the therapist can then focus on other therapeutic factors that play an important role. One could argue that Jungian psychotherapy consists of two people who get together to try to understand what is happening in the subconscious of one of them. The Jungian therapist is an active therapist who encourages and helps the patient to develop its individuation.

  6. The Role of Attachment Functions in Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Jeremy; Severino, Sally K.; Morrison, Nancy K.

    2000-01-01

    The authors propose to clarify concepts of emotional attunement and failures of attunement in early development derived from theoretical and clinical work (Kohut) and infant psychiatry (Stern). Early attunement failures are experienced as shameful by the infant/child, and without repair they form a nidus for later destructive adult interpersonal relationships, “social blindness,” and depression. The authors present a case illustrating these ideas. The role of empathic attunement experienced in the unique setting/structure of psychotherapy emerges as the single critical variable for a successful outcome. PMID:10608906

  7. The role of attachment functions in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, J; Severino, S K; Morrison, N K

    2000-01-01

    The authors propose to clarify concepts of emotional attunement and failures of attunement in early development derived from theoretical and clinical work (Kohut) and infant psychiatry (Stern). Early attunement failures are experienced as shameful by the infant/child, and without repair they form a nidus for later destructive adult interpersonal relationships, "social blindness," and depression. The authors present a case illustrating these ideas. The role of empathic attunement experienced in the unique setting/structure of psychotherapy emerges as the single critical variable for a successful outcome.

  8. [Psychotherapy in bipolar disorders -- randomised controlled trials of treatment efficacy].

    PubMed

    Rode, Sibylle; Wagner, Petra; Bräunig, Peter

    2006-03-01

    On the basis of a vulnerability-stress-model psycho-educative, cognitive-behavioural, family-oriented and interpersonal approaches of psychotherapy for bipolar disorders are described. This is followed by a review of randomised controlled trials investigating the treatment efficacy of psychotherapeutic interventions. These studies show positive results particularly for psychoeducation, cognitive-behavioural therapy and family-oriented therapy. Finally, it is discussed in which respects evidence for the successful implementation of psychotherapy is still missing and why it is so important to move towards manualized psychotherapeutic programs.

  9. Spiritual energy of Islamic prayers as a catalyst for psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Henry, Hani M

    2015-04-01

    Islamic prayers can produce spiritual energy that may yield many psychological benefits, such as amelioration of stress and improvement in subjective well-being, interpersonal sensitivity, and mastery. Islamic prayers can also be integrated into mainstream therapeutic interventions with religious Muslim clients, and this integration can mobilize, transform, and invigorate the process of psychotherapy. This paper provides methods that can be used for the explicit integration of Islamic prayers into traditional psychotherapy. Further, the paper offers strategies for avoiding potential pitfalls that may hamper this process. Finally, a case study illustrating this therapeutic integration and its psychological benefits will be presented.

  10. The feasibility of adapted group-based interpersonal therapy (IPT) for the treatment of depression by community health workers within the context of task shifting in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Petersen, I; Bhana, A; Baillie, K

    2012-06-01

    Within the context of a large treatment gap for depression and a scarcity of specialist resources, there is a need for task shifting to scale up mental health services to address this gap in South Africa. This study assessed the feasibility of an adapted manualized version of grouped based Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) for use by supervised community health workers through a pilot study on 60 primary health care clinic users screened as having moderate to severe depression. Retention was good and participants in the group-based IPT intervention showed significant reduction in depressive symptoms on completion of the 12-week intervention as well as 24 weeks post baseline compared to the control group. Qualitative process evaluation suggests that improved social support, individual coping skills and improved personal agency assisted in the reduction of depressive symptoms.

  11. Interpersonal Theory and Adolescents with Depression: Clinical Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellin, Elizabeth A.; Beamish, Patricia M.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides mental health counselors with information about the prevalence and course of adolescent depression, other empirically tested treatments for adolescent depression, an explanation of Interpersonal psychotherapy for adolescents (IPT-A) treatment protocol, and results of outcome studies on the effectiveness of IPT-A. Suggestions…

  12. An Investigation of the Relationship Between the Alliance Negotiation Scale and Psychotherapy Process and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Doran, Jennifer M; Safran, Jeremy D; Muran, J Christopher

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the validity of the Alliance Negotiation Scale (ANS) in a psychotherapy research program. Analyses were designed to evaluate the relationship between the ANS and psychotherapy process and outcome variables. Data were collected in a metropolitan psychotherapy research program. Participants completed 30 sessions of therapy, postsession assessments, and a battery of measures at intake and termination. Relationships were found between the ANS and session outcome, working alliance, and the presence of ruptures and their resolution. Relationships emerged between the ANS and treatment outcome on measures of psychiatric distress and interpersonal problems. The ANS demonstrated relationships with several psychotherapy process and outcome variables. The ANS was the most differentiated from the working alliance on measures of interpersonal functioning and in discriminating personality disorder pathology. These results extend previous findings on the ANS' psychometric integrity, and offer new data on the relationship between negotiation and treatment outcome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Emotion-focused psychotherapy for patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Shear, M K; Houck, P; Greeno, C; Masters, S

    2001-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that most patients treated for panic disorder receive forms of psychotherapy other than cognitive behavior therapy, even though there is little information about the efficacy of such treatments or how they compare to proven active treatments. The authors compared one of these other forms, emotion-focused psychotherapy (given to 30 patients with panic disorder), to results obtained with recommended standard treatment (either cognitive behavior therapy [N=36] or imipramine [N=22]). The authors also compared emotion-focused psychotherapy to results obtained in subjects given pill placebo (N=24). Subjects met DSM-IV criteria for panic disorder with no more than mild agoraphobia. Treatment consisted of approximately 3 months of weekly visits followed by 6 monthly maintenance visits. Assessments were conducted after each treatment phase and at a follow-up visit after 6 months of no treatment. Emotion-focused psychotherapy was less effective for symptoms of panic disorder than treatment with either cognitive behavior therapy or imipramine; results obtained with emotion-focused psychotherapy after the acute and maintenance phases were similar to those seen with placebo. Treatment expectations were not different among the different groups. Patients receiving emotion-focused psychotherapy had the highest completion rate. The results suggest that emotion-focused psychotherapy (a supportive form of psychotherapy) has low efficacy for the treatment of panic disorder. However, emotion-focused psychotherapy may be superior to medical management in helping patients stay in treatment.

  14. Are There Subtypes of Panic Disorder? An Interpersonal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zilcha-Mano, Sigal; McCarthy, Kevin S.; Dinger, Ulrike; Chambless, Dianne L.; Milrod, Barbara L.; Kunik, Lauren; Barber, Jacques P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Panic disorder (PD) is associated with significant personal, social, and economic costs. However, little is known about specific interpersonal dysfunctions that characterize the PD population. The current study systematically examined these interpersonal dysfunctions. Method The present analyses included 194 patients with PD out of a sample of 201 who were randomized to cognitive-behavioral therapy, panic-focused psychodynamic psychotherapy, or applied relaxation training. Interpersonal dysfunction was measured using the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems–Circumplex (Horowitz, Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 2000). Results Individuals with PD reported greater levels of interpersonal distress than that of a normative cohort (especially when PD was accompanied by agoraphobia), but lower than that of a cohort of patients with major depression. There was no single interpersonal profile that characterized PD patients. Symptom-based clusters (with versus without agoraphobia) could not be discriminated on core or central interpersonal problems. Rather, as revealed by cluster analysis based on the pathoplasticity framework, there were two empirically derived interpersonal clusters among PD patients which were not accounted for by symptom severity and were opposite in nature: domineering-intrusive and nonassertive. The empirically derived interpersonal clusters appear to be of clinical utility in predicting alliance development throughout treatment: While the domineering-intrusive cluster did not show any changes in the alliance throughout treatment, the non-assertive cluster showed a process of significant strengthening of the alliance. Conclusions Empirically derived interpersonal clusters in PD provide clinically useful and non-redundant information about individuals with PD. PMID:26030762

  15. Synchrony in Psychotherapy: A Review and an Integrative Framework for the Therapeutic Alliance

    PubMed Central

    Koole, Sander L.; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    During psychotherapy, patient and therapist tend to spontaneously synchronize their vocal pitch, bodily movements, and even their physiological processes. In the present article, we consider how this pervasive phenomenon may shed new light on the therapeutic relationship– or alliance– and its role within psychotherapy. We first review clinical research on the alliance and the multidisciplinary area of interpersonal synchrony. We then integrate both literatures in the Interpersonal Synchrony (In-Sync) model of psychotherapy. According to the model, the alliance is grounded in the coupling of patient and therapist’s brains. Because brains do not interact directly, movement synchrony may help to establish inter-brain coupling. Inter-brain coupling may provide patient and therapist with access to another’s internal states, which facilitates common understanding and emotional sharing. Over time, these interpersonal exchanges may improve patients’ emotion-regulatory capacities and related therapeutic outcomes. We discuss the empirical assessment of interpersonal synchrony and review preliminary research on synchrony in psychotherapy. Finally, we summarize our main conclusions and consider the broader implications of viewing psychotherapy as the product of two interacting brains. PMID:27378968

  16. A Content Validity Study of AIMIT (Assessing Interpersonal Motivation in Transcripts).

    PubMed

    Fassone, Giovanni; Lo Reto, Floriana; Foggetti, Paola; Santomassimo, Chiara; D'Onofrio, Maria Rita; Ivaldi, Antonella; Liotti, Giovanni; Trincia, Valeria; Picardi, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    Multi-motivational theories of human relatedness state that different motivational systems with an evolutionary basis modulate interpersonal relationships. The reliable assessment of their dynamics may usefully inform the understanding of the therapeutic relationship. The coding system of the Assessing Interpersonal Motivation in Transcripts (AIMIT) allows to identify in the clinical the activity of five main interpersonal motivational systems (IMSs): attachment (care-seeking), caregiving, ranking, sexuality and peer cooperation. To assess whether the criteria currently used to score the AIMIT are consistently correlated with the conceptual formulation of the interpersonal multi-motivational theory, two different studies were designed. Study 1: Content validity as assessed by highly qualified independent raters. Study 2: Content validity as assessed by unqualified raters. Results of study 1 show that out of the total 60 AIMIT verbal criteria, 52 (86.7%) met the required minimum degree of correspondence. The average semantic correspondence scores between these items and the related IMSs were quite good (overall mean: 3.74, standard deviation: 0.61). In study 2, a group of 20 naïve raters had to identify each prevalent motivation (IMS) in a random sequence of 1000 utterances drawn from therapy sessions. Cohen's Kappa coefficient was calculated for each rater with reference to each IMS and then calculated the average Kappa for all raters for each IMS. All average Kappa values were satisfactory (>0.60) and ranged between 0.63 (ranking system) and 0.83 (sexuality system). Data confirmed the overall soundness of AIMIT's theoretical-applicative approach. Results are discussed, corroborating the hypothesis that the AIMIT possesses the required criteria for content validity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Assessing Interpersonal Motivations in psychotherapy transcripts as a useful tool to better understand links between motivational systems and intersubjectivity

  17. [Personal resources in inpatient psychotherapy - Relationships and development].

    PubMed

    Kati, Alexandra; Stumpf, Astrid; Heuft, Gereon; Burgmer, Markus; Schneider, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    We examined how personal resources develop during inpatient psychodynamic psychotherapy, their relationship to symptom development, Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnosis (OPD-2), and sociodemographic aspects. 483 patients were examined using self-assessment questionnaires (Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP), Questionnaire of Actual Resource Realization (RES)) as well as the expert ratings Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF), Impairment Score (IS), OPD-2, and the Heidelberg Structural Change Scale (HSCS), both at the beginning and the end of treatment. There was a marked improvement in the realization of personal resources during inpatient psychotherapy, which showed significant correlations to the improvement of symptoms. The extent of improvement of resources correlated with the duration of psychotherapy and the assessment of the psychodynamic therapy foci on the HSCS. The results show that personal resources are activated when successfully working on the psychodynamic foci in psychodynamic inpatient treatment, and that this corresponds to an improvement of symptoms.

  18. Metacognitive mastery dysfunctions in personality disorder psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Carcione, Antonino; Nicolò, Giuseppe; Pedone, Roberto; Popolo, Raffaele; Conti, Laura; Fiore, Donatella; Procacci, Michele; Semerari, Antonio; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2011-11-30

    Individuals with personality disorders (PDs) have difficulties in modulating mental states and in coping with interpersonal problems according to a mentalistic formulation of the problem. In this article we analyzed the first 16 psychotherapy sessions of 14 PD patients in order to explore whether their abilities to master distress and interpersonal problems were actually impaired and how they changed during the early therapy phase. We used the Mastery Section of the Metacognition Assessment Scale, which assesses the use of mentalistic knowledge to solve problems and promote adaptation. We explored the hypotheses that a) PD patients had problems in using their mentalistic knowledge to master distress and solve social problems; b) the impairments were partially stable and only a minimal improvement could be observed during the analyzed period; c) patients' mastery preferences differed from one another; d) at the beginning of treatment the more effective strategies were those involving minimal knowledge about mental states. Results seemed to support the hypotheses; the patients examined had significant difficulties in mastery abilities, and these difficulties persisted after 16 sessions. Moreover, the attitudes towards problem-solving were not homogenous across the patients. Lastly, we discuss implications for assessment and treatment of metacognitive disorders in psychotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Psychotherapist mindfulness and the psychotherapy process.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Noah; Bruce, Noah G; Shapiro, Shauna L; Constantino, Michael J; Manber, Rachel

    2010-03-01

    [Correction Notice: An erratum for this article was reported in Vol 47(2) of Psychotherapy: Theory, Research & Practice (see record 2010-13424-005). the order of authorship and the affiliations of the authors was incorrectly printed. The correct order and affiliations are as follows: Noah Bruce, Shauna L. Shapiro, Michael J. Constantino, and Rachel Manber; Kaiser Permanente, Santa Clara University, University of Massachusetts, Stanford University] A psychotherapist's ability to relate to his or her patients is essential for decreasing patient suffering and promoting patient growth. However, the psychotherapy field has identified few effective means for training psychotherapists in this ability. In this conceptual article, we propose that mindfulness practice may be a means for training psychotherapists to better relate to their patients. We posit that mindfulness is a means of self-attunement that increases one's ability to attune to others (in this case, patients) and that this interpersonal attunement ultimately helps patients achieve greater self-attunement that, in turn, fosters decreased symptom severity, greater well-being, and better interpersonal relationships. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Values in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Holmes, J

    1996-01-01

    There is a tension between those who hold that psychotherapy is a scientific discipline and therefore "value-free," and those who believe that values are inherent in the nature of psychotherapy. Psychoanalysis has moved from a science-based ideology, through the ethical concerns of Melanie Klein, to a recognition of the "aesthetic" dimension--the creation of suitable forms that can contain psychological distress. From this latter perspective, the antagonism between religion and psychotherapy, initiated by Freud, becomes less acute. Action-based ethical systems, which ignore the inner world, are critically scrutinized. The evidence suggesting there is a relationship between good outcome in psychotherapy and shared values between therapist and client is reviewed. It is posited that through examination of the "ethical countertransference," therapists should become aware of their own value systems and how they influence practice.

  1. Student Attitudes Toward Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farber, Barry A.; Geller, Jesse D.

    1977-01-01

    Psychotherapy is viewed by college students as highly useful in dealing with living problems, yet--when given the availability of other treatment methods (peer interaction, yoga, meditation)-- it is frequently not the first choice of the student. (MJB)

  2. On Running and Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Denzel; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Frederic Leer's article "Running as an Adjunct to Psychotherapy" (January 1980 issue of this journal) is criticized by three authors. They focus on the psychological and social effects of running and its usefulness as a treatment for depressed adults. (LAB)

  3. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... social worker. When used with other types of treatment (such as medications or individual psychotherapy), STEPPS can help reduce symptoms and problem BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve quality of life. Dynamic Deconstructive Therapy ( ...

  4. Group Psychotherapeutic Factors and Perceived Social Support Among Veterans With PTSD Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Cox, Daniel W; Owen, Jess J; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2017-02-01

    One of the most potent protective factors against psychiatric symptoms after military trauma is perceived social support. Although group psychotherapy has been linked with increasing social support, no research has evaluated which therapeutic mechanisms are associated with this increase beyond symptom reduction. We investigated which interpersonal therapeutic factors were related to changes in social support, beyond posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom reduction. Participants were 117 veterans in a multimodal outpatient group psychotherapy treatment designed to reduce PTSD symptoms and interpersonal difficulties. Generally, therapeutic factors were related to improvements in social support from baseline to posttreatment beyond the effects of PTSD symptom reduction. Specifically, social learning was associated with changes in appraisal support, secure emotional expression was associated with changes in tangible support, and neither was associated with changes in belonging support. Depending on the goals of treatment, understanding these variations are important so clinicians and researchers can appropriately design and target their interventions to facilitate desired changes.

  5. Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy: A Form of Psychotherapy for Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Emily A.; Irwin, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Caring for patients with cancer involves addressing their myriad physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. Although many cancer treatments focus on physical or psychological needs, few treatments specifically target the basic need for meaning and spiritual well-being in this population. This article describes the creation and evolution of a new psychotherapy devoted to these needs, a therapy termed “meaning-centered psychotherapy.” In this article, a detailed description of meaning-centered psychotherapy is provided. An explanation of the current research findings related to this treatment are also offered, with information about the various group and individual treatments as well as the new expansions for use with cancer survivors or nursing staff. Overall, meaning-centered psychotherapy shows promise for enhancing meaning and spiritual well-being among patients with cancer and offers exciting possibilities for future research in other areas. PMID:25182513

  6. Commentary: forensic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Altshul, Victor A

    2013-01-01

    Yakeley and Adshead present a broad view of the increasing influence of psychodynamically informed thought and practice on the British criminal justice system, adumbrating a model they call forensic psychotherapy. They explore such topics as mitigating factors, influences on recidivism, and psychotherapy with incarcerated inmates. While I am sympathetic with their overall aims, I outline some theoretical and practical difficulties in attempting to wed two very different systems of thought and the limitations that these difficulties impose.

  7. Introduction: Psychotherapy for Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Beginning with Paul Federn--a contemporary of Sigmund Freud--every generation of psychotherapists for the past hundred years has included a small number of determined clinicians who have worked psychotherapeutically with psychotic patients, and written about their work. This special issue of the American Journal of Psychotherapy contains seven papers by clinicians in this generation who are using psychotherapy in the treatment of psychosis.

  8. Special Forces Interpersonal Performance Assessment System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Phase I interpersonal performance assessment system: selection of the target group , identification of performance dimensions, and performance scale...development. > Target Group Selection The U.S. Army Special Forces (SF) was chosen as the target group because interpersonal skills are critical for the...1 IDENTIFYING THE TARGET GROUP ................................................................................... 2 IDENTIFYING CRITICAL

  9. Psychotherapy for subclinical depression: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cuijpers, Pim; Koole, Sander L.; van Dijke, Annemiek; Roca, Miquel; Li, Juan; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is controversy about whether psychotherapies are effective in the treatment of subclinical depression, defined by clinically relevant depressive symptoms in the absence of a major depressive disorder. Aims To examine whether psychotherapies are effective in reducing depressive symptoms, reduce the risk of developing major depressive disorder and have comparable effects to psychological treatment of major depression. Method We conducted a meta-analysis of 18 studies comparing a psychological treatment of subclinical depression with a control group. Results The target groups, therapies and characteristics of the included studies differed considerably from each other, and the quality of many studies was not optimal. Psychotherapies did have a small to moderate effect on depressive symptoms against care as usual at the post-test assessment (g = 0.35, 95% CI 0.23-0.47; NNT = 5, 95% CI 4-8) and significantly reduced the incidence of major depressive episodes at 6 months (RR = 0.61) and possibly at 12 months (RR = 0.74). The effects were significantly smaller than those of psychotherapy for major depressive disorder and could be accounted for by non-specific effects of treatment. Conclusions Psychotherapy may be effective in the treatment of subclinical depression and reduce the incidence of major depression, but more high-quality research is needed. PMID:25274315

  10. On the social influence of emotions in groups: interpersonal effects of anger and happiness on conformity versus deviance.

    PubMed

    Heerdink, Marc W; van Kleef, Gerben A; Homan, Astrid C; Fischer, Agneta H

    2013-08-01

    How do emotional expressions of group members shape conformity versus deviance in groups? We hypothesized that angry and happy responses to a group member's deviating opinion are interpreted as signals of imminent rejection versus acceptance. In 5 studies, the majority's expressions of anger led the deviant individual to feel rejected, whereas expressions of happiness made the deviant feel accepted. Because conformity can be seen as strategic behavior aimed at gaining (re)acceptance, the effects of emotional expressions on conformity should be moderated by social-contextual factors that determine the motivation to be accepted by the group and by the extent to which conformity is a means to this end. Accordingly, in Study 2, the availability of alternative groups determined whether a deviant conformed to the current group or abandoned the group after an angry reaction. In Study 3, anger and happiness were only associated with conformity pressure in situations that were perceived as cooperative (rather than competitive). Employing an interactive group task in Study 4, we showed that individuals who received an angry reaction contributed less in a cooperative group task than did those who received a neutral or happy reaction. Finally, in Study 5, peripheral group members conformed more after an angry reaction than after a happy reaction, but prototypical group members did not. Moreover, conformity was still manifest 3 weeks after the experiment, and this effect was mediated by feelings of rejection. We discuss implications of these findings for theorizing about social functions of emotions and the role of emotions in groups.

  11. Changes in prefrontal-limbic function in major depression after 15 months of long-term psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Anna; Viviani, Roberto; Kessler, Henrik; Kächele, Horst; Cierpka, Manfred; Roth, Gerhard; George, Carol; Kernberg, Otto F; Bruns, Georg; Taubner, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of depression have demonstrated treatment-specific changes involving the limbic system and regulatory regions in the prefrontal cortex. While these studies have examined the effect of short-term, interpersonal or cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy, the effect of long-term, psychodynamic intervention has never been assessed. Here, we investigated recurrently depressed (DSM-IV) unmedicated outpatients (N = 16) and control participants matched for sex, age, and education (N = 17) before and after 15 months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Participants were scanned at two time points, during which presentations of attachment-related scenes with neutral descriptions alternated with descriptions containing personal core sentences previously extracted from an attachment interview. Outcome measure was the interaction of the signal difference between personal and neutral presentations with group and time, and its association with symptom improvement during therapy. Signal associated with processing personalized attachment material varied in patients from baseline to endpoint, but not in healthy controls. Patients showed a higher activation in the left anterior hippocampus/amygdala, subgenual cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortex before treatment and a reduction in these areas after 15 months. This reduction was associated with improvement in depressiveness specifically, and in the medial prefrontal cortex with symptom improvement more generally. This is the first study documenting neurobiological changes in circuits implicated in emotional reactivity and control after long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy.

  12. Changes in Prefrontal-Limbic Function in Major Depression after 15 Months of Long-Term Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Buchheim, Anna; Viviani, Roberto; Kessler, Henrik; Kächele, Horst; Cierpka, Manfred; Roth, Gerhard; George, Carol; Kernberg, Otto F.; Bruns, Georg; Taubner, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of depression have demonstrated treatment-specific changes involving the limbic system and regulatory regions in the prefrontal cortex. While these studies have examined the effect of short-term, interpersonal or cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy, the effect of long-term, psychodynamic intervention has never been assessed. Here, we investigated recurrently depressed (DSM-IV) unmedicated outpatients (N = 16) and control participants matched for sex, age, and education (N = 17) before and after 15 months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Participants were scanned at two time points, during which presentations of attachment-related scenes with neutral descriptions alternated with descriptions containing personal core sentences previously extracted from an attachment interview. Outcome measure was the interaction of the signal difference between personal and neutral presentations with group and time, and its association with symptom improvement during therapy. Signal associated with processing personalized attachment material varied in patients from baseline to endpoint, but not in healthy controls. Patients showed a higher activation in the left anterior hippocampus/amygdala, subgenual cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortex before treatment and a reduction in these areas after 15 months. This reduction was associated with improvement in depressiveness specifically, and in the medial prefrontal cortex with symptom improvement more generally. This is the first study documenting neurobiological changes in circuits implicated in emotional reactivity and control after long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy. PMID:22470470

  13. Interpersonal Congruency, Attitude Similarity, and Interpersonal Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touhey, John C.

    1975-01-01

    As no experimental study has examined the effects of congruency on attraction, the present investigation orthogonally varied attitude similarity and interpersonal congruency in order to compare the two independent variables as determinants of interpersonal attraction. (Author/RK)

  14. Shame, guilt, and posttraumatic stress disorder in adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse at risk for human immunodeficiency virus: outcomes of a randomized clinical trial of group psychotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, Karni; Butler, Lisa D; Giese-Davis, Janine; Cavanaugh, Courtenay E; Neri, Eric; Koopman, Cheryl; Classen, Catherine C; Spiegel, David

    2009-07-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of group psychotherapy in reducing levels of shame and guilt in adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse at risk for HIV, and whether such reductions would mediate the effects of treatment on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. One hundred sixty-six women were randomized into 3 conditions: a trauma-focused group, a present-focused group, and a waitlist group. Women received 6 months of treatment and were assessed at pretreatment (T1), immediately posttreatment (T2), and 6 months posttreatment (T3). Both treatment conditions resulted in reduced shame and guilt. The treatment effect on PTSD symptoms was mediated by changes in shame, but it was not associated with changes in guilt. These findings suggest that, when treating childhood sexual abuse survivors' PTSD, it is important to address the negative self-appraisals, such as shame, that commonly accompany such symptoms.

  15. An Investigation of Sex Roles, Dimensions of Interpersonal Attraction and Communication Behavior In a Small Group Communication Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Earl E.; McDowell, Carlene E.

    Biological sex, social area, task area, and psychological sex were used as independent variables when 72 high school students in speech communication classes rated themselves and other members of small discussion groups. The results for males, females, and composite groups revealed that psychological sex was a more significant discriminating…

  16. Outcome of Brief Cathartic Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Michael P.

    1974-01-01

    This comparison (with University Health Service patients) between emotive psychotherapy and insight oriented analytic therapy confirmed effectiveness of emotive psychotherapy in producing catharsis leading to therapeutic improvement. (Author/EK)

  17. Integrative Treatment of Personality Disorder. Part I: Psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Mirjana Divac; Svrakic, Dragan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we outline the concept of integrative therapy of borderline personality, also referred to as fragmented personality, which we consider to be the core psychopathology underlying all clinical subtypes of personality disorder. Hence, the terms borderline personality, borderline disorder, fragmented personality, and personality disorder are used interchangeably, as synonyms. Our integrative approach combines pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, each specifically tailored to accomplish a positive feedback modulation of their respective effects. We argue that pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy of personality disorder complement each other. Pharmacological control of disruptive affects clears the stage, in some cases builds the stage, for the psychotherapeutic process to take place. In turn, psychotherapy promotes integration of personality fragments into more cohesive structures of self and identity, ultimately establishing self-regulation of mood and anxiety. We introduce our original method of psychotherapy, called reconstructive interpersonal therapy (RIT). The RIT integrates humanistic-existential and psychodynamic paradigms, and is thereby designed to accomplish a deep reconstruction of core psychopathology within the setting of high structure. We review and comment the current literature on the strategies, goals, therapy process, priorities, and phases of psychotherapy of borderline disorders, and describe in detail the fundamental principles of RIT.

  18. Ethical reflection and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vyskocilová, Jana; Prasko, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Theories of ethics and ethical reflection may be applied to both theory and practice in psychotherapy. There is a natural affinity between ethics and psychotherapy. Psychotherapy practice is concerned with human problems, dilemmas and emotions related to both one's own and other people's values. Ethics is also concerned with dilemmas in human thinking and with how these dilemmas reflect other individuals' values. Philosophical reflection itself is not a sufficient basis for the ethics of psychotherapy but it may aid in exploring attitudes related to psychotherapy, psychiatry and health care. PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched for articles containing the keywords "psychotherapy", "ethics", "therapeutic relationship" and "supervision". The search was conducted by repeating the terms in various combinations without language or time restrictions. Also included were data from monographs cited in reviews. The resulting text is a review with conclusions concerning ethical aspects of psychotherapy. The ability to behave altruistically, sense for justice and reciprocity and mutual help are likely to be genetically determined as dispositions to be later developed by upbringing or to be formed or deformed by upbringing. Early experiences lead to formation of ethical attitudes which are internalized and then applied to both one's own and other people's behavior. Altruistic behavior has a strong impact on an individual's health and its acceptance may positively influence the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying numerous diseases. Ethical theory and reflection, however, may be applied to both theory and practice of psychotherapy in a conscious, targeted and thoughtful manner. In everyday practice, psychotherapists and organizations must necessarily deal with conscious conflicts between therapeutic possibilities, clients' wishes, their own as well as clients' ideas and the real world. Understanding one's own motives in therapy is one of the aims of a

  19. WELLFOCUS PPT: Modifying positive psychotherapy for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Riches, Simon; Schrank, Beate; Rashid, Tayyab; Slade, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) is an established psychological intervention initially validated with people experiencing symptoms of depression. PPT is a positive psychology intervention, an academic discipline that has developed somewhat separately from psychotherapy and focuses on amplifying well-being rather than ameliorating deficit. The processes targeted in PPT (e.g., strengths, forgiveness, gratitude, savoring) are not emphasized in traditional psychotherapy approaches to psychosis. The goal in modifying PPT is to develop a new clinical approach to helping people experiencing psychosis. An evidence-based theoretical framework was therefore used to modify 14-session standard PPT into a manualized intervention, called WELLFOCUS PPT, which aims to improve well-being for people with psychosis. Informed by a systematic review and qualitative research, modification was undertaken in 4 stages: qualitative study, expert consultation, manualization, and stake-holder review. The resulting WELLFOCUS PPT is a theory-based 11-session manualized group therapy.

  20. Psychotherapy and Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Jay C.; Price, Rebecca B.

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances in neuroimaging have enabled researchers to examine, in vivo, the relationship between psychotherapeutic interventions and markers of brain activity. This review focuses on two kinds of neuroimaging studies in psychotherapy: those that examine the patterns of brain activity associated with response to treatments and those that examine the changes that occur in brain activity during treatment. A general, hypothetical neural model of psychotherapy is presented, and support for the model is evaluated across anxiety disorders and major depression. Neuroimaging studies are broadly consistent in observing associations between response to psychotherapy and baseline activity in several key regions within the prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, and limbic areas. These regions are involved in the generation and regulation of emotion, fear responding, and response to reward. Pre-post examinations of change following psychotherapy also typically observe that psychological treatments for anxiety and depression can affect neural activity in these regions. Despite general consensus that activity in these regions is associated with psychotherapy, substantial discrepancy persists regarding the precise direction of the observed relationships. Methodological challenges of the existing literature are considered, and future directions are discussed. PMID:25346646

  1. Psychotherapy: A 40-Year Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Sol L.

    1981-01-01

    Appraises selected issues and developments in the field of psychotherapy since 1940. Discusses increased participation of clinical psychologists in the area of psychotherapy, increased popularity of psychotherapy, declining influence of psychoanalysis and related views, emergence of behavioral and cognitive therapies, and recent emphasis on…

  2. Teachers' Interpersonal Role Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Want, Anna C.; den Brok, Perry; Beijaard, Douwe; Brekelmans, Mieke; Claessens, Luce C. A.; Pennings, Helena J. M.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the link between teachers' appraisal of specific interpersonal situations in classrooms and their more general interpersonal identity standard, which together form their interpersonal role identity. Using semi-structured and video-stimulated interviews, data on teachers' appraisals and interpersonal identity standards…

  3. Teachers' Interpersonal Role Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Want, Anna C.; den Brok, Perry; Beijaard, Douwe; Brekelmans, Mieke; Claessens, Luce C. A.; Pennings, Helena J. M.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the link between teachers' appraisal of specific interpersonal situations in classrooms and their more general interpersonal identity standard, which together form their interpersonal role identity. Using semi-structured and video-stimulated interviews, data on teachers' appraisals and interpersonal identity standards…

  4. Sprirtual aspects of psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prasinos, S

    1992-03-01

    This article addresses the relevance of spirituality to psychology and psychotherapy. It argues that spiritual experience is phenomenologically legitimate and worthy of study, especially by students of mental health. It utilizes Fox's (1985) definition of spirituality as "unitive experience" to show that spiritual experience is often present, overtly or covertly, within the ritual of psychotherapy. The paper argues that the therapist's adoption of an empathic posture is essentially a spiritual position. This position consists of a sense of peace, eternity, forgiveness, faith, love, truth, and God. These aspects are part of an integrated spiritual gestalt which is, though generally unacknowledged, fundamental to the communal healing process of psychotherapy. The paper concludes by asserting that greater involvement with the unitive (as opposed to the disunitive) represents a positive paradigmatic shift for psychology and humanity.

  5. [Psychotherapy in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Stubbe, H

    1980-01-01

    Present conditions in Brazil are characterized by sharp contrasts and rapid social changes. Modern Brazilian civilisation has its roots in Indian, Portuguese and African cultures, which have grown together in the course of many years to form a harmonious union of civilisations. The Indian and Afro-Brazilian elements of this civilisation in particular have brought about a great number of syncretistic cults, hitherto scarcely explored; such as Candomblé, Umbanda, Macumba and Spiritualism, all of which, together with a vigorously active folklore, exert an important psychohygienic function. The institutions created within these cults provide a ritualized therapeutic treatment of psychiatric conditions supplementing the professional psychiatric care available to the population. The variety of forms of the Brazilian psychotherapy stretches from the pre-scientifical methods of the Indian medicine man through the seemingly medieval forms of exorcisme and spiritualism right to the scientifically founded psychotherapy in all its lines. Integrative endeavours towards a culture-anthropological psychotherapy are becoming evident.

  6. Cross-Cultural Psychotherapy and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNiff, Shaun

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an introduction to cross-cultural psychotherapy, with reference to historical theories of art, symbols and myth, and to the therapist working with the client--both individual and groups. Cross-cultural dimensions of art therapy are delineated with a support for further research and cooperation between cultures, with attention…

  7. African American's Perceptions of Psychotherapy and Psychotherapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Vetta L. Sanders; Akbar, Maysa D.; Bazile, Anita

    The attitudes and beliefs about utilization of mental health services of 201 African Americans, 18 years and older, are explored. One hundred and thirty-four females and 66 males participated in mixed sex focus groups conducted in an urban, Midwestern city. Discussion probes addressed participant perceptions of psychotherapists and psychotherapy,…

  8. Applying a traditional individual psychotherapy model to Equine-facilitated Psychotherapy (EFP): theory and method.

    PubMed

    Karol, Jane

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a unique, innovative, and effective method of psychotherapy using horses to aid in the therapeutic process (Equine-facilitated Psychotherapy or EFP). The remarkable elements of the horse--power, grace, vulnerability, and a willingness to bear another--combine to form a fertile stage for psychotherapeutic exploration. Therapeutic programs using horses to work with various psychiatric presentations in children and adolescents have begun to receive attention over the past 10 years. However, few EFP programs utilize the expertise of masters and doctoral-level psychologists, clinical social workers, or psychiatrists. In contrast, the psychological practice described in this article, written and practiced by a doctoral-level clinician, applies the breadth and depth of psychological theory and practice developed over the last century to a distinctly compelling milieu. The method relies not only on the therapeutic relationship with the clinician, but is also fueled by the client's compelling attachment to the therapeutic horse. As both of these relationships progress, the child's inner world and interpersonal style come to the forefront and the EFP theater allows the clinician to explore the client's intrapersonal and interpersonal worlds on preverbal, nonverbal and verbal levels of experience.

  9. Psychotherapy in Contemporary Psychiatric Practice.

    PubMed

    Hadjipavlou, George; Hernandez, Carlos A Sierra; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2015-06-01

    American data suggest a declining trend in the provision of psychotherapy by psychiatrists. Nevertheless, the extent to which such findings generalize to psychiatric practice in other countries is unclear. We surveyed psychiatrists in British Columbia to examine whether the reported decline in psychotherapy provision extends to the landscape of Canadian psychiatric practice. A survey was mailed to the entire population of fully licensed psychiatrists registered in British Columbia (n = 623). The survey consisted of 30 items. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and psychotherapy practice patterns. Associations between variables were evaluated using nonparametric tests. A total of 423 psychiatrists returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 68%. Overall, 80.9% of psychiatrists (n = 342) reported practicing psychotherapy. A decline in the provision of psychotherapy was not observed; in fact, there was an increase in psychotherapy provision among psychiatrists entering practice in the last 10 years. Individual therapy was the predominant format used by psychiatrists. The most common primary theoretical orientation was psychodynamic (29.9%). Regarding actual practice, supportive psychotherapy was practiced most frequently. Professional time constraints were perceived as the most significant barrier to providing psychotherapy. The majority (85%) of clinicians did not view remuneration as a significant barrier to treating patients with psychotherapy. Our findings challenge the prevailing view that psychotherapy is in decline among psychiatrists. Psychiatrists in British Columbia continue to integrate psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in clinical practice, thus preserving their unique place in the spectrum of mental health services.

  10. Psychotherapy in Contemporary Psychiatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipavlou, George; Hernandez, Carlos A Sierra; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: American data suggest a declining trend in the provision of psychotherapy by psychiatrists. Nevertheless, the extent to which such findings generalize to psychiatric practice in other countries is unclear. We surveyed psychiatrists in British Columbia to examine whether the reported decline in psychotherapy provision extends to the landscape of Canadian psychiatric practice. Method: A survey was mailed to the entire population of fully licensed psychiatrists registered in British Columbia (n = 623). The survey consisted of 30 items. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and psychotherapy practice patterns. Associations between variables were evaluated using nonparametric tests. Results: A total of 423 psychiatrists returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 68%. Overall, 80.9% of psychiatrists (n = 342) reported practicing psychotherapy. A decline in the provision of psychotherapy was not observed; in fact, there was an increase in psychotherapy provision among psychiatrists entering practice in the last 10 years. Individual therapy was the predominant format used by psychiatrists. The most common primary theoretical orientation was psychodynamic (29.9%). Regarding actual practice, supportive psychotherapy was practiced most frequently. Professional time constraints were perceived as the most significant barrier to providing psychotherapy. The majority (85%) of clinicians did not view remuneration as a significant barrier to treating patients with psychotherapy. Conclusions: Our findings challenge the prevailing view that psychotherapy is in decline among psychiatrists. Psychiatrists in British Columbia continue to integrate psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in clinical practice, thus preserving their unique place in the spectrum of mental health services. PMID:26175328

  11. [Transference Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline-Adolescents in a Day Clinic Treatment Program].

    PubMed

    Krischer, Maya; Ponton-Rodriguez, Tamara; Gooran, Ghazal Rostami; Bender, Stephan

    2017-07-01

    Transference Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline-Adolescents in a Day Clinic Treatment Program This paper focuses on the concept of transference focused psychotherapy (TFP) modified for juvenile borderline patients. Adolescents with borderline developmental personality disorder (bpd) have an essential deficit in their personality structure that leads to oscillations in their self-esteem and in a "split" perception of the world. They suffer from a variety of symptoms and severe impairments on their own and their families' quality of life. Their fragmented perception of themselves and others make relationships almost unbearable for them. Relationships are mostly marked by severe anxiety of resentment and rejection. For these patients this causes intolerable trouble at school where every day conflicts take place. Self-mutilation and suicidal thoughts often seem the only way out. By now, there is an agreement that an early specialized assessment and treatment is necessary in order to stop the typical consequences of their self-mutilative and dysfunctional behavior. Still, in contrast to adult age, empirical evidence is missing which proves the effectiveness of treating adolescent borderline patients. In this paper we present a research project on the effectiveness of transference focused psychotherapy with adolescent borderline patients (TFP-A) in a day clinic setting, combining TFP with group skills training as known from dialectic behavior therapy (DBT). Furthermore, we give first results on analyzing the effectiveness of our day clinic treatment program based on TFP-A, focusing on improving core symptoms such as affective problems, aggressive behavior against self and others and interpersonal problems.

  12. Psychotherapy for Suicidal Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1994-01-01

    Reviews various systems of psychotherapy for suitability for suicidal clients. Discusses psychoanalysis, cognitive therapy, primal therapy, transactional analysis, Gestalt therapy, reality therapy, person-centered therapy, existential analysis, and Jungian analysis in light of available treatment options. Includes 36 citations. (Author/CRR)

  13. "Psychotherapy" Versus "Treatment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkowitz, Hal

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on "Psychological treatments" by D. H. Barlow. Barlow proposed that we distinguish between the terms "treatment" and "psychotherapy." The author believes that not only is the distinction unnecessary, but that its implications could have negative consequences for the field of clinical psychology. It is the proposed…

  14. Moments in Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terr, Lenore C.; McDermott, John F.; Benson, Ronald M.; Blos, Peter, Jr.; Deeney, John M.; Rogers, Rita R.; Zrull, Joel P.

    2005-01-01

    In the summer of 2004, a number of psychotherapists with old ties to the University of Michigan or UCLA decided to write 500-word vignettes that attempted to capture a turning point in one of their child patient's psychotherapies. What did the child and adolescent psychiatrist do to elicit such a moment? Upon receiving seven vignettes, one of us…

  15. Psychotherapy, Postmodernism, and Morality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitwood, Tom

    1990-01-01

    Proposes a postmodern ethics based on mutual respect and trust, derived from psychotherapy, and recognizing the primacy of individual subjectivity. Develops the concept of free attention to one another creating moral space. Stresses affect over reason and practice over theory. Sees moral space as fundamental to the social fabric. (CH)

  16. Transpersonal Perspectives in Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Frances Vaughan

    1977-01-01

    Emerging paradigms in transpersonal psychotherapy are discussed in relation to values and attitudes of the therapist and the place of transpersonal experience in the growth process, which goes beyond self-actualization to self-transcendence. Transpersonal therapy is not identified with specific techniques, but three distinct stages of therapy are…

  17. Transpersonal Perspectives in Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Frances Vaughan

    1977-01-01

    Emerging paradigms in transpersonal psychotherapy are discussed in relation to values and attitudes of the therapist and the place of transpersonal experience in the growth process, which goes beyond self-actualization to self-transcendence. Transpersonal therapy is not identified with specific techniques, but three distinct stages of therapy are…

  18. Recipes for Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sechrest, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Responds to previous article (Stiles and Shapiro, this issue) that suggests abandoning model of drug research in exploring psychotherapy effectiveness. Contends that Stiles and Shapiro's analysis can be challenged on methodological grounds involving failure to use multivariate analytic approaches, incomplete exploitation of advantages of growth…

  19. Psychotherapy for Suicidal Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1994-01-01

    Reviews various systems of psychotherapy for suitability for suicidal clients. Discusses psychoanalysis, cognitive therapy, primal therapy, transactional analysis, Gestalt therapy, reality therapy, person-centered therapy, existential analysis, and Jungian analysis in light of available treatment options. Includes 36 citations. (Author/CRR)

  20. Piaget and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Friedman, T L

    1978-04-01

    It is difficult to apply Piaget's theory to psychotherapy because the place of affect in it is ambiguous. When the alternatives are considered, it seems most consistent with Piaget's ideas to regard both cognitive and affective phenomena as problem-solving organizations. Piaget's remarkable discoveries in the cognitive sphere are a consequence of the easy access in that sphere to the kind of problems that need solving, and the phasic development of solutions. But the nature of the problems to be solved or the values to be guarded by a patient in psychotherapy are not knowable independently of the patient's actual behavior. In one respect all that is left from Piaget's approach for psychotherapy generally is the truism that therapy fosters differentiation and integration. However, even if we cannot frame a peculiarly Piagetian paradigm of psychotherapy, Piaget is valuable in posing a subsidiary question, namely, what in therapy fosters problem-solving activity. A reading of Piaget suggests that a patient learns by acting on his therapist and tacitly interpreting the results of his actions, that difficulties in therapy are the material from which therapy proceeds, and that in order to grasp the situation of the patient, the therapist himself may need to act on him and not just think about him. An implied lesson for training would be that supervision should instill a professional identity that is reinforced rather than challenged by therapy difficulties, and does not rely solely on theoretical categorizing.

  1. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  2. "Psychotherapy" Versus "Treatment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkowitz, Hal

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on "Psychological treatments" by D. H. Barlow. Barlow proposed that we distinguish between the terms "treatment" and "psychotherapy." The author believes that not only is the distinction unnecessary, but that its implications could have negative consequences for the field of clinical psychology. It is the proposed…

  3. Interpersonal Needs of Remedial Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Judith

    A study sought to determine the effects of reading deficiency on the interpersonal relationship needs of regular and remedial readers as composite groups and on elementary and secondary school remedial and regular readers as age groups. Elementary and secondary school students were randomly selected and tested on the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests…

  4. The right brain is dominant in psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schore, Allan N

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses how recent studies of the right brain, which is dominant for the implicit, nonverbal, intuitive, holistic processing of emotional information and social interactions, can elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the relational foundations of psychotherapy. Utilizing the interpersonal neurobiological perspective of regulation theory, I describe the fundamental role of the early developing right brain in relational processes, throughout the life span. I present interdisciplinary evidence documenting right brain functions in early attachment processes, in emotional communications within the therapeutic alliance, in mutual therapeutic enactments, and in therapeutic change processes. This work highlights the fact that the current emphasis on relational processes is shared by, cross-fertilizing, and indeed transforming both psychology and neuroscience, with important consequences for clinical psychological models of psychotherapeutic change.

  5. Improving psychotherapy research: The example of mindfulness based interventions

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number and sophistication of available psychotherapies suggests that a critical appraisal of the methodological issues of psychotherapy studies is highly needed. Several key questions regarding the efficacy of a given intervention, the understanding of whether positive effects observed following the delivery of a psychotherapeutic intervention are specifically attributable to the intervention itself or to other “non specific” factors, such as benefit expectations, therapist attention and support, and the possibility of improving psychotherapy research need an answer. This, in turn, could provide clinicians with more rigorous information about psychotherapy outcomes and could properly address several shortcomings that are frequently observed in current psychotherapy studies. Accordingly, in this editorial I will highlight some of the most important critical issues that a well designed psychotherapy study should take into account, including the need for appropriate control groups, appropriate randomization and blinding procedures, and the importance of performing appropriately powered studies that include a sufficiently long follow-up period. Finally, I will build on my expertise in the field of mindfulness based interventions, in particular mindfulness based stress reduction and mindfulness based cognitive therapy, to show how such issues have been and can be successfully implemented in the design of future psychotherapy studies. PMID:25237607

  6. Interpersonal criticism and the clergy.

    PubMed

    Garner, Randy

    2013-03-01

    Though well-crafted criticism can provide valuable information for the recipient, the abundance of literature finds that criticism is overwhelmingly viewed negatively. The consequences of adverse interpersonal criticism were assessed by a focus group of randomly selected clergy members from a large ministerial alliance. Collectively the focus group revealed that interpersonal criticism can have deleterious vocational, psychological, and health consequence for those in the ministry. Clergy reported that criticism from parishioners, the public, denominational officials, and others adversely affect interpersonal relationships and can lead to stress, burnout, and early departure from the ministry. The participants indicated that current training and resources were inadequate to deal with the issue and further denominational support and seminary education was necessary.

  7. Psychotherapy with physically disabled patients.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rui Aragao; Milliner, Eric K; Page, Richard

    2004-01-01

    With the last decades, health care interventions have been more productively attuned to actualizing the potential for optimal recuperation of every patient. Unique and important contributions of psychotherapy to this effort include: 1) A formulation which synthesizes an understanding of clinical behaviors, reality-based physical limitations and risks with an appreciation of the patient's mechanisms of defense, ego strengths and weaknesses, and transference expectations which impact the treatment process; 2) The utilization of individual psychotherapy (focused on "insight") in combination with supportive individual and group experiences. For children and adolescents struggling with age-appropriate physical-developmental and social issues or learning disabilities, psychoeducational approach for disabled youngsters has proven very beneficial. 3) Occasional crises occur which involve the spouse or relatives more than the index patient. Working to provide supportive Couple or Family System intervention is sometimes as essential as caring for the disabled individual. 4) Numerous Group Therapy approaches have proven efficacious. Treatment in a group setting is attractive to those who are concerned about cost-containment. Unfortunately, groups for disabled are often "didactic" and utilize a format that provides factual information about disabilities, medical procedures, and sometimes an intellectual discussion of "emotional answers" for certain types of problems or conditions. Groups that facilitate self-disclosure and emotional interactions among the members accomplish more meaningful results. In conclusion, we wish to emphasize the importance of developing rigorous scientific research in the area of disabilities which will match the excellence of clinical work already being done in the field. Gaining an accurate and more thorough understanding of the psychological reality of a disabled person's internal world may be a key to facilitating his or her self-esteem and

  8. Interaction and Interpersonality in Online Discussion Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beuchot, Alberto; Bullen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal study evaluated the amount and type of interaction and interpersonal content in messages posted by online graduate students in small group asynchronous forums. It also assessed the relationship between interpersonality and interactivity. To achieve this, a new coding scheme was developed to categorize the content of online…

  9. Interaction and Interpersonality in Online Discussion Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beuchot, Alberto; Bullen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal study evaluated the amount and type of interaction and interpersonal content in messages posted by online graduate students in small group asynchronous forums. It also assessed the relationship between interpersonality and interactivity. To achieve this, a new coding scheme was developed to categorize the content of online…

  10. Interpersonal Compatibility: Effect on Simulation Game Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yantis, Betty; Nixon, John E.

    1982-01-01

    Investigates the impact of interpersonal relationships on decision-making success in small groups using a business simulation game as a research vehicle. The study concludes that group decision making may be unfavorably affected by personality conflicts. (Author/JJD)

  11. Determining adolescents' suitability for inpatient psychotherapy: utility of the clinician-rated Readiness for Inpatient Psychotherapy Scale with an adolescent inpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Greg; Siefert, Caleb; Stoycheva, Valentina; Sinclair, Samuel Justin; Baity, Matthew; Zodan, Jennifer; Mehra, Ashwin; Chand, Vijay; Blais, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Growing economic pressure on inpatient services for adolescents has resulted in fewer clinicians to provide individual psychotherapy. As a result, inpatient treatment trends have favored group psychotherapy modalities and psychopharmacological interventions. Currently, no clinician-rated measures exist to assist clinicians in determining who would be able to better utilize individual psychotherapy on inpatient units. The current study sought to demonstrate the utility of the Readiness for Inpatient Psychotherapy Scale with an adolescent inpatient sample. This study also used the RIPS as it is intended to be used in everyday practice. Results from the authors' analyses reveal that the RIPS demonstrates good psychometrics and interrater reliability, as well as construct validity.

  12. Future directions in research on psychotherapy for adolescent depression.

    PubMed

    Curry, John F

    2014-01-01

    Research over the past 3 decades has shown that psychotherapy can successfully address adolescent depression. Cognitive behavioral models have been most extensively and rigorously tested, with evidence also supporting interpersonal psychotherapy and attachment-based family therapy. However, the vast majority of studies have focused on short-term treatment of depressive episodes, even as evidence accumulates that depression is frequently a recurring condition extending into adulthood. Moreover, treatment studies indicate that better longer term outcomes are attained by adolescents who respond earlier and more completely to intervention. Given what has been learned to date about adolescent depression treatment, future psychotherapy research should adopt a longer term perspective and focus on the following key challenges: (a) preventing relapse and recurrent episodes, while improving speed and thoroughness of initial treatment response; (b) identifying the necessary treatment components and learning processes that lead to successful and enduring recovery from depression; (c) determining whether-and, if so, how-to address comorbid disorders within depression treatment; (d) addressing the dilemma of simplicity versus complexity in treatment models. Given the relatively small number of evidence-based treatment models, newer approaches warrant investigation. These should be tested against existing models and also compared to medication and combined (psychotherapy plus medication) treatment. Advances in technology now enable investigators to improve dissemination, to conduct experimental psychotherapeutics and to expand application of Internet-based interventions to the goals of relapse and recurrence prevention.

  13. The Impact of Perceived Interpersonal Functioning on Treatment for Adolescent Depression: IPT-A versus Treatment as Usual in School-Based Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunlicks-Stoessel, Meredith; Mufson, Laura; Jekal, Angela; Turner, J. Blake

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Aspects of depressed adolescents' perceived interpersonal functioning were examined as moderators of response to treatment among adolescents treated with interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A; Mufson, Dorta, Moreau, & Weissman, 2004) or treatment as usual (TAU) in school-based health clinics. Method:…

  14. Interpersonal Aspects of Dangerousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Held, Barbara S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    An interpersonal theory of dangerousness asserts that dangerousness is a function of perceptions and attributions within an interpersonal context, rather than a stable personality trait. Using the guards and 78 inmates of a penal complex, the interpersonal theory of dangerousness was tested from a racial perspective. (Author)

  15. Interpersonal Aspects of Dangerousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Held, Barbara S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    An interpersonal theory of dangerousness asserts that dangerousness is a function of perceptions and attributions within an interpersonal context, rather than a stable personality trait. Using the guards and 78 inmates of a penal complex, the interpersonal theory of dangerousness was tested from a racial perspective. (Author)

  16. Elements of Interpersonal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keltner, John W.

    Fundamental to this books is an understanding of the self and the other in the societal context of interpersonal communication. The book develops a concept of interpersonal communication which encompasses the utilitarian, the artistic, and the therapeutic functions interpersonal interaction peforms. Inherent in the development of all three…

  17. Chinese inpatients' subjective experiences of the helping process as viewed through examination of a nurses' focused, structured therapy group.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Fei-Hsiu; Lin, Shu-Mei; Liao, Hsiao-Yuan; Lai, Mei-Chih

    2004-10-01

    This study examined Chinese inpatients' views on what aspects of a nurses' focused, structured therapy group worked to help their psychological and interpersonal problems and what traditional Chinese cultural values influenced their viewpoints. Nine Chinese inpatients with mental illness participated in the four-session nurses' focused, structured therapy group. After they completed the last session of therapy, they were invited to participate in a structured interview and a semi-structured interview regarding their perceptions of the change mechanisms in nurses' focused, structured group therapy. The semi-structured interviews were recorded and transcribed to be further analysed according to the principal of content analysis. The results indicate that (i) all patients believed that a nurses' focused, structured group psychotherapy enhanced their interpersonal learning and improved the quality of their lives, (ii) traditional Chinese cultural values--those emphasizing the importance of maintaining harmonious interpersonal relationships--influenced the Chinese inpatients' expression of negative emotions in the group and their motivation on interpersonal learning. In conclusion, we found that transcultural modification for applying Western group psychotherapy in Chinese culture was needed. The modification included establishing a 'pseudo-kin' or 'own people' relationship among group members and the therapists, organizing warm-up exercises and structured activities, applying projective methods and focusing on the issues of interpersonal relationships and interpersonal problems. The small sample size of the present study raises questions regarding how representative the views of the sample are with respect to the majority of Chinese inpatients. Nevertheless, this preliminary study revealed a cultural aspect in nursing training that requires significant consideration in order to work effectively with Chinese patients. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

  18. Psychotherapy of the Postdysthymic Patient

    PubMed Central

    MARKOWITZ, JOHN C.

    1993-01-01

    Many patients with dysthymia respond to antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Psychotherapy of dysthymic patients has received less study, but it may have efficacy as a primary treatment or as complement to pharmacotherapy. This preliminary report offers an impression of the value of psychotherapy for 21 dysthymic responders to antidepressant medication. Successful pharmacotherapy appeared to relieve not only depressive symptoms, but also seemingly characterological traits. Yet patients who felt better than ever before lacked social skills whose development dysthymia had retarded. Case examples illustrate the importance of psychotherapy in developing personality and fostering appropriate risk-taking. Prescription of combined pharmaco- and psychotherapy may be appropriate in dysthymia. PMID:22700139

  19. Brief Psychotherapy in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Peter J.; Brown, Alan

    1986-01-01

    A large number of patients with psychosocial or psychiatric disorders present to family physicians, and the family physician needs a model of psychotherapy with which to cope with their problems. A model of brief psychotherapy is presented which is time limited, goal directed and easy to learn. It consists of four facets drawn from established areas of psychotherapy: characteristics of the therapist; characteristics of the patient; Eriksonian developmental stages; and the process of therapy as described by Carkhuff. These facets fit together in a way which is useful to the family physician in managing those patient problems for which brief psychotherapy is indicated. PMID:21267176

  20. Intensive psychotherapy of schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Keats, C. J.; McGlashan, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    The literature on strategies of investigative psychotherapy of schizophrenia is selectively reviewed, and a case history is presented. The format is modelled on the authors' research technique of contrasting theory with practice. While long-term observation of single cases does not address cause and effect, descriptions of cases with a variety of known outcomes can help to build a typology of treatment processes. PMID:4049907