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Sample records for group proteins antagonistically

  1. CHD3 proteins and polycomb group proteins antagonistically determine cell identity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Villar, Corina B R; Farrona, Sara; Reyes, José C; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia

    2009-08-01

    Dynamic regulation of chromatin structure is of fundamental importance for modulating genomic activities in higher eukaryotes. The opposing activities of Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins are part of a chromatin-based cellular memory system ensuring the correct expression of specific transcriptional programs at defined developmental stages. The default silencing activity of PcG proteins is counteracted by trxG proteins that activate PcG target genes and prevent PcG mediated silencing activities. Therefore, the timely expression and regulation of PcG proteins and counteracting trxG proteins is likely to be of fundamental importance for establishing cell identity. Here, we report that the chromodomain/helicase/DNA-binding domain CHD3 proteins PICKLE (PKL) and PICKLE RELATED2 (PKR2) have trxG-like functions in plants and are required for the expression of many genes that are repressed by PcG proteins. The pkl mutant could partly suppress the leaf and flower phenotype of the PcG mutant curly leaf, supporting the idea that CHD3 proteins and PcG proteins antagonistically determine cell identity in plants. The direct targets of PKL in roots include the PcG genes SWINGER and EMBRYONIC FLOWER2 that encode subunits of Polycomb repressive complexes responsible for trimethylating histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3). Similar to mutants lacking PcG proteins, lack of PKL and PKR2 caused reduced H3K27me3 levels and, therefore, increased expression of a set of PcG protein target genes in roots. Thus, PKL and PKR2 are directly required for activation of PcG protein target genes and in roots are also indirectly required for repression of PcG protein target genes. Reduced PcG protein activity can lead to cell de-differentiation and callus-like tissue formation in pkl pkr2 mutants. Thus, in contrast to mammals, where PcG proteins are required to maintain pluripotency and to prevent cell differentiation, in plants PcG proteins are required to promote cell

  2. Antagonists of IAP proteins as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dynek, Jasmin N; Vucic, Domagoj

    2013-05-28

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins play pivotal roles in cellular survival by blocking apoptosis, modulating signal transduction, and affecting cellular proliferation. Through their interactions with inducers and effectors of apoptosis IAP proteins can effectively suppress apoptosis triggered by diverse stimuli including death receptor signaling, irradiation, chemotherapeutic agents, or growth factor withdrawal. Evasion of apoptosis, in part due to the action of IAP proteins, enhances resistance of cancer cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and contributes to tumor progression. Additionally, IAP genes are known to be subject to amplification, mutation, and chromosomal translocation in human malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this review we will discuss the role of IAP proteins in cancer and the development of antagonists targeting IAP proteins for cancer treatment.

  3. Nef proteins from simian immunodeficiency viruses are tetherin antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengwen; Wilson, Sam J.; Langford, Wilmina; Virgen, Beatriz; Gregory, Devon; Johnson, Marc; Munch, Jan; Kirchhoff, Frank; Bieniasz, Paul D.; Hatziioannou, Theodora

    2010-01-01

    The tetherin/BST2/CD317 protein blocks the release of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses by inducing tethering of nascent particles to infected cell surfaces. The HIV-1 Vpu protein antagonizes the antiviral activity of human but not monkey tetherins and many simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) do not encode Vpu. Here, we show that the apparently ‘missing’ anti-tetherin activity in SIVs has been acquired by several SIV Nef proteins. Specifically, SIVMAC/SIVSMM, SIVAGM and SIVBLU Nef proteins can suppress tetherin activity. Notably, tetherin antagonism by SIV Nef proteins is species-specific, is genetically separable from other Nef activities and is most evident with simian rather than human tetherin proteins. Accordingly, a critical determinant of sensitivity to SIVMAC Nef in the tetherin cytoplasmic tail is variable in nonhuman primate tetherins and deleted in human tetherin, likely due to selective pressures imposed by viral antagonists, perhaps including Nef proteins. PMID:19501037

  4. G protein antagonists. A novel hydrophobic peptide competes with receptor for G protein binding.

    PubMed

    Mukai, H; Munekata, E; Higashijima, T

    1992-08-15

    A substance P (SP) analog, [D-Pro4,D-Trp7,9,10] SP4-11, is known to inhibit the actions of various structurally unrelated messenger molecules as well as SP. Our studies on the effects of this peptide on the regulation of purified G proteins by receptor showed that at least some of the biological effects of the peptide can be explained by the ability of the peptide to block the activation of G proteins by receptors. Here we report that a novel truncated SP-related peptide, pGlu-Gln-D-Trp-Phe-D-Trp-D-Trp-Met-NH2, inhibited the activation of G(i) or G(o) by M2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2 mAChR) or of Gs by beta-adrenergic receptor in the reconstituted phospholipid vesicles, assayed by receptor-promoted GTP hydrolysis. The inhibition by the peptide was apparently reversible and competitive with respect to receptor binding to G proteins; the inhibition could be overcome by increasing the concentration of receptor in the vesicles and was not altered by changes in the concentration of G protein. The competing effects of the peptide were used to analyze the effect of agonist on receptor-G protein interaction. The concentration change of muscarinic agonist did not alter the inhibitory effects of the peptide on M2 mAChR-promoted GTPase by G(o), which is consistent with the idea that agonist increases the regulatory efficiency of the receptor but does not alter its affinity for G proteins. This new group of compounds (G protein antagonists) is a promising tool to study receptor-G protein interaction quantitatively.

  5. Bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin-1 regulates colon cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, George S; Musrap, Natasha; Saraon, Punit; Treacy, Ann; Schaeffer, David F; Kirsch, Richard; Riddell, Robert H; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2015-02-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) are phylogenetically conserved signaling molecules of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily of proteins, involved in developmental and (patho)physiological processes, including cancer. BMP signaling has been regarded as tumor-suppressive in colorectal cancer (CRC) by reducing cancer cell proliferation and invasion, and by impairing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here, we mined existing proteomic repositories to explore the expression of BMPs in CRC. We found that the BMP antagonist gremlin-1 (GREM1) is secreted from heterotypic tumor-host cell interactions. We then sought to investigate whether GREM1 is contextually and mechanistically associated with EMT in CRC. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that GREM1-expressing stromal cells harbor prominent features of myofibroblasts (i.e., cancer-associated fibroblasts), such as expression of α-smooth muscle actin and laminin-beta-1, and were in contextual proximity to invasion fronts with loss of the tight junction protein occludin and parallel nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, two prominent EMT hallmarks. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated that GREM1-dependent suppression of BMP signaling results in EMT induction, characterized by cadherin switching (loss of E-cadherin-upregulation of N-cadherin) and overexpression of Snail. Collectively, our data support that GREM1 promotes the loss of cancer cell differentiation at the cancer invasion front, a mechanism that may facilitate tumor progression.

  6. Proneurogenic Group II mGluR antagonist improves learning and reduces anxiety in Alzheimer Aβ oligomer mouse.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Steele, J W; Lee, S W; Clemenson, G D; Carter, T A; Treuner, K; Gadient, R; Wedel, P; Glabe, C; Barlow, C; Ehrlich, M E; Gage, F H; Gandy, S

    2014-11-01

    Proneurogenic compounds have recently shown promise in some mouse models of Alzheimer's pathology. Antagonists at Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (Group II mGluR: mGlu2, mGlu3) are reported to stimulate neurogenesis. Agonists at those receptors trigger γ-secretase-inhibitor-sensitive biogenesis of Aβ42 peptides from isolated synaptic terminals, which is selectively suppressed by antagonist pretreatment. We have assessed the therapeutic potential of chronic pharmacological inhibition of Group II mGluR in Dutch APP (Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein E693Q) transgenic mice that accumulate Dutch amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers but never develop Aβ plaques. BCI-838 is a clinically well-tolerated, orally bioavailable, investigational prodrug that delivers to the brain BCI-632, the active Group II mGluR antagonist metabolite. Dutch Aβ-oligomer-forming APP transgenic mice (APP E693Q) were dosed with BCI-838 for 3 months. Chronic treatment with BCI-838 was associated with reversal of transgene-related amnestic behavior, reduction in anxiety, reduction in levels of brain Aβ monomers and oligomers, and stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis. Group II mGluR inhibition may offer a unique package of relevant properties as an Alzheimer's disease therapeutic or prophylactic by providing both attenuation of neuropathology and stimulation of repair.

  7. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Ian R.; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L.; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days. In conclusion: we provide proof of concept that a fusion of GHR antagonist to its binding protein generates a long acting GHR antagonist and we confirmed that introducing the W104A amino acid change in the GH binding domain enhances antagonist activity. PMID:27731358

  8. Structure-Based Design of a Periplasmic Binding Protein Antagonist that Prevents Domain Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Borrok, M. Jack; Zhu, Yimin; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2009-07-31

    Many receptors undergo ligand-induced conformational changes to initiate signal transduction. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are bacterial receptors that exhibit dramatic conformational changes upon ligand binding. These proteins mediate a wide variety of fundamental processes including transport, chemotaxis, and quorum sensing. Despite the importance of these receptors, no PBP antagonists have been identified and characterized. In this study, we identify 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as an antagonist of glucose/galactose-binding protein and demonstrate that it inhibits glucose chemotaxis in E. coli. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography, we show that this antagonist acts as a wedge. It prevents the large-scale domain closure that gives rise to the active signaling state. Guided by these results and the structures of open and closed glucose/galactose-binding protein, we designed and synthesized an antagonist composed of two linked glucose residues. These findings provide a blueprint for the design of new bacterial PBP inhibitors. Given the key role of PBPs in microbial physiology, we anticipate that PBP antagonists will have widespread uses as probes and antimicrobial agents.

  9. Drug Discovery Toward Antagonists of Methyl-Lysine Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herold, J. Martin; Ingerman, Lindsey A; Gao, Cen; Frye, Stephen V

    2011-01-01

    The recognition of methyl-lysine and -arginine residues on both histone and other proteins by specific “reader” elements is important for chromatin regulation, gene expression, and control of cell-cycle progression. Recently the crucial role of these reader proteins in cancer development and dedifferentiation has emerged, owing to the increased interest among the scientific community. The methyl-lysine and -arginine readers are a large and very diverse set of effector proteins and targeting them with small molecule probes in drug discovery will inevitably require a detailed understanding of their structural biology and mechanism of binding. In the following review, the critical elements of methyl-lysine and -arginine recognition will be summarized with respect to each protein family and initial results in assay development, probe design, and drug discovery will be highlighted. PMID:22145013

  10. Antagonistic regulation of α-actinin alternative splicing by CELF proteins and polypyrimidine tract binding protein

    PubMed Central

    GROMAK, NATALIA; MATLIN, ARIANNE J.; COOPER, THOMAS A.; SMITH, CHRISTOPHER W.J.

    2003-01-01

    The α-actinin gene has a pair of alternatively spliced exons. The smooth muscle (SM) exon is repressed in most cell types by polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB). CELF (CUG-BP and ETR3-like factors) family proteins, splicing regulators whose activities are altered in myotonic dystrophy, were found to coordinately regulate selection of the two α-actinin exons. CUG-BP and ETR3 activated the SM exon, and along with CELF4 they were also able to repress splicing of the NM (nonmuscle) exon both in vivo and in vitro. Activation of SM exon splicing was associated with displacement of PTB from the polypyrimidine tract by binding of CUG-BP at adjacent sites. Our data provides direct evidence for the activity of CELF proteins as both activators and repressors of splicing within a single-model system of alternative splicing, and suggests a model whereby α-actinin alternative splicing is regulated by synergistic and antagonistic interactions between members of the CELF and PTB families. PMID:12649496

  11. RNA Aptamers as Effective Protein Antagonists in a Multicellular Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Hoffman, Bryan E.; Lis, John T.

    1999-08-01

    RNA aptamers selected against proteins can be used to modulate specific protein function. Expression of such reagents in cells and whole organisms could provide a means of dissecting and controlling molecular mechanisms in vivo. We demonstrate that Drosophila B53 protein can be specifically inhibited in vitro and in vivo by a multivalent RNA aptamer. This inhibitory aptamer RNA binds B52 avidly and inhibits B52-stimulated pre-mRNA splicing. It can be expressed in cultured cells and whole animals in a stable form that accumulates up to 10% of total mRNA. It binds B52 in vivo and suppresses all phenotypes caused by B52 overexpression. The strategies presented here should prove general in design and expression of functional and therapeutic RNAs.

  12. The bone morphogenetic protein antagonist Gremlin is overexpressed in human malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dian-Jun; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhang, Shu-Cai; Jiang, Miao; Liu, Peng; Han, Xing-Peng; Li, Jun; Chen, Zhao; Wang, Chang-Li

    2012-01-01

    Gremlin is a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist family and its antagonistic effect is likely through direct binding to BMP proteins. As an antagonist of BMP, Gremlin plays a role in regulating organogenesis, body patterning and tissue differentiation. Recent studies have shown a deregulation of Gremlin in several types of human cancers. However, the role of Gremlin in human malignant mesothelioma (MM) is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of Gremlin in human MM. We found that Gremlin mRNA and protein were both overexpressed in the majority of primary MM tissue samples that we examined. We also observed high level expression of the Gremlin gene in 4 of the 6 MM cell lines. Consistently, we found that the Gremlin promoter activity was significantly elevated in those MM cell lines expressing the Gremlin gene. On the other hand, no activity of the Gremlin promoter was detected in the two MM cell lines lacking Gremlin expression. Moreover, to examine the functional significance of the Gremlin overexpression in MM, we used shRNA to knock down Gremlin expression in MM cell lines expressing Gremlin and found that inhibition of Gremlin expression significantly suppressed proliferation of those MM cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the BMP antagonist Gremlin is overexpressed in MM and that aberrant activation of Gremlin may play a critical role in the tumorigenesis of human MM.

  13. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Ian R; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J; Sayers, Jon R; Ross, Richard J

    2016-10-12

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days.

  14. Oxytocin differentially modulates compromise and competitive approach but not withdrawal to antagonists from own vs. rivaling other groups.

    PubMed

    Ten Velden, Femke S; Baas, Matthijs; Shalvi, Shaul; Kret, Mariska E; De Dreu, Carsten K W

    2014-09-11

    In humans, oxytocin promotes cognitive and motivational tendencies that benefit the groups on which humans depend for their survival and prosperity. Here we examined decision making in an incentivized two-player poker game with either an in-group or out-group antagonist. Sixty nine healthy males received 24 IU oxytocin or matching placebo, and played four rounds of a simplified poker game. On each round they received either low or high value cards to create differences in competitive strength, and then responded to a bet placed by their (simulated) (in-group or out-group) antagonist. Under placebo, participants withdrew and competed depending on their own (low vs. high) competitive strength, regardless of their antagonist's group membership. Under oxytocin, however, participants settled more and competed less with an in-group as compared to an out-group antagonist; withdrawal was unaffected by group membership. We conclude that oxytocin sensitizes humans to the group membership of their interaction partner, rendering them relatively more benevolent and less competitive towards those seen as belonging to their own group. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin and Social Behav.

  15. Inhibition of Ebola and Marburg Virus Entry by G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Han; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Johansen, Lisa; Varhegyi, Elizabeth; Chen, Zheng W.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses, consisting of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV), are among the most lethal infectious threats to mankind. Infections by these viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans and nonhuman primates with high mortality rates. Since there is currently no vaccine or antiviral therapy approved for humans, there is an urgent need to develop prophylactic and therapeutic options for use during filoviral outbreaks and bioterrorist attacks. One of the ideal targets against filoviral infection and diseases is at the entry step, which is mediated by the filoviral glycoprotein (GP). In this report, we screened a chemical library of small molecules and identified numerous inhibitors, which are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs, including histamine receptors, 5-HT (serotonin) receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and adrenergic receptor. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of both infectious EBOV and MARV, indicating a broad antiviral activity of the GPCR antagonists. The time-of-addition experiment and microscopic studies suggest that GPCR antagonists block filoviral entry at a step following the initial attachment but prior to viral/cell membrane fusion. These results strongly suggest that GPCRs play a critical role in filoviral entry and GPCR antagonists can be developed as an effective anti-EBOV/MARV therapy. IMPORTANCE Infection of Ebola virus and Marburg virus can cause severe illness in humans with a high mortality rate, and currently there is no FDA-approved vaccine or therapeutic treatment available. The 2013-2015 epidemic in West Africa underscores a lack of our understanding in the infection and pathogenesis of these viruses and the urgency of drug discovery and development. In this study, we have identified numerous inhibitors that are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of

  16. Modulation of a 40-kDa catecholamine regulated protein by dopamine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sharan, N; Nair, V D; Mishra, R K

    2001-02-09

    Previous reports have shown that catecholamine regulated proteins (CRP) are central nervous system specific and covalently bind to catecholamines. In the present study, we report the subcellular localization and differential modulation of a 40-kDa catecholamine regulated protein (CRP40) by dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists. CRP40 was found to be localized with nuclear and synaptosomal/mitochondrial and fractions. Chronic treatment with dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol in rats significantly increased the levels of CRP40 in the striatum, whereas, chronic R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH 23390) dopamine D1 receptor antagonist administration significantly decreased striatal CRP40 levels. Moreover, acute haloperidol treatment did not alter the levels of CRP40 in any of the brain regions. Despite a sequence homology with the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), levels of HSP70 remained unchanged after either drug treatment, suggesting a distinct function of CRP40 than HSP70. These results further suggest that CRP40 play an important role in dopaminergic neuronal function and the dopamine D1 receptor-mediated signaling pathway may be involved in the regulation of CRP40.

  17. Screening bicyclic peptide libraries for protein-protein interaction inhibitors: discovery of a tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wenlong; Upadhyaya, Punit; Rhodes, Curran A; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2013-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions represent a new class of exciting but challenging drug targets, because their large, flat binding sites lack well-defined pockets for small molecules to bind. We report here a methodology for chemical synthesis and screening of large combinatorial libraries of bicyclic peptides displayed on rigid small-molecule scaffolds. With planar trimesic acid as the scaffold, the resulting bicyclic peptides are effective for binding to protein surfaces such as the interfaces of protein-protein interactions. Screening of a bicyclic peptide library against tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) identified a potent antagonist that inhibits the TNFα-TNFα receptor interaction and protects cells from TNFα-induced cell death. Bicyclic peptides of this type may provide a general solution for inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  18. Dimeric Macrocyclic Antagonists of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of dimeric macrocyclic compounds were prepared and evaluated as antagonists for inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. The most potent analogue 11, which binds to XIAP and c-IAP proteins with high affinity and induces caspase-3 activation and ultimately cell apoptosis, inhibits growth of human melanoma and colorectal cell lines at low nanomolar concentrations. Furthermore, compound 11 demonstrated significant antitumor activity in the A875 human melanoma xenograft model at doses as low as 2 mg/kg on a q3d schedule. PMID:26191364

  19. Yeast mitochondrial fission proteins induce antagonistic Gaussian membrane curvatures to regulate apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Michelle; Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Xian, Wujing; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondria form a dynamic and interconnected network, which disintegrates during apoptosis to generate numerous smaller mitochondrial fragments. This process is at present not well understood. Yeast mitochondrial fission machinery proteins, Dnm1 and Fis1, are believed to regulate programmed cell death in yeast. Yeast Dnm1 has been previously shown to promote mitochondrial fragmentation and degradation characteristic of apoptotic cells, while yeast Fis1 inhibits cell death by limiting the mitochondrial fission induced by Dnm1 [Fannjiang et al, Genes & Dev. 2004. 18: 2785-2797]. To better understand the mechanisms of these antagonistic fission proteins, we use synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate their interaction with model cell membranes. The relationship between each protein, Dnm1 and Fis1, and protein-induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. Through the comparison of the membrane rearrangement and phase behavior induced by each protein, we will discuss their respective roles in the regulation of mitochondrial fission.

  20. TNF binding protein of variola virus acts as a TNF antagonist at epicutaneous application.

    PubMed

    Gileva, Irina P; Viazovaia, Elena A; Toporkova, Ludmila B; Tsyrendorzhiev, Dondok D; Shchelkunov, Sergei N; Orlovskaya, Irina A

    2015-01-01

    VARV-CrmB is a TNF binding protein of variola virus. VARV-CrmB protein was previously shown to be active as a TNF-antagonist in a number of in vivo and in vitro models. Here we investigated the epicutaneous effect of recombinant VARV-CrmB protein using an experimental model of muTNFinduced migration of skin leukocytes as well as colony forming activity of bone marrow cells (BMC). Epiсutaneous applications of muTNF enhanced the number of cells migrating from skin flaps of BALB/c mice, whereas subsequent applications of VARV-CrmB protein in 30 min after muTNF, abolished that effect. Epicutaneously applied muTNF influenced the activity of committed hematopoietic progenitors causing a reduction of erythroid (BFUe+CFUe) colonies and increase of granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) colonies in the colony-forming tests. VARV-CrmB, applied in combination with muTNF, demonstrated an ability to reverse this effect, namely, to increase BFUe+CFUe and reduce CFU-GM back to the control levels. Taking together, these data demonstrate the TNF-blocking properties of VARV-CrmB in vivo at epicutaneous applications. As effective TNF antagonist VARV-CrmB protein might be conceded as a beneficial candidate for future research and development of therapeutic approaches in the field of inflammatory skin diseases.

  1. Michelob_x is the missing inhibitor of apoptosis protein antagonist in mosquito genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Jiang, Guohua; Chan, Gina; Santos, Carl P; Severson, David W; Xiao, Lei

    2005-08-01

    Apoptosis is implicated in the life cycle of the malaria parasite in mosquitoes. The genome project for the primary malaria vector Anopheles gambiae showed a significant expansion of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) and caspase gene families in comparison with Drosophila. However, because of extensive sequence divergence, no orthologue was identified for the reaper/grim-like IAP antagonist genes that have a pivotal role in cell death regulation in Drosophila. Using a customized searching strategy, we identified michelob_x(mx), a gene not predicted by the genome project, as the missing IAP antagonist in the An. gambiae and other mosquito genomes. Mx has a highly conserved amino-terminal IAP-binding motif. Expression of Mx induces rapid cell death in insect cell lines and is a potent tissue ablator in vivo. Its proapoptotic activity is totally dependent on the IAP-binding motif. Like reaper in Drosophila, mx is transcriptionally induced by ultraviolet irradiation to mediate cell death.

  2. Candidate nematicidal proteins in a new Pseudomonas veronii isolate identified by its antagonistic properties against Xiphinema index.

    PubMed

    Canchignia, Hayron; Altimira, Fabiola; Montes, Christian; Sánchez, Evelyn; Tapia, Eduardo; Miccono, María; Espinoza, Daniel; Aguirre, Carlos; Seeger, Michael; Prieto, Humberto

    2017-03-17

    The nematode Xiphinema index affects grape vines and transmits important viruses associated with fanleaf degeneration. Pseudomonas spp. are an extensive bacterial group in which important biodegradation and/or biocontrol properties can occur for several strains in the group. The aim of this study was to identify new Pseudomonas isolates with antagonist activity against X. index. Forty bacterial isolates were obtained from soil and root samples from Chilean vineyards. Thirteen new fluorescent pseudomonads were found and assessed for their antagonistic capability. The nematicide Pseudomonas protegens CHA0 was used as a control. Challenges of nematode individuals in King's B semi-solid agar Petri dishes facilitated the identification of the Pseudomonas veronii isolate R4, as determined by a 16S rRNA sequence comparison. This isolate was as effective as CHA0 as an antagonist of X. index, although it had a different lethality kinetic. Milk-induced R4 cultures exhibited protease and lipase activities in cell supernatants using both gelatin/tributyrin Petri dish assays and zymograms. Three proteins with these activities were isolated and subjected to mass spectrometry. Amino acid partial sequences enabled the identification of a 49-kDa protease similar to metalloprotease AprA and two lipases of 50 kDa and 69 kDa similar to LipA and ExoU, respectively. Electron microscopy analyses of challenged nematodes revealed degraded cuticle after R4 supernatant treatment. These results represent a new and unexplored property in this species associated with the presence of secretable lipases and protease, similar to characterized enzymes present in biocontrol pseudomonads.

  3. Pushing the threshold: how NMDAR antagonists induce homeostasis through protein synthesis to remedy depression

    PubMed Central

    Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.; Workman, Emily R.; Namjoshi, Sanjeev; Niere, Farr

    2016-01-01

    Healthy neurons have an optimal operating range, coded globally by the frequency of action potentials or locally by calcium. The maintenance of this range is governed by homeostatic plasticity. Here, we discuss how new approaches to treat depression alter synaptic activity. These approaches induce the neuron to recruit homeostatic mechanisms to relieve depression. Homeostasis generally implies that the direction of activity necessary to restore the neuron’s critical operating range is opposite in direction to its current activity pattern. Unconventional antidepressant therapies deep brain stimulation and NMDAR antagonists alter the neuron’s “depressed” state by pushing the neuron’s current activity in the same direction but to the extreme edge. These therapies rally the intrinsic drive of neurons in the opposite direction, thereby allowing the cell to return to baseline activity, form new synapses, and restore proper communication. In this review, we discuss seminal studies on protein synthesis dependent homeostatic plasticity and their contribution to our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of NMDAR antagonists as rapid antidepressants. Rapid antidepressant efficacy is likely to require a cascade of mRNA translational regulation. Emerging evidence suggests that changes in synaptic strength or intrinsic excitability converge on the same protein synthesis pathways, relieving depressive symptoms. Thus, we address the question: Are there multiple homeostatic mechanisms that induce the neuron and neuronal circuits to self-correct to regulate mood in vivo? Targeting alternative ways to induce homeostatic protein synthesis may provide, faster, safer, and longer lasting antidepressants. PMID:27125595

  4. Proteome approach to characterize proteins induced by antagonist yeast and salicylic acid in peach fruit.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zhulong; Qin, Guozheng; Xu, Xiangbin; Li, Boqiang; Tian, Shiping

    2007-05-01

    Proteins induced by antagonist yeast Pichia membranefaciens and salicylic acid (SA) in peach fruit were determined using proteome analysis in this study. Both the yeast and SA enhanced the resistance of peach fruit and delayed the initiation infection of Penicillium expansum. When quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer was used, a total of 25 proteins could be identified as significantly up- or down-regulated in response to at least one activitor. According to the function, these proteins were attributed to protein metabolism, defense response, transcription, energy metabolism, and cell structure. Among them, 6 antioxidant and 3 pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins were induced by P. membranefaciens or SA treatments. The induction results of these proteins were related to treatment time. Six other proteins were identified as the enzymes which catalyze the reactions of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle. In addition, both the yeast and SA treatments enhanced the transcript and translation expression of the catalase gene. These results suggested that antioxidant and PR proteins, as well as enzymes associated with sugar metabolism, were involved in resistance of peach fruit induced by P. membranefaciens and SA.

  5. Expression of gremlin, a bone morphogenetic protein antagonist,is associated with vascular calcification in uraemia.

    PubMed

    Jara, Aquiles; Chacón, Cecilia; Burgos, María Eugenia; Droguett, Alejandra; Valdivieso, Andrés; Ortiz, Mireya; Troncoso, Pablo; Mezzano, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    Vascular calcification has been widely recognized as a significant contributor to cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease. Recent evidence suggests that BMP-7 decreases the vascular calcification observed in uraemic rats, while BMP-2 could also be participating in this process. Gremlin, a bone morphogenetic protein antagonist, has been detected in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and since the role of the VSMCs into vascular calcification in uraemia is considered critical in this process, we hypothesized that gremlin could be participating in its pathogenesis. With this aim, we studied its expression in aorta from uraemic rats with calcitriol-induced vascular calcification and in 16-vessel biopsies of uraemic patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Gremlin was detected by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IMH). BMP-7, BMP-2 and BMP-2 receptor (BMPR2) were detected by IMH. Vascular calcification was assessed by the von Kossa staining method. Sham-operated and 5/6 nephrectomized rats (NFX) (1.2%P) were treated with vehicle or calcitriol (80 ng/kg, intraperitoneally every other day). Rats were killed after 4 weeks of treatment, and abdominal aorta was dissected for assessment of gremlin expression and vascular calcification. Epigastric arteries were obtained from dialysis patients during kidney transplantation procedure. Arteries from kidney donors were also studied. NFX rats developed a mild vascular calcification, whereas NFX-calcitriol rats developed a severe vascular and tissue calcification. A marked overexpression of gremlin was observed in the vascular media of aorta from NFX-calcitriol rats as compared with NFX and sham-calcitriol groups (4.8 +/- 1.3 versus 0.59 +/- 0.17 versus 0.19 +/- 0.07 percentage/mm(2), P < 0.01), and correlated with the BMP-2 and BMPR2 expression. Sham rats showed minimal or null gremlin expression. BMP-7 was not found in sham or calcified arteries. In human studies, we

  6. Group II Introns and Their Protein Collaborators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solem, Amanda; Zingler, Nora; Pyle, Anna Marie; Li-Pook-Than, Jennifer

    Group II introns are an abundant class of autocatalytic introns that excise themselves from precursor mRNAs. Although group II introns are catalytic RNAs, they require the assistance of proteins for efficient splicing in vivo. Proteins that facilitate splicing of organellar group II introns fall into two main categories: intron-encoded maturases and host-encoded proteins. This chapter will focus on the host proteins that group II introns recruited to ensure their function. It will discuss the great diversity of these proteins, define common features, and describe different strategies employed to achieve specificity. Special emphasis will be placed on DEAD-box ATPases, currently the best studied example of host-encoded proteins with a role in group II intron splicing. Since the exact mechanisms by which splicing is facilitated is not known for any of the host proteins, general mechanistic strategies for protein-mediated RNA folding are described and assessed for their potential role in group II intron splicing.

  7. The effects of sigma ligands on protein release from lacrimal acinar cells: a potential agonist/antagonist assay.

    PubMed

    Schoenwald, R D; Barfknecht, C F; Shirolkar, S; Xia, E

    1995-03-03

    Sigma receptor antagonists have been proposed as leading clinical candidates for use in various psychotic disorders. Prior to clinical testing, it is imperative that a new agent be correctly identified as an antagonist and not an agonist since the latter may worsen the psychosis. For sigma-ligands many behavioral and pharmacological assays have been developed in an attempt to classify agonist/antagonist activity. These assays evaluate a response or a behavior in an animal model that can be related to clinical efficacy. However, is the action by the presumed antagonist a consequence of sigma-receptor activity? Previously we have identified sigma-receptors in acinar cells of the main lacrimal gland of the New Zealand white rabbit and have measured protein release after the addition of various N,N-disubstituted phenylalkylamine derivatives known to be sigma-ligands by receptor binding studies. Although protein release from acinar cells has been attributed to either muscarinic or alpha-adrenergic stimulation, protein release from sigma-receptor stimulation was also confirmed. In the reported studies here, we isolated and incubated acinar cells with varying concentrations of known sigma-ligands and measured protein concentration. A knowledge of the receptor profile for the disubstituted phenylalkylamines permitted experiments to be designed in which various alpha, muscarinic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic antagonists could be added in equimolar concentrations. Under the conditions of these experiments, statistically significant increases in protein release for sigma-ligands could be attributed to stimulation of sigma-receptors. Haloperidol, an apparent sigma-antagonist, caused a statistically significant decrease in protein release and also inhibited protein release when tested with a known sigma-ligand, AF2975 [N,N-dimethyl-2-phenylethylamine]. In this system, stimulation and inhibition of protein release were defined as agonist and antagonist behavior, respectively

  8. [Induction of amnesia evoked by memory reconsolidation disruption with glutamate or serotonin receptor antagonists depends on protein synthesis activation].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V P; Solntseva, S V

    2010-12-01

    Effects of DNQX (ionotropic AMPA/cainate glutamate receptor antagonist) and metiotepin (serotonin receptor antagonist) and cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor) on long-term memory reconsolidation processes were studied in snail Helix lucorum with definite type of food aversion conditioned reflex. DNQX or cycloheximide injected immediately before reminding disrupt retrieval of the food aversion 24 hours after conditioning, and repeated trials of learning with the same food as at initial trials did not form the food aversion 2 weeks later. Metiotepin + reminding also discrupt recalling of food aversion 24 hours after conditioning, while food aversion was repaired after repeated trials 2 weeks later. Simultaneous injections of DNQX + cycloheximide or metiotepin + cycloheximide immediately before reminding do not discrupt the food aversion. We suggest that unrecovered and recovered forms of amnesia induced by AMPA/cainate glutamate receptor antagonists or serotonin receptor antagonist, respectively, need specific protein molecules de novo.

  9. Antagonistic roles of the N-terminal domain of prion protein to doppel.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Suehiro

    2008-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP)-like molecule, doppel (Dpl), is neurotoxic in mice, causing Purkinje cell degeneration. In contrast, PrP antagonizes Dpl in trans, rescuing mice from Purkinje cell death. We have previously shown that PrP with deletion of the N-terminal residues 23-88 failed to neutralize Dpl in mice, indicating that the N-terminal region, particularly that including residues 23-88, may have trans-protective activity against Dpl. Interestingly, PrP with deletion elongated to residues 121 or 134 in the N-terminal region was shown to be similarly neurotoxic to Dpl, indicating that the PrP C-terminal region may have toxicity which is normally prevented by the N-terminal domain in cis. We recently investigated further roles for the N-terminal region of PrP in antagonistic interactions with Dpl by producing three different types of transgenic mice. These mice expressed PrP with deletion of residues 25-50 or 51-90, or a fusion protein of the N-terminal region of PrP with Dpl. Here, we discuss a possible model for the antagonistic interaction between PrP and Dpl.

  10. A Single Amino Acid Dictates Protein Kinase R Susceptibility to Unrelated Viral Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Esparo, Nicolle M.; Child, Stephanie J.; Geballe, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    During millions of years of coevolution with their hosts, cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) have succeeded in adapting to overcome host-specific immune defenses, including the protein kinase R (PKR) pathway. Consequently, these adaptations may also contribute to the inability of CMVs to cross species barriers. Here, we provide evidence that the evolutionary arms race between the antiviral factor PKR and its CMV antagonist TRS1 has led to extensive differences in the species-specificity of primate CMV TRS1 proteins. Moreover, we identify a single residue in human PKR that when mutated to the amino acid present in African green monkey (Agm) PKR (F489S) is sufficient to confer resistance to HCMVTRS1. Notably, this precise molecular determinant of PKR resistance has evolved under strong positive selection among primate PKR alleles and is positioned within the αG helix, which mediates the direct interaction of PKR with its substrate eIF2α. Remarkably, this same residue also impacts sensitivity to K3L, a poxvirus-encoded pseudosubstrate that structurally mimics eIF2α. Unlike K3L, TRS1 has no homology to eIF2α, suggesting that unrelated viral genes have convergently evolved to target this critical region of PKR. Despite its functional importance, the αG helix exhibits extraordinary plasticity, enabling adaptations that allow PKR to evade diverse viral antagonists while still maintaining its critical interaction with eIF2α. PMID:27780231

  11. CXCR4 Protein Epitope Mimetic Antagonist, POL5551, Disrupts Metastasis and Enhances Chemotherapy Effect in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jingyu; Hurchla, Michelle A.; Fontana, Francesca; Su, Xinming; Amend, Sarah R.; Esser, Alison K.; Douglas, Garry J.; Mudalagiriyappa, Chidananda; Luker, Kathryn E.; Pluard, Timothy; Ademuyiwa, Foluso O.; Romagnoli, Barbara; Tuffin, Gérald; Chevalier, Eric; Luker, Gary D.; Bauer, Michael; Zimmermann, Johann; Aft, Rebecca L.; Dembowsky, Klaus; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.

    2016-01-01

    The SDF-1-receptor CXCR4 has been associated with early metastasis and poorer prognosis in breast cancers, especially the most aggressive triple negative subtype. In line with previous reports, we found that tumoral CXCR4 expression in patients with locally advanced breast cancer was associated with increased metastases and rapid tumor progression. Moreover, high CXCR4 expression identified a group of bone marrow disseminated tumor cells (DTC) negative patients at high risk for metastasis and death. The Protein Epitope Mimetic (PEM) POL5551, a novel CXCR4 antagonist, inhibited binding of SDF-1 to CXCR4, had no direct effects on tumor cell viability, but reduced migration of breast cancer cells in vitro. In two orthotopic models of triple negative breast cancer, POL5551 had little inhibitory effect on primary tumor growth but significantly reduced distant metastasis. When combined with eribulin, a chemotherapeutic microtubule inhibitor, POL5551 additively reduced metastasis and prolonged survival in mice after resection of the primary tumor compared to single-agent eribulin. Hypothesizing that POL5551 may mobilize tumor cells from their microenvironment and sensitize them to chemotherapy, we utilized a “chemotherapy framing” dosing strategy. When administered shortly before and after eribulin treatment, 3 doses of POL5551 with eribulin reduced bone and liver tumor burden more effectively than chemotherapy alone. These data suggest that sequenced administration of CXCR4 antagonists with cytotoxic chemotherapy synergize to reduce distant metastases. PMID:26269605

  12. Target hopping as a useful tool for the identification of novel EphA2 protein-protein antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tognolini, Massimiliano; Incerti, Matteo; Pala, Daniele; Russo, Simonetta; Castelli, Riccardo; Hassan-Mohamed, Iftiin; Giorgio, Carmine; Lodola, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Lithocholic acid (LCA), a physiological ligand for the nuclear receptor FXR and the G-protein-coupled receptor TGR5, has been recently described as an antagonist of the EphA2 receptor, a key member of the ephrin signalling system involved in tumour growth. Given the ability of LCA to recognize FXR, TGR5, and EphA2 receptors, we hypothesized that the structural requirements for a small molecule to bind each of these receptors might be similar. We therefore selected a set of commercially available FXR or TGR5 ligands and tested them for their ability to inhibit EphA2 by targeting the EphA2-ephrin-A1 interface. Among the selected compounds, the stilbene carboxylic acid GW4064 was identified as an effective antagonist of EphA2, being able to block EphA2 activation in prostate carcinoma cells, in the micromolar range. This finding proposes the "target hopping" approach as a new effective strategy to discover new protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

  13. Purification and sequencing of radish seed calmodulin antagonists phosphorylated by calcium-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Polya, G M; Chandra, S; Condron, R

    1993-02-01

    A family of radish (Raphanus sativus) calmodulin antagonists (RCAs) was purified from seeds by extraction, centrifugation, batch-wise elution from carboxymethyl-cellulose, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an SP5PW cation-exchange column. This RCA fraction was further resolved into three calmodulin antagonist polypeptides (RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3) by denaturation in the presence of guanidinium HCl and mercaptoethanol and subsequent reverse-phase HPLC on a C8 column eluted with an acetonitrile gradient in the presence of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and other radish seed proteins are phosphorylated by wheat embryo Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). The RCA preparation contains other CDPK substrates in addition to RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 inhibit chicken gizzard calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase assayed with a myosin-light chain-based synthetic peptide substrate (fifty percent inhibitory concentrations of RCA2 and RCA3 are about 7 and 2 microM, respectively). N-terminal sequencing by sequential Edman degradation of RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 revealed sequences having a high homology with the small subunit of the storage protein napin from Brassica napus and with related proteins. The deduced amino acid sequences of RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and RCA3' (a subform of RCA3) have agreement with average molecular masses from electrospray mass spectrometry of 4537, 4543, 4532, and 4560 kD, respectively. The only sites for serine phosphorylation are near or at the C termini and hence adjacent to the sites of proteolytic precursor cleavage.

  14. Purification and sequencing of radish seed calmodulin antagonists phosphorylated by calcium-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Polya, G M; Chandra, S; Condron, R

    1993-01-01

    A family of radish (Raphanus sativus) calmodulin antagonists (RCAs) was purified from seeds by extraction, centrifugation, batch-wise elution from carboxymethyl-cellulose, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an SP5PW cation-exchange column. This RCA fraction was further resolved into three calmodulin antagonist polypeptides (RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3) by denaturation in the presence of guanidinium HCl and mercaptoethanol and subsequent reverse-phase HPLC on a C8 column eluted with an acetonitrile gradient in the presence of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and other radish seed proteins are phosphorylated by wheat embryo Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). The RCA preparation contains other CDPK substrates in addition to RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3. The RCA preparation, RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 inhibit chicken gizzard calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase assayed with a myosin-light chain-based synthetic peptide substrate (fifty percent inhibitory concentrations of RCA2 and RCA3 are about 7 and 2 microM, respectively). N-terminal sequencing by sequential Edman degradation of RCA1, RCA2, and RCA3 revealed sequences having a high homology with the small subunit of the storage protein napin from Brassica napus and with related proteins. The deduced amino acid sequences of RCA1, RCA2, RCA3, and RCA3' (a subform of RCA3) have agreement with average molecular masses from electrospray mass spectrometry of 4537, 4543, 4532, and 4560 kD, respectively. The only sites for serine phosphorylation are near or at the C termini and hence adjacent to the sites of proteolytic precursor cleavage. PMID:8278508

  15. [Effects of antagonist and agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on injury of rat neurons induced by amyloid β-protein].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-gang; Qi, Ren-bin; Zhu, Li-hong; Lu, Da-xiang

    2013-03-19

    To explore the chronic effects of nicotinic antagonist and agonist on rat neurons injury induced by β-amyloid protein. The rat model of neuron injury was established by the exposure to Aβ25-35 and the intervention agent was either methyllycaconitine (MLA) or nicotine (Nic). And the experimental groups were control (distilled water), Aβ25-35, MLA (MLA and Aβ25-35) and Nic (Nic and Aβ25-35). Cellular viability was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) chromatometry while apoptosis and necrosis were detected by flow cytometer. Compared with control, cellular viability decreased while the apoptotic and necrotic rates increased in Aβ25-35 group(P = 0.00). The values of cellular viability at (0.75 ± 0.02) and (0.75 ± 0.09) in Aβ25-35 and MLA groups respectively were significantly lower than that of Nic group (0.81 ± 0.02, P = 0.01) at Day 3 and 7. No significant differences existed in cellular viability between Aβ25-35 and MLA groups. At Day 14, the differences of cellular viability were not obvious in all groups. At Day 21, cell viability of MLA group (0.64 ± 0.10) was significantly higher than those of Aβ25-35 (0.57 ± 0.04, P = 0.019) and Nic groups (0.56 ± 0.04, P = 0.008). The apoptotic rate was lower than that of Aβ25-35 group (3.70% ± 0.20% vs 4.70% ± 0.46%, P = 0.008) while the necrotic rate lower than that of Aβ25-35 group (7.73% ± 0.86% vs 16.30% ± 1.05%, P = 0.00) and Nic group (16.03% ± 1.53%, P = 0.00). However, no significant differences existed in cellular viability or apoptotic and necrotic rate between Aβ25-35 and Nic groups. With chronic treatment, the protective effect of α7 nicotinic antagonist methyllycaconitine increases whereas that of nicotinic agonist nicotine decreases.

  16. Tenotomy of m.soleus antagonists prevents the changes in fiber type characteristics and sarcomeric cytoskeletal proteins in unloaded rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukhina, Alexandra; Ardabievskaya, Anna; Vikhlyantsev, Ivan; Podlubnaya, Zoya; Nemirovskaya, Tatiana; Shenkman, Boris

    2005-08-01

    It is known that activity of postural extensors (m. soleus) decreases and activity of flexors (m. tibialis anterior) increases under unloading conditions. We have tested the hypothesis supposing that increased flexor activities during unloading exert suppressive influence on postural extensor activities and thus lead to dramatic changes in fiber size, MHC expression, sarcomeric proteins content in m.soleus. We have inactivated hindlimb flexor muscles (m.soleus antagonists) by bilateral tenotomy. 20 male Wistar rats were divided on 3 groups: cage control (C), hindlimb suspension for 14 days (HS), tenotomy of hindlimb flexor muscles with 14 days hindlimb suspension afterwards (HST). Several soleus muscle fiber characteristics decreased significantly in HS group (p<0.05) as compared with C group: cross sectional area (CSA) of type I muscle fibers, titin/MyHC ratio and nebulin/MyHC ratio. MyHC isoform pattern shifted slow-to-fast significantly. NFATc1 content increased in nuclear protein extract of m. soleus in HS group. None of these parameters was significantly different in HST group from those of C group. It has been concluded that the tenotomy of flexors under hindlimb suspension prevents atrophy of type I muscle fibers, decrease the degradation of titin and nebulin and prevent slow-to-fast shift of fiber MyHC isoform pattern, possibly through prevention of increase NFATc1 content in muscle fiber nuclear protein extract. Therefore, suppressive influence of increased flexor activity could be one of mechanisms that lead to the changes in m. soleus under unloading conditions. The work was supported by RFBR grants: 02-04-50025, 03- 04-48487 and the special program of RAS "Integration mechanisms of functional control in the living system".

  17. Structure based drug discovery of Rab38 protein- Identification of antagonists as cancer drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Vuruputuri, Uma; Abdelmonsef, Aboubakr Haredi; Dulapalli, Ramasree; Dasari, Thirupathi; Padmarao, Lavanya Souda; Mukkera, Thirupathi

    2016-10-26

    Cancer is responsible for one in eight deaths worldwide. The Rab family members are involved in important processes including membrane trafficking, cell growth and differentiation. It has been shown that Rab38 is located in melanosomes, and overexpressed at the RNA level in melanoma cancers. Rab38 represents a novel class of cellular modulators that can affect both initiation or progression of tumor cells in Homo sapiens. In the present work, the 3D structure of Rab38 (211 residues) was generated using homology modelling method; the structure shows the presence of 6 α- helices and 6 β- strands. The 3D structure was energy minimized and validated using standard protocols. The active site was identified using computational prediction tools like CASTp, efindsite and SiteMap, which show that the residues (Ser35 to Leu63) are important for binding. Protein-protein docking studies were carried out between the target protein and its natural substrate BLOC-3 using patchDock tool. Virtual screening studies were carried out with small ligand databases using glide Schrödinger suite. The ligands which are potential antagonists against the Rab38 protein were prioritized from the results of virtual screening based on glide score, glide energy and acceptable ADME properties.

  18. The antagonistic effect of Banana bunchy top virus multifunctional protein B4 against Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jun; Coates, Christopher J; Mao, Qianzhuo; Wu, Zujian; Xie, Lianhui

    2016-06-01

    The viral-induced banana bunchy top disease and the fungal-induced banana blight are two major causes of concern for industrial scale production of bananas. Banana blight is particularly troublesome, affecting ∼80% of crops worldwide. Strict guidelines and protocols are in place in order to ameliorate the effects of this devastating disease, yet little success has been achieved. From the data presented here, we have found that Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV)-infected bananas are more resistant to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc). BBTV appears to be antagonistic towards Foc, thus improving the survivability of plants against blight. The BBTV suppressor of RNA silencing, namely protein B4, displays fungicidal properties in vitro. Furthermore, transgenic tomatoes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged protein B4 demonstrate enhanced resistance to F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol). Differential gene expression analysis indicates that increased numbers of photogenesis-related gene transcripts are present in dark-green leaves of B4-GFP-modified tomato plants relative to those found in WT plants. Conversely, the transcript abundance of immunity-related genes is substantially lower in transgenic tomatoes compared with WT plants, suggesting that plant defences may be influenced by protein B4. This viral-fungal interaction provides new insights into microbial community dynamics within a single host and has potential commercial value for the breeding of transgenic resistance to Fusarium-related blight/wilt. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation by Trithorax-Group Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, Robert E.; Tamkun, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The trithorax group of genes (trxG) was identified in mutational screens that examined developmental phenotypes and suppression of Polycomb mutant phenotypes. The protein products of these genes are primarily involved in gene activation, although some can also have repressive effects. There is no central function for these proteins. Some move nucleosomes about on the genome in an ATP-dependent manner, some covalently modify histones such as methylating lysine 4 of histone H3, and some directly interact with the transcription machinery or are a part of that machinery. It is interesting to consider why these specific members of large families of functionally related proteins have strong developmental phenotypes. PMID:25274705

  20. A Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein Antagonist Is Down-Regulated in Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blish, Kimberly Rose; Wang, Wei; Willingham, Mark C.; Du, Wei; Birse, Charles E.; Krishnan, Surekha R.; Brown, Julie C.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Garvin, A. Julian; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Torti, Frank M.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed expression of candidate genes encoding cell surface or secreted proteins in normal kidney and kidney cancer. This screen identified a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist, SOSTDC1 (sclerostin domain–containing-1) as down-regulated in kidney tumors. To confirm screening results, we probed cDNA dot blots with SOSTDC1. The SOSTDC1 message was decreased in 20/20 kidney tumors compared with normal kidney tissue. Immunohistochemistry confirmed significant decrease of SOSTDC1 protein in clear cell renal carcinomas relative to normal proximal renal tubule cells (p < 0.001). Expression of SOSTDC1 was not decreased in papillary and chromophobe kidney tumors. SOSTDC1 was abundantly expressed in podocytes, distal tubules, and transitional epithelia of the normal kidney. Transfection experiments demonstrated that SOSTDC1 is secreted and binds to neighboring cells and/or the extracellular matrix. SOSTDC1 suppresses both BMP-7–induced phosphorylation of R-Smads-1, -5, and -8 and Wnt-3a signaling. Restoration of SOSTDC1 in renal clear carcinoma cells profoundly suppresses proliferation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SOSTDC1 is expressed in the human kidney and decreased in renal clear cell carcinoma. Because SOSTDC1 suppresses proliferation of renal carcinoma cells, restoration of SOSTDC1 signaling may represent a novel target in treatment of renal clear cell carcinoma. PMID:18032587

  1. EHB1 and AGD12, two calcium-dependent proteins affect gravitropism antagonistically in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Dümmer, Michaela; Michalski, Christian; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Rath, Magnus; Galland, Paul; Forreiter, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    The ADP-RIBOSYLATION FACTOR GTPase-ACTIVATING PROTEIN (AGD) 12, a member of the ARF-GAP protein family, affects gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. A loss-of-function mutant lacking AGD12 displayed diminished gravitropism in roots and hypocotyls indicating that both organs are affected by this regulator. AGD12 is structurally related to ENHANCED BENDING (EHB) 1, previously described as a negative effector of gravitropism. In contrast to agd12 mutants, ehb1 loss-of function seedlings displayed enhanced gravitropic bending. While EHB1 and AGD12 both possess a C-terminal C2/CaLB-domain, EHB1 lacks the N-terminal ARF-GAP domain present in AGD12. Subcellular localization analysis using Brefeldin A indicated that both proteins are elements of the trans Golgi network. Physiological analyses provided evidence that gravitropic signaling might operate via an antagonistic interaction of ARF-GAP (AGD12) and EHB1 in their Ca(2+)-activated states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Heat shock protein antagonists in early stage clinical trials for NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Lizza E L; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C

    2017-05-01

    Cancer cells have a higher need of chaperones than normal cells to prevent the toxic effects of intracellular protein misfolding and aggregation. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) belong to these chaperones; they are classified into families according to molecular size. Hsps are upregulated in many cancers and inhibition can inhibit tumor growth by destabilizing proteins necessary for tumor survival. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), there are three different Hsp antagonist classes that are in (early) clinical trials: Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp27 inhibitors. Areas covered: The rationale to use Hsp inhibitors in NSCLC will be summarized and phase I-III trials will be reviewed. Expert opinion: Several Hsp90 inhibitors have been tested in phase I-III trials, until now none was positive in unselected NSCLC; therefore development of AUY922, ganetespib and retaspimycin was halted. Results seem more promising in molecularly selected patients, especially in ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Hsp27 is overexpressed in squamous NSCLC and is a mechanism of chemotherapy resistance. The Hsp27 inhibitor apatorsen is now tested in squamous NSCLC. No phase II/III data are known for Hsp70 inhibitors. Combination of Hsp inhibitors with heat shock transcription factor 1 inhibitors or focal adhesion kinase inhibitors might be of interest for future trials.

  3. Antagonists of the miRNA-Argonaute 2 Protein Complex: Anti-miR-AGOs.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marco F; Korb, Oliver; Abell, Chris

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as high-value drug targets. A widely applied strategy in miRNA inhibition is the use of antisense agents. However, it has been shown that oligonucleotides are poorly cell permeable because of their complex chemical structure and due to their negatively charged backbone. Consequently, the general application of oligonucleotides in therapy is limited. Since miRNAs' functions are executed exclusively by the Argonaute 2 protein, we therefore describe a protocol for the design of a novel miRNA inhibitor class: antagonists of the miRNA-Argonaute 2 protein complex, so-called anti-miR-AGOs, that not only block the crucial binding site of the target miRNA but also bind to the protein's active site. Due to their lower molecular weight and, thus, more drug-like chemical structure, the novel inhibitor class may show better pharmacokinetic properties than reported oligonucleotide inhibitors, enabling them for potential therapeutic use.

  4. Effect of interdomain linker length on an antagonistic folding-unfolding equilibrium between two protein domains.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Thomas A; Mills, Brandon M; Lubin, David J; Chong, Lillian T; Loh, Stewart N

    2009-02-27

    Fusion of one protein domain with another is a common event in both evolution and protein engineering experiments. When insertion is at an internal site (e.g., a surface loop or turn), as opposed to one of the termini, conformational strain can be introduced into both domains. Strain is manifested by an antagonistic folding-unfolding equilibrium between the two domains, which we previously showed can be parameterized by a coupling free-energy term (DeltaG(X)). The extent of strain is predicted to depend primarily on the ratio of the N-to-C distance of the guest protein to the distance between ends of the surface loop in the host protein. Here, we test that hypothesis by inserting ubiquitin (Ub) into the bacterial ribonuclease barnase (Bn), using peptide linkers from zero to 10 amino acids each. DeltaG(X) values are determined by measuring the extent to which Co(2+) binding to an engineered site on the Ub domain destabilizes the Bn domain. All-atom, unforced Langevin dynamics simulations are employed to gain structural insight into the mechanism of mechanically induced unfolding. Experimental and computational results find that the two domains are structurally and energetically uncoupled when linkers are long and that DeltaG(X) increases with decreasing linker length. When the linkers are fewer than two amino acids, strain is so great that one domain unfolds the other. However, the protein is able to refold as dimers and higher-order oligomers. The likely mechanism is a three-dimensional domain swap of the Bn domain, which relieves conformational strain. The simulations suggest that an effective route to mechanical unfolding begins with disruption of the hydrophobic core of Bn near the Ub insertion site.

  5. Exploiting Free-Energy Minima to Design Novel EphA2 Protein-Protein Antagonists: From Simulation to Experiment and Return.

    PubMed

    Russo, Simonetta; Callegari, Donatella; Incerti, Matteo; Pala, Daniele; Giorgio, Carmine; Brunetti, Jlenia; Bracci, Luisa; Vicini, Paola; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Capoferri, Luigi; Rivara, Silvia; Tognolini, Massimiliano; Mor, Marco; Lodola, Alessio

    2016-06-06

    The free-energy surface (FES) of protein-ligand binding contains information useful for drug design. Here we show how to exploit a free-energy minimum of a protein-ligand complex identified by metadynamics simulations to design a new EphA2 antagonist with improved inhibitory potency.

  6. Competition between antagonistic complement factors for a single protein on N. meningitidis rules disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Caesar, Joseph JE; Lavender, Hayley; Ward, Philip N; Exley, Rachel M; Eaton, Jack; Chittock, Emily; Malik, Talat H; Goiecoechea De Jorge, Elena; Pickering, Matthew C; Tang, Christoph M; Lea, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have found variation within the complement factor H gene family links to host susceptibility to meningococcal disease caused by infection with Neisseria meningitidis (Davila et al., 2010). Mechanistic insights have been challenging since variation within this locus is complex and biological roles of the factor H-related proteins, unlike factor H, are incompletely understood. N. meningitidis subverts immune responses by hijacking a host-immune regulator, complement factor H (CFH), to the bacterial surface (Schneider et al., 2006; Madico et al., 2007; Schneider et al., 2009). We demonstrate that complement factor-H related 3 (CFHR3) promotes immune activation by acting as an antagonist of CFH. Conserved sequences between CFH and CFHR3 mean that the bacterium cannot sufficiently distinguish between these two serum proteins to allow it to hijack the regulator alone. The level of protection from complement attack achieved by circulating N. meningitidis therefore depends on the relative levels of CFH and CFHR3 in serum. These data may explain the association between genetic variation in both CFH and CFHR3 and susceptibility to meningococcal disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04008.001 PMID:25534642

  7. Curariform Antagonists Bind in Different Orientations to Acetylcholine-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fan; Bren, Nina; Little, Alicia; Wang, Hai-Long; Hansen, Scott B.; Talley, Todd T.; Taylor, Palmer; Sine, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) recently emerged as a prototype for relating structure to function of the ligand binding domain of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). To understand interactions of competitive antagonists at the atomic structural level, we studied binding of the curare derivatives d-tubocurarine (d-TC) and metocurine to AChBP using computational methods, mutagenesis, and ligand binding measurements. To account for protein flexibility, we used a 2-ns molecular dynamics simulation of AChBP to generate multiple snapshots of the equilibrated dynamic structure to which optimal docking orientations were determined. Our results predict a predominant docking orientation for both d-TC and metocurine, but unexpectedly, the bound orientations differ fundamentally for each ligand. At one subunit interface of AChBP, the side chain of Tyr-89 closely approaches a positively charged nitrogen in d-TC but is farther away from the equivalent nitrogen in metocurine, whereas, at the opposing interface, side chains of Trp-53 and Gln-55 closely approach the metocurine scaffold but not that of d-TC. The different orientations correspond to ~170° rotation and ~30° degree tilt of the curare scaffold within the binding pocket. Mutagenesis of binding site residues in AChBP, combined with measurements of ligand binding, confirms the different docking orientations. Thus structurally similar ligands can adopt distinct orientations at receptor binding sites, posing challenges for interpreting structure-activity relationships for many drugs. PMID:12682067

  8. Identification of a group of brominated flame retardants as novel androgen receptor antagonists and potential neuronal and endocrine disrupters.

    PubMed

    Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Pradhan, Ajay; Asnake, Solomon; Walstad, Anders; Ivarsson, Per; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) are used in industrial products to reduce the risk of fire. However, their continuous release into the environment is a concern as they are often persistent, bioaccumulating and toxic. Information on the impact these compounds have on human health and wildlife is limited and only a few of them have been identified to disrupt hormone receptor functions. In the present study we used in silico modeling to determine the interactions of selected BFRs with the human androgen receptor (AR). Three compounds were found to dock into the ligand-binding domain of the human AR and these were further tested using in vitro analysis. Allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE) and 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) were observed to act as AR antagonists. These BFRs have recently been detected in the environment, in house dust and in aquatic animals. The compounds have been detected at high concentrations in both blubber and brain of seals and we therefore also assessed their impact on the expression of L-type amino acid transporter system (LAT) genes, that are needed for amino acid uptake across the blood-brain barrier, as disruption of LAT gene function has been implicated in several brain disorders. The three BFRs down-regulated the expression of AR target genes that encode for prostate specific antigen (PSA), 5α-reductases and β-microseminoprotein. The potency of PSA inhibition was of the same magnitude as the common prostate cancer drugs, demonstrating that these compounds are strong AR antagonists. Western blot analysis of AR protein showed that ATE, BATE and DPTE decreased the 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced AR protein levels, further confirming that these BFRs act as AR antagonists. The transcription of the LAT genes was altered by the three BFRs, indicating an effect on amino-acid uptake across cellular membranes and blood-brain barrier. This study demonstrated that ATE, BATE

  9. Transcriptional Silencing by Polycomb-Group Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, Ueli; Paro, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb-group (PcG) genes encode chromatin proteins involved in stable and heritable transcriptional silencing. PcG proteins participate in distinct multimeric complexes that deposit, or bind to, specific histone modifications (e.g., H3K27me3 and H2AK119ub1) to prevent gene activation and maintain repressed chromatin domains. PcG proteins are evolutionary conserved and play a role in processes ranging from vernalization and seed development in plants, over X-chromosome inactivation in mammals, to the maintenance of stem cell identity. PcG silencing is medically relevant as it is often observed in human disorders, including cancer, and tissue regeneration, which involve the reprogramming of PcG-controlled target genes. PMID:25367972

  10. Enabling large-scale design, synthesis and validation of small molecule protein-protein antagonists.

    PubMed

    Koes, David; Khoury, Kareem; Huang, Yijun; Wang, Wei; Bista, Michal; Popowicz, Grzegorz M; Wolf, Siglinde; Holak, Tad A; Dömling, Alexander; Camacho, Carlos J

    2012-01-01

    Although there is no shortage of potential drug targets, there are only a handful known low-molecular-weight inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). One problem is that current efforts are dominated by low-yield high-throughput screening, whose rigid framework is not suitable for the diverse chemotypes present in PPIs. Here, we developed a novel pharmacophore-based interactive screening technology that builds on the role anchor residues, or deeply buried hot spots, have in PPIs, and redesigns these entry points with anchor-biased virtual multicomponent reactions, delivering tens of millions of readily synthesizable novel compounds. Application of this approach to the MDM2/p53 cancer target led to high hit rates, resulting in a large and diverse set of confirmed inhibitors, and co-crystal structures validate the designed compounds. Our unique open-access technology promises to expand chemical space and the exploration of the human interactome by leveraging in-house small-scale assays and user-friendly chemistry to rationally design ligands for PPIs with known structure.

  11. Control of hematopoietic stem cell emergence by antagonistic functions of ribosomal protein paralogs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Duc, Anne-Cécile E; Rao, Shuyun; Sun, Xiao-Li; Bilbee, Alison N; Rhodes, Michele; Li, Qin; Kappes, Dietmar J; Rhodes, Jennifer; Wiest, David L

    2013-02-25

    It remains controversial whether the highly homologous ribosomal protein (RP) paralogs found in lower eukaryotes have distinct functions and this has not been explored in vertebrates. Here we demonstrate that despite ubiquitous expression, the RP paralogs, Rpl22 and Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1) play essential, distinct, and antagonistic roles in hematopoietic development. Knockdown of Rpl22 in zebrafish embryos selectively blocks the development of T lineage progenitors after they have seeded the thymus. In contrast, knockdown of the Rpl22 paralog, Rpl22l1, impairs the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros by abrogating Smad1 expression and the consequent induction of essential transcriptional regulator, Runx1. Indeed, despite the ability of both paralogs to bind smad1 RNA, Rpl22 and Rpl22l1 have opposing effects on Smad1 expression. Accordingly, circumstances that tip the balance of these paralogs in favor of Rpl22 (e.g., Rpl22l1 knockdown or Rpl22 overexpression) result in repression of Smad1 and blockade of HSC emergence.

  12. Purinergic Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Odorant-Induced Heat Shock Protein 25 Induction in Mouse Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hegg, Colleen C.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) accumulate in cells exposed to a variety of physiological and environmental factors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, toxicants, and odorants. Ischemic, stressed, and injured cells release ATP in large amounts. Our hypothesis is that noxious stimulation (in this case, strong odorant) evokes the release of ATP in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Extracellular ATP, a signal of cellular stress, induces the expression of HSPs via purinergic receptors. In the present study, in vivo odorant exposure (heptanal or r-carvone) led to a selective induction of HSP25 in glia-like sustentacular cells in the Swiss Webster mouse OE, as previously shown in rats (Carr et al., 2001). Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo administration of purinergic receptor antagonists suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid (PPADS) blocked the expression of HSP25 immunoreactivity in sustentacular cells. ATP released by acutely injured cells could act as an early signal of cell and tissue damage, causing HSP expression and initiating a stress signaling cascade to protect against further damage. Sustentacular cells have a high capacity to detoxify xenobiotics and thereby protect the olfactory epithelium from airborne pollutants. Thus, the robust, rapid induction of HSPs in sustentacular cells may help maintain the integrity of the OE during exposure to toxicants. PMID:16206165

  13. The bone morphogenic protein antagonist gremlin regulates proximal-distal patterning of the lung.

    PubMed

    Lu, M M; Yang, H; Zhang, L; Shu, W; Blair, D G; Morrisey, E E

    2001-12-01

    The proximal-distal patterning of lung epithelium involves a complex series of signaling and transcriptional events resulting in the programmed differentiation of highly specialized cells for gas exchange and surfactant protein expression essential for postnatal lung function. The BMP signaling pathway has been shown to regulate cellular differentiation in the lung as well as other tissues. In this report, we show that the can family of related BMP antagonists, including gremlin, cer-1, PRDC, and Dan are expressed in the lung during embryonic development with gremlin expression observed in the proximal airway epithelium. The role of gremlin in lung development was explored by overexpressing it in the distal lung epithelium of transgenic mice using the human SP-C promoter. SP-C/gremlin transgenic mice exhibited a disruption of the proximal-distal patterning found in the airways of the mammalian lung. Expanded expression of the proximal epithelial cell markers CC10 and HFH-4 (Foxj1) was observed in the distal regions of transgenic lungs. Furthermore, smooth muscle alpha-actin expression was observed surrounding the distal airways of SP-C/gremlin mice, indicating a proximalization of distal lung tubules. These data suggest that gremlin plays an important role in lung morphogenesis by regulating the proximal-distal patterning of the lung during development. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Gremlin, a Bone Morphogenetic Protein Antagonist, Is a Crucial Angiogenic Factor in Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Daizo; Kim, Kyongsong; Ishii, Yudo; Tahara, Shigeyuki; Teramoto, Akira; Morita, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Gremlin is an antagonist of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and a major driving force in skeletal modeling in the fetal stage. Several recent reports have shown that Gremlin is also involved in angiogenesis of lung cancer and diabetic retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Gremlin in tumor angiogenesis in pituitary adenoma. Double fluorescence immunohistochemistry of Gremlin and CD34 was performed in pituitary adenoma tissues obtained during transsphenoidal surgery in 45 cases (7 PRLoma, 17 GHoma, 2 ACTHoma, and 2 TSHoma). Gremlin and microvascular density (MVD) were detected by double-immunofluorescence microscopy in CD34-positive vessels from tissue microarray analysis of 60 cases of pituitary adenomas (6 PRLoma, 23 GHoma, 22 NFoma, 5 ACTHoma, and 4 TSHoma). In tissue microarray analysis, MVD was significantly correlated with an increased Gremlin level (linear regression: P < 0.005,  r 2 = 0.4958). In contrast, Gremlin expression showed no correlation with tumor subtype or Knosp score. The high level of expression of Gremlin in pituitary adenoma tissue with many CD34-positive vessels and the strong coherence of these regions indicate that Gremlin is associated with angiogenesis in pituitary adenoma cells. PMID:25834571

  15. Control of hematopoietic stem cell emergence by antagonistic functions of ribosomal protein paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Duc, Anne-Cécile E.; Rao, Shuyun; Sun, Xiao-Li; Bilbee, Alison N.; Rhodes, Michele; Li, Qin; Kappes, Dietmar J.; Rhodes, Jennifer; Wiest, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary It remains controversial whether the highly-homologous ribosomal protein (RP) paralogs found in lower eukaryotes have distinct functions and this has not been explored in vertebrates. Here we demonstrate that despite ubiquitous expression, the RP paralogs, Rpl22 and Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1) play essential, distinct, and antagonistic roles in hematopoietic development. Knockdown of rpl22 in zebrafish embryos selectively blocks the development of T lineage progenitors after they have seeded the thymus. In contrast, knockdown of the rpl22 paralog, rpl22l1, impairs the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros by abrogating Smad1 expression and the consequent induction of essential transcriptional regulator, Runx1. Indeed, despite the ability of both paralogs to bind Smad1 RNA, Rpl22 and Rpl22l1 have opposing effects on Smad1 expression. Accordingly, circumstances that tip the balance of these paralogs in favor of Rpl22 (e.g., Rpl22l1 knockdown or Rpl22 overexpression) result in repression of Smad1 and blockade of HSC emergence. PMID:23449473

  16. Chemical synthesis and X-ray structure of a heterochiral {D-protein antagonist plus vascular endothelial growth factor} protein complex by racemic crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Uppalapati, Maruti; Ault-Riché, Dana; Kenney, John; Lowitz, Joshua; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2012-10-23

    Total chemical synthesis was used to prepare the mirror image (D-protein) form of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A). Phage display against D-VEGF-A was used to screen designed libraries based on a unique small protein scaffold in order to identify a high affinity ligand. Chemically synthesized D- and L- forms of the protein ligand showed reciprocal chiral specificity in surface plasmon resonance binding experiments: The L-protein ligand bound only to D-VEGF-A, whereas the D-protein ligand bound only to L-VEGF-A. The D-protein ligand, but not the L-protein ligand, inhibited the binding of natural VEGF{sub 165} to the VEGFR1 receptor. Racemic protein crystallography was used to determine the high resolution X-ray structure of the heterochiral complex consisting of {l_brace}D-protein antagonist + L-protein form of VEGF-A{r_brace}. Crystallization of a racemic mixture of these synthetic proteins in appropriate stoichiometry gave a racemic protein complex of more than 73 kDa containing six synthetic protein molecules. The structure of the complex was determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. Detailed analysis of the interaction between the D-protein antagonist and the VEGF-A protein molecule showed that the binding interface comprised a contact surface area of approximately 800 {angstrom}{sup 2} in accord with our design objectives, and that the D-protein antagonist binds to the same region of VEGF-A that interacts with VEGFR1-domain 2.

  17. Genetic Evidence for an Interferon-Antagonistic Function of Rift Valley Fever Virus Nonstructural Protein NSs

    PubMed Central

    Bouloy, Michèle; Janzen, Christian; Vialat, Pierre; Khun, Huot; Pavlovic, Jovan; Huerre, Michel; Haller, Otto

    2001-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, is a major public health threat in Egypt and sub-Saharan Africa. The viral and host cellular factors that contribute to RVFV virulence and pathogenicity are still poorly understood. All pathogenic RVFV strains direct the synthesis of a nonstructural phosphoprotein (NSs) that is encoded by the smallest (S) segment of the tripartite genome and has an undefined accessory function. In this report, we show that MP12 and clone 13, two attenuated RVFV strains with mutations in the NSs gene, were highly virulent in IFNAR−/− mice lacking the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor but remained attenuated in IFN-γ receptor-deficient mice. Both attenuated strains proved to be excellent inducers of early IFN-α/β production. In contrast, the virulent strain ZH548 failed to induce detectable amounts of IFN-α/β and replicated extensively in both IFN-competent and IFN-deficient mice. Clone 13 has a defective NSs gene with a large in-frame deletion. This defect in the NSs gene results in expression of a truncated protein which is rapidly degraded. To investigate whether the presence of the wild-type NSs gene correlated with inhibition of IFN-α/β production, we infected susceptible IFNAR−/− mice with S gene reassortant viruses. When the S segment of ZH548 was replaced by that of clone 13, the resulting reassortants became strong IFN inducers. When the defective S segment of clone 13 was exchanged with the wild-type S segment of ZH548, the reassortant virus lost the capacity to stimulate IFN-α/β production. These results demonstrate that the ability of RVFV to inhibit IFN-α/β production correlates with viral virulence and suggest that the accessory protein NSs is an IFN antagonist. PMID:11152510

  18. Biology of polycomb and trithorax group proteins.

    PubMed

    Breiling, Achim; Sessa, Luca; Orlando, Valerio

    2007-01-01

    Cellular phenotypes can be ascribed to different patterns of gene expression. Epigenetic mechanisms control the generation of different phenotypes from the same genotype. Thus differentiation is basically a process driven by changes in gene activity during development, often in response to transient factors or environmental stimuli. To keep the specific characteristics of cell types, tissue-specific gene expression patterns must be transmitted stably from one cell to the daughter cells, also in the absence of the early-acting determination factors. This heritability of patterns of active and inactive genes is enabled by epigenetic mechanisms that create a layer of information on top of the DNA sequence that ensures mitotic and sometimes also meiotic transmission of expression patterns. The proteins of the Polycomb and Trithorax group comprise such a cellular memory mechanism that preserves gene expression patterns through many rounds of cell division. This review provides an overview of the genetics and molecular biology of these maintenance proteins, concentrating mainly on mechanisms of Polycomb group-mediated repression.

  19. Effects of the calcium antagonists perhexiline and cinnarizine on vascular and cardiac contractile protein function.

    PubMed

    Silver, P J; Dachiw, J; Ambrose, J M; Pinto, P B

    1985-09-01

    The weakly basic, lipophilic Ca++ antagonists perhexiline and cinnarizine have been compared with the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 and the cardiotonics Vardax and APP-201-533 for the ability to modulate Ca++-dependent contractile protein interactions directly, as well as Ca++-calmodulin-mediated myosin light chain phosphorylation, in arterial actomyosin or cardiac myofibrils. Both perhexiline and cinnarizine inhibited arterial myosin P-light chain phosphorylation and superprecipitation of arterial actomyosin over the concentration range of 10 to 200 microM. Concomitant inhibition of arterial superprecipitation and phosphorylation by perhexiline (IC50 = 33 microM) and cinnarizine (IC50 = 60 microM) was similar to W-7 (IC50 = 35 microM), and was characterized by a rightward shift in the pCa superprecipitation and pCa-light chain phosphorylation relationships, depressed maximum activity and attenuation by 2 microM exogenous calmodulin. However, whereas inhibition of superprecipitation and P-light chain phosphorylation by W-7 was equal at different Mg++ concentrations, relatively greater inhibition with perhexiline and less inhibition with cinnarizine was apparent as the free Mg++ concentration was lowered. In cardiac myofibrils prepared from both bovine and canine ventricles, perhexiline stimulated Mg-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity and cinnarizine was without effect, whereas W-7 significantly depressed ATPase activity. Perhexiline was 10-fold more potent and 3-fold more efficacious than either Vardax or APP-201-533 in canine cardiac myofibrils. Whereas APP-201-533 increased Ca++ sensitivity and maximum ATPase activity (Vmax), perhexiline increased Ca++ sensitivity, but not Vmax, and W-7 depressed both parameters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. A Network of Genes Antagonistic to the LIN-35 Retinoblastoma Protein of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Polley, Stanley R. G.; Fay, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans pRb ortholog, LIN-35, functions in a wide range of cellular and developmental processes. This includes a role of LIN-35 in nutrient utilization by the intestine, which it carries out redundantly with SLR-2, a zinc-finger protein. This and other redundant functions of LIN-35 were identified in genetic screens for mutations that display synthetic phenotypes in conjunction with loss of lin-35. To explore the intestinal role of LIN-35, we conducted a genome-wide RNA-interference-feeding screen for suppressors of lin-35; slr-2 early larval arrest. Of the 26 suppressors identified, 17 fall into three functional classes: (1) ribosome biogenesis genes, (2) mitochondrial prohibitins, and (3) chromatin regulators. Further characterization indicates that different categories of suppressors act through distinct molecular mechanisms. We also tested lin-35; slr-2 suppressors, as well as suppressors of the synthetic multivulval phenotype, to determine the spectrum of lin-35-synthetic phenotypes that could be suppressed following inhibition of these genes. We identified 19 genes, most of which are evolutionarily conserved, that can suppress multiple unrelated lin-35-synthetic phenotypes. Our study reveals a network of genes broadly antagonistic to LIN-35 as well as genes specific to the role of LIN-35 in intestinal and vulval development. Suppressors of multiple lin-35 phenotypes may be candidate targets for anticancer therapies. Moreover, screening for suppressors of phenotypically distinct synthetic interactions, which share a common altered gene, may prove to be a novel and effective approach for identifying genes whose activities are most directly relevant to the core functions of the shared gene. PMID:22542970

  1. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Type I Receptor Antagonists Decrease Growth and Induce Cell Death of Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Langenfeld, Elaine; Hong, Charles C.; Lanke, Gandhi; Langenfeld, John

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are highly conserved morphogens that are essential for normal development. BMP-2 is highly expressed in the majority of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) but not in normal lung tissue or benign lung tumors. The effects of the BMP signaling cascade on the growth and survival of cancer cells is poorly understood. We show that BMP signaling is basally active in lung cancer cell lines, which can be effectively inhibited with selective antagonists of the BMP type I receptors. Lung cancer cell lines express alk2, alk3, and alk6 and inhibition of a single BMP receptor was not sufficient to decrease signaling. Inhibition of more than one type I receptor was required to decrease BMP signaling in lung cancer cell lines. BMP receptor antagonists and silencing of BMP type I receptors with siRNA induced cell death, inhibited cell growth, and caused a significant decrease in the expression of inhibitor of differentiation (Id1, Id2, and Id3) family members, which are known to regulate cell growth and survival in many types of cancers. BMP receptor antagonists also decreased clonogenic cell growth. Knockdown of Id3 significantly decreased cell growth and induced cell death of lung cancer cells. H1299 cells stably overexpressing Id3 were resistant to growth suppression and induction of cell death induced by the BMP antagonist DMH2. These studies suggest that BMP signaling promotes cell growth and survival of lung cancer cells, which is mediated through its regulation of Id family members. Selective antagonists of the BMP type I receptors represents a potential means to pharmacologically treat NSCLC and other carcinomas with an activated BMP signaling cascade. PMID:23593444

  2. Mathematical modelling of signalling in a two-ligand G-protein coupled receptor system: agonist-antagonist competition.

    PubMed

    Bridge, L J; King, J R; Hill, S J; Owen, M R

    2010-02-01

    A new mathematical model of cell signalling for a two-ligand G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) system is presented. This model extends the single-ligand cubic ternary complex to account for the possibility of an agonist and an antagonist competing for receptor sites. The G-protein cycle is included, and signalling as far as the dissociated G(alpha) subunit is considered. Numerical simulations are performed, and the effects on the system dynamics, such as peak and plateau behaviour, of antagonist "stickiness", and of the doses of agonist and antagonist, are discussed. Under certain parameter regimes, the plateau response is subject to surmountable antagonism, while the peak response is subject to insurmountable antagonism. The numerical results reveal responses evolving over a number of time-scales. An asymptotic analysis is presented which identifies dominant reactions and gives leading order solutions over these various time-scales, for a number of parameter regimes. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Source memory in rats is impaired by an NMDA receptor antagonist but not by PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interaction inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexandra E.; Xu, Zhili; Lai, Yvonne Y.; Kulkarni, Pushkar M.; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Hohmann, Andrea G.; Crystal, Jonathon D.

    2016-01-01

    Limitations of preclinical models of human memory contribute to the pervasive view that rodent models do not adequately predict therapeutic efficacy in producing cognitive impairments or improvements in humans. We used a source-memory model (i.e. a representation of the origin of information) we developed for use in rats to evaluate possible drug-induced impairments of both spatial memory and higher order memory functions in the same task. Memory impairment represents a major barrier to use of NMDAR antagonists as pharmacotherapies. The scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95kDa (PSD95) links NMDARs to the neuronal enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which catalyzes production of the signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO). Therefore, interrupting PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions downstream of NMDARs represents a novel therapeutic strategy to interrupt NMDAR-dependent NO signaling while bypassing unwanted side effects of NMDAR antagonists. We hypothesized that the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 would impair source memory. We also hypothesized that PSD95-nNOS inhibitors (IC87201 and ZL006) would lack the profile of cognitive impairment associated with global NMDAR antagonists. IC87201 and ZL006 suppressed NMDA-stimulated formation of cGMP, a marker of NO production, in cultured hippocampal neurons. MK-801, at doses that did not impair motor function, impaired source memory under conditions in which spatial memory was spared. Thus, source memory was more vulnerable than spatial memory to impairment. By contrast, PSD95-nNOS inhibitors, IC87201 and ZL006, administered at doses that are behaviorally effective in rats, spared source memory, spatial memory, and motor function. Thus, PSD95-nNOS inhibitors are likely to exhibit favorable therapeutic ratios compared to NMDAR antagonists. PMID:26909849

  4. Trithorax group proteins: switching genes on and keeping them active.

    PubMed

    Schuettengruber, Bernd; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Iovino, Nicola; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2011-11-23

    Cellular memory is provided by two counteracting groups of chromatin proteins termed Trithorax group (TrxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. TrxG proteins activate transcription and are perhaps best known because of the involvement of the TrxG protein MLL in leukaemia. However, in terms of molecular analysis, they have lived in the shadow of their more famous counterparts, the PcG proteins. Recent advances have improved our understanding of TrxG protein function and demonstrated that the heterogeneous group of TrxG proteins is of critical importance in the epigenetic regulation of the cell cycle, senescence, DNA damage and stem cell biology.

  5. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Antagonist Noggin Promotes Skin Tumorigenesis via Stimulation of the Wnt and Shh Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Andrey A.; Mardaryev, Andrei N.; Sharova, Tatyana Y.; Grachtchouk, Marina; Atoyan, Ruzanna; Byers, H. Randolph; Seykora, John T.; Overbeek, Paul; Dlugosz, Andrzej; Botchkarev, Vladimir A.

    2009-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play pivotal roles in the regulation of skin development. To study the role of BMPs in skin tumorigenesis, BMP antagonist noggin was used to generate keratin 14-targeted transgenic mice. In contrast to wild-type mice, transgenic mice developed spontaneous hair follicle-derived tumors, which resemble human trichofolliculoma. Global gene expression profiles revealed that in contrast to anagen hair follicles of wild-type mice, tumors of transgenic mice showed stage-dependent increases in the expression of genes encoding the selected components of Wnt and Shh pathways. Specifically, expression of the Wnt ligands increased at the initiation stage of tumor formation, whereas expression of the Wnt antagonist and tumor suppressor Wnt inhibitory factor-1 decreased, as compared with fully developed tumors. In contrast, expression of the components of Shh pathway increased in fully developed tumors, as compared with the tumor placodes. Consistent with the expression data, pharmacological treatment of transgenic mice with Wnt and Shh antagonists resulted in the stage-dependent inhibition of tumor initiation, and progression, respectively. Furthermore, BMP signaling stimulated Wnt inhibitory factor-1 expression and promoter activity in cultured tumor cells and HaCaT keratinocytes, as well as inhibited Shh expression, as compared with the corresponding controls. Thus, tumor suppressor activity of the BMPs in skin epithelium depends on the local concentrations of noggin and is mediated at least in part via stage-dependent antagonizing of Wnt and Shh signaling pathways. PMID:19700758

  6. Compartmentalization of bone morphogenetic proteins and their antagonists in lymphoid progenitors and supporting microenvironments and functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Passa, Ourania; Tsalavos, Sotiris; Belyaev, Nikolai N; Petryk, Anna; Potocnik, Alexandre J; Graf, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling regulates lymphopoiesis in bone marrow and thymus via the interaction of haemato-lymphoid progenitors with the stroma microenvironment. Despite increasing functional evidence for the role of BMP signalling in lymphopoiesis, little is known of the spatial distribution of BMP/BMP antagonists in the thymus and of how BMP signals exert specific functions in developing lymphocytes. We analysed expression of BMP/BMP antagonists in the thymus and bone marrow and determined the topology of BMP/BMP antagonist expression using lacZ reporter mice. Bmp4, Bmp7, Gremlin and Twisted gastrulation (Twsg1) are all expressed in the thymus and expression was clearly different for each gene investigated. Expression was seen both in cortical and medullary regions suggesting that BMP signals regulate all stages of T-cell development. Two genes in particular, Bmp7 and Twsg1, were dynamically expressed in developing T and B lymphocytes. Their conditional ablation in all haematopoietic cells surprisingly did not affect the steady state of B-cell and T-cell development. This indicates that both lymphoid cell-derived BMP7 and TWSG1 are dispensable for normal lymphopoiesis and that bone-marrow stroma-derived TWSG1 is responsible for the lymphoid defects observed in Twsg1 null mice. In summary our data demonstrate a complex network of lymphoid and stroma derived BMP signals involved in the orchestration of lymphopoiesis in both bone marrow and thymus. PMID:21978004

  7. Death-associated protein kinase: A molecule with functional antagonistic duality and a potential role in inflammatory bowel disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    STEINMANN, SARA; SCHEIBE, KRISTINA; ERLENBACH-WUENSCH, KATHARINA; NEUFERT, CLEMENS; SCHNEIDER-STOCK, REGINE

    2015-01-01

    The cytoskeleton-associated serine/threonine kinase death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) has been described as a cancer gene chameleon with functional antagonistic duality in a cell type and context specific manner. The broad range of interaction partners and substrates link DAPK to inflammatory processes especially in the gut. Herein we summarize our knowledge on the role of DAPK in different cell types that play a role under inflammatory conditions in the gut. Besides some promising experimental data suggesting DAPK as an interesting drug target in inflammatory bowel disease there are many open questions regarding direct evidence for a role of DAPK in intestinal inflammation. PMID:25963636

  8. Death-associated protein kinase: A molecule with functional antagonistic duality and a potential role in inflammatory bowel disease (Review).

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Sara; Scheibe, Kristina; Erlenbach-Wuensch, Katharina; Neufert, Clemens; Schneider-Stock, Regine

    2015-07-01

    The cytoskeleton-associated serine/threonine kinase death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) has been described as a cancer gene chameleon with functional antagonistic duality in a cell type and context specific manner. The broad range of interaction partners and substrates link DAPK to inflammatory processes especially in the gut. Herein we summarize our knowledge on the role of DAPK in different cell types that play a role under inflammatory conditions in the gut. Besides some promising experimental data suggesting DAPK as an interesting drug target in inflammatory bowel disease there are many open questions regarding direct evidence for a role of DAPK in intestinal inflammation.

  9. Genome Sequencing of Bacillus subtilis SC-8, Antagonistic to the Bacillus cereus Group, Isolated from Traditional Korean Fermented-Soybean Food

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, In-Cheol; Lee, Nam Keun

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis SC-8 is a Gram-positive bacterium displaying narrow antagonistic activity for the Bacillus cereus group. B. subtilis SC-8 was isolated from Korean traditional fermented-soybean food. Here we report the draft genome sequence of B. subtilis SC-8, including biosynthetic genes for antibiotics that may have beneficial effects for control of food-borne pathogens. PMID:22207744

  10. Interaction of fenoterol stereoisomers with β2-adrenoceptor-G sα fusion proteins: antagonist and agonist competition binding.

    PubMed

    Reinartz, Michael T; Kälble, Solveig; Wainer, Irving W; Seifert, Roland

    2015-05-01

    The specific interaction between G-protein-coupled receptors and ligand is the starting point for downstream signaling. Fenoterol stereoisomers were successfully used to probe ligand-specific activation (functional selectivity) of the β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR) (Reinartz et al. 2015). In the present study, we extended the pharmacological profile of fenoterol stereoisomers using β2AR-Gsα fusion proteins in agonist and antagonist competition binding assays. Dissociations between binding affinities and effector potencies were found for (R,S')- and (S,S')-isomers of 4'-methoxy-1-naphthyl-fenoterol. Our data corroborate former studies on the importance of the aminoalkyl moiety of fenoterol derivatives for functional selectivity.

  11. Enrichment map profiling of the cancer invasion front suggests regulation of colorectal cancer progression by the bone morphogenetic protein antagonist, gremlin-1.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, George S; Berk, Aaron; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2013-08-01

    The cancer invasion front (CIF), a spatially-recognized area due to the frequent presence of peritumoral desmoplastic reaction, represents a cancer site where many hallmarks of cancer metastasis occur. It is now strongly suggested that the desmoplastic microenvironment holds crucial information for determining tumor development and progression. Despite extensive research on tumor-host cell interactions at CIFs, the exact paracrine molecular network that is hardwired into the proteome of the stromal and cancer subpopulations remains partially understood. Here, we interrogated the signaling pathways and the molecular functional signatures across the proteome of a desmoplastic coculture model system of colorectal cancer progression. We discovered a group of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonists that coordinates major biological programs in CIFs, including cell proliferation, invasion, migration and differentiation processes. Using a mathematical model of cancer cell progression, coupled to in vitro cell migration assays, we demonstrated that the prominent BMP antagonist gremlin-1 (GREM1) may trigger motility of cancer cell cohorts. Our data collectively demonstrate that the desmoplastic CIFs deploy a microenvironmental signature, based on BMP antagonism, in order to regulate the motogenic fates of cancer cell cohorts invading the adjacent stroma. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  12. SET antagonist enhances the chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells by reactivating protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Hung, Man-Hsin; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yen-Lin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Hsiao, Yung-Jen; Tai, Wei-Tien; Chao, Ting-Ting; Yu, Hui-Chuan; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-05

    SET is known as a potent PP2A inhibitor, however, its oncogenic role including its tumorigenic potential and involvement in the development of chemoresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not yet been fully discussed. In present study, we investigated the oncogenic role of SET by SET-knockdown and showed that SET silencing impaired cell growth rate, colony formation and tumor sphere formation in A549 cells. Notably, silencing SET enhanced the pro-apoptotic effects of paclitaxel, while ectopic expression of SET diminished the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to paclitaxel. Since the SET protein was shown to affect chemosensitivity, we next examined whether combining a novel SET antagonist, EMQA, sensitized NSCLC cells to paclitaxel. Both the in vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that EMQA and paclitaxel combination treatment was synergistic. Importantly, we found that downregulating p-Akt by inhibiting SET-mediated protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inactivation determined the pro-apoptotic effects of EMQA and paclitaxel combination treatment. To dissect the critical site for EMQA functioning, we generated several truncated SET proteins. By analysis of the effects of EMQA on the binding affinities of different truncated SET proteins to PP2A-catalytic subunits, we revealed that the 227-277 amino-acid sequence is critical for EMQA-induced SET inhibition. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of SET in NSCLC, particularly in the development of chemoresistance. The synergistic effects of paclitaxel and the SET antagonist shown in current study encourage further validation of the clinical potential of this combination.

  13. SET antagonist enhances the chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells by reactivating protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Man-Hsin; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yen-Lin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Hsiao, Yung-Jen; Tai, Wei-Tien; Chao, Ting-Ting; Yu, Hui-Chuan; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    SET is known as a potent PP2A inhibitor, however, its oncogenic role including its tumorigenic potential and involvement in the development of chemoresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not yet been fully discussed. In present study, we investigated the oncogenic role of SET by SET-knockdown and showed that SET silencing impaired cell growth rate, colony formation and tumor sphere formation in A549 cells. Notably, silencing SET enhanced the pro-apoptotic effects of paclitaxel, while ectopic expression of SET diminished the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to paclitaxel. Since the SET protein was shown to affect chemosensitivity, we next examined whether combining a novel SET antagonist, EMQA, sensitized NSCLC cells to paclitaxel. Both the in vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that EMQA and paclitaxel combination treatment was synergistic. Importantly, we found that downregulating p-Akt by inhibiting SET-mediated protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inactivation determined the pro-apoptotic effects of EMQA and paclitaxel combination treatment. To dissect the critical site for EMQA functioning, we generated several truncated SET proteins. By analysis of the effects of EMQA on the binding affinities of different truncated SET proteins to PP2A-catalytic subunits, we revealed that the 227–277 amino-acid sequence is critical for EMQA-induced SET inhibition. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of SET in NSCLC, particularly in the development of chemoresistance. The synergistic effects of paclitaxel and the SET antagonist shown in current study encourage further validation of the clinical potential of this combination. PMID:26575017

  14. Testis dysfunction by isoproterenol is mediated by upregulating endothelin receptor A, leptin and protein kinase Cvarepsilon and is attenuated by an endothelin receptor antagonist CPU0213.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Si; Dai, De-Zai; Dai, Yin

    2010-07-01

    This study has examined whether upregulation of endothelin receptor A, leptin and phosphorylated protein kinase Cvarepsilon contributes to stress-induced testicular damaged and its possible reversal by endothelial (ET) antagonism. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and isoproterenol (ISO 1mg/kg, subcutaneous (s.c.), 10 days) groups, and intervened with the ET receptor antagonist CPU0213 (20mg/kg, s.c.), on days 6-10. In ISO group, testicular succinate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, acid phosphotase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and serum testosterone decreased, whereas FSH increased, relative to control. The seminiferous tubules were damaged in association with testicular upregulation of protein abundance of leptin and pPKCvarepsilon, and mRNA and protein expression of leptin receptor (OBRb) and ET(A). CPU0213 was effective in ameliorating these abnormalities. Over-expression of ET(A) and leptin accounting for the testis dysfunction is likely to be mediated by pPKCvarepsilon in the ISO treated rats. The upregulated ET pathway appears to be critical in pathologies of the testis.

  15. Dimethylmaleic anhydride, a specific reagent for protein amino groups.

    PubMed

    de la Escalera, S; Palacián, E

    1989-01-01

    The reagent dimethylmaleic anhydride does not cause a stable modification of thiol compounds under the conditions used for modification of protein amino groups, in contrast to maleic and monomethylmaleic anhydrides, which produce an irreversible modification of sulfhydryl groups. This behavior and the low reactivity toward hydroxyamino acid residues, shown in a previous work, make dimethylmaleic anhydride a specific reagent for protein amino groups.

  16. Discovery of Klotho peptide antagonists against Wnt3 and Wnt3a target proteins using combination of protein engineering, protein-protein docking, peptide docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Shaher Bano; Ekhteiari Salmas, Ramin; Fatmi, M Qaiser; Durdagi, Serdar

    2017-12-01

    The Klotho is known as lifespan enhancing protein involved in antagonizing the effect of Wnt proteins. Wnt proteins are stem cell regulators, and uninterrupted exposure of Wnt proteins to the cell can cause stem and progenitor cell senescence, which may lead to aging. Keeping in mind the importance of Klotho in Wnt signaling, in silico approaches have been applied to study the important interactions between Klotho and Wnt3 and Wnt3a (wingless-type mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) integration site family members 3 and 3a). The main aim of the study is to identify important residues of the Klotho that help in designing peptides which can act as Wnt antagonists. For this aim, a protein engineering study is performed for Klotho, Wnt3 and Wnt3a. During the theoretical analysis of homology models, unexpected role of number of disulfide bonds and secondary structure elements has been witnessed in case of Wnt3 and Wnt3a proteins. Different in silico experiments were carried out to observe the effect of correct number of disulfide bonds on 3D protein models. For this aim, total of 10 molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for each system. Based on the protein-protein docking simulations of selected protein models of Klotho with Wnt3 and Wnt3a, different peptides derived from Klotho have been designed. Wnt3 and Wnt3a proteins have three important domains: Index finger, N-terminal domain and a patch of ∼10 residues on the solvent exposed surface of palm domain. Protein-peptide docking of designed peptides of Klotho against three important domains of palmitoylated Wnt3 and Wnt3a yields encouraging results and leads better understanding of the Wnt protein inhibition by proposed Klotho peptides. Further in vitro studies can be carried out to verify effects of novel designed peptides as Wnt antagonists.

  17. Pseudomonas DING proteins as human transcriptional regulators and HIV-1 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-HIV-1 therapy depends upon multiple agents that target different phases of the viral replication cycle. Recent reports indicate that plant and human DING proteins are unique in targeting viral gene transcription as the basis of their anti-HIV-1 therapy. Methods Two cloned DING genes from Pseudomonas were transiently expressed in human cells, and effects on NFκB-mediated transcription, HIV-1 transcription, and HIV-1 production were measured. Results Both DING proteins elevated NFκB-mediated transcription. In microglial cells, one protein, from P. aeruginosa PA14, suppressed HIV-1 transcription; the other protein, from P. fluorescens SBW25, was inactive. The PA14DING protein also reduces HIV-1 production in microglial cells. Conclusions Structural differences between the two DING proteins highlight regions of the PA14DING protein essential to the anti-HIV-1 activity, and may guide the design of therapeutic agents. PMID:23855931

  18. Selective Allosteric Antagonists for the G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPRC6A Based on the 2-Phenylindole Privileged Structure Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Henrik; Boesgaard, Michael Worch; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Larsen, Inna; Kuhne, Sebastiaan; Gloriam, David E; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2015-11-25

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a biological target class of fundamental importance in drug therapy. The GPRC6A receptor is a newly deorphanized class C GPCR that we recently reported for the first allosteric antagonists based on the 2-arylindole privileged structure scaffold (e.g., 1-3). Herein, we present the first structure-activity relationship study for the 2-arylindole antagonist 3, comprising the design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of a focused library of 3-substituted 2-arylindoles. In a FRET-based inositol monophosphate (IP1) assay we identified compounds 7, 13e, and 34b as antagonists at the GPRC6A receptor in the low micromolar range and show that 7 and 34b display >9-fold selectivity for the GPRC6A receptor over related GPCRs, making 7 and 34b the most potent and selective antagonists for the GPRC6A receptor reported to date.

  19. Apoptosis and the FLIP and NF-kappa B proteins as pharmacodynamic criteria for biosimilar TNF-alpha antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Paulo César Martins; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Azevedo, Valderilio Feijó

    2014-01-01

    Various criteria are necessary to assess the efficacy and safety of biological medications in order to grant companies the right to register these medications with the appropriate bodies that regulate their sale. The imminent expiration of the patents on reference biological products which block the cytokine TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) raises the possibility of bringing so-called biosimilars to the market (similar to the biologicals of reference products). This occurrence is inevitable, but criteria to adequately evaluate these medications are now needed. Even among controversy, there is a demand from publications correlating the pro-apoptotic mechanism of the original TNF-α antagonists (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab pegol) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases. In this article, the authors discuss the possibility of utilizing the pro-apoptotic effect correlated with the regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins FLIP and NF-κB as new criteria for analyzing the pharmacodynamics of possible biosimilar TNF-α antagonists which should be submitted to regulatory agencies for evaluation. PMID:25114503

  20. Design, stereoselective synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel tri-cyclic compounds as inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Asano, Moriteru; Hashimoto, Kentaro; Saito, Bunnai; Shiokawa, Zenyu; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Masato; Yoshimatsu, Mie; Aoyama, Kazunobu; Hamada, Teruki; Morishita, Nao; Dougan, Douglas R; Mol, Clifford D; Yoshida, Sei; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu

    2013-09-15

    We recently reported the discovery of octahydropyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine A as a lead compound for an inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) antagonist. To develop IAP antagonists with favorable PK profiles, we designed novel tri-cyclic compounds, octahydro-1H-cyclopropa[4,5]pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazines 1 and 2 based on co-crystal structural analysis of A with cellular IAP-1 (cIAP-1). The additional cyclopropane moiety was used to block the predicted metabolic site of compound A without detriment to the binding affinity for cIAP. Compounds 1 and 2 were stereoselectively synthesized via intermediates 4a and 5b', which were obtained by Simmons-Smith cyclopropanation of ethylester 3a and silyl ether 3b'. Compounds 1 and 2 showed strong growth inhibition in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and improved metabolic stability in comparison to A. Compound 2 exhibited significant in vivo PD effects to increase tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA in a dose dependent manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A calixpyrrole derivative acts as an antagonist to GPER, a G-protein coupled receptor: mechanisms and models

    PubMed Central

    Lappano, Rosamaria; Rosano, Camillo; Pisano, Assunta; Santolla, Maria Francesca; De Francesco, Ernestina Marianna; De Marco, Paola; Dolce, Vincenza; Ponassi, Marco; Felli, Lamberto; Cafeo, Grazia; Kohnke, Franz Heinrich; Abonante, Sergio; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Estrogens regulate numerous pathophysiological processes, mainly by binding to and activating estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ. Increasing amounts of evidence have recently demonstrated that G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPR30; also known as GPER) is also involved in diverse biological responses to estrogens both in normal and cancer cells. The classical ER and GPER share several features, including the ability to bind to identical compounds; nevertheless, some ligands exhibit opposed activity through these receptors. It is worth noting that, owing to the availability of selective agonists and antagonists of GPER for research, certain differential roles elicited by GPER compared with ER have been identified. Here, we provide evidence on the molecular mechanisms through which a calixpyrrole derivative acts as a GPER antagonist in different model systems, such as breast tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) obtained from breast cancer patients. Our data might open new perspectives toward the development of a further class of selective GPER ligands in order to better dissect the role exerted by this receptor in different pathophysiological conditions. Moreover, calixpyrrole derivatives could be considered in future anticancer strategies targeting GPER in cancer cells. PMID:26183213

  2. Apoptosis and the FLIP and NF-kappa B proteins as pharmacodynamic criteria for biosimilar TNF-alpha antagonists.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Paulo César Martins; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Azevedo, Valderilio Feijó

    2014-01-01

    Various criteria are necessary to assess the efficacy and safety of biological medications in order to grant companies the right to register these medications with the appropriate bodies that regulate their sale. The imminent expiration of the patents on reference biological products which block the cytokine TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) raises the possibility of bringing so-called biosimilars to the market (similar to the biologicals of reference products). This occurrence is inevitable, but criteria to adequately evaluate these medications are now needed. Even among controversy, there is a demand from publications correlating the pro-apoptotic mechanism of the original TNF-α antagonists (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab pegol) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases. In this article, the authors discuss the possibility of utilizing the pro-apoptotic effect correlated with the regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins FLIP and NF-κB as new criteria for analyzing the pharmacodynamics of possible biosimilar TNF-α antagonists which should be submitted to regulatory agencies for evaluation.

  3. Lloviu virus VP24 and VP35 proteins function as innate immune antagonists in human and bat cells

    SciTech Connect

    Feagins, Alicia R.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2015-11-15

    Lloviu virus (LLOV) is a new member of the filovirus family that also includes Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV). LLOV has not been cultured; however, its genomic RNA sequence indicates the coding capacity to produce homologs of the EBOV and MARV VP24, VP35, and VP40 proteins. EBOV and MARV VP35 proteins inhibit interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta production and EBOV VP35 blocks activation of the antiviral kinase PKR. The EBOV VP24 and MARV VP40 proteins inhibit IFN signaling, albeit by different mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that LLOV VP35 suppresses Sendai virus induced IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) phosphorylation, IFN-α/β production, and PKR phosphorylation. Additionally, LLOV VP24 blocks tyrosine phosphorylated STAT1 binding to karyopherin alpha 5 (KPNA5), STAT1 nuclear accumulation, and IFN-induced gene expression. LLOV VP40 lacks detectable IFN antagonist function. These activities parallel EBOV IFN inhibitory functions. EBOV and LLOV VP35 and VP24 proteins also inhibit IFN responses in bat cells. These data suggest that LLOV infection will block innate immune responses in a manner similar to EBOV. - Highlights: • Lloviu virus (LLOV) is a new member of the filovirus family. • LLOV VP35 blocks IRF3 phosphorylation, IFN-α/β production and PKR phosphorylation. • LLOV VP24 inhibits IFN responses by targeting phospho-STAT1 KPNA interaction. • Infection by LLOV may block innate immune responses in a manner similar to EBOV.

  4. Human eosinophil major basic protein is an endogenous allosteric antagonist at the inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, D B; Gleich, G J; Fryer, A D

    1993-01-01

    The effect of human eosinophil major basic protein (MBP) as well as other eosinophil proteins, on binding of [3H]N-methyl-scopolamine ([3H]NMS: 1 x 10(-10) M) to muscarinic M2 receptors in heart membranes and M3 receptors in submandibular gland membranes was studied. MBP inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors. MBP also inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating that the interaction of MBP with the M2 muscarinic receptor is allosteric. This effect of MBP suggests that it may function as an endogenous allosteric inhibitor of agonist binding to the M2 muscarinic receptor. Inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by MBP was reversible by treatment with heparin, which binds and neutralizes MBP. Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) also inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors and inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes. On a molar basis, EPO is less potent than MBP. Neither eosinophil cationic protein nor eosinophil-derived neurotoxin affected binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors. Thus both MBP and EPO are selective allosteric antagonists at M2 receptors. The effects of these proteins may be important causes of M2 receptor dysfunction and enhanced vagally mediated bronchoconstriction in asthma. Images PMID:8473484

  5. Lloviu virus VP24 and VP35 proteins function as innate immune antagonists in human and bat cells.

    PubMed

    Feagins, Alicia R; Basler, Christopher F

    2015-11-01

    Lloviu virus (LLOV) is a new member of the filovirus family that also includes Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV). LLOV has not been cultured; however, its genomic RNA sequence indicates the coding capacity to produce homologs of the EBOV and MARV VP24, VP35, and VP40 proteins. EBOV and MARV VP35 proteins inhibit interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta production and EBOV VP35 blocks activation of the antiviral kinase PKR. The EBOV VP24 and MARV VP40 proteins inhibit IFN signaling, albeit by different mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that LLOV VP35 suppresses Sendai virus induced IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) phosphorylation, IFN-α/β production, and PKR phosphorylation. Additionally, LLOV VP24 blocks tyrosine phosphorylated STAT1 binding to karyopherin alpha 5 (KPNA5), STAT1 nuclear accumulation, and IFN-induced gene expression. LLOV VP40 lacks detectable IFN antagonist function. These activities parallel EBOV IFN inhibitory functions. EBOV and LLOV VP35 and VP24 proteins also inhibit IFN responses in bat cells. These data suggest that LLOV infection will block innate immune responses in a manner similar to EBOV.

  6. In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in Avena sativa L. coleoptiles: effects of Ca2+, calmodulin antagonists, and auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veluthambi, K.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylations in oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile segments were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In vitro phosphorylation of several polypeptides was distinctly promoted at 1 to 15 micromolar free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2(+)-stimulated phosphorylation was markedly reduced by trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, and naphthalene sulfonamide (W7). Two polypeptides were phosphorylated both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, but the patterns of phosphorylation of several other polypeptides were different under the two conditions indicating that the in vivo phosphorylation pattern of proteins is not truly reflected by in vitro phosphorylation studies. Trifluoperazine, W7, or ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + calcium ionophore A23187 treatments resulted in reduced levels of in vivo protein phosphorylation of both control and auxin-treated coleoptile segments. Analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis following in vivo phosphorylation revealed auxin-dependent changes of certain polypeptides. A general inhibition of phosphorylation by calmodulin antagonists suggested that both control and auxin-treated coleoptiles exhibited Ca2+, and calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in vivo.

  7. In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in Avena sativa L. coleoptiles: effects of Ca2+, calmodulin antagonists, and auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veluthambi, K.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylations in oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile segments were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In vitro phosphorylation of several polypeptides was distinctly promoted at 1 to 15 micromolar free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2(+)-stimulated phosphorylation was markedly reduced by trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, and naphthalene sulfonamide (W7). Two polypeptides were phosphorylated both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, but the patterns of phosphorylation of several other polypeptides were different under the two conditions indicating that the in vivo phosphorylation pattern of proteins is not truly reflected by in vitro phosphorylation studies. Trifluoperazine, W7, or ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + calcium ionophore A23187 treatments resulted in reduced levels of in vivo protein phosphorylation of both control and auxin-treated coleoptile segments. Analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis following in vivo phosphorylation revealed auxin-dependent changes of certain polypeptides. A general inhibition of phosphorylation by calmodulin antagonists suggested that both control and auxin-treated coleoptiles exhibited Ca2+, and calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in vivo.

  8. In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in Avena sativa L. coleoptiles: effects of Ca2+, calmodulin antagonists, and auxin.

    PubMed Central

    Veluthambi, K; Poovaiah, B W

    1986-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylations in oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile segments were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In vitro phosphorylation of several polypeptides was distinctly promoted at 1 to 15 micromolar free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2(+)-stimulated phosphorylation was markedly reduced by trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, and naphthalene sulfonamide (W7). Two polypeptides were phosphorylated both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, but the patterns of phosphorylation of several other polypeptides were different under the two conditions indicating that the in vivo phosphorylation pattern of proteins is not truly reflected by in vitro phosphorylation studies. Trifluoperazine, W7, or ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + calcium ionophore A23187 treatments resulted in reduced levels of in vivo protein phosphorylation of both control and auxin-treated coleoptile segments. Analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis following in vivo phosphorylation revealed auxin-dependent changes of certain polypeptides. A general inhibition of phosphorylation by calmodulin antagonists suggested that both control and auxin-treated coleoptiles exhibited Ca2+, and calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:11539102

  9. ACTH Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  10. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Accessory Protein 4a Is a Type I Interferon Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, Daniela; Zillinger, Thomas; Muth, Doreen; Zielecki, Florian; Horvath, Gabor; Suliman, Tasnim; Barchet, Winfried; Weber, Friedemann

    2013-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe acute respiratory infection with as yet unclear epidemiology. We previously showed that MERS-CoV counteracts parts of the innate immune response in human bronchiolar cells. Here we analyzed accessory proteins 3, 4a, 4b, and 5 for their abilities to inhibit the type I interferon response. Accessory protein 4a was found to block interferon induction at the level of melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5) activation presumably by direct interaction with double-stranded RNA. PMID:24027320

  11. Recombinant TNF-binding protein from variola virus as a novel potential TNF antagonist.

    PubMed

    Gileva, I P; Nepomnyashchikh, T S; Ryazankin, I A; Shchelkunov, S N

    2009-12-01

    Gel-filtration chromatographic separation of the lysate of Sf21 insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus BVi67 containing the gene for TNF-binding protein (CrmB) of variola virus (VARV) revealed that hTNF-cytotoxicity neutralization activity is associated with a fraction corresponding mainly to high molecular weight proteins (above 500 kDa) and less with fractions corresponding to proteins of 270 or 90 kDa. The recombinant VARV-CrmB protein has been purified by affinity chromatography. Difference in the experimentally determined and estimated (according to amino acid composition) VARV-CrmB molecular weight is due to glycosylation of the recombinant protein expressed in the insect cells. VARV-CrmB neutralizes in vitro the cytotoxic effect of hTNF and hLTalpha, and its TNF-neutralizing activity is two to three orders of magnitude higher compared to the analogous effects of type I and II soluble TNF receptors, comparable with the activity of mAb MAK195, and somewhat lower than the effect of the commercial drug Remicade.

  12. Crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis anti-TRAP protein, an antagonist of TRAP/RNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Mikhail B.; Chen, Yanling; Gollnick, Paul; Antson, Alfred A.

    2005-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis the anti-TRAP protein (AT) is produced in response to the accumulation of uncharged tRNATrp. AT regulates expression of genes involved in tryptophan biosynthesis and transport by binding to the tryptophan-activated trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) and preventing its interaction with several mRNAs. Here, we report the x-ray structure of AT at 2.8 Å resolution, showing that the protein subunits assemble into tight trimers. Four such trimers are further associated into a 12-subunit particle in which individual trimers are related by twofold and threefold symmetry axes. Twelve DnaJ-like, cysteine-rich zinc-binding domains form spikes on the surface of the dodecamer. Available data suggest several possible ways for AT to interact with the 11-subunit TRAP. Interaction between the two symmetry-mismatching molecules could be assisted by the flexible nature of AT zinc-binding domains. PMID:16306262

  13. Gambogic acid is an antagonist of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Dayong; Jin, Chaofang; Shiau, Chung-wai; Kitada, Shinichi; Satterthwait, Arnold C; Reed, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The natural product Gambogic acid (GA) has been reported to have cytotoxic activity against tumor cells in culture, and was identified as an active compound in a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for activators of caspases, proteases involved in apoptosis. Using the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein, Bfl-1, as a target for screening of a library of natural products, we identified GA as a competitive inhibitor that displaced BH3 peptides from Bfl-1 in a fluorescent polarization assay (FPA). Analysis of competition for BH3 peptide binding revealed that GA inhibits all 6 human Bcl-2-family proteins to various extents, with Mcl-1 and Bcl-B the most potently inhibited (concentrations required for 50% inhibition [IC50] <1 μM). Competition for BH3 peptide binding was also confirmed using a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay. GA functionally inhibited the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family proteins, as demonstrated by experiments using isolated mitochondria in which recombinant purified Bcl-2-family proteins suppress SMAC release in vitro, showing that GA neutralizes their suppressive effects on mitochondria in a concentration-dependent manner. GA killed tumor cell lines via an apoptotic mechanism, whereas analogs of GA with greatly reduced potency at BH3 peptide displacement showed little or no cytotoxic activity. However, GA retained cytotoxic activity against bax−/− bak−/− cells in which anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family proteins lack a cytoprotective phenotype, implying that GA also has additional targets that contribute to its cytotoxic mechanism. Altogether, the findings suggest that suppression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2-family proteins may be among the cytotoxic mechanisms by which GA kills tumor cells. PMID:18566235

  14. Enhanced Osteogenesis of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Regulating Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Antagonists and Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jiabing; Im, Choong Sung; Guo, Mian; Cui, Zhong-Kai; Fartash, Armita; Kim, Soyon; Patel, Nikhil; Bezouglaia, Olga; Wu, Benjamin M.; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Although adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are an attractive cell source for bone tissue engineering, direct use of ASCs alone has had limited success in the treatment of large bone defects. Although bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are believed to be the most potent osteoinductive factors to promote osteogenic differentiation of ASCs, their clinical applications require supraphysiological dosage, leading to high medical burden and adverse side effects. In the present study, we demonstrated an alternative approach that can effectively complement the BMP activity to maximize the osteogenesis of ASCs without exogenous application of BMPs by regulating levels of antagonists and agonists to BMP signaling. Treatment of ASCs with the amiloride derivative phenamil, a positive regulator of BMP signaling, combined with gene manipulation to suppress the BMP antagonist noggin, significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation of ASCs through increased BMP–Smad signaling in vitro. Furthermore, the combination approach of noggin suppression and phenamil stimulation enhanced the BMP signaling and bone repair in a mouse calvarial defect model by adding noggin knockdown ASCs to apatite-coated poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) scaffolds loaded with phenamil. These results suggest novel complementary osteoinductive strategies that could maximize activity of the BMP pathway in ASC bone repair while reducing potential adverse effects of current BMP-based therapeutics. Significance Although stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy offers a promising alternative to repair damaged bone, direct use of stem cells alone is not adequate for challenging healing environments such as in large bone defects. This study demonstrates a novel strategy to maximize bone formation pathways in osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and functional bone formation by combining gene manipulation with a small molecule activator toward osteogenesis. The findings indicate promising stem cell

  15. Identification of protein interaction antagonists using the repressed transactivator two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Phalgun B; Hirst, Martin; Malcolm, Tom; Parent, Jennifer; Mitchell, David; Lund, Karen; Sadowski, Ivan

    2007-05-01

    The repressed transactivator (RTA) yeast two-hybrid system was developed to enable genetic identification of interactions with transcriptional activator proteins. We have devised modifications of this system that enable its use in screening for inhibitors of protein interactions from small molecule compound libraries. We show that inhibition of protein interactions can be measured by monitoring growth in selective medium containing 3-aminotriazole (3-AT) and using this assay have identified inhibitors of four independent protein interactions in screens with a 23,000 small molecule compound library. Compounds found to inhibit one of the tested interactions between FKBP12 and the transforming growth factor beta receptor (TGFbeta-R) were validated in vivo and found to inhibit calcineurin-dependent signaling in T cells. One of these compounds was also found to cause elevated basal expression of a TGFbeta-R/SMAD-dependent reporter gene. These results demonstrate the capability of the RTA small molecule screening assay for discovery of potentially novel therapeutic compounds.

  16. Hedgehog Proteins Consume Steroidal CYP17A1 Antagonists: Potential Therapeutic Significance in Advanced Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bordeau, Brandon M; Ciulla, Daniel A; Callahan, Brian P

    2016-09-20

    Abiraterone, a potent inhibitor of the human enzyme CYP17A1 (cytochrome P450c17), provides a last line of defense against ectopic androgenesis in advanced prostate cancer. Herein we report an unprecedented off-target interaction between abiraterone and oncogenic hedgehog proteins. Our experiments indicate that abiraterone and its structural congener, galeterone, can replace cholesterol as a substrate in a specialized biosynthetic event of hedgehog proteins, known as cholesterolysis. The off-target reaction generates covalent hedgehog-drug conjugates. Cell-based reporter assays indicate that these conjugates activate hedgehog signaling when present in the low nanomolar range. Because hedgehog signaling is implicated in prostate cancer progression, and abiraterone is administered to treat advanced stages of the disease, this off-target interaction may have therapeutic significance.

  17. Bone morphogenetic proteins and their antagonists: current and emerging clinical uses

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Imran H A; Brazil, Derek P

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the TGFβ superfamily of secreted cysteine knot proteins that includes TGFβ1, nodal, activins and inhibins. BMPs were first discovered by Urist in the 1960s when he showed that implantation of demineralized bone into intramuscular tissue of rabbits induced bone and cartilage formation. Since this seminal discovery, BMPs have also been shown to play key roles in several other biological processes, including limb, kidney, skin, hair and neuronal development, as well as maintaining vascular homeostasis. The multifunctional effects of BMPs make them attractive targets for the treatment of several pathologies, including bone disorders, kidney and lung fibrosis, and cancer. This review will summarize current knowledge on the BMP signalling pathway and critically evaluate the potential of recombinant BMPs as pharmacological agents for the treatment of bone repair and tissue fibrosis in patients. PMID:24758361

  18. Antagonistic regulation of mRNA expression and splicing by CELF and MBNL proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric T.; Ward, Amanda J.; Cherone, Jennifer M.; Giudice, Jimena; Wang, Thomas T.; Treacy, Daniel J.; Lambert, Nicole J.; Freese, Peter; Saxena, Tanvi; Cooper, Thomas A.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins of the conserved CUGBP1, Elav-like factor (CELF) family contribute to heart and skeletal muscle development and are implicated in myotonic dystrophy (DM). To understand their genome-wide functions, we analyzed the transcriptome dynamics following induction of CELF1 or CELF2 in adult mouse heart and of CELF1 in muscle by RNA-seq, complemented by crosslinking/immunoprecipitation-sequencing (CLIP-seq) analysis of mouse cells and tissues to distinguish direct from indirect regulatory targets. We identified hundreds of mRNAs bound in their 3′ UTRs by both CELF1 and the developmentally induced MBNL1 protein, a threefold greater overlap in target messages than expected, including messages involved in development and cell differentiation. The extent of 3′ UTR binding by CELF1 and MBNL1 predicted the degree of mRNA repression or stabilization, respectively, following CELF1 induction. However, CELF1's RNA binding specificity in vitro was not detectably altered by coincubation with recombinant MBNL1. These findings support a model in which CELF and MBNL proteins bind independently to mRNAs but functionally compete to specify down-regulation or localization/stabilization, respectively, of hundreds of mRNA targets. Expression of many alternative 3′ UTR isoforms was altered following CELF1 induction, with 3′ UTR binding associated with down-regulation of isoforms and genes. The splicing of hundreds of alternative exons was oppositely regulated by these proteins, confirming an additional layer of regulatory antagonism previously observed in a handful of cases. The regulatory relationships between CELFs and MBNLs in control of both mRNA abundance and splicing appear to have evolved to enhance developmental transitions in major classes of heart and muscle genes. PMID:25883322

  19. Protein carbonyl groups as biomarkers of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Rossi, Ranieri; Giustarini, Daniela; Milzani, Aldo; Colombo, Roberto

    2003-03-01

    Oxidative stress, an imbalance toward the pro-oxidant side of the pro-oxidant/antioxidant homeostasis, occurs in several human diseases. Among these diseases are those in which high levels of protein carbonyl (CO) groups have been observed, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, sepsis, chronic renal failure, and respiratory distress syndrome. What relationships might be among high level of protein CO groups, oxidative stress, and diseases remain uncertain.The usage of protein CO groups as biomarkers of oxidative stress has some advantages in comparison with the measurement of other oxidation products because of the relative early formation and the relative stability of carbonylated proteins. Most of the assays for detection of protein CO groups involve derivatisation of the carbonyl group with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), which leads to formation of a stable dinitrophenyl (DNP) hydrazone product. This then can be detected by various means, such as spectrophotometric assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and one-dimensional or two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by Western blot immunoassay. At present, the measurement of protein CO groups after their derivatisation with DNPH is the most widely utilized measure of protein oxidation.

  20. Unexpected relationship between plasma protein binding and the pharmacodynamics of 2-NAP, a CCK1-receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Gerskowitch, V P; Hodge, J; Hull, R A D; Shankley, N P; Kalindjian, S B; McEwen, J; Black, J W

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject? Two chemically diverse CCK1 receptor antagonists have been shown clinically to inhibit CCK-evoked contraction of human gallbladder [2, 3]. These studies have not examined the relationship between plasma concentration and effect, the latter usually considered to be predictive from the free drug concentration [8]. We wanted to examine our novel CCK1 receptor antagonist in this validated model and also to explore its PK-PD relationship. What this study adds 2-NAP inhibited CCK-evoked human gallbladder contraction in vivo but at a plasma free concentration that was, in theory, too low to have achieved adequate CCK1 receptor occupancy. The study serves as a caveat to the assumption that free plasma concentration can be used to predict pharmacological effect. Aims To study the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 2-NAP (2-naphthalenesulfonyl-L-aspartyl-(2-phenethyl)amide), a selective CCK1 receptor antagonist in healthy volunteers. Methods 2-NAP was given to 12 healthy male volunteers in an ascending dose, safety and PK phase 1a study by 1 h i.v. infusion (0.6–9.6 mg kg−1 h−1). A further 12 healthy male volunteers received i.v. CCK-8S (6.25 pmol kg−1 h−1) to produce gallbladder contraction, measured by ultrasound recordings of gallbladder volume, and the effect of concurrent i.v. 2-NAP administration was studied. Plasma protein binding in vitro and ex vivo was measured by ultrafiltration and by equilibrium dialysis. Results 2-NAP was generally well tolerated, displayed linear pharmacokinetics and a very high degree of plasma protein binding (99.9%). A 105 min i.v. CCK-8S infusion induced a reduction in gallbladder volume of 14.9 (±7.0) ml during placebo co-infusion and this was reduced to 2.4 (±5.9) ml when 2-NAP was co-infused with CCK-8S (P = 0.00024, paired t-test, mean change 12.5 ml; 95% CI For mean 7.4, 18.3 ml). This extent of inhibition was consistent with a 2-NAP total plasma concentration of 36 µm, but

  1. Molecular approach for the rapid detection of Bacillus and Pseudomonas genera--dominant antagonistic groups--from diverse ecological niches using colony multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anusree V; Pradeep, M A; Vijayan, K K

    2014-07-01

    Bacillus and Pseudomonas are the dominant groups of bacteria known for their antagonistic potential against many plant and animal pathogens. Presently, exploration of these genera with antagonistic property for disease management of aquaculture system is gaining more importance to overcome the use of antibiotics and related resistance issues. Rapid screening and identification of these genera from diverse bacterial populations by conventional methods is laborious, cost-intensive, and time-consuming. To overcome these limiting factors, in the present study, a colony multiplex PCR (cmPCR) method was developed and evaluated for the rapid detection of Bacillus and Pseudomonas. The technique amplifies the partial 16S rRNA gene of Bacillus and Pseudomonas with a product size of ~1,100 and ~375 bp, respectively, using single forward (BSF2) and two reverse primers (PAGSR and BK1R). Reliability of the cmPCR method was confirmed by screening 472 isolates obtained from ten different eco-stations, of which 133 isolates belonged to Bacillus and 32 to Pseudomonas. The cmPCR method also helped to identify six different Pseudomonas spp. and 14 different Bacillus spp. from environmental samples. Of the total 472 isolates studied, 46 showed antagonistic activity, among which 63 % were Bacillus and 17.4 % were Pseudomonas. Thus, the newly developed molecular approach provides a quick, sensitive, and potential screening tool to detect novel, antagonistically important Bacillus and Pseudomonas genera for their use in aquaculture. Further, it can also act as a taxonomic tool to understand the distribution of these genera from wide ecological niches and their exploitation for diverse biotechnological applications.

  2. Pretreatment with group I metabotropic glutamate receptors antagonists attenuates lethality induced by acute cocaine overdose and expression of sensitization to hyperlocomotor effect of cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kotlinska, Jolanta; Bochenski, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine abuse and dependence is a worldwide health problem. However, there are no currently approved medications to reduce cocaine abuse/relapse and toxicity. The aim of the present study was to test, whether group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) antagonists (mGluR1 and mGluR5) differentially regulate toxic versus behavioral effects of cocaine, both phenomena relevant to the psychopathology of cocaine addiction in humans. In the present study, we assessed the impact of mGluR1 antagonist-EMQMCM and mGluR5 antagonist-MTEP on the cocaine-induced lethality and the expression of sensitization to hyperlocomotor effect of cocaine in mice. Our study indicated that EMQMCM and MTEP, both substances at the doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg (but not 2.5 mg/kg), decreased cocaine-induced lethality produced by 75 mg/kg of cocaine, which was given acutely. The effect of EMQMCM was dose-dependent, and this compound at the dose of 10 mg/kg almost completely abolished the lethality induced by cocaine. MTEP reduced this cocaine effect at the doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg, equally. Furthermore, EMQMCM (1.25-5 mg/kg) at the doses of 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, and MTEP (2.5-10 mg/kg) only at the highest dose of 10 mg/kg, significantly reduced the expression of cocaine-induced (10 mg/kg) behavioral sensitization. Our results suggest that stimulation of mGluR1 and mGluR5 is involved in lethal effect of cocaine overdose and cocaine seeking behavior evaluated in behavioral sensitization test. However, the participation of mGluR1 in these cocaine effects seems to be dominant. Therefore, antagonists showing preferences towards mGluR1 might be useful in therapy of cocaine toxicity and abuse.

  3. Insulin Stimulates S100B Secretion and These Proteins Antagonistically Modulate Brain Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; de Souza, Daniela F; Biasibetti, Regina; Bobermin, Larissa D; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Brain metabolism is highly dependent on glucose, which is derived from the blood circulation and metabolized by the astrocytes and other neural cells via several pathways. Glucose uptake in the brain does not involve insulin-dependent glucose transporters; however, this hormone affects the glucose influx to the brain. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of S100B (an astrocyte-derived protein) have been associated with alterations in glucose metabolism; however, there is no evidence whether insulin modulates glucose metabolism and S100B secretion. Herein, we investigated the effect of S100B on glucose metabolism, measuring D-(3)H-glucose incorporation in two preparations, C6 glioma cells and acute hippocampal slices, and we also investigated the effect of insulin on S100B secretion. Our results showed that: (a) S100B at physiological levels decreases glucose uptake, through the multiligand receptor RAGE and mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK signaling, and (b) insulin stimulated S100B secretion via PI3K signaling. Our findings indicate the existence of insulin-S100B modulation of glucose utilization in the brain tissue, and may improve our understanding of glucose metabolism in several conditions such as ketosis, streptozotocin-induced dementia and pharmacological exposure to antipsychotics, situations that lead to changes in insulin signaling and extracellular levels of S100B.

  4. The bone morphogenetic protein antagonist Noggin is regulated by Sox9 during endochondral differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zehentner, Barbara Katharina; Haussmann, Anja; Burtscher, Helmut

    2002-02-01

    Noggin has been described to be capable of binding bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) and inhibiting BMP signaling by preventing the interactions of BMP with their receptors. Noggin expression during endochondral differentiation was analyzed to elucidate its potential role during chondrogenesis. Throughout mouse development, Noggin was expressed abundantly in the chondrocytic lineage as early as collagen type II RNA was detectable. In addition, a strong correlation was detected between Noggin expression and the expression profile of Sox9 during chondrogenesis. Sox9 (known to play an important role during chondrogenesis) and Noggin expression were investigated in the pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2, stimulated by BMP-2. BMP-2 caused significant upregulation of Sox9 and Noggin expression in these cells. The upregulation of Noggin could be inhibited by introducing antisense oligonucleotides against Sox9 mRNA into the cells. Using mouse limb bud cultures, the role of Sox9 and Noggin during endochondral tissue differentiation was further studied. Treatment of cultures with Sox9 antisense oligonucleotides and/or Noggin protein caused significant alterations in limb morphogenesis and endochondral development. The data suggest that the transcriptional control of Noggin by Sox9 is a potent regulatory mechanism in chondrocyte differentiation.

  5. Patient-derived glioblastoma cells show significant heterogeneity in treatment responses to the inhibitor-of-apoptosis-protein antagonist birinapant

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Z; Tivnan, A; Flanagan, L; Murray, D W; Salvucci, M; Stringer, B W; Day, B W; Boyd, A W; Kögel, D; Rehm, M; O'Brien, D F; Byrne, A T; Prehn, J H M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resistance to temozolomide (TMZ) greatly limits chemotherapeutic effectiveness in glioblastoma (GBM). Here we analysed the ability of the Inhibitor-of-apoptosis-protein (IAP) antagonist birinapant to enhance treatment responses to TMZ in both commercially available and patient-derived GBM cells. Methods: Responses to TMZ and birinapant were analysed in a panel of commercial and patient-derived GBM cell lines using colorimetric viability assays, flow cytometry, morphological analysis and protein expression profiling of pro- and antiapoptotic proteins. Responses in vivo were analysed in an orthotopic xenograft GBM model. Results: Single-agent treatment experiments categorised GBM cells into TMZ-sensitive cells, birinapant-sensitive cells, and cells that were insensitive to either treatment. Combination treatment allowed sensitisation to therapy in only a subset of resistant GBM cells. Cell death analysis identified three principal response patterns: Type A cells that readily activated caspase-8 and cell death in response to TMZ while addition of birinapant further sensitised the cells to TMZ-induced cell death; Type B cells that readily activated caspase-8 and cell death in response to birinapant but did not show further sensitisation with TMZ; and Type C cells that showed no significant cell death or moderately enhanced cell death in the combined treatment paradigm. Furthermore, in vivo, a Type C patient-derived cell line that was TMZ-insensitive in vitro and showed a strong sensitivity to TMZ and TMZ plus birinapant treatments. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate remarkable differences in responses of patient-derived GBM cells to birinapant single and combination treatments, and suggest that therapeutic responses in vivo may be greatly affected by the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26657652

  6. Transcriptome analysis reveals the host response to Schmallenberg virus in bovine cells and antagonistic effects of the NSs protein.

    PubMed

    Blomström, Anne-Lie; Gu, Quan; Barry, Gerald; Wilkie, Gavin; Skelton, Jessica K; Baird, Margaret; McFarlane, Melanie; Schnettler, Esther; Elliott, Richard M; Palmarini, Massimo; Kohl, Alain

    2015-04-19

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is a member of the Orthobunyavirus genus (Bunyaviridae family) causing malformations and abortions in ruminants. Although, as for other members of this family/genus, the non-structural protein NSs has been shown to be an interferon antagonist, very little is known regarding the overall inhibitory effects and targets of orthobunyavirus NSs proteins on host gene expression during infection. Therefore, using RNA-seq this study describes changes to the transcriptome of primary bovine cells following infection with Schmallenberg virus (SBV) or with a mutant lacking the non-structural protein NSs (SBVdelNSs) providing a detailed comparison of the effect of NSs expression on the host cell. The sequence reads from all samples (uninfected cells, SBV and SBVdelNSs) assembled well to the bovine host reference genome (on average 87.43% of the reads). During infection with SBVdelNSs, 649 genes were differentially expressed compared to uninfected cells (78.7% upregulated) and many of these were known antiviral and IFN-stimulated genes. On the other hand, only nine genes were differentially expressed in SBV infected cells compared to uninfected control cells, demonstrating the strong inhibitory effect of NSs on cellular gene expression. However, the majority of the genes that were expressed during SBV infection are involved in restriction of viral replication and spread indicating that SBV does not completely manage to shutdown the host antiviral response. In this study we show the effects of SBV NSs on the transcriptome of infected cells as well as the cellular response to wild type SBV. Although NSs is very efficient in shutting down genes of the host innate response, a number of possible antiviral factors were identified. Thus the data from this study can serve as a base for more detailed mechanistic studies of SBV and other orthobunyaviruses.

  7. The bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin 1 is overexpressed in human cancers and interacts with YWHAH protein

    PubMed Central

    Namkoong, Hong; Shin, Seung Min; Kim, Hyun Kee; Ha, Seon-Ah; Cho, Goang Won; Hur, Soo Young; Kim, Tae Eung; Kim, Jin Woo

    2006-01-01

    Background Basic studies of oncogenesis have demonstrated that either the elevated production of particular oncogene proteins or the occurrence of qualitative abnormalities in oncogenes can contribute to neoplastic cellular transformation. The purpose of our study was to identify an unique gene that shows cancer-associated expression, and characterizes its function related to human carcinogenesis. Methods We used the differential display (DD) RT-PCR method using normal cervical, cervical cancer, metastatic cervical tissues, and cervical cancer cell lines to identify genes overexpressed in cervical cancers and identified gremlin 1 which was overexpressed in cervical cancers. We determined expression levels of gremlin 1 using Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemical study in various types of human normal and cancer tissues. To understand the tumorigenesis pathway of identified gremlin 1 protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen, GST pull down assay, and immunoprecipitation to identify gremlin 1 interacting proteins. Results DDRT-PCR analysis revealed that gremlin 1 was overexpressed in uterine cervical cancer. We also identified a human gremlin 1 that was overexpressed in various human tumors including carcinomas of the lung, ovary, kidney, breast, colon, pancreas, and sarcoma. PIG-2-transfected HEK 293 cells exhibited growth stimulation and increased telomerase activity. Gremlin 1 interacted with homo sapiens tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, eta polypeptide (14-3-3 eta; YWHAH). YWHAH protein binding site for gremlin 1 was located between residues 61–80 and gremlin 1 binding site for YWHAH was found to be located between residues 1 to 67. Conclusion Gremlin 1 may play an oncogenic role especially in carcinomas of the uterine cervix, lung, ovary, kidney, breast, colon, pancreas, and sarcoma. Over-expressed gremlin 1 functions by interaction with YWHAH. Therefore, Gremlin 1 and its binding protein YWHAH could be good

  8. The bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin 1 is overexpressed in human cancers and interacts with YWHAH protein.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Hong; Shin, Seung Min; Kim, Hyun Kee; Ha, Seon-Ah; Cho, Goang Won; Hur, Soo Young; Kim, Tae Eung; Kim, Jin Woo

    2006-03-18

    Basic studies of oncogenesis have demonstrated that either the elevated production of particular oncogene proteins or the occurrence of qualitative abnormalities in oncogenes can contribute to neoplastic cellular transformation. The purpose of our study was to identify an unique gene that shows cancer-associated expression, and characterizes its function related to human carcinogenesis. We used the differential display (DD) RT-PCR method using normal cervical, cervical cancer, metastatic cervical tissues, and cervical cancer cell lines to identify genes overexpressed in cervical cancers and identified gremlin 1 which was overexpressed in cervical cancers. We determined expression levels of gremlin 1 using Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemical study in various types of human normal and cancer tissues. To understand the tumorigenesis pathway of identified gremlin 1 protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen, GST pull down assay, and immunoprecipitation to identify gremlin 1 interacting proteins. DDRT-PCR analysis revealed that gremlin 1 was overexpressed in uterine cervical cancer. We also identified a human gremlin 1 that was overexpressed in various human tumors including carcinomas of the lung, ovary, kidney, breast, colon, pancreas, and sarcoma. PIG-2-transfected HEK 293 cells exhibited growth stimulation and increased telomerase activity. Gremlin 1 interacted with homo sapiens tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, eta polypeptide (14-3-3 eta; YWHAH). YWHAH protein binding site for gremlin 1 was located between residues 61-80 and gremlin 1 binding site for YWHAH was found to be located between residues 1 to 67. Gremlin 1 may play an oncogenic role especially in carcinomas of the uterine cervix, lung, ovary, kidney, breast, colon, pancreas, and sarcoma. Over-expressed gremlin 1 functions by interaction with YWHAH. Therefore, Gremlin 1 and its binding protein YWHAH could be good targets for developing diagnostic and

  9. Phosphorylation and calcium antagonistically tune myosin-binding protein C’s structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Previs, Michael J.; Mun, Ji Young; Michalek, Arthur J.; Previs, Samantha Beck; Gulick, James; Robbins, Jeffrey; Warshaw, David M.; Craig, Roger

    2016-01-01

    During each heartbeat, cardiac contractility results from calcium-activated sliding of actin thin filaments toward the centers of myosin thick filaments to shorten cellular length. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is a component of the thick filament that appears to tune these mechanochemical interactions by its N-terminal domains transiently interacting with actin and/or the myosin S2 domain, sensitizing thin filaments to calcium and governing maximal sliding velocity. Both functional mechanisms are potentially further tunable by phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered, extensible region of cMyBP-C’s N terminus, the M-domain. Using atomic force spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and mutant protein expression, we demonstrate that phosphorylation reduced the M-domain’s extensibility and shifted the conformation of the N-terminal domain from an extended structure to a compact configuration. In combination with motility assay data, these structural effects of M-domain phosphorylation suggest a mechanism for diminishing the functional potency of individual cMyBP-C molecules. Interestingly, we found that calcium levels necessary to maximally activate the thin filament mitigated the structural effects of phosphorylation by increasing M-domain extensibility and shifting the phosphorylated N-terminal fragments back to the extended state, as if unphosphorylated. Functionally, the addition of calcium to the motility assays ablated the impact of phosphorylation on maximal sliding velocities, fully restoring cMyBP-C’s inhibitory capacity. We conclude that M-domain phosphorylation may have its greatest effect on tuning cMyBP-C’s calcium-sensitization of thin filaments at the low calcium levels between contractions. Importantly, calcium levels at the peak of contraction would allow cMyBP-C to remain a potent contractile modulator, regardless of cMyBP-C’s phosphorylation state. PMID:26908872

  10. Antagonistic regulation of F-BAR protein assemblies controls actin polymerization during podosome formation.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Kazuya; Kondo, Akihiro; Kurisu, Shusaku; Hasegawa, Junya; Itoh, Toshiki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2013-05-15

    FBP17, an F-BAR domain protein, has emerged as a crucial factor linking the plasma membrane to WASP-mediated actin polymerization. Although it is well established that FBP17 has a powerful self-polymerizing ability that promotes actin nucleation on membranes in vitro, knowledge of inhibitory factors that counteract this activity in vivo is limited. Here, we demonstrate that the assembly of FBP17 on the plasma membranes is antagonized by PSTPIP2, another F-BAR protein implicated in auto-inflammatory disorder. Knockdown of PSTPIP2 in macrophage promotes the assembly of FBP17 as well as subsequent actin nucleation at podosomes, resulting in an enhancement of matrix degradation. This phenotype is rescued by expression of PSTPIP2 in a manner dependent on its F-BAR domain. Time-lapse total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy observations reveal that the self-assembly of FBP17 at the podosomal membrane initiates actin polymerization, whereas the clustering of PSTPIP2 has an opposite effect. Biochemical analysis and live-cell imaging show that PSTPIP2 inhibits actin polymerization by competing with FBP17 for assembly at artificial as well as the plasma membrane. Interestingly, the assembly of FBP17 is dependent on WASP, and its dissociation by WASP inhibition strongly induces a self-organization of PSTPIP2 at podosomes. Thus, our data uncover a previously unappreciated antagonism between different F-BAR domain assemblies that determines the threshold of actin polymerization for the formation of functional podosomes and may explain how the absence of PSTPIP2 causes auto-inflammatory disorder.

  11. Group G streptococcal M protein exhibits structural features analogous to those of class I M protein of group A streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, C M; Kimura, A; Bisno, A L

    1992-01-01

    We have previously studied a collection of group G streptococcal strains isolated from bacteremic human infections and demonstrated that such strains resist phagocytosis by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes but are type specifically opsonized by homologous antiserum. We have now performed Southern hybridization analysis on genomic DNA from eight blood isolates. All eight isolates showed DNA homology to a group A emm24 gene probe. The M-protein gene of one of the isolates, strain 1750, has now been isolated. This gene (emmG1) encodes a polypeptide of 67 kDa (MG1) which is reactive with antibodies to the partially purified M protein of the parent strain. The predicted amino acid structure of MG1 demonstrates significant identity with the carboxy terminus (C, D, and anchor domains) of M6 and M24 but only limited identity with the amino terminus (variable portion) of these group A M proteins. Southern hybridization of genomic DNA of the eight group G blood isolates with an emmG1 gene probe indicated there were at least four emm alleles associated with these strains. These studies indicate that M proteins of group G streptococci, like those of group A, are genetically heterogeneous. Moreover, MG1 appears to conform to the recently proposed class I structure of M-protein molecules and thus shares certain distinct structural features with the M proteins of well-established rheumatogenic group A streptococcal serotypes. Further comparison of the structures of group G and group A M proteins of throat and skin isolates may cast light on those configurations of the M protein molecules which are and are not critical for the expression of rheumatogenicity. Images PMID:1500178

  12. Genetic Variation in Toll-Interacting Protein Is Associated With Leprosy Susceptibility and Cutaneous Expression of Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Shah, Javeed A; Berrington, William R; Vary, James C; Wells, Richard D; Peterson, Glenna J; Kunwar, Chhatra B; Khadge, Saraswoti; Hagge, Deanna A; Hawn, Thomas R

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease characterized by skin and peripheral nerve pathology and immune responses that fail to control Mycobacterium leprae. Toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP) regulates Toll-like receptor (TLR) and interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling against mycobacteria. We analyzed messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of candidate immune genes in skin biopsy specimens from 85 individuals with leprosy. TOLLIP mRNA was highly and specifically correlated with IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra). In a case-control gene-association study with 477 cases and 1021 controls in Nepal, TOLLIP single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3793964 TT genotype was associated with increased susceptibility to leprosy (recessive, P = 1.4 × 10(-3)) and with increased skin expression of TOLLIP and IL-1Ra. Stimulation of TOLLIP-deficient monocytes with M. leprae produced significantly less IL-1Ra (P < .001), compared with control. These data suggest that M. leprae upregulates IL-1Ra by a TOLLIP-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of TOLLIP may decrease an individual's susceptibility to leprosy and offer a novel therapeutic target for IL-1-dependent diseases. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Anti-stress effects of ONO-2952, a novel translocator protein 18 kDa antagonist, in rats.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Katsukuni; Niwa, Tomohiro; Kawahara, Yuji; Morimoto, Noriko; Ohmoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Masashi; Yamaura, Yoshiyuki; Yoshimoto, Naoki; Suna, Hideaki; Katsumata, Seishi

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown the pathophysiological significance of the translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) in the central nervous system. In this study, we evaluated the beneficial effects of ONO-2952, a novel TSPO antagonist in rat stress models. ONO-2952 potently bound both rat and human TSPO (Ki=0.330-9.30 nmol/L) with high selectivity over other receptors, transporters, ion channels and enzymes. ONO-2952 inhibited both neurosteroid accumulation and noradrenaline release in the brain of rats exposed to acute stress. The inhibitory effect of ONO-2952 on stress-induced noradrenaline release was attenuated by co-treatment with the TSPO agonist CB34 in a dose-dependent manner. ONO-2952, at 0.3 mg/kg or higher, dose-dependently suppressed restraint stress-induced defecation in rats with brain TSPO occupancy of more than 50%. In addition, ONO-2952, at 1 mg/kg or higher, suppressed conditioned fear stress-induced freezing behavior in rats with an efficacy equivalent to that of diazepam, given orally at 3 mg/kg. Results of the passive avoidance learning test revealed that ONO-2952, unlike diazepam, did not affect learning and memory even at doses 10 times higher than its effective doses in the stress models. The present findings indicate that ONO-2952 is a promising candidate for the treatment of stress-related disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Screening and Characterization of Hydrate Forms of T-3256336, a Novel Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) Protein Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shoko; Kojima, Takashi; Hashimoto, Kentaro; Saito, Bunnai; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu; Ikeda, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Different crystal packing of hydrates from anhydrate crystals leads to different physical properties, such as solubility and stability. Investigation of the potential of varied hydrate formation, and understanding the stability in an anhydrous/hydrate system, are crucial to prevent an undesired transition during the manufacturing process and storage. Only one anhydrous form of T-3256336, a novel inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) protein antagonist, was discovered during synthesis, and no hydrate form has been identified. In this study, we conducted hydrate screening such as dynamic water vapor sorption/desorption (DVS), and the slurry experiment, and characterized the solid-state properties of anhydrous/hydrate forms to determine the most desirable crystalline form for development. New hydrate forms, both mono-hydrate and hemi-hydrate forms, were discovered as a result of this hydrate screening. The characterization of two new hydrate forms was conducted, and the anhydrous form was determined to be the most desirable development form of T-3256336 in terms of solid-state stability. In addition, the stability of the anhydrous form was investigated using the water content and temperature controlled slurry experiment to obtain the desirable crystal form in the crystallization process. The water content regions of the stable phase of the desired form, the anhydrous form, were identified for the cooling crystallization process.

  15. Discovery of the First α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Antagonist Dependent upon Transmembrane AMPA Receptor Regulatory Protein (TARP) γ-8.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon K; Ornstein, Paul L; Spinazze, Patrick; Stevens, F Craig; Hahn, Patric; Hollinshead, Sean P; Mayhugh, Daniel; Schkeryantz, Jeff; Khilevich, Albert; De Frutos, Oscar; Gleason, Scott D; Kato, Akihiko S; Luffer-Atlas, Debra; Desai, Prashant V; Swanson, Steven; Burris, Kevin D; Ding, Chunjin; Heinz, Beverly A; Need, Anne B; Barth, Vanessa N; Stephenson, Gregory A; Diseroad, Benjamin A; Woods, Tim A; Yu, Hong; Bredt, David; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-05-26

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are a family of scaffolding proteins that regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function. TARP γ-8 is one member of this family and is highly expressed within the hippocampus relative to the cerebellum. A selective TARP γ-8-dependent AMPA receptor antagonist (TDAA) is an innovative approach to modulate AMPA receptors in specific brain regions to potentially increase the therapeutic index relative to known non-TARP-dependent AMPA antagonists. We describe here, for the first time, the discovery of a noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist that is dependent on the presence of TARP γ-8. Three major iteration cycles were employed to improve upon potency, CYP1A2-dependent challenges, and in vivo clearance. An optimized molecule, compound (-)-25 (LY3130481), was fully protective against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in rats without the motor impairment associated with non-TARP-dependent AMPA receptor antagonists. Compound (-)-25 could be utilized to provide proof of concept for antiepileptic efficacy with reduced motor side effects in patients.

  16. Differential gene expression and regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein antagonists follistatin and gremlin in normal and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Ginette; Hum, David; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Boileau, Christelle; Ranger, Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne

    2004-08-01

    To compare gene expression in normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human chondrocytes using microarray technology. Of the novel genes identified, we selected follistatin, a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist, and investigated its expression/regulation as well as that of 3 other antagonists, gremlin, chordin, and noggin, in normal and OA chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Basal and induced gene expression were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Gene regulation was monitored following treatment with inflammatory, antiinflammatory, growth, and developmental factors. Follistatin protein production was measured using a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and localization of follistatin and gremlin in cartilage was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. All BMP antagonists except noggin were expressed in chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Follistatin and gremlin were significantly up-regulated in OA chondrocytes but not in OA synovial fibroblasts. Chordin was weakly expressed in normal and OA cells. Production of follistatin protein paralleled the gene expression pattern. Follistatin and gremlin were expressed preferentially by the chondrocytes at the superficial layers of cartilage. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon-gamma significantly stimulated follistatin expression but down-regulated expression of gremlin. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) had no effect on follistatin but reduced gremlin expression. Conversely, BMP-2 and BMP-4 significantly stimulated expression of gremlin but down-regulated that of follistatin. IL-13, dexamethasone, transforming growth factor beta1, basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor type BB, and endothelial cell growth factor down-regulated the expression of both antagonists. This study is the first to show the possible involvement of follistatin and gremlin in OA pathophysiology. The increased activin/BMP-binding activities of these antagonists could affect tissue

  17. Novel Multiplexed Assay for Identifying SH2 Domain Antagonists of STAT Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Takakuma, Kazuyuki; Ogo, Naohisa; Uehara, Yutaka; Takahashi, Susumu; Miyoshi, Nao; Asai, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Some of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family members are constitutively activated in a wide variety of human tumors. The activity of STAT depends on their Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-mediated binding to sequences containing phosphorylated tyrosine. Thus, antagonizing this binding is a feasible approach to inhibiting STAT activation. We have developed a novel multiplexed assay for STAT3- and STAT5b-SH2 binding, based on amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay (Alpha) technology. AlphaLISA and AlphaScreen beads were combined in a single-well assay, which allowed the binding of STAT3- and STAT5b-SH2 to phosphotyrosine peptides to be simultaneously monitored. Biotin-labeled recombinant human STAT proteins were obtained as N- and C-terminal deletion mutants. The spacer length of the DIG-labeled peptide, the reaction time, and the concentration of sodium chloride were optimized to establish a HTS system with Z’ values of greater than 0.6 for both STAT3- and STAT5b-SH2 binding. We performed a HTS campaign for chemical libraries using this multiplexed assay and identified hit compounds. A 2-chloro-1,4-naphthalenedione derivative, Compound 1, preferentially inhibited STAT3-SH2 binding in vitro, and the nuclear translocation of STAT3 in HeLa cells. Initial structure activity relationship (SAR) studies using the multiplexed assay showed the 3-substituent effect on both the activity and selectivity of STAT3 and STAT5b inhibition. Therefore, this multiplexed assay is useful for not only searching for potential lead compounds but also obtaining SAR data for developing new STAT3/STAT5b inhibitors. PMID:23977103

  18. Diet-dependent modulation of hippocampal expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in cannabinoid antagonist-treated obese rats.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Patricia; Luque-Rojas, María Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Blanco, Eduardo; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; Crespillo, Ana; Vida, Margarita; Grondona, Jesús M; Cifuentes, Manuel; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco J; de la Torre, Rafael; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Suárez, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity produces changes in endocannabinoid signaling (ECS), influencing the regulation of energy homeostasis. Recently, we demonstrated that, in high-fat-diet-fed rats, blockade of CB1 receptor by AM251 not only reduced body weight but also increased adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, suggesting an influence of diet on hippocampal cannabinoid function. To further explore the role of hippocampal ECS in high-fat-diet-induced obesity, we investigated whether the immunohistochemical expression of the enzymes that produce (diacylglycerol lipase alpha and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D) and degrade (monoacylglycerol lipase and fatty acid amino hydrolase) endocannabinoids may be altered in the hippocampus of AM251 (3 mg/kg)-treated rats fed three different diets: standard diet (normal chow), high-carbohydrate diet (70% carbohydrate) and high-fat diet (60% fat). Results indicated that AM251 reduced caloric intake and body weight gain, and induced a modulation of the expression of ECS-related proteins in the hippocampus of animals exposed to hypercaloric diets. These effects were differentially restricted to either the 2-arachinodoyl glycerol or anandamide signaling pathways, in a diet-dependent manner. AM251-treated rats fed the high-carbohydrate diet showed a reduction of the diacylglycerol lipase alpha : monoacylglycerol lipase ratio, whereas AM251-treated rats fed the high-fat diet showed a decrease of the N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D : fatty acid amino hydrolase ratio. These results are consistent with the reduced levels of hippocampal endocannabinoids found after food restriction. Regarding the CB1 expression, AM251 induced specific changes focused in the CA1 stratum pyramidale of high-fat-diet-fed rats. These findings indicated that the cannabinoid antagonist AM251 modulates ECS-related proteins in the rat hippocampus in a diet-specific manner. Overall, these results suggest that the hippocampal ECS participates

  19. Small-molecule agonists and antagonists of F-box protein-substrate interactions in auxin perception and signaling.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Tan, Xu; Zheng, Ning; Hatate, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yoshio; Kepinski, Stefan; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2008-04-08

    The regulation of gene expression by the hormone auxin is a crucial mechanism in plant development. We have shown that the Arabidopsis F-box protein TIR1 is a receptor for auxin, and our recent structural work has revealed the molecular mechanism of auxin perception. TIR1 is the substrate receptor of the ubiquitin-ligase complex SCF(TIR1). Auxin binding enhances the interaction between TIR1 and its substrates, the Aux/IAA repressors, thereby promoting the ubiquitination and degradation of Aux/IAAs, altering the expression of hundreds of genes. TIR1 is the prototype of a new class of hormone receptor and the first example of an SCF ubiquitin-ligase modulated by a small molecule. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of a series of auxin agonists and antagonists. We show these molecules are specific to TIR1-mediated events in Arabidopsis, and their mode of action in binding to TIR1 is confirmed by x-ray crystallographic analysis. Further, we demonstrate the utility of these probes for the analysis of TIR1-mediated auxin signaling in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Our work not only provides a useful tool for plant chemical biology but also demonstrates an example of a specific small-molecule inhibitor of F-box protein-substrate recruitment. Substrate recognition and subsequent ubiquitination by SCF-type ubiquitin ligases are central to many cellular processes in eukaryotes, and ubiquitin-ligase function is affected in several human diseases. Our work supports the idea that it may be possible to design small-molecule agents to modulate ubiquitin-ligase function therapeutically.

  20. Kisspeptin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Roseweir, Antonia Kathryn; Millar, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin is now known to be an important regulator of the hypothalamic--pituitary-gonadal axis and is the target of a range of regulators, such as steroid hormone feedback, nutritional and metabolic regulation. Kisspeptin binds to its cognate receptor, KISS1R (also called GPR54), on GnRH neurons and stimulates their activity, which in turn provides an obligatory signal for GnRH secretion-thus gating down-stream events supporting reproduction. The development of peripherally active kisspeptin antagonists could offer a unique therapeutic agent for treating hormone-dependent disorders of reproduction, including precocious puberty, endometriosis, and metastatic prostate cancer. The following chapter discusses the advances made in the search for both peptide and small molecule kisspeptin antagonists and their use in delineating the role of kisspeptin within the reproductive system. To date, four peptide antagonists and one small molecule antagonist have been designed.

  1. Molecular recognition of agonists and antagonists by the nucleotide-activated G protein-coupled P2Y2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rafehi, Muhammad; Neumann, Alexander; Baqi, Younis; Malik, Enas M; Wiese, Michael; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Müller, Christa E

    2017-09-22

    A homology model of the nucleotide-activated P2Y2R was created based on the X-ray structures of the P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors. Docking studies were performed, and receptor mutants were created to probe the identified binding interactions. Mutation of residues predicted to interact with the ribose (Arg110) and the phosphates of the nucleotide agonists (Arg265, Arg292) or that contribute indirectly to binding (Tyr288) abolished activity. The Y114F, R194A, and F261A mutations led to inactivity of diadenosine tetraphosphate and to a reduced response of UTP. Significant reduction in agonist potency was observed for all other receptor mutants (Phe111, His184, Ser193, Phe261, Tyr268, Tyr269) predicted to be involved in agonist recognition. An ionic lock between Asp185 and Arg292 that is probably involved in receptor activation interacts with the phosphate groups. The antagonist AR C118925 and anthraquinones likely bind to the orthosteric site. The updated homology models will be useful for virtual screening and drug design.

  2. Protein oxidation in a group of subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caimi, Gregorio; Hopps, Eugenia; Noto, Davide; Canino, Baldassare; Montana, Maria; Lucido, Daniela; Lo Presti, Rosalia; Averna, Maurizio R

    2013-01-01

    To examine the protein oxidation, marker of the oxidative stress, in metabolic syndrome (MS). We enrolled 106 subjects (45 women and 61 men) with MS of which 43 (14 women and 27 men) were with diabetes mellitus and 63 (31 women and 32 men) were without diabetes mellitus, and 54 subjects (19 women and 35 men) as control group. The protein oxidation, expressed as carbonyl groups, was measured by an enzyme-like immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit (BioCell PC test kit, Enzo Life Sciences AG, Switzerland). In the whole group of MS subjects, in comparison with control group, a significant increase in carbonyl groups was present. The same datum was also evident between control group and diabetic subjects with MS and between control group and nondiabetic subjects with MS. No difference was observed between the two subgroups (diabetic and nondiabetic subjects with MS) about NOx. Few information were obtained examining the linear regression among carbonyl groups, age, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure values and metabolic pattern of MS subjects. In MS subject we observed an increase of protein oxidation not influenced by diabetes mellitus. Several strategies may be employed to reduce this parameter. Copyright © 2013 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Group 1 mGlu-family proteins promote neuroadaptation to ethanol and withdrawal-associated hippocampal damage.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Anna R; Williams, Luke A; Saunders, Meredith A; Prendergast, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Group 1 mGlu-family proteins (i.e., mGlu) consist of mGlu1 and mGlu5 and their activity may influence voluntary ethanol intake. The present studies sought to examine the influence of these receptors on the development of ethanol dependence using in vitro and in vivo models of chronic, intermittent ethanol (CIE). Rat hippocampal explants were exposed to CIE with or without the addition of mGlu1 antagonist (7-hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCCOEt; 0.5, 1, and 3μM) or mGlu5 antagonist (E)-2-methyl-6-styryl-pyridine (SIB-1893; 20, 100, and 200μM) to assess sparing of withdrawal-induced cytotoxicity. In a separate study, adult male rats were administered CIE with or without the addition of oral administration of group 1 mGlu antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP; 3mg/kg). Blood ethanol levels (BELs) were determined at 0930h on Day 2 of Weeks 1, 2, and 3. Withdrawal behavior was monitored during Day 6 of the third consecutive withdrawal. CIE produced significant hippocampal cytotoxicity. These effects were attenuated by co-exposure to CPCCOEt (3μM) with ethanol in the CA3. By contrast, these effects were blocked by SIB-1893 (20μM) in each primary cell layer. Oral administration of MPEP with ethanol significantly attenuated behavioral effects of subsequent withdrawal and reduced BELs. These data demonstrate that ethanol activates group 1 mGlu-family proteins to promote withdrawal-associated cytotoxicity in vitro and physical dependence in vivo. These findings suggest that group 1 mGlu-family proteins may be therapeutic targets for treatment of alcohol use disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Polycomb group protein bodybuilding: working out the routines.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Cem; Paro, Renato

    2013-09-30

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate gene expression by modifying chemical and structural properties of chromatin. Isono et al. (2013) now report in Developmental Cell a polymerization-dependent mechanism used by PcG proteins to form higher-order chromatin structures, referred to as Polycomb bodies, and demonstrate its necessity for gene silencing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An example of designed multiple ligands spanning protein classes: dual MCH-1R antagonists/DPPIV inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gattrell, William T; Sambrook Smith, Colin P; Smith, Alun J

    2012-04-01

    A ligand-based approach to identify potential starting points for a dual MCH-1R antagonist/DPPIV inhibitor medicinal chemistry program was undertaken. Potential ligand pairs were identified by analysis of MCH-1R and DPPIV in vitro data. A highly targeted synthetic effort lead to the discovery of pyridone 11, a dual MCH-1R antagonist/DPPIV inhibitor with selectivity over DPP8 and DPP9.

  6. Structural Isosteres of Phosphate Groups in the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuezhou; Borrel, Alexandre; Ghemtio, Leo; Regad, Leslie; Boije Af Gennäs, Gustav; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Xhaard, Henri

    2017-03-13

    We developed a computational workflow to mine the Protein Data Bank for isosteric replacements that exist in different binding site environments but have not necessarily been identified and exploited in compound design. Taking phosphate groups as examples, the workflow was used to construct 157 data sets, each composed of a reference protein complexed with AMP, ADP, ATP, or pyrophosphate as well other ligands. Phosphate binding sites appear to have a high hydration content and large size, resulting in U-shaped bioactive conformations recurrently found across unrelated protein families. A total of 16 413 replacements were extracted, filtered for a significant structural overlap on phosphate groups, and sorted according to their SMILES codes. In addition to the classical isosteres of phosphate, such as carboxylate, sulfone, or sulfonamide, unexpected replacements that do not conserve charge or polarity, such as aryl, aliphatic, or positively charged groups, were found.

  7. Classifying proteins into functional groups based on all-versus-all BLAST of 10 million proteins.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Natali; Higdon, Roger; Broomall, William; Stanberry, Larissa; Welch, Dean; Lu, Wei; Haynes, Winston; Barga, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    To address the monumental challenge of assigning function to millions of sequenced proteins, we completed the first of a kind all-versus-all sequence alignments using BLAST for 9.9 million proteins in the UniRef100 database. Microsoft Windows Azure produced over 3 billion filtered records in 6 days using 475 eight-core virtual machines. Protein classification into functional groups was then performed using Hive and custom jars implemented on top of Apache Hadoop utilizing the MapReduce paradigm. First, using the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database, a length normalized bit score (LNBS) was determined to be the best similarity measure for classification of proteins. LNBS achieved sensitivity and specificity of 98% each. Second, out of 5.1 million bacterial proteins, about two-thirds were assigned to significantly extended COG groups, encompassing 30 times more assigned proteins. Third, the remaining proteins were classified into protein functional groups using an innovative implementation of a single-linkage algorithm on an in-house Hadoop compute cluster. This implementation significantly reduces the run time for nonindexed queries and optimizes efficient clustering on a large scale. The performance was also verified on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This clustering assigned nearly 2 million proteins to approximately half a million different functional groups. A similar approach was applied to classify 2.8 million eukaryotic sequences resulting in over 1 million proteins being assign to existing KOG groups and the remainder clustered into 100,000 functional groups.

  8. Regulation by Polycomb and Trithorax Group Proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Venegas, Raúl

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins are key regulators of homeotic genes and have crucial roles in cell proliferation, growth and development. PcG and trxG proteins form higher order protein complexes that contain SET domain proteins, with a histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity, responsible for the different types of lysine methylation at the N-terminal tails of the core histone proteins. In recent years, genetic studies along with biochemical and cell biological analyses in Arabidopsis have enabled researchers to begin to understand how PcG and trxG proteins are recruited to chromatin and how they regulate their target genes and to elucidate their functions. This review focuses on the advances in our understanding of the biological roles of PcG and trxG proteins, their molecular mechanisms of action and further examines the role of histone marks in PcG and trxG regulation in Arabidopsis. PMID:22303254

  9. An inhibitor of apoptosis protein antagonist T-3256336 potentiates the antitumor efficacy of the Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor pevonedistat (TAK-924/MLN4924).

    PubMed

    Sumi, Hiroyuki; Inazuka, Masakazu; Morimoto, Megumi; Hibino, Ryosuke; Hashimoto, Kentaro; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu; Kuida, Keisuke; Smith, Peter G; Yoshida, Sei; Yabuki, Masato

    2016-11-18

    Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are antiapoptotic regulators that block cell death, and are frequently overexpressed in several human cancers, where they facilitate evasion of apoptosis and promote cell survival. IAP antagonists are also known as second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (SMAC)-mimetics, and have recently been considered as novel therapeutic agents for inducing apoptosis, alone and in combination with other anticancer drugs. In this study, we showed that T-3256336, the orally available IAP antagonist has synergistically enhances the antiproliferative effects of the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor pevonedistat (TAK-924/MLN4924), and these effects were attenuated by a TNFα-neutralizing antibody. In the present mechanistic analyses, pevonedistat induced TNFα mRNA and triggered IAP antagonist-dependent extrinsic apoptotic cell death in cancer cell lines. Furthermore, synergistic effects of the combination of T-3256336 and pevonedistat were demonstrated in a HL-60 mouse xenograft model. Our findings provide mechanistic evidence of the effects of IAP antagonists in combination with NAE inhibitors, and demonstrate the potential of a new combination therapy for cancer.

  10. Bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin 1 is widely expressed by cancer-associated stromal cells and can promote tumor cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneddon, Julie B.; Zhen, Hanson H.; Montgomery, Kelli; van de Rijn, Matt; Tward, Aaron D.; West, Robert; Gladstone, Hayes; Chang, Howard Y.; Morganroth, Greg S.; Oro, Anthony E.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2006-10-01

    Although tissue microenvironments play critical roles in epithelial development and tumorigenesis, the factors mediating these effects are poorly understood. In this work, we used a genomic approach to identify factors produced by cells in the microenvironment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin, one of the most common human cancers. The global gene expression programs of stromal cell cultures derived from human BCCs showed consistent, systematic differences from those derived from nontumor skin. The gene most consistently expressed at a higher level in BCC tumor stromal cells compared with those from nontumor skin was GREMLIN 1, which encodes a secreted antagonist of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. BMPs and their antagonists are known to play a crucial role in stem and progenitor cell biology as regulators of the balance between expansion and differentiation. Consistent with the hypothesis that BMP antagonists might have a similar role in cancer, we found GREMLIN 1 expression in the stroma of human BCC tumors but not in normal skin in vivo. Furthermore, BMP 2 and 4 are expressed by BCC cells. Ex vivo, BMP inhibits, and Gremlin 1 promotes, proliferation of cultured BCC cells. We further found that GREMLIN 1 is expressed by stromal cells in many carcinomas but not in the corresponding normal tissue counterparts that we examined. Our data suggest that BMP antagonists may be important constituents of tumor stroma, providing a favorable microenvironment for cancer cell survival and expansion in many cancers. cancer biology | stem cell regulation | tissue microenvironment | tumor stroma

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin 1 is widely expressed by cancer-associated stromal cells and can promote tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sneddon, Julie B; Zhen, Hanson H; Montgomery, Kelli; van de Rijn, Matt; Tward, Aaron D; West, Robert; Gladstone, Hayes; Chang, Howard Y; Morganroth, Greg S; Oro, Anthony E; Brown, Patrick O

    2006-10-03

    Although tissue microenvironments play critical roles in epithelial development and tumorigenesis, the factors mediating these effects are poorly understood. In this work, we used a genomic approach to identify factors produced by cells in the microenvironment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin, one of the most common human cancers. The global gene expression programs of stromal cell cultures derived from human BCCs showed consistent, systematic differences from those derived from nontumor skin. The gene most consistently expressed at a higher level in BCC tumor stromal cells compared with those from nontumor skin was GREMLIN 1, which encodes a secreted antagonist of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. BMPs and their antagonists are known to play a crucial role in stem and progenitor cell biology as regulators of the balance between expansion and differentiation. Consistent with the hypothesis that BMP antagonists might have a similar role in cancer, we found GREMLIN 1 expression in the stroma of human BCC tumors but not in normal skin in vivo. Furthermore, BMP 2 and 4 are expressed by BCC cells. Ex vivo, BMP inhibits, and Gremlin 1 promotes, proliferation of cultured BCC cells. We further found that GREMLIN 1 is expressed by stromal cells in many carcinomas but not in the corresponding normal tissue counterparts that we examined. Our data suggest that BMP antagonists may be important constituents of tumor stroma, providing a favorable microenvironment for cancer cell survival and expansion in many cancers.

  12. Comparison of two different starting multiple dose gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocols in a selected group of in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer patients.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Ernesto; Bosch, Ernesto; Crespo, Juana; Simón, Carlos; Remohí, José; Pellicer, Antonio

    2004-03-01

    To compare the efficacy of two starting protocols of multiple dose GnRH antagonists (GnRH-a). Prospective randomized controlled study. In vitro fertilization-embryo transfer program at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, Valencia, Spain. One hundred nine patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with recombinant gonadotropins and GnRH-a (0.25 mg/d). Patients started GnRH-a administration on stimulation day 6 (group 1) or when the leading follicle reached a mean diameter of 14 mm (group 2). Implantation and pregnancy rates; serum E(2) and LH levels during ovarian stimulation; days of stimulation and GnRH-a administration. Days needed for ovarian stimulation were similar in both groups but there was a significant difference when comparing days of GnRH-a administration. Serum E(2) and LH followed similar curves in both groups. Implantation and pregnancy rates were 23.7% and 44.4 % in group 1 and 28.6% and 50.9 % in group 2 (P=not significant [NS]). The efficacy of the two starting protocols of the multiple dose GnRH-a evaluated in this study is similar; however, this remark can only be drawn for a selected group of patients.

  13. Combgap contributes to recruitment of Polycomb group proteins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Payal; De, Sandip; Mitra, Apratim; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A. A.; Pfeifer, Karl; Kassis, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are responsible for maintaining the silenced transcriptional state of many developmentally regulated genes. PcG proteins are organized into multiprotein complexes that are recruited to DNA via cis-acting elements known as “Polycomb response elements” (PREs). In Drosophila, PREs consist of binding sites for many different DNA-binding proteins, some known and others unknown. Identification of these DNA-binding proteins is crucial to understanding the mechanism of PcG recruitment to PREs. We report here the identification of Combgap (Cg), a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that is involved in recruitment of PcG proteins. Cg can bind directly to PREs via GTGT motifs and colocalizes with the PcG proteins Pleiohomeotic (Pho) and Polyhomeotic (Ph) at the majority of PREs in the genome. In addition, Cg colocalizes with Ph at a number of targets independent of Pho. Loss of Cg leads to decreased recruitment of Ph at only a subset of sites; some of these sites are binding sites for other Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) components, others are not. Our data suggest that Cg can recruit Ph in the absence of PRC1 and illustrate the diversity and redundancy of PcG protein recruitment mechanisms. PMID:27001825

  14. High mobility group protein, HMG-1, contains insignificant glycosyl modification.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Y. B.; Scovell, W. M.; Yan, S. B.

    1994-01-01

    High mobility group protein-1 (HMG-1) is a ubiquitous, highly conserved, and abundant nuclear protein. Recent findings suggest that HMG-1 may serve as a DNA chaperone protein and play a role in the regulation of transcription. There is a mounting interest in elucidating the mechanism by which HMG-1 protein takes part in these activities. HMG-1 has been reported to undergo an extensive array of posttranslational modifications, including glycosylation. We extend the earlier findings on the glycosylation of HMG-1 by quantitating the amount of carbohydrate on HMG-1 from calf thymus and chicken erythrocytes isolated by 2 different purification procedures. In addition, 2 different developmental stages (embryonic and adult) were examined in the chicken erythrocytes. The glycosyl composition was quantitated using the Dionex HPAE-PAD II system. Furthermore, the presence of O-linked GlcNAc on HMG-1 was determined by the enzymatic incorporation of 3H-galactose into HMG-1 protein. Contrary to earlier reports, less than 0.5 mol of total monosaccharides (Fuc, Man, GalNH2, GlcNH2, Gal) were detected per mole of HMG-1 protein, regardless of the source of the protein or the method of isolation. In addition, less than 0.002 mol of O-linked GlcNAc per mole of HMG-1 protein was detected. Thus, insignificant amount of glycosylation was found on HMG-1 protein. Because O-linked GlcNAc modification of proteins is believed to be a reversible posttranslational event, more definitive studies will need to be conducted before ruling out that the function of HMG-1 protein is not regulated by glycosylation. PMID:7757000

  15. The zipper groups of the amyloid state of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, James C.

    2013-04-01

    A formal derivation is provided of the 15 symmetry groups (zipper groups) available to the amyloid homosteric zipper. Fibrous proteins in the amyloid state are found both associated with numerous diseases and in the normal functions of cells. Amyloid fibers contain a repetitive spine, commonly built from a pair of β-sheets whose β-strands run perpendicular to the fiber direction and whose side chains interdigitate, much like the teeth of a zipper. In fiber spines known as homosteric zippers, identical protein segments sharing identical packing environments make the two β-sheets. In previous work based on atomic resolution crystal structures of homosteric zippers derived from a dozen proteins, the symmetries of homosteric zippers were categorized into eight classes. Here, it is shown through a formal derivation that each homosteric zipper class corresponds to a unique set of symmetry groups termed ‘zipper groups’. Furthermore, the eight previously identified classes do not account for all of the 15 possible zipper groups, which may be categorized into the complete set of ten classes. Because of their foundations in group theory, the 15 zipper groups provide a mathematically rigorous classification for homosteric zippers.

  16. Protein profiles and immunoreactivities of Acanthamoeba morphological groups and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pumidonming, Wilawan; Koehsler, Martina; Leitsch, David; Walochnik, Julia

    2014-11-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protozoan found in a wide variety of habitats. A classification of Acanthamoeba into currently eighteen genotypes (T1-T18) has been established, however, data on differences between genotypes on the protein level are scarce. The aim of this study was to compare protein and immunoreactivity profiles of Acanthamoeba genotypes. Thirteen strains, both clinical and non-clinical, from genotypes T4, T5, T6, T7, T9, T11 and T12, representing three morphological groups, were investigated for their protein profiles and IgG, IgM and IgA immunoreactivities. It was shown that protein and immunoreactivity profiles of Acanthamoeba genotypes T4, T5, T6, T7, T9, T11 and T12 are clearly distinct from each other, but the banding patterns correlate to the morphological groups. Normal human sera revealed anti-Acanthamoeba antibodies against isolates of all investigated genotypes, interestingly, however only very weak IgM and virtually no IgA immunoreactivity with T7 and T9, both representing morphological group I. The strongest IgG, IgM and IgA immunoreactivities were observed for genotypes T4, T5 and T6. Differences of both, protein and immunological patterns, between cytopathic and non-cytopathic strains, particularly within genotype T4, were not at the level of banding patterns, but rather in expression levels.

  17. Behaviour of protein carbonyl groups in juvenile myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Caimi, Gregorio; Canino, Baldassare; Incalcaterra, Egle; Ferrera, Eleonora; Montana, Maria; Lo Presti, Rosalia

    2013-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is accompanied by oxidative stress, and protein oxidation is among the consequences of oxidative stress. We examined the plasma concentration of protein carbonyl groups (PC), a marker of protein oxidation, in a group of young subjects with AMI (45 men and 5 women; mean age 40.4 ± 4.8 yrs). We found a significant increase of PC (p < 0.001) in comparison with normal controls. No difference was observed between patients with AMI characterized by elevated ST segment and those without elevation of ST segment. There was no correlation between the ejection fraction and PC in the whole group nor in the subgroups of STEMI and non-STEMI patients. Subdividing the whole group of AMI patients according to the number of risk factors and the number of stenosed coronary vessels, the difference in PC level was not statistically significant among the subgroups. This study showed an increased protein oxidation in young subjects with recent AMI. Further investigation is needed to ascertain whether this can be a target of therapeutic intervention.

  18. The Meat and Protein Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the meat and protein group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words…

  19. The Meat and Protein Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the meat and protein group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words…

  20. Finding sequence motifs in groups of functionally related proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, H O; Annau, T M; Chandrasegaran, S

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a method for rapidly finding patterns of conserved amino acid residues (motifs) in groups of functionally related proteins. All 3-amino acid patterns in a group of proteins of the type aa1 d1 aa2 d2 aa3, where d1 and d2 are distances that can be varied in a range up to 24 residues, are accumulated into an array. Segments of the proteins containing those patterns that occur most frequently are aligned on each other by a scoring method that obtains an average relatedness value for all the amino acids in each column of the aligned sequence block based on the Dayhoff relatedness odds matrix. The automated method successfully finds and displays nearly all of the sequence motifs that have been previously reported to occur in 33 reverse transcriptases, 18 DNA integrases, and 30 DNA methyltransferases.

  1. The TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 and the OMA RNA-binding proteins antagonistically control the prophase-to-metaphase transition and growth of Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes.

    PubMed

    Spike, Caroline A; Coetzee, Donna; Eichten, Carly; Wang, Xin; Hansen, Dave; Greenstein, David

    2014-12-01

    In many animals, oocytes enter meiosis early in their development but arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this arrest period, enables the acquisition of meiotic competence and the capacity to produce healthy progeny. Meiotic resumption, or meiotic maturation, involves the transition to metaphase I (M phase) and is regulated by intercellular signaling and cyclin-dependent kinase activation. Premature meiotic maturation would be predicted to diminish fertility as the timing of this event, which normally occurs after oocyte growth is complete, is crucial. In the accompanying article in this issue, we identify the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 as a translational repressor that copurifies with OMA-1 and OMA-2, RNA-binding proteins redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. In this article, we show that LIN-41 enables the production of high-quality oocytes and plays an essential role in controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. lin-41 null mutants display a striking defect that is specific to oogenesis: pachytene-stage cells cellularize prematurely and fail to progress to diplotene. Instead, these cells activate CDK-1, enter M phase, assemble spindles, and attempt to segregate chromosomes. Translational derepression of the CDK-1 activator CDC-25.3 appears to contribute to premature M-phase entry in lin-41 mutant oocytes. Genetic and phenotypic analyses indicate that LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 exhibit an antagonistic relationship, and we suggest that translational regulation by these proteins could be important for controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation.

  2. The TRIM-NHL Protein LIN-41 and the OMA RNA-Binding Proteins Antagonistically Control the Prophase-to-Metaphase Transition and Growth of Caenorhabditis elegans Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Spike, Caroline A.; Coetzee, Donna; Eichten, Carly; Wang, Xin; Hansen, Dave; Greenstein, David

    2014-01-01

    In many animals, oocytes enter meiosis early in their development but arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this arrest period, enables the acquisition of meiotic competence and the capacity to produce healthy progeny. Meiotic resumption, or meiotic maturation, involves the transition to metaphase I (M phase) and is regulated by intercellular signaling and cyclin-dependent kinase activation. Premature meiotic maturation would be predicted to diminish fertility as the timing of this event, which normally occurs after oocyte growth is complete, is crucial. In the accompanying article in this issue, we identify the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 as a translational repressor that copurifies with OMA-1 and OMA-2, RNA-binding proteins redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. In this article, we show that LIN-41 enables the production of high-quality oocytes and plays an essential role in controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. lin-41 null mutants display a striking defect that is specific to oogenesis: pachytene-stage cells cellularize prematurely and fail to progress to diplotene. Instead, these cells activate CDK-1, enter M phase, assemble spindles, and attempt to segregate chromosomes. Translational derepression of the CDK-1 activator CDC-25.3 appears to contribute to premature M-phase entry in lin-41 mutant oocytes. Genetic and phenotypic analyses indicate that LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 exhibit an antagonistic relationship, and we suggest that translational regulation by these proteins could be important for controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. PMID:25261698

  3. Chromatin topology is coupled to Polycomb group protein subnuclear organization

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Ajazul H.; Boettiger, Alistair N.; Schorderet, Patrick; Ergun, Ayla; Münger, Christine; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Kingston, Robert E.; Francis, Nicole J.

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of metazoa are organized at multiple scales. Many proteins that regulate genome architecture, including Polycomb group (PcG) proteins, form subnuclear structures. Deciphering mechanistic links between protein organization and chromatin architecture requires precise description and mechanistic perturbations of both. Using super-resolution microscopy, here we show that PcG proteins are organized into hundreds of nanoscale protein clusters. We manipulated PcG clusters by disrupting the polymerization activity of the sterile alpha motif (SAM) of the PcG protein Polyhomeotic (Ph) or by increasing Ph levels. Ph with mutant SAM disrupts clustering of endogenous PcG complexes and chromatin interactions while elevating Ph level increases cluster number and chromatin interactions. These effects can be captured by molecular simulations based on a previously described chromatin polymer model. Both perturbations also alter gene expression. Organization of PcG proteins into small, abundant clusters on chromatin through Ph SAM polymerization activity may shape genome architecture through chromatin interactions. PMID:26759081

  4. Role of the alpha-amino group of protein in ubiquitin-mediated protein breakdown.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Heller, H; Eytan, E; Kaklij, G; Rose, I A

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the conjugation of ubiquitin to NH2 groups of proteins is required for protein breakdown. We now show that the selective modification of NH2-terminal alpha-NH2 groups of globin and lysozyme prevents their degradation by the ubiquitin proteolytic system from reticulocytes. The conjugation by ubiquitin of epsilon-NH2 groups of lysine residues, usually seen in multiples, was also inhibited in alpha-NH2-blocked proteins. Naturally occurring N alpha-acetylated proteins are not degraded by the ubiquitin system at a significant rate, while their nonacetylated counterparts from other species are good substrates. This suggests that one function of N alpha-acetylation of cellular proteins is to prevent their degradation by the ubiquitin system. alpha-NH2-blocked proteins can have their activity as substrates for degradation increased by incorporation of alpha-NH2 groups through the introduction of polyalanine side chains. Proteins in which most epsilon-NH2 groups are blocked but the alpha-NH2 group is free are degraded by the ubiquitin system, but at a reduced rate. It is therefore suggested that the exposure of a free NH2 terminus of proteins is required for degradation and probably initiates the formation of ubiquitin conjugates committed for degradation. Images PMID:6095265

  5. Longitudinal Profiles of Girls' Irritable, Defiant and Antagonistic Oppositional Symptoms: Evidence for Group Based Differences in Symptom Severity.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Khrista; Rowe, Richard; Duku, Eric; Waldman, Irwin; Stepp, Stephanie; Hipwell, Alison; Burke, Jeffrey

    2016-11-19

    Three subdimensions of ODD symptoms have been proposed -angry/irritable (IR), argumentative/defiant (DF) and antagonism (AN). This study tested whether longitudinal symptom trajectories could be identified by these subdimensions. Group-based trajectory analysis was used to identify developmental trajectories of IR, DF and AN symptoms. Multi-group trajectory analysis was then used to identify how subdimension trajectories were linked together over time. Data were drawn from the Pittsburgh Girls Study (PGS; N = 2450), an urban community sample of girls between the ages of five--eight at baseline. We included five waves of annual data across ages five-13 to model trajectories. Three trajectories were identified for each ODD subdimension: DF and AN were characterized by high, medium and low severity groups; IR was characterized by low, medium stable, and high increasing groups. Multi-trajectory analysis confirmed these subdimensions were best linked together based on symptom severity. We did not identify girls' trajectory groups that were characterized predominantly by a particular subdimension of ODD symptoms. Membership in more severe symptom groups was significantly associated with worse outcomes five years later. In childhood and early adolescence girls with high levels of ODD symptoms can be identified, and these youth are characterized by a persistently elevated profile of IR, DF and AN symptoms. Further studies in clinical samples are required to examine the ICD-10 proposal that ODD with irritability is a distinct or more severe form of ODD.

  6. Direct protein-protein conjugation by genetically introducing bioorthogonal functional groups into proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanggil; Ko, Wooseok; Sung, Bong Hyun; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hyun Soo

    2016-11-15

    Proteins often function as complex structures in conjunction with other proteins. Because these complex structures are essential for sophisticated functions, developing protein-protein conjugates has gained research interest. In this study, site-specific protein-protein conjugation was performed by genetically incorporating an azide-containing amino acid into one protein and a bicyclononyne (BCN)-containing amino acid into the other. Three to four sites in each of the proteins were tested for conjugation efficiency, and three combinations showed excellent conjugation efficiency. The genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) is technically simple and produces the mutant protein in high yield. In addition, the conjugation reaction can be conducted by simple mixing, and does not require additional reagents or linker molecules. Therefore, this method may prove very useful for generating protein-protein conjugates and protein complexes of biochemical significance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Nonretinoid Retinol Binding Protein 4 Antagonists for the Potential Treatment of Atrophic Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4–/– mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%. PMID:25210858

  8. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of nonretinoid retinol binding protein 4 antagonists for the potential treatment of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Dobri, Nicoleta; Freeman, Emily E; Conlon, Michael P; Chen, Ping; Stafford, Douglas G; Schwarz, Daniel M C; Golden, Kathy C; Zhu, Lei; Kitchen, Douglas B; Barnes, Keith D; Racz, Boglarka; Qin, Qiong; Michelotti, Enrique; Cywin, Charles L; Martin, William H; Pearson, Paul G; Johnson, Graham; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2014-09-25

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4(-/-) mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%.

  9. Banana Ovate Family Protein MaOFP1 and MADS-Box Protein MuMADS1 Antagonistically Regulated Banana Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Miao, Hongxia; Zhang, Jianbin; Jia, Caihong; Wang, Zhuo; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The ovate family protein named MaOFP1 was identified in banana (Musa acuminata L.AAA) fruit by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) method using the banana MADS-box gene MuMADS1 as bait and a 2 day postharvest (DPH) banana fruit cDNA library as prey. The interaction between MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 was further confirmed by Y2H and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) methods, which showed that the MuMADS1 K domain interacted with MaOFP1. Real-time quantitative PCR evaluation of MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 expression patterns in banana showed that they are highly expressed in 0 DPH fruit, but present in low levels in the stem, which suggests that simultaneous but different expression patterns exist for both MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 in different tissues and developing fruits. Meanwhile, MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 expression was highly stimulated and greatly suppressed, respectively, by exogenous ethylene. In contrast, MaOFP1 expression was highly stimulated while MuMADS1 was greatly suppressed by the ethylene competitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP). These results indicate that MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 are antagonistically regulated by ethylene and might play important roles in postharvest banana fruit ripening. PMID:25886169

  10. Defining MC1R regulation in human melanocytes by its agonist α-melanocortin and antagonists agouti signaling protein and β-defensin 3.

    PubMed

    Swope, Viki B; Jameson, Joshua A; McFarland, Kevin L; Supp, Dorothy M; Miller, William E; McGraw, Dennis W; Patel, Mira A; Nix, Matthew A; Millhauser, Glenn L; Babcock, George F; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A

    2012-09-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a G(s) protein-coupled receptor, has an important role in human pigmentation. We investigated the regulation of expression and activity of the MC1R in primary human melanocyte cultures. Human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) acted as an antagonist for MC1R, inhibiting the α-melanocortin (α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH))-induced increase in the activities of adenylate cyclase and tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme for melanogenesis. α-Melanocortin and forskolin, which activate adenylate cyclase, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, which activates protein kinase C, increased, whereas exposure to UV radiation reduced, MC1R gene and membrane protein expression. Brief treatment with α-MSH resulted in MC1R desensitization, whereas continuous treatment up to 3 hours caused a steady rise in cAMP, suggesting receptor recycling. Pretreatment with agouti signaling protein or HBD3 prohibited responsiveness to α-MSH, but not forskolin, suggesting receptor desensitization by these antagonists. Melanocytes from different donors expressed different levels of the G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) 2, 3, 5, and 6, as well as β-arrestin 1. Therefore, in addition to the MC1R genotype, regulation of MC1R expression and activity is expected to affect human pigmentation and the responses to UV.

  11. Purification and partial characterization of a novel calcium-binding protein from Bacillus cereus T spores and inhibition of germination by calmodulin antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding protein has been purified from the dormant spores of Bacillus cereus T. B. cereus T spores were extensively washed, broken, and heated at 90{degree}C for 2 min. Using calcium-dependent hydrophobic interaction chromatography plus DEAE-cellulose and hydroxylapatite columns, a single protein was obtained which possessed calcium-binding capacity and some characteristics of calmodulin. This heat-stable protein was retained by hydrophobic matrices or a calmodulin antagonist in a calcium-dependent manner. The crude spore extract displaced bovine brain calmodulin from its antibody in a radioimmunoassay and the immunoreactive specific activity of the partially purified fraction which eluted from phenyl-Sepharose was ca. 200-fold greater than the crude spore extract. Purity of this protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. Calcium-binding ability was verified with a competitive calcium binding assay using Chelex-100 resin and {sup 45}Ca autoradiography. SDS-PAGE and amino acid composition indicated the molecular weight of the protein was 24-kDa. The effects of two calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) on L-alanine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus T spores were examined by measuring commitment to germination, loss of heat resistance, release of calcium, decrease in optical density at 660 nm and phase-contrast microscopy.

  12. The functional domain grouping of microtubule associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Charlotte M; Wakefield, James G

    2008-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs), which play crucial roles in normal cell function, are regulated by MT associated proteins (MAPs). Using a combinatorial approach that includes biochemistry, proteomics and bioinformatics, we have recently identified 270 putative MAPs from Drosophila embryos and characterized some of those required for correct progression through mitosis. Here we identify functional groups of these MAPs using a reciprocal hits sequence alignment technique and assign InterPro functional domains to 28 previously uncharacterized proteins. This approach gives insight into the potential functions of MAPs and how their roles may affect MTs. PMID:19704789

  13. Binding of fusion protein FLSC IgG1 to CCR5 is enhanced by CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Latinovic, Olga; Schneider, Kate; Szmacinski, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Heredia, Alonso; Redfield, Robert R

    2014-12-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is crucial for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, acting as the principal coreceptor for HIV-1 entry and transmission and is thus an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Studies have suggested that CCR5 surface density and its conformational changes subsequent to virion engagement are rate limiting for entry, and consequently, infection. Not all CCR5 antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection, suggesting a need for more potent reagents. Here we evaluated full length single chain (FLSC) IgG1, a novel IgG-CD4-gp120(BAL) fusion protein with several characteristics that make it an attractive candidate for treatment of HIV-1 infections, including bivalency and a potentially increased serum half-life over FLSC, the parental molecule. FLSC IgG1 binds two domains on CCR5, the N-terminus and the second extracellular loop, lowering the levels of available CCR5 viral attachment sites. Furthermore, FLSC IgG1 synergizes with Maraviroc (MVC), the only licensed CCR5 antagonist. In this study, we used both microscopy and functional assays to address the mechanistic aspects of the interactions of FLSC IgG1 and MVC in the context of CCR5 conformational changes and viral infection. We used a novel stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), based on high resolution localization of photoswitchable dyes to visualize direct contacts between FLSC IgG1 and CCR5. We compared viral entry inhibition by FLSC IgG1 with that of other CCR5 blockers and showed FLSC IgG1 to be the most potent. We also showed that lower CCR5 surface densities in HIV-1 infected primary cells result in lower FLSC IgG1 EC50 values. In addition, CCR5 binding by FLSC IgG1, but not CCR5 Ab 2D7, was significantly increased when cells were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC allosterically increases exposure of the FLSC IgG1 binding site. These data have implications for future antiviral therapy development.

  14. CARMIL is a potent capping protein antagonist: identification of a conserved CARMIL domain that inhibits the activity of capping protein and uncaps capped actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Uruno, Takehito; Remmert, Kirsten; Hammer, John A

    2006-04-14

    Acanthamoeba CARMIL was previously shown to co-purify with capping protein (CP) and to bind pure CP. Here we show that this interaction inhibits the barbed end-capping activity of CP. Even more strikingly, this interaction drives the uncapping of actin filaments previously capped with CP. These activities are CP-specific; CARMIL does not inhibit the capping activities of either gelsolin or CapG and does not uncap gelsolin-capped filaments. Although full-length (FL) CARMIL (residues 1-1121) possesses both anti-CP activities, C-terminal fragments like glutathione S-transferase (GST)-P (940-1121) that contain the CARMIL CP binding site are at least 10 times more active. We localized the full activities of GST-P to its C-terminal 51 residues (1071-1121). This sequence contains a stretch of 25 residues that is highly conserved in CARMIL proteins from protozoa, flies, worms, and vertebrates (CARMIL Homology domain 3; CAH3). Point mutations showed that the majority of the most highly conserved residues within CAH3 are critical for the anti-CP activity of GST-AP (862-1121). Finally, we found that GST-AP binds CP approximately 20-fold more tightly than does FL-CARMIL. This observation together with the elevated activities of C-terminal fragments relative to FL-CARMIL suggests that FL-CARMIL might exist primarily in an autoinhibited state. Consistent with this idea, proteolytic cleavage of FL-CARMIL with thrombin generated an approximately 14-kDa C-terminal fragment that expresses full anti-CP activities. We propose that, after some type of physiological activation event, FL-CARMIL could function in vivo as a potent CP antagonist. Given the pivotal role that CP plays in determining the global actin phenotype of cells, our results suggest that CARMIL may play an important role in the physiological regulation of actin assembly.

  15. Blood Group Antigen Recognition via the Group A Streptococcal M Protein Mediates Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    De Oliveira, David M. P.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; Everest-Dass, Arun; Day, Christopher J.; Dabbs, Rebecca A.; Ve, Thomas; Kobe, Bostjan; Nizet, Victor; Packer, Nicolle H.; Walker, Mark J.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) is responsible for over 500,000 deaths worldwide each year. The highly virulent M1T1 GAS clone is one of the most frequently isolated serotypes from streptococcal pharyngitis and invasive disease. The oral epithelial tract is a niche highly abundant in glycosylated structures, particularly those of the ABO(H) blood group antigen family. Using a high-throughput approach, we determined that a strain representative of the globally disseminated M1T1 GAS clone 5448 interacts with numerous, structurally diverse glycans. Preeminent among GAS virulence factors is the surface-expressed M protein. M1 protein showed high affinity for several terminal galactose blood group antigen structures. Deletion mutagenesis shows that M1 protein mediates glycan binding via its B repeat domains. Association of M1T1 GAS with oral epithelial cells varied significantly as a result of phenotypic differences in blood group antigen expression, with significantly higher adherence to those cells expressing H antigen structures compared to cells expressing A, B, or AB antigen structures. These data suggest a novel mechanism for GAS attachment to host cells and propose a link between host blood group antigen expression and M1T1 GAS colonization. PMID:28119471

  16. The sorting of blood group active proteins during enucleation.

    PubMed

    Satchwell, Timothy J; Bell, Amanda J; Toye, Ashley M

    2015-04-01

    Enucleation represents the critical stage during red blood cell development when the nucleus is extruded from an orthochromatic erythroblast in order to generate a nascent immature reticulocyte. Extrusion of the nucleus results in loss of a proportion of the erythroblast plasma membrane, which surrounds the nucleus, the bulk of the endoplasmic reticulum and a small region of cytoplasm. For this reason enucleation provides an important point in erythroblast differentiation at which proteins not required for the function of the erythrocyte can be lost, whilst those that are important for the structure-function properties of the mature erythrocyte must be efficiently retained in the reticulocyte plasma membrane. Disturbances in protein distribution during enucleation are envisaged to occur during human diseases such as Hereditary Spherocytosis. This article will discuss the current knowledge of erythroblast enucleation in the context of retention and loss of proteins that display antigenic blood group sites and that exist within multiprotein complexes within the erythrocyte membrane.

  17. The Antagonistic Effect of Selenium on Lead-Induced Inflammatory Factors and Heat Shock Protein mRNA Level in Chicken Cartilage Tissue.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shufang; Song, Huanyu; Gao, Han; Liu, Chunpeng; Zhang, Ziwei; Fu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Selenium (Se) is recognized as a necessary trace mineral in animal diets, including those of birds. Lead (Pb) is a toxic heavy metal and can damage organs in humans and animals. Complex antagonistic interactions between Se and heavy metals have been reported in previous studies. However, little is known regarding the effects of Se on Pb-induced toxicity and the expression of inflammatory factors and heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the cartilage of chickens. In this present study, we fed chickens either with Se or Pb or both Se and Pb supplement and later analyzed the mRNA expressions of inflammatory factors (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)) and HSPs (Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90). The results showed that Se and Pb influenced the expression of inflammatory factors and HSP genes in the chicken cartilage tissues. Additionally, we also found that antagonistic interaction existed between Se and Pb supplementation. Our findings suggested that Se could exert a antagonistic effect on Pb in chicken cartilage tissues.

  18. A Gβ protein and the TupA Co-Regulator Bind to Protein Kinase A Tpk2 to Act as Antagonistic Molecular Switches of Fungal Morphological Changes

    PubMed Central

    Janganan, Thamarai K.; Chen, Gongyou; Chen, Daliang; Menino, João F.; Rodrigues, Fernando; Borges-Walmsley, Maria I.; Walmsley, Adrian R.

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb) undergoes a morphological transition from a saprobic mycelium to pathogenic yeast that is controlled by the cAMP-signaling pathway. There is a change in the expression of the Gβ-protein PbGpb1, which interacts with adenylate cyclase, during this morphological transition. We exploited the fact that the cAMP-signaling pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not include a Gβ-protein to probe the functional role of PbGpb1. We present data that indicates that PbGpb1 and the transcriptional regulator PbTupA both bind to the PKA protein PbTpk2. PbTPK2 was able to complement a TPK2Δ strain of S. cerevisiae, XPY5a/α, which was defective in pseudohyphal growth. Whilst PbGPB1 had no effect on the parent S. cerevisiae strain, MLY61a/α, it repressed the filamentous growth of XPY5a/α transformed with PbTPK2, behaviour that correlated with a reduced expression of the floculin FLO11. In vitro, PbGpb1 reduced the kinase activity of PbTpk2, suggesting that inhibition of PbTpk2 by PbGpb1 reduces the level of expression of Flo11, antagonizing the filamentous growth of the cells. In contrast, expressing the co-regulator PbTUPA in XPY5a/α cells transformed with PbTPK2, but not untransformed cells, induced hyperfilamentous growth, which could be antagonized by co-transforming the cells with PbGPB1. PbTUPA was unable to induce the hyperfilamentous growth of a FLO8Δ strain, suggesting that PbTupA functions in conjunction with the transcription factor Flo8 to control Flo11 expression. Our data indicates that P. brasiliensis PbGpb1 and PbTupA, both of which have WD/β-propeller structures, bind to PbTpk2 to act as antagonistic molecular switches of cell morphology, with PbTupA and PbGpb1 inducing and repressing filamentous growth, respectively. Our findings define a potential mechanism for controlling the morphological switch that underpins the virulence of dimorphic fungi. PMID:26334875

  19. Analysis of interleukin (IL)-1beta IL-1 receptor antagonist, soluble IL-1 receptor type II and IL-1 accessory protein in HCV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Libra, Massimo; Mangano, Katia; Anzaldi, Massimiliano; Quattrocchi, Cinzia; Donia, Marco; di Marco, Roberto; Signorelli, Santo; Scalia, Guido; Zignego, Anna L; de Re, Valli; Mazzarino, Maria C; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2006-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and may also induce type II mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (MC), a disease characterized by clonal B-cell lymphoproliferations that can evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a cytokine that plays an important role in initiating the cascade of events of immunoinflammatory responses through costimulation of T lymphocytes, B-cell proliferation, induction of adhesion molecules and stimulation of the production of other inflammatory cytokines. The role of IL-1 in immunoinflammatory responses is highlighted by the presence of endogenous regulators (IL-1 receptor antagonist, soluble receptors type 1 and II, human IL-1 accessory protein) that, when secreted into the blood stream may serve as endogenous regulators of IL-1 action. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether abnormalities in the blood levels of IL-1beta IL-1 receptor antagonist, soluble IL-1 receptor type II and human IL-1 accessory protein in HCV+ patients are associated with development of MC and/or NHL. Relative to healthy controls, we observed: i) an increase in the circulating levels of IL-1beta in HCV+ patients simultaneously affected by NHL; ii) increased levels of IL-1 accessory protein in patients singly infected by HCV; iii) increase of IL-1 receptor antagonist in HCV+ patients and in those affected also by NHL with or without MC; iv) a homogeneous increase of sIL-1R type II in all the subgroup of patients. These data indicate that an attempt to increased circulating levels of IL-1 inhibitors occurs at different extent in the course of HCV infection as well as in its progression to NHL and/or MC.

  20. On the detection of functionally coherent groups of protein domains with an extension to protein annotation

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, William A; Chen, Ken; Hou, Tingjun; Wang, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein domains coordinate to perform multifaceted cellular functions, and domain combinations serve as the functional building blocks of the cell. The available methods to identify functional domain combinations are limited in their scope, e.g. to the identification of combinations falling within individual proteins or within specific regions in a translated genome. Further effort is needed to identify groups of domains that span across two or more proteins and are linked by a cooperative function. Such functional domain combinations can be useful for protein annotation. Results Using a new computational method, we have identified 114 groups of domains, referred to as domain assembly units (DASSEM units), in the proteome of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The units participate in many important cellular processes such as transcription regulation, translation initiation, and mRNA splicing. Within the units the domains were found to function in a cooperative manner; and each domain contributed to a different aspect of the unit's overall function. The member domains of DASSEM units were found to be significantly enriched among proteins contained in transcription modules, defined as genes sharing similar expression profiles and presumably similar functions. The observation further confirmed the functional coherence of DASSEM units. The functional linkages of units were found in both functionally characterized and uncharacterized proteins, which enabled the assessment of protein function based on domain composition. Conclusion A new computational method was developed to identify groups of domains that are linked by a common function in the proteome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These groups can either lie within individual proteins or span across different proteins. We propose that the functional linkages among the domains within the DASSEM units can be used as a non-homology based tool to annotate uncharacterized proteins. PMID:17937820

  1. Interaction of Polycomb-group proteins controlling flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chanvivattana, Yindee; Bishopp, Anthony; Schubert, Daniel; Stock, Christine; Moon, Yong-Hwan; Sung, Z Renee; Goodrich, Justin

    2004-11-01

    In Arabidopsis, the EMBYRONIC FLOWER2 (EMF2), VERNALISATION2 (VRN2) and FERTILISATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM2 (FIS2) genes encode related Polycomb-group (Pc-G) proteins. Their homologues in animals act together with other Pc-G proteins as part of a multimeric complex, Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), which functions as a histone methyltransferase. Despite similarities between the fis2 mutant phenotype and those of some other plant Pc-G members, it has remained unclear how the FIS2/EMF2/VRN2 class Pc-G genes interact with the others. We have identified a weak emf2 allele that reveals a novel phenotype with striking similarity to that of severe mutations in another Pc-G gene, CURLY LEAF (CLF), suggesting that the two genes may act in a common pathway. Consistent with this, we demonstrate that EMF2 and CLF interact genetically and that this reflects interaction of their protein products through two conserved motifs, the VEFS domain and the C5 domain. We show that the full function of CLF is masked by partial redundancy with a closely related gene, SWINGER (SWN), so that null clf mutants have a much less severe phenotype than emf2 mutants. Analysis in yeast further indicates a potential for the CLF and SWN proteins to interact with the other VEFS domain proteins VRN2 and FIS2. The functions of individual Pc-G members may therefore be broader than single mutant phenotypes reveal. We suggest that plants have Pc-G protein complexes similar to the Polycomb Repressive Complex2 (PRC2) of animals, but the duplication and subsequent diversification of components has given rise to different complexes with partially discrete functions.

  2. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetic Profile of the Novel Translocator Protein 18 kDa Antagonist ONO-2952 in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Suto, Fumitaka; Wood, Andrew T; Kobayashi, Michiyoshi; Komaba, Junji; Duffy, Kevin; Bruce, Mark

    2015-09-01

    To investigate safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic properties of single and multiple doses of novel translocator protein 18 kDa antagonist ONO-2952 in healthy subjects. Double-blind, placebo-controlled single (SAD) and multiple (MAD) dose escalation studies were conducted. Healthy men and women aged 18 to 55 years inclusive and without history of psychiatric disorders were eligible. Forty-eight volunteers received single doses of ONO-2952 (3, 10, 30, 100, 200, or 400 mg) or placebo under fasted conditions (SAD study), and 36 received ONO-2952 (30, 60, or 100 mg/d) or placebo for 21 consecutive days under fed conditions (MAD study). ONO-2952 10 and 200 mg were administered under fasted and fed conditions in the SAD study to investigate the effect of food on the absorption of ONO-2952. Safety assessments included adverse events, vital signs, 12-lead ECGs, and clinical laboratory evaluations. Plasma and urine pharmacokinetic profiles of ONO-2952 were determined. Across both studies, mean age ranged from 29.8 to 39.8 years, most participants were white, and the proportion of female volunteers was 52%. No treatment or dose-related trends in adverse events were observed. The most frequent adverse events were headache and presyncope (n = 2 each [SAD study]) and constipation and headache (n = 3 each [MAD study]). All headache and constipation episodes were possibly related to the study drug. Plasma ONO-2952 concentrations peaked 2.5 to 3.5 hours (SAD study) and 3.0 to 4.0 hours (MAD study) postdose. ONO-2952 systemic exposure increased less than dose proportionally under fasted conditions. Fed conditions significantly increased exposure compared with fasted conditions: geometric mean ratios of Cmax (90% CIs) were 229% (176-299 [10 mg]) and 778% (623-971 [200 mg]), and AUClast were 159% (131-192 [10 mg]) and 382% (288-506 [200 mg]). In the MAD study, the systemic exposure of ONO-2952 increased in a slightly greater than dose-proportional manner. Geometric mean

  3. Classification epitopes in groups based on their protein family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The humoral immune system response is based on the interaction between antibodies and antigens for the clearance of pathogens and foreign molecules. The interaction between these proteins occurs at specific positions known as antigenic determinants or B-cell epitopes. The experimental identification of epitopes is costly and time consuming. Therefore the use of in silico methods, to help discover new epitopes, is an appealing alternative due the importance of biomedical applications such as vaccine design, disease diagnostic, anti-venoms and immune-therapeutics. However, the performance of predictions is not optimal been around 70% of accuracy. Further research could increase our understanding of the biochemical and structural properties that characterize a B-cell epitope. Results We investigated the possibility of linear epitopes from the same protein family to share common properties. This hypothesis led us to analyze physico-chemical (PCP) and predicted secondary structure (PSS) features of a curated dataset of epitope sequences available in the literature belonging to two different groups of antigens (metalloproteinases and neurotoxins). We discovered statistically significant parameters with data mining techniques which allow us to distinguish neurotoxin from metalloproteinase and these two from random sequences. After a five cross fold validation we found that PCP based models obtained area under the curve values (AUC) and accuracy above 0.9 for regression, decision tree and support vector machine. Conclusions We demonstrated that antigen's family can be inferred from properties within a single group of linear epitopes (metalloproteinases or neurotoxins). Also we discovered the characteristics that represent these two epitope groups including their similarities and differences with random peptides and their respective amino acid sequence. These findings open new perspectives to improve epitope prediction by considering the specific antigen

  4. (−)-Stepholidine is a potent pan-dopamine receptor antagonist of both G protein- and β-arrestin-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Julie A.; Free, R. Benjamin; Miller, Nicole R.; Chun, Lani S.; Doyle, Trevor B.; Moritz, Amy E.; Conroy, Jennie L.; Watts, Val J.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale (−)-Stepholidine is a tetrahydroberberine alkaloid that is known to interact with dopamine receptors and has also been proposed as a novel antipsychotic agent. Its suggested novelty lies in the fact that it has been proposed to have D1-like receptor agonist and D2-like receptor antagonist properties. Thus, it might be effective in treating both positive and negative (cognition) symptoms of schizophrenia. However, its activity on specific dopamine receptor subtypes has not been clarified, especially with respect to its ability to activate D1-like receptors. Objectives We wished to examine the affinity and functional activity of (−)-stepholidine at each of the human dopamine receptor subtypes expressed in a defined cellular environment. Methods D1–D5 dopamine receptors were stably expressed in cell lines and their interactions with (−)-stepholidine were examined using radioligand binding and various functional signaling assays. Radioligand binding assays were also performed using bovine striatal membranes. Results (−)-Stepholidine exhibited high (nM) affinity for D1 and D5 receptors, somewhat lower (two- to four-fold) affinity for D2 and D3 receptors, and low micromolar affinity for D4 receptors. Functionally, (−)-stepholidine was ineffective in activating G protein-mediated signaling of D1-like and D2 receptors and was also ineffective in stimulating β-arrestin recruitment to any dopamine receptor subtype. It did, however, antagonize all of these responses. It also antagonized D1–D2 heteromer-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. Radioligand binding assays of D1-like receptors in brain membranes also indicated that (−)-stepholidine binds to the D1 receptor with antagonist-like properties. Conclusions (−)-Stepholidine is a pan-dopamine receptor antagonist and its in vivo effects are largely mediated through dopamine receptor blockade with potential cross-talk to other receptors or signaling proteins. PMID:25231919

  5. Protective Immunogenicity of Group A Streptococcal M-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Niedermeyer, Shannon E.; Agbaosi, Tina; Hysmith, Nicholas D.; Penfound, Thomas A.; Hohn, Claudia M.; Pullen, Matthew; Bright, Michael I.; Murrell, Daniel S.; Shenep, Lori E.; Courtney, Harry S.

    2015-01-01

    Many previous studies have focused on the surface M proteins of group A streptococci (GAS) as virulence determinants and protective antigens. However, the majority of GAS isolates express M-related protein (Mrp) in addition to M protein, and both have been shown to be required for optimal virulence. In the current study, we evaluated the protective immunogenicity of Mrp to determine its potential as a vaccine component that may broaden the coverage of M protein-based vaccines. Sequence analyses of 33 mrp genes indicated that there are three families of structurally related Mrps (MrpI, MrpII, and MrpIII). N-terminal peptides of Mrps were cloned, expressed, and purified from M type 2 (M2) (MrpI), M4 (MrpII), and M49 (MrpIII) GAS. Rabbit antisera against the Mrps reacted at high titers with the homologous Mrp, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and promoted bactericidal activity against GAS emm types expressing Mrps within the same family. Mice passively immunized with rabbit antisera against MrpII were protected against challenge infections with M28 GAS. Assays for Mrp antibodies in serum samples from 281 pediatric subjects aged 2 to 16 indicated that the Mrp immune response correlated with increasing age of the subjects. Affinity-purified human Mrp antibodies promoted bactericidal activity against a number of GAS representing different emm types that expressed an Mrp within the same family but showed no activity against emm types expressing an Mrp from a different family. Our results indicate that Mrps have semiconserved N-terminal sequences that contain bactericidal epitopes which are immunogenic in humans. These findings may have direct implications for the development of GAS vaccines. PMID:25630406

  6. Tamoxifen resistant breast cancer: coregulators determine the direction of transcription by antagonist-occupied steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, G S; Graham, J D; Jackson, T A; Tung, L; Powell, R L; Horwitz, L D; Horwitz, K B

    1999-01-01

    Pharmacological antagonists of steroid receptor action had been thought to exert their effects by a passive mechanism driven principally by the ability of the antagonist to compete with agonist for the ligand binding site. However, recent analyses of antagonist-occupied receptor function suggest a more complex picture. Antagonists can be subdivided into two groups, type I, or pure antagonists, and type II, or mixed antagonists that can have variable transcriptional activity based upon differential dimerization and DNA binding properties. This led us to propose that receptor antagonism may not simply be a passive competition for the ligand binding site, but may, in some cases, involve active recruitment of corepressor or coactivator proteins to produce a mixed transcriptional phenotype. We used a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that interact specifically with antagonist-occupied receptors. Two proteins have been characterized: L7/SPA, a ribosome-associated protein that is localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, but with no known extranucleolar nuclear function; and hN-CoR, the human homolog of the mouse thyroid receptor corepressor mN-CoR. In in vivo transcription assays we show that L7/SPA enhances the partial agonist activity of type II mixed antagonists, and that N-CoR and the related corepressor, SMRT, suppresses it. The coregulators do not affect agonists or pure antagonists. Moreover, the net agonist activity seen with mixed antagonists is a function of the ratio of coactivator to corepressor. Based upon these results, we proposed that in breast tumors the inappropriate agonist activity seen with therapeutic antagonists such as tamoxifen is responsible for the hormone-resistant state. To confirm this, we are quantitating coactivator/corepressor ratios in breast tumor cells lines and clinical breast cancers. Results should provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the progression of breast cancer to hormone resistance, and may

  7. Increased Uterine NK cell numbers and perforin expression during the implantation phase in IVF Cycles with GnRH Antagonist Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bufang; Wang, Jingwen; Xia, Lan; Zhang, Dan; Wu, Xian; Zhang, Aijun

    2017-01-01

    GnRH antagonist negatively affects endometrial receptivity in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles, however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. To explore its target molecules, we studied endometria in the window phase of fixed GnRH antagonist, low-dose flexible GnRH antagonist, GnRH agonist long protocol, and untreated control groups. There were 384 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the fixed antagonist group with greater than twofold expression change compared with the control group and 197 DEGs between the fixed antagonist and agonist groups, the majority of which were associated with the natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity pathway. We then analysed the PRF1 and FASLG protein levels. The perforin level were significantly higher in both the antagonist groups than in other two groups, and was higher in the fixed antagonist group. Similarly, the uNK cell numbers were higher in the antagonist groups, and the highest uNK cell number occurred in the fixed group (p < 0.05). No significant differences existed in the Fas ligand levels and apoptosis rates among the three treatment groups, but were higher in the treatment groups than the control group. Together, these data indicate that GnRH antagonist may increase the uNK cell numbers and perforin expression, and this effect may be dose-dependent. PMID:28045093

  8. A CD4+ T cell antagonist epitope down-regulates activating signaling proteins, up-regulates inhibitory signaling proteins and abrogates HIV-specific T cell function.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Evan S; Persad, Desmond; Ran, Longsi; Danesh, Ali; Heitman, John W; Deng, Xutao; Cameron, Mark J; Kelvin, David J; Norris, Philip J

    2014-07-05

    CD4+ T cells are critically important in HIV infection, being both the primary cells infected by HIV and likely playing a direct or indirect role in helping control virus replication. Key areas of interest in HIV vaccine research are mechanisms of viral escape from the immune response. Interestingly, in HIV infection it has been shown that peptide sequence variation can reduce CD4+ T cell responses to the virus, and small changes to peptide sequences can transform agonist peptides into antagonist peptides. We describe, at a molecular level, the consequences of antagonism of HIV p24-specific CD4+ T cells. Antagonist peptide exposure in the presence of agonist peptide caused a global suppression of agonist-induced gene expression and signaling molecule phosphorylation. In addition to down-regulation of factors associated with T cell activation, a smaller subset of genes associated with negative regulation of cell activation was up-regulated, including KFL-2, SOCS-1, and SPDEY9P. Finally, antagonist peptide in the absence of agonist peptide also delivered a negative signal to T cells. Small changes in p24-specific peptides can result in T cell antagonism and reductions of both T cell receptor signaling and activation. These changes are at least in part mediated by a dominant negative signal delivered by antagonist peptide, as evidenced by up-regulation of negative regulatory genes in the presence of agonist plus antagonist stimulation. Antagonism can have dramatic effects on CD4+ T cell function and presents a potential obstacle to HIV vaccine development.

  9. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a new bone morphogenetic protein-2 and -4 (BMP-2/4) antagonist identified in pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Sallon, Céline; Callebaut, Isabelle; Boulay, Ida; Fontaine, Joel; Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Henriquet, Corinne; Pugnière, Martine; Cayla, Xavier; Monget, Philippe; Harichaux, Grégoire; Labas, Valérie; Canepa, Sylvie; Taragnat, Catherine

    2017-09-15

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) regulate diverse cellular responses during embryogenesis and in adulthood including cell differentiation, proliferation, and death in various tissues. In the adult pituitary, BMPs participate in the control of hormone secretion and cell proliferation, suggesting a potential endocrine/paracrine role for BMPs, but some of the mechanisms are unclear. Here, using a bioactivity test based on embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2) transfected with a BMP-responsive element, we sought to determine whether pituitary cells secrete BMPs or BMP antagonists. Interestingly, we found that pituitary-conditioned medium contains a factor that inhibits action of BMP-2 and -4. Combining surface plasmon resonance and high-resolution mass spectrometry helped pinpoint this factor as thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1). Surface plasmon resonance and co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that recombinant human TSP-1 can bind BMP-2 and -4 and antagonize their effects on C3H10T1/2 cells. Moreover, TSP-1 inhibited the action of serum BMPs. We also report that the von Willebrand type C domain of TSP-1 is likely responsible for this BMP-2/4-binding activity, an assertion based on sequence similarity that TSP-1 shares with the von Willebrand type C domain of Crossveinless 2 (CV-2), a BMP antagonist and member of the chordin family. In summary, we identified for the first time TSP-1 as a BMP-2/-4 antagonist and presented a structural basis for the physical interaction between TSP-1 and BMP-4. We propose that TSP-1 could regulate bioavailability of BMPs, either produced locally or reaching the pituitary via blood circulation. In conclusion, our findings provide new insights into the involvement of TSP-1 in the BMP-2/-4 mechanisms of action. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Enhanceosome transcription factors preferentially dimerize with high mobility group proteins.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Aleksander; Obara, Paulina; Mathur, Utsav; Tiuryn, Jerzy

    2016-02-04

    The enhanceosome is an enhancer located upstream of the human interferon β gene, bound by transcription factor (TF) complex of extremely rigid structure. Within these rigid constraints, even a slight change of distances between transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) results in loss of functionality of the enhanceosome. We hypothesized that smaller subunits of the enhanceosome may entail TF complex formation in other regulatory regions. In order to verify this hypothesis we systematically searched for dimerization preferences of the TFs that have TFBS in the enhanceosome. For this we utilized our recently developed tool, TACO. We performed this computational experiment in a cell-type-specific manner by utilizing cell-type-specific DNase-seq data for 105 human cell types. We also used 20 TRANSFAC motifs comprising not only the usual TFs constituting the enhanceosome but also the architectural proteins of High Mobility Group I(Y) (HMG I). A similar experiment used 42 DNase-seq data sets for mouse cell types. We found 137 statistically significant dimer predictions in the human genome, and 37 predictions in the mouse genome, that matched the positioning on the enhanceosome with ±2 bp tolerance. To characterize these predicted TF dimers, we performed functional analysis (Gene Ontology enrichment) for sets of genes which were in the neighbourhood of predicted dimer instances. A notable feature of these instances is that (1) most of them are located in introns of genes, (2) they are enriched in regulatory states, and (3) those instances that are located near transcription start sites are enriched for inclusion in computationally predicted enhancers. We also investigated similarity of dimer predictions between human and mouse. It follows from our experiments that, except for homodimer formed by IRF proteins, the rest of the dimers were formed exclusively between one of the transcriptional activators (ATF-2/c-Jun and IRF) and a HMG I protein. NF- κB did not

  11. Post-blast treatment with Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor antagonist reduces brain injury-induced hypoxia and signaling proteins in vestibulomotor-related brain regions.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O; Durand, Cindy D; Gonzalez, Larry P; Tompkins, Paul; Zhang, Yong; Lerner, Megan R; Brackett, Daniel J; Sherry, David M; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2016-10-25

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) diagnoses have increased due to aggressive sports and blast-related injuries, but the cellular mechanisms and pathology underlying mTBI are not completely understood. Previous reports indicate that Nociceptin Orphanin/FQ (N/OFQ), an endogenous neuropeptide, contributes to post-injury ischemia following mechanical brain injury, yet its specific role in cerebral hypoxia, vestibulomotor function and injury marker expression following blast-induced TBI is not known. This study is the first to identify a direct association of N/OFQ and its N/OFQ peptide (NOP) receptor with TBI-induced changes following a single 80psi head blast exposure in male rats. N/OFQ and NOP receptor expression increased in brain tissue and plasma following TBI, concurrent with vestibular dysfunction but preceding hypoxia and appearance of injury markers compared to sham rats. A single post-blast treatment with the NOP receptor antagonist, SB-612111, transiently improved acute vestibulomotor performance. It also prevented increases in markers of TBI-induced hypoxia, pro-apoptotic proteins and injury seen 8-10days post-blast. This study reveals an apparent role for the N/OFQ-NOP receptor system in blast TBI and suggests potential therapeutic utility of NOP receptor antagonists for mTBI.

  12. The down-regulation of IL-6-stimulated fibrinogen steady state mRNA and protein levels by human recombinant IL-1 is not PGE2-dependent: effects of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA).

    PubMed

    Conti, P; Bartle, L; Barbacane, R C; Reale, M; Sipe, J D

    1995-01-26

    Infections, trauma and inflammatory processes induce a host response with increases in a large group of structurally and functionally diverse plasma proteins. Parental administration of foreign proteins also induce an increase in plasma fibrinogen. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a monocyte-derived mediator and has regulatory effects on acute phase protein genes which result in the induction of fibrinogen synthesis in primary hepatocytes, while the addition of interleukin-1 (IL-1) exerts a negative modulating influence on the IL-6-stimulated fibrinogen. In order to understand the mechanisms by which IL-1 inhibits IL-6-stimulated fibrinogen transcription and translation, and since IL-1 is believed to act through PGE2 stimulation, we have studied the influence of PGE2 in IL-6 or IL-1, alone and in combination, on Fg mRNA expression (by Northern blot analysis) and the influence of PGE2, indomethacin, and arachidonic acid on Fg secretion. Moreover, since human recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (hrIL-1ra) is a strong inhibitor of IL-1 induced IL-1 transcription and translation and has an inhibitory effect on PGE2, we have studied the effects of IL-1ra on the down-regulation of IL-6 stimulated fibrinogen by IL-1, using an Fg ELISA method.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Antigenic and immunogenic analysis of group A and group B respiratory syncytial virus G proteins expressed from recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sullender, W M; Britt, W J

    1996-04-01

    The attachment glycoprotein G plays a major role in the antigenic variability of respiratory syncytial (RS) virus. We have expressed from recombinant baculoviruses antigenic group A and group B RS virus G proteins (designated bacAG for the group A and bacBG for the group B virus G protein). The insect cell-produced G proteins migrated more rapidly in SDS-PAGE as compared to HEp-2 cell derived G proteins owing to glycosylation differences. Antigenicity was tested by immunofluorescence; five or five group cross-reactive, five or six group A-specific, and six of six group B-specific MAbs reacted appropriately with bacAG and/or bacBG. In addition, bacAG and bacBG reacted with human polyclonal antibodies to RS virus. Cotton rats were immunized with bacAG, bacBG or a control lysate and challenged intranasally with a group A RS virus. The bacAG-immunized group had a statistically significant reduction in viral replication in the lungs (lung titres as mean log10 p.f.u./g +/- SD, bacAG = 3.1 +/- 1.2; control = 4.8 +/- 0.6, P = 0.013). The bacBG-immunized group showed less reduction in viral titres (bacBG lung titres = 4.1 +/- 0.6, P = 0.13 for bacBG compared to control). Thus, as expected, homologous protein (bacAG) immunization provided more protection against viral replication than immunization with the heterologous protein (bacBG). The G protein of RS virus expressed in insect cells had antigenic and immunogenic features which were similar to that of the G protein expressed in mammalian cells. The baculovirus-expressed G proteins should be useful for the study of immune responses to RS viruses.

  14. Locating overlapping dense subgraphs in gene (protein) association networks and predicting novel protein functional groups among these subgraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Gergely; Derenyi, Imre; Farkas, Illes J.; Vicsek, Tamas

    2006-03-01

    Most tasks in a cell are performed not by individual proteins, but by functional groups of proteins (either physically interacting with each other or associated in other ways). In gene (protein) association networks these groups show up as sets of densely connected nodes. In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, known physically interacting groups of proteins (called protein complexes) strongly overlap: the total number of proteins contained by these complexes by far underestimates the sum of their sizes (2750 vs. 8932). Thus, most functional groups of proteins, both physically interacting and other, are likely to share many of their members with other groups. However, current algorithms searching for dense groups of nodes in networks usually exclude overlaps. With the aim to discover both novel functions of individual proteins and novel protein functional groups we combine in protein association networks (i) a search for overlapping dense subgraphs based on the Clique Percolation Method (CPM) (Palla, G., et.al. Nature 435, 814-818 (2005), http://angel.elte.hu/clustering), which explicitly allows for overlaps among the groups, and (ii) a verification and characterization of the identified groups of nodes (proteins) with the help of standard annotation databases listing known functions.

  15. Antagonistic Regulation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Cell Surface Expression by Protein Kinases WNK4 and Spleen Tyrosine Kinase ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Ana Isabel; Matos, Paulo; Moniz, Sónia; Luz, Simão; Amaral, Margarida D.; Farinha, Carlos M.; Jordan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Members of the WNK (with-no-lysine [K]) subfamily of protein kinases regulate various ion channels involved in sodium, potassium, and chloride homeostasis by either inducing their phosphorylation or regulating the number of channel proteins expressed at the cell surface. Here, we describe findings demonstrating that the cell surface expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is also regulated by WNK4 in mammalian cells. This effect of WNK4 is independent of the presence of kinase and involves interaction with and inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), which phosphorylates Tyr512 in the first nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) of CFTR. Transfection of catalytically active Syk into CFTR-expressing baby hamster kidney cells reduces the cell surface expression of CFTR, whereas that of WNK4 promotes it. This is shown by biotinylation of cell surface proteins, immunofluorescence microscopy, and functional efflux assays. Mutation of Tyr512 to either glutamic acid or phenylalanine is sufficient to alter CFTR surface levels. In human airway epithelial cells, downregulation of endogenous Syk and WNK4 confirms their roles as physiologic regulators of CFTR surface expression. Together, our results show that Tyr512 phosphorylation is a novel signal regulating the prevalence of CFTR at the cell surface and that WNK4 and Syk perform an antagonistic role in this process. PMID:21807898

  16. Generation of Mutant Uukuniemi Viruses Lacking the Nonstructural Protein NSs by Reverse Genetics Indicates that NSs Is a Weak Interferon Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Rezelj, Veronica V.; Överby, Anna K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uukuniemi virus (UUKV) is a tick-borne member of the Phlebovirus genus (family Bunyaviridae) and has been widely used as a safe laboratory model to study aspects of bunyavirus replication. Recently, a number of new tick-borne phleboviruses have been discovered, some of which, like severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus and Heartland virus, are highly pathogenic in humans. UUKV could now serve as a useful comparator to understand the molecular basis for the different pathogenicities of these related viruses. We established a reverse-genetics system to recover UUKV entirely from cDNA clones. We generated two recombinant viruses, one in which the nonstructural protein NSs open reading frame was deleted from the S segment and one in which the NSs gene was replaced with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing convenient visualization of viral infection. We show that the UUKV NSs protein acts as a weak interferon antagonist in human cells but that it is unable to completely counteract the interferon response, which could serve as an explanation for its inability to cause disease in humans. IMPORTANCE Uukuniemi virus (UUKV) is a tick-borne phlebovirus that is apathogenic for humans and has been used as a convenient model to investigate aspects of phlebovirus replication. Recently, new tick-borne phleboviruses have emerged, such as severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus in China and Heartland virus in the United States, that are highly pathogenic, and UUKV will now serve as a comparator to aid in the understanding of the molecular basis for the virulence of these new viruses. To help such investigations, we have developed a reverse-genetics system for UUKV that permits manipulation of the viral genome. We generated viruses lacking the nonstructural protein NSs and show that UUKV NSs is a weak interferon antagonist. In addition, we created a virus that expresses GFP and thus allows convenient monitoring of virus replication. These new tools

  17. An efficient synthesis of a rationally designed 1,5 disubstituted imidazole AT1 Angiotensin II receptor antagonist: reorientation of imidazole pharmacophore groups in losartan reserves high receptor affinity and confirms docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agelis, George; Roumelioti, Panagiota; Resvani, Amalia; Durdagi, Serdar; Androutsou, Maria-Eleni; Kelaidonis, Konstantinos; Vlahakos, Demetrios; Mavromoustakos, Thomas; Matsoukas, John

    2010-09-01

    A new 1,5 disubstituted imidazole AT1 Angiotensin II (AII) receptor antagonist related to losartan with reversion of butyl and hydroxymethyl groups at the 2-, 5-positions of the imidazole ring was synthesized and evaluated for its antagonist activity ( V8). In vitro results indicated that the reorientation of butyl and hydroxymethyl groups on the imidazole template of losartan retained high binding affinity to the AT1 receptor concluding that the spacing of the substituents at the 2,5- positions is of primary importance. The docking studies are confirmed by binding assay results which clearly show a comparable binding score of the designed compound V8 with that of the prototype losartan. An efficient, regioselective and cost effective synthesis renders the new compound as an attractive candidate for advanced toxicological evaluation and a drug against hypertension.

  18. GnRH antagonists may affect endometrial receptivity

    PubMed Central

    Rackow, Beth W.; Kliman, Harvey J.; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2009-01-01

    Study objective HOXA10 is an essential regulator of endometrial receptivity. To determine the effect of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists on endometrial receptivity we assessed endometrial HOXA10 expression in GnRH antagonist, GnRH agonist, and natural cycles. Design Prospective case-control study Setting University academic medical center Patients Nineteen subjects were included: 12 subjects underwent controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) and used either a GnRH antagonist or a GnRH agonist; 7 control subjects underwent natural cycles. Interventions Pipelle endometrial biopsies were obtained 11 days after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration or spontaneous luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in untreated cycles, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess HOXA10 protein expression in endometrial glands and stroma. Main outcome measure(s) Endometrial HOXA10 protein expression Results HOXA10 expression was significantly decreased in endometrial stromal cells in GnRH antagonist treated cycles compared with GnRH agonist treated cycles or natural cycle controls. There was no significant difference in glandular cell HOXA10 expression among the three groups. Conclusions Use of GnRH antagonists may be associated with impaired HOXA10 expression in endometrial stromal cells, and thus may affect endometrial receptivity. PMID:18410932

  19. The binding of the bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin to kidney heparan sulfate: Such binding is not essential for BMP antagonism.

    PubMed

    Tatsinkam, Arnold Junior; Rune, Naomi; Smith, Joy; Norman, Jill T; Mulloy, Barbara; Rider, Christopher C

    2017-02-01

    Gremlin-1, a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist, has essential roles in kidney and limb bone development, and is important in chronic diseases including tissue fibrosis. It also functions as an activating ligand of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and binds strongly to the sulfated polysaccharide, heparin. Here we investigated the extent to which gremlin binds to the related polysaccharide heparan sulfate (HS), which unlike heparin is widely distributed spread within tissues. We determined that both highly sulfated HS and kidney HS are able to partially compete for the binding of heparin to gremlin, whereas low sulfated HS is a poor competitor. In further investigations of the interaction between gremlin and HS, we found that wild-type gremlin is able to bind broadly across the various regions of kidney in an HS-dependent manner, with particularly intense binding to tubular structures in the renal cortex. In a model of chronic kidney disease, fibrotic changes in the kidney result in a loss of gremlin binding sites. Gremlin mutants with reduced affinity for heparin showed negligible binding under the same conditions. These mutants nonetheless remain functional as BMP antagonists on C2C12 myoblastic cells transfected with a Smad 1 reporter gene construct. Overall our findings indicate that on secretion, gremlin will bind to HS structures on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix, thus providing for a localised reservoir which can modulate BMP activity in a temporospatially restricted manner. Although binding of heparin/HS to gremlin has been shown elsewhere to be necessary for gremlin activation of VEGFR2, this does not appear to be essential for BMP antagonism by gremlin. Thus these sulfated polysaccharides differentially regulate the activities of gremlin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Novel Nuclear Trafficking Module Regulates the Nucleocytoplasmic Localization of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist, P Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Oksayan, Sibil; Wiltzer, Linda; Rowe, Caitlin L.; Blondel, Danielle; Jans, David A.; Moseley, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    Regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins is central to cellular function and dysfunction during processes such as viral infection. Active protein trafficking into and out of the nucleus is dependent on the presence within cargo proteins of intrinsic specific modular signals for nuclear import (nuclear localization signals, NLSs) and export (nuclear export signals, NESs). Rabies virus (RabV) phospho (P) protein, which is largely responsible for antagonising the host anti-viral response, is expressed as five isoforms (P1–P5). The subcellular trafficking of these isoforms is thought to depend on a balance between the activities of a dominant N-terminal NES (N-NES) and a distinct C-terminal NLS (C-NLS). Specifically, the N-NES-containing isoforms P1 and P2 are cytoplasmic, whereas the shorter P3–P5 isoforms, which lack the N-NES, are believed to be nuclear through the activity of the C-NLS. Here, we show for the first time that RabV P contains an additional strong NLS in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), which, intriguingly, overlaps with the N-NES. This arrangement represents a novel nuclear trafficking module where the N-NLS is inactive in P1 but becomes activated in P3, concomitant with truncation of the N-NES, to become the principal targeting signal conferring nuclear accumulation. Understanding this unique switch arrangement of overlapping, co-regulated NES/NLS sequences is vital to delineating the critical role of RabV P protein in viral infection. PMID:22700958

  1. Discovery of pyrazine carboxamide CB1 antagonists: the introduction of a hydroxyl group improves the pharmaceutical properties and in vivo efficacy of the series.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Bruce A; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Yeheng; Pendri, Annapurna; Gerritz, Samuel W; Sun, Chongqing; Carlson, Kenneth E; Kang, Liya; Baska, Rose A; Yang, Yifan; Huang, Qi; Burford, Neil T; Cullen, Mary Jane; Johnghar, Susan; Behnia, Kamelia; Pelleymounter, Mary Ann; Washburn, William N; Ewing, William R

    2007-07-15

    Structure-activity relationships for a series of pyrazine carboxamide CB1 antagonists are reported. Pharmaceutical properties of the series are improved via inclusion of hydroxyl-containing sidechains. This structural modification sufficiently improved ADME properties of an orally inactive series such that food intake reduction was achieved in rat feeding models. Compound 35 elicits a 46% reduction in food intake in ad libidum fed rats 4-h post-dose.

  2. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and their antagonists regulate spontaneous and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Conor J; Sheridan, Clare; Cullen, Sean P; Tynan, Graham A; Logue, Susan E; Afonina, Inna S; Vucic, Domagoj; Lavelle, Ed C; Martin, Seamus J

    2013-02-15

    Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) play a major role in determining whether cells undergo apoptosis in response to TNF as well as other stimuli. However, TNF is also highly proinflammatory through its ability to trigger the secretion of multiple inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which is arguably the most important role of TNF in vivo. Indeed, deregulated production of TNF-induced cytokines is a major driver of inflammation in several autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we show that IAPs are required for the production of multiple TNF-induced proinflammatory mediators. Ablation or antagonism of IAPs potently suppressed TNF- or RIPK1-induced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. Surprisingly, IAP antagonism also led to spontaneous production of chemokines, particularly RANTES, in vitro and in vivo. Thus, IAPs play a major role in influencing the production of multiple inflammatory mediators, arguing that these proteins are important regulators of inflammation in addition to apoptosis. Furthermore, small molecule IAP antagonists can modulate spontaneous as well as TNF-induced inflammatory responses, which may have implications for use of these agents in therapeutic settings.

  3. Agonistic and antagonistic effects of C5a-chimera bearing S19 ribosomal protein tail portion on the C5a receptor of monocytes and neutrophils, respectively.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yuuichiro; Tokita, Kazutaka; Ota, Yoshihiko; Li, Ying; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Nishino, Norikazu; Takagi, Katsumasa; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    C-terminus of S19 ribosomal protein (RP S19) endows the cross-linked homodimer with a dual effect on the C5a receptor in leucocyte chemoattraction; agonistic effect on the monocyte receptor, and antagonistic effect on the neutrophil receptor. C5a exhibits the uniform agonistic effect on this receptor of both cell types. We have currently prepared a recombinant C5a-chimeric protein bearing the C-terminus of RP S19 (C5a/RP S19 chimera) to be used as a substitute of the RP S19 dimer. In vitro, this chimera similarly inhibited the intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization of neutrophils induced by C5a to the RP S19 dimer did. In the guinea pig skin, 10(-7) M C5a/RP S19 chimera exhibited an inhibitory capacity to the neutrophil infiltration induced by 3 x 10(-7) M C5a without enhancing monocyte infiltration. In reverse passive Arthus reaction, the neutrophil infiltration associated with plasma extravasation was significantly reduced by the simultaneous administration of 10(-7) M C5a/RP S19 chimera with antibodies. The C5a/RP S19 chimera is a useful tool not only to examine the molecular mechanism that underlies the functional difference of the C5a receptor between monocytes and neutrophils, but also to prevent C5a-mediated hyper-response of neutrophils in acute inflammation.

  4. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies on a Macrocyclic Agouti-Related Protein (AGRP) Scaffold Reveal Agouti Signaling Protein (ASP) Residue Substitutions Maintain Melanocortin-4 Receptor Antagonist Potency and Result in Inverse Agonist Pharmacology at the Melanocortin-5 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Mark D; Freeman, Katie T; Schnell, Sathya M; Fleming, Katlyn A; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2017-10-04

    The melanocortin system consists of five reported receptors, agonists from the proopiomelanocortin gene transcript, and two antagonists, agouti-signaling protein (ASP) and agouti-related protein (AGRP). For both ASP and AGRP, the hypothesized Arg-Phe-Phe pharmacophores are on exposed β-hairpin loops. In this study, the Asn and Ala positions of a reported AGRP macrocyclic scaffold (c[Pro-Arg-Phe-Phe-Asn-Ala-Phe-DPro]) were explored with 14-compound and 8-compound libraries, respectively, to generate more potent, selective melanocortin receptor antagonists. Substituting diaminopropionic acid (Dap), DDap, and His at the Asn position yielded potent MC4R ligands, while replacing Ala with Ser maintained MC4R potency. Since these substitutions correlate to ASP loop residues, an additional Phe to Ala substitution was synthesized and observed to maintain MC4R potency. Seventeen compounds also possessed inverse agonist activity at the MC5R, the first report of this pharmacology. These findings are useful in developing molecular probes to study negative energy balance conditions and unidentified functions of the MC5R.

  5. A CRM domain protein functions dually in group I and group II intron splicing in land plant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yukari; Barkan, Alice

    2007-12-01

    The CRM domain is a recently recognized RNA binding domain found in three group II intron splicing factors in chloroplasts, in a bacterial protein that associates with ribosome precursors, and in a family of uncharacterized proteins in plants. To elucidate the functional repertoire of proteins with CRM domains, we studied CFM2 (for CRM Family Member 2), which harbors four CRM domains. RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that CFM2 in maize (Zea mays) chloroplasts is associated with the group I intron in pre-trnL-UAA and group II introns in the ndhA and ycf3 pre-mRNAs. T-DNA insertions in the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog condition a defective-seed phenotype (strong allele) or chlorophyll-deficient seedlings with impaired splicing of the trnL group I intron and the ndhA, ycf3-int1, and clpP-int2 group II introns (weak alleles). CFM2 and two previously described CRM proteins are bound simultaneously to the ndhA and ycf3-int1 introns and act in a nonredundant fashion to promote their splicing. With these findings, CRM domain proteins are implicated in the activities of three classes of catalytic RNA: group I introns, group II introns, and 23S rRNA.

  6. Inhibition of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Reverses Autistic-Like Phenotypes Caused by Deficiency of the Translation Repressor eIF4E Binding Protein 2.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Valles, Argel; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Khoutorsky, Arkady; Gkogkas, Christos; Nader, Karim; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-08-05

    Exacerbated mRNA translation during brain development has been linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Deletion of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 2 gene (Eif4ebp2), encoding the suppressor of mRNA translation initiation 4E-BP2, leads to an imbalance in excitatory-to-inhibitory neurotransmission and ASD-like behaviors. Inhibition of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) mGluR1 and mGluR5 reverses the autistic phenotypes in several ASD mouse models. Importantly, these receptors control synaptic physiology via activation of mRNA translation. We investigated the potential reversal of autistic-like phenotypes in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice by using antagonists of mGluR1 (JNJ16259685) or mGluR5 (fenobam). Augmented hippocampal mGluR-induced long-term depression (LTD; or chemically induced mGluR-LTD) in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice was rescued by mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. While rescue by mGluR5 inhibition occurs through the blockade of a protein synthesis-dependent component of LTD, normalization by mGluR1 antagonists requires the activation of protein synthesis. Synaptically induced LTD was deficient in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice, and this deficit was not rescued by group I mGluR antagonists. Furthermore, a single dose of mGluR1 (0.3 mg/kg) or mGluR5 (3 mg/kg) antagonists in vivo reversed the deficits in social interaction and repetitive behaviors (marble burying) in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice serve as a relevant model to test potential therapies for ASD symptoms. In addition, we provide substantive evidence that the inhibition of mGluR1/mGluR5 is an effective treatment for physiological and behavioral alterations caused by exacerbated mRNA translation initiation. Exacerbated mRNA translation during brain development is associated with several autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We recently demonstrated that the deletion of a negative regulator of mRNA translation initiation, the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E

  7. PGCA: An algorithm to link protein groups created from MS/MS data

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Mayu; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Smith, Derek; McManus, Bruce; McMaster, W. Robert; Ng, Raymond T.; Cohen Freue, Gabriela V.

    2017-01-01

    The quantitation of proteins using shotgun proteomics has gained popularity in the last decades, simplifying sample handling procedures, removing extensive protein separation steps and achieving a relatively high throughput readout. The process starts with the digestion of the protein mixture into peptides, which are then separated by liquid chromatography and sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). At the end of the workflow, recovering the identity of the proteins originally present in the sample is often a difficult and ambiguous process, because more than one protein identifier may match a set of peptides identified from the MS/MS spectra. To address this identification problem, many MS/MS data processing software tools combine all plausible protein identifiers matching a common set of peptides into a protein group. However, this solution introduces new challenges in studies with multiple experimental runs, which can be characterized by three main factors: i) protein groups’ identifiers are local, i.e., they vary run to run, ii) the composition of each group may change across runs, and iii) the supporting evidence of proteins within each group may also change across runs. Since in general there is no conclusive evidence about the absence of proteins in the groups, protein groups need to be linked across different runs in subsequent statistical analyses. We propose an algorithm, called Protein Group Code Algorithm (PGCA), to link groups from multiple experimental runs by forming global protein groups from connected local groups. The algorithm is computationally inexpensive and enables the connection and analysis of lists of protein groups across runs needed in biomarkers studies. We illustrate the identification problem and the stability of the PGCA mapping using 65 iTRAQ experimental runs. Further, we use two biomarker studies to show how PGCA enables the discovery of relevant candidate protein group markers with similar but non-identical compositions

  8. Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) is a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 signaling antagonist in controlling mouse lung development

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yan; Dong, Yingying; Yu, Mingyan; Zhang, Long; Yan, Xiaohua; Sun, Jingxia; Qiao, Long; Geng, Huixia; Nakajima, Masahiro; Furuichi, Tatsuya; Ikegawa, Shiro; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Ye-Guang; Jiang, Dianhua; Ning, Wen

    2011-01-01

    Lung morphogenesis is a well orchestrated, tightly regulated process through several molecular pathways, including TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. Alteration of these signaling pathways leads to lung malformation. We investigated the role of Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), a secreted follistatin-module–containing glycoprotein, in lung development. Deletion of Fstl1 in mice led to postnatal lethality as a result of respiratory failure. Analysis of the mutant phenotype showed that Fstl1 is essential for tracheal cartilage formation and alveolar maturation. Deletion of the Fstl1 gene resulted in malformed tracheal rings manifested as discontinued rings and reduced ring number. Fstl1-deficient mice displayed septal hypercellularity and end-expiratory atelectasis, which were associated with impaired differentiation of distal alveolar epithelial cells and insufficient production of mature surfactant proteins. Mechanistically, Fstl1 interacted directly with BMP4, negatively regulated BMP4/Smad1/5/8 signaling, and inhibited BMP4-induced surfactant gene expression. Reducing BMP signaling activity by Noggin rescued pulmonary atelectasis of Fstl1-deficient mice. Therefore, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence to demonstrate that Fstl1 modulates lung development and alveolar maturation, in part, through BMP4 signaling. PMID:21482757

  9. Antagonistic interactions between the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and Tor signaling pathways modulate cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Vidhya; Herman, Paul K

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells integrate information from multiple sources to respond appropriately to changes in the environment. Here, we examined the relationship between two signaling pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are essential for the coordination of cell growth with nutrient availability. These pathways involve the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and Tor proteins, respectively. Although these pathways control a similar set of processes important for growth, it was not clear how their activities were integrated in vivo. The experiments here examined this coordination and, in particular, tested whether the PKA pathway was primarily a downstream effector of the TORC1 signaling complex. Using a number of reporters for the PKA pathway, we found that the inhibition of TORC1 did not result in diminished PKA signaling activity. To the contrary, decreased TORC1 signaling was generally associated with elevated levels of PKA activity. Similarly, TORC1 activity appeared to increase in response to lower levels of PKA signaling. Consistent with these observations, we found that diminished PKA signaling partially suppressed the growth defects associated with decreased TORC1 activity. In all, these data suggested that the PKA and TORC1 pathways were functioning in parallel to promote cell growth and that each pathway might restrain, either directly or indirectly, the activity of the other. The potential significance of this antagonism for the regulation of cell growth and overall fitness is discussed.

  10. High Mobility Group A proteins in esophageal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Palumbo Júnior, Antonio; Da Costa, Nathalia Meireles; Esposito, Francesco; Fusco, Alfredo; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro

    2016-09-16

    We have recently shown that HMGA2 is overexpressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its detection allows to discriminate between cancer and normal surrounding tissue proposing HMGA2 as a novel diagnostic marker. Interestingly, esophageal adenocarcinoma shows an opposite behavior with the overexpression of HMGA1 but not HMGA2. Moreover, we show that the suppression of HMGA2 in 2 ESCC cell lines reduces the malignant phenotype. Then, this paper highlights a differential induction of the HMGA proteins, depending on the cancer histological type, and reinforces the perspective of an innovative esophageal cancer therapy based on the suppression of the HMGA protein function and/or expression.

  11. Role of bacterial infection in the epigenetic regulation of Wnt antagonist WIF1 by PRC2 protein EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Badal C.; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ahmed, Ishfaq; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.; Hester, Christina; Greiner, K. Allen; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Anant, Shrikant; Umar, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancer of Zeste Homolog-2 (EZH2) represses gene transcription through histone H3 lysine-27-trimethylation (H3K27me3). Citrobacter rodentium (CR) promotes crypt hyperplasia and tumorigenesis by aberrantly regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We aimed at investigating EZH2’s role in epigenetically regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling following bacterial infection. NIH:Swiss outbred and ApcMin/+ mice were infected with CR (108cfu); BLT1−/−ApcMin/+ mice, AOM/DSS-treated mice and de-identified human adenocarcinoma samples were models of colon cancer. Following infection with wild type but not mutant CR, elevated EZH2 levels in the crypt at days-6 and 12 (peak hyperplasia) coincided with increases in H3K27me3 and β-catenin levels, respectively. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed EZH2 and H3K27me3’s occupancy on WIF1 (Wnt Inhibitory Factor-1) promoter resulting in reduced WIF1 mRNA and protein expression. Following EZH2 knockdown via siRNA or EZH2-inhibitor DZNep either alone or in combination with HDAC inhibitor SAHA, WIF1 promoter activity increased significantly while overexpression of EZH2 attenuated WIF1-reporter activity. Ectopic overexpression of SET domain mutant (F681Y) almost completely rescued WIF1 reporter activity and partially rescued WIF1 protein levels while H3K27me3 levels were significantly attenuated suggesting that an intact methyltransferases activity is required for EZH2-dependent effects. Interestingly, while β-catenin levels were lower in EZH2-knocked-down cells, F681Y mutants exhibited only partial reduction in β-catenin levels. Besides EZH2, increases in miR-203 expression in the crypts at days-6 and 12 post-infection correlated with reduced levels of its target WIF1; overexpression of miR-203 in primary colonocytes decreased WIF1 mRNA and protein levels. Elevated levels of EZH2 and β-catenin with concomitant decrease in WIF1 expression in the polyps of CR-infected ApcMin/+ mice paralleled changes recorded in BLT1

  12. Succination of Thiol Groups in Adipose Tissue Proteins in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Frizzell, Norma; Rajesh, Mathur; Jepson, Matthew J.; Nagai, Ryoji; Carson, James A.; Thorpe, Suzanne R.; Baynes, John W.

    2009-01-01

    S-(2-Succinyl)cysteine (2SC) is formed by reaction of the Krebs cycle intermediate fumarate with cysteine residues in protein, a process termed succination of protein. Both fumarate and succination of proteins are increased in adipocytes cultured in high glucose medium (Nagai, R., Brock, J. W., Blatnik, M., Baatz, J. E., Bethard, J., Walla, M. D., Thorpe, S. R., Baynes, J. W., and Frizzell, N. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 34219–34228). We show here that succination of protein is also increased in epididymal, mesenteric, and subcutaneous adipose tissue of diabetic (db/db) mice and that adiponectin is a major target for succination in both adipocytes and adipose tissue. Cys-39, which is involved in cross-linking of adiponectin monomers to form trimers, was identified as a key site of succination of adiponectin in adipocytes. 2SC was detected on two of seven monomeric forms of adiponectin immunoprecipitated from adipocytes and epididymal adipose tissue. Based on densitometry, 2SC-adiponectin accounted for ∼7 and 8% of total intracellular adiponectin in cells and tissue, respectively. 2SC was found only in the intracellular, monomeric forms of adiponectin and was not detectable in polymeric forms of adiponectin in cell culture medium or plasma. We conclude that succination of adiponectin blocks its incorporation into trimeric and higher molecular weight, secreted forms of adiponectin. We propose that succination of proteins is a biomarker of mitochondrial stress and accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates in adipose tissue in diabetes and that succination of adiponectin may contribute to the decrease in plasma adiponectin in diabetes. PMID:19592500

  13. Differential Control of BST2 Restriction and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Antiviral Response by Antagonists Encoded by HIV-1 Group M and O Strains.

    PubMed

    Bego, Mariana G; Cong, Lijun; Mack, Katharina; Kirchhoff, Frank; Cohen, Éric A

    2016-11-15

    BST2/tetherin is a type I interferon (IFN-I)-stimulated host factor that restricts the release of HIV-1 by entrapping budding virions at the cell surface. This membrane-associated protein can also engage and activate the plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC)-specific immunoglobulin-like transcript 7 (ILT7) inhibitory receptor to downregulate the IFN-I response by pDCs. Pandemic HIV-1 group M uses Vpu (M-Vpu) to counteract the two BST2 isoforms (long and short) that are expressed in human cells. M-Vpu efficiently downregulates surface long BST2, while it displaces short BST2 molecules away from viral assembly sites. We recently found that this attribute is used by M-Vpu to activate the BST2/ILT7-dependent negative-feedback pathway and to suppress pDC IFN-I responses during sensing of infected cells. However, whether this property is conserved in endemic HIV-1 group O, which has evolved Nef (O-Nef) to counteract specifically the long BST2 isoform, remains unknown. In the present study, we validated that O-Nefs have the capacity to downregulate surface BST2 and enhance HIV-1 particle release although less efficiently than M-Vpu. In contrast to M-Vpu, O-Nef did not efficiently enhance viral spread in T cell culture or displace short BST2 from viral assembly sites to prevent its occlusion by tethered HIV-1 particles. Consequently, O-Nef impairs the ability of BST2 to activate negative ILT7 signaling to suppress the IFN-I response by pDC-containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during sensing of infected cells. These distinctive features of BST2 counteraction by O-Nefs may in part explain the limited spread of HIV-1 group O in the human population.

  14. Associations of erythrocyte membrane fatty acids with the concentrations of C-reactive protein, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist and adiponectin in 1373 men.

    PubMed

    Takkunen, M J; de Mello, V D F; Schwab, U S; Ågren, J J; Kuusisto, J; Uusitupa, M I J

    2014-10-01

    Dietary and endogenous fatty acids could play a role in low-grade inflammation. In this cross-sectional study the proportions of erythrocyte membrane fatty acids (EMFA) and the concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and adiponectin were measured and their confounder-adjusted associations examined in 1373 randomly selected Finnish men aged 45-70 years participating in the population based Metsim study in Eastern Finland. The sum of n-6 EMFAs, without linoleic acid (LA), was positively associated with concentrations of CRP and IL-1Ra (r partial=0.139 and r partial=0.115, P<0.001). These associations were especially strong among lean men (waist circumference <94 cm; r partial=0.156 and r partial=0.189, P<0.001). Total n-3 EMFAs correlated inversely with concentrations of CRP (r partial=-0.098, P<0.001). Palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7) correlated positively with CRP (r partial=0.096, P<0.001). Cis-vaccenic acid (18:1n-7) was associated with high concentrations of adiponectin (r partial=0.139, P<0.001). In conclusion, n-6 EMFAs, except for LA, correlated positively with the inflammatory markers. Palmitoleic acid was associated with CRP, whereas, interestingly, its elongation product, cis-vaccenic acid, associated with anti-inflammatory adiponectin.

  15. The F-box-containing protein UFO and AGAMOUS participate in antagonistic pathways governing early petal development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Tim; Roe, Judith L; Sessions, R Allen; Inouye, Carla; Serikawa, Kyle; Feldmann, Kenneth A; Weigel, Detlef; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2003-07-08

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for multiple processes in the developing Arabidopsis flower, including the proper patterning and identity of both petals and stamens. The gene encodes an F-box-containing protein, UFO, which interacts physically and genetically with the Skp1 homolog, ASK1. In this report, we describe four ufo alleles characterized by the absence of petals, which uncover another role for UFO in promoting second whorl development. This UFO-dependent pathway is required regardless of the second whorl organ to be formed, arguing that it affects a basic process acting in parallel with those establishing organ identity. However, the pathway is dispensable in the absence of AGAMOUS (AG), a known inhibitor of petal development. In situ hybridization results argue that AG is not transcribed in the petal region, suggesting that it acts non-cell-autonomously to inhibit second whorl development in ufo mutants. These results are combined into a genetic model explaining early second whorl initiation/proliferation, in which UFO functions to inhibit an AG-dependent activity.

  16. Smad proteins act in combination with synergistic and antagonistic regulators to target Dpp responses to the Drosophila mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaolei; Yin, Zhizhang; Hudson, John B.; Ferguson, Edwin L.; Frasch, Manfred

    1998-01-01

    Dorsal mesoderm induction in arthropods and ventral mesoderm induction in vertebrates are closely related processes that involve signals of the BMP family. In Drosophila, induction of visceral mesoderm, dorsal muscles, and the heart by Dpp is, at least in part, effected through the transcriptional activation and function of the homeobox gene tinman in dorsal mesodermal cells during early embryogenesis. Here we present a functional dissection of a tinman enhancer that mediates the Dpp response. We provide evidence that mesoderm-specific induction of tinman requires the binding of both activators and repressors. Screens for binding factors yielded Tinman itself and the Smad4 homolog Medea. We show that the binding and synergistic activities of Smad and Tinman proteins are critical for mesodermal tinman induction, whereas repressor binding sites prevent induction in the dorsal ectoderm and amnioserosa. Thus, integration of positive and negative regulators on enhancers of target genes appears to be an important mechanism in tissue-specific induction by TGF-β molecules. PMID:9694800

  17. The F-box-containing protein UFO and AGAMOUS participate in antagonistic pathways governing early petal development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Durfee, Tim; Roe, Judith L.; Sessions, R. Allen; Inouye, Carla; Serikawa, Kyle; Feldmann, Kenneth A.; Weigel, Detlef; Zambryski, Patricia C.

    2003-01-01

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for multiple processes in the developing Arabidopsis flower, including the proper patterning and identity of both petals and stamens. The gene encodes an F-box-containing protein, UFO, which interacts physically and genetically with the Skp1 homolog, ASK1. In this report, we describe four ufo alleles characterized by the absence of petals, which uncover another role for UFO in promoting second whorl development. This UFO-dependent pathway is required regardless of the second whorl organ to be formed, arguing that it affects a basic process acting in parallel with those establishing organ identity. However, the pathway is dispensable in the absence of AGAMOUS (AG), a known inhibitor of petal development. In situ hybridization results argue that AG is not transcribed in the petal region, suggesting that it acts non-cell-autonomously to inhibit second whorl development in ufo mutants. These results are combined into a genetic model explaining early second whorl initiation/proliferation, in which UFO functions to inhibit an AG-dependent activity. PMID:12826617

  18. Cross-interactions of two p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors and two cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists with the CCK1 receptor and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Morel, Caroline; Ibarz, Géraldine; Oiry, Catherine; Carnazzi, Eric; Bergé, Gilbert; Gagne, Didier; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Martinez, Jean

    2005-06-03

    Although SB202190 and SB203580 are described as specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, several reports have indicated that other enzymes are also sensitive to SB203580. Using a pharmacological approach, we report for the first time that compounds SB202190 and SB203580 were able to directly and selectively interact with a G-protein-coupled receptor, namely the cholecystokinin receptor subtype CCK1, but not with the CCK2 receptor. We demonstrated that these compounds were non-competitive antagonists of the CCK1 receptor at concentrations typically used to inhibit protein kinases. By chimeric construction of the CCK2 receptor, we determined the involvement of two CCK1 receptor intracellular loops in the binding of SB202190 and SB203580. We also showed that two CCK antagonists, L364,718 and L365,260, were able to regulate p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Using a reporter gene strategy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrated that both CCK antagonists inhibited selectively the enzymatic activity of p38 MAP kinase. Kinase assays suggested that this inhibition resulted from a direct interaction with both CCK antagonists. Molecular modeling simulations suggested that this interaction occurs in the ATP binding pocket of p38 MAP kinase. These results suggest that SB202190 and SB203580 bind to the CCK1 receptor and, as such, these compounds should be used with caution in models that express this receptor. We also found that L364,718 and L365,260, two CCK receptor antagonists, directly interacted with p38 MAP kinase and inhibited its activity. These findings suggest that the CCK1 receptor shares structural analogies with the p38 MAP kinase ATP binding site. They open the way to potential design of either a new family of MAP kinase inhibitors from CCK1 receptor ligand structures or new CCK1 receptor ligands based on p38 MAP kinase inhibitor structures.

  19. Soluble interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis by a different mode of action from that of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Smeets, R L; Joosten, L A B; Arntz, O J; Bennink, M B; Takahashi, N; Carlsen, H; Martin, M U; van den Berg, W B; van de Loo, F A J

    2005-07-01

    To discern the mode of interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibition of soluble IL-1 receptor accessory protein (sIL-1RAcP) by comparison with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in arthritis. Adenoviral vectors encoding either sIL-1RAcP or IL-1Ra were administered systemically before onset of collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice. Anti-bovine type II collagen IgG and IL-6 were quantified in serum. Proliferative response of splenic T cells was determined in the presence of sIL-1RAcP or IL-1Ra. The effect on IL-1 inhibition of recombinant sIL-1RAcP and IL-1Ra was further examined in vitro, using NF-kappaB luciferase reporter cell lines. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the relative messenger RNA expression of the IL-1 receptors. Adenoviral overexpression of both sIL-1RAcP and IL-1Ra resulted in amelioration of the collagen-induced arthritis. Both IL-1 antagonists reduced the circulating levels of antigen-specific IgG2a antibodies, but only IL-1Ra was able to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation. By using purified lymphocyte populations derived from NF-kappaB reporter mice, we showed that sIL-1RAcP inhibits IL-1-induced NF-kappaB activity in B cells but not T cells, whereas IL-1Ra inhibited IL-1 on both cell types. A study in a panel of NF-kappaB luciferase reporter cells showed that the sIL-1RAcP inhibits IL-1 signaling on cells expressing either low levels of membrane IL-1RAcP or high levels of IL-1RII. We show that the sIL-1RAcP ameliorated experimental arthritis without affecting T cell immunity, in contrast to IL-1Ra. Our results provide data in support of receptor competition by sIL-1RAcP as an explanation for the different mode of IL-1 antagonism in comparison with IL-1Ra.

  20. CART Peptide Stimulation of G Protein-Mediated Signaling in Differentiated PC12 Cells: Identification of PACAP 6-38 as a CART Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yiming; Hall, Randy A.; Kuhar, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    CART peptides are peptide neurotransmitters and hormones that are involved in many different physiological responses. While much is known about the peptides regarding their structure, processing and gene regulation, less is known about their postsynaptic actions and receptors. Using 125I-CART 61-102 as a ligand and unlabeled CART 61-102 or CART 55-102 as displacers, high-affinity specific binding was detected in PC12 cells. Differentiation of the PC12 cells increased specific binding several-fold. The increase in specific binding found after differentiation was inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, suggesting that the increase in specific binding was dependent on RNA and protein synthesis. CART 1-27, a peptide that has never been shown to elicit responses, did not displace 125I-CART61-102 binding, nor did more than 20 other peptides that were examined. Surprisingly, however, PACAP 1-38 and PACAP 6-38 were found to be low-affinity inhibitors of CART binding. CART treatment increased binding of 35S-GTPgamma-S to PC12 cell membranes. Moreover, CART treatment of intact PC12 cells elicited robust increases in phospho-ERK in a manner that was increased with differentiation, blocked by pertussis toxin and antagonized by PACAP 6-38. These findings extend previous research and suggest that the CART binding site in PC12 cells reflects a G protein-coupled receptor linked with Gi/o, and also demonstrate that PACAP 6-38 may be useful as a CART receptor antagonist. PMID:21855138

  1. Targeting the apoptotic machinery in pancreatic cancers using small-molecule antagonists of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    PubMed Central

    Karikari, Collins A.; Roy, Indrajit; Tryggestad, Eric; Feldmann, Georg; Pinilla, Clemencia; Welsh, Kate; Reed, John C.; Armour, Elwood P.; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph; Rakheja, Dinesh; Maitra, Anirban

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of many solid tumors, including pancreatic cancers, and may be the underlying basis for the suboptimal response to chemo-radiation therapies. Overexpression of a family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) is commonly observed in pancreatic malignancies. We determined the therapeutic efficacy of recently described small-molecule antagonists of the X-linked IAP (XIAP) in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. Primary pancreatic cancers were assessed for XIAP expression by immunohistochemistry, using a pancreatic cancer tissue microarray. XIAP small-molecule antagonists (“XAntag”; compounds 1396-11 and 1396-12) and the related compound 1396-28 were tested in vitro in a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc1, Capan1, and BxPC3) and in vivo in s.c. xenograft models for their ability to induce apoptosis and impede neoplastic growth. In addition, pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with XAntags in conjunction with either tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or with radiation to determine potential synergy for such dual targeting of the apoptotic machinery. XIAP was overexpressed in 14 of 18 (77%) of primary pancreatic cancers. The XAntags 1396-11 and 1396-12, but not the inactive isomer 1396-28, induced profound apoptosis in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines tested in vitro, with a IC50 in the range of 2 to 5 μmol/L. Mechanistic specificity of the XAntags for the baculoviral IAP repeat-2 domain of XIAP was shown by preferential activation of downstream “effector” caspases (caspase-3 and caspase-7) versus the upstream “initiator” caspase-9. S.c. BxPC3 xenograft growth in athymic mice was significantly inhibited by monotherapy with XAntags; treated xenografts showed marked apoptosis and increased cleavage of caspase-3. Notably, striking synergy was demonstrable when XAntags were combined with either TRAIL or radiation therapy, as measured by growth inhibition in

  2. Activation of DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator), a calcium-binding protein, reduces L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in mice.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-DeDiego, Irene; Mellstrom, Britt; Vallejo, Mario; Naranjo, Jose R; Moratalla, Rosario

    2015-01-15

    Previous studies have implicated the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A pathway as well as FosB and dynorphin-B expression mediated by dopamine D1 receptor stimulation in the development of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia. The magnitude of these molecular changes correlates with the intensity of dyskinesias. The calcium-binding protein downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM) binds to regulatory element sites called DRE in the DNA and represses transcription of target genes such as c-fos, fos-related antigen-2 (fra-2), and prodynorphin. This repression is released by calcium and protein kinase A activation. Dominant-active DREAM transgenic mice (daDREAM) and DREAM knockout mice (DREAM(-/-)) were used to define the involvement of DREAM in dyskinesias. Dyskinesias were evaluated twice a week in mice with 6-hydroxydopamine lesions during long-term L-DOPA (25 mg/kg) treatment. The impact of DREAM on L-DOPA efficacy was evaluated using the rotarod and the cylinder test after the establishment of dyskinesia and the molecular changes by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. In daDREAM mice, L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia was decreased throughout the entire treatment. In correlation with these behavioral results, daDREAM mice showed a decrease in FosB, phosphoacetylated histone H3, dynorphin-B, and phosphorylated glutamate receptor subunit, type 1 expression. Conversely, genetic inactivation of DREAM potentiated the intensity of dyskinesia, and DREAM(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in expression of molecular markers associated with dyskinesias. The DREAM modifications did not affect the kinetic profile or antiparkinsonian efficacy of L-DOPA therapy. The protein DREAM decreases development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in mice and reduces L-DOPA-induced expression of FosB, phosphoacetylated histone H3, and dynorphin-B in the striatum. These data suggest that therapeutic approaches that activate DREAM may be useful to

  3. Cholinergic antagonists in a solitary wasp venom.

    PubMed

    Piek, T; Mantel, P

    1986-01-01

    The venom of the solitary wasp Philanthus triangulum contains a cholinergic antagonist of the nicotinic receptor of the rectus abdominis muscle of the frog, Xenopus laevis. The venom of African P. triangulum contains two different cholinergic factors, a competitive and a non-competitive antagonist. The venom of the European P. triangulum may not contain a competitive antagonist of the nicotinic receptor of X. laevis, but only a very strong non-competitive antagonist. The possible non-synonymity of both groups of P. triangulum is discussed.

  4. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    a novel hypocretiniorexin antagonist, almorexant (ALM), to a standard hypnotic , zolpidem (ZOL), and placebo (PBO) on neurocognitive performance at...Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Parallel- Group Study Comparing the Effect of a Novel HypocretiniOrexin Antagonist (Almorexant) Versus a Standard Hypnotic ...Group Study Comparing the Effect of a Novel HypocretiniOrexin Antagonist (Almorexant) Versus a Standard Hypnotic (Zolpidem) and Placebo on

  5. Screening for inhibitors of low-affinity epigenetic peptide-protein interactions: an AlphaScreen-based assay for antagonists of methyl-lysine binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Tim J; Herold, J Martin; Senisterra, Guillermo A; Vedadi, Masoud; Kireev, Dmitri B; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Frye, Stephen V; Janzen, William P

    2010-01-01

    The histone code comprises many posttranslational modifications that occur mainly in histone tail peptides. The identity and location of these marks are read by a variety of histone-binding proteins that are emerging as important regulators of cellular differentiation and development and are increasingly being implicated in numerous disease states. The authors describe the development of the first high-throughput screening assay for the discovery of inhibitors of methyl-lysine binding proteins that will be used to initiate a full-scale discovery effort for this broad target class. They focus on the development of an AlphaScreen-based assay for malignant brain tumor (MBT) domain-containing proteins, which bind to the lower methylation states of lysine residues present in histone tail peptides. This assay takes advantage of the avidity of the AlphaScreen beads to clear the hurdle to assay development presented by the low micromolar binding constants of the histone binding proteins for their cognate peptides. The assay is applicable to other families of methyl-lysine binding proteins, and it has the potential to be used in screening efforts toward the discovery of novel small molecules with utility as research tools for cellular reprogramming and ultimately drug discovery.

  6. Platelet-activating factor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Negro Alvarez, J M; Miralles López, J C; Ortiz Martínez, J L; Abellán Alemán, A; Rubio del Barrio, R

    1997-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), identified as 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine, exhibits potent proinflammatory properties. PAF is produced by numerous cell types, including endothelial cells, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, basophils, eosinophils and mastocytes. Since the discovery and identification of the chemical structure of PAF, a large variety of specific PAF-receptor antagonists, both natural and synthetic compounds, have been described. Intensive research has been conducted and development programs set up by more 25 pharmaceutical companies world-wide, studying the therapeutic interest of more than 50 PAF-receptors antagonists in various pathophysiological conditions. Medline (1966-1996), Embase (Excerpta Medica; 1974-1996), and other biomedical and drug directory databases were searched to identify English-language articles (basic science, clinical trial research, and review articles) and abstracts of conference proceedings on PAF receptor antagonists and related terms. The most important PAF receptor antagonists are reviewed with their effectiveness in various experimental tests. Fundamentally, PAF antagonists may be divided in two groups: natural and synthetic compounds. Natural (Ginkgolides, Kadsurenone, Chantancin, Phomactin, Swietemohonin A, Prehispalone, THC-7-oic acid, Aglafoline, FR 900452, PCA 4248 and SCH 37370), and synthetic antagonists (CV-3988, CV-6209, SRI 63-072, SRI 63-441, UR-10324, UR-11353, E-5880, CL 184005, 6-Mono and Bis-aryl phosphate antagonists, TCV-309, Ro-74719, WEB 2086, Y 24180, BN 50726, BN 50727, BN 50730, BN 50739, Ro 24-4736, Ro 24-0238, RP 55778, RP 59227, RP 66681, YM 264, YM 461, SM 10661, SR 27417, UK 74505, BB 182, BB 823, BB 654, SDZ 64-412, SDZ 65-123, L 652731, L 659898, L 668750, L 671284, L680573, L 680574, CIS 19, ABT-299 and Pinusolide) have a great variability in their chemical structure that might have importance in their different pharmacological profile. The great majority of these

  7. CSNK1A1 and Gli2 as Novel Targets Identified Through an Integrative Analysis of Gene Expression Data, Protein-Protein Interaction and Pathways Networks in Glioblastoma Tumors: Can These Two Be Antagonistic Proteins?

    PubMed

    Mishra, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the malignant form of glioma, and the interplay of different pathways working in concert in GBM development and progression needs to be fully understood. Wnt signaling and sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathways, having basic similarities, are among the major pathways aberrantly activated in GBM, and hence, need to be targeted. It becomes imperative, therefore, to explore the functioning of these pathways in context of each other in GBM. An integrative approach may help provide new biological insights, as well as solve the problem of identifying common drug targets for simultaneous targeting of these pathways. The beauty of this approach is that it can recapitulate several known facts, as well as decipher new emerging patterns, identifying those targets that could be missed when relying on one type of data at a time. This approach can be easily extended to other systems to discover key patterns in the functioning of signaling molecules. Studies were designed to assess the relationship between significant differential expression of genes of the Wnt (Wnt/β-catenin canonical and Wnt non-canonical) and SHH signaling pathways and their connectivity patterns in interaction and signaling networks. Further, the aim was to decipher underlying mechanistic patterns that may be involved in a more specific way and to generate a ranked list of genes that can be used as markers or drug targets. These studies predict that Wnt pathway plays a relatively more pro-active role than the SHH pathway in GBM. Further, CTNNB1, CSNK1A1, and Gli2 proteins may act as key drug targets common to these pathways. While CTNNB1 is a widely studied molecule in the context of GBM, the likely roles of CSNK1A1 and Gli2 are found to be relatively novel. It is surmised that Gli2 may be antagonistic to CSNK1A1, preventing the phosphorylation of CTNNB1 and SMO proteins in Wnt and SHH signaling pathway, respectively, by CSNK1A1, and thereby, aberrant activation. New insights into the

  8. CSNK1A1 and Gli2 as Novel Targets Identified Through an Integrative Analysis of Gene Expression Data, Protein-Protein Interaction and Pathways Networks in Glioblastoma Tumors: Can These Two Be Antagonistic Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the malignant form of glioma, and the interplay of different pathways working in concert in GBM development and progression needs to be fully understood. Wnt signaling and sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathways, having basic similarities, are among the major pathways aberrantly activated in GBM, and hence, need to be targeted. It becomes imperative, therefore, to explore the functioning of these pathways in context of each other in GBM. An integrative approach may help provide new biological insights, as well as solve the problem of identifying common drug targets for simultaneous targeting of these pathways. The beauty of this approach is that it can recapitulate several known facts, as well as decipher new emerging patterns, identifying those targets that could be missed when relying on one type of data at a time. This approach can be easily extended to other systems to discover key patterns in the functioning of signaling molecules. Studies were designed to assess the relationship between significant differential expression of genes of the Wnt (Wnt/β-catenin canonical and Wnt non-canonical) and SHH signaling pathways and their connectivity patterns in interaction and signaling networks. Further, the aim was to decipher underlying mechanistic patterns that may be involved in a more specific way and to generate a ranked list of genes that can be used as markers or drug targets. These studies predict that Wnt pathway plays a relatively more pro-active role than the SHH pathway in GBM. Further, CTNNB1, CSNK1A1, and Gli2 proteins may act as key drug targets common to these pathways. While CTNNB1 is a widely studied molecule in the context of GBM, the likely roles of CSNK1A1 and Gli2 are found to be relatively novel. It is surmised that Gli2 may be antagonistic to CSNK1A1, preventing the phosphorylation of CTNNB1 and SMO proteins in Wnt and SHH signaling pathway, respectively, by CSNK1A1, and thereby, aberrant activation. New insights into the

  9. Programmed cell death 4 protein (Pdcd4) and homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (Hipk2) antagonistically control translation of Hipk2 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ohnheiser, Johanna; Ferlemann, Eva; Haas, Astrid; Müller, Jan P; Werwein, Eugen; Fehler, Olesja; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2015-07-01

    The tumor suppressor protein programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) is a highly conserved RNA-binding protein that inhibits the translation of specific mRNAs. Here, we have identified the homeobox-interacting protein kinase-2 (Hipk2) mRNA as a novel translational target of Pdcd4. Unlike most other protein kinases Hipk2 is constitutively active after being synthesized by the ribosome and its expression and activity are thought to be mainly controlled by modulation of the half-life of the kinase. Our work provides the first evidence that Hipk2 expression is also controlled on the level of translation. We show that Hipk2 stimulates the translation of its own mRNA and that Pdcd4 suppresses the translation of Hipk2 mRNA by interfering with this auto-regulatory feedback mechanism. We also show that the translation of the related kinase Hipk1 is controlled by a similar feedback loop and that Hipk2 also stimulates the translation of Hipk1 mRNA. Taken together, our work describes a novel mechanism of translational suppression by Pdcd4 and shows for the first time that Hipk2 controls its own synthesis by an auto-regulatory feedback mechanism. Furthermore, the effect of Hipk2 on the translation of Hipk1 RNA suggests that Hipk2 and Pdcd4 can act in similar manner to control the translation of other mRNAs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force between functional groups in protein and polymer brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Sho; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-18

    To understand interactions between polymer surfaces and different functional groups in proteins, interaction forces were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Various polymer brush surfaces were systematically prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization as well-defined model surfaces to understand protein adsorption behavior. The polymer brush layers consisted of phosphorylcholine groups (zwitterionic/hydrophilic), trimethylammonium groups (cationic/hydrophilic), sulfonate groups (anionic/hydrophilic), hydroxyl groups (nonionic/hydrophilic), and n-butyl groups (nonionic/hydrophobic) in their side chains. The interaction forces between these polymer brush surfaces and different functional groups (carboxyl groups, amino groups, and methyl groups, which are typical functional groups existing in proteins) were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Furthermore, the amount of adsorbed protein on the polymer brush surfaces was quantified by surface plasmon resonance using albumin with a negative net charge and lysozyme with a positive net charge under physiological conditions. The amount of proteins adsorbed on the polymer brush surfaces corresponded to the interaction forces generated between the functional groups on the cantilever and the polymer brush surfaces. The weakest interaction force and least amount of protein adsorbed were observed in the case of the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine groups in the side chain. On the other hand, positive and negative surfaces generated strong forces against the oppositely charged functional groups. In addition, they showed significant adsorption with albumin and lysozyme, respectively. These results indicated that the interaction force at the functional group level might be

  11. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1) Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kudryavtsev, Denis; Bychkov, Maxim L.; Kulbatskii, Dmitrii S.; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Astapova, Maria V.; Feofanov, Alexey V.; Thomsen, Morten S.; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Dolgikh, Dmitry A.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.

    2016-01-01

    SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and controls inflammation and malignant cell transformation. The majority of previous studies of SLURP-1 have been made using fusion constructs containing, in addition to the native protein, extra polypeptide sequences. Here we describe the activity and pharmacological profile of a recombinant analogue of human SLURP-1 (rSLURP-1) differing from the native protein only by one additional N-terminal Met residue. rSLURP-1 significantly inhibited proliferation (up to ~ 40%, EC50 ~ 4 nM) of human oral keratinocytes (Het-1A cells). Application of mecamylamine and atropine,—non-selective inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively to the α7-nAChRs. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7-nAChRs to rSLURP-1 caused a significant non-competitive inhibition of the response to acetylcholine (up to ~ 70%, IC50 ~ 1 μM). It was shown that rSLURP-1 binds to α7-nAChRs overexpressed in GH4Cl cells, but does not compete with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the receptor. These findings imply an allosteric antagonist-like mode of SLURP-1 interaction with α7-nAChRs outside the classical ligand-binding site. Contrary to rSLURP-1, other inhibitors of α7-nAChRs (mecamylamine, α-bungarotoxin and Lynx1) did not suppress the proliferation of keratinocytes. Moreover, the co-application of α-bungarotoxin with rSLURP-1 did not influence antiproliferative activity of the latter. This supports the hypothesis that

  12. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1) Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Kudryavtsev, Denis; Bychkov, Maxim L; Kulbatskii, Dmitrii S; Kasheverov, Igor E; Astapova, Maria V; Feofanov, Alexey V; Thomsen, Morten S; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Tsetlin, Victor I; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2016-01-01

    SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and controls inflammation and malignant cell transformation. The majority of previous studies of SLURP-1 have been made using fusion constructs containing, in addition to the native protein, extra polypeptide sequences. Here we describe the activity and pharmacological profile of a recombinant analogue of human SLURP-1 (rSLURP-1) differing from the native protein only by one additional N-terminal Met residue. rSLURP-1 significantly inhibited proliferation (up to ~ 40%, EC50 ~ 4 nM) of human oral keratinocytes (Het-1A cells). Application of mecamylamine and atropine,--non-selective inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively to the α7-nAChRs. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7-nAChRs to rSLURP-1 caused a significant non-competitive inhibition of the response to acetylcholine (up to ~ 70%, IC50 ~ 1 μM). It was shown that rSLURP-1 binds to α7-nAChRs overexpressed in GH4Cl cells, but does not compete with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the receptor. These findings imply an allosteric antagonist-like mode of SLURP-1 interaction with α7-nAChRs outside the classical ligand-binding site. Contrary to rSLURP-1, other inhibitors of α7-nAChRs (mecamylamine, α-bungarotoxin and Lynx1) did not suppress the proliferation of keratinocytes. Moreover, the co-application of α-bungarotoxin with rSLURP-1 did not influence antiproliferative activity of the latter. This supports the hypothesis that

  13. An IgM-kappa rat monoclonal antibody specific for the type 1 sphingosine 1-phosphate G protein-coupled receptor with antagonist and agonist activities.

    PubMed

    Goetzl, Edward J; Dembrow, Dale; Van Brocklyn, James R; Gráler, Markus; Huang, Mei-Chuan

    2004-04-30

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) type 1G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1 GPCRs) are specific high-affinity transducers for this lipid growth factor and cellular mediator. S1P1 GPCRs are widely-expressed and physiologically critical in the cardiovascular and immune systems. Functional rat monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been generated against human S1P1 GPCRs expressed in rat null-cell transductants to provide bioavailable agents capable of stimulating or suppressing the S1P-S1P1 GPCR axis. The rat IgM-kappa anti-S1P1 GPCR MoAb designated 4B5.2 binds specifically to native human or mouse S1P1 GPCRs in cell membranes, but not to solubilized and denatured S1P1 GPCRs. Specific binding of 32P-S1P to cellular S1P1 GPCRs is not blocked by 4B5.2. T cell chemotactic responses to S1P and S1P suppression of T cell chemotaxis to chemokines both are inhibited selectively by 4B5.2. In contrast, generation of gamma-interferon by stimulated T cells is diminished by 4B5.2 as by S1P. T cell S1P1 GPCR-selective antagonist and agonist effects of 4B5.2 in vivo may alter immune responses as distinctively as the available poly-S1P GPCR-directed pharmacological agents, without the undesirable side-effects attributable to actions of these agents on other S1P GPCRs.

  14. The Arabidopsis thaliana MEDEA Polycomb group protein controls expression of PHERES1 by parental imprinting.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Claudia; Page, Damian R; Gagliardini, Valeria; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2005-01-01

    The maternally expressed Arabidopsis thaliana Polycomb group protein MEDEA (MEA) controls expression of the MADS-box gene PHERES1 (PHE1). Here, we show that PHE1 is mainly paternally expressed but maternally repressed and that this maternal repression of PHE1 breaks down in seeds lacking maternal MEA activity. Because Polycomb group proteins control parental imprinting in mammals as well, the independent recruitment of similar protein machineries for the imprinting of genes is a notable example of convergent evolution.

  15. Macroevolutionary trends of atomic composition and related functional group proportion in eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Juan; Yang, Chun-Lin; Hao, You-Jin; Li, Ying; Chen, Bin; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2014-01-25

    To fully explore the trends of atomic composition during the macroevolution from prokaryote to eukaryote, five atoms (oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen) and related functional groups in prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins were surveyed and compared. Genome-wide analysis showed that eukaryotic proteins have more oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen atoms than prokaryotes do. Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) analysis revealed that oxygen, sulfur, carbon and hydrogen frequencies are higher in eukaryotic proteins than in their prokaryotic orthologs. Furthermore, functional group analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic proteins tend to have higher proportions of sulfhydryl, hydroxyl and acylamino, but lower of sulfide and carboxyl. Taken together, an apparent trend of increase was observed for oxygen and sulfur atoms in the macroevolution; the variation of oxygen and sulfur compositions and their related functional groups in macroevolution made eukaryotic proteins carry more useful functional groups. These results will be helpful for better understanding the functional significances of atomic composition evolution.

  16. Protein-sparing therapy after major abdominal surgery: lack of clinical effects. Protein-Sparing Therapy Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Doglietto, G B; Gallitelli, L; Pacelli, F; Bellantone, R; Malerba, M; Sgadari, A; Crucitti, F

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A prospective multicenter randomized trial was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of postoperative protein-sparing therapy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The metabolic effect of postoperative protein-sparing therapy has been shown by several studies, but the clinical utility of this treatment has not been investigated by large prospective trials. METHODS: Six hundred seventy-eight patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were randomly assigned to receive either protein-sparing therapy after surgery (protein-sparing therapy group) or conventional therapy (control group). The patients were monitored for postoperative complications and mortality. RESULTS: The rate of major postoperative complications was similar in both groups (protein-sparing therapy group, 19.5%; control group, 20.9%; p=0.66) as were the overall postoperative mortality rates (4.7% and 3.5%, respectively; p=0.43). CONCLUSIONS: The present study indicates that routine protein-sparing therapy for patients normonourished or mildly malnourished undergoing major abdominal surgery is not clinically justified. PMID:8633913

  17. Competitive labelling, a method for determining the reactivity of individual groups in proteins. The amino groups of porcine elastase

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, H.; Stevenson, K. J.; Hartley, B. S.

    1971-01-01

    1. A method is described for determining the ionization constants and reactivities of individual amino groups in proteins. The principle is that in the presence of a trace amount of radioactive label, the various reactive groups in a protein molecule will compete for the label and the amount incorporated into any one group will be determined by its nucleophilicity, pK and micro-environment. The relative amounts of label incorporated into various groups will be proportional to their second-order rate constants and by comparing these rate constants with those expected on the basis of a linear free-energy relationship obtained with a series of standard compounds, the micro-environment can be defined for a particular amino group. 2. The method consists of treating a protein and an internal standard with a limiting amount of radioactive reagent and then with an excess of unlabelled reagent to yield a chemically homogeneous but heterogeneously labelled compound. After appropriate enzymic digestion peptides containing each labelled group are isolated and their rates of reaction, relative to the internal standard, are determined from their specific radioactivities. The entire procedure is repeated at several pH values. 3. When the method was applied to the amino groups of porcine elastase by using tritiated acetic anhydride as the labelling reagent, the N-terminus was found to have pKa 9.7 and a much lower than normal reactivity. Lysine-87 and lysine-224 were found to have pKa 10.3 and normal reactivities. At pH values greater than 10.5 there are discontinuities in all the titration curves, indicating that the entire molecule is undergoing a structural reorganization. ImagesPLATE 3PLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5158490

  18. Pho85p, a cyclin-dependent protein kinase, and the Snf1p protein kinase act antagonistically to control glycogen accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, D; Farkas, I; Roach, P J

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient levels control multiple cellular processes. Cells lacking the SNF1 gene cannot express glucose-repressible genes and do not accumulate the storage polysaccharide glycogen. The impaired glycogen synthesis is due to maintenance of glycogen synthase in a hyperphosphorylated, inactive state. In a screen for second site suppressors of the glycogen storage defect of snf1 cells, we identified a mutant gene that restored glycogen accumulation and which was allelic with PHO85, which encodes a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family. In cells with disrupted PHO85 genes, we observed hyperaccumulation of glycogen, activation of glycogen synthase, and impaired glycogen synthase kinase activity. In snf1 cells, glycogen synthase kinase activity was elevated. Partial purification of glycogen synthase kinase activity from yeast extracts resulted in the separation of two fractions by phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, both of which phosphorylated and inactivated glycogen synthase. The activity of one of these, GPK2, was inhibited by olomoucine, which potently inhibits cyclin-dependent protein kinases, and contained an approximately 36-kDa species that reacted with antibodies to Pho85p. Analysis of Ser-to-Ala mutations at the three potential Gsy2p phosphorylation sites in pho85 cells implicated Ser-654 and/or Thr-667 in PHO85 control of glycogen synthase. We propose that Pho85p is a physiological glycogen synthase kinase, possibly acting downstream of Snf1p. PMID:8754836

  19. Nef Proteins of Epidemic HIV-1 Group O Strains Antagonize Human Tetherin

    PubMed Central

    Kluge, Silvia F.; Mack, Katharina; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Pujol, François M.; Heigele, Anke; Learn, Gerald H.; Usmani, Shariq M.; Sauter, Daniel; Joas, Simone; Hotter, Dominik; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Plenderleith, Lindsey J.; Peeters, Martine; Geyer, Matthias; Sharp, Paul M.; Fackler, Oliver T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Most simian immunodeficiency viruses use their Nef protein to antagonize the host restriction factor tetherin. A deletion in human tetherin confers Nef resistance, representing a hurdle to successful zoonotic transmission. HIV-1 group M evolved to utilize the viral protein U (Vpu) to counteract tetherin. Although HIV-1 group O has spread epidemically in humans, it has not evolved a Vpu-based tetherin antagonism. Here we show that HIV-1 group O Nef targets a region adjacent to this deletion to inhibit transport of human tetherin to the cell surface, enhances virion release, and increases viral resistance to inhibition by interferon-α. The Nef protein of the inferred common ancestor of group O viruses is also active against human tetherin. Thus, Nef-mediated antagonism of human tetherin evolved prior to the spread of HIV-1 group O and likely facilitated secondary virus transmission. Our results may explain the epidemic spread of HIV-1 group O. PMID:25525794

  20. Isotope-Encoded Carboxyl Group Footprinting for Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Conformational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    We report an isotope-encoding method coupled with carboxyl-group footprinting to monitor protein conformational changes. The carboxyl groups of aspartic/glutamic acids and of the C-terminus of proteins can serve as reporters for protein conformational changes when labeled with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) mediated by carbodiimide. In the new development, isotope-encoded "heavy" and "light" GEE are used to label separately the two states of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) from cyanobacteria. Two samples are mixed (1:1 ratio) and analyzed by a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The differences in labeling extent between the two states are represented by the ratio of the "heavy" and "light" peptides, providing information about protein conformational changes. Combining isotope-encoded MS quantitative analysis and carboxyl-group footprinting reduces the time of MS analysis and improves the sensitivity of GEE and other footprinting.

  1. Successful Conversion of the Bacillus subtilis BirA Group II Biotin Protein Ligase into a Group I Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Sarah K.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Group II biotin protein ligases (BPLs) are characterized by the presence of an N-terminal DNA binding domain that allows transcriptional regulation of biotin biosynthetic and transport genes whereas Group I BPLs lack this N-terminal domain. The Bacillus subtilis BPL, BirA, is classified as a Group II BPL based on sequence predictions of an N-terminal helix-turn-helix motif and mutational alteration of its regulatory properties. We report evidence that B. subtilis BirA is a Group II BPL that regulates transcription at three genomic sites: bioWAFDBI, yuiG and yhfUTS. Moreover, unlike the paradigm Group II BPL, E. coli BirA, the N-terminal DNA binding domain can be deleted from Bacillus subtilis BirA without adverse effects on its ligase function. This is the first example of successful conversion of a Group II BPL to a Group I BPL with retention of full ligase activity. PMID:24816803

  2. Cotranscriptional splicing of a group I intron is facilitated by the Cbp2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.S.; Thomas, J. Jr.; Tirupati, H.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates the coupling between transcription and splicing of a mitochondrial group I intron in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the effect of the Cbp2 protein on splicing. 65 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability recognize human C4b-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z.; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J.; Hirakis, Sophia P.; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-09-05

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of M protein HVRs (apparently ~90%). Such broad recognition is rare, and we discovered a unique mechanism for this through the structure determination of four sequence-diverse M proteins in complexes with C4BP. The structures revealed a uniform and tolerant ‘reading head’ in C4BP, which detected conserved sequence patterns hidden within hypervariability. Our results open up possibilities for rational therapies that target the M–C4BP interaction, and also inform a path towards vaccine design.

  4. Regulation of Autophagy-Related Protein and Cell Differentiation by High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein in Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huanhuan; Zhang, Guojun; Liu, Guoyan; Yang, Can

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a molecule related to the development of inflammation. Autophagy is vital to maintain cellular homeostasis and protect against inflammation of adipocyte injury. Our recent work focused on the relationship of HMGB1 and autophagy in 3T3-L1 cells. In vivo experimental results showed that, compared with the normal-diet group, the high-fat diet mice displayed an increase in adipocyte size in the epididymal adipose tissues. The expression levels of HMGB1 and LC3II also increased in epididymal adipose tissues in high-fat diet group compared to the normal-diet mice. The in vitro results indicated that HMGB1 protein treatment increased LC3II formation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in contrast to that in the control group. Furthermore, LC3II formation was inhibited through HMGB1 knockdown by siRNA. Treatment with the HMGB1 protein enhanced LC3II expression after 2 and 4 days but decreased the expression after 8 and 10 days among various differentiation stages of adipocytes. By contrast, FABP4 expression decreased on the fourth day and increased on the eighth day. Hence, the HMGB1 protein modulated autophagy-related proteins and lipid-metabolism-related genes in adipocytes and could be a new target for treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:27843198

  5. Effects of surface functional groups on the formation of nanoparticle-protein corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podila, R.; Chen, R.; Ke, P. C.; Brown, J. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Herein, we examined the dependence of protein adsorption on the nanoparticle surface in the presence of functional groups. Our UV-visible spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering measurements evidently suggested that the functional groups play an important role in the formation of nanoparticle-protein corona. We found that uncoated and surfactant-free silver nanoparticles derived from a laser ablation process promoted a maximum protein (bovine serum albumin) coating due to increased changes in entropy. On the other hand, bovine serum albumin displayed a relatively lower affinity for electrostatically stabilized nanoparticles due to the constrained entropy changes.

  6. The antitumor agent doxorubicin binds to Fanconi anemia group F protein.

    PubMed

    Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Tsukuda, Senko; Shimura, Satomi; Manita, Daisuke; Iwakiri, Kanako; Kamisuki, Shinji; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Kuramochi, Kouji; Nakazaki, Atsuo; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sugawara, Fumio

    2012-11-01

    Doxorubicin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapy agent, elicits several potent biological effects, including synergistic-antitumor activity in combination with cisplatin. However, the mechanism of this synergism remains obscure. Here, we employed an improved T7 phage display screening method to identify Fanconi anemia group F protein (FANCF) as a doxorubicin-binding protein. The FANCF-doxorubicin interaction was confirmed by pull-down assay and SPR analysis. FANCF is a component of the Fanconi anemia complex, which monoubiquitinates D2 protein of Fanconi anemia group as a cellular response against DNA cross-linkers such as cisplatin. We observed that the monoubiquitination was inhibited by doxorubicin treatment.

  7. Membrane cofactor protein (CD46) is a keratinocyte receptor for the M protein of the group A streptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, N; Liszewski, M K; Atkinson, J P; Caparon, M

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is the causative agent of numerous suppurative diseases of human skin. The M protein of S. pyogenes mediates the adherence of the bacterium to keratinocytes, the most numerous cell type in the epidermis. In this study, we have constructed and analyzed a series of mutant M proteins and have shown that the C repeat domain of the M molecule is responsible for cell recognition. The binding of factor H, a serum regulator of complement activation, to the C repeat region of M protein blocked bacterial adherence. Factor H is a member of a large family of complement regulatory proteins that share a homologous structural motif termed the short consensus repeat. Membrane cofactor protein (MCP), or CD46, is a short consensus repeat-containing protein found on the surface of keratinocytes, and purified MCP could competitively inhibit the adherence of S. pyogenes to these cells. Furthermore, the M protein was found to bind directly to MCP, whereas mutant M proteins that lacked the C repeat domain did not bind MCP, suggesting that recognition of MCP plays an important role in the ability of the streptococcus to adhere to keratinocytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708671

  8. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Secreted Immunoglobulin Binding Protein from Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Peter K.; Reinscheid, Dieter; Gottschalk, Birgit; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.

    2001-01-01

    Immunoglobulin binding proteins are one of several pathogenicity factors which have been associated with invasive disease caused by group A streptococci. The surface-bound M and M-like proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes are the most characterized of these immunoglobulin binding proteins, and in most cases they bind only a single antibody class. Here we report the identification of a novel non-M-type secreted protein, designated SibA (for secreted immunoglobulin binding protein from group A streptococcus), which binds all immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses, the Fc and Fab fragments, and also IgA and IgM. SibA has no significant sequence homology to any M-related proteins, is not found in the vir regulon, and contains none of the characteristic M-protein regions, such as the A or C repeats. Like M proteins, however, SibA does have relatively high levels of alanine, lysine, glutamic acid, leucine, and glycine. SibA and M proteins also share an alpha-helical N-terminal secondary structure which has been previously implicated in immunoglobulin binding in M proteins. Evidence presented here indicates that this is also the case for SibA. SibA also has regions of local similarity with other coiled-coil proteins such as Listeria monocytogenes P45 autolysin, human myosin heavy chain, macrogolgin, and Schistoma mansoni paramyosin, some of which are of potential significance since cross-reactive antibodies between myosin proteins and M proteins have been implicated in the development of the autoimmune sequelae of streptococcal disease. PMID:11447160

  9. Read-Through Proteins of Group 4 RNA Bacteriophages TW19 and TW28

    PubMed Central

    Aoi, Takeshi; Kaesberg, Paul

    1976-01-01

    Group 4 phages TW19 and TW28 of Escherichia coli possess a “read-through” (IIb) protein, although group 2 phage GA does not. This may have implications concerning the evolution and classification of RNA phages. Images PMID:978795

  10. Quantification of protein group coherence and pathway assignment using functional association

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genomics and proteomics experiments produce a large amount of data that are awaiting functional elucidation. An important step in analyzing such data is to identify functional units, which consist of proteins that play coherent roles to carry out the function. Importantly, functional coherence is not identical with functional similarity. For example, proteins in the same pathway may not share the same Gene Ontology (GO) terms, but they work in a coordinated fashion so that the aimed function can be performed. Thus, simply applying existing functional similarity measures might not be the best solution to identify functional units in omics data. Results We have designed two scores for quantifying the functional coherence by considering association of GO terms observed in two biological contexts, co-occurrences in protein annotations and co-mentions in literature in the PubMed database. The counted co-occurrences of GO terms were normalized in a similar fashion as the statistical amino acid contact potential is computed in the protein structure prediction field. We demonstrate that the developed scores can identify functionally coherent protein sets, i.e. proteins in the same pathways, co-localized proteins, and protein complexes, with statistically significant score values showing a better accuracy than existing functional similarity scores. The scores are also capable of detecting protein pairs that interact with each other. It is further shown that the functional coherence scores can accurately assign proteins to their respective pathways. Conclusion We have developed two scores which quantify the functional coherence of sets of proteins. The scores reflect the actual associations of GO terms observed either in protein annotations or in literature. It has been shown that they have the ability to accurately distinguish biologically relevant groups of proteins from random ones as well as a good discriminative power for detecting interacting pairs of

  11. High-mobility group box-1 protein determination in postmortem samples.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, Cristian; Augsburger, Marc; Mangin, Patrice

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess whether high-mobility group box-1 protein can be determined in biological fluids collected during autopsy and evaluate the diagnostic potential of high-mobility group box-1 protein in identifying sepsis-related deaths. High-mobility group box-1 protein was measured in serum collected during hospitalization as well as in undiluted and diluted postmortem serum and pericardial fluid collected during autopsy in a group of sepsis-related deaths and control cases with noninfectious causes of death. Inclusion criteria consisted of full biological sample availability and postmortem interval not exceeding 6h. The preliminary results indicate that high-mobility group box-1 protein levels markedly increase after death. Concentrations beyond the upper limit of the calibration curve were obtained in undiluted postmortem serum in septic and traumatic control cases. In pericardial fluid, concentrations beyond the upper limit of the calibration curve were found in all cases. These findings suggest that the diagnostic potential of high-mobility group box-1 protein in the postmortem setting is extremely limited due to molecule release into the bloodstream after death, rendering antemortem levels difficult or impossible to estimate even after sample dilution.

  12. Tissue distribution of blood group membrane proteins beyond red cells: evidence from cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Rojewski, Markus T; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Flegel, Willy A

    2006-08-01

    The proteins of blood group systems are expressed on red blood cells (RBC) by definition. We searched nucleotide databases of human expressed sequence tags (EST) to collate the distribution of 22 distinct membrane proteins in cells and tissues other than RBC. The documented blood group genes are: MNS, Rh, Lutheran, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, Diego, Yt, Xg, Scianna, Dombrock, Colton, Landsteiner-Wiener, Kx, Gerbich, Cromer, Knops, Indian, Ok, Raph, John-Milton-Hagen and Gill. The genes were grouped according to their overall and their relative expression in embryo and adults. We describe the distribution of EST in cells, tissues and cell lines with a focus on non-RBC tissues.

  13. 2-Phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-containing ligands of the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) behave as agonists and antagonists of steroidogenesis in a mouse leydig tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Midzak, Andrew; Denora, Nunzio; Laquintana, Valentino; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Lopedota, Angela; Franco, Massimo; Altomare, Cosimo D; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-08-30

    Ligands of 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) are known for their ability to potently and dose-dependently stimulate steroid biosynthesis in steroidogenic cells. In this study, we investigated a number of 2-phenyl-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamide derivatives, analogs of alpidem, for their ability to bind TSPO and to affect steroidogenesis in a mouse Leydig tumor cell line. We observed that not only some compounds behaved as agonists, stimulating steroidogenesis (e.g., 3 and 4) with EC50 values (15.9 and 6.99μM) close to that determined for FGIN-1-27 used as positive control (7.24μM), but two compounds, namely 5 and 6, which on the other hand are the most lipophilic ones in the investigated series, behaved as antagonists, by significantly inhibiting steroid production at concentrations at least twenty times lower than the cytotoxic ones. To our surprise, the newly synthesized compound 3, which is a strict analog of alpidem bearing at the para position of the 2-phenyl group a methoxy group instead of chlorine, achieved a ten-fold stimulation of the steroid production (for comparison FGIN-1-27 achieved 1.6-fold stimulation). Within the limits of the examined property space, some unprecedented SARs were unveiled, which can help in understanding the key molecular factors underlying the transition from agonism to antagonism in the steroidogenesis process. Besides the substitution pattern and the physicochemical features (mainly hydrogen bonding potential) of the substituents at the positions C(6) and C(8) of the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine nucleus, and at the para position of the 2-phenyl group, the structure-activity relationship analysis suggested lipophilicity, whose increase seems to be generally related to steroidogenesis inhibition, and steric hindrance, which appeared as a stimulation-limiting factor, as two main properties to control in the design or optimization of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-based TSPO ligands endowed with potential in modulating the

  14. Polycomb Group Proteins as Epigenetic Mediators of Neuroprotection in Ischemic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Stapels, Martha; Piper, Chelsea; Yang, Tao; Li, Minghua; Stowell, Cheri; Xiong, Zhi-gang; Saugstad, Julie; Simon, Roger P.; Geromanos, Scott; Langridge, James; Lan, Jing-quan; Zhou, An

    2010-01-01

    Exposing the brain to sublethal ischemia affects the response to a subsequent, otherwise injurious ischemia, resulting in transcriptional suppression and neuroprotection, a response called ischemic tolerance. Here, we show that the proteomic signature of the ischemic-tolerant brain is characterized by increased abundance of transcriptional repressors, particularly polycomb group (PcG) proteins. Knocking down PcG proteins precluded the induction of ischemic tolerance, whereas in an in vitro model, overexpressing the PcG proteins SCMH1 or BMI1 induced tolerance to ischemia without preconditioning. We found that PcG proteins are associated with the promoter regions of genes encoding two potassium channel proteins that show decreased abundance in ischemic-tolerant brains. Furthermore, PcG proteins decreased potassium currents in cultured neuronal cells and knocking down potassium channels elicited tolerance without preconditioning. These findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism of neuroprotection that involves gene repressors of the PcG family. PMID:20197544

  15. Polycomb group proteins as epigenetic mediators of neuroprotection in ischemic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Stapels, Martha; Piper, Chelsea; Yang, Tao; Li, Minghua; Stowell, Cheri; Xiong, Zhi-gang; Saugstad, Julie; Simon, Roger P; Geromanos, Scott; Langridge, James; Lan, Jing-quan; Zhou, An

    2010-03-02

    Exposing the brain to sublethal ischemia affects the response to a subsequent, otherwise injurious ischemia, resulting in transcriptional suppression and neuroprotection, a response called ischemic tolerance. Here, we show that the proteomic signature of the ischemic-tolerant brain is characterized by increased abundance of transcriptional repressors, particularly polycomb group (PcG) proteins. Knocking down PcG proteins precluded the induction of ischemic tolerance, whereas in an in vitro model, overexpressing the PcG proteins SCMH1 or BMI1 induced tolerance to ischemia without preconditioning. We found that PcG proteins are associated with the promoter regions of genes encoding two potassium channel proteins that show decreased abundance in ischemic-tolerant brains. Furthermore, PcG proteins decreased potassium currents in cultured neuronal cells, and knocking down potassium channels elicited tolerance without preconditioning. These findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism of neuroprotection that involves gene repressors of the PcG family.

  16. UV damage-specific DNA-binding protein in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, H.; Fujiwara, Y. )

    1991-03-29

    The gel mobility shift assay method revealed a specifically ultraviolet (UV) damage recognizing, DNA-binding protein in nuclear extracts of normal human cells. The resulted DNA/protein complexes caused the two retarded mobility shifts. Four xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XPE) fibroblast strains derived from unrelated Japanese families were not deficient in such a DNA damage recognition/binding protein because of the normal complex formation and gel mobility shifts, although we confirmed the reported lack of the protein in the European XPE (XP2RO and XP3RO) cells. Thus, the absence of this binding protein is not always commonly observed in all the XPE strains, and the partially repair-deficient and intermediately UV-hypersensitive phenotype of XPE cells are much similar whether or not they lack the protein.

  17. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K

    2015-07-10

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH <6.2 due to protonation of key histidine residues on helices 2 and 3. To develop an LRP1 inhibitor that does not dissociate at low pH, we introduced a disulfide bond between the second and third helices in the RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Joni M.; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2015-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH <6.2 due to protonation of key histidine residues on helices 2 and 3. To develop an LRP1 inhibitor that does not dissociate at low pH, we introduced a disulfide bond between the second and third helices in the RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective. PMID:26013822

  19. Trapping Open and Closed Forms of FitE-A Group III Periplasmic Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, R.; Proteau, A; Wagner, J; Cui, Q; Purisima, E; Matte, A; Cygler, M

    2009-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are essential components of bacterial transport systems, necessary for bacterial growth and survival. The two-domain structures of PBPs are topologically classified into three groups based on the number of crossovers or hinges between the globular domains: group I PBPs have three connections, group II have two, and group III have only one. Although a large number of structures for group I or II PBPs are known, fewer group III PBPs have been structurally characterized. Group I and II PBPs exhibit significant domain motions during transition from the unbound to ligand-bound form, however, no large conformational changes have been observed to date in group III PBPs. We have solved the crystal structure of a periplasmic binding protein FitE, part of an iron transport system, fit, recently identified in a clinical E. coli isolate. The structure, determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, shows that FitE is a group III PBP containing a single {alpha}-helix bridging the two domains. Among the individual FitE molecules present in two crystal forms we observed three different conformations (open, closed, intermediate). Our crystallographic and molecular dynamics results strongly support the notion that group III PBPs also adopt the same Venus flytrap mechanism as do groups I and II PBPs. Unlike other group III PBPs, FitE forms dimers both in solution and in the crystals. The putative siderophore binding pocket is lined with arginine residues, suggesting an anionic nature of the iron-containing siderophore.

  20. Desolvation penalty for burying hydrogen-bonded peptide groups in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Robert L

    2010-12-16

    A novel analysis of the enthalpy of protein unfolding is proposed and used to test for a desolvation penalty when hydrogen-bonded peptide groups are desolvated via folding. The unfolding enthalpy has three components, (1) the change when peptide hydrogen bonds are broken and the exposed -CO and -NH groups are solvated, (2) the change when protein-protein van der Waals interactions are broken and replaced by protein-water van der Waals interactions, and (3) the change produced by the hydrophobic interaction when nonpolar groups in the protein interior (represented as a liquid hydrocarbon) are transferred to water. A key feature of the analysis is that the enthalpy change from the hydrophobic interaction goes through 0 at 22 °C according to the liquid hydrocarbon model. Protein unfolding enthalpies are smaller at 22 °C than the enthalpy change for unfolding an alanine peptide helix. Data in the literature indicate that the van der Waals contribution to the unfolding enthalpy is considerably larger than the unfolding enthalpy itself at 22 °C, and therefore, a sizable desolvation penalty is predicted. Such a desolvation penalty was predicted earlier from electrostatic calculations of a stabilizing interaction between water and the hydrogen-bonded peptide group.

  1. Contribution of polar groups in the interior of a protein to the conformational stability.

    PubMed

    Takano, K; Yamagata, Y; Yutani, K

    2001-04-17

    It has been generally believed that polar residues are usually located on the surface of protein structures. However, there are many polar groups in the interior of the structures in reality. To evaluate the contribution of such buried polar groups to the conformational stability of a protein, nonpolar to polar mutations (L8T, A9S, A32S, I56T, I59T, I59S, A92S, V93T, A96S, V99T, and V100T) in the interior of a human lysozyme were examined. The thermodynamic parameters for denaturation were determined using a differential scanning calorimeter, and the crystal structures were analyzed by X-ray crystallography. If a polar group had a heavy energy cost to be buried, a mutant protein would be remarkably destabilized. However, the stability (Delta G) of the Ala to Ser and Val to Thr mutant human lysozymes was comparable to that of the wild-type protein, suggesting a low-energy penalty of buried polar groups. The structural analysis showed that all polar side chains introduced in the mutant proteins were able to find their hydrogen bond partners, which are ubiquitous in protein structures. The empirical structure-based calculation of stability change (Delta Delta G) [Takano et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 12698--12708] revealed that the mutant proteins decreased the hydrophobic effect contributing to the stability (Delta G(HP)), but this destabilization was recovered by the hydrogen bonds newly introduced. The present study shows the favorable contribution of polar groups with hydrogen bonds in the interior of protein molecules to the conformational stability.

  2. Chemical Interactions of Polyethylene Glycols (PEG) and Glycerol with Protein Functional Groups: Applications to PEG, Glycerol Effects on Protein Processes

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, DB; Shkel, Irina A; Phan, Noel M; Sternke, Matt; Lingeman, Emily; Cheng, Xian; Cheng, Lixue; O’Connor, Kevin; Record, M. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Here we obtain the data needed to predict chemical interactions of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) and glycerol with proteins and related organic compounds, and thereby interpret or predict chemical effects of PEGs on protein processes. To accomplish this we determine interactions of glycerol and tetraEG with >30 model compounds displaying the major C, N, and O functional groups of proteins. Analysis of these data yields coefficients (α-values) quantifying interactions of glycerol, tetraEG and PEG end (-CH2OH) and interior (-CH2OCH2-) groups with these groups, relative to interactions with water. TetraEG (strongly) and glycerol (weakly) interact favorably with aromatic C, amide N, and cationic N, but unfavorably with amide O, carboxylate O and salt ions. Strongly unfavorable O and salt anion interactions help make both small and large PEGs effective protein precipitants. Interactions of tetraEG and PEG interior groups with aliphatic C are quite favorable, while interactions of glycerol and PEG end groups with aliphatic C are not. Hence tetraEG and PEG 300 favor unfolding of the DNA-binding domain of lac repressor (lacDBD) while glycerol, di- and mono-ethylene glycol are stabilizers. Favorable interactions with aromatic and aliphatic C explain why PEG400 greatly increases the solubility of aromatic hydrocarbons and steroids. PEG400-steroid interactions are unusually favorable, presumably because of simultaneous interactions of multiple PEG interior groups with the fused ring system of the steroid. Using α-values reported here, chemical contributions to PEG m-values can be predicted or interpreted in terms of changes in water-accessible surface area (ΔASA), and separated from excluded volume effects. PMID:25962980

  3. A Semi-Automated Assignment Protocol for Methyl Group Side-Chains in Large Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonggul; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Geoffrey; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    The developments of biosynthetic specific labeling strategies for side-chain methyl groups have allowed structural and dynamic characterization of very large proteins and protein complexes. However, the assignment of the methyl-group resonances remains an Achilles’ heel for NMR, as the experiments designed to correlate side chains to the protein backbone become rather insensitive with the increase of the transverse relaxation rates. In this chapter, we outline a semi-empirical approach to assign the resonances of methyl group side chains in large proteins. This method requires a crystal structure or an NMR ensemble of conformers as an input, together with NMR data sets such as NOEs and PREs, to be implemented in a computational protocol that provides a probabilistic assignment of methyl group resonances. As an example, we report the protocol used in our laboratory to assign the side chains of the 42-kDa catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Although we emphasize the labeling of isoleucine, leucine, and valine residues, this method is applicable to other methyl group side chains such as those of alanine, methionine, and threonine, as well as reductively-methylated cysteine side chains. PMID:26791975

  4. A Semiautomated Assignment Protocol for Methyl Group Side Chains in Large Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonggul; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Geoffrey; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    The developments of biosynthetic specific labeling strategies for side-chain methyl groups have allowed structural and dynamic characterization of very large proteins and protein complexes. However, the assignment of the methyl-group resonances remains an Achilles' heel for NMR, as the experiments designed to correlate side chains to the protein backbone become rather insensitive with the increase of the transverse relaxation rates. In this chapter, we outline a semiempirical approach to assign the resonances of methyl-group side chains in large proteins. This method requires a crystal structure or an NMR ensemble of conformers as an input, together with NMR data sets such as nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) and paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), to be implemented in a computational protocol that provides a probabilistic assignment of methyl-group resonances. As an example, we report the protocol used in our laboratory to assign the side chains of the 42-kDa catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Although we emphasize the labeling of isoleucine, leucine, and valine residues, this method is applicable to other methyl group side chains such as those of alanine, methionine, and threonine, as well as reductively methylated cysteine side chains. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Single-molecule studies of high-mobility group B architectural DNA bending proteins.

    PubMed

    Murugesapillai, Divakaran; McCauley, Micah J; Maher, L James; Williams, Mark C

    2017-02-01

    Protein-DNA interactions can be characterized and quantified using single molecule methods such as optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence imaging. In this review, we discuss studies that characterize the binding of high-mobility group B (HMGB) architectural proteins to single DNA molecules. We show how these studies are able to extract quantitative information regarding equilibrium binding as well as non-equilibrium binding kinetics. HMGB proteins play critical but poorly understood roles in cellular function. These roles vary from the maintenance of chromatin structure and facilitation of ribosomal RNA transcription (yeast high-mobility group 1 protein) to regulatory and packaging roles (human mitochondrial transcription factor A). We describe how these HMGB proteins bind, bend, bridge, loop and compact DNA to perform these functions. We also describe how single molecule experiments observe multiple rates for dissociation of HMGB proteins from DNA, while only one rate is observed in bulk experiments. The measured single-molecule kinetics reveals a local, microscopic mechanism by which HMGB proteins alter DNA flexibility, along with a second, much slower macroscopic rate that describes the complete dissociation of the protein from DNA.

  6. Polycomb purification by in vivo biotinylation tagging reveals cohesin and Trithorax group proteins as interaction partners

    PubMed Central

    Strübbe, Gero; Popp, Christian; Schmidt, Alexander; Pauli, Andrea; Ringrose, Leonie; Beisel, Christian; Paro, Renato

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of specific gene expression patterns during cellular proliferation is crucial for the identity of every cell type and the development of tissues in multicellular organisms. Such a cellular memory function is conveyed by the complex interplay of the Polycomb and Trithorax groups of proteins (PcG/TrxG). These proteins exert their function at the level of chromatin by establishing and maintaining repressed (PcG) and active (TrxG) chromatin domains. Past studies indicated that a core PcG protein complex is potentially associated with cell type or even cell stage-specific sets of accessory proteins. In order to better understand the dynamic aspects underlying PcG composition and function we have established an inducible version of the biotinylation tagging approach to purify Polycomb and associated factors from Drosophila embryos. This system enabled fast and efficient isolation of Polycomb containing complexes under near physiological conditions, thereby preserving substoichiometric interactions. Novel interacting proteins were identified by highly sensitive mass spectrometric analysis. We found many TrxG related proteins, suggesting a previously unrecognized extent of molecular interaction of the two counteracting chromatin regulatory protein groups. Furthermore, our analysis revealed an association of PcG protein complexes with the cohesin complex and showed that Polycomb-dependent silencing of a transgenic reporter depends on cohesin function. PMID:21415365

  7. Kicking against the PRCs – A Domesticated Transposase Antagonises Silencing Mediated by Polycomb Group Proteins and Is an Accessory Component of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Pumi; Mora-García, Santiago; de Leau, Erica; Thornton, Harry; de Alves, Flavia Lima; Rapsilber, Juri; Yang, Suxin; James, Geo Velikkakam; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Finnegan, E. Jean; Turck, Franziska; Goodrich, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) genes play crucial roles in development by regulating expression of homeotic and other genes controlling cell fate. Both groups catalyse modifications of chromatin, particularly histone methylation, leading to epigenetic changes that affect gene activity. The trxG antagonizes the function of PcG genes by activating PcG target genes, and consequently trxG mutants suppress PcG mutant phenotypes. We previously identified the ANTAGONIST OF LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (ALP1) gene as a genetic suppressor of mutants in the Arabidopsis PcG gene LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). Here, we show that ALP1 interacts genetically with several other PcG and trxG components and that it antagonizes PcG silencing. Transcriptional profiling reveals that when PcG activity is compromised numerous target genes are hyper-activated in seedlings and that in most cases this requires ALP1. Furthermore, when PcG activity is present ALP1 is needed for full activation of several floral homeotic genes that are repressed by the PcG. Strikingly, ALP1 does not encode a known chromatin protein but rather a protein related to PIF/Harbinger class transposases. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ALP1 is broadly conserved in land plants and likely lost transposase activity and acquired a novel function during angiosperm evolution. Consistent with this, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry (IP-MS) show that ALP1 associates, in vivo, with core components of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX 2 (PRC2), a widely conserved PcG protein complex which functions as a H3K27me3 histone methyltransferase. Furthermore, in reciprocal pulldowns using the histone methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF), we identify not only ALP1 and the core PRC2 components but also plant-specific accessory components including EMBRYONIC FLOWER 1 (EMF1), a transcriptional repressor previously associated with PRC1-like complexes. Taken together our data suggest that ALP1 inhibits Pc

  8. Kicking against the PRCs - A Domesticated Transposase Antagonises Silencing Mediated by Polycomb Group Proteins and Is an Accessory Component of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih Chieh; Hartwig, Ben; Perera, Pumi; Mora-García, Santiago; de Leau, Erica; Thornton, Harry; de Lima Alves, Flavia; de Alves, Flavia Lima; Rappsilber, Juri; Rapsilber, Juri; Yang, Suxin; James, Geo Velikkakam; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Finnegan, E Jean; Turck, Franziska; Goodrich, Justin

    2015-12-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) genes play crucial roles in development by regulating expression of homeotic and other genes controlling cell fate. Both groups catalyse modifications of chromatin, particularly histone methylation, leading to epigenetic changes that affect gene activity. The trxG antagonizes the function of PcG genes by activating PcG target genes, and consequently trxG mutants suppress PcG mutant phenotypes. We previously identified the ANTAGONIST OF LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (ALP1) gene as a genetic suppressor of mutants in the Arabidopsis PcG gene LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). Here, we show that ALP1 interacts genetically with several other PcG and trxG components and that it antagonizes PcG silencing. Transcriptional profiling reveals that when PcG activity is compromised numerous target genes are hyper-activated in seedlings and that in most cases this requires ALP1. Furthermore, when PcG activity is present ALP1 is needed for full activation of several floral homeotic genes that are repressed by the PcG. Strikingly, ALP1 does not encode a known chromatin protein but rather a protein related to PIF/Harbinger class transposases. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ALP1 is broadly conserved in land plants and likely lost transposase activity and acquired a novel function during angiosperm evolution. Consistent with this, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry (IP-MS) show that ALP1 associates, in vivo, with core components of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX 2 (PRC2), a widely conserved PcG protein complex which functions as a H3K27me3 histone methyltransferase. Furthermore, in reciprocal pulldowns using the histone methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF), we identify not only ALP1 and the core PRC2 components but also plant-specific accessory components including EMBRYONIC FLOWER 1 (EMF1), a transcriptional repressor previously associated with PRC1-like complexes. Taken together our data suggest that ALP1 inhibits Pc

  9. Long-term treatment with l-DOPA and an mGlu5 receptor antagonist prevents changes in brain basal ganglia dopamine receptors, their associated signaling proteins and neuropeptides in parkinsonian monkeys.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicolas; Jourdain, Vincent A; Morissette, Marc; Grégoire, Laurent; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2014-04-01

    Brain glutamate overactivity is well documented in Parkinson's disease (PD) and antiglutamatergic drugs decrease L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA)-induced dyskinesias (LID); the implication of dopamine neurotransmission is not documented in this anti-LID activity. Therefore, we evaluated changes of dopamine receptors, their associated signaling proteins and neuropeptides mRNA, in normal control monkeys, in saline-treated 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned monkeys and in L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys, without or with an adjunct treatment to reduce the development of LID: 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP), the prototypal metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor antagonist. All de novo treatments were administered for 1 month and the animals were sacrificed thereafter. MPTP monkeys treated with l-DOPA + MPEP developed significantly less LID than MPTP monkeys treated with l-DOPA alone. [(3)H]SCH-23390 specific binding to D1 receptors of all MPTP monkeys was decreased as compared to controls in the basal ganglia and no difference was observed between all MPTP groups, while striatal D1 receptor mRNA levels remained unchanged. [(3)H]raclopride specific binding to striatal D2 receptors and mRNA levels of D2 receptors were increased in MPTP monkeys compared to controls; l-DOPA treatment reduced this binding in MPTP monkeys while it remained elevated with the l-DOPA + MPEP treatment. Striatal [(3)H]raclopride specific binding correlated positively with D2 receptor mRNA levels of all MPTP-lesioned monkeys. Striatal preproenkephalin/preprodynorphin mRNA levels and phosphorylated ERK1/2 and Akt/GSK3β levels increased only in L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys as compared to controls, saline treated-MPTP and l-DOPA + MPEP treated MPTP monkeys. Hence, reduction of development of LID with MPEP was associated with changes in D2 receptors, their associated signaling proteins and neuropeptides.

  10. Localization of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein and replication protein A on damaged DNA in nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) and replication protein A (RPA) with damaged DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) was studied using model dsDNA and bubble-DNA structure with 5-{3-[6-(carboxyamido-fluoresceinyl)amidocapromoyl]allyl}-dUMP lesions in one strand and containing photoreactive 5-iodo-dUMP residues in defined positions. Interactions of XPA and RPA with damaged and undamaged DNA strands were investigated by DNA–protein photocrosslinking and gel shift analysis. XPA showed two maximums of crosslinking intensities located on the 5′-side from a lesion. RPA mainly localized on undamaged strand of damaged DNA duplex and damaged bubble-DNA structure. These results presented for the first time the direct evidence for the localization of XPA in the 5′-side of the lesion and suggested the key role of XPA orientation in conjunction with RPA binding to undamaged strand for the positioning of the NER preincision complex. The findings supported the mechanism of loading of the heterodimer consisting of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum group F proteins by XPA on the 5′-side from the lesion before damaged strand incision. Importantly, the proper orientation of XPA and RPA in the stage of preincision was achieved in the absence of TFIIH and XPG. PMID:20693538

  11. Identification and characterization of major proteins carrying ABO blood group antigens in the human kidney.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Masayuki; Yoshida, Yutaka; Miyamoto, Masahito; Nameta, Masaaki; Cuellar, Lino M; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Yaoita, Eishin; Nakagawa, Yuki; Saito, Kazuhide; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kota

    2009-04-27

    It is generally admitted that ABO(H) blood group antigens are linked to lipids and proteins. Although glycolipids carrying ABO antigens have been well characterized in human kidneys, glycoproteins carrying ABO antigens are largely unknown, and their molecular properties remain to be elucidated. All the blood group A antigen-linked proteins in human kidney could be solubilized and captured on immobilized Helix pomatia lectin that recognizes A antigens. These proteins were separated on SDS-PAGE gels. The gel pieces containing protein bands immunoreactive with anti-A antibody were excised, in-gel digested with trypsin, and analyzed by nanoLC tandem mass spectrometer. Protein candidates that carry ABO antigens were confirmed by immunoprecipitation and double-labeled immunofluorescense microscopy. All the glycoproteins carrying ABO antigens were found to be Asn-linked glycoproteins, and presented as multiple bands on SDS-PAGE with molecular masses ranging from 60 to 270 kDa. The protein bands were subjected for mass spectrometric analysis, which identified 121 distinct proteins with high confidence. Of the identified proteins, 55 N-glycosylated, membrane proteins were selected as glycoprotein candidates that carry ABO antigens. Among them, most abundantly expressed proteins as estimated by the number of peptide matches in the MS spectrometric analysis, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1, plasmalemmal vesicle-associated protein, and von Willebrand factor, were further characterized. Several glycoproteins were identified that represented major glycoproteins carrying ABO antigens in the human kidney, which exhibited distinct features in localization to most of vascular endothelial cells.

  12. Specific reduction of carboxyl groups in peptides and proteins by diborane.

    PubMed

    Atassi, M Z; Rosenthal, A F

    1969-02-01

    1. The reaction of several peptides and proteins with diborane was studied under different conditions to determine those most suitable for the specific reduction of carboxyl groups. 2. In the reaction of model peptides and the cyclic peptides bacitracin and tyrocidin, reduction at 0 degrees was entirely specific for the carboxyl groups without affecting the peptide bonds. Acid amide residues were not reduced. Some tripeptides showed anomalous results in that the C-terminal residue was quite resistant to reduction. 3. Specific reduction of carboxyl groups was achieved in each of the following proteins: human serum albumin, egg albumin, adult human haemoglobin, sperm-whale apomyoglobin, horse heart cytochrome c and egg-white lysozyme. The C-terminal amino acid was usually reduced. 4. Conditions for specific reduction of all available carboxyl groups are not easily found and may vary from one substance to another. Specific reduction of a limited number of available carboxyl groups may be generally accomplished by reactions at -10 degrees . 5. It is suggested that this chemical modification, which has the advantage of permanence, may be useful in studying the role of carboxyl groups in the conformation of proteins and in the biological properties of peptides and proteins.

  13. The trithorax-group protein Lid is a histone H3 trimethyl-Lys4 demethylase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nara; Zhang, Junyu; Klose, Robert J; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Jones, Richard S; Zhang, Yi

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that histone methylation can be dynamically regulated through active demethylation. However, no demethylase specific to histone H3 trimethyl-Lys4 (H3K4me3) has been identified. Here we report that the Drosophila melanogaster protein 'little imaginal discs' (Lid), a JmjC domain-containing trithorax group protein, can demethylate H3K4me3. Consistent with its genetic classification, Lid positively regulates Hox gene expression in S2 cells.

  14. Ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow in the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.): an Hev b 7-like protein acts as a universal antagonist of rubber particle aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min-Jing; Cai, Fu-Ge; Tian, Wei-Min

    2016-02-01

    Ethrel is the most effective stimuli in prolonging the latex flow that consequently increases yield per tapping. This effect is largely ascribed to the enhanced lutoid stability, which is associated with the decreased release of initiators of rubber particle (RP) aggregation from lutoid bursting. However, the increase in both the bursting index of lutoids and the duration of latex flow after applying ethrel or ethylene gas in high concentrations suggests that a new mechanism needs to be introduced. In this study, a latex allergen Hev b 7-like protein in C-serum was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). In vitro analysis showed that the protein acted as a universal antagonist of RP aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum. Ethrel treatment obviously weakened the effect of C-serum on RP aggregation, which was closely associated with the increase in the level of the Hev b 7-like protein and the decrease in the level of the 37 kDa protein, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), western blotting analysis and antibody neutralization. Thus, the increase of the Hev b 7-like protein level or the ratio of the Hev b 7-like protein to the 37 kDa protein in C-serum should be primarily ascribed to the ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow duration.

  15. Ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow in the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.): an Hev b 7-like protein acts as a universal antagonist of rubber particle aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min-Jing; Cai, Fu-Ge; Tian, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Ethrel is the most effective stimuli in prolonging the latex flow that consequently increases yield per tapping. This effect is largely ascribed to the enhanced lutoid stability, which is associated with the decreased release of initiators of rubber particle (RP) aggregation from lutoid bursting. However, the increase in both the bursting index of lutoids and the duration of latex flow after applying ethrel or ethylene gas in high concentrations suggests that a new mechanism needs to be introduced. In this study, a latex allergen Hev b 7-like protein in C-serum was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). In vitro analysis showed that the protein acted as a universal antagonist of RP aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum. Ethrel treatment obviously weakened the effect of C-serum on RP aggregation, which was closely associated with the increase in the level of the Hev b 7-like protein and the decrease in the level of the 37 kDa protein, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), western blotting analysis and antibody neutralization. Thus, the increase of the Hev b 7-like protein level or the ratio of the Hev b 7-like protein to the 37 kDa protein in C-serum should be primarily ascribed to the ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow duration. PMID:26381537

  16. Polycomb Group (PcG) Proteins and Human Cancers: Multifaceted Functions and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Voruganti, Sukesh; Nag, Subhasree; Zhou, Jianwei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors that regulate several crucial developmental and physiological processes in the cell. More recently, they have been found to play important roles in human carcinogenesis and cancer development and progression. The deregulation and dysfunction of PcG proteins often lead to blocking or inappropriate activation of developmental pathways, enhancing cellular proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis, and increasing the cancer stem cell population. Genetic and molecular investigations of PcG proteins have long been focused on their PcG functions. However, PcG proteins have recently been shown to exert non-polycomb functions, contributing to the regulation of diverse cellular functions. We and others have demonstrated that PcG proteins regulate the expression and function of several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in a PcG-independent manner, and PcG proteins are associated with the survival of patients with cancer. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the research on PcG proteins, including both the polycomb-repressive and non-polycomb functions. We specifically focus on the mechanisms by which PcG proteins play roles in cancer initiation, development, and progression. Finally, we discuss the potential value of PcG proteins as molecular biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer, and as molecular targets for cancer therapy. PMID:26227500

  17. Structure-based design of broadly protective group a streptococcal M protein-based vaccines

    DOE PAGES

    Dale, James B.; Smeesters, Pierre R.; Courtney, Harry S.; ...

    2016-11-24

    Here, a major obstacle to the development of broadly protective M protein-based group A streptococcal (GAS) vaccines is the variability within the N-terminal epitopes that evoke potent bactericidal antibodies. The concept of M type-specific protective immune responses has recently been challenged based on the observation that multivalent M protein vaccines elicited cross-reactive bactericidal antibodies against a number of non-vaccine M types of GAS. Additionally, a new “cluster-based” typing system of 175 M proteins identified a limited number of clusters containing closely related M proteins. In the current study, we used the emm cluster typing system, in combination with computational structure-basedmore » peptide modeling, as a novel approach to the design of potentially broadly protective M protein-based vaccines.« less

  18. Structure-based design of broadly protective group a streptococcal M protein-based vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, James B.; Smeesters, Pierre R.; Courtney, Harry S.; Penfound, Thomas A.; Hohn, Claudia M.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Baudry, Jerome Y.

    2016-11-24

    Here, a major obstacle to the development of broadly protective M protein-based group A streptococcal (GAS) vaccines is the variability within the N-terminal epitopes that evoke potent bactericidal antibodies. The concept of M type-specific protective immune responses has recently been challenged based on the observation that multivalent M protein vaccines elicited cross-reactive bactericidal antibodies against a number of non-vaccine M types of GAS. Additionally, a new “cluster-based” typing system of 175 M proteins identified a limited number of clusters containing closely related M proteins. In the current study, we used the emm cluster typing system, in combination with computational structure-based peptide modeling, as a novel approach to the design of potentially broadly protective M protein-based vaccines.

  19. sHA 14-1, a stable and ROS-free antagonist against anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, bypasses drug resistances and synergizes cancer therapies in human leukemia cell

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Defeng; Das, Sonia Goutam Kumar; Doshi, Jignesh M.; Peng, Jun; Lin, Jialing; Xing, Chengguo

    2009-01-01

    HA 14-1, a small-molecule antagonist against anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, was demonstrated to induce selective cytotoxicity toward malignant cells and to overcome drug resistance. Due to its poor stability and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by its decomposition, chemical modification of HA 14-1 is needed for its future development. We have synthesized a stabilized analog of HA 14-1 – sHA 14-1, which did not induce the formation of ROS. As expected for a putative antagonist against anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins like HA 14-1, sHA 14-1 disrupted the binding interaction of a Bak BH3 peptide with Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL protein, inhibited the growth of tumor cells through the induction of apoptosis, and circumvented the drug resistance induced by the over-expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL proteins. Interestingly, the impairment of extrinsic apoptotic pathway induced moderate resistance to sHA 14-1. The moderate resistance suggested that sHA 14-1 generated part of its apoptotic stress through the intrinsic pathway, possibly through its antagonism against anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. The resistance indicated that sHA 14-1 generated apoptotic stress through the extrinsic apoptotic pathway as well. The ability of sHA 14-1 to induce apoptotic stress through both pathways was further supported by the synergism of sHA 14-1 towards the cytotoxicities of Fas ligand and dexamethasone in Jurkat cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that sHA 14-1 may represent a promising candidate for the treatment of drug-resistant cancers either as a monotherapy or in combination with current cancer therapies. PMID:18037229

  20. Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Matera, Maria Gabriella; Cazzola, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Parasympathetic activity is increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma and appears to be the major reversible component of airway obstruction. Therefore, treatment with muscarinic receptor antagonists is an effective bronchodilator therapy in COPD and also in asthmatic patients. In recent years, the accumulating evidence that the cholinergic system controls not only contraction by airway smooth muscle but also the functions of inflammatory cells and airway epithelial cells has suggested that muscarinic receptor antagonists could exert other effects that may be of clinical relevance when we must treat a patient suffering from COPD or asthma. There are currently six muscarinic receptor antagonists licenced for use in the treatment of COPD, the short-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (SAMAs) ipratropium bromide and oxitropium bromide and the long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) aclidinium bromide, tiotropium bromide, glycopyrronium bromide and umeclidinium bromide. Concerns have been raised about possible associations of muscarinic receptor antagonists with cardiovascular safety, but the most advanced compounds seem to have an improved safety profile. Further beneficial effects of SAMAs and LAMAs are seen when added to existing treatments, including LABAs, inhaled corticosteroids and phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors. The importance of tiotropium bromide in the maintenance treatment of COPD, and likely in asthma, has spurred further research to identify new LAMAs. There are a number of molecules that are being identified, but only few have reached the clinical development.

  1. Functional Gene Group Analysis Indicates No Role for Heterotrimeric G Proteins in Cognitive Ability

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gail; Liewald, David Cherry McLachlan; Payton, Anthony; Craig, Leone C. A.; Whalley, Lawrence J.; Horan, Mike; Ollier, William; Starr, John M.; Pendleton, Neil; Posthuma, Danielle; Bates, Timothy C.; Deary, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous functional gene group analyses implicated common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in heterotrimeric G protein coding genes as being associated with differences in human intelligence. Here, we sought to replicate this finding using five independent cohorts of older adults including current IQ and childhood IQ, and using both gene- and SNP-based analytic strategies. No significant associations were found between variation in heterotrimeric G protein genes and intelligence in any cohort at either of the two time points. These results indicate that, whereas G protein systems are important in cognition, common genetic variation in these genes is unlikely to be a substantial influence on human intelligence differences. PMID:24626473

  2. Single inhaler extrafine triple therapy versus long-acting muscarinic antagonist therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (TRINITY): a double-blind, parallel group, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Papi, Alberto; Corradi, Massimo; Blazhko, Viktor; Montagna, Isabella; Francisco, Catherine; Cohuet, Géraldine; Vezzoli, Stefano; Scuri, Mario; Singh, Dave

    2017-05-13

    Limited data are available for the efficacy of triple therapy with two long-acting bronchodilators and an inhaled corticosteroid in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We compared treatment with extrafine beclometasone dipropionate, formoterol fumarate, and glycopyrronium bromide (BDP/FF/GB; fixed triple) with tiotropium, and BDP/FF plus tiotropium (open triple). For this double-blind, parallel-group, randomised, controlled trial, eligible patients had COPD, post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of less than 50%, at least one moderate-to-severe COPD exacerbation in the previous 12 months, and a COPD Assessment Test total score of at least 10. After a 2-week run-in period receiving one inhalation per day via single-dose dry-powder inhaler of open-label 18 μg tiotropium, patients were randomised (2:2:1) using a interactive response technology system to 52 weeks treatment with tiotropium, fixed triple, or open triple. Randomisation was stratified by country and severity of airflow limitation. The primary endpoint was moderate-to-severe COPD exacerbation rate. The key secondary endpoint was change from baseline in pre-dose FEV1 at week 52. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01911364. Between Jan 21, 2014, and March 18, 2016, 2691 patients received fixed triple (n=1078), tiotropium (n=1075), or open triple (n=538). Moderate-to-severe exacerbation rates were 0·46 (95% CI 0·41-0·51) for fixed triple, 0·57 (0·52-0·63) for tiotropium, and 0·45 (0·39-0·52) for open triple; fixed triple was superior to tiotropium (rate ratio 0·80 [95% CI 0·69-0·92]; p=0·0025). For week 52 pre-dose FEV1, fixed triple was superior to tiotropium (mean difference 0·061 L [0·037 to 0·086]; p<0·0001) and non-inferior to open triple (-0·003L [-0·033 to 0·027]; p=0·85). Adverse events were reported by 594 (55%) patients with fixed triple, 622 (58%) with tiotropium, and 309 (58%) with open triple. In our TRINITY study

  3. Identification of isp, a locus encoding an immunogenic secreted protein conserved among group A streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    McIver, K S; Subbarao, S; Kellner, E M; Heath, A S; Scott, J R

    1996-01-01

    The protein Mga (mga), which is required for transcription of several virulence genes of group A streptococci (GAS), including the antiphagocytic M protein, was suggested to act as the response regulator element of a bacterial two-component pathway. To investigate whether a gene encoding a cognate sensor protein is located upstream of mga, 3.1 kb of DNA 5' of the mga translational start site was cloned from serotype M6 GAS strain JRS4. Sequence analysis of this region revealed two adjacent open reading frames, a previously described orf and a new locus, isp (immunogenic secreted protein), which could encode proteins of 9 and 59 kDa, respectively. Inactivation of either open reading frame had no significant effect on transcription of the gene encoding M protein (emm) under normal growth conditions, suggesting that neither isp nor orf is involved in the Mga regulatory circuit. A protein migrating at an apparent molecular weight of 65,000 was produced when isp was transcribed and translated in vitro. The predicted isp product (Isp) contains an amino-terminal signal sequence region homologous to that found in bacterial secreted proteins, and expression of isp in Escherichia coli resulted in the presence of Isp in the periplasmic fraction. Convalescent-phase serum from a patient with an active GAS infection recognized forms of Isp both from the periplasm of E. coli and the supernatant of a GAS strain. Both isp and orf are highly conserved among strains of GAS, as shown by hybridization analyses. PMID:8698478

  4. A domain shared by the Polycomb group proteins Scm and ph mediates heterotypic and homotypic interactions.

    PubMed

    Peterson, A J; Kyba, M; Bornemann, D; Morgan, K; Brock, H W; Simon, J

    1997-11-01

    The Sex comb on midleg (Scm) and polyhomeotic (ph) proteins are members of the Polycomb group (PcG) of transcriptional repressors. PcG proteins maintain differential patterns of homeotic gene expression during development in Drosophila flies. The Scm and ph proteins share a homology domain with 38% identity over a length of 65 amino acids, termed the SPM domain, that is located at their respective C termini. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro protein-binding assays, we show that the SPM domain mediates direct interaction between Scm and ph. Binding studies with isolated SPM domains from Scm and ph show that the domain is sufficient for these protein interactions. These studies also show that the Scm-ph and Scm-Scm domain interactions are much stronger than the ph-ph domain interaction, indicating that the isolated domain has intrinsic binding specificity determinants. Analysis of site-directed point mutations identifies residues that are important for SPM domain function. These binding properties, predicted alpha-helical secondary structure, and conservation of hydrophobic residues prompt comparisons of the SPM domain to the helix-loop-helix and leucine zipper domains used for homotypic and heterotypic protein interactions in other transcriptional regulators. In addition to in vitro studies, we show colocalization of the Scm and ph proteins at polytene chromosome sites in vivo. We discuss the possible roles of the SPM domain in the assembly or function of molecular complexes of PcG proteins.

  5. The contribution of polar group burial to protein stability is strongly context-dependent.

    PubMed

    Takano, Kazufumi; Scholtz, J Martin; Sacchettini, James C; Pace, C Nick

    2003-08-22

    We previously suggested that proteins gain more stability from the burial and hydrogen bonding of polar groups than from the burial of nonpolar groups (Pace, C. N. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 310-313). To study this further, we prepared eight Thr-to-Val mutants of RNase Sa, four in which the Thr side chain is hydrogen-bonded and four in which it is not. We measured the stability of these mutants by analyzing their thermal denaturation curves. The four hydrogen-bonded Thr side chains contribute 1.3 +/- 0.9 kcal/mol to the stability; those that are not still contribute 0.4 +/- 0.9 kcal/mol to the stability. For 40 Thr-to-Val mutants of 11 proteins, the average decrease in stability is 1.0 +/- 1.0 kcal/mol when the Thr side chain is hydrogen-bonded and 0.0 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol when it is not. This is clear evidence that hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. In addition, we prepared four Val-to-Thr mutants of RNase Sa, measured their stability, and determined their crystal structures. In all cases, the mutants are less stable than the wild-type protein, with the decreases in stability ranging from 0.5 to 4.4 kcal/mol. For 41 Val-to-Thr mutants of 11 proteins, the average decrease in stability is 1.8 +/- 1.3 kcal/mol and is unfavorable for 40 of 41 mutants. This shows that placing an [bond]OH group at a site designed for a [bond]CH3 group is very unfavorable. So, [bond]OH groups can contribute favorably to protein stability, even if they are not hydrogen-bonded, if the site was selected for an [bond]OH group, but they will make an unfavorable contribution to stability, even if they are hydrogen-bonded, when they are placed at a site selected for a [bond]CH3 group. The contribution that polar groups make to protein stability depends strongly on their environment.

  6. Nef proteins of epidemic HIV-1 group O strains antagonize human tetherin.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Silvia F; Mack, Katharina; Iyer, Shilpa S; Pujol, François M; Heigele, Anke; Learn, Gerald H; Usmani, Shariq M; Sauter, Daniel; Joas, Simone; Hotter, Dominik; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Plenderleith, Lindsey J; Peeters, Martine; Geyer, Matthias; Sharp, Paul M; Fackler, Oliver T; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2014-11-12

    Most simian immunodeficiency viruses use their Nef protein to antagonize the host restriction factor tetherin. A deletion in human tetherin confers Nef resistance, representing a hurdle to successful zoonotic transmission. HIV-1 group M evolved to utilize the viral protein U (Vpu) to counteract tetherin. Although HIV-1 group O has spread epidemically in humans, it has not evolved a Vpu-based tetherin antagonism. Here we show that HIV-1 group O Nef targets a region adjacent to this deletion to inhibit transport of human tetherin to the cell surface, enhances virion release, and increases viral resistance to inhibition by interferon-α. The Nef protein of the inferred common ancestor of group O viruses is also active against human tetherin. Thus, Nef-mediated antagonism of human tetherin evolved prior to the spread of HIV-1 group O and likely facilitated secondary virus transmission. Our results may explain the epidemic spread of HIV-1 group O. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuronal eotaxin and the effects of ccr3 antagonist on airway hyperreactivity and M2 receptor dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Allison D.; Stein, Louis H.; Nie, Zhenying; Curtis, Damian E.; Evans, Christopher M.; Hodgson, Simon T.; Jose, Peter J.; Belmonte, Kristen E.; Fitch, Erin; Jacoby, David B.

    2006-01-01

    Eosinophils cluster around airway nerves in patients with fatal asthma and in antigen-challenged animals. Activated eosinophils release major basic protein, which blocks inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptors (M2Rs) on nerves, increasing acetylcholine release and potentiating vagally mediated bronchoconstriction. We tested whether GW701897B, an antagonist of CCR3 (the receptor for eotaxin as well as a group of eosinophil active chemokines), affected vagal reactivity and M2R function in ovalbumin-challenged guinea pigs. Sensitized animals were treated with the CCR3 antagonist before inhaling ovalbumin. Antigen-challenged animals were hyperresponsive to vagal stimulation, but those that received the CCR3 antagonist were not. M2R function was lost in antigen-challenged animals, but not in those that received the CCR3 antagonist. Although the CCR3 antagonist did not decrease the number of eosinophils in lung tissues as assessed histologically, CCR3 antagonist prevented antigen-induced clustering of eosinophils along the nerves. Immunostaining revealed eotaxin in airway nerves and in cultured airway parasympathetic neurons from both guinea pigs and humans. Both IL-4 and IL-13 increased expression of eotaxin in cultured airway parasympathetic neurons as well as in human neuroblastoma cells. Thus, signaling via CCR3 mediates eosinophil recruitment to airway nerves and may be a prerequisite to blockade of inhibitory M2Rs by eosinophil major basic protein. PMID:16374515

  8. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of derivatization reagents for different types of protein-bound carbonyl groups.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Fedorova, Maria; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2013-09-07

    Mass spectrometry (MS) of 'carbonylated proteins' often involves derivatization of reactive carbonyl groups to facilitate their enrichment, identification and quantification. Among the many reported reagents, 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), biotin hydrazide (BHZ) and O-(biotinylcarbazoylmethyl) hydroxylamine (ARP) are the most frequently used. Despite their common use in carbonylation research, their reactivity towards protein-bound carbonyls has not been quantitatively evaluated in detail, to the best of our knowledge. Thus we studied the reactivity and specificity of these reagents towards different classes of reactive carbonyl groups (e.g. aldehydes, ketones and lactams), each being represented by a synthetic peptide carrying an accordingly modified residue. All three tagging reagents were selective for aliphatic aldehydes and ketones. Lactams and carbonyl-containing tryptophan oxidation products, however, were labelled only at low levels or not at all. Whereas DNPH derivatization was efficient under the published standard conditions, the derivatization conditions for BHZ and ARP had to be altered. Acidic conditions provided quantitative labelling yields for ARP. Peptides derivatized with DNPH, BHZ and ARP fragmented efficiently in tandem mass spectrometry, when the experimental conditions were chosen carefully for each reagent. Importantly, the tested carbonylated peptides did not cross-react with amino groups in other proteins present during sample preparations or enzymatic digestion. Thus, it appears favourable to digest proteins first and then derivatise the reactive carbonyl groups more efficiently at the peptide level under acidic conditions. The carbonylated model peptides used in this study might be valid internal standards for carbonylation proteomics.

  9. Complete chemical modification of amine and acid functional groups of peptides and small proteins

    PubMed Central

    Krusemark, Casey J.; Frey, Brian L.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Belshaw, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The chemical modification of protein thiols by reduction and alkylation is common in the preparation of proteomic samples for analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). Modification at other functional groups has received less attention in MS-based proteomics. Amine modification (Lys, N-termini) by reductive dimethylation or by acylation (e.g. iTRAQ labeling) has recently gained some popularity in peptide-based approaches (bottom-up MS). Modification at acidic groups (Asp, Glu, C-termini) has been explored very minimally. Here, we describe a sequential labeling strategy that enables complete modification of thiols, amines, and acids on peptides or small intact proteins. This method includes (1) the reduction and alkylation of thiols, (2) the reductive dimethylation of amines, and (3) the amidation of acids with any of several amines. This chemical modification scheme offers several options both for the incorporation of stable isotopes for relative quantification and for improving peptides or proteins as MS analytes. PMID:21604117

  10. Characterization of New Members of the Group 3 Outer Membrane Protein Family of Brucella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Salhi, Imed; Boigegrain, Rose-Anne; Machold, Jan; Weise, Christoph; Cloeckaert, Axel; Rouot, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    Impairment of the omp25 gene in Brucella spp. leads to attenuated strains and confers protection to the host. Omp25 and Omp31, whose functions remain unknown, were the first characterized members of group 3 outer membrane proteins (Omps) (25 to 34 kDa). Recently, genomic and proteomic approaches identified five new putative members of this family, some of which are produced in B. melitensis or B. abortus. In the present study, using protein microsequencing, we identified new members of group 3 Omps proteins produced in B. suis. Since several monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Omp25 cross-reacted with other members of group 3 Omps, we also performed Western immunoblotting to compare wild-type B. suis with mutants systematically having B. suis omp25-related genes knocked out. We demonstrate the production of three paralogs of Omp31 and/or Omp25 in B. suis, and the existence of a common site of signal peptide cleavage (AXAAD), which is very similar to that present in the five homologous Omps of Bartonella quintana. The seven group 3 Omps were classified in four-subgroups on the basis of percentage amino acid sequence identities: Omp25 alone, the Omp25b-Omp25c-Omp25d cluster, the Omp31/31b subgroup, and the less related Omp22 protein (also called Omp3b). Together with previous data, our results demonstrate that all new members of group 3 Omps are produced in B. suis or in other Brucella species and we propose a nomenclature that integrates all of these proteins to facilitate the understanding of future Brucella interspecies study results. PMID:12874309

  11. Conformational Properties of Helical Protein Polymers with Varying Densities of Chemically Reactive Groups.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Robin S; Argust, Lindsey M; Sharp, Jared D; Kiick, Kristi L

    2006-01-01

    Protein engineering strategies have proven valuable for the production of a variety of well-defined macromolecular materials with controlled properties that have enabled their use in a range of materials and biological applications. In this work, such biosynthetic strategies have been employed in the production of monodisperse alanine-rich, helical protein polymers with the sequences [AAAQEAAAAQAAAQAEAAQAAQ](3) and [AAAQAAQAQAAAEAAAQAAQAQ](6). The composition of these protein polymers is similar to that of a previously reported family of alanine-rich protein polymers, but the density and placement of chemically reactive residues has been varied to facilitate the future use of these macromolecules in elucidating polymeric structure-function relationships in biological recognition events. Both protein polymers are readily expressed from E. coli and purified to homogeneity; characterization of their conformational behavior via circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD) indicates that they adopt highly helical conformations under a range of solution conditions. Differential scanning calorimetry, in concert with CD, demonstrates that the conformational transition from helix to coil in these macromolecules can be well-defined, with helicity, conformational transitions, T(m) values, and calorimetric enthalpies that vary with the molecular weight of the protein polymers. A combination of infrared spectroscopy and CD also reveals that the macromolecules can adopt beta-sheet structures at elevated temperatures and concentrations and that the existence and kinetics of this conformational transition appear to be related to the density of charged groups on the protein polymer.

  12. Complementary genetic and genomic approaches help characterize the linkage group I seed protein QTL in soybean

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The nutritional and economic value of many crops is effectively a function of seed protein and oil content. Insight into the genetic and molecular control mechanisms involved in the deposition of these constituents in the developing seed is needed to guide crop improvement. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) on Linkage Group I (LG I) of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) has a striking effect on seed protein content. Results A soybean near-isogenic line (NIL) pair contrasting in seed protein and differing in an introgressed genomic segment containing the LG I protein QTL was used as a resource to demarcate the QTL region and to study variation in transcript abundance in developing seed. The LG I QTL region was delineated to less than 8.4 Mbp of genomic sequence on chromosome 20. Using Affymetrix® Soy GeneChip and high-throughput Illumina® whole transcriptome sequencing platforms, 13 genes displaying significant seed transcript accumulation differences between NILs were identified that mapped to the 8.4 Mbp LG I protein QTL region. Conclusions This study identifies gene candidates at the LG I protein QTL for potential involvement in the regulation of protein content in the soybean seed. The results demonstrate the power of complementary approaches to characterize contrasting NILs and provide genome-wide transcriptome insight towards understanding seed biology and the soybean genome. PMID:20199683

  13. Identification of Group B Streptococcal Sip Protein, Which Elicits Cross-Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Brodeur, Bernard R.; Boyer, Martine; Charlebois, Isabelle; Hamel, Josée; Couture, France; Rioux, Clément R.; Martin, Denis

    2000-01-01

    A protein of group B streptococci (GBS), named Sip for surface immunogenic protein, which is distinct from previously described surface proteins, was identified after immunological screening of a genomic library. Immunoblots using a Sip-specific monoclonal antibody indicated that a protein band with an approximate molecular mass of 53 kDa which did not vary in size was present in every GBS strain tested. Representatives of all nine GBS serotypes were included in the panel of strains. Cloning and sequencing of the sip gene revealed an open reading frame of 1,305 nucleotides coding for a polypeptide of 434 amino acid residues, with a calculated pI of 6.84 and molecular mass of 45.5 kDa. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences from six different strains confirmed with 98% identity that the sip gene is highly conserved among GBS isolates. N-terminal amino acid sequencing also indicated the presence of a 25-amino-acid signal peptide which is cleaved in the mature protein. More importantly, immunization with the recombinant Sip protein efficiently protected CD-1 mice against deadly challenges with six GBS strains of serotypes Ia/c, Ib, II/R, III, V, and VI. The data presented in this study suggest that this highly conserved protein induces cross-protective immunity against GBS infections and emphasize its potential as a universal vaccine candidate. PMID:10992461

  14. Conformational Properties of Helical Protein Polymers with Varying Densities of Chemically Reactive Groups

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Robin S.; Argust, Lindsey M.; Sharp, Jared D.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2008-01-01

    Protein engineering strategies have proven valuable for the production of a variety of well-defined macromolecular materials with controlled properties that have enabled their use in a range of materials and biological applications. In this work, such biosynthetic strategies have been employed in the production of monodisperse alanine-rich, helical protein polymers with the sequences [AAAQEAAAAQAAAQAEAAQAAQ]3 and [AAAQAAQAQAAAEAAAQAAQAQ]6. The composition of these protein polymers is similar to that of a previously reported family of alanine-rich protein polymers, but the density and placement of chemically reactive residues has been varied to facilitate the future use of these macromolecules in elucidating polymeric structure-function relationships in biological recognition events. Both protein polymers are readily expressed from E. coli and purified to homogeneity; characterization of their conformational behavior via circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD) indicates that they adopt highly helical conformations under a range of solution conditions. Differential scanning calorimetry, in concert with CD, demonstrates that the conformational transition from helix to coil in these macromolecules can be well-defined, with helicity, conformational transitions, Tm values, and calorimetric enthalpies that vary with the molecular weight of the protein polymers. A combination of infrared spectroscopy and CD also reveals that the macromolecules can adopt β-sheet structures at elevated temperatures and concentrations and that the existence and kinetics of this conformational transition appear to be related to the density of charged groups on the protein polymer. PMID:19180254

  15. Identification of plasma protein profiles associated with risk groups of prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, Malin; Wingren, Christer; Rose, Carsten; Bjartell, Anders; Becker, Charlotte; Lilja, Hans; Borrebaeck, Carl AK

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Early detection of prostate cancer (PC) using prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in blood reduces PC-death among unscreened men. However, due to modest specificity of PSA at commonly used cut-offs, there are urgent needs for additional biomarkers contributing enhanced risk classification among men with modestly elevated PSA. Experimental design Recombinant antibody microarrays were applied for protein expression profiling of 80 plasma samples from routine PSA-measurements, a priori divided into four risk groups, based on levels of total and %free PSA. Results The results demonstrated that plasma protein profiles could be identified that pinpointed PC (a malignant biomarker signature) and most importantly that showed moderate to high correlation with biochemically defined PC risk groups. Notably, the data also implied that the risk group with mid-range PSA and low %free PSA, a priori known to be heterogeneous, could be further stratified into two subgroups, more resembling the lowest and highest risk groups, respectively. Conclusions and clinical relevance In this pilot study, we have shown that plasma protein biomarker signatures, associated with risk groups of PC, could be identified from crude plasma samples using affinity proteomics. This approach could in the longer perspective provide novel opportunities for improved risk classification of PC patients. PMID:25196118

  16. Protein dynamics and thermodynamics crossover at 10 °C: Different roles of hydration at hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Yuan; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Wu, Yue

    2016-11-01

    Water at hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups interact differently with proteins. Particularly, hydration properties at hydrophobic groups undergo qualitative changes as temperature decreases below 10 °C. The influence of such interfacial changes on protein dynamics and thermodynamics remains largely unexplored. Here, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are investigated by in-situ NMR as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 °C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The influence of water at hydrophilic groups shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 °C.

  17. A novel integrin {alpha}5{beta}1 antagonistic peptide, A5-1, screened by Protein Chip system as a potent angiogenesis inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eung-Yoon; Bang, Ji Young; Chang, Soo-Ik; Kang, In-Cheol

    2008-12-26

    Integrin {alpha}5{beta}1 immobilized on a ProteoChip was used to screen new antagonistic peptides from multiple hexapeptide sub-libraries of the positional scanning synthetic peptide combinatorial library (PS-SPCL). The integrin {alpha}5{beta}1-Fibronectin interaction was demonstrated on the chip. A novel peptide ligand, A5-1 (VILVLF), with high affinity to integrin {alpha}5{beta}1 was identified from the hexapeptide libraries with this chip-based screening method on the basis of a competitive inhibition assay. A5-1 inhibits the integrin-fibronectin interaction in a dose-dependent manner (IC{sub 50}; 1.56 {+-} 0.28 {mu}M. In addition, it inhibits human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, tubular network formation, and bFGF-induced neovascularization in a chick chorioallantoic membrane. These results suggest that A5-1 will be a potent inhibitor of neovascularization.

  18. Conformational responses to changes in the state of ionization of titrable groups in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Daniel Eric

    Electrostatic energy links the structural properties of proteins with some of their important biological functions, including catalysis, energy transduction, and binding and recognition. Accurate calculation of electrostatic energy is essential for predicting and for analyzing function from structure. All proteins have many ionizable residues at the protein-water interface. These groups tend to have ionization equilibria (pK a values) shifted slightly relative to their values in water. In contrast, groups buried in the hydrophobic interior usually have highly anomalous p Ka values. These shifts are what structure-based calculations have to reproduce to allow examination of contributions from electrostatics to stability, solubility and interactions of proteins. Electrostatic energies are challenging to calculate accurately because proteins are heterogeneous dielectric materials. Any individual ionizable group can experience very different local environments with different dielectric properties. The studies in this thesis examine the hypothesis that proteins reorganize concomitant with changes in their state of ionization. It appears that the pKa value measured experimentally reflects the average of pKa values experienced in the different electrostatic environments corresponding to different conformational microstates. Current computational models fail to sample conformational reorganization of the backbone correctly. Staphyloccocal nuclease (SNase) was used as a model protein in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies to characterize the conformational rearrangements of the protein coupled to changes in the ionization state of titrable groups. One set of experiments tests the hypothesis that proton binding to surface Asp and Glu side chains drives local unfolding by stabilizing less-native, more water-solvated conformations in which the side chains have normalized pKa values. Increased backbone flexibility in the ps-ns timescale, hydrogen bond (H

  19. Effect of Hofmeister ions on protein thermal stability: roles of ion hydration and peptide groups?

    PubMed

    Sedlák, Erik; Stagg, Loren; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-11-01

    We have systematically explored the Hofmeister effects of cations and anions (0.3-1.75 M range) for acidic Desulfovibrio desulfuricans apoflavodoxin (net charge -19, pH 7) and basic horse heart cytochrome c (net charge +17, pH 4.5). The Hofmeister effect of the ions on protein thermal stability was assessed by the parameter dT trs/d[ion] (T trs; thermal midpoint). We show that dT trs/d[ion] correlates with ion partition coefficients between surface and bulk water and ion surface tension effects: this suggests direct interactions between ions and proteins. Surprisingly, the stability effects of the different ions on the two model proteins are similar, implying a major role of the peptide backbone, instead of charged groups, in mediation of the interactions. Upon assessing chemical/physical properties of the ions responsible for the Hofmeister effects on protein stability, ion charge density was identified as most important. Taken together, our study suggests key roles for ion hydration and the peptide group in facilitating interactions between Hofmeister ions and proteins.

  20. Comparative structural bioinformatics analysis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens chemotaxis proteins within Bacillus subtilis group.

    PubMed

    Yssel, Anna; Reva, Oleg; Tastan Bishop, Ozlem

    2011-12-01

    Chemotaxis is a process in which bacteria sense their chemical environment and move towards more favorable conditions. Since plant colonization by bacteria is a multifaceted process which requires a response to the complex chemical environment, a finely tuned and sensitive chemotaxis system is needed. Members of the Bacillus subtilis group including Bacillus amyloliquefaciens are industrially important, for example, as bio-pesticides. The group exhibits plant growth-promoting characteristics, with different specificity towards certain host plants. Therefore, we hypothesize that while the principal molecular mechanisms of bacterial chemotaxis may be conserved, the bacterial chemotaxis system may need an evolutionary tweaking to adapt it to specific requirements, particularly in the process of evolution of free-living soil organisms, towards plant colonization behaviour. To date, almost nothing is known about what parts of the chemotaxis proteins are subjected to positive amino acid substitutions, involved in adjusting the chemotaxis system of bacteria during speciation. In this novel study, positively selected and purified sites of chemotaxis proteins were calculated, and these residues were mapped onto homology models that were built for the chemotaxis proteins, in an attempt to understand the spatial evolution of the chemotaxis proteins. Various positively selected amino acids were identified in semi-conserved regions of the proteins away from the known active sites.

  1. Modification of Hypoxic Respiratory Response by Protein Tyrosine Kinase in Brainstem Ventral Respiratory Neuron Group

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Huai, Ruituo; Yang, Junqing; Li, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) mediated the tyrosine phosphorylation modification of neuronal receptors and ion channels. Whether such modification resulted in changes of physiological functions was not sufficiently studied. In this study we examined whether the hypoxic respiratory response—which is the enhancement of breathing in hypoxic environment could be affected by the inhibition of PTK at brainstem ventral respiratory neuron column (VRC). Experiments were performed on urethane anesthetized adult rabbits. Phrenic nerve discharge was recorded as the central respiratory motor output. Hypoxic respiratory response was produced by ventilating the rabbit with 10% O2-balance 90% N2 for 5 minutes. The responses of phrenic nerve discharge to hypoxia were observed before and after microinjecting PTK inhibitor genistein, AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX, or inactive PTK inhibitor analogue daidzein at the region of ambiguus nucleus (NA) at levels 0–2 mm rostral to obex where the inspiratory subgroup of VRC were recorded. Results were as follows: 1. the hypoxic respiratory response was significantly attenuated after microinjection of genistein and/or CNQX, and no additive effect (i.e., further attenuation of hypoxic respiratory response) was observed when genistein and CNQX were microinjected one after another at the same injection site. Microinjection of daidzein had no effect on hypoxic respiratory response. 2. Fluorescent immunostaining showed that hypoxia significantly increased the number of phosphotyrosine immunopositive neurons in areas surrounding NA and most of these neurons were also immunopositive to glutamate AMPA receptor subunit GluR1. These results suggested that PTK played an important role in regulating the hypoxic respiratory response, possibly through the tyrosine phosphorylation modification of glutamate AMPA receptors on the respiratory neurons of ventral respiratory neuron column. PMID:27798679

  2. CCR2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Struthers, Mary; Pasternak, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of CCR2 has been considered as a target for multiple therapeutic diseases including autoimmune disease, atherosclerosis, pain, and metabolic disease, based in part on the critical role this receptor plays on monocyte migration. Numerous companies have reported programs to identify CCR2 antagonists. Common challenges to the development of CCR2 agents have included poor activity at the rodent receptor and selectivity for both other chemokine receptors and ion channels. This review summarizes the rationale for targeting CCR2 in disease, the recent progress in the identification of potent and select CCR2 antagonists, and the current status of clinical trials for CCR2 agents.

  3. Hydrogen bonding motifs of protein side chains: descriptions of binding of arginine and amide groups.

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, L.; Glusker, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    The modes of hydrogen bonding of arginine, asparagine, and glutamine side chains and of urea have been examined in small-molecule crystal structures in the Cambridge Structural Database and in crystal structures of protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein complexes. Analysis of the hydrogen bonding patterns of each by graph-set theory shows three patterns of rings (R) with one or two hydrogen bond acceptors and two donors and with eight, nine, or six atoms in the ring, designated R2(2)(8), R2(2)(9), and R1(2)(6). These three patterns are found for arginine-like groups and for urea, whereas only the first two patterns R2(2)(8) and R2(2)(9) are found for asparagine- and glutamine-like groups. In each case, the entire system is planar within 0.7 A or less. On the other hand, in macromolecular crystal structures, the hydrogen bonding patterns in protein-nucleic acid complexes between the nucleic acid base and the protein are all R2(2)(9), whereas hydrogen bonding between Watson-Crick-like pairs of nucleic acid bases is R2(2)(8). These two hydrogen bonding arrangements [R2(2)(9)] and R2(2)(8)] are predetermined by the nature of the groups available for hydrogen bonding. The third motif identified, R1(2)(6), involves hydrogen bonds that are less linear than in the other two motifs and is found in proteins. PMID:7773178

  4. Calcineurin inhibitor protein (CAIN) attenuates Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor endocytosis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucimar T; Dale, Lianne B; Ribeiro, Fabiola M; Babwah, Andy V; Pampillo, Macarena; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2009-10-16

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are coupled via phospholipase Cbeta to the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides and function to modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission at glutamatergic synapses. The desensitization of Group I mGluR signaling is thought to be mediated primarily via second messenger-dependent protein kinases and G protein-coupled receptor kinases. We show here that both mGluR1 and mGluR5 interact with the calcineurin inhibitor protein (CAIN). CAIN is co-immunoprecipitated in a complex with Group I mGluRs from both HEK 293 cells and mouse cortical brain lysates. Purified CAIN and its C-terminal domain specifically interact with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins corresponding to the second intracellular loop and the distal C-terminal tail domains of mGluR1. The interaction of CAIN with mGluR1 could also be blocked using a Tat-tagged peptide corresponding to the mGluR1 second intracellular loop domain. Overexpression of full-length CAIN attenuates the agonist-stimulated endocytosis of both mGluR1a and mGluR5a in HEK 293 cells, but expression of the CAIN C-terminal domain does not alter mGluR5a internalization. In contrast, overexpression of either full-length CAIN or the CAIN C-terminal domain impairs agonist-stimulated inositol phosphate formation in HEK 293 cells expressing mGluR1a. This CAIN-mediated antagonism of mGluR1a signaling appears to involve the disruption of receptor-Galpha(q/11) complexes. Taken together, these observations suggest that the association of CAIN with intracellular domains involved in mGluR/G protein coupling provides an additional mechanism by which Group I mGluR endocytosis and signaling are regulated.

  5. The selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 decreases immobility time in the forced swim test and affects cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Cornelius G; Bilang-Bleuel, Alicia; De Carli, Sonja; Linthorst, Astrid C E; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists can block the retention of the immobility response in the forced swimming test. Recently, we showed that forced swimming evokes a distinct spatiotemporal pattern of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and neocortex. In the present study, we found that chronic treatment of rats with the selective GR antagonist ORG 34116 decreased the immobility time in the forced swim test, increased baseline levels of phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) in the DG and neocortex and affected the forced swimming-induced changes in P-CREB levels in a time- and site-specific manner. Overall, we observed that, in control rats, forced swimming evoked increases in P-CREB levels in the DG and neocortex, whereas in ORG 34116-treated animals a major dephosphorylation of P-CREB was observed. These observations underscore an important role of GRs in the control of the phosphorylation state of CREB which seems to be of significance for the immobility response in the forced swim test and extend the molecular mechanism of action of GRs in the brain.

  6. Prediction of functional sites in proteins using conserved functional group analysis.

    PubMed

    Innis, C Axel; Anand, A Prem; Sowdhamini, R

    2004-04-02

    A detailed knowledge of a protein's functional site is an absolute prerequisite for understanding its mode of action at the molecular level. However, the rapid pace at which sequence and structural information is being accumulated for proteins greatly exceeds our ability to determine their biochemical roles experimentally. As a result, computational methods are required which allow for the efficient processing of the evolutionary information contained in this wealth of data, in particular that related to the nature and location of functionally important sites and residues. The method presented here, referred to as conserved functional group (CFG) analysis, relies on a simplified representation of the chemical groups found in amino acid side-chains to identify functional sites from a single protein structure and a number of its sequence homologues. We show that CFG analysis can fully or partially predict the location of functional sites in approximately 96% of the 470 cases tested and that, unlike other methods available, it is able to tolerate wide variations in sequence identity. In addition, we discuss its potential in a structural genomics context, where automation, scalability and efficiency are critical, and an increasing number of protein structures are determined with no prior knowledge of function. This is exemplified by our analysis of the hypothetical protein Ydde_Ecoli, whose structure was recently solved by members of the North East Structural Genomics consortium. Although the proposed active site for this protein needs to be validated experimentally, this example illustrates the scope of CFG analysis as a general tool for the identification of residues likely to play an important role in a protein's biochemical function. Thus, our method offers a convenient solution to rapidly and automatically process the vast amounts of data that are beginning to emerge from structural genomics projects.

  7. Mathematical Characterization of Protein Sequences Using Patterns as Chemical Group Combinations of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Pabitra Pal; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of amino acid sequence similarity is the fundamental concept behind the protein phylogenetic tree formation. By virtue of this method, we can explain the evolutionary relationships, but further explanations are not possible unless sequences are studied through the chemical nature of individual amino acids. Here we develop a new methodology to characterize the protein sequences on the basis of the chemical nature of the amino acids. We design various algorithms for studying the variation of chemical group transitions and various chemical group combinations as patterns in the protein sequences. The amino acid sequence of conventional myosin II head domain of 14 family members are taken to illustrate this new approach. We find two blocks of maximum length 6 aa as ‘FPKATD’ and ‘Y/FTNEKL’ without repeating the same chemical nature and one block of maximum length 20 aa with the repetition of chemical nature which are common among all 14 members. We also check commonality with another motor protein sub-family kinesin, KIF1A. Based on our analysis we find a common block of length 8 aa both in myosin II and KIF1A. This motif is located in the neck linker region which could be responsible for the generation of mechanical force, enabling us to find the unique blocks which remain chemically conserved across the family. We also validate our methodology with different protein families such as MYOI, Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase. Altogether, our studies provide a new methodology for investigating the conserved amino acids’ pattern in different proteins. PMID:27930687

  8. Mathematical Characterization of Protein Sequences Using Patterns as Chemical Group Combinations of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayanta Kumar; Das, Provas; Ray, Korak Kumar; Choudhury, Pabitra Pal; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of amino acid sequence similarity is the fundamental concept behind the protein phylogenetic tree formation. By virtue of this method, we can explain the evolutionary relationships, but further explanations are not possible unless sequences are studied through the chemical nature of individual amino acids. Here we develop a new methodology to characterize the protein sequences on the basis of the chemical nature of the amino acids. We design various algorithms for studying the variation of chemical group transitions and various chemical group combinations as patterns in the protein sequences. The amino acid sequence of conventional myosin II head domain of 14 family members are taken to illustrate this new approach. We find two blocks of maximum length 6 aa as 'FPKATD' and 'Y/FTNEKL' without repeating the same chemical nature and one block of maximum length 20 aa with the repetition of chemical nature which are common among all 14 members. We also check commonality with another motor protein sub-family kinesin, KIF1A. Based on our analysis we find a common block of length 8 aa both in myosin II and KIF1A. This motif is located in the neck linker region which could be responsible for the generation of mechanical force, enabling us to find the unique blocks which remain chemically conserved across the family. We also validate our methodology with different protein families such as MYOI, Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase. Altogether, our studies provide a new methodology for investigating the conserved amino acids' pattern in different proteins.

  9. An mTERF domain protein functions in group II intron splicing in maize chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Hammani, Kamel; Barkan, Alice

    2014-04-01

    The mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) proteins are nucleic acid binding proteins characterized by degenerate helical repeats of ∼30 amino acids. Metazoan genomes encode a small family of mTERF proteins whose members influence mitochondrial gene expression and DNA replication. The mTERF family in higher plants consists of roughly 30 members, which localize to mitochondria or chloroplasts. Effects of several mTERF proteins on plant development and physiology have been described, but molecular functions of mTERF proteins in plants are unknown. We show that a maize mTERF protein, Zm-mTERF4, promotes the splicing of group II introns in chloroplasts. Zm-mTERF4 coimmunoprecipitates with many chloroplast introns and the splicing of some of these introns is disrupted even in hypomorphic Zm-mterf4 mutants. Furthermore, Zm-mTERF4 is found in high molecular weight complexes that include known chloroplast splicing factors. The splicing of two transfer RNAs (trnI-GAU and trnA-UGC) and one ribosomal protein messenger RNA (rpl2) is particularly sensitive to the loss of Zm-mTERF4, accounting for the loss of plastid ribosomes in Zm-mTERF4 mutants. These findings extend the known functional repertoire of the mTERF family to include group II intron splicing and suggest that a conserved role in chloroplast RNA splicing underlies the physiological defects described for mutations in BSM/Rugosa2, the Zm-mTERF4 ortholog in Arabidopsis.

  10. Epigenetic regulation of cellular memory by the Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins.

    PubMed

    Ringrose, Leonie; Paro, Renato

    2004-01-01

    During the development of multicellular organisms, cells become different from one another by changing their genetic program in response to transient stimuli. Long after the stimulus is gone, "cellular memory" mechanisms enable cells to remember their chosen fate over many cell divisions. The Polycomb and Trithorax groups of proteins, respectively, work to maintain repressed or active transcription states of developmentally important genes through many rounds of cell division. Here we review current ideas on the protein and DNA components of this transcriptional memory system and how they interact dynamically with each other to orchestrate cellular memory for several hundred genes.

  11. Using OrthoMCL to assign proteins to OrthoMCL-DB groups or to cluster proteomes into new ortholog groups

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Steve; Brunk, Brian P.; Chen, Feng; Gao, Xin; Harb, Omar S.; Iodice, John B.; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Roos, David S.; Stoeckert, Christian J.

    2011-01-01

    OrthoMCL is an algorithm for grouping proteins into ortholog groups based on their sequence similarity. OrthoMCL-DB is a public database that allows users to browse and view ortholog groups that were pre-computed using the OrthoMCL algorithm. Version 4 of this database contained 116,536 ortholog groups clustered from 1,270,853 proteins obtained from 88 eukaryotic genomes, 16 archaeal genomes and 34 bacterial genomes. Future versions of OrthoMCL-DB will include more proteomes as more genomes are sequenced. Here, we describe how you can group your proteins of interest into ortholog clusters using two different means provided by the OrthoMCL system. The OrthoMCL-DB website has a tool for uploading and grouping a set of protein sequences, typically representing a proteome. This method maps the uploaded proteins to existing groups in OrthoMCL-DB. Alternatively, if you have proteins from a set of genomes that need to be grouped, you can download, install and run the standalone OrthoMCL software. PMID:21901743

  12. Human Tetherin Exerts Strong Selection Pressure on the HIV-1 Group N Vpu Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Daniel; Unterweger, Daniel; Vogl, Michael; Usmani, Shariq M.; Heigele, Anke; Kluge, Silvia F.; Hermkes, Elisabeth; Moll, Markus; Barker, Edward; Peeters, Martine; Learn, Gerald H.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Fackler, Oliver T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 groups M and N emerged within the last century following two independent cross-species transmissions of SIVcpz from chimpanzees to humans. In contrast to pandemic group M strains, HIV-1 group N viruses are exceedingly rare, with only about a dozen infections identified, all but one in individuals from Cameroon. Poor adaptation to the human host may be responsible for this limited spread of HIV-1 group N in the human population. Here, we analyzed the function of Vpu proteins from seven group N strains from Cameroon, the place where this zoonosis originally emerged. We found that these N-Vpus acquired four amino acid substitutions (E15A, V19A and IV25/26LL) in their transmembrane domain (TMD) that allow efficient interaction with human tetherin. However, despite these adaptive changes, most N-Vpus still antagonize human tetherin only poorly and fail to down-modulate CD4, the natural killer (NK) cell ligand NTB-A as well as the lipid-antigen presenting protein CD1d. These functional deficiencies were mapped to amino acid changes in the cytoplasmic domain that disrupt putative adaptor protein binding sites and an otherwise highly conserved ßTrCP-binding DSGxxS motif. As a consequence, N-Vpus exhibited aberrant intracellular localization and/or failed to recruit the ubiquitin-ligase complex to induce tetherin degradation. The only exception was the Vpu of a group N strain recently discovered in France, but originally acquired in Togo, which contained intact cytoplasmic motifs and counteracted tetherin as effectively as the Vpus of pandemic HIV-1 M strains. These results indicate that HIV-1 group N Vpu is under strong host-specific selection pressure and that the acquisition of effective tetherin antagonism may lead to the emergence of viral variants with increased transmission fitness. PMID:23308067

  13. Topography of Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins. The order of reactivity of thiol groups*

    PubMed Central

    Bakardjieva, Anastasia; Crichton, Robert R.

    1974-01-01

    1. 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli were treated with N-[2,3-14C]-ethylmaleimide and iodo[14C]acetamide. 2. The proteins in the native subunits which reacted with the reagents were S1,‡ S2, S12, S13, S18, S21, L2, L5, L6, L10, L11, L15, L17, L20, L26+28 and L27. 3. Several proteins, such as S1, S12, S14, S18, L2, L6, L10, L11 and either L26 or 28, had thiol groups in an oxidized form and reacted to a greater extent after reduction with β-mercaptoethanol or dithiothreitol. 4. The total number of thiol groups in 30S and 50S subunits was determined as 16–17 and 26–27 respectively. The total number of thiol groups in each ribosomal protein was also determined. 5. The reaction of 30S and 50S subunits with iodoacetamide under several different conditions established the order of reactivity of thiol groups. PMID:4618476

  14. Do DEAD-box proteins promote group II intron splicing without unwinding RNA?

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Mark; Tijerina, Pilar; Bhaskaran, Hari; Mohr, Sabine; Yang, Quansheng; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Russell, Rick; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2007-10-12

    The DEAD-box protein Mss116p promotes group II intron splicing in vivo and in vitro. Here we explore two hypotheses for how Mss116p promotes group II intron splicing: by using its RNA unwinding activity to act as an RNA chaperone or by stabilizing RNA folding intermediates. We show that an Mss116p mutant in helicase motif III (SAT/AAA), which was reported to stimulate splicing without unwinding RNA, retains ATP-dependent unwinding activity and promotes unfolding of a structured RNA. Its unwinding activity increases sharply with decreasing duplex length and correlates with group II intron splicing activity in quantitative assays. Additionally, we show that Mss116p can promote ATP-independent RNA unwinding, presumably via single-strand capture, also potentially contributing to DEAD-box protein RNA chaperone activity. Our findings favor the hypothesis that DEAD-box proteins function in group II intron splicing as in other processes by using their unwinding activity to act as RNA chaperones.

  15. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein acts as a processivity factor.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M W; Yang, L

    2000-05-19

    We have previously shown that endonucleases present in a protein complex, which has specificity for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, locate sites of damage in DNA by a processive mechanism of action in normal human lymphoblastoid cells. In contrast, the endonucleases present in this complex from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) cells locate damage sites by a distributive or significantly less processive mechanism. Since the XPA protein has been shown to be responsible for the DNA repair defect in XPA cells, this protein was examined for involvement in the mechanism of target site location of these endonucleases. A recombinant XPA protein, produced by expression of the normal XPA cDNA in E. coli, was isolated and purified. The results show that the recombinant XPA protein was able to correct the defect in ability of the XPA endonucleases to act by a processive mechanism of action on UVC irradiated DNA. These studies indicate that the XPA protein, in addition to a role in damage recognition or damage verification, may function as a processivity factor.

  16. Genetic linkage of capsid protein-encoding RNA segments in group A equine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Miño, Samuel; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana; Parra, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus virions are formed by three concentric protein layers that enclose the 11 dsRNA genome segments and the viral proteins VP1 and VP3. Interactions amongst the capsid proteins (VP2, VP6, VP7 and VP4) have been described to play a major role in viral fitness, whilst restricting the reassortment of the genomic segments during co-infection with different rotavirus strains. In this work we describe and characterize the linkage between VP6 and VP7 proteins based on structural and genomic analyses of group A rotavirus strains circulating in Argentinean horses. Strains with the VP7 genotype G3 showed a strong association with the VP6 genotype I6, whilst strains with G14 were associated with the I2 genotype. Most of the differences on the VP6 and VP7 proteins were observed in interactive regions between the two proteins, suggesting that VP6 : VP7 interactions may drive the co-evolution and co-segregation of their respective gene segments.

  17. High-mobility group A1 proteins are overexpressed in human leukaemias.

    PubMed Central

    Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Agosti, Valter; Fedele, Monica; Bond, Heather; Caliendo, Irene; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Lo Coco, Francesco; Pane, Fabrizio; Turco, Maria Caterina; Morrone, Giovanni; Venuta, Salvatore; Fusco, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    High-mobility group A (HMGA) proteins are non-histone nuclear proteins that bind DNA and several transcription factors. They are involved in the regulation of chromatin structure and function. HMGA protein expression is low in normal adult tissues, but abundant during embryonic development and in several human tumours. Rearrangements of the HMGA genes have been frequently detected in human benign tumours of mesenchymal origin, e.g. lipomas, lung hamartomas and uterine leiomiomas. HMGA proteins have been implicated in the control of cell growth and differentiation of the pre-adipocytic cell line 3T3-L1. In an attempt to better understand the role of HMGA1 proteins in haematological neoplasias and in the differentiation of haematopietic cells, we have investigated their expression in human leukaemias and in leukaemic cell lines induced to terminal differentiation. Here we report HMGA1 overexpression in most fresh human leukaemias of different origin and in several leukaemic cell lines. Moreover, differentiation of three cell lines towards the megakaryocytic phenotype was associated with HMGA1 protein induction, whereas induction of erythroid and monocytic differentiation generally resulted in reduced HMGA1 expression. PMID:12573034

  18. Synthesis of a select group of proteins by Neisseria gonorrhoeae in response to thermal stress.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, M L; Bonfiglioli, R; McGee, Z A; Georgopoulos, C

    1990-01-01

    We report the thermal conditions that induce the heat shock response in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Under conditions of thermal stress, Neisseria gonorrhoeae synthesizes heat shock proteins (hsps), which differ quantitatively from conventionally studied gonococcal proteins. Gonococci accelerate the rate of synthesis of the hsps as early as 5 min after the appropriate stimulus is applied, with synthesis continuing for 30 min, as demonstrated by in vivo labeling experiments with L-[35S]methionine. Two of the gonococcal hsps are immunologically cross-reactive with the hsps of Escherichia coli, DnaK and GroEL, as demonstrated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. Ten hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of whole gonococci (total protein). Four hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of 1% N-lauroylsarcosine (sodium salt) (Sarkosyl)-insoluble membrane fractions. Two of the hsps from the 1% Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction are found exclusively in this fraction, suggesting that they are membrane proteins. The identification of this group of proteins will facilitate further study of the function of these proteins and provide insight into the possible role of hsps in disease pathogenesis. Images PMID:2106493

  19. Synthesis of a select group of proteins by Neisseria gonorrhoeae in response to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Woods, M L; Bonfiglioli, R; McGee, Z A; Georgopoulos, C

    1990-03-01

    We report the thermal conditions that induce the heat shock response in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Under conditions of thermal stress, Neisseria gonorrhoeae synthesizes heat shock proteins (hsps), which differ quantitatively from conventionally studied gonococcal proteins. Gonococci accelerate the rate of synthesis of the hsps as early as 5 min after the appropriate stimulus is applied, with synthesis continuing for 30 min, as demonstrated by in vivo labeling experiments with L-[35S]methionine. Two of the gonococcal hsps are immunologically cross-reactive with the hsps of Escherichia coli, DnaK and GroEL, as demonstrated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. Ten hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of whole gonococci (total protein). Four hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of 1% N-lauroylsarcosine (sodium salt) (Sarkosyl)-insoluble membrane fractions. Two of the hsps from the 1% Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction are found exclusively in this fraction, suggesting that they are membrane proteins. The identification of this group of proteins will facilitate further study of the function of these proteins and provide insight into the possible role of hsps in disease pathogenesis.

  20. Differential carbonylation of cytoskeletal proteins in blood group O erythrocytes: potential role in protection against severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Darío; Hernáez, María L; Kamali, Ali N; Diez, Amalia; Puyet, Antonio; Bautista, José M

    2012-12-01

    The molecular basis for the prevalence of blood group O in regions where malaria is endemic remains unclear. In some genetic backgrounds oxidative modifications have been linked to a reduced susceptibility to severe malaria disease. Through redox proteomics, we detected differences in carbonylated membrane proteins among the different blood groups, both in Plasmodium-infected and uninfected erythrocytes (RBC). Carbonylation profiles of RBC membrane proteins revealed that group O blood shows a reduced protein oxidation pattern compared to groups A, B and AB. Upon infection with Plasmodium falciparum Dd2, erythrocytes of all blood groups showed increased oxidation of membrane proteins. By examining 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) modified proteins by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry) we observed that, upon malaria infection, the protein components of lipid rafts and cytoskeleton were the main targets of 4-HNE carbonylation in all blood groups. Ankyrins and protein bands 4.2 and 4.1 were differentially carbonylated in group O as compared to A and B groups. During trophozoite maturation in group O erythrocytes, a steady increase was observed in the number of 4-HNE-modified proteins, suggesting a parasite-driven 4-HNE-carbonylation process. Our findings indicate a possible correlation between the protection against severe malaria in blood group O individuals and a specific pattern of 4-HNE-carbonylation of cytoskeleton proteins.

  1. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  2. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  3. Development of selective agonists and antagonists of P2Y receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei A.; de Castro, Sonia; Harden, T. Kendall; Ko, Hyojin

    2008-01-01

    Although elucidation of the medicinal chemistry of agonists and antagonists of the P2Y receptors has lagged behind that of many other members of group A G protein-coupled receptors, detailed qualitative and quantitative structure–activity relationships (SARs) were recently constructed for several of the subtypes. Agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2, and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors are now known. Selective nonnucleotide antagonists were reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y11, P2Y12, and P2Y13 receptors. At the P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, nucleotide agonists (5′-diphosphate derivatives) were converted into antagonists of nanomolar affinity by altering the phosphate moieties, with a focus particularly on the ribose conformation and substitution pattern. Nucleotide analogues with conformationally constrained ribose-like rings were introduced as selective receptor probes for P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors. Screening chemically diverse compound libraries has begun to yield new lead compounds for the development of P2Y receptor antagonists, such as competitive P2Y12 receptor antagonists with antithrombotic activity. Selective agonists for the P2Y4, P2Y11, and P2Y13 receptors and selective antagonists for P2Y4 and P2Y14 receptors have not yet been identified. The P2Y14 receptor appears to be the most restrictive of the class with respect to modification of the nucleobase, ribose, and phosphate moieties. The continuing process of ligand design for the P2Y receptors will aid in the identification of new clinical targets. PMID:18600475

  4. Structural insights into the LCIB protein family reveals a new group of β-carbonic anhydrases

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shengyang; Sun, Jian; Wunder, Tobias; Tang, Desong; Cousins, Asaph B.; Sze, Siu Kwan; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Gao, Yong-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic microalgae have evolved diverse CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to saturate the carboxylase with its substrate, to compensate for the slow kinetics and competing oxygenation reaction of the key photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme rubisco. The limiting CO2-inducible B protein (LCIB) is known to be essential for CCM function in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. To assign a function to this previously uncharacterized protein family, we purified and characterized a phylogenetically diverse set of LCIB homologs. Three of the six homologs are functional carbonic anhydrases (CAs). We determined the crystal structures of LCIB and limiting CO2-inducible C protein (LCIC) from C. reinhardtii and a CA-functional homolog from Phaeodactylum tricornutum, all of which harbor motifs bearing close resemblance to the active site of canonical β-CAs. Our results identify the LCIB family as a previously unidentified group of β-CAs, and provide a biochemical foundation for their function in the microalgal CCMs. PMID:27911826

  5. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; Pérez, José Luis García; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells. PMID:26244523

  6. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells.

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; García Pérez, José Luis; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-08-05

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells.

  7. Distribution of sulphydryl groups and disulphide linkages in tissue proteins of quail uropygial glands.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Maruyama, T; Morohashi, M

    1994-07-01

    1. The distribution of sulphydryl (-SH) groups and disulphide (S-S) linkages in the tissue proteins of quail uropygial glands was histochemically observed by a staining method using N-[7-dimethylamino-4-methyl-3-coumarinyl]maleimide. 2. In the uropygial gland, the -SH groups of the tissue proteins of glandular cells displayed a progressive change to S-S linkages concomitant with the shift from the transitional cell layer to the degenerating cell layer, suggesting that cell destruction was occurring with the products being released as secretions. This phenomenon was apparently more pronounced in the deep compared with the shallow portion of secretory tubules. 3. The above results indicated that a mechanism similar to epidermal differentiation operates in the process of holocrine secretion in the uropygial gland.

  8. High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein as an Auxiliary Biomarker for Dengue Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Vázquez, Susana; Guzmán, Maria G.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of many methods for rapid and early diagnosis of dengue, there is still a need to develop new approaches that not only combine low cost, specificity, and sensitivity, but also are capable of accurately detecting secondary infection in the early stages of the disease. We report the potential of the high mobility group box 1 protein as an auxiliary biomarker for early dengue diagnosis. We tested a 205-sample serum panel that included negative and positive samples from primary and secondary dengue cases, as well as samples from patients with dengue-like symptoms. We observed that high mobility group box 1 protein was generally detected only in dengue-positive samples for persons with primary and secondary infections. These results highlight the possibility of using this endogenous molecule as an auxiliary biomarker to aid in dengue detection and improve current methods for early diagnosis of dengue. PMID:23269659

  9. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Interacting Proteins: Fine-Tuning Receptor Functions in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Francesconi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors mediate slow excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and are critical to activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, a cellular substrate of learning and memory. Dysregulated receptor signaling is implicated in neuropsychiatric conditions ranging from neurodevelopmental to neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling functions can be modulated by interacting proteins that mediate receptor trafficking, expression and coupling efficiency to signaling effectors. These interactions afford cell- or pathway-specific modulation to fine-tune receptor function, thus representing a potential target for pharmacological interventions in pathological conditions. PMID:27296642

  10. Histochemical Demonstration of Protein-Bound Alpha-Acylamido Carboxyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Barrnett, Russell J.; Seligman, Arnold M.

    1958-01-01

    A method has been developed to demonstrate the alpha-acylamido carboxyl groups of protein, taking advantage of the fact that acylamido carboxyl groups are converted to ketonic carbonyls by the action of acetic anhydride and absolute pyridine. The method utilizes deparaffinized sections of tissues fixed in a variety of fixatives. Following the conversion of carboxyls to the methyl ketones, the latter are stained with 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoic acid hydrazide. Control experiments have indicated that methylation of carboxyls prevented staining, as did carbonyl reagents after the carboxyls were transformed to methyl ketones. Leucofuchsin did not stain the ketonic carbonyls, and only elastic tissue stained with 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoic acid hydrazide without the previous use of the catalyzed reaction with anhydride. A brief survey of the reaction on various tissues of the albino rat was made, and the effects of various fixatives were assayed. Of particular interest were certain sites, such as acidophiles of the anterior pituitary gland, where an intense reaction occurred. The possibility exists that certain specific proteins rich in terminal acylamido carboxyl groups, by virtue of their protein side chains or low molecular weight, may be demonstrated by this method. PMID:13525430

  11. High Mobility Group B Proteins, Their Partners, and Other Redox Sensors in Ovarian and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro-Alonso, Aida; Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Vizoso-Vázquez, Ángel; Quindós, María; Cerdán, M. Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells try to avoid the overproduction of reactive oxygen species by metabolic rearrangements. These cells also develop specific strategies to increase ROS resistance and to express the enzymatic activities necessary for ROS detoxification. Oxidative stress produces DNA damage and also induces responses, which could help the cell to restore the initial equilibrium. But if this is not possible, oxidative stress finally activates signals that will lead to cell death. High mobility group B (HMGB) proteins have been previously related to the onset and progressions of cancers of different origins. The protein HMGB1 behaves as a redox sensor and its structural changes, which are conditioned by the oxidative environment, are associated with different functions of the protein. This review describes recent advances in the role of human HMGB proteins and other proteins interacting with them, in cancerous processes related to oxidative stress, with special reference to ovarian and prostate cancer. Their participation in the molecular mechanisms of resistance to cisplatin, a drug commonly used in chemotherapy, is also revised. PMID:26682011

  12. Phosphorylation and subcellular redistribution of high mobility group proteins 14 and 17, analyzed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Louie, D. F.; Gloor, K. K.; Galasinski, S. C.; Resing, K. A.; Ahn, N. G.

    2000-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins 14 and 17 are nonhistone nuclear proteins that have been implicated in control of transcription and chromatin structure. To examine the posttranslational modifications of HMG-14 and -17 in vivo, HMG proteins were prepared from nuclear vs. cytosolic fractions of human K562 cells treated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) or okadaic acid (OA) and examined by electrospray mass spectrometry. Analysis of full-length masses demonstrated mono-, di-, and triphosphorylation of HMG-14 and mono- and diphosphorylation of HMG-17 from OA treated cells, whereas HMG-14 and -17 from TPA treated cells were monophosphorylated. Peptide mass and sequence analysis showed major and minor phosphorylation sites, respectively, at Ser24 and Ser28 in HMG-17, and Ser20 and Ser24 in HMG-14. These sites were found in the consensus sequence RRSARLSAK, within the nucleosomal binding domain of each protein. A third phosphorylation site in HMG-14 was located at either Ser6 or Ser7. Interestingly, the proportion of HMG-14 and -17 found in cytosolic pools increased significantly after 1 h of treatment compared to control cells and showed preferential phosphorylation compared with proteins from nuclear fractions. These results suggest that phosphorylation of HMG-14 and -7 interferes with nuclear localization mechanisms in a manner favoring release from nuclei. PMID:10739259

  13. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein Loads as a Separate Factor onto DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Suzanne; Volker, Marcel; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Nigg, Alex L.; Moné, Martijn J.; van Zeeland, Albert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main DNA repair pathway in mammals for removal of UV-induced lesions. NER involves the concerted action of more than 25 polypeptides in a coordinated fashion. The xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) has been suggested to function as a central organizer and damage verifier in NER. How XPA reaches DNA lesions and how the protein is distributed in time and space in living cells are unknown. Here we studied XPA in vivo by using a cell line stably expressing physiological levels of functional XPA fused to green fluorescent protein and by applying quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The majority of XPA moves rapidly through the nucleoplasm with a diffusion rate different from those of other NER factors tested, arguing against a preassembled XPA-containing NER complex. DNA damage induced a transient (∼5-min) immobilization of maximally 30% of XPA. Immobilization depends on XPC, indicating that XPA is not the initial lesion recognition protein in vivo. Moreover, loading of replication protein A on NER lesions was not dependent on XPA. Thus, XPA participates in NER by incorporation of free diffusing molecules in XPC-dependent NER-DNA complexes. This study supports a model for a rapid consecutive assembly of free NER factors, and a relatively slow simultaneous disassembly, after repair. PMID:12897146

  14. Interaction of the Arabidopsis polycomb group proteins FIE and MEA mediates their common phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Spillane, C; MacDougall, C; Stock, C; Köhler, C; Vielle-Calzada, J P; Nunes, S M; Grossniklaus, U; Goodrich, J

    2000-11-30

    Genes of the FERTILISATION INDEPENDENT SEED (FIS) class regulate cell proliferation during reproductive development in Arabidopsis [1-5]. The FIS genes FERTILISATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE) and MEDEA (MEA) encode homologs of animal Polycomb group (Pc-G) proteins, transcriptional regulators that modify chromatin structure and are thought to form multimeric complexes [3-11]. To test whether similarities in fis mutant phenotypes reflect interactions between their protein products, we characterised FIE RNA and protein localisation in vivo, and FIE protein interactions in yeast and in vitro. Expression of FIE mRNA overlaps with that of MEA during embryo sac and seed development and is unaffected in mea mutants. Results from the yeast two-hybrid system and an in vitro pull-down assay indicate that MEA and FIE proteins interact. The relevance of this interaction in vivo is supported by the finding that FIE and MEA co-localise in the nucleus in transfected plant cells. Interaction of MEA and FIE is mediated by the amino-terminal region of MEA. Despite sequence divergence in this domain, MEA can interact with its corresponding animal partner Extrasexcombs (ESC) in the yeast two-hybrid system. We conclude that FIE and MEA act together as part of a multimeric complex and that this accounts for the similarities in mutant phenotypes. We propose that an ancient mechanism for chromatin modification has been independently recruited to different developmental processes in the two kingdoms.

  15. Biophysical characterization of G protein ectodomain of group B human respiratory syncytial virus from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wajihul Hasan; Srungaram, V L N Raghuram; Islam, Asimul; Beg, Ilyas; Haider, Md Shakir H; Ahmad, Faizan; Broor, Shobha; Parveen, Shama

    2016-07-03

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is an important pathogen of acute respiratory tract infection. The G protein of hRSV is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is a neutralizing antigen and is thus a vaccine candidate. In this study, synthetic codon optimized ectodomain G protein [G(ΔTM)] of BA genotype of group B hRSV was cloned, expressed, and characterized using biophysical techniques. The molar absorption coefficient and mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm ([θ]222) of G (ΔTM) was found to be 7950 M(-1) cm(-1) and -19701.7 deg cm(2) dmol(-1) respectively. It was concluded that G(ΔTM) mainly consist of α-helix (74.9%) with some amount of β-sheet (4%). The protein was stable up to 85°C without any transition curve. However, heat-induced denaturation of G(ΔTM) resulted in total loss of β-sheet whereas not much change was observed in the α-helix part of the secondary structure. It was concluded that G(ΔTM) is an α-helical protein and it is highly stable at high temperature, but could be easily denatured using high concentrations of GdmCl/urea or acidic condition. This is the first investigation of cloning, expression, and characterization of G(ΔTM) of BA viruses from India. Structural characterization of G protein will assist in drug designing and vaccine development for hRSV.

  16. Characterization of TcHMGB, a high mobility group B family member protein from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cribb, Pamela; Perozzi, Marina; Villanova, Gabriela Vanina; Trochine, Andrea; Serra, Esteban

    2011-09-01

    High mobility group B (HMGB) proteins are highly abundant non-histone chromatin proteins that play important roles in the execution and control of many nuclear functions. Based on homology searches, we identified the coding sequence for the TcHMGB protein, an HMGB family member from Trypanosoma cruzi. TcHMGB has two HMG box domains, similar to mammalian HMGBs, but lacks the typical C-terminal acidic tail. Instead, it contains a 110 amino acid long N-terminal domain. The TcHMGB N-terminal domain is conserved between the TriTryp sequences (70-80% similarity) and seems to be characteristic of kinetoplastid HMGBs. Despite these differences, TcHMGB maintains HMG box architectural functions: we demonstrated that the trypanosomatid HMGB binds distorted DNA structures such as cruciform DNA in gel shift assays. TcHMGB is also able to bend linear DNA as determined by T4 ligase circularization assays, similar to other HMGB family members. Immunofluorescence and western blot assays showed that TcHMGB is a nuclear protein expressed in all life cycle stages. Protein levels, however, seem to vary throughout the life cycle, which may be related to previously described changes in heterochromatin distribution and transcription rates.

  17. The high mobility group AT-hook 1 protein stimulates bovine herpesvirus 1 productive infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqian; Jones, Clinton

    2017-06-15

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) is an important pathogen of cattle that causes clinical symptoms in the upper respiratory tract and conjunctivitis. Like most alpha-herpesvirinae subfamily members, BoHV-1 establishes latency in sensory neurons. Stress consistently induces reactivation from latency, which is essential for virus transmission. Recent studies demonstrated that a viral protein (ORF2) expressed in a subset of latently infected neurons is associated with β-catenin and the high mobility group AT-hook 1 protein (HMGA1), which correlates with increased expression of these proteins in latently infected neurons. Since HMGA1 is primarily expressed in actively growing cells, binds to the minor groove of A+T rich regions in double-stranded DNA, and mediates gene transcription, we hypothesized that HMGA1 regulates BoHV-1 productive infection. Studies in this report indicated that productive infection increased HMGA1 protein levels and re-localized the protein in the nucleus. Netropsin, a small molecule that binds to the minor groove of DNA and prevents HMGA1 from interacting with DNA inhibited viral replication and interfered with the ability of BoHV-1 to induce HMGA1 re-localization. Furthermore, netropsin reduced RNA and protein expression of two viral regulatory proteins (bICP0 and bICP22) during productive infection, but increased bICP4 levels. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that specifically target HMGA1 reduced HMGA1 RNA levels and virus production confirming HMGA1 stimulates productive infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein-Induced Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Signaling Is Inhibited by the TLR4 Antagonists Rhodobacter sphaeroides Lipopolysaccharide and Eritoran (E5564) and Requires Direct Interaction with MD-2

    PubMed Central

    Rallabhandi, Prasad; Phillips, Rachel L.; Boukhvalova, Marina S.; Pletneva, Lioubov M.; Shirey, Kari Ann; Gioannini, Theresa L.; Weiss, Jerrold P.; Chow, Jesse C.; Hawkins, Lynn D.; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Blanco, Jorge C. G.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a signaling receptor for structurally diverse microbe-associated molecular patterns, is activated by the RSV fusion (F) protein and by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a CD14-dependent manner. TLR4 signaling by LPS also requires the presence of an additional protein, MD-2. Thus, it is possible that F protein-mediated TLR4 activation relies on MD-2 as well, although this hypothesis has not been formally tested. LPS-free RSV F protein was found to activate NF-κB in HEK293T transfectants that express wild-type (WT) TLR4 and CD14, but only when MD-2 was coexpressed. These findings were confirmed by measuring F-protein-induced interleukin 1β (IL-1β) mRNA in WT versus MD-2−/− macrophages, where MD-2−/− macrophages failed to show IL-1β expression upon F-protein treatment, in contrast to the WT. Both Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS and synthetic E5564 (eritoran), LPS antagonists that inhibit TLR4 signaling by binding a hydrophobic pocket in MD-2, significantly reduced RSV F-protein-mediated TLR4 activity in HEK293T-TLR4–CD14–MD-2 transfectants in a dose-dependent manner, while TLR4-independent NF-κB activation by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was unaffected. In vitro coimmunoprecipitation studies confirmed a physical interaction between native RSV F protein and MD-2. Further, we demonstrated that the N-terminal domain of the F1 segment of RSV F protein interacts with MD-2. These data provide new insights into the importance of MD-2 in RSV F-protein-mediated TLR4 activation. Thus, targeting the interaction between MD-2 and RSV F protein may potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammation and pathology. PMID:22872782

  19. The Structure of the Human Centrin 2-Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C Protein Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson,J.; Ryan, Z.; Salisbury, J.; Kumar, R.

    2006-01-01

    Human centrin-2 plays a key role in centrosome function and stimulates nucleotide excision repair by binding to the xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein. To determine the structure of human centrin-2 and to develop an understanding of molecular interactions between centrin and xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein, we characterized the crystal structure of calcium-loaded full-length centrin-2 complexed with a xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptide. Our structure shows that the carboxyl-terminal domain of centrin-2 binds this peptide and two calcium atoms, whereas the amino-terminal lobe is in a closed conformation positioned distantly by an ordered {alpha}-helical linker. A stretch of the amino-terminal domain unique to centrins appears disordered. Two xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptides both bound to centrin-2 also interact to form an {alpha}-helical coiled-coil. The interface between centrin-2 and each peptide is predominantly nonpolar, and key hydrophobic residues of XPC have been identified that lead us to propose a novel binding motif for centrin.

  20. Structural Properties of 2/2 Hemoglobins: The Group III Protein from Helicobacter hepaticus

    PubMed Central

    Nothnagel, Henry J.; Winer, Benjamin Y.; Vuletich, David A.; Pond, Matthew P.; Lecomte, Juliette T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ε-proteobacterium Helicobacter hepaticus (Hh) contains a gene coding for a hemoglobin (Hb). The protein belongs to the 2/2 Hb lineage and is representative of Group III, a set of Hbs about which little is known. An expression and purification procedure was developed for Hh Hb. Electronic absorption and NMR spectra were used to characterize ligation states of the ferric and ferrous protein. The pKa of the acid/alkaline transition of ferric Hh Hb was 7.3, an unusually low value. NMR analysis of the cyanomet complex showed the orientation of the heme group to be reversed compared to most Group I and II 2/2 Hbs. Ferrous Hh Hb formed a stable cyanide complex that yielded NMR spectra similar to those of the carbonmonoxy complex. All forms of Hh Hb self-associated at NMR concentrations. Comparison was made to the related Campylobacter jejuni 2/2 Hb (Ctb), and the amino acid conservation pattern of Group III was re-inspected to help in the generalization of structure–function relationships. PMID:21445851

  1. A novel protein modification generating an aldehyde group in sulfatases: its role in catalysis and disease.

    PubMed

    von Figura, K; Schmidt, B; Selmer, T; Dierks, T

    1998-06-01

    In multiple sulfatase deficiency, a rare human lysosomal storage disorder, all known sulfatases are synthesized as catalytically poorly active polypeptides. Analysis of the latter has shown that they lack a protein modification that was detected in all members of the sulfatase family. This novel protein modification generates a 2-amino-3-oxopropanoic acid (C alpha-formylglycine) residue by oxidation of the thiol group of a cysteine that is conserved among all eukaryotic sulfatases. The oxidation occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum at a stage when the nascent polypeptide is not yet folded. The aldehyde is part of the catalytic site and is likely to act as an aldehyde hydrate. One of the geminal hydroxyl groups accepts the sulfate during sulfate ester cleavage leading to the formation of a covalently sulfated enzyme intermediate. The other hydroxyl is required for the subsequent elimination of the sulfate and regeneration of the aldehyde group. In some prokaryotic members of the sulfatase gene family, the DNA sequence predicts a serine residue, and not a cysteine. Analysis of one of these prokaryotic sulfatases, however, revealed the presence of the C alpha-formylglycine indicating that the aldehyde group is essential for all members of the sulfatase family and that it can be generated from either cysteine or serine.

  2. Entropy Loss of Hydroxyl Groups of Balanol upon Binding to Protein Kinase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidofalvi, Gergely; Wong, Chung F.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2002-09-01

    This article describes a short project for an undergraduate to learn several techniques for computer-aided drug design. The project involves estimating the loss of the rotational entropy of the hydroxyl groups of balanol upon its binding to the enzyme protein kinase A (PKA), as the entropy loss can significantly influence PKA balanol binding affinity. This work employs semiempirical quantum mechanical techniques for estimating the potential energy curves for the rotation of the hydroxyl groups of balanol in vacuum and in PKA, and solves the Poisson equation to correct the potential energy curves for hydration effects. Statistical mechanical principles are then applied to estimate the desired entropy loss from the potential energy curves. The analysis examines the influence of hydration effects on the rotational preference of the hydroxyl groups and the significance of the rotational entropy in determining binding affinity.

  3. Calcium antagonists and atherosclerosis protection in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Rafael Hernández; Armas-Hernández, María José; Velasco, Manuel; Israili, Zafar H; Armas-Padilla, María Cristina

    2003-01-01

    Calcium antagonists are effective in hypertensive patients of all ethnic groups, irrespective of age, dietary salt intake, salt-sensitivity status or plasma renin activity profile. Some prospective studies show that the calcium antagonists, nifedipine GITS and nitrendipine, reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality at least to the same extent as the diuretics. Other prospective studies are in progress to evaluate the effect of calcium antagonists on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the progression of atherosclerosis in hypertensive patients. Calcium antagonists, especially the highly lipophilic amlodipine, lacidipine and nisoldipine, are shown to possess antioxidant properties. These drugs reduce the oxidation of LDL and its influx into the arterial wall, and reduce atherosclerotic lesions in animals. Platelet production of malondialdehyde, a marker of oxygen free radical formation, is suppressed by amlodipine, lacidipine or nifedipine in hypertensive patients. New evidence from long-term clinical trials of calcium antagonists indicates that these drugs can reduce the rate of progression of atherosclerosis in hypertensive and coronary heart disease patients. In the Regression Growth Evaluation Statin Study (REGRESS), co-administration of calcium antagonist, amlodipine or nifedipine with pravasatin caused a significant reduction in the appearance of new angiographic lesions. In the Verapamil in Hypertension and Atherosclerosis Study (VHAS), verapamil was more effective than chlorthalidone in promoting regression of thicker carotid lesions in parallel with a reduction in the incidence of cardiovascular events. In the Prospective Randomized Evaluation of the Vascular Effects of Norvasc Trial (PREVENT), amlodipine slowed the progression of early coronary atherosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease. In a subprotocol of the Intervention as a Goal in the Hypertension Treatment (INSIGHT) study, nifedipine GITS significantly decreased intima

  4. Divergence of protein-coding capacity and regulation in the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group contains ubiquitous facultative anaerobic soil-borne Gram-positive spore-forming bacilli. Molecular phylogeny and comparative genome sequencing have suggested that these organisms should be classified as a single species. While clonal in nature, there do not appear to be species-specific clonal lineages, excepting B. anthracis, in spite of the wide array of phenotypes displayed by these organisms. Results We compared the protein-coding content of 201 B. cereus sensu lato genomes to characterize differences and understand the consequences of these differences on biological function. From this larger group we selected a subset consisting of 25 whole genomes for deeper analysis. Cluster analysis of orthologous proteins grouped these genomes into five distinct clades. Each clade could be characterized by unique genes shared among the group, with consequences for the phenotype of each clade. Surprisingly, this population structure recapitulates our recent observations on the divergence of the generalized stress response (SigB) regulons in these organisms. Divergence of the SigB regulon among these organisms is primarily due to the placement of SigB-dependent promoters that bring genes from a common gene pool into/out of the SigB regulon. Conclusions Collectively, our observations suggest the hypothesis that the evolution of these closely related bacteria is a consequence of two distinct processes. Horizontal gene transfer, gene duplication/divergence and deletion dictate the underlying coding capacity in these genomes. Regulatory divergence overlays this protein coding reservoir and shapes the expression of both the unique and shared coding capacity of these organisms, resulting in phenotypic divergence. Data from other organisms suggests that this is likely a common pattern in prokaryotic evolution. PMID:25350501

  5. Structure-based design of broadly protective group a streptococcal M protein-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dale, James B; Smeesters, Pierre R; Courtney, Harry S; Penfound, Thomas A; Hohn, Claudia M; Smith, Jeremy C; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2017-01-03

    A major obstacle to the development of broadly protective M protein-based group A streptococcal (GAS) vaccines is the variability within the N-terminal epitopes that evoke potent bactericidal antibodies. The concept of M type-specific protective immune responses has recently been challenged based on the observation that multivalent M protein vaccines elicited cross-reactive bactericidal antibodies against a number of non-vaccine M types of GAS. Additionally, a new "cluster-based" typing system of 175M proteins identified a limited number of clusters containing closely related M proteins. In the current study, we used the emm cluster typing system, in combination with computational structure-based peptide modeling, as a novel approach to the design of potentially broadly protective M protein-based vaccines. M protein sequences (AA 16-50) from the E4 cluster containing 17 emm types of GAS were analyzed using de novo 3-D structure prediction tools and the resulting structures subjected to chemical diversity analysis to identify sequences that were the most representative of the 3-D physicochemical properties of the M peptides in the cluster. Five peptides that spanned the range of physicochemical attributes of all 17 peptides were used to formulate synthetic and recombinant vaccines. Rabbit antisera were assayed for antibodies that cross-reacted with E4 peptides and whole bacteria by ELISA and for bactericidal activity against all E4GAS. The synthetic vaccine rabbit antisera reacted with all 17 E4M peptides and demonstrated bactericidal activity against 15/17 E4GAS. A recombinant hybrid vaccine containing the same E4 peptides also elicited antibodies that cross-reacted with all E4M peptides. Comprehensive studies using structure-based design may result in a broadly protective M peptide vaccine that will elicit cluster-specific and emm type-specific antibody responses against the majority of clinically relevant emm types of GAS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  6. Expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C protein predicts cisplatin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tan-Chen; Chow, Kuan-Chih; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Cho, Hsin-Ching; Chen, Chih-Yi; Lin, Tze-Yi; Chiang, I-Ping; Ho, Shu-Peng

    2011-05-01

    DNA repair has been suggested to be a major cause of spontaneous drug resistance in patients with lung adenocarcinomas (LADC). Among the DNA repair-related proteins, excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) has been shown to be essential for repairing cisplatin-induced interstrand cross-linkage. However, the role of other DNA repair-related proteins in drug resistance has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we used suppression subtractive hybridization and microarray analysis to identify the DNA repair-related genes associated with cisplatin resistance. We focused on the association of XPC protein expression, which plays a pivotal role in the earliest response to global genomic repair, with the survival of LADC patients. Using suppression subtractive hybridization and a microarray analysis to identify drug resistance-associated DNA repair-related genes, we found that the mRNA levels of ERCC1, MSH-3, MSH-6 and XPC were significantly increased in LADC patients. Since the results of ERCC1 mRNA expression corresponded well with those in previous reports, in this study we focused on the clinical correlation between XPC expression and patient survival. The level of XPC protein was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses. We detected the XPC protein in 46 (43%) of 107 pathological LADC samples. XPC protein expression correlated with tumor stage, cigarette smoking and poor survival. In the in vitro experiments with LADC cell lines, increased XPC expression was associated with elevated drug resistance, and silencing of XPC expression reduced cisplatin resistance. Our results suggest that XPC expression predicts drug resistance in LADC.

  7. Accumulation of Group 3 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins in Zea mays Embryos 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomann, Estela B.; Sollinger, John; White, Constance; Rivin, Carol J.

    1992-01-01

    Several different types of proteins that are modulated by abscisic acid (ABA) accumulate in developing embryos of maize (Zea mays L.). Some of these proteins are specific to the developing seed, such as the storage globulin, GLB1, whereas others are involved in general responses to water deficit. Here we describe a maize protein family of this second type, a Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (MLG3). Like other proteins of this class, MLG3 polypeptides are ABA-responsive. They are found in maturing seeds and in dehydrating plant tissues. Antigenically related proteins are found in other cereals. To distinguish the regulation of developmentally programmed ABA responses from those that are environmentally induced, we compared the ontological pattern and accumulation requirements of MLG3 polypeptides with those we previously described for GLB1. GLB1 accumulation begins early in the maturation phase and specifically requires high levels of ABA and the participation of the Viviparous-1 (Vp1) gene product. Vp1 is required for other ABA-modulated events in maize seed development as well. In experiments using vp1 mutants and mutants deficient in ABA synthesis (vp5 mutation), we show that MLG3 accumulation also is dependent upon ABA, but it shows striking differences from GLB1. MLG3 accumulates much later in embryogenesis, coincident with the onset of dehydration. In contrast to GLB1, MLG3 proteins can be induced by de novo ABA synthesis in response to culturing in high osmoticum. Unlike GLB1, MLG3 has no specific requirement for the Vp1 gene product. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:16668930

  8. Advantages of an antagonist: bicuculline and other GABA antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Graham AR

    2013-01-01

    The convulsant alkaloid bicuculline continues to be investigated more than 40 years after the first publication of its action as an antagonist of receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. This historical perspective highlights key aspects of the discovery of bicuculline as a GABA antagonist and the sustained interest in this and other GABA antagonists. The exciting advances in the molecular biology, pharmacology and physiology of GABA receptors provide a continuing stimulus for the discovery of new antagonists with increasing selectivity for the myriad of GABA receptor subclasses. Interesting GABA antagonists not structurally related to bicuculline include gabazine, salicylidene salicylhydrazide, RU5135 and 4-(3-biphenyl-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazole. Bicuculline became the benchmark antagonist for what became known as GABAA receptors, but not all ionotropic GABA receptors are susceptible to bicuculline. In addition, not all GABAA receptor antagonists are convulsants. Thus there are still surprises in store as the study of GABA receptors evolves. PMID:23425285

  9. Experimental transmission of AA amyloidosis by injecting the AA amyloid protein into interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Uchida, K; Chambers, J K; Tei, M; Shoji, A; Ushio, N; Nakayama, H

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of AA amyloidosis is high in humans with rheumatoid arthritis and several animal species, including cats and cattle with prolonged inflammation. AA amyloidosis can be experimentally induced in mice using severe inflammatory stimuli and a coinjection of AA amyloid; however, difficulties have been associated with transmitting AA amyloidosis to a different animal species, and this has been attributed to the "species barrier." The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mouse, a rodent model of human rheumatoid arthritis, has been used in the transmission of AA amyloid. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with mouse AA amyloid together with a subcutaneous pretreatment of 2% AgNO3, all mice from both strains that were injected with crude or purified murine AA amyloid developed AA amyloidosis. However, the amyloid index, which was determined by the intensity of AA amyloid deposition, was significantly higher in IL-1raKO mice than in BALB/c mice. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified bovine AA amyloid together with the pretreatment, 83% (5/6 cases) and 38% (3/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 17% (1/6 cases) and 0% (0/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. Similarly, when IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified feline AA amyloid, 33% (2/6 cases) and 88% (7/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 0% (0/6 cases) and 29% (2/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. These results indicated that IL-1raKO mice are a useful animal model for investigating AA amyloidogenesis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Calcium-Sensing Receptor Antagonist NPS 2143 Restores Amyloid Precursor Protein Physiological Non-Amyloidogenic Processing in Aβ-Exposed Adult Human Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Liu, Daisong; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2017-04-28

    Physiological non-amyloidogenic processing (NAP) of amyloid precursor holoprotein (hAPP) by α-secretases (e.g., ADAM10) extracellularly sheds neurotrophic/neuroprotective soluble (s)APPα and precludes amyloid-β peptides (Aβs) production via β-secretase amyloidogenic processing (AP). Evidence exists that Aβs interact with calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) in human astrocytes and neurons, driving the overrelease of toxic Aβ42/Aβ42-os (oligomers), which is completely blocked by CaSR antagonist (calcilytic) NPS 2143. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying NPS 2143 beneficial effects in human astrocytes. Moreover, because Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves neuroinflammation, we examined whether NPS 2143 remained beneficial when both fibrillary (f)Aβ25-35 and a microglial cytokine mixture (CMT) were present. Thus, hAPP NAP prevailed over AP in untreated astrocytes, which extracellularly shed all synthesized sAPPα while secreting basal Aβ40/42 amounts. Conversely, fAβ25-35 alone dramatically reduced sAPPα extracellular shedding while driving Aβ42/Aβ42-os oversecretion that CMT accelerated but not increased, despite a concurring hAPP overexpression. NPS 2143 promoted hAPP and ADAM10 translocation to the plasma membrane, thereby restoring sAPPα extracellular shedding and fully suppressing any Aβ42/Aβ42-os oversecretion, but left hAPP expression unaffected. Therefore, as anti-AD therapeutics calcilytics support neuronal viability by safeguarding astrocytes neurotrophic/neuroprotective sAPPα shedding, suppressing neurons and astrocytes Aβ42/Aβ42-os build-up/secretion, and remaining effective even under AD-typical neuroinflammatory conditions.

  11. Indications for Opioid Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Coppes, O J Michael; Sang, Christine N

    2017-06-01

    As opioids have become more common in clinical practice for the treatment of both acute and chronic pain, so too has the need for a deeper understanding of the clinical applications of opioid antagonists. The purpose of this review is to present both the longstanding and potential new indications for the use of drugs that block the effects of opioid receptors. There is a growing body of data demonstrating the modulation of pain by opioid antagonists. Additional clinical studies that show their direct antinociceptive effects and/or enhancement of the analgesic potency of opioid agonists are warranted. We briefly discuss the well-established role that these agents play in the reversal of life-threatening opioid toxicity and explore both existing and expanding clinical applications, including their apparent paradox that they may themselves be associated with analgesia.

  12. Phylogenomics and signature proteins for the alpha proteobacteria and its main groups.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S; Mok, Amy

    2007-11-28

    Alpha proteobacteria are one of the largest and most extensively studied groups within bacteria. However, for these bacteria as a whole and for all of its major subgroups (viz. Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales and Caulobacterales), very few or no distinctive molecular or biochemical characteristics are known. We have carried out comprehensive phylogenomic analyses by means of Blastp and PSI-Blast searches on the open reading frames in the genomes of several alpha-proteobacteria (viz. Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Brucella suis, Caulobacter crescentus, Gluconobacter oxydans, Mesorhizobium loti, Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, Silicibacter sp. TM1040, Rhodospirillum rubrum and Wolbachia (Drosophila) endosymbiont). These studies have identified several proteins that are distinctive characteristics of all alpha-proteobacteria, as well as numerous proteins that are unique repertoires of all of its main orders (viz. Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales and Caulobacterales) and many families (viz. Rickettsiaceae, Anaplasmataceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Bradyrhiozobiaceae, Brucellaceae and Bartonellaceae). Many other proteins that are present at different phylogenetic depths in alpha-proteobacteria provide important information regarding their evolution. The evolutionary relationships among alpha-proteobacteria as deduced from these studies are in excellent agreement with their branching pattern in the phylogenetic trees and character compatibility cliques based on concatenated sequences for many conserved proteins. These studies provide evidence that the major groups within alpha-proteobacteria have diverged in the following order: (Rickettsiales(Rhodospirillales (Sphingomonadales (Rhodobacterales (Caulobacterales-Parvularculales (Rhizobiales)))))). We also describe two conserved inserts in DNA Gyrase B and RNA

  13. Phylogenomics and signature proteins for the alpha Proteobacteria and its main groups

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Radhey S; Mok, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Background Alpha proteobacteria are one of the largest and most extensively studied groups within bacteria. However, for these bacteria as a whole and for all of its major subgroups (viz. Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales and Caulobacterales), very few or no distinctive molecular or biochemical characteristics are known. Results We have carried out comprehensive phylogenomic analyses by means of Blastp and PSI-Blast searches on the open reading frames in the genomes of several α-proteobacteria (viz. Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Brucella suis, Caulobacter crescentus, Gluconobacter oxydans, Mesorhizobium loti, Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, Silicibacter sp. TM1040, Rhodospirillum rubrum and Wolbachia (Drosophila) endosymbiont). These studies have identified several proteins that are distinctive characteristics of all α-proteobacteria, as well as numerous proteins that are unique repertoires of all of its main orders (viz. Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Rickettsiales, Sphingomonadales and Caulobacterales) and many families (viz. Rickettsiaceae, Anaplasmataceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Bradyrhiozobiaceae, Brucellaceae and Bartonellaceae). Many other proteins that are present at different phylogenetic depths in α-proteobacteria provide important information regarding their evolution. The evolutionary relationships among α-proteobacteria as deduced from these studies are in excellent agreement with their branching pattern in the phylogenetic trees and character compatibility cliques based on concatenated sequences for many conserved proteins. These studies provide evidence that the major groups within α-proteobacteria have diverged in the following order: (Rickettsiales(Rhodospirillales (Sphingomonadales (Rhodobacterales (Caulobacterales-Parvularculales (Rhizobiales)))))). We also describe two conserved inserts in DNA Gyrase B and RNA

  14. Two CRM protein subfamilies cooperate in the splicing of group IIB introns in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yukari; Bayraktar, Omer Ali; Barkan, Alice

    2008-11-01

    Chloroplast genomes in angiosperms encode approximately 20 group II introns, approximately half of which are classified as subgroup IIB. The splicing of all but one of the subgroup IIB introns requires a heterodimer containing the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase homolog CRS2 and one of two closely related proteins, CAF1 or CAF2, that harbor a recently recognized RNA binding domain called the CRM domain. Two CRS2/CAF-dependent introns require, in addition, a CRM domain protein called CFM2 that is only distantly related to CAF1 and CAF2. Here, we show that CFM3, a close relative of CFM2, associates in vivo with those CRS2/CAF-dependent introns that are not CFM2 ligands. Mutant phenotypes in rice and Arabidopsis support a role for CFM3 in the splicing of most of the introns with which it associates. These results show that either CAF1 or CAF2 and either CFM2 or CFM3 simultaneously bind most chloroplast subgroup IIB introns in vivo, and that the CAF and CFM subunits play nonredundant roles in splicing. These results suggest that the expansion of the CRM protein family in plants resulted in two subfamilies that play different roles in group II intron splicing, with further diversification within a subfamily to accommodate multiple intron ligands.

  15. alpha2-Adrenoreceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Imbert, T

    2001-06-01

    A review of the literature relating to the therapeutic potential of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists published between 1990 and 2000 is presented. Although extensively studied since the early 1970s in a wide spectrum of therapeutic applications, the distinction of alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes and some emerging evidence concerning new applications in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, obesity and schizophrenia, have refreshed an interest in this class of agents.

  16. Opioid antagonists for smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    David, Sean P; Lancaster, Tim; Stead, Lindsay F; Evins, A. Eden; Prochaska, Judith J

    2014-01-01

    Background The reinforcing properties of nicotine may be mediated through release of various neurotransmitters both centrally and systemically. People who smoke report positive effects such as pleasure, arousal, and relaxation as well as relief of negative affect, tension, and anxiety. Opioid (narcotic) antagonists are of particular interest to investigators as potential agents to attenuate the rewarding effects of cigarette smoking. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of opioid antagonists in promoting long-term smoking cessation. The drugs include naloxone and the longer-acting opioid antagonist naltrexone. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register for trials of naloxone, naltrexone and other opioid antagonists and conducted an additional search of MEDLINE using ’Narcotic antagonists’ and smoking terms in April 2013. We also contacted investigators, when possible, for information on unpublished studies. Selection criteria We considered randomised controlled trials comparing opioid antagonists to placebo or an alternative therapeutic control for smoking cessation. We included in the meta-analysis only those trials which reported data on abstinence for a minimum of six months. We also reviewed, for descriptive purposes, results from short-term laboratory-based studies of opioid antagonists designed to evaluate psycho-biological mediating variables associated with nicotine dependence. Data collection and analysis We extracted data in duplicate on the study population, the nature of the drug therapy, the outcome measures, method of randomisation, and completeness of follow-up. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up in patients smoking at baseline. Abstinence at end of treatment was a secondary outcome. We extracted cotinine- or carbon monoxide-verified abstinence where available. Where appropriate, we performed meta-analysis, pooling risk ratios using a Mantel

  17. Mallory bodies: lesions of hepatocytes containing proteins of the keratin-myosin-epidermin group.

    PubMed

    Meloan, S N; Puchtler, H

    1982-01-01

    Mallory's alcoholic hyalin in hepatocytes was found also in other diseases and is now referred to as Mallory bodies. Data concerning their histochemical, immuno and electron microscopic properties are partly contradictory. In this study, early stages of Mallory bodies reacted strongly with configurational technics for myosins; affinity tended to decrease when material with the properties of keratohyalin and the matrix of stratum corneum was formed. Thus, many Mallory bodies contained histochemically distinct myoid and keratin-like proteins. Electron microscopists demonstrated thick and thin filaments resembling contractile systems in Mallory bodies; the failure of immunologists to visualize actomyosin may be due to the heterogeneity of these proteins. The currently popular term prekeratin has been applied to a variety of substances extracted from epidermis, hoof and hair under different conditions. The prekeratin of recent immunofluorescence studies seems to contain mainly epidermin and low molecular matrix proteins; both were studied extensively by chemists. Epithelial filaments, including tonofibrils and contractile fibrils regarded as a subgroup of myofibrils, were well known half a century ago, but were banished by electron microscopy. Observations in this study and data on epidermal actomyosin indicate that different proteins of the k-m-e-f group can indeed coexist in epithelial cells. The formation and resolution of Mallory bodies can be regarded as an example of the well known shifts of epithelial cells between secretory and keratinizing states.

  18. SUMOylation of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein regulates DNA damage recognition during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Masaki; Tak, Yon-Soo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Syota; Okuda-Shimizu, Yuki; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Nishi, Ryotaro; Saitoh, Hisato; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex is a key factor that detects DNA damage and initiates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Although biochemical and structural studies have elucidated the interaction of XPC with damaged DNA, the mechanism of its regulation in vivo remains to be understood in more details. Here, we show that the XPC protein undergoes modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins and the lack of this modification compromises the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions. In the absence of SUMOylation, XPC is normally recruited to the sites with photolesions, but then immobilized profoundly by the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) complex. Since the absence of UV-DDB alleviates the NER defect caused by impaired SUMOylation of XPC, we propose that this modification is critical for functional interactions of XPC with UV-DDB, which facilitate the efficient damage handover between the two damage recognition factors and subsequent initiation of NER. PMID:26042670

  19. Polycomb group proteins: Novel molecules associated with ultraviolet A-induced photoaging of human skin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhuoxia; Zhang, Lianbo

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic repressor polycomb group (PcG) proteins are thought to serve a role in a number of cellular processes, including carcinogenesis, senescence, apoptosis and DNA repair. In the present study, long-wave ultraviolet A (UVA) was used to irradiate human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) and embryonic skin fibroblasts (ESFs) in order to simulate photoaging of the skin. The results of cell proliferation, apoptosis, hyaluronic acid (HA) content and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that the expression levels of genes encoding key PcG proteins (BMI-1 and EZH2) were altered. In addition, the expression levels of these genes were associated with the expression of enzymes that regulate HA synthesis. Furthermore, the expression levels of PcG proteins differed between HSFs and ESFs, suggesting that PcG proteins serve a role in altering HA synthesis during the UVA-induced fibroblast aging process. This signaling pathway may represent a novel molecular mechanism regulating the photoaging of the skin. The findings of the present study provide important insights into the underlying mechanisms of photoaging of the human skin. Further studies are required to clarify the molecular mechanisms underling skin aging and to identify targets for the clinical treatment of photoaging.

  20. Induction of human gamma interferon by structurally defined polypeptide fragments of group A streptococcal M protein.

    PubMed Central

    Weigent, D A; Beachey, E H; Huff, T; Peterson, J W; Stanton, G J; Baron, S

    1984-01-01

    The presence of interferon (IFN) has been demonstrated previously (i) in fluids obtained from the middle ears of children with Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, (ii) from the serum of mice injected intraperitoneally with either S. pneumoniae or Streptococcus pyogenes, and (iii) from human lymphoid cell cultures treated with a variety of bacteria. In this study, we showed that highly purified peptic extracts of three different serotypes of group A streptococcal M protein (pep M5, pep M6, and pep M24) stimulated human peripheral leukocytes to produce IFN. IFN production was apparent by 10 h and peaked 24 h after exposure. Dose-response experiments indicated that IFN could be detected in cultures treated with concentrations of M protein as low as 6 micrograms/ml, whereas maximum IFN production occurred at a concentration of 200 micrograms/ml. The IFN had antigenic and physicochemical characteristics of IFN-gamma. Preliminary leukocyte fractionation studies revealed that the IFN-producing cell was a nonadherent lymphocyte with receptors for sheep erythrocytes (T cell). Rabbit antisera specific for these structurally defined polypeptide fragments of streptococcal M protein (pep M5, pep M6, and pep M24) blocked IFN induction by each of the polypeptides. The data suggest that the different serotypes of streptococcal M protein may induce IFN by a common structural determinant shared by each of the polypeptide fragments tested. PMID:6418655

  1. Calcium antagonists and vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F B

    1990-04-01

    A critical review of the clinical data supports the conclusion that nimodipine decreases the severity of neurologic deficits and improves outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The mechanisms by which mortality and morbidity are reduced are still controversial. First, the frequency of vasospasm is not altered (Figs. 5 and 6). Second, the consistent reversal of vasospasm once present has not been demonstrated either angiographically or by noninvasive cerebral blood flow studies. These observations suggest that there is either modification of microcirculatory flow (i.e., dilation of pial conducting vessels or decreased platelet aggregation) or a direct neuronal protective effect. As suggested previously, support for either mechanism is not resolute, and further investigation is necessary. Currently, nimodipine has been the most thoroughly investigated calcium antagonist both from an experimental and clinical perspective. Oral administration has had few reported complications. Therefore, the benefit/risk ratio clearly supports the prophylactic use of this calcium antagonist in patients of all clinical grades after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Evidence also indicates that starting nimodipine after the onset of delayed ischemic deficits is of benefit. Finally, it can be predicted that in the future additional calcium antagonists with more selective vascular or neuronal effects will be developed for use in neurologic disorders.

  2. Identification of a group of Haemophilus influenzae penicillin-binding proteins that may have complementary physiological roles

    SciTech Connect

    Malouin, F.; Parr, T.R. Jr.; Bryan, L.E. )

    1990-02-01

    (35S)penicillin bound to different Haemophilus influenzae proteins in assays performed at 20, 37, or 42{degrees}C. Penicillin-binding proteins 3a, 3b, 4, and 4' formed a group characterized by their affinity for moxalactam, cefotaxime, and piperacillin. Penicillin-binding protein 4' showed specific properties that may reflect its complementary role in septation.

  3. Ca2+-activated nucleotidase 1, a novel target gene for the transcriptional repressor DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator), is involved in protein folding and degradation.

    PubMed

    Calì, Tito; Fedrizzi, Laura; Ottolini, Denis; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Mellström, Britt; Naranjo, Jose R; Carafoli, Ernesto; Brini, Marisa

    2012-05-25

    DREAM is a Ca(2+)-dependent transcriptional repressor highly expressed in neuronal cells. A number of genes have already been identified as the target of its regulation. Targeted analysis performed on cerebella from transgenic mice expressing a dominant active DREAM mutant (daDREAM) showed a drastic reduction of the amount of transcript of Ca(2+)-activated nucleotidase 1 (CANT1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi resident Ca(2+)-dependent nucleoside diphosphatase that has been suggested to have a role in glucosylation reactions related to the quality control of proteins in the ER and the Golgi apparatus. CANT1 down-regulation was also found in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably overexpressing wild type (wt) DREAM or daDREAM, thus providing a simple cell model to investigate the protein maturation pathway. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the down-regulation of CANT1 is associated with reduced protein secretion and increased degradation rates. Importantly, overexpression of wtDREAM or daDREAM augmented the expression of the EDEM1 gene, which encodes a key component of the ER-associated degradation pathway, suggesting an alternative pathway to enhanced protein degradation. Restoring CANT1 levels in neuroblastoma clones recovered the phenotype, thus confirming a key role of CANT1, and of the regulation of its gene by DREAM, in the control of protein synthesis and degradation.

  4. Group B Streptococcus surface proteins as major determinants for meningeal tropism.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Asmaa; Bellais, Samuel; Tardieux, Isabelle; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Poyart, Claire

    2012-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS), a normal constituent of the intestinal microbiota is the major cause of human neonatal infections and a worldwide spread 'hypervirulent' clone, GBS ST-17, is strongly associated with neonatal meningitis. Adhesion to epithelial and endothelial cells constitutes a key step of the infectious process. Therefore GBS surface-anchored proteins are obvious potential adhesion mediators of barrier crossing and determinant of hypervirulence. This review addresses the most recent molecular insights gained from studies on GBS surface proteins proven to be involved in the crossing of the brain-blood barrier and emphasizes on the specificity of a hypervirulent clone that displays meningeal tropism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The regulation of apoptosis by the downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator/potassium channel interacting protein 3 (DREAM/KChIP3) through interactions with hexokinase I.

    PubMed

    Craig, Theodore A; Ramachandran, Pradeep L; Bergen, H Robert; Podratz, Jewel L; Windebank, Anthony J; Kumar, Rajiv

    2013-04-19

    The EF-hand protein, DREAM/KChIP3 (henceforth referred to as DREAM), regulates apoptosis by incompletely understood mechanisms. We demonstrate that in the presence of Ca2+, DREAM interacts with hexokinase I, a protein known to bind mitochondria and regulate apoptosis. A mutant DREAM protein construct incapable of binding Ca2+ does not associate with hexokinase I. The amino-terminal portion of DREAM is required for binding to hexokinase I, as a DREAM construct lacking the first 94 amino terminal residues fails to bind hexokinase I. Expression of DREAM in neuroblastoma cells enhances cisplatin mediated caspase-3 activity. Simultaneous expression of hexokinase I in such cells reduces DREAM-stimulated apoptosis. DREAM overexpression in neuroblastoma cells reduces hexokinase I localization on isolated mitochondria. The interaction of DREAM with hexokinase I may be important in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Regulation of Apoptosis by the Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonistic Modulator/Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 3 (DREAM/KChIP3) Through Interactions with Hexokinase I

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Theodore A.; Ramachandran, Pradeep L.; Bergen, H. Robert; Podratz, Jewel L; Windebank, Anthony J.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    The EF-hand protein, DREAM/KChIP3 (henceforth referred to as DREAM), regulates apoptosis by incompletely understood mechanisms. We demonstrate that in the presence of Ca2+, DREAM interacts with hexokinase I, a protein known to bind mitochondria and regulate apoptosis. A mutant DREAM protein construct incapable of binding Ca2+ does not associate with hexokinase I. The amino-terminal portion of DREAM is required for binding to hexokinase I, as a DREAM construct lacking the first 94 amino terminal residues fails to bind hexokinase I. Expression of DREAM in neuroblastoma cells enhances cisplatin mediated caspase-3 activity. Simultaneous expression of hexokinase I in such cells reduces DREAM-stimulated apoptosis. DREAM overexpression in neuroblastoma cells reduces hexokinase I localization on isolated mitochondria. The interaction of DREAM with hexokinase I may be important in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis. PMID:23524266

  7. Extreme Sleep Durations and Increased C-Reactive Protein: Effects of Sex and Ethnoracial Group

    PubMed Central

    Grandner, Michael A.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Jackson, Nicholas; Sands-Lincoln, Megan; Pandey, Abhishek; Jean-Louis, Girardin

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: We hypothesize that extremes of sleep duration are associated with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), a pro-inflammatory marker for cardiovascular disease risk. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Population-based research. Participants: Nationally representative sample of 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants (n = 5,587 adults). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Associations between CRP and self-reported total sleep time (TST) were examined. Explanatory models considered contributions of sex, age, race/ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), and BMI squared (BMI2). Models also explored the role of insomnia symptoms, sleep apnea, active medical illness, and antidiabetic/antihypertensive treatment. Differential patterns among race/ethnicity groups were examined using interactions and stratified analyses. Nonlinear relationships between CRP and TST were assessed using polynomial and multinomial regression models (< 5, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and > 9 h). Linear and squared terms were significant in all models in the complete sample, with notable differences by sex and ethnoracial group. Overall, in models adjusted for sociodemographics and BMI, different patterns were observed for non-Hispanic white (elevated CRP for < 5 h and > 9 h), black/African-American (elevated CRP for < 5 h and 8 h), Hispanic/Latino (elevated CRP for > 9 h), and Asian/ Other (higher in 9 and > 9 h and lower in 5 h and 6 h) groups. Ethnoracial groups also demonstrated patterning by sex. Conclusion: In a representative sample of American adults, elevated CRP was associated with extreme sleep durations. Sex, race/ethnicity, sleep disorders, and medical comorbidity influenced these associations. Differences in CRP along these dimensions should be considered in future research on sleep related disparities influencing cardiometabolic disease risk. Citation: Grandner MA; Buxton OM; Jackson N; Sands M; Pandey A; Jean-Louis G. Extreme sleep durations and

  8. CF45-1, a Secreted Protein Which Participates in Dictyostelium Group Size Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Debra A.; Hatton, R. Diane; Giurgiutiu, Dan-Victor; Scott, Brenton; Jang, Wonhee; Ammann, Robin; Gomer, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    Developing Dictyostelium cells aggregate to form fruiting bodies containing typically 2 × 104 cells. To prevent the formation of an excessively large fruiting body, streams of aggregating cells break up into groups if there are too many cells. The breakup is regulated by a secreted complex of polypeptides called counting factor (CF). Countin and CF50 are two of the components of CF. Disrupting the expression of either of these proteins results in cells secreting very little detectable CF activity, and as a result, aggregation streams remain intact and form large fruiting bodies, which invariably collapse. We find that disrupting the gene encoding a third protein present in crude CF, CF45-1, also results in the formation of large groups when cells are grown with bacteria on agar plates and then starve. However, unlike countin− and cf50− cells, cf45-1− cells sometimes form smaller groups than wild-type cells when the cells are starved on filter pads. The predicted amino acid sequence of CF45-1 has some similarity to that of lysozyme, but recombinant CF45-1 has no detectable lysozyme activity. In the exudates from starved cells, CF45-1 is present in a ∼450-kDa fraction that also contains countin and CF50, suggesting that it is part of a complex. Recombinant CF45-1 decreases group size in colonies of cf45-1− cells with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of ∼8 ng/ml and in colonies of wild-type and cf50− cells with an EC50 of ∼40 ng/ml. Like countin− and cf50− cells, cf45-1− cells have high levels of cytosolic glucose, high cell-cell adhesion, and low cell motility. Together, the data suggest that CF45-1 participates in group size regulation in Dictyostelium. PMID:12912898

  9. The catecholestrogen, 2-hydroxyestradiol-17beta, acts as a G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER/GPR30) antagonist to promote the resumption of meiosis in zebrafish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, Tapan K; Pang, Yefei; Thomas, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Estradiol-17beta (E2) maintains high cAMP levels and meiotic arrest in zebrafish oocytes through activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). The catecholestrogen 2-hydroxyestradiol-17beta (2-OHE2) has an opposite effect to that of E2 on oocyte maturation (OM) and cAMP levels in Indian catfish oocytes. We tested the hypothesis that 2-OHE2 is produced in zebrafish ovaries and promotes the resumption of oocyte meiosis through its action as a GPER antagonist. Ovarian 2-OHE2 production by estrogen-2-hydroxylase (EH) was up-regulated by gonadotropin treatment at the onset of OM, consistent with a physiological role for 2-OHE2 in regulating OM. The increases in EH activity and OM were blocked by treatment with CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 inhibitors. Expression of cyp1a, cyp1b1, and cyp1c mRNAs was increased by gonadotropin treatment, further implicating these Cyp1s in 2-OHE2 synthesis prior to OM. Conversely, aromatase activity and cyp19a1 mRNA expression declined during gonadotropin induction of OM. 2-OHE2 treatment significantly increased spontaneous OM in defolliculated zebrafish oocytes and reversed the inhibition of OM by E2 and the GPER agonist G-1. 2-OHE2 was an effective competitor of [(3)H]-E2 binding to recombinant zebrafish GPER expressed in HEK-293 cells. 2-OHE2 also antagonized estrogen actions through GPER on cAMP production in zebrafish oocytes, resulting in a reduction in cAMP levels. Stimulation of OM by 2-OHE2 was blocked by pretreatment of defolliculated oocytes with the GPER antibody. Collectively, the results suggest that 2-OHE2 functions as a GPER antagonist and promotes OM in zebrafish through blocking GPER-dependent E2 inhibition of the resumption of OM. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  10. Thermodynamic characterization of the biocompatible ionic liquid effects on protein model compounds and their functional groups.

    PubMed

    Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2011-04-14

    The stability of proteins under co-solvent conditions is dependant on the nature of the co-solvent; the co-solvent can alter a protein's properties and structural effects through bimolecular interactions between its functional groups and co-solvent particles. Ionic liquids (ILs) represent a rather diverse class of co-solvents that are combinations of different ions, which are liquids at or close to room temperature. To quantify the bimolecular interactions of protein functional groups with biocompatible ILs, we report the systematic and quantitative apparent transfer free energies (ΔG'(tr)) of a homologous series of cyclic dipeptides (CDs) from water to aqueous solutions of ILs through solubility measurements, as a function of IL concentration at 25 °C under atmospheric pressure. The materials investigated in the present work included the CDs of cyclo(Gly-Gly), cyclo(Ala-Gly), cyclo(Ala-Ala), cyclo(Leu-Ala), and cyclo(Val-Val). The ILs used such as diethylammonium acetate ([Et(2)NH][CH(3)COO], DEAA), triethylammonium acetate ([Et(3)NH][CH(3)COO], TEAA), diethylammonium dihydogen phosphate ([Et(3)NH][H(2)PO(4)], DEAP), triethylammonium dihydogen phosphate ([Et(3)NH][H(2)PO(4)], TEAP), diethylammonium sulfate ([Et(3)NH][HSO(4)], DEAS) and triethylammonium sulfate ([Et(3)NH][HSO(4)], TEAS). We observed positive values of ΔG'(tr) for CDs from water to ILs, indicating that interactions between ILs and CDs are unfavourable, which leads to stabilization of the native structure of CDs. The experimental results were further used for estimating the transfer free energies (Δg'(tr)) of the peptide bond (-CONH-), the peptide backbone unit (-CH(2)C=ONH-), and various functional groups from water to IL solutions. Our results explicitly elucidate that a series of all ammonium ILs act as stabilizers for tested model compounds through the exclusion of ILs from CDs surface.

  11. Trivalent M-related protein as a component of next generation group A streptococcal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose There is a need to broaden protective coverage of M protein–based vaccines against group A streptococci (GAS) because coverage of the current 30-valent M protein vaccine does not extend to all emm types. An additional GAS antigen and virulence factor that could potentially extend vaccine coverage is M-related protein (Mrp). Previous work indicated that there are three structurally related families of Mrp (MrpI, MrpII, and MrpIII) and peptides of all three elicited bactericidal antibodies against multiple emm types. The purpose of this study was to determine if a recombinant form containing Mrp from the three families would evoke bactericidal antiserum and to determine if this antiserum could enhance the effectiveness of antisera to the 30-valent M protein vaccine. Materials and Methods A trivalent recombinant Mrp (trMrp) protein containing N-terminal fragments from the three families (trMrp) was constructed, purified and used to immunize rabbits. Anti-trMrp sera contained high titers of antibodies against the trMrp immunogen and recombinant forms representing MrpI, MrpII, and MrpIII. Results The antisera opsonized emm types of GAS representing each Mrp family and also opsonized emm types not covered by the 30-valent M protein–based vaccine. Importantly, a combination of trMrp and 30-valent M protein antiserum resulted in higher levels of opsonization of GAS than either antiserum alone. Conclusion These findings suggest that trMrp may be an effective addition to future constructs of GAS vaccines. PMID:28168173

  12. Role of the Methoxy Group in Immune Responses to mPEG-Protein Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Anti-PEG antibodies have been reported to mediate the accelerated clearance of PEG-conjugated proteins and liposomes, all of which contain methoxyPEG (mPEG). The goal of this research was to assess the role of the methoxy group in the immune responses to mPEG conjugates and the potential advantages of replacing mPEG with hydroxyPEG (HO-PEG). Rabbits were immunized with mPEG, HO-PEG, or t-butoxyPEG (t-BuO-PEG) conjugates of human serum albumin, human interferon-α, or porcine uricase as adjuvant emulsions. Assay plates for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were coated with mPEG, HO-PEG, or t-BuO-PEG conjugates of the non-cross-reacting protein, porcine superoxide dismutase (SOD). In sera from rabbits immunized with HO-PEG conjugates of interferon-α or uricase, the ratio of titers of anti-PEG antibodies detected on mPEG-SOD over HO-PEG-SOD (“relative titer”) had a median of 1.1 (range 0.9–1.5). In contrast, sera from rabbits immunized with mPEG conjugates of three proteins had relative titers with a median of 3.0 (range 1.1–20). Analyses of sera from rabbits immunized with t-BuO-PEG-albumin showed that t-butoxy groups are more immunogenic than methoxy groups. Adding Tween 20 or Tween 80 to buffers used to wash the assay plates, as is often done in ELISAs, greatly reduced the sensitivity of detection of anti-PEG antibodies. Competitive ELISAs revealed that the affinities of antibodies raised against mPEG-uricase were c. 70 times higher for 10 kDa mPEG than for 10 kDa PEG diol and that anti-PEG antibodies raised against mPEG conjugates of three proteins had >1000 times higher affinities for albumin conjugates with c. 20 mPEGs than for analogous HO-PEG-albumin conjugates. Overall, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that antibodies with high affinity for methoxy groups contribute to the loss of efficacy of mPEG conjugates, especially if multiply-PEGylated. Using monofunctionally activated HO-PEG instead of mPEG in preparing conjugates for

  13. Role of the methoxy group in immune responses to mPEG-protein conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Merry R; Williams, L David; Sobczyk, Monika A; Michaels, Shawnya J; Saifer, Mark G P

    2012-03-21

    Anti-PEG antibodies have been reported to mediate the accelerated clearance of PEG-conjugated proteins and liposomes, all of which contain methoxyPEG (mPEG). The goal of this research was to assess the role of the methoxy group in the immune responses to mPEG conjugates and the potential advantages of replacing mPEG with hydroxyPEG (HO-PEG). Rabbits were immunized with mPEG, HO-PEG, or t-butoxyPEG (t-BuO-PEG) conjugates of human serum albumin, human interferon-α, or porcine uricase as adjuvant emulsions. Assay plates for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were coated with mPEG, HO-PEG, or t-BuO-PEG conjugates of the non-cross-reacting protein, porcine superoxide dismutase (SOD). In sera from rabbits immunized with HO-PEG conjugates of interferon-α or uricase, the ratio of titers of anti-PEG antibodies detected on mPEG-SOD over HO-PEG-SOD ("relative titer") had a median of 1.1 (range 0.9-1.5). In contrast, sera from rabbits immunized with mPEG conjugates of three proteins had relative titers with a median of 3.0 (range 1.1-20). Analyses of sera from rabbits immunized with t-BuO-PEG-albumin showed that t-butoxy groups are more immunogenic than methoxy groups. Adding Tween 20 or Tween 80 to buffers used to wash the assay plates, as is often done in ELISAs, greatly reduced the sensitivity of detection of anti-PEG antibodies. Competitive ELISAs revealed that the affinities of antibodies raised against mPEG-uricase were c. 70 times higher for 10 kDa mPEG than for 10 kDa PEG diol and that anti-PEG antibodies raised against mPEG conjugates of three proteins had >1000 times higher affinities for albumin conjugates with c. 20 mPEGs than for analogous HO-PEG-albumin conjugates. Overall, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that antibodies with high affinity for methoxy groups contribute to the loss of efficacy of mPEG conjugates, especially if multiply-PEGylated. Using monofunctionally activated HO-PEG instead of mPEG in preparing conjugates for

  14. Identification of non-heme diiron proteins that catalyze triple bond and epoxy group formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Lenman, M; Banaś, A; Bafor, M; Singh, S; Schweizer, M; Nilsson, R; Liljenberg, C; Dahlqvist, A; Gummeson, P O; Sjödahl, S; Green, A; Stymne, S

    1998-05-08

    Acetylenic bonds are present in more than 600 naturally occurring compounds. Plant enzymes that catalyze the formation of the Delta12 acetylenic bond in 9-octadecen-12-ynoic acid and the Delta12 epoxy group in 12,13-epoxy-9-octadecenoic acid were characterized, and two genes, similar in sequence, were cloned. When these complementary DNAs were expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana, the content of acetylenic or epoxidated fatty acids in the seeds increased from 0 to 25 or 15 percent, respectively. Both enzymes have characteristics similar to the membrane proteins containing non-heme iron that have histidine-rich motifs.

  15. Antagonistic effects of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzymes 1 and 2 on beta-amyloid peptide production in cells.

    PubMed

    Basi, Guriqbal; Frigon, Normand; Barbour, Robin; Doan, Tam; Gordon, Grace; McConlogue, Lisa; Sinha, Sukanto; Zeller, Michelle

    2003-08-22

    The deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in the brain is a pathologic feature of Alzheimer's disease. The beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), an integral membrane aspartyl protease responsible for cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the beta-site, promotes A beta production. A second integral membrane aspartyl protease related to BACE1, referred to as beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 2 (BACE2) has also been demonstrated to cleave APP at the beta-cleavage site in transfected cells. The role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production remains unresolved. We investigated the role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production in cells by selective inactivation of its transcripts using RNA interference. We are able to reduce steady state levels for mRNA for each enzyme by >85%, and protein amounts by 88-94% in cells. Selective inactivation of BACE1 by RNA interference results in decreased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells, as expected. Selective inactivation of BACE2 by RNAi results in increased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells. Simultaneous targeting of both enzymes by RNA interference does not have any net effect on A beta released from cells. Our observations of changes in APP metabolism and A beta are consistent with a role of BACE2 in suppressing A beta production in cells that co-express both enzymes.

  16. Tetraspanin18 is a FoxD3-responsive antagonist of cranial neural crest epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition that maintains cadherin-6B protein

    PubMed Central

    Fairchild, Corinne L.; Gammill, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary During epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tightly associated, polarized epithelial cells become individual mesenchymal cells capable of migrating. Here, we investigate the role of the transmembrane protein tetraspanin18 (Tspan18) in chick cranial neural crest EMT. Tspan18 mRNA is expressed in premigratory cranial neural crest cells, but is absent from actively migrating neural crest cells. Tspan18 knockdown leads to a concomitant loss of cadherin-6B (Cad6B) protein, whereas Cad6B protein persists when Tspan18 expression is extended. The temporal profile of Cad6B mRNA downregulation is unaffected in these embryos, which indicates that Tspan18 maintains Cad6B protein levels and reveals that Cad6B is regulated by post-translational mechanisms. Although downregulation of Tspan18 is necessary, it is not sufficient for neural crest migration: the timing of neural crest emigration, basal lamina breakdown and Cad7 upregulation proceed normally in Tspan18-deficient cells. This emphasizes the need for coordinated transcriptional and post-translational regulation of Cad6B during EMT and illustrates that Tspan18-antagonized remodeling of cell–cell adhesions is only one step in preparation for cranial neural crest migration. Unlike Cad6B, which is transcriptionally repressed by Snail2, Tspan18 expression is downstream of the winged-helix transcription factor FoxD3, providing a new transcriptional input into cranial neural crest EMT. Together, our data reveal post-translational regulation of Cad6B protein levels by Tspan18 that must be relieved by a FoxD3-dependent mechanism in order for cranial neural crest cells to migrate. These results offer new insight into the molecular mechanisms of cranial neural crest EMT and expand our understanding of tetraspanin function relevant to metastasis. PMID:23418345

  17. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 2. Transport studies, photoaffinity labeling, and identification of the membrane carrier protein for methotrexate from murine L1210 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1987-07-28

    A membrane-derived component of the methotrexate/one-carbon-reduced folate transport system in murine L1210 cells has been identified by using a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate. The compound, a radioiodinated 4-azidosalicylyl derivative of the lysine analogue of methotrexate, is transported into murine L1210 cells in a temperature-dependent, sulfhydryl reagent inhibitable manner with a K/sub t/ of 506 +/- 79 nM and a V/sub max/ of 17.9 +/- 4.2 pmol min/sup -1/ (mg of total cellular protein)/sup -1/. Uptake of the iodinated compound at 200 nM is inhibited by low amounts of methotrexate. The parent compounds of the iodinated photoprobe inhibit (/sup 3/H)methotrexate uptake, with the uniodinated 4-azidosalicylyl derivative exhibiting a K/sub i/ of 66 +/- 21 nM. UV irradiation, at 4 /sup 0/C, of a cell suspension that had been incubated with the probe results in the covalent modification of a 46K-48K protein. This can be demonstrated when the plasma membranes from the labeled cells are analyzed via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Labeling of this protein occurs half-maximally at a reagent concentration that correlates with the K/sub t/ for transport of the iodinated compound. Protection against labeling of this protein by increasing amounts of methotrexate parallels the concentration dependence of inhibition of photoprobe uptake by methotrexate. Evidence that, in the absence of irradiation and at 37/sup 0/C, the iodinated probe is actually internalized is demonstrated by the labeling of two soluble proteins (M/sub r/ 38K and 21K) derived from the cell homogenate supernatant.

  18. Functional group placement in protein binding sites: a comparison of GRID and MCSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitetti-Putzer, Ryan; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane; Hogle, James M.; Karplus, Martin

    2001-10-01

    One approach to combinatorial ligand design begins by determining optimal locations (i.e., local potential energy minima) for functional groups in the binding site of a target macromolecule. MCSS and GRID are two methods, based on significantly different algorithms, which are used for this purpose. A comparison of the two methods for the same functional groups is reported. Calculations were performed for nonpolar and polar functional groups in the internal hydrophobic pocket of the poliovirus capsid protein, and on the binding surface of the src SH3 domain. The two approaches are shown to agree qualitatively; i.e., the global characteristics of the functional group maps generated by MCSS and GRID are similar. However, there are significant differences in the relative interaction energies of the two sets of minima, a consequence of the different functional form used to evaluate polar interactions (electrostatics and hydrogen bonding) in the two methods. The single sphere representation used by GRID affords only positional information, supplemented by the identification of hydrogen bonding interactions. By contrast, the multi-atom representation of most MCSS groups yields in both positional and orientational information. The two methods are most similar for small functional groups, while for larger functional groups MCSS yields results consistent with GRID but superior in detail. These results are in accord with the somewhat different purposes for which the two methods were developed. GRID has been used mainly to introduce functionalities at specific positions in lead compounds, in which case the orientation is predetermined by the structure of the latter. The orientational information provided by MCSS is important for its use in the de novo design of large, multi-functional ligands, as well as for improving lead compounds.

  19. A protocol for protein estimation that gives a nearly constant color yield with simple proteins and nullifies the effects of four known interfering agents: microestimation of peptide groups.

    PubMed

    Raghupathi, R N; Diwan, A M

    1994-06-01

    A modified version of the Lowry protocol for protein measurement is being introduced in which the increment in color due to copper-protein interactions can be directly equated to the concentration of peptide groups (the CO-NH moieties) present in the sample. The method provides an accurate estimation of protein concentrations in the range of 5-40 micrograms, with a sensitivity similar to that of the original assay procedure. It yields hardly any protein-to-protein variation with simple proteins and eliminates the interference by four compounds that commonly affect the Lowry assay. A numerical factor has been calculated that allows conversion of micromoles of peptide groups into actual micrograms of protein present in the sample.

  20. Prokaryotic Virus Orthologous Groups (pVOGs): a resource for comparative genomics and protein family annotation

    PubMed Central

    Grazziotin, Ana Laura; Koonin, Eugene V.; Kristensen, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant and diverse biological entities on earth, and while most of this diversity remains completely unexplored, advances in genome sequencing have provided unprecedented glimpses into the virosphere. The Prokaryotic Virus Orthologous Groups (pVOGs, formerly called Phage Orthologous Groups, POGs) resource has aided in this task over the past decade by using automated methods to keep pace with the rapid increase in genomic data. The uses of pVOGs include functional annotation of viral proteins, identification of genes and viruses in uncharacterized DNA samples, phylogenetic analysis, large-scale comparative genomics projects, and more. The pVOGs database represents a comprehensive set of orthologous gene families shared across multiple complete genomes of viruses that infect bacterial or archaeal hosts (viruses of eukaryotes will be added at a future date). The pVOGs are constructed within the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) framework that is widely used for orthology identification in prokaryotes. Since the previous release of the POGs, the size has tripled to nearly 3000 genomes and 300 000 proteins, and the number of conserved orthologous groups doubled to 9518. User-friendly webpages are available, including multiple sequence alignments and HMM profiles for each VOG. These changes provide major improvements to the pVOGs database, at a time of rapid advances in virus genomics. The pVOGs database is hosted jointly at the University of Iowa at http://dmk-brain.ecn.uiowa.edu/pVOGs and the NCBI at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/kristensen/pVOGs/home.html. PMID:27789703

  1. Prokaryotic Virus Orthologous Groups (pVOGs): a resource for comparative genomics and protein family annotation.

    PubMed

    Grazziotin, Ana Laura; Koonin, Eugene V; Kristensen, David M

    2017-01-04

    Viruses are the most abundant and diverse biological entities on earth, and while most of this diversity remains completely unexplored, advances in genome sequencing have provided unprecedented glimpses into the virosphere. The Prokaryotic Virus Orthologous Groups (pVOGs, formerly called Phage Orthologous Groups, POGs) resource has aided in this task over the past decade by using automated methods to keep pace with the rapid increase in genomic data. The uses of pVOGs include functional annotation of viral proteins, identification of genes and viruses in uncharacterized DNA samples, phylogenetic analysis, large-scale comparative genomics projects, and more. The pVOGs database represents a comprehensive set of orthologous gene families shared across multiple complete genomes of viruses that infect bacterial or archaeal hosts (viruses of eukaryotes will be added at a future date). The pVOGs are constructed within the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) framework that is widely used for orthology identification in prokaryotes. Since the previous release of the POGs, the size has tripled to nearly 3000 genomes and 300 000 proteins, and the number of conserved orthologous groups doubled to 9518. User-friendly webpages are available, including multiple sequence alignments and HMM profiles for each VOG. These changes provide major improvements to the pVOGs database, at a time of rapid advances in virus genomics. The pVOGs database is hosted jointly at the University of Iowa at http://dmk-brain.ecn.uiowa.edu/pVOGs and the NCBI at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/kristensen/pVOGs/home.html. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. In-vitro relationship between protein-binding and free drug concentrations of a water-soluble selective beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist (atenolol) and its interaction with arsenic.

    PubMed

    Alam, M A; Awal, M A; Subhan, N; Mostofa, M

    2009-02-01

    The degree of binding of a drug to plasma proteins has a marked effect on its distribution, elimination, and pharmacological effect since only the unbound fraction is available for distribution into extra-vascular space. The protein-binding of atenolol was measured by equilibrium dialysis in the bovine serum albumin (BSA). Free atenolol concentration was increased due to addition of arsenic which reduced the binding of the compounds to BSA. During concurrent administration, arsenic displaced atenolol from its high-affinity binding Site I, and free concentration of atenolol increased from 4.286 +/- 0.629% and 5.953 +/- 0.605% to 82.153 +/- 1.924% and 85.486 +/- 1.158% in absence and presence of Site I probe respectively. Thus, it can be suggested that arsenic displaced atenolol from its binding site resulting in an increase of the free atenolol concentration in plasma.

  3. Group A Streptococcal M1 Protein Provides Resistance against the Antimicrobial Activity of Histones

    PubMed Central

    Döhrmann, Simon; LaRock, Christopher N.; Anderson, Ericka L.; Cole, Jason N.; Ryali, Brinda; Stewart, Chelsea; Nonejuie, Poochit; Pogliano, Joe; Corriden, Ross; Ghosh, Partho; Nizet, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Histones are essential elements of chromatin structure and gene regulation in eukaryotes. An unexpected attribute of these nuclear proteins is their antimicrobial activity. A framework for histone release and function in host defense in vivo was revealed with the discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps, a specialized cell death process in which DNA-based structures containing histones are extruded to ensnare and kill bacteria. Investigating the susceptibility of various Gram-positive pathogens to histones, we found high-level resistance by one leading human pathogen, group A Streptococcus (GAS). A screen of isogenic mutants revealed that the highly surface-expressed M1 protein, a classical GAS virulence factor, was required for high-level histone resistance. Biochemical and microscopic analyses revealed that the N-terminal domain of M1 protein binds and inactivates histones before they reach their cell wall target of action. This finding illustrates a new pathogenic function for this classic GAS virulence factor, and highlights a potential innate immune evasion strategy that may be employed by other bacterial pathogens. PMID:28220899

  4. A Polycomb Group Protein Is Retained at Specific Sites on Chromatin in Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Follmer, Nicole E.; Wani, Ajazul H.; Francis, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression, including by Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins, may depend on heritable chromatin states, but how these states can be propagated through mitosis is unclear. Using immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we find PcG proteins associated with mitotic chromosomes in Drosophila S2 cells. Genome-wide sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP–SEQ) from mitotic cells indicates that Posterior Sex Combs (PSC) is not present at well-characterized PcG targets including Hox genes in mitosis, but does remain at a subset of interphase sites. Many of these persistent sites overlap with chromatin domain borders described by Sexton et al. (2012), which are genomic regions characterized by low levels of long range contacts. Persistent PSC binding sites flank both Hox gene clusters. We hypothesize that disruption of long-range chromatin contacts in mitosis contributes to PcG protein release from most sites, while persistent binding at sites with minimal long-range contacts may nucleate re-establishment of PcG binding and chromosome organization after mitosis. PMID:23284300

  5. Characterization of the gene encoding the human LW blood group protein in LW+ and LW- phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hermand, P; Le Pennec, P Y; Rouger, P; Cartron, J P; Bailly, P

    1996-04-01

    The LW blood group is carried by a 42-kD glycoprotein that belongs to the family of intercellular adhesion molecules. The LW gene is organized into three exons spanning an HindIII fragment of approximately 2.65 kb. The exon/intron architecture correlates to the structural domains of the protein and resembles that of other Ig superfamily members except that the signal peptide and the first Ig-like domain are encoded by the first exon. The 5'UT region (nucleotides -289 to +9) includes potential binding sites for various transcription factors (Ets, CACC, SP1, GATA-1, AP2) and exhibited a significant transcriptional activity after transfection in the erythroleukemic K562 cells. No obvious abnormality of the LW gene, including the 5'UT region, has been detected by sequencing polymerase chain reaction-amplified genomic DNA from RhD+ or RhD- donors and from an Rhnull variant that lacks the Rh and LW proteins on red blood cells. However, a deletion of 10 bp in exon 1 of the LW gene was identified in the genome of an LW (a- b-) individual (Big) deficient for LW antigens but carrying a normal Rh phenotype. The 10-bp deletion generates a premature stop codon and encodes a truncated protein without transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain. No detectable abnormality of the LW gene or transcript could be detected in another LW(a- b-) individual (Nic), suggesting the heterogeneity of these phenotypes.

  6. Enhancement of chemical rules for predicting compound reactivity towards protein thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Metz, James T; Huth, Jeffrey R; Hajduk, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    Non-specific chemical modification of protein thiol groups continues to be a significant source of false positive hits from high-throughput screening campaigns and can even plague certain protein targets and chemical series well into lead optimization. While experimental tools exist to assess the risk and promiscuity associated with the chemical reactivity of existing compounds, computational tools are desired that can reliably identify substructures that are associated with chemical reactivity to aid in triage of HTS hit lists, external compound purchases, and library design. Here we describe a Bayesian classification model derived from more than 8,800 compounds that have been experimentally assessed for their potential to covalently modify protein targets. The resulting model can be implemented in the large-scale assessment of compound libraries for purchase or design. In addition, the individual substructures identified as highly reactive in the model can be used as look-up tables to guide chemists during hit-to-lead and lead optimization campaigns.

  7. Structural Insight into Amino Group-carrier Protein-mediated Lysine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Ayako; Tomita, Takeo; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    In the biosynthesis of lysine by Thermus thermophilus, the metabolite α-ketoglutarate is converted to the intermediate α-aminoadipate (AAA), which is protected by the 54-amino acid acidic protein LysW. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of LysZ from T. thermophilus (TtLysZ), an amino acid kinase that catalyzes the second step in the AAA to lysine conversion, which was in a complex with LysW at a resolution of 1.85 Å. A crystal analysis coupled with isothermal titration calorimetry of the TtLysZ mutants for TtLysW revealed tight interactions between LysZ and the globular and C-terminal extension domains of the LysW protein, which were mainly attributed to electrostatic forces. These results provided structural evidence for LysW acting as a protecting molecule for the α-amino group of AAA and also as a carrier protein to guarantee better recognition by biosynthetic enzymes for the efficient biosynthesis of lysine. PMID:25392000

  8. A novel role for high-mobility group a proteins in cellular senescence and heterochromatin formation.

    PubMed

    Narita, Masashi; Narita, Masako; Krizhanovsky, Valery; Nuñez, Sabrina; Chicas, Agustin; Hearn, Stephen A; Myers, Michael P; Lowe, Scott W

    2006-08-11

    Cellular senescence is a stable state of proliferative arrest that provides a barrier to malignant transformation and contributes to the antitumor activity of certain chemotherapies. Senescent cells can accumulate senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHFs), which may provide a chromatin buffer that prevents activation of proliferation-associated genes by mitogenic transcription factors. Surprisingly, we show that the High-Mobility Group A (HMGA) proteins, which can promote tumorigenesis, accumulate on the chromatin of senescent fibroblasts and are essential structural components of SAHFs. HMGA proteins cooperate with the p16(INK4a) tumor suppressor to promote SAHF formation and proliferative arrest and stabilize senescence by contributing to the repression of proliferation-associated genes. These antiproliferative activities are canceled by coexpression of the HDM2 and CDK4 oncogenes, which are often coamplified with HMGA2 in human cancers. Our results identify a component of the senescence machinery that contributes to heterochromatin formation and imply that HMGA proteins also act in tumor suppressor networks.

  9. Requirement for sex comb on midleg protein interactions in Drosophila polycomb group repression.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Aidan J; Mallin, Daniel R; Francis, Nicole J; Ketel, Carrie S; Stamm, Joyce; Voeller, Rochus K; Kingston, Robert E; Simon, Jeffrey A

    2004-07-01

    The Drosophila Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) protein is a transcriptional repressor of the Polycomb group (PcG). Although genetic studies establish SCM as a crucial PcG member, its molecular role is not known. To investigate how SCM might link to PcG complexes, we analyzed the in vivo role of a conserved protein interaction module, the SPM domain. This domain is found in SCM and in another PcG protein, Polyhomeotic (PH), which is a core component of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). SCM-PH interactions in vitro are mediated by their respective SPM domains. Yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays were used to isolate and characterize >30 missense mutations in the SPM domain of SCM. Genetic rescue assays showed that SCM repressor function in vivo is disrupted by mutations that impair SPM domain interactions in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of an isolated, wild-type SPM domain produced PcG loss-of-function phenotypes in flies. Coassembly of SCM with a reconstituted PRC1 core complex shows that SCM can partner with PRC1. However, gel filtration chromatography showed that the bulk of SCM is biochemically separable from PH in embryo nuclear extracts. These results suggest that SCM, although not a core component of PRC1, interacts and functions with PRC1 in gene silencing.

  10. Selective editing of Val and Leu methyl groups in high molecular weight protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Weidong; Namanja, Andrew T.; Wong, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The development of methyl-TROSY approaches and specific 13C–1H labeling of Ile, Leu and Val methyl groups in highly deuterated proteins has made it possible to study high molecular weight proteins, either alone or in complexes, using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here we present 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) NMR experiments designed to achieve complete separation of the methyl resonances of Val and Leu, labeled using the same precursor, α-ketoisovalerate or acetolactate. The 2D experiment can further select the methyl resonances of Val or Leu based on the Cα or Cβ chemical shift values of Val or Leu, respectively. In the 3D spectrum, the methyl cross peaks of Val and Leu residues have opposite signs; thus, not only can the residue types be easily distinguished, but the methyl pairs from the same residue can also be identified. The feasibility of this approach, implemented in both 2D and 3D experiments, has been demonstrated on an 82 kDa protein, malate synthase G. The methods developed in this study will reduce resonance overlaps and also facilitate structure-guided resonance assignments. PMID:22532128

  11. Requirement for sex comb on midleg protein interactions in Drosophila polycomb group repression.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Aidan J; Mallin, Daniel R; Francis, Nicole J; Ketel, Carrie S; Stamm, Joyce; Voeller, Rochus K; Kingston, Robert E; Simon, Jeffrey A

    2004-01-01

    The Drosophila Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) protein is a transcriptional repressor of the Polycomb group (PcG). Although genetic studies establish SCM as a crucial PcG member, its molecular role is not known. To investigate how SCM might link to PcG complexes, we analyzed the in vivo role of a conserved protein interaction module, the SPM domain. This domain is found in SCM and in another PcG protein, Polyhomeotic (PH), which is a core component of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). SCM-PH interactions in vitro are mediated by their respective SPM domains. Yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays were used to isolate and characterize >30 missense mutations in the SPM domain of SCM. Genetic rescue assays showed that SCM repressor function in vivo is disrupted by mutations that impair SPM domain interactions in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of an isolated, wild-type SPM domain produced PcG loss-of-function phenotypes in flies. Coassembly of SCM with a reconstituted PRC1 core complex shows that SCM can partner with PRC1. However, gel filtration chromatography showed that the bulk of SCM is biochemically separable from PH in embryo nuclear extracts. These results suggest that SCM, although not a core component of PRC1, interacts and functions with PRC1 in gene silencing. PMID:15280237

  12. Dichotomous Life of DNA Binding High Mobility Group Box1 Protein in Human Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Lohani, Neelam; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2016-01-01

    The High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an extremely versatile, highly conserved nuclear protein, with its unique intracellular and extracellular functions mediated by its relatively simple domain structure. Within the nucleus, HMGB1 binds to DNA minor groove in a nonspecific manner and causes bends in the double helix thus helps in recruiting a number of DNA binding protein and transcription factors, to facilitate transcription of various genes. HMGB1 also helps in DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, V (D) J recombination, and assembly of nucleosome on the chromatin. On contrary, under pathological conditions HMGB1 displays inflammatory response by interaction with specific cell surface receptors like RAGE, TLR-4, TLR9, and TLR2 and activates NF-kB downstream signaling pathways. The upregulation of HMGB1 is directly associated with the pathogenesis of cancer, sepsis, ischemia, hemorrhagic shock, anorexia, rheumatic disease, periodontal disease etc. Therefore, HMGB1 has been considered as a promising target in the treatment of various human diseases. The interest in HMGB1 is evident and reflected in the exponential increase in the recent publications, and therefore there is a need for an update on the understanding of the role of HMGB1 in pathogenesis and its potential application of HMGB1 as a therapeutic target in a number of human diseases.

  13. Decreased organ failure in patients with severe SIRS and septic shock treated with the platelet-activating factor antagonist TCV-309: a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized phase II trial. TCV-309 Septic Shock Study Group.

    PubMed

    Poeze, M; Froon, A H; Ramsay, G; Buurman, W A; Greve, J W

    2000-10-01

    Sepsis and organ failure remain the main cause of death on the ICU. Sepsis is characterized by a severe inflammatory response, in which platelet-activating factor (PAF) is considered to play an important role. This study investigated whether treatment with the PAF-antagonist TCV-309 reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with septic shock. The study was conducted as a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled multicenter study. The included patients had to fulfill the SIRS criteria with a clinical suspicion of infection, an admission APACHE II score greater than 15, and shock, defined as a mean arterial pressure <70 mmHg and/or a decrease > or =40 mmHg despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Patients received 1.0 mg/kg TCV-309 or placebo, twice daily, intravenously during 14 days. The prospectively set goals were MOF score, recovery from shock, mortality, and assessment of the safety of the medication. A total of 98 patients were included of which 97 were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. The overall survival at day 56 of TCV-309 treated patients was similar compared to placebo treated patients (51.0% vs. 41.7%, P = 0.47). In contrast, the mean percentage of failed organs per patient present after 14 days in the TCV-309 treated patients was significantly lower compared to the placebo treated patients (11.9% vs. 25.1%, P = 0.04), leading to a reduced need for vasopressors, dialysis, and ventilatory support. Furthermore, the mean APACHE-II score during treatment with TCV-309 was significantly lower and the number of patients recovered from shock after day 14 was significantly higher in the TCV-309 treated patient group (2/32 vs. 9/29, P = 0.01). The number of adverse events was not significantly different between the TCV-309 and placebo treated patients. TCV-309 did not change overall mortality of septic shock, however a substantial reduction in organ dysfunction and morbidity, frequently associated with septic shock was achieved, without significant

  14. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Simon, Dawn M; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5' exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns.

  15. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Bonnie A.; Simon, Dawn M.; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5′ splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5′ exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns. PMID:24214997

  16. Surfen, a small molecule antagonist of heparan sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Schuksz, Manuela; Fuster, Mark M.; Brown, Jillian R.; Crawford, Brett E.; Ditto, David P.; Lawrence, Roger; Glass, Charles A.; Wang, Lianchun; Tor, Yitzhak; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    In a search for small molecule antagonists of heparan sulfate, we examined the activity of bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide, also known as surfen. Fluorescence-based titrations indicated that surfen bound to glycosaminoglycans, and the extent of binding increased according to charge density in the order heparin > dermatan sulfate > heparan sulfate > chondroitin sulfate. All charged groups in heparin (N-sulfates, O-sulfates, and carboxyl groups) contributed to binding, consistent with the idea that surfen interacted electrostatically. Surfen neutralized the anticoagulant activity of both unfractionated and low molecular weight heparins and inhibited enzymatic sulfation and degradation reactions in vitro. Addition of surfen to cultured cells blocked FGF2-binding and signaling that depended on cell surface heparan sulfate and prevented both FGF2- and VEGF165-mediated sprouting of endothelial cells in Matrigel. Surfen also blocked heparan sulfate-mediated cell adhesion to the Hep-II domain of fibronectin and prevented infection by HSV-1 that depended on glycoprotein D interaction with heparan sulfate. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of identifying small molecule antagonists of heparan sulfate and raise the possibility of developing pharmacological agents to treat disorders that involve glycosaminoglycan–protein interactions. PMID:18725627

  17. Group 1 LEA proteins contribute to the desiccation and freeze tolerance of Artemia franciscana embryos during diapause.

    PubMed

    Toxopeus, Jantina; Warner, Alden H; MacRae, Thomas H

    2014-11-01

    Water loss either by desiccation or freezing causes multiple forms of cellular damage. The encysted embryos (cysts) of the crustacean Artemia franciscana have several molecular mechanisms to enable anhydrobiosis-life without water-during diapause. To better understand how cysts survive reduced hydration, group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, hydrophilic unstructured proteins that accumulate in the stress-tolerant cysts of A. franciscana, were knocked down using RNA interference (RNAi). Embryos lacking group 1 LEA proteins showed significantly lower survival than control embryos after desiccation and freezing, or freezing alone, demonstrating a role for group 1 LEA proteins in A. franciscana tolerance of low water conditions. In contrast, regardless of group 1 LEA protein presence, cysts responded similarly to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure, indicating little to no function for these proteins in diapause termination. This is the first in vivo study of group 1 LEA proteins in an animal and it contributes to the fundamental understanding of these proteins. Knowing how LEA proteins protect A. franciscana cysts from desiccation and freezing may have applied significance in aquaculture, where Artemia is an important feed source, and in the cryopreservation of cells for therapeutic applications.

  18. Characteristics Of Bridging Oxo And Sulfido Groups In Multinuclear Iron Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loehr, Thomas M.

    1989-07-01

    The presence of oxo-bridged dinuclear iron clusters has been established in the respiratory protein, hemerythrin (Hr), and in the DNA-biosynthesis regulatory enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase (Rr). For the iron proteins uteroferrin and purple acid phosphatase (PAP) evidence for μ-oxo-bridged centers is less clear. Resonance Raman (RR) spectra obtained by excitation into an 0(2-) --> Fe(III) CT band may show strong symmetric and weak antisymmetric Fe-0-Fe vibrational modes. We have investigated the spectra of a variety of μ-oxo-bridged Fe(III) complexes to establish the dependence of Raman scattering intensities upon structural parameters. Intensities were found to relate to the nature of the ligand trans to the oxo group: nitrogen ligands with unsaturation (e.g., pyrazole and imidazole) lead to strong scattering, whereas saturated ligands provide only poor scattering. The Fe-0 bonds in Hr and Rr are strong scatterers; the former is known from x-ray crystallography to have a histidyl ligand trans to the μ-oxo group. On this basis, a similar ligand structure is likely in the reductase. In contrast, PAP shows no oxo-bridge with UV and near-UV excitation. We propose that a different structural framework is necessary to account for this result. Hydrogen bonding of protein side chains to oxo and sulfido ligands is proposed to explain changes in frequencies for samples dissolved in water vs. D20. Differences in hydrogen-bond strengths between 0...(D) and S...(D) systems are transferred to the observed Fe-0 and Fe-S bond vibrations.

  19. The implication and potential applications of high-mobility group box 1 protein in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sohun, Moonindranath

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, non-histone and ubiquitous chromosomal protein found enriched in active chromatin forming part of the high mobility group family of proteins and is encoded by the HMGB1 gene (13q12) in human beings. It has various intranuclear and extracellular functions. It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. In 2012, there was approximately 1.67 million new breast cancer cases diagnosed which makes it the second most frequent cancer in the world after lung cancer (25% of all cancers) and the commonest cancer among women. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that HMGB1 might be a useful target in the management of breast cancer. This review summarises the structure and functions of HMGB1 and its dual role in carcinogenesis both as a pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic factor. It also sums up evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies using breast cancer cell lines and samples which demonstrate its influence in radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy in breast cancer. It may have particular importance in HER2 positive and metastatic breast cancer. It might pave the way for new breast cancer treatments through development of novel drugs, use of microRNAs (miRNAs), targeting breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and breast cancer immunotherapy. It may also play a role in determining breast cancer prognosis. Thus HMGB1 may open up novel avenues in breast cancer management. PMID:27386491

  20. The implication and potential applications of high-mobility group box 1 protein in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sohun, Moonindranath; Shen, Huiling

    2016-06-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, non-histone and ubiquitous chromosomal protein found enriched in active chromatin forming part of the high mobility group family of proteins and is encoded by the HMGB1 gene (13q12) in human beings. It has various intranuclear and extracellular functions. It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. In 2012, there was approximately 1.67 million new breast cancer cases diagnosed which makes it the second most frequent cancer in the world after lung cancer (25% of all cancers) and the commonest cancer among women. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that HMGB1 might be a useful target in the management of breast cancer. This review summarises the structure and functions of HMGB1 and its dual role in carcinogenesis both as a pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic factor. It also sums up evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies using breast cancer cell lines and samples which demonstrate its influence in radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy in breast cancer. It may have particular importance in HER2 positive and metastatic breast cancer. It might pave the way for new breast cancer treatments through development of novel drugs, use of microRNAs (miRNAs), targeting breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and breast cancer immunotherapy. It may also play a role in determining breast cancer prognosis. Thus HMGB1 may open up novel avenues in breast cancer management.

  1. Tetrahydroindolizinone NK1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianming; Lu, Huagang; Morriello, Gregori J; Carlson, Emma J; Wheeldon, Alan; Chicchi, Gary G; Kurtz, Marc M; Tsao, Kwei-Lan C; Zheng, Song; Tong, Xinchun; Mills, Sander G; DeVita, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    A new class of potent NK(1) receptor antagonists with a tetrahydroindolizinone core has been identified. This series of compounds demonstrated improved functional activities as compared to previously identified 5,5-fused pyrrolidine lead structures. SAR at the 7-position of the tetrahydroindolizinone core is discussed in detail. A number of compounds displayed high NK(1) receptor occupancy at both 1 h and 24 h in a gerbil foot tapping model. Compound 40 has high NK(1) binding affinity, good selectivity for other NK receptors and promising in vivo properties. It also has clean P(450) inhibition and hPXR induction profiles. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrogen exchange study on the hydroxyl groups of serine and threonine residues in proteins and structure refinement using NOE restraints with polar side-chain groups.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Jee, JunGoo; Ono, Akira M; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2011-11-02

    We recently developed new NMR methods for monitoring the hydrogen exchange rates of tyrosine hydroxyl (Tyr-OH) and cysteine sulfhydryl (Cys-SH) groups in proteins. These methods facilitate the identification of slowly exchanging polar side-chain protons in proteins, which serve as sources of NOE restraints for protein structure refinement. Here, we have extended the methods for monitoring the hydrogen exchange rates of the OH groups of serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues in an 18.2 kDa protein, EPPIb, and thus demonstrated the usefulness of NOE restraints with slowly exchanging OH protons for refining the protein structure. The slowly exchanging Ser/Thr-OH groups were readily identified by monitoring the (13)C(β)-NMR signals in an H(2)O/D(2)O (1:1) mixture, for the protein containing Ser/Thr residues with (13)C, (2)H-double labels at their β carbons. Under these circumstances, the OH groups exist in equilibrium between the protonated and deuterated isotopomers, and the (13)C(β) peaks of the two species are resolved when their exchange rate is slower than the time scale of the isotope shift effect. In the case of EPPIb dissolved in 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) at 40 °C, one Ser and four Thr residues were found to have slowly exchanging hydroxyl groups (k(ex) < ~40 s(-1)). With the information for the slowly exchanging Ser/Thr-OH groups in hand, we could collect additional NOE restraints for EPPIb, thereby making a unique and important contribution toward defining the spatial positions of the OH protons, and thus the hydrogen-bonding acceptor atoms.

  3. Polycomb group protein expression during differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into pancreatic lineage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pethe, Prasad; Nagvenkar, Punam; Bhartiya, Deepa

    2014-05-24

    Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are chromatin modifiers involved in early embryonic development as well as in proliferation of adult stem cells and cancer cells. PcG proteins form large repressive complexes termed Polycomb Repressive Complexes (PRCs) of which PRC1 and PRC2 are well studied. Differentiation of human Embryonic Stem (hES) cells into insulin producing cells has been achieved to limited extent, but several aspects of differentiation remain unexplored. The PcG protein dynamics in human embryonic stem (hES) cells during differentiation into pancreatic lineage has not yet been reported. In the present study, the expression of RING1A, RING1B, BMI1, CBX2, SUZ12, EZH2, EED and JARID2 during differentiation of hES cells towards pancreatic lineage was examined. In-house derived hES cell line KIND1 was used to study expression of PcG protein upon spontaneous and directed differentiation towards pancreatic lineage. qRT-PCR analysis showed expression of gene transcripts for various lineages in spontaneously differentiated KIND1 cells, but no differentiation into pancreatic lineage was observed. Directed differentiation induced KIND1 cells grown under feeder-free conditions to transition from definitive endoderm (Day 4), primitive gut tube stage (Day 8) and pancreatic progenitors (Day 12-Day 16) as evident from expression of SOX17, PDX1 and SOX9 by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. In spontaneously differentiating KIND1 cells, RING1A and SUZ12 were upregulated at day 15, while other PcG transcripts were downregulated. qRT-PCR analysis showed transcripts of RING1B, BMI1, SUZ12, EZH2 and EED were upregulated, while RING1A and CBX2 expression remained low and JARID2 was downregulated during directed differentiation of KIND1 cells. Upregulation of BMI1, EZH2 and SUZ12 during differentiation into pancreatic lineage was also confirmed by Western blotting. Histone modifications such as H3K27 trimethylation and monoubiquitinylation of H2AK119 increased during differentiation

  4. Activation of the high-mobility group box 1 protein-receptor for advanced glycation end-products signaling pathway in rats during neurogenesis after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chunyan; Wu, Bo; Cao, Tian; Zhang, Shuting; Liu, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) may promote neurogenesis that supports functional recovery. How HMGB1 regulates or participates in this process is unclear, as are the pattern recognition receptors and signaling pathways involved. ICH was induced by injection of collagenase in Sprague-Dawley rats, which were treated 3 days later with saline, with the HMGB1 inhibitor ethyl pyruvate or with FPS-ZM1, an antagonist of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. A Sham group was treated with saline solution instead of collagenase and then treated 3 days later with saline again or with ethyl pyruvate or N-benzyl-4-chloro-N-cyclohexylbenzamide (FPS-ZM1). Expression of the following proteins was measured by Western blot, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence: HMGB1, receptor for advanced glycation end-products, toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, TLR4, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and matrix metalloproteinase-9. The number of cells positive for 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine or doublecortin was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Levels of HMGB1, receptor for advanced glycation end-products, TLR4, TLR2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were significantly higher 14 days after ICH than at baseline, as were the numbers of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine- or doublecortin-positive cells. At the same time, HMGB1 moved from the nucleus into the cytoplasm. Administering ethyl pyruvate significantly reduced all these ICH-induced increases, except the increase in TLR4 and TLR2. Administering FPS-ZM1 reduced the ICH-induced increases in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9 and in the numbers of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine- or doublecortin-positive cells. These findings suggest that HMGB1 acts via the receptor for advanced glycation end-products signaling pathway to promote neurogenesis in later phases of ICH. © 2014 American Heart Association

  5. The influence of glutamatergic receptor antagonists on biochemical and ultrastructural changes in myelin membranes of rats subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska-Bouta, Beata; Strużyńska, Lidia; Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Małgorzata; Sulkowski, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Elevated extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft causes overactivation of glutamate receptors and kills neurons by an excitotoxic mechanism. Recent studies have shown that glutamate can also lead to toxic injury of white matter oligodendrocytes in myelin sheaths and consequently to axon demyelination. The present study was performed using the rodent model of multiple sclerosis known as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The aim of the study was to test the effects of the glutamatergic receptor antagonists amantadine and memantine (antagonists of NMDA receptors), LY 367384 (an antagonist of mGluR1), and MPEP (an mGluR5 antagonist) on the development of neurological symptoms in immunized animals, morphological changes in cerebral myelin, and expression of mRNA of the principal myelin proteins PLP, MBP, MOG, MAG, and CNPase. Pharmacological inhibition of NMDA receptors by amantadine and memantine was found to suppress neurological symptoms in EAE rats, whereas antagonists of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs G I) did not function positively. In the symptomatic phase of the disease we observed destruction of myelin sheaths via electron microscopy and decreased levels of mRNA for all of the principal myelin proteins. The results reveal that glutamate receptor antagonists have a positive effect on the expression of mRNA MBP and glycoproteins MAG and MOG but not on myelin ultrastructure.

  6. Effects of peptidic growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) antagonist [D-Lys3] on some of serum hormonal and biochemical parameters in Wistar rat model.

    PubMed

    Shahryar, Habib Aghdam; Lotfi, Alireza

    2014-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of different dosages of a GHS-R antagonist [D-Lys3] on some serum hormonal (cortisol, T3 and T4) and biochemical parameters in a rat. Thirty-six 60-day-old male rats were assigned to four treatments. [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 solutions were infused via intraperitoneal injections. Blood was collected and analyzed. The large dosages of a GHS-R antagonist (200 ng/kg BW) caused increases in cortisol, whereas no significant changes occurred when low dosages were injected. There were no significant changes in T3 and T4 following the administration of the GHS-R antagonist, but a considerable increase was observed in blood glucose levels of the groups (G50, G100, and G200 ng/kg BW). There was a significant increase in total protein when the greatest dose was administrated (G200 ng/kg BW). However, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and albumin showed no significant changes. Exogenous GHS-R antagonist can cause an increase in glucose and moderate increases in cortisol and total protein, yet it has no significant effect on T3 and T4 levels or on the concentrations of serum lipids. The effect of GHS-R antagonist is not completely adverse to the effects of ghrelin. Further molecular studies are necessary to identify the physiological effects of the peptidic GHS-R antagonist.

  7. Adamantane-based amphiphiles (ADAs) for membrane protein study: importance of a detergent hydrophobic group in membrane protein solubilisation.

    PubMed

    Chae, Pil Seok; Bae, Hyoung Eun; Das, Manabendra

    2014-10-21

    We prepared adamantane-containing amphiphiles and evaluated them using a large membrane protein complex in terms of protein solubilisation and stabilization efficacy. These agents were superior to conventional detergents, especially in terms of the membrane protein solubilisation efficiency, implying a new detergent structure-property relationship.

  8. Antagonist-Elicited Cannabis Withdrawal in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gorelick, David A.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; McMahon, Robert P.; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40–120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0–8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses. PMID:21869692

  9. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  10. Antagonistic control of the turnover pathway for the global regulatory sRNA CsrB by the CsrA and CsrD proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Leng, Yuanyuan; Abe, Hazuki; Amaki, Takumi; Okayama, Akihiro; Babitzke, Paul; Suzuki, Kazushi; Romeo, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The widely conserved protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator A) globally regulates bacterial gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In many species, CsrA activity is governed by untranslated sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC in Escherichia coli, which bind to multiple CsrA dimers, sequestering them from lower affinity mRNA targets. Both the synthesis and turnover of CsrB/C are regulated. Their turnover requires the housekeeping endonuclease RNase E and is activated by the presence of a preferred carbon source via the binding of EIIAGlc of the glucose transport system to the GGDEF-EAL domain protein CsrD. We demonstrate that the CsrB 3′ segment contains the features necessary for CsrD-mediated decay. RNase E cleavage in an unstructured segment located immediately upstream from the intrinsic terminator is necessary for subsequent degradation to occur. CsrA stabilizes CsrB against RNase E cleavage by binding to two canonical sites adjacent to the necessary cleavage site, while CsrD acts by overcoming CsrA-mediated protection. Our genetic, biochemical and structural studies establish a molecular framework for sRNA turnover by the CsrD-RNase E pathway. We propose that CsrD evolution was driven by the selective advantage of decoupling Csr sRNA decay from CsrA binding, connecting it instead to the availability of a preferred carbon source. PMID:27235416

  11. Equine arteritis virus does not induce interferon production in equine endothelial cells: identification of nonstructural protein 1 as a main interferon antagonist.

    PubMed

    Go, Yun Young; Li, Yanhua; Chen, Zhenhai; Han, Mingyuan; Yoo, Dongwan; Fang, Ying; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of equine arteritis virus (EAV) on type I interferon (IFN) production. Equine endothelial cells (EECs) were infected with the virulent Bucyrus strain (VBS) of EAV and expression of IFN-β was measured at mRNA and protein levels by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and IFN bioassay using vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP), respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that IFN-β mRNA levels in EECs infected with EAV VBS were not increased compared to those in mock-infected cells. Consistent with quantitative RT-PCR, Sendai virus- (SeV-) induced type I IFN production was inhibited by EAV infection. Using an IFN-β promoter-luciferase reporter assay, we subsequently demonstrated that EAV nsps 1, 2, and 11 had the capability to inhibit type I IFN activation. Of these three nsps, nsp1 exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect. Taken together, these data demonstrate that EAV has the ability to suppress the type I IFN production in EECs and nsp1 may play a critical role to subvert the equine innate immune response.

  12. Identification of two auto-cleavage products of nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infected cells: nsp1 function as interferon antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Lawson, S.; Sun, Z.; Zhou, X.; Guan, X.; Christopher-Hennings, J.; Nelson, E.A.; Fang, Y.

    2010-03-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nsp1 is predicted to be auto-cleaved from the replicase polyprotein into nsp1alpha and nsp1beta subunits. In infected cells, we detected the actual existence of nsp1alpha and nsp1beta. Cleavage sites between nsp1alpha/nsp1beta and nsp1beta/nsp2 were identified by protein microsequencing analysis. Time course study showed that nsp1alpha and nsp1beta mainly localize into the cell nucleus after 10 h post infection. Further analysis revealed that both proteins dramatically inhibited IFN-beta expression. The nsp1beta was observed to significantly inhibit expression from an interferon-stimulated response element promoter after Sendai virus infection or interferon treatment. It was further determined to inhibit nuclear translocation of STAT1 in the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. These results demonstrated that nsp1beta has ability to inhibit both interferon synthesis and signaling, while nsp1alpha alone strongly inhibits interferon synthesis. These findings provide important insights into mechanisms of nsp1 in PRRSV pathogenesis and its impact in vaccine development.

  13. Polycomb group proteins are required to couple seed coat initiation to fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Roszak, Pawel; Köhler, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Seed development in flowering plants is initiated after a double fertilization event leading to the formation of zygotic embryo and endosperm tissues surrounded by the maternally derived seed coat. Although the seed coat does not take part in the fertilization process it develops immediately after fertilization, implicating a signaling mechanism from zygotic tissues to the surrounding maternal tissues. We addressed the question of the underlying mechanisms repressing seed coat development before fertilization and initiating seed coat development after fertilization by analyzing combinations of mutants that initiate seed development in the absence of fertilization. We discovered that seed coat development is actively repressed before fertilization by dosage-sensitive Polycomb group proteins acting in maternal tissues surrounding the female gametophyte. This repression is relieved after fertilization by a signal that is formed by the sexual endosperm. Fertilization is required for signal formation, as asexually formed endosperm fails to effectively initiate seed coat development in mutants with uncompromised maternal Polycomb group function. Mutants for the MADS-box transcription factor AGL62 initiate embryo and endosperm formation but fail to develop a seed coat, implicating AGL62 expression in the endosperm as a requirement for signal initiation. Together, our results provide evidence that fertilization of the central cell generates a signal that relieves Polycomb group-mediated repression in the surrounding maternal tissues to initiate seed coat formation. PMID:22143805

  14. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 correlates with renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to determine whether HMGB-1 serum levels are elevated in CKD patients. The study groups were categorized as follows: 110 patients starting dialysis defined as CKD 5; 67 patients with moderately to severely reduced renal function or CKD 3-4; and 48 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum-albumin (S-albumin), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), hemoglobin, subjective global nutritional assessment (SGA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for continuous variables. HMGB-1, measured by Western blot, was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in CKD 5 (146.7 +/- 58.6 ng/mL) and CKD 3-4 (85.6 +/- 31.8) compared with controls (10.9 +/- 10.5). HMGB-1 levels were correlated positively with TNF (Rho = 0.52; P < 0.001), hs-CRP (Rho = 0.38; P < 0.001), IL-6 (Rho = 0.30; P < 0.001), HbA(1c) (Rho = 0.14; P = 0.02) and SGA (Rho = 0.21; P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with GFR (Rho = -0.69; P = 0.0001), Hb (Rho = -0.60; P < 0.001), S-albumin (Rho = -0.31; P < 0.001). The current study has revealed that HMGB-1 is elevated significantly in CKD patients and correlates with GFR as well as markers of inflammation and malnutrition. Future studies may delineate whether HMGB-1 is also a marker of disease activity and severity as well as a predictor of outcome in CKD.

  15. PPARα/γ antagonists reverse the ameliorative effects of osthole on hepatic lipid metabolism and inflammatory response in steatohepatitic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Ruijun; Zhu, Zengyan; Xie, Meilin

    2017-02-25

    Our previous studies have indicated that osthole may ameliorate the hepatic lipid metabolism and inflammatory response in nonalcoholic steatohepatitic rats, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed to determine whether the effects of osthole were mediated by the activation of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ (PPARα/γ). A rat model with steatohepatitis was induced by orally feeding high-fat and high-sucrose emulsion for 6 weeks. These experimental rats were then treated with osthole (20 mg/kg), PPARα antagonist MK886 (1 mg/kg) plus osthole (20 mg/kg), PPARγ antagonist GW9662 (1 mg/kg) plus osthole (20 mg/kg) and MK886 (1 mg/kg) plus GW9662 (1 mg/kg) plus osthole (20 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. The results showed that after osthole treatment, the hepatic triglycerides, free fatty acids, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8 and liver index decreased by 52.3, 31.0, 32.4, 28.9, 36.3, 29.3 and 29.9%, respectively, and the score of steatohepatitis also decreased by 70.0%, indicating that osthole improved the hepatic steatosis and inflammation. However, these effects of osthole were reduced or abrogated after simultaneous addition of the specific PPARα antagonist MK886 or/and the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, especially in the co-PPARα/γ antagonists-treated group. Importantly, the osthole-induced hepatic expressions of PPARα/γ proteins were decreased, and the osthole-regulated hepatic expressions of lipogenic and inflammatory gene proteins were also reversed by PPARα/γ antagonist treatment. These findings demonstrated that the ameliorative effect of osthole on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis was mediated by PPARα/γ activation, and osthole might be a natural dual PPARα/γ activator.

  16. Contrasting evolutionary patterns of spore coat proteins in two Bacillus species groups are linked to a difference in cellular structure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Bacillus subtilis-group and the Bacillus cereus-group are two well-studied groups of species in the genus Bacillus. Bacteria in this genus can produce a highly resistant cell type, the spore, which is encased in a complex protective protein shell called the coat. Spores in the B. cereus-group contain an additional outer layer, the exosporium, which encircles the coat. The coat in B. subtilis spores possesses inner and outer layers. The aim of this study is to investigate whether differences in the spore structures influenced the divergence of the coat protein genes during the evolution of these two Bacillus species groups. Results We designed and implemented a computational framework to compare the evolutionary histories of coat proteins. We curated a list of B. subtilis coat proteins and identified their orthologs in 11 Bacillus species based on phylogenetic congruence. Phylogenetic profiles of these coat proteins show that they can be divided into conserved and labile ones. Coat proteins comprising the B. subtilis inner coat are significantly more conserved than those comprising the outer coat. We then performed genome-wide comparisons of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rate ratio, dN/dS, and found contrasting patterns: Coat proteins have significantly higher dN/dS in the B. subtilis-group genomes, but not in the B. cereus-group genomes. We further corroborated this contrast by examining changes of dN/dS within gene trees, and found that some coat protein gene trees have significantly different dN/dS between the B subtilis-clade and the B. cereus-clade. Conclusions Coat proteins in the B. subtilis- and B. cereus-group species are under contrasting selective pressures. We speculate that the absence of the exosporium in the B. subtilis spore coat effectively lifted a structural constraint that has led to relaxed negative selection pressure on the outer coat. PMID:24283940

  17. Antagonistic control of the turnover pathway for the global regulatory sRNA CsrB by the CsrA and CsrD proteins.

    PubMed

    Vakulskas, Christopher A; Leng, Yuanyuan; Abe, Hazuki; Amaki, Takumi; Okayama, Akihiro; Babitzke, Paul; Suzuki, Kazushi; Romeo, Tony

    2016-09-19

    The widely conserved protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator A) globally regulates bacterial gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In many species, CsrA activity is governed by untranslated sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC in Escherichia coli, which bind to multiple CsrA dimers, sequestering them from lower affinity mRNA targets. Both the synthesis and turnover of CsrB/C are regulated. Their turnover requires the housekeeping endonuclease RNase E and is activated by the presence of a preferred carbon source via the binding of EIIA(Glc) of the glucose transport system to the GGDEF-EAL domain protein CsrD. We demonstrate that the CsrB 3' segment contains the features necessary for CsrD-mediated decay. RNase E cleavage in an unstructured segment located immediately upstream from the intrinsic terminator is necessary for subsequent degradation to occur. CsrA stabilizes CsrB against RNase E cleavage by binding to two canonical sites adjacent to the necessary cleavage site, while CsrD acts by overcoming CsrA-mediated protection. Our genetic, biochemical and structural studies establish a molecular framework for sRNA turnover by the CsrD-RNase E pathway. We propose that CsrD evolution was driven by the selective advantage of decoupling Csr sRNA decay from CsrA binding, connecting it instead to the availability of a preferred carbon source. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein N-terminus is a novel osteoclast antagonist that counteracts bone loss.

    PubMed

    Rucci, Nadia; Capulli, Mattia; Ventura, Luca; Angelucci, Adriano; Peruzzi, Barbara; Tillgren, Viveka; Muraca, Maurizio; Heinegård, Dick; Teti, Anna

    2013-09-01

    (hbd) PRELP is a peptide corresponding to the N-terminal heparin binding domain of the matrix protein proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP). (hbd) PRELP inhibits osteoclastogenesis entering pre-fusion osteoclasts through a chondroitin sulfate- and annexin 2-dependent mechanism and reducing the nuclear factor-κB transcription factor activity. In this work, we hypothesized that (hbd) PRELP could have a pharmacological relevance, counteracting bone loss in a variety of in vivo models of bone diseases induced by exacerbated osteoclast activity. In healthy mice, we demonstrated that the peptide targeted the bone and increased trabecular bone mass over basal level. In mice treated with retinoic acid to induce an acute increase of osteoclast formation, the peptide consistently antagonized osteoclastogenesis and prevented the increase of the serum levels of the osteoclast-specific marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. In ovariectomized mice, in which osteoclast activity was chronically enhanced by estrogen deficiency, (hbd) PRELP counteracted exacerbated osteoclast activity and bone loss. In mice carrying osteolytic bone metastases, in which osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption were enhanced by tumor cell-derived factors, (hbd) PRELP reduced the incidence of osteolytic lesions, both preventively and curatively, with mechanisms involving impaired tumor cell homing to bone and tumor growth in the bone microenvironment. Interestingly, in tumor-bearing mice, (hbd) PRELP also inhibited breast tumor growth in orthotopic sites and development of metastatic disease in visceral organs, reducing cachexia and improving survival especially when administered preventively. (hbd) PRELP was retained in the tumor tissue and appeared to affect tumor growth by interacting with the microenvironment rather than by directly affecting the tumor cells. Because safety studies and high-dose treatments revealed no adverse effects, (hbd) PRELP could be employed as a

  19. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  20. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  1. High mobility group 1 (HMG1) protein in mouse preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Spada, F; Brunet, A; Mercier, Y; Renard, J P; Bianchi, M E; Thompson, E M

    1998-08-01

    High mobility group 1 protein (HMG1) has traditionally been considered a structural component of chromatin, possibly similar in function to histone H1. In fact, at the onset of Xenopus and Drosophila development, HMG1 appears to substitute for histone H1: HMG1 is abundant when histone H1 is absent after the midblastula transition histone H1 largely replaces HMG1. We show that in early mouse embryos the expression patterns of HMG1 and histone H1 are not complementary. Instead, HMG1 content increases after zygotic genome activation at the same time as histone H1. HMG1 does not remain associated to mitotic chromosomes either in embryos or somatic cells. These results argue against a shared structural role for HMG1 and histone H1 in mammalian chromatin.

  2. Polycomb group protein ezh2 controls actin polymerization and cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, I-hsin; Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Dickinson, Ephraim; Oser, Matthew; Basavaraj, Ashwin; Marqueron, Raphael; Viale, Agnes; Reinberg, Danny; Wülfing, Christoph; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2005-05-06

    Polycomb group protein Ezh2, one of the key regulators of development in organisms from flies to mice, exerts its epigenetic function through regulation of histone methylation. Here, we report the existence of the cytosolic Ezh2-containing methyltransferase complex and tie the function of this complex to regulation of actin polymerization in various cell types. Genetic evidence supports the essential role of cytosolic Ezh2 in actin polymerization-dependent processes such as antigen receptor signaling in T cells and PDGF-induced dorsal circular ruffle formation in fibroblasts. Revealed function of Ezh2 points to a broader usage of lysine methylation in regulation of both nuclear and extra-nuclear signaling processes.

  3. Tree ferns: monophyletic groups and their relationships as revealed by four protein-coding plastid loci.

    PubMed

    Korall, Petra; Pryer, Kathleen M; Metzgar, Jordan S; Schneider, Harald; Conant, David S

    2006-06-01

    Tree ferns are a well-established clade within leptosporangiate ferns. Most of the 600 species (in seven families and 13 genera) are arborescent, but considerable morphological variability exists, spanning the giant scaly tree ferns (Cyatheaceae), the low, erect plants (Plagiogyriaceae), and the diminutive endemics of the Guayana Highlands (Hymenophyllopsidaceae). In this study, we investigate phylogenetic relationships within tree ferns based on analyses of four protein-coding, plastid loci (atpA, atpB, rbcL, and rps4). Our results reveal four well-supported clades, with genera of Dicksoniaceae (sensu ) interspersed among them: (A) (Loxomataceae, (Culcita, Plagiogyriaceae)), (B) (Calochlaena, (Dicksonia, Lophosoriaceae)), (C) Cibotium, and (D) Cyatheaceae, with Hymenophyllopsidaceae nested within. How these four groups are related to one other, to Thyrsopteris, or to Metaxyaceae is weakly supported. Our results show that Dicksoniaceae and Cyatheaceae, as currently recognised, are not monophyletic and new circumscriptions for these families are needed.

  4. The Dimerization State of the Mammalian High Mobility Group Protein AT-Hook 2 (HMGA2)

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Lorraine; Baez, Maria A. M.; Harrilal, Christopher; Garabedian, Alyssa; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco; Leng, Fenfei

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian high mobility group protein AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) is a chromosomal architectural transcription factor involved in cell transformation and oncogenesis. It consists of three positively charged “AT-hooks” and a negatively charged C-terminus. Sequence analyses, circular dichroism experiments, and gel-filtration studies showed that HMGA2, in the native state, does not have a defined secondary or tertiary structure. Surprisingly, using combined approaches of 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) chemical cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and mass spectrometry, we discovered that HMGA2 is capable of self-associating into homodimers in aqueous buffer solution. Our results showed that electrostatic interactions between the positively charged “AT-hooks” and the negatively charged C-terminus greatly contribute to the homodimer formation. PMID:26114780

  5. A summary of the measured pK values of the ionizable groups in folded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grimsley, Gerald R; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2009-01-01

    We tabulated 541 measured pK values reported in the literature for the Asp, Glu, His, Cys, Tyr, and Lys side chains, and the C and N termini of 78 folded proteins. The majority of these values are for the Asp, Glu, and His side chains. The average pK values are Asp 3.5 ± 1.2 (139); Glu 4.2 ± 0.9 (153); His 6.6 ± 1.0 (131); Cys 6.8 ± 2.7 (25); Tyr 10.3 ± 1.2 (20); Lys 10.5 ± 1.1 (35); C-terminus 3.3 ± 0.8 (22) and N-terminus 7.7 ± 0.5 (16). We compare these results with the measured pK values of these groups in alanine pentapeptides, and comment on our overall findings. PMID:19177368

  6. Methyl group turnover on methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins during chemotaxis by Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Thoelke, M.S.; Casper, J.M.; Ordal, G.W. )

    1990-02-05

    The addition of attractant to Bacillus subtilis briefly exposed to radioactive methionine causes an increase of labeling of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. The addition of attractant to cells radiolabeled for longer times shows no change in the extent of methylation. Therefore, the increase in labeling for the briefly labeled cells is due to an increased turnover of methyl groups caused by attractant. All amino acids gave enhanced turnover. This turnover lasted for a prolonged time, probably spanning the period of smooth swimming caused by the attractant addition. Repellent did not affect the turnover when added alone or simultaneously with attractant. Thus, for amino acid attractants, the turnover is probably the excitatory signal, which is seen to extend long into or throughout the adaptation period, not just at the start of it.

  7. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Smeesters, Pierre R.; Frost, Hannah R. C.; Steer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates. PMID:26101780

  8. The Investigation and Characterization of the Group 3 [Nickel-Iron]-Hydrogenases Using Protein Film Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chelsea Lee

    Hydrogenases, the enzymes that reversibly convert protons and electrons to hydrogen, are used in all three domains of life. [NiFe]-hydrogenases are considered best suited for biotechnological applications because of their reversible inactivation with oxygen. Phylogenetically, there are four groups of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. The best characterized group, "uptake" hydrogenases, are membrane-bound and catalyze hydrogen oxidation in vivo. In contrast, the group 3 [NiFe]-hydrogenases are heteromultimeric, bifunctional enzymes that fulfill various cellular roles. In this dissertation, protein film electrochemistry (PFE) is used to characterize the catalytic properties of two group 3 [NiFe]-hydrogenases: HoxEFUYH from Synechocystsis sp. PCC 6803 and SHI from Pyrococcus furiosus. First, HoxEFUYH is shown to be biased towards hydrogen production. Upon exposure to oxygen, HoxEFUYH inactivates to two states, both of which can be reactivated on the timescale of seconds. Second, we show that PfSHI is the first example of an oxygen tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase that produces two inactive states upon exposure to oxygen. Both inactive states are analogous to those characterized for HoxEFUYH, but oxygen exposed PfSHI produces a greater fraction that reactivates at high potentials, enabling hydrogen oxidation in the presence of oxygen. Third, it is shown that removing the NAD(P)-reducing subunits from PfSHI leads to a decrease in bias towards hydrogen oxidation and renders the enzyme oxygen sensitive. Both traits are likely due to impaired intramolecular electron transfer. Mechanistic hypotheseses for these functional differences are considered.

  9. Protein conformational exchange measured by 1H R1ρ relaxation dispersion of methyl groups.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Ulrich; Blissing, Annica T; Hennig, Janosch; Ahlner, Alexandra; Liu, Zhihong; Vogel, Hans J; Akke, Mikael; Lundström, Patrik

    2013-09-01

    Activated dynamics plays a central role in protein function, where transitions between distinct conformations often underlie the switching between active and inactive states. The characteristic time scales of these transitions typically fall in the microsecond to millisecond range, which is amenable to investigations by NMR relaxation dispersion experiments. Processes at the faster end of this range are more challenging to study, because higher RF field strengths are required to achieve refocusing of the exchanging magnetization. Here we describe a rotating-frame relaxation dispersion experiment for (1)H spins in methyl (13)CHD2 groups, which improves the characterization of fast exchange processes. The influence of (1)H-(1)H rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effects (ROE) is shown to be negligible, based on a comparison of R 1ρ relaxation data acquired with tilt angles of 90° and 35°, in which the ROE is maximal and minimal, respectively, and on samples containing different (1)H densities surrounding the monitored methyl groups. The method was applied to ubiquitin and the apo form of calmodulin. We find that ubiquitin does not exhibit any (1)H relaxation dispersion of its methyl groups at 10 or 25 °C. By contrast, calmodulin shows significant conformational exchange of the methionine methyl groups in its C-terminal domain, as previously demonstrated by (1)H and (13)C CPMG experiments. The present R 1ρ experiment extends the relaxation dispersion profile towards higher refocusing frequencies, which improves the definition of the exchange correlation time, compared to previous results.

  10. Pluripotency Factors and Polycomb Group Proteins Repress Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Expression in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Chia-I; Wang, Qin; Fan, Yunxia; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor and environmental sensor that regulates expression of genes involved in drug-metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, Ahr ablation in mice and studies with orthologous genes in invertebrates suggest that AHR may also play a significant role in embryonic development. To address this hypothesis, we studied the regulation of Ahr expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny. In ES cells, interactions between OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and Polycomb Group proteins at the Ahr promoter repress AHR expression, which can also be repressed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors in hepatoma cells. In ES cells, unproductive RNA polymerase II binds at the Ahr transcription start site and drives the synthesis of short abortive transcripts. Activation of Ahr expression during differentiation follows from reversal of repressive marks in Ahr promoter chromatin, release of pluripotency factors and PcG proteins, binding of Sp factors, establishment of histone marks of open chromatin, and engagement of active RNAPII to drive full-length RNA transcript elongation. Our results suggest that reversible Ahr repression in ES cells holds the gene poised for expression and allows for a quick switch to activation during embryonic development. PMID:24316986

  11. Nonhistone nuclear high mobility group proteins 14 and 17 stabilize nucleosome core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Paton, A.E.; Wilkinson-Singley, E.; Olins, D.W.

    1983-11-10

    Nucleosome core particles form well defined complexes with the nuclear nonhistone proteins HMG 14 or 17. The binding of HMG 14 or 17 to nucleosomes results in greater stability of the nucleosomal DNA as shown by circular dichroism and thermal denaturation. Under appropriate conditions the binding is cooperative, and cooperativity is ionic strength dependent. The specificity and cooperative transitions of high mobility group (HMG) binding are preserved in 1 M urea. Specificity is lost in 4 M urea. Thermal denaturation and circular dichroism show a dramatic reversal of the effects of urea on nucleosomes when HMG 14 or 17 is bound, indicating stabilization of the nucleosome by HMG proteins. Complexes formed between reconstructed nucleosomes containing purified inner histones plus poly (dA-dT) and HMG 14 or 17 demonstrate that the HMG binding site requires only DNA and histones. Electron microscopy reveals no major structural alterations in the nucleosome upon binding of HMG 14 or 17. Cross-linking the nucleosome extensively with formaldehyde under cooperative HMG binding conditions does not prevent the ionic strength-dependent shift to noncooperative binding. This suggests mechanisms other than internal nucleosome conformational changes may be involved in cooperative HMG binding.

  12. Immunization with Streptococcal Heme Binding Protein (Shp) Protects Mice Against Group A Streptococcus Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Song, Yingli; Li, Yuanmeng; Cai, Minghui; Meng, Yuan; Zhu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcal heme binding protein (Shp) is a surface protein of the heme acquisition system that is an essential iron nutrient in Group A Streptococcus (GAS). Here, we tested whether Shp immunization protects mice from subcutaneous infection. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with recombinant Shp and then challenged with GAS. The protective effects against GAS challenge were evaluated two weeks after the last immunization. Immunization with Shp elicited a robust IgG response, resulting in high anti-Shp IgG titers in the serum. Immunized mice had a higher survival rate and smaller skin lesions than adjuvant control mice. Furthermore, immunized mice had lower GAS numbers at the skin lesions and in the liver, spleen and lung. Histological analysis with Gram staining showed that GAS invaded the surrounding area of the inoculation sites in the skin in control mice, but not in immunized mice. Thus, Shp immunization enhances GAS clearance and reduces GAS skin invasion and systemic dissemination. These findings indicate that Shp is a protective antigen.

  13. Preliminary study of high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1(HMGB1) in ankylosing spondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Sun, Wei; Li, Shouxin; Ni, Juan; Su, Yuying; Wang, Chenqiong; Luo, Xiaofang; Tu, Wei; Shen, Guifen; Gong, Feili; Zheng, Fang; Dong, Lingli

    2015-01-01

    To compare the serum levels of high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) between patients with AS and healthy controls, and evaluate its association with disease activities and functional abilities; to investigate the cell surface receptors related to HMGB1 in AS patients. The HMGB1 serum levels from71 previously untreated AS patients and 40 healthy controls were detected by ELISA method. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), erythrocytesedimentationrate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were assessed on these participants. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and its relevant cell surface receptors RAGE, TLR2, TLR4, and IL-1Racp complex were analysed by RT-PCR. The HMGB1 serum levels from AS patients were significantly higher than those from healthy controls and remarkably positive correlated with BASDAI, ASDAS, BASFI, CRP, and ESR. ASDAS showed more correlated to HMGB1 serum levels than BASDAI. Besides, the expression of TLR2, TLR4, and IL-1Racp from PBMCs revealed significant correlations with the expression of HMGB1. HMGB1 might be a good laboratory index for the evaluation of disease activities and disease severity in AS patients. Further, extracellular HMGB1 play its inflammatory role mainly via the expression of cell surface receptors TLR2, TLR4 and IL-1RAcP complex.

  14. High mobility group protein 1: A collaborator in nucleosome dynamics and estrogen-responsive gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Scovell, William M

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that interacts with DNA and chromatin to influence the regulation of transcription, DNA replication and repair and recombination. We show that HMGB1 alters the structure and stability of the canonical nucleosome (N) in a nonenzymatic, adenosine triphosphate-independent manner. As a result, the canonical nucleosome is converted to two stable, physically distinct nucleosome conformers. Although estrogen receptor (ER) does not bind to its consensus estrogen response element within a nucleosome, HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate strong ER binding. The isolated HMGB1-restructured nucleosomes (N’ and N’’) remain stable and exhibit a number of characteristics that are distinctly different from the canonical nucleosome. These findings complement previous studies that showed (1) HMGB1 stimulates in vivo transcriptional activation at estrogen response elements and (2) knock down of HMGB1 expression by siRNA precipitously reduced transcriptional activation. The findings indicate that a major facet of the mechanism of HMGB1 action involves a restructuring of aspects of the nucleosome that appear to relax structural constraints within the nucleosome. The findings are extended to reveal the differences between ER and the other steroid hormone receptors. A working proposal outlines mechanisms that highlight the multiple facets that HMGB1 may utilize in restructuring the nucleosome. PMID:27247709

  15. Polycomb Group Protein Ezh2 Regulates Hepatic Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in Murine Embryonic Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Yasuharu; Nakata, Susumu; Obana, Yuta; Sekine, Keisuke; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Takebe, Takanori; Isono, Kyoichi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In embryonic liver, hepatic progenitor cells are actively proliferating and generate a fundamental cellular pool for establishing parenchymal components. However, the molecular basis for the expansion of the progenitors maintaining their immature state remains elusive. Polycomb group proteins regulate gene expression throughout the genome by modulating of chromatin structure and play crucial roles in development. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a key component of polycomb group proteins, catalyzes tri-methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3), which trigger the gene suppression. In the present study, we investigated a role of Ezh2 in the regulation of the expanding hepatic progenitor population in vivo. We found that Ezh2 is highly expressed in the actively proliferating cells at the early developmental stage. Using a conditional knockout mouse model, we show that the deletion of the SET domain of Ezh2, which is responsible for catalytic induction of H3K27me3, results in significant reduction of the total liver size, absolute number of liver parenchymal cells, and hepatic progenitor cell population in size. A clonal colony assay in the hepatic progenitor cells directly isolated from in vivo fetal livers revealed that the bi-potent clonogenicity was significantly attenuated by the Ezh2 loss of function. Moreover, a marker expression based analysis and a global gene expression analysis showed that the knockout of Ezh2 inhibited differentiation to hepatocyte with reduced expression of a number of liver-function related genes. Taken together, our results indicate that Ezh2 is required for the hepatic progenitor expansion in vivo, which is essential for the functional maturation of embryonic liver, through its activity for catalyzing H3K27me3. PMID:25153170

  16. Design, synthesis, and biological activities of novel hexahydropyrazino[1,2-a]indole derivatives as potent inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) proteins antagonists with improved membrane permeability across MDR1 expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Shiokawa, Zenyu; Hashimoto, Kentaro; Saito, Bunnai; Oguro, Yuya; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Masato; Yoshimatsu, Mie; Kosugi, Yohei; Debori, Yasuyuki; Morishita, Nao; Dougan, Douglas R; Snell, Gyorgy P; Yoshida, Sei; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu

    2013-12-15

    We previously reported octahydropyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine derivative 2 (T-3256336) as a potent antagonist for inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Because compound 2 was susceptible to MDR1 mediated efflux, we developed another scaffold, hexahydropyrazino[1,2-a]indole, using structure-based drug design. The fused benzene ring of this scaffold was aimed at increasing the lipophilicity and decreasing the basicity of the scaffold to improve the membrane permeability across MDR1 expressing cells. We established a chiral pool synthetic route to yield the desired tricyclic chiral isomers. Chemical modification of the core scaffold led to a representative compound 50, which showed strong inhibition of IAP binding (X chromosome-linked IAP [XIAP]: IC50 23 nM and cellular IAP [cIAP]: IC50 1.1 nM) and cell growth inhibition (MDA-MB-231 cells: GI50 2.8 nM) with high permeability and low potential of MDR1 substrate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular dynamics at the receptor level of immunodominant myelin basic protein epitope 87-99 implicated in multiple sclerosis and its antagonists altered peptide ligands: triggering of immune response.

    PubMed

    Mantzourani, Efthimia D; Platts, James A; Brancale, Andrea; Mavromoustakos, Thomas M; Tselios, Theodore V

    2007-09-01

    This work reports molecular dynamics studies at the receptor level of the immunodominant myelin basic protein (MBP) epitope 87-99 implicated in multiple sclerosis, and its antagonists altered peptide ligands (APLs), namely [Arg91, Ala96] MBP87-99 and [Ala91,96] MBP87-99. The interaction of each peptide ligand with the receptor human leukocyte antigen HLA-DR2b was studied, starting from X-ray structure with pdb code: 1ymm. This is the first such study of APL-HLA-DR2b complexes, and hence the first attempt to gain a better understanding of the molecular recognition mechanisms that underlie TCR antagonism by these APLs. The amino acids His88 and Phe89 serve as T-cell receptor (TCR) anchors in the formation of the trimolecular complex TCR-peptide-HLA-DR2b, where the TCR binds in a diagonal, off-centered mode to the peptide-HLA complex. The present findings indicate that these two amino acids have a different orientation in the APLs [Arg91, Ala96] MBP87-99 and [Ala91,96] MBP87-99: His88 and Phe89 remain buried in HLA grooves and are not available for interaction with the TCR. We propose that this different topology could provide a possible mechanism of action for TCR antagonism.

  18. Preoperative prognostic values of α-fetoprotein (AFP) and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma for living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Hwan; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Wan-Joon; Kang, Woo-Hyoung; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Jwa, Eun Kyung; Cho, Hwui-Dong; Ha, Su-Min; Chung, Yong-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-12-01

    Adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is one of the best treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, when recurrence of HCC after LDLT occurs, the prognosis is poor because of rapid progression. Preoperative level of α-fetoprotein (AFP) and protein induced by vitamin K antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) reportedly correlate with recurrence of HCC after LDLT. We examined AFP and PIVKA-II preoperatively as predictors of HCC recurrence in 461 patients who underwent LDLT using right liver graft for HCC from May 2007 to December 2013. Among these, 77 patients (16.7%) who experienced recurrence were retrospectively reviewed. Multivariate analysis revealed tumor size >5 cm, AFP >150 nag/mol and PIVKA-II >100 maul/mol as significant independent risk factors for recurrence. The median time to recurrence was 10 months. The median survival time after recurrence was 26 months, and the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates after recurrence were 80.5%, 58%, and 28.3% respectively. Preoperatively, not only morphology of the tumor but also AFP and PIVKA-II levels can offers important information for the recurrence after LDLT for HCC. Thus, combination of tumor markers might be used for expansion of pre-existing strict selection criteria of liver transplantation for HCC.

  19. Preoperative prognostic values of α-fetoprotein (AFP) and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma for living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Hwan; Kim, Wan-Joon; Kang, Woo-Hyoung; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Jwa, Eun Kyung; Cho, Hwui-Dong; Ha, Su-Min; Chung, Yong-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background Adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is one of the best treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, when recurrence of HCC after LDLT occurs, the prognosis is poor because of rapid progression. Preoperative level of α-fetoprotein (AFP) and protein induced by vitamin K antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) reportedly correlate with recurrence of HCC after LDLT. Methods We examined AFP and PIVKA-II preoperatively as predictors of HCC recurrence in 461 patients who underwent LDLT using right liver graft for HCC from May 2007 to December 2013. Results Among these, 77 patients (16.7%) who experienced recurrence were retrospectively reviewed. Multivariate analysis revealed tumor size >5 cm, AFP >150 nag/mol and PIVKA-II >100 maul/mol as significant independent risk factors for recurrence. The median time to recurrence was 10 months. The median survival time after recurrence was 26 months, and the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates after recurrence were 80.5%, 58%, and 28.3% respectively. Conclusions Preoperatively, not only morphology of the tumor but also AFP and PIVKA-II levels can offers important information for the recurrence after LDLT for HCC. Thus, combination of tumor markers might be used for expansion of pre-existing strict selection criteria of liver transplantation for HCC. PMID:28124000

  20. Localization and expression profile of Group I and II Activators of G-protein Signaling in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Pressly, Jeffrey D.; Arnett, Joanna; Regner, Kevin R.; Park, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Activators of G-protein Signaling (AGS) are a family of accessory proteins that were discovered as modulators of heterotrimeric G-protein subunits. The primary aim of the present study was to localize Group I and II AGS proteins and determine the renal expression profile using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively, during normal and injured states of the kidney. Group I AGS1 was found to be predominantly localized to the proximal tubule, Group II AGS3 and AGS5 were exclusively localized to the distal tubular segments, and Group II AGS6 was ubiquitously expressed in every nephron segment of the rodent kidney. In rat kidneys following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), Group I AGS1 mRNA was dramatically increased after 24 hours by 5-fold (P<0.05), whereas Group II AGS3 and AGS4 mRNA was significantly decreased at the same time point (P<0.05). No significant change in the transcript levels were detected at other time points for any of the AGS genes between control and IRI groups. In polycystic diseased kidneys, mRNA levels for AGS3, AGS4 and AGS6 was significantly increased (P<0.05) by 75–80% in PCK rat kidneys. The identification of Group I and II AGS mRNA and protein in the kidney may provide insight into the potential mechanism of action during normal and varying states of renal disease or injury. PMID:25533045

  1. High mobility group protein DSP1 negatively regulates HSP70 transcription in Crassostrea hongkongensis

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Zongyu; Xu, Delin; Cui, Miao; Zhang, Qizhong

    2016-06-10

    HSP70 acts mostly as a molecular chaperone and plays important roles in facilitating the folding of nascent peptides as well as the refolding or degradation of the denatured proteins. Under stressed conditions, the expression level of HSP70 is upregulated significantly and rapidly, as is known to be achieved by various regulatory factors controlling the transcriptional level. In this study, a high mobility group protein DSP1 was identified by DNA-affinity purification from the nuclear extracts of Crassostrea hongkongensis using the ChHSP70 promoter as a bait. The specific interaction between the prokaryotically expressed ChDSP1 and the FITC-labeled ChHSP70 promoter was confirmed by EMSA analysis. ChDSP1 was shown to negatively regulate ChHSP70 promoter expression by Luciferase Reporter Assay in the heterologous HEK293T cells. Both ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were induced by either thermal or CdCl{sub 2} stress, while the accumulated expression peaks of ChDSP1 were always slightly delayed when compared with that of ChHSP70. This indicates that ChDSP1 is involved, very likely to exert its suppressive role, in the recovery of the ChHSP70 expression from the induced level to its original state. This study is the first to report negative regulator of HSP70 gene transcription, and provides novel insights into the mechanisms controlling heat shock protein expression. -- Highlights: •HMG protein ChDSP1 shows affinity to ChHSP70 promoter in Crassostrea hongkongensis. •ChDSP1 negatively regulates ChHSP70 transcription. •ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were coordinately induced by thermal/Cd stress. •ChDSP1 may contribute to the recovery of the induced ChHSP70 to its original state. •This is the first report regarding negative regulator of HSP70 transcription.

  2. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C protein (XPC) serves as a general sensor of damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shell, Steven M.; Hawkins, Edward K.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Hlaing, Aye Su; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C protein (XPC) serves as the primary initiating factor in the global genome nucleotide excision repair pathway (GG-NER). Recent reports suggest XPC also stimulates repair of oxidative lesions by base excision repair. However, whether XPC distinguishes among various types of DNA lesions remains unclear. Although the DNA binding properties of XPC have been studied by several groups, there is a lack of consensus over whether XPC discriminates between DNA damaged by lesions associated with NER activity versus those that are not. In this study we report a high-throughput fluorescence anisotropy assay used to measure the DNA binding affinity of XPC for a panel of DNA substrates containing a range of chemical lesions in a common sequence. Our results demonstrate that while XPC displays a preference for binding damaged DNA, the identity of the lesion has little effect on the binding affinity of XPC. Moreover, XPC was equally capable of binding to DNA substrates containing lesions not repaired by GG-NER. Our results support an indirect read-out model for sensing the presence of lesions by human XPC and suggest XPC may act as a general sensor of damaged DNA capable of recognizing DNA containing lesions not repaired by NER. PMID:24051049

  3. The trithorax group proteins Kismet and ASH1 promote H3K36 dimethylation to counteract Polycomb group repression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dorighi, Kristel M.; Tamkun, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Polycomb group of repressors and trithorax group of activators maintain heritable states of transcription by modifying nucleosomal histones or remodeling chromatin. Although tremendous progress has been made toward defining the biochemical activities of Polycomb and trithorax group proteins, much remains to be learned about how they interact with each other and the general transcription machinery to maintain on or off states of gene expression. The trithorax group protein Kismet (KIS) is related to the SWI/SNF and CHD families of chromatin remodeling factors. KIS promotes transcription elongation, facilitates the binding of the trithorax group histone methyltransferases ASH1 and TRX to active genes, and counteracts repressive methylation of histone H3 on lysine 27 (H3K27) by Polycomb group proteins. Here, we sought to clarify the mechanism of action of KIS and how it interacts with ASH1 to antagonize H3K27 methylation in Drosophila. We present evidence that KIS promotes transcription elongation and counteracts Polycomb group repression via distinct mechanisms. A chemical inhibitor of transcription elongation, DRB, had no effect on ASH1 recruitment or H3K27 methylation. Conversely, loss of ASH1 function had no effect on transcription elongation. Mutations in kis cause a global reduction in the di- and tri-methylation of histone H3 on lysine 36 (H3K36) - modifications that antagonize H3K27 methylation in vitro. Furthermore, loss of ASH1 significantly decreases H3K36 dimethylation, providing further evidence that ASH1 is an H3K36 dimethylase in vivo. These and other findings suggest that KIS antagonizes Polycomb group repression by facilitating ASH1-dependent H3K36 dimethylation. PMID:24004944

  4. Hydrophobic tendency of polar group hydration as a major force in type I antifreeze protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Sharp, Kim A

    2005-05-01

    The random network model of water quantitatively describes the different hydration heat capacities of polar and apolar solutes in terms of distortions of the water-water hydrogen bonding angle in the first hydration shell (Gallagher and Sharp, JACS 2003;125:9853). The distribution of this angle in pure water is bimodal, with a low-angle population and high-angle population. Polar solutes increase the high-angle population while apolar solutes increase the low-angle population. The ratio of the two populations quantifies the hydrophobicity of the solute and provides a sensitive measure of water structural distortions. This method of analysis is applied to study hydration of type I thermal hysteresis protein (THP) from winter flounder and three quadruple mutants of four threonine residues at positions 2, 13, 24, and 35. Wild-type and two mutants (VVVV and AAAA) have antifreeze (thermal hysteresis) activity, while the other mutant (SSSS) has no activity. The analysis reveals significant differences in the hydration structure of the ice-binding site. For the SSSS mutant, polar groups have a typical polar-like hydration, that is, more high-angle H-bonds than bulk water. For the wild-type and active mutants, polar groups have unusual, very apolar-like hydration, that is, more low-angle H-bonds than bulk water. This pattern of hydration was seen previously in the structurally distinct type III THPs (Yang & Sharp Biophys Chem 2004;109:137), suggesting for the first time a general mechanism for different THP classes. The specific shape, residue size, and clustering of both polar and apoler groups are essential for an active ice binding surface.

  5. Protein FOG is a moderate inducer of MIG/CXCL9, and group G streptococci are more tolerant than group A streptococci to this chemokine's antibacterial effect.

    PubMed

    Linge, Helena M; Sastalla, Inka; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric; Egesten, Arne; Frick, Inga-Maria

    2007-11-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (group G streptococci; GGS) cause disease in humans but are often regarded as commensals in comparison with Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci; GAS). The current study investigated the degree and kinetics of the innate immune response elicited by the two species. This was assessed as expression of the chemokine MIG/CXCL9 and bacterial susceptibility to its bactericidal effect. No significant difference in MIG/CXCL9 expression from THP-1 or Detroit 562 cells was observed when comparing whole GGS or GAS as stimuli. The study demonstrates that protein FOG was released from the bacterial surface directly and by neutrophil elastase. Expression of MIG/CXCL9 following stimulation with soluble M proteins of the two species (the recently described protein FOG of GGS and protein M1 of GAS) was reduced for protein FOG in both the monocytic and the epithelial cell line. When the antibacterial effects of MIG/CXCL9 were examined in conditions of increased ionic strength, MIG/CXCL9 killed GAS more efficiently than GGS. Also in the absence of MIG/CXCL9, GGS were more tolerant to increased salt concentrations than GAS. In summary, both GGS and GAS evoke MIG/CXCL9 expression but they differ in susceptibility to its antibacterial effects. This may in part explain the success of GGS as a commensal and its potential as a pathogen.

  6. Development of Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, F. Ivy; Carlezon, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) belong to the G-protein coupled class of receptors (GPCRs). They are activated by the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin (DYN) and expressed at particularly high levels within brain areas implicated in modulation of motivation, emotion, and cognitive function. Chronic activation of KORs in animal models has maladaptive effects including increases in behaviors that reflect depression, the propensity to engage in drug-seeking behavior, and drug craving. The fact that KOR activation has such a profound influence on behaviors often triggered by stress has led to interest in selective KOR antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. This perspective provides a description of preclinical research conducted in the development of several different classes of selective KOR antagonists, a summary of the clinical studies conducted thus far, and recommendations for the type of work needed in the future to determine if these agents would be useful as pharmacotherapies for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:23360448

  7. Small Molecule CXCR3 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Stephen P; Cox, Rhona J

    2016-04-14

    Chemokines and their receptors are known to play important roles in disease. More than 40 chemokine ligands and 20 chemokine receptors have been identified, but, to date, only two small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists have been approved by the FDA. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 was identified in 1996, and nearly 20 years later, new areas of CXCR3 disease biology continue to emerge. Several classes of small molecule CXCR3 antagonists have been developed, and two have shown efficacy in preclinical models of inflammatory disease. However, only one CXCR3 antagonist has been evaluated in clinical trials, and there remain many opportunities to further investigate known classes of CXCR3 antagonists and to identify new chemotypes. This Perspective reviews the known CXCR3 antagonists and considers future opportunities for the development of small molecules for clinical evaluation.

  8. A Proteomic approach to discover and compare interacting partners of Papillomavirus E2 proteins from diverse phylogenetic groups

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Moon Kyoo; Anderson, D. Eric; van Doorslaer, Koenraad; McBride, Alison A.

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are a very successful group of viruses that replicate persistently in localized regions of the stratified epithelium of their specific host. Infection results in pathologies ranging from asymptomatic infection, benign warts, to malignant carcinomas. Despite this diversity, papillomavirus genomes are small (7-8 kbp) and contain at most eight genes. To sustain the complex papillomaviral life cycle, each viral protein has multiple functions and interacts with and manipulates a plethora of cellular proteins. In this study, we use tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify host factors that interact with eleven different papillomavirus E2 proteins from diverse phylogenetic groups. The E2 proteins function in viral transcription and replication and correspondingly interact with host proteins involved in transcription, chromatin remodeling and modification, replication and RNA processing. PMID:25758368

  9. Fc-receptor and M-protein genes of group A streptococci are products of gene duplication.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D G; Cleary, P P

    1989-01-01

    The partial nucleotide sequence for an Fc-receptor gene from an M-type 76 group A streptococcus was determined. DNA sequence analysis revealed considerable sequence similarity between the Fc-receptor and M-protein genes in their proposed promoter regions, signal sequences, and 3' termini. Additional analysis indicated that the deduced Fc-receptor protein contains a proline-rich region and membrane anchor region highly similar to that of M protein. In view of these results, we postulated that Fc-receptor and M-protein genes of group A streptococci are the products of gene duplication from a common ancestral gene. It is proposed that DNA sequence similarity between these two genes may allow for extragenic homologous recombination as a means of generating antigenic diversity in these two surface proteins. PMID:2660147

  10. Heterogeneity of high-mobility-group protein 2. Enrichment of a rapidly migrating form in testis.

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, L R; Brock, W A; Meistrich, M L

    1985-01-01

    A determination of the absolute amounts of high-mobility-group proteins 1 and 2 (HMG1 and HMG2) in rat tissues demonstrated that amounts of HMG2 were low in non-proliferating tissues, somewhat higher in proliferating and lymphoid tissues, but were extremely elevated in the testis. This increase was due to a germ-cell-specific form of HMG2 with increased mobility relative to somatic HMG2 on acid/urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. To determine if the findings in the rat were a general feature of spermatogenesis, testis (germinal), spleen (lymphoid), and liver (non-proliferating) tissues from various vertebrate species were examined for their relative amounts of HMG1 and HMG2, and for HMG2 heterogeneity. Bull, chimpanzee, cynomologus monkey, dog, gopher, guinea pig, hamster, mouse, opossum, rabbit, rat, rhesus monkey, squirrel and toad (Xenopus) tissues were analysed. Nearly all species showed relatively high contents of HMG2 in testis tissue, whereas HMG1 contents were similar in all species and tissues. Ten of thirteen species showed a rapidly migrating HMG2 subtype in testis tissue, separable by acid/urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Xenopus, which lacks HMG2 in somatic tissues, showed an HMG2-like protein in testis tissue. Although the rapidly migrating HMG2 subtype in species other than rat was not testis-specific, it was always enriched in the testis. This study indicates that increased amounts of HMG2 and the enrichment of a rapidly migrating HMG2 subtype are general features of spermatogenic cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:4038257

  11. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  12. Heat capacity changes upon burial of polar and nonpolar groups in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Loladze, Vakhtang V.; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we address the question of whether the burial of polar and nonpolar groups in the protein locale is indeed accompanied by the heat capacity changes, ΔCp, that have an opposite sign, negative for nonpolar groups and positive for polar groups. To accomplish this, we introduced amino acid substitutions at four fully buried positions of the ubiquitin molecule (Val5, Val17, Leu67, and Gln41). We substituted Val at positions 5 and 17 and Leu at position 67 with a polar residue, Asn. As a control, Ala was introduced at the same three positions. We also replaced the buried polar Gln41 with Val and Leu, nonpolar residues that have similar size and shape as Gln. As a control, Asn was introduced at Gln41 as well. The effects of these amino acid substitutions on the stability, and in particular, on the heat capacity change upon unfolding were measured using differential scanning calorimetry. The effect of the amino acid substitutions on the structure was also evaluated by comparing the 1H-15N HSQC spectra of the ubiquitin variants. It was found that the Ala substitutions did not have a considerable effect on the heat capacity change upon unfolding. However, the substitutions of aliphatic side chains (Val or Leu) with a polar residue (Asn) lead to a significant (> 30%) decrease in the heat capacity change upon unfolding. The decrease in heat capacity changes does not appear to be the result of significant structural perturbations as seen from the HSQC spectra of the variants. The substitution of a buried polar residue (Gln41) to a nonpolar residue (Leu or Val) leads to a significant (> 25%) increase in heat capacity change upon unfolding. These results indicate that indeed the heat capacity change of burial of polar and nonpolar groups has an opposite sign. However, the observed changes in ΔCp are several times larger than those predicted, based on the changes in water accessible surface area upon substitution. PMID:11420436

  13. Temperature, pressure, and electrochemical constraints on protein speciation: Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized unfolded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J. M.; Larowe, D. E.; Helgeson, H. C.

    2006-07-01

    Thermodynamic calculations can be used to quantify environmental constraints on the speciation of proteins, such as the pH and temperature dependence of ionization state, and the relative chemical stabilities of proteins in different biogeochemical settings. These calculations depend in part on values of the standard molal Gibbs energies of proteins and their ionization reactions as a function of temperature and pressure. Because these values are not generally available, we calculated values of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar as well as the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of neutral and charged zwitterionic reference model compounds including aqueous amino acids, polypeptides, and unfolded proteins. The experimental calorimetric and volumetric data for these species taken from the literature were combined with group additivity algorithms to calculate the properties and parameters of neutral and ionized sidechain and backbone groups in unfolded proteins. The resulting set of group contributions enables the calculation of the standard molal Gibbs energy, enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, and isothermal compressibility of unfolded proteins in a range of proton ionization states to temperatures and pressures exceeding 100°C and 1000 bar. This approach provides a useful frame of reference for thermodynamic studies of protein folding and complexation reactions. It can also be used to assign provisional values of the net charge and Gibbs energy of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pH. Using these values, an Eh-pH diagram for a reaction representing the speciation of extracellular proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus and Bacillus subtilis was generated. The predicted predominance limits of these proteins correspond with the different electrochemical conditions of hydrothermal vents and soils. More comprehensive calculations of this kind may reveal pervasive chemical potential

  14. [Protein phosphatases: structure and function].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, E G; Budagian, V M

    1994-01-01

    The process of protein and enzyme systems phosphorylation is necessary for cell growth, differentiation and preparation for division and mitosis. The conformation changes of protein as a result of phosphorylation lead to increased enzyme activity and enhanced affinity to substrates. A large group of enzymes--protein kinases--is responsible for phosphorylation process in cell, which are divided into tyrosine- and serine-threonine-kinases depending on their ability to phosphorylate appropriate amino acid residues. In this review has been considered the functional importance and structure of protein phosphatases--enzymes, which are functional antagonists of protein kinases.

  15. THE SMALL ACID SOLUBLE PROTEINS (SASP α and SASP β) OF BACILLUS WEIHENSTEPHANENSIS AND B. MYCOIDES GROUP 2 ARE THE MOST DISTINCT AMONG THE B. CEREUS GROUP

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Courtney; Fox, Karen; Fox, Alvin

    2009-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus mycoides and Bacillus weihenstephanensis. The small acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) β has been previously demonstrated to be among the biomarkers differentiating B. anthracis and B. cereus; SASP β of B. cereus most commonly exhibits one or two amino acid substitutions when compared to B. anthracis. SASP α is conserved in sequence among these two species. Neither SASP α nor β for B. thuringiensis, B. mycoides and B. weihenstephanensis have been previously characterized as taxonomic discriminators. In the current work molecular weight (MW) variation of these SASPs were determined by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) for representative strains of the 5 species within the B. cereus group. The measured MWs also correlate with calculated MWs of translated amino acid sequences generated from whole genome sequencing projects. SASP α and β demonstrated consistent MW among B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. mycoides strains (group 1). However B. mycoides (group 2) and B. weihenstephanensis SASP α and β were quite distinct making them unique among the B. cereus group. Limited sequence changes were observed in SASP α (at most 3 substitutions and 2 deletions) indicating it is a more conserved protein than SASP β (up to 6 substitutions and a deletion). Another even more conserved SASP, SASP α-β type, was described here for the first time. PMID:19616612

  16. Piwi maintains germline stem cells and oogenesis in Drosophila through negative regulation of Polycomb group proteins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jamy C; Valouev, Anton; Liu, Na; Lin, Haifan

    2016-03-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster Piwi protein regulates both niche and intrinsic mechanisms to maintain germline stem cells, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that Piwi interacts with Polycomb group complexes PRC1 and PRC2 in niche and germline cells to regulate ovarian germline stem cells and oogenesis. Piwi physically interacts with the PRC2 subunits Su(z)12 and Esc in the ovary and in vitro. Chromatin coimmunoprecipitation of Piwi, the PRC2 enzymatic subunit E(z), histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) and RNA polymerase II in wild-type and piwi mutant ovaries demonstrates that Piwi binds a conserved DNA motif at ∼ 72 genomic sites and inhibits PRC2 binding to many non-Piwi-binding genomic targets and H3K27 trimethylation. Moreover, Piwi influences RNA polymerase II activities in Drosophila ovaries, likely via inhibiting PRC2. We hypothesize that Piwi negatively regulates PRC2 binding by sequestering PRC2 in the nucleoplasm, thus reducing PRC2 binding to many targets and influencing transcription during oogenesis.

  17. A bridging model for persistence of a polycomb group protein complex through DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lo, Stanley M; Follmer, Nicole E; Lengsfeld, Bettina M; Madamba, Egbert V; Seong, Samuel; Grau, Daniel J; Francis, Nicole J

    2012-06-29

    Epigenetic regulation may involve heritable chromatin states, but how chromatin features can be inherited through DNA replication is incompletely understood. We address this question using cell-free replication of chromatin. Previously, we showed that a Polycomb group complex, PRC1, remains continuously associated with chromatin through DNA replication. Here we investigate the mechanism of persistence. We find that a single PRC1 subunit, Posterior sex combs (PSC), can reconstitute persistence through DNA replication. PSC binds nucleosomes and self-interacts, bridging nucleosomes into a stable, oligomeric structure. Within these structures, individual PSC-chromatin contacts are dynamic. Stable association of PSC with chromatin, including through DNA replication, depends on PSC-PSC interactions. Our data suggest that labile individual PSC-chromatin contacts allow passage of the DNA replication machinery while PSC-PSC interactions prevent PSC from dissociating, allowing it to rebind to replicated chromatin. This mechanism may allow inheritance of chromatin proteins including PRC1 through DNA replication to maintain chromatin states.

  18. High-mobility group box 1 protein and its role in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao; Li, Wei-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which belongs to the subfamily of HMG-1/-2, is a highly conserved single peptide chain consisting of 215 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of approximately 24894 Da. HMGB1 is a ubiquitous nuclear protein in mammals and plays a vital role in inflammatory diseases. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain with a poor prognosis. Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas (duration of less than six months), for which the severe form is called severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). More and more studies have shown that HMGB1 has a bidirectional effect in the pathogenesis of SAP. Extracellular HMGB1 can aggravate the pancreatic inflammatory process, whereas intracellular HMGB1 has a protective effect against pancreatitis. The mechanism of HMGB1 is multiple, mainly through the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Receptors for advanced glycation end-products and toll-like receptors (TLR), especially TLR-2 and TLR-4, are two major types of receptors mediating the inflammatory process triggered by HMGB1 and may be also the main mediators in the pathogenesis of SAP. HMGB1 inhibitors, such as ethyl pyruvate, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, can decrease the level of extracellular HMGB1 and are the promising targets in the treatment of SAP. PMID:25663762

  19. Polycomb group protein gene silencing, non-coding RNA, stem cells, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gieni, Randall S; Hendzel, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Epigenetic programming is an important facet of biology, controlling gene expression patterns and the choice between developmental pathways. The Polycomb group proteins (PcGs) silence gene expression, allowing cells to both acquire and maintain identity. PcG silencing is important for stemness, X chromosome inactivation (XCI), genomic imprinting, and the abnormally silenced genes in cancers. Stem and cancer cells commonly share gene expression patterns, regulatory mechanisms, and signalling pathways. Many microRNA species have oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity, and disruptions in these networks are common in cancer; however, long non-coding (nc)RNA species are also important. Many of these directly guide PcG deposition and gene silencing at the HOX locus, during XCI, and in examples of genomic imprinting. Since inappropriate HOX expression and loss of genomic imprinting are hallmarks of cancer, disruption of long ncRNA-mediated PcG silencing likely has a role in oncogenesis. Aberrant silencing of coding and non-coding loci is critical for both the genesis and progression of cancers. In addition, PcGs are commonly abnormally overexpressed years prior to cancer pathology, making early PcG targeted therapy an option to reverse tumor formation, someday replacing the blunt instrument of eradication in the cancer therapy arsenal.

  20. Increased serum levels of high mobility group box 1 protein in patients with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, Enzo; Boso, Marianna; Brondino, Natascia; Pietra, Stefania; Barale, Francesco; Ucelli di Nemi, Stefania; Politi, Pierluigi

    2010-05-30

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein that functions as an activator for inducing the immune response and can be released from neurons after glutamate excitotoxicity. The objective of the present study was to measure serum levels of HMGB1 in patients with autistic disorder and to study their relationship with clinical characteristics. We enrolled 22 adult patients with autistic disorder (mean age: 28.1+/-7.7 years) and 28 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age: 28.7+/-8.1 years). Serum levels of HMGB1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with healthy subjects, serum levels of HMGB1 were significantly higher in patients with autistic disorder (10.8+/-2.6 ng/mL versus 5.6+/-2.5 ng/mL, respectively, P<0.001). After adjustment for potential confounders, serum HMGB1 levels were independently associated with their domain A scores in the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, which reflects their impairments in social interaction. These results suggest that HMGB1 levels may be affected in autistic disorder. Increased HMGB1 may be a biological correlate of the impaired reciprocal social interactions in this neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Potential Coverage of a Multivalent M Protein-Based Group A Streptococcal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Dale, James B.; Penfound, Thomas A.; Tamboura, Boubou; Sow, Samba O.; Nataro, James P.; Tapia, Milagritos; Kotloff, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The greatest burden of Group A streptococcal (GAS) disease worldwide is due to acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Safe, effective and affordable vaccines designed to prevent GAS infections that trigger ARF could reduce the overall global morbidity and mortality from RHD. The current study evaluated the potential coverage of a new 30-valent M protein-based vaccine using GAS isolates from school children in Bamako, Mali, a population at high risk for the development of RHD. Methods The bactericidal activity of rabbit antisera against the 30-valent vaccine was assessed using a collection of GAS isolates recovered during a study of the epidemiology of pharyngitis in Bamako. Results Single isolates representing 42 of 67 emm-types, accounting for 85% of the GAS infections during the study, were evaluated. All (14/14) of the vaccine emm-types in the collection were opsonized (bactericidal killing >50%) and 26/28 non-vaccine types were opsonized. Bactericidal activity was observed against 60% of the total emm-types recovered in Bamako, which accounted for 81% of all infections. Conclusions Multivalent vaccines comprised of N-terminal M peptides elicit bactericidal antibodies against a broad range of GAS serotypes, indicating that their efficacy may extend beyond the emm-types included in the vaccine. PMID:23375817

  2. Potential coverage of a multivalent M protein-based group A streptococcal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dale, James B; Penfound, Thomas A; Tamboura, Boubou; Sow, Samba O; Nataro, James P; Tapia, Milagritos; Kotloff, Karen L

    2013-03-15

    The greatest burden of group A streptococcal (GAS) disease worldwide is due to acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Safe, effective and affordable vaccines designed to prevent GAS infections that trigger ARF could reduce the overall global morbidity and mortality from RHD. The current study evaluated the potential coverage of a new 30-valent M protein-based vaccine using GAS isolates from school children in Bamako, Mali, a population at high risk for the development of RHD. The bactericidal activity of rabbit antisera against the 30-valent vaccine was assessed using a collection of GAS isolates recovered during a study of the epidemiology of pharyngitis in Bamako. Single isolates representing 42 of 67 emm-types, accounting for 85% of the GAS infections during the study, were evaluated. All (14/14) of the vaccine emm-types in the collection were opsonized (bactericidal killing >50%) and 26/28 non-vaccine types were opsonized. Bactericidal activity was observed against 60% of the total emm-types recovered in Bamako, which accounted for 81% of all infections. Multivalent vaccines comprised of N-terminal M peptides elicit bactericidal antibodies against a broad range of GAS serotypes, indicating that their efficacy may extend beyond the emm-types included in the vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A new transgenic mouse model for conditional overexpression of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2.

    PubMed

    Koppens, Martijn A J; Tanger, Ellen; Nacerddine, Karim; Westerman, Bart; Song, Ji-Ying; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    201