Science.gov

Sample records for group proteins antagonistically

  1. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist eritoran tetrasodium attenuates liver ischemia and reperfusion injury through inhibition of high-mobility group box protein B1 (HMGB1) signaling.

    PubMed

    Mcdonald, Kerry-Ann; Huang, Hai; Tohme, Samer; Loughran, Patricia; Ferrero, Kimberly; Billiar, Timothy; Tsung, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is ubiquitously expressed on parenchymal and immune cells of the liver and is the most studied TLR responsible for the activation of proinflammatory signaling cascades in liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). Since pharmacological inhibition of TLR4 during the sterile inflammatory response of I/R has not been studied, we sought to determine whether eritoran, a TLR4 antagonist trialed in sepsis, could block hepatic TLR4-mediated inflammation and end organ damage. When C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with eritoran and subjected to warm liver I/R, there was significantly less hepatocellular injury compared to control counterparts. Additionally, we found that eritoran is protective in liver I/R through inhibition of high-mobility group box protein B1 (HMGB1)-mediated inflammatory signaling. When eritoran was administered in conjunction with recombinant HMGB1 during liver I/R, there was significantly less injury, suggesting that eritoran blocks the HMGB1-TLR4 interaction. Not only does eritoran attenuate TLR4-dependent HMGB1 release in vivo, but this TLR4 antagonist also dampened HMGB1's release from hypoxic hepatocytes in vitro and thereby weakened HMGB1's activation of innate immune cells. HMGB1 signaling through TLR4 makes an important contribution to the inflammatory response seen after liver I/R. This study demonstrates that novel blockade of HMGB1 by the TLR4 antagonist eritoran leads to the amelioration of liver injury. PMID:25375408

  2. Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Antagonist Eritoran Tetrasodium Attenuates Liver Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury through Inhibition of High-Mobility Group Box Protein B1 (HMGB1) Signaling

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Kerry-Ann; Huang, Hai; Tohme, Samer; Loughran, Patricia; Ferrero, Kimberly; Billiar, Timothy; Tsung, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is ubiquitously expressed on parenchymal and immune cells of the liver and is the most studied TLR responsible for the activation of proinflammatory signaling cascades in liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). Since pharmacological inhibition of TLR4 during the sterile inflammatory response of I/R has not been studied, we sought to determine whether eritoran, a TLR4 antagonist trialed in sepsis, could block hepatic TLR4-mediated inflammation and end organ damage. When C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with eritoran and subjected to warm liver I/R, there was significantly less hepatocellular injury compared to control counterparts. Additionally, we found that eritoran is protective in liver I/R through inhibition of high-mobility group box protein B1 (HMGB1)-mediated inflammatory signaling. When eritoran was administered in conjunction with recombinant HMGB1 during liver I/R, there was significantly less injury, suggesting that eritoran blocks the HMGB1–TLR4 interaction. Not only does eritoran attenuate TLR4-dependent HMGB1 release in vivo, but this TLR4 antagonist also dampened HMGB1’s release from hypoxic hepatocytes in vitro and thereby weakened HMGB1’s activation of innate immune cells. HMGB1 signaling through TLR4 makes an important contribution to the inflammatory response seen after liver I/R. This study demonstrates that novel blockade of HMGB1 by the TLR4 antagonist eritoran leads to the amelioration of liver injury. PMID:25375408

  3. Antagonists of IAP proteins: novel anti-tumor agents.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yichao; Liu, Tingting; Hou, Xuben; Dun, Yanyan; Guan, Peng; Fang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis is an important reason for tumor cells to resist the anticancer drugs in cancer therapy. As a critical regulator, the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) can block the apoptosis by inhibiting the activities of caspases. Scientists find that IAPs are over-expressed in many cancer cells, such as leukemia and B-cell lymphoma, which elucidate that high levels of IAPs are closely related to tumorigenesis and cancer development. Thus, targeting IAPs may be an attractive strategy for anti-tumor treatment. As an endogenous antagonist of IAPs, second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) can suppress their activities through directly binding to IAPs. Based on structural biology study, Smac interacts with IAPs through the Ala-Val-Pro-Ile (AVPI) tetra-peptide of Smac. Therefore, many agents have been studied to suppress the IAPs which result in the activation of caspases and subsequently induce the apoptosis of tumor cells based on mimicking AVPI peptide strategy. In this review, the functions of IAPs in apoptosis and the recent advance of IAPs antagonists will be discussed.

  4. Proneurogenic Group II mGluR antagonist improves learning and reduces anxiety in Alzheimer Aβ oligomer mouse.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Steele, J W; Lee, S W; Clemenson, G D; Carter, T A; Treuner, K; Gadient, R; Wedel, P; Glabe, C; Barlow, C; Ehrlich, M E; Gage, F H; Gandy, S

    2014-11-01

    Proneurogenic compounds have recently shown promise in some mouse models of Alzheimer's pathology. Antagonists at Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (Group II mGluR: mGlu2, mGlu3) are reported to stimulate neurogenesis. Agonists at those receptors trigger γ-secretase-inhibitor-sensitive biogenesis of Aβ42 peptides from isolated synaptic terminals, which is selectively suppressed by antagonist pretreatment. We have assessed the therapeutic potential of chronic pharmacological inhibition of Group II mGluR in Dutch APP (Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein E693Q) transgenic mice that accumulate Dutch amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers but never develop Aβ plaques. BCI-838 is a clinically well-tolerated, orally bioavailable, investigational prodrug that delivers to the brain BCI-632, the active Group II mGluR antagonist metabolite. Dutch Aβ-oligomer-forming APP transgenic mice (APP E693Q) were dosed with BCI-838 for 3 months. Chronic treatment with BCI-838 was associated with reversal of transgene-related amnestic behavior, reduction in anxiety, reduction in levels of brain Aβ monomers and oligomers, and stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis. Group II mGluR inhibition may offer a unique package of relevant properties as an Alzheimer's disease therapeutic or prophylactic by providing both attenuation of neuropathology and stimulation of repair. PMID:25113378

  5. Proneurogenic Group II mGluR antagonist improves learning and reduces anxiety in Alzheimer Aβ oligomer mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S H; Steele, J W; Lee, S W; Clemenson, G D; Carter, T A; Treuner, K; Gadient, R; Wedel, P; Glabe, C; Barlow, C; Ehrlich, M E; Gage, F H; Gandy, S

    2014-01-01

    Proneurogenic compounds have recently shown promise in some mouse models of Alzheimer's pathology. Antagonists at Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (Group II mGluR: mGlu2, mGlu3) are reported to stimulate neurogenesis. Agonists at those receptors trigger γ-secretase-inhibitor-sensitive biogenesis of Aβ42 peptides from isolated synaptic terminals, which is selectively suppressed by antagonist pretreatment. We have assessed the therapeutic potential of chronic pharmacological inhibition of Group II mGluR in Dutch APP (Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein E693Q) transgenic mice that accumulate Dutch amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers but never develop Aβ plaques. BCI-838 is a clinically well-tolerated, orally bioavailable, investigational prodrug that delivers to the brain BCI-632, the active Group II mGluR antagonist metabolite. Dutch Aβ-oligomer-forming APP transgenic mice (APP E693Q) were dosed with BCI-838 for 3 months. Chronic treatment with BCI-838 was associated with reversal of transgene-related amnestic behavior, reduction in anxiety, reduction in levels of brain Aβ monomers and oligomers, and stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis. Group II mGluR inhibition may offer a unique package of relevant properties as an Alzheimer's disease therapeutic or prophylactic by providing both attenuation of neuropathology and stimulation of repair. PMID:25113378

  6. High-throughput screening of antagonists for the orphan G-protein coupled receptor GPR139

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Zhu, Lin-yun; Liu, Qing; Hentzer, Morten; Smith, Garrick Paul; Wang, Ming-wei

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To discover antagonists of the orphan G-protein coupled receptor GPR139 through high-throughput screening of a collection of diverse small molecules. Methods: Calcium mobilization assays were used to identify initial hits and for subsequent confirmation studies. Results: Five small molecule antagonists, representing 4 different scaffolds, were identified following high-throughput screening of 16 000 synthetic compounds. Conclusion: The findings provide important tools for further study of this orphan G-protein coupled receptor. PMID:26027661

  7. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Ian R.; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L.; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days. In conclusion: we provide proof of concept that a fusion of GHR antagonist to its binding protein generates a long acting GHR antagonist and we confirmed that introducing the W104A amino acid change in the GH binding domain enhances antagonist activity. PMID:27731358

  8. Structure-Based Design of a Periplasmic Binding Protein Antagonist that Prevents Domain Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Borrok, M. Jack; Zhu, Yimin; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2009-07-31

    Many receptors undergo ligand-induced conformational changes to initiate signal transduction. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are bacterial receptors that exhibit dramatic conformational changes upon ligand binding. These proteins mediate a wide variety of fundamental processes including transport, chemotaxis, and quorum sensing. Despite the importance of these receptors, no PBP antagonists have been identified and characterized. In this study, we identify 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as an antagonist of glucose/galactose-binding protein and demonstrate that it inhibits glucose chemotaxis in E. coli. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography, we show that this antagonist acts as a wedge. It prevents the large-scale domain closure that gives rise to the active signaling state. Guided by these results and the structures of open and closed glucose/galactose-binding protein, we designed and synthesized an antagonist composed of two linked glucose residues. These findings provide a blueprint for the design of new bacterial PBP inhibitors. Given the key role of PBPs in microbial physiology, we anticipate that PBP antagonists will have widespread uses as probes and antimicrobial agents.

  9. Human trabecular meshwork cells express BMP antagonist mRNAs and proteins.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Vidales, Tara; Fitzgerald, Ashley M; Clark, Abbot F

    2016-06-01

    Glaucoma patients have elevated aqueous humor and trabecular meshwork (TM) levels of transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-β2). TGF-β2 has been associated with increased extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition (i.e. fibronectin), which is attributed to the increased resistance of aqueous humor outflow through the TM. We have previously demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 selectively counteracts the profibrotic effect of TGF-β2 with respect to ECM synthesis in the TM, and this action is reversed by the BMP antagonist gremlin. Thus, the BMP and TGF-β signaling pathways antagonize each other's antifibrotic and profibrotic roles. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cultured human TM cells: (a) express other BMP antagonists including noggin, chordin, BMPER, BAMBI, Smurf1 and 2, and (b) whether expression of these proteins is regulated by exogenous TGF-β2 treatment. Primary human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells were grown to confluency and treated with TGF-β2 (5 ng/ml) for 24 or 48 h in serum-free medium. Untreated cell served as controls. qPCR and Western immunoblots (WB) determined that human TM cells expressed mRNAs and proteins for the BMP antagonist proteins: noggin, chordin, BMPER, BAMBI, and Smurf1/2. Exogenous TGF-β2 decreased chordin, BMPER, BAMBI, and Smurf1 mRNA and protein expression. In contrast, TGF-β2 increased secreted noggin and Smurf2 mRNA and protein levels. BMP antagonist members are expressed in the human TM. These molecules may be involved in the normal function of the TM as well as TM pathogenesis. Altered expression of BMP antagonist members may lead to functional changes in the human TM. PMID:27167364

  10. Oxytocin differentially modulates compromise and competitive approach but not withdrawal to antagonists from own vs. rivaling other groups.

    PubMed

    Ten Velden, Femke S; Baas, Matthijs; Shalvi, Shaul; Kret, Mariska E; De Dreu, Carsten K W

    2014-09-11

    In humans, oxytocin promotes cognitive and motivational tendencies that benefit the groups on which humans depend for their survival and prosperity. Here we examined decision making in an incentivized two-player poker game with either an in-group or out-group antagonist. Sixty nine healthy males received 24 IU oxytocin or matching placebo, and played four rounds of a simplified poker game. On each round they received either low or high value cards to create differences in competitive strength, and then responded to a bet placed by their (simulated) (in-group or out-group) antagonist. Under placebo, participants withdrew and competed depending on their own (low vs. high) competitive strength, regardless of their antagonist's group membership. Under oxytocin, however, participants settled more and competed less with an in-group as compared to an out-group antagonist; withdrawal was unaffected by group membership. We conclude that oxytocin sensitizes humans to the group membership of their interaction partner, rendering them relatively more benevolent and less competitive towards those seen as belonging to their own group. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin and Social Behav. PMID:24055737

  11. Phosphorylation of influenza A virus NS1 protein at threonine 49 suppresses its interferon antagonistic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kathum, Omer Abid; Schräder, Tobias; Anhlan, Darisuren; Nordhoff, Carolin; Liedmann, Swantje; Pande, Amit; Mellmann, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Christina; Wixler, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation acts as a fundamental molecular switch that alters protein function and thereby regulates many cellular processes. The non‐structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus is an important factor regulating virulence by counteracting cellular immune responses against viral infection. NS1 was shown to be phosphorylated at several sites; however, so far, no function has been conclusively assigned to these post‐translational events yet. Here, we show that the newly identified phospho‐site threonine 49 of NS1 is differentially phosphorylated in the viral replication cycle. Phosphorylation impairs binding of NS1 to double‐stranded RNA and TRIM25 as well as complex formation with RIG‐I, thereby switching off its interferon antagonistic activity. Because phosphorylation was shown to occur at later stages of infection, we hypothesize that at this stage other functions of the multifunctional NS1 beyond its interferon‐antagonistic activity are needed. PMID:26687707

  12. Phosphorylation of influenza A virus NS1 protein at threonine 49 suppresses its interferon antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Kathum, Omer Abid; Schräder, Tobias; Anhlan, Darisuren; Nordhoff, Carolin; Liedmann, Swantje; Pande, Amit; Mellmann, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Christina; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation acts as a fundamental molecular switch that alters protein function and thereby regulates many cellular processes. The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus is an important factor regulating virulence by counteracting cellular immune responses against viral infection. NS1 was shown to be phosphorylated at several sites; however, so far, no function has been conclusively assigned to these post-translational events yet. Here, we show that the newly identified phospho-site threonine 49 of NS1 is differentially phosphorylated in the viral replication cycle. Phosphorylation impairs binding of NS1 to double-stranded RNA and TRIM25 as well as complex formation with RIG-I, thereby switching off its interferon antagonistic activity. Because phosphorylation was shown to occur at later stages of infection, we hypothesize that at this stage other functions of the multifunctional NS1 beyond its interferon-antagonistic activity are needed.

  13. Inhibition of Ebola and Marburg Virus Entry by G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Han; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Johansen, Lisa; Varhegyi, Elizabeth; Chen, Zheng W.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses, consisting of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV), are among the most lethal infectious threats to mankind. Infections by these viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans and nonhuman primates with high mortality rates. Since there is currently no vaccine or antiviral therapy approved for humans, there is an urgent need to develop prophylactic and therapeutic options for use during filoviral outbreaks and bioterrorist attacks. One of the ideal targets against filoviral infection and diseases is at the entry step, which is mediated by the filoviral glycoprotein (GP). In this report, we screened a chemical library of small molecules and identified numerous inhibitors, which are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs, including histamine receptors, 5-HT (serotonin) receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and adrenergic receptor. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of both infectious EBOV and MARV, indicating a broad antiviral activity of the GPCR antagonists. The time-of-addition experiment and microscopic studies suggest that GPCR antagonists block filoviral entry at a step following the initial attachment but prior to viral/cell membrane fusion. These results strongly suggest that GPCRs play a critical role in filoviral entry and GPCR antagonists can be developed as an effective anti-EBOV/MARV therapy. IMPORTANCE Infection of Ebola virus and Marburg virus can cause severe illness in humans with a high mortality rate, and currently there is no FDA-approved vaccine or therapeutic treatment available. The 2013-2015 epidemic in West Africa underscores a lack of our understanding in the infection and pathogenesis of these viruses and the urgency of drug discovery and development. In this study, we have identified numerous inhibitors that are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of

  14. TNF binding protein of variola virus acts as a TNF antagonist at epicutaneous application.

    PubMed

    Gileva, Irina P; Viazovaia, Elena A; Toporkova, Ludmila B; Tsyrendorzhiev, Dondok D; Shchelkunov, Sergei N; Orlovskaya, Irina A

    2015-01-01

    VARV-CrmB is a TNF binding protein of variola virus. VARV-CrmB protein was previously shown to be active as a TNF-antagonist in a number of in vivo and in vitro models. Here we investigated the epicutaneous effect of recombinant VARV-CrmB protein using an experimental model of muTNFinduced migration of skin leukocytes as well as colony forming activity of bone marrow cells (BMC). Epiсutaneous applications of muTNF enhanced the number of cells migrating from skin flaps of BALB/c mice, whereas subsequent applications of VARV-CrmB protein in 30 min after muTNF, abolished that effect. Epicutaneously applied muTNF influenced the activity of committed hematopoietic progenitors causing a reduction of erythroid (BFUe+CFUe) colonies and increase of granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) colonies in the colony-forming tests. VARV-CrmB, applied in combination with muTNF, demonstrated an ability to reverse this effect, namely, to increase BFUe+CFUe and reduce CFU-GM back to the control levels. Taking together, these data demonstrate the TNF-blocking properties of VARV-CrmB in vivo at epicutaneous applications. As effective TNF antagonist VARV-CrmB protein might be conceded as a beneficial candidate for future research and development of therapeutic approaches in the field of inflammatory skin diseases.

  15. LY341495 is a nanomolar potent and selective antagonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Kingston, A E; Ornstein, P L; Wright, R A; Johnson, B G; Mayne, N G; Burnett, J P; Belagaje, R; Wu, S; Schoepp, D D

    1998-01-01

    The in vitro pharmacology of a structurally novel compound, LY341495, was investigated at human recombinant metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor subtypes expressed in non-neuronal (RGT, rat glutamate transporter) cells. LY341495 was a nanomolar potent antagonist of 1S,3R-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD)-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation at mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors (respective IC50S of 0.021 and 0.014 microM). At group I mGlu receptor expressing cells, LY341495 was micromolar potent in antagonizing quisqualate-induced phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis, with IC50 values of 7.8 and 8.2 microM for mGlu1a and mGlu5a receptors, respectively. Among the human group III mGlu receptors, the most potent inhibition of L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) responses was seen for LY341495 at mGlu8, with an IC50 of 0.17 microM. LY341495 was less potent at mGlu7 (IC50 = 0.99 microM) and least potent at mGlu4 (IC50 = 22 microM). Binding studies in rat brain membranes also demonstrated nanomolar potent group II mGlu receptor affinity for LY341495, with no appreciable displacement of ionotropic glutamate receptor ligand binding. Thus, LY341495 has a unique range of selectivity across the mGlu receptor subtypes with a potency order of mGlu3 > or = mGlu2 > mGlu8 > mGlu7 > mGlu1a = mGlu5a > mGlu4. In particular, LY341495 is the most potent antagonist yet reported at mGlu2, 3 and 8 receptors. Thus, it represents a novel pharmacological agent for elucidating the function of mGlu receptors in experimental systems. PMID:9680254

  16. Effect of an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist on the hemodynamic manifestations of group B streptococcal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Vallette, J D; Goldberg, R N; Suguihara, C; Del Moral, T; Martinez, O; Lin, J; Thompson, R C; Bancalari, E

    1995-11-01

    IL-1 is purported to be a proximal mediator in the cascade leading to septic shock. To characterize its hemodynamic effects and to ascertain whether its blockade would ameliorate the deleterious consequences of sepsis, an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) was administered to 16 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated piglets that received a continuous infusion of group B streptococci (GBS) (7.5 x 10(7) colony-forming units/kg/min). Systemic (Psa), pulmonary artery (Ppa), and wedge (Pwp) pressures and cardiac output were measured pre-GBS and every 30 min during GBS infusion. After 15 min of bacterial infusion the control group received normal saline, whereas the treatment group received a bolus of IL-1ra (40 mg/kg) followed by a continuous infusion of IL-1ra (60 micrograms/kg/min). In comparing IL-1ra-treated animals with controls from the 15-min GBS baseline to the succeeding septic study period (45-120 min), the following treatment effects were noted (120-min values shown): mean Psa remained elevated in treatment compared with control animals (12.7 +/- 2.5 versus 9 +/- 3.5 kPa; p < 0.001) as did CO (0.21 +/- 0.07 versus 0.13 +/- 0.08 L/min/kg; p < 0.001). Pwp decreased in the treatment compared to the control group over the study period (1 +/- 0.3 versus 1.6 +/- 0.7 kPa; p < 0.02). Mean Ppa and mean Pra were not different between groups over time. Median length of survival was significantly longer (p = 0.04) in treated (226 min) compared with control animals (150 min). These data suggest that IL-1 plays an important role in GBS sepsis and septic shock, and that IL-1ra may in part ameliorate the cardiovascular alterations associated with GBS sepsis in the neonate.

  17. Targeting inhibitor of apoptosis proteins in combination with ErbB antagonists in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Fiona M; Owens, Thomas W; Tanianis-Hughes, Jolanta; Clarke, Robert B; Brennan, Keith; Bundred, Nigel J; Streuli, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAPs) proteins are a family of proteins that can block apoptosis in normal cells and have been suggested to cause resistance to apoptosis in cancer. Overexpression of oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases is common in breast cancer; in particular 20% of all cases show elevated Her2. Despite clinical success with the use of targeted therapies, such as Trastuzumab, only up to 35% of Her2-positive patients initially respond. We reasoned that IAP-mediated apoptosis resistance might contribute to this insensitivity to receptor tyrosine kinase therapy, in particular ErbB antagonists. Here we examine the levels of IAPs in breast cancer and evaluate whether targeting IAPs can enhance apoptosis in response to growth factor receptor antagonists and TRAIL. Methods IAP levels were examined in a breast cancer cell line panel and in patient samples. IAPs were inhibited using siRNA or cell permeable mimetics of endogenous inhibitors. Cells were then exposed to TRAIL, Trastuzumab, Lapatinib, or Gefitinib for 48 hours. Examining nuclear morphology and staining for cleaved caspase 3 was used to score apoptosis. Proliferation was examined by Ki67 staining. Results Four members of the IAP family, Survivin, XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2, were all expressed to varying extents in breast cancer cell lines or tumours. MDAMB468, BT474 and BT20 cells all expressed XIAP to varying extents. Depleting the cells of XIAP overcame the intrinsic resistance of BT20 and MDAMB468 cells to TRAIL. Moreover, siRNA-based depletion of XIAP or use of a Smac mimetic to target multiple IAPs increased apoptosis in response to the ErbB antagonists, Trastuzumab, Lapatinib or Gefitinib in Her2-overexpressing BT474 cells, or Gefitinib in EGFR-overexpressing MDAMB468 cells. Conclusions The novel findings of this study are that multiple IAPs are concomitantly expressed in breast cancers, and that, in combination with clinically relevant Her2 treatments, IAP antagonists promote apoptosis

  18. A Single Amino Acid Dictates Protein Kinase R Susceptibility to Unrelated Viral Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Esparo, Nicolle M.; Child, Stephanie J.; Geballe, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    During millions of years of coevolution with their hosts, cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) have succeeded in adapting to overcome host-specific immune defenses, including the protein kinase R (PKR) pathway. Consequently, these adaptations may also contribute to the inability of CMVs to cross species barriers. Here, we provide evidence that the evolutionary arms race between the antiviral factor PKR and its CMV antagonist TRS1 has led to extensive differences in the species-specificity of primate CMV TRS1 proteins. Moreover, we identify a single residue in human PKR that when mutated to the amino acid present in African green monkey (Agm) PKR (F489S) is sufficient to confer resistance to HCMVTRS1. Notably, this precise molecular determinant of PKR resistance has evolved under strong positive selection among primate PKR alleles and is positioned within the αG helix, which mediates the direct interaction of PKR with its substrate eIF2α. Remarkably, this same residue also impacts sensitivity to K3L, a poxvirus-encoded pseudosubstrate that structurally mimics eIF2α. Unlike K3L, TRS1 has no homology to eIF2α, suggesting that unrelated viral genes have convergently evolved to target this critical region of PKR. Despite its functional importance, the αG helix exhibits extraordinary plasticity, enabling adaptations that allow PKR to evade diverse viral antagonists while still maintaining its critical interaction with eIF2α. PMID:27780231

  19. Group II Introns and Their Protein Collaborators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solem, Amanda; Zingler, Nora; Pyle, Anna Marie; Li-Pook-Than, Jennifer

    Group II introns are an abundant class of autocatalytic introns that excise themselves from precursor mRNAs. Although group II introns are catalytic RNAs, they require the assistance of proteins for efficient splicing in vivo. Proteins that facilitate splicing of organellar group II introns fall into two main categories: intron-encoded maturases and host-encoded proteins. This chapter will focus on the host proteins that group II introns recruited to ensure their function. It will discuss the great diversity of these proteins, define common features, and describe different strategies employed to achieve specificity. Special emphasis will be placed on DEAD-box ATPases, currently the best studied example of host-encoded proteins with a role in group II intron splicing. Since the exact mechanisms by which splicing is facilitated is not known for any of the host proteins, general mechanistic strategies for protein-mediated RNA folding are described and assessed for their potential role in group II intron splicing.

  20. Target hopping as a useful tool for the identification of novel EphA2 protein-protein antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tognolini, Massimiliano; Incerti, Matteo; Pala, Daniele; Russo, Simonetta; Castelli, Riccardo; Hassan-Mohamed, Iftiin; Giorgio, Carmine; Lodola, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Lithocholic acid (LCA), a physiological ligand for the nuclear receptor FXR and the G-protein-coupled receptor TGR5, has been recently described as an antagonist of the EphA2 receptor, a key member of the ephrin signalling system involved in tumour growth. Given the ability of LCA to recognize FXR, TGR5, and EphA2 receptors, we hypothesized that the structural requirements for a small molecule to bind each of these receptors might be similar. We therefore selected a set of commercially available FXR or TGR5 ligands and tested them for their ability to inhibit EphA2 by targeting the EphA2-ephrin-A1 interface. Among the selected compounds, the stilbene carboxylic acid GW4064 was identified as an effective antagonist of EphA2, being able to block EphA2 activation in prostate carcinoma cells, in the micromolar range. This finding proposes the "target hopping" approach as a new effective strategy to discover new protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

  1. The Role of Interferon Antagonist, Non-Structural Proteins in the Pathogenesis and Emergence of Arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hollidge, Bradley S.; Weiss, Susan R.; Soldan, Samantha S.

    2011-01-01

    A myriad of factors favor the emergence and re-emergence of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses), including migration, climate change, intensified livestock production, an increasing volume of international trade and transportation, and changes to ecosystems (e.g., deforestation and loss of biodiversity). Consequently, arboviruses are distributed worldwide and represent over 30% of all emerging infectious diseases identified in the past decade. Although some arboviral infections go undetected or are associated with mild, flu-like symptoms, many are important human and veterinary pathogens causing serious illnesses such as arthritis, gastroenteritis, encephalitis and hemorrhagic fever and devastating economic loss as a consequence of lost productivity and high mortality rates among livestock. One of the most consistent molecular features of emerging arboviruses, in addition to their near exclusive use of RNA genomes, is the inclusion of viral, non-structural proteins that act as interferon antagonists. In this review, we describe these interferon antagonists and common strategies that arboviruses use to counter the host innate immune response. In addition, we discuss the complex interplay between host factors and viral determinants that are associated with virus emergence and re-emergence, and identify potential targets for vaccine and anti-viral therapies. PMID:21994750

  2. The potent antiplasmodial calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine inhibits plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Cavagnino, Andrea; Rossi, Franca; Rizzi, Menico

    2011-12-01

    Due to their critical involvement in the execution of the malaria parasite developmental pattern both in the mosquito vector and in the human host, Plasmodium calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are considered promising candidates for the development of new tools to block malaria transmission. We report here that the phenothiazine trifluoperazine non-competitively inhibits Plasmodium falciparum CDPK4 in the micromolar range while other calmodulin antagonists only marginally affect the enzyme activity, and we propose the inhibition mechanism. Our results demonstrate that selective enzyme inhibition is achievable by targeting its calmodulin-like domain. This observation could be exploited for the discovery of innovative phenothiazine-based CDPK inhibitors of potential medical interest.

  3. Mediastinal Yolk Sac Tumor Producing Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonist-II.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Noriyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Isosaka, Mai; Mita, Hiroaki; Takagi, Hideyasu; Sasaki, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Masumori, Naoya; Endo, Takao; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Extragonadal yolk sac tumors (YSTs) are rare. We herein report the case of a 66-year-old man with mediastinal, lung and liver tumors. The largest mass was located in the liver and contained a high concentration of protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein. Therefore, the lesion was difficult to distinguish from hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, YST was diagnosed based on the results of a liver biopsy. Although chemotherapy was effective, the patient died of respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed primary mediastinal YST. In the current report, we describe this case of PIVKA-II-producing YST and review previous cases of PIVKA-II-producing tumors other than hepatoma.

  4. Mediastinal Yolk Sac Tumor Producing Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonist-II.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Noriyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Isosaka, Mai; Mita, Hiroaki; Takagi, Hideyasu; Sasaki, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Masumori, Naoya; Endo, Takao; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Extragonadal yolk sac tumors (YSTs) are rare. We herein report the case of a 66-year-old man with mediastinal, lung and liver tumors. The largest mass was located in the liver and contained a high concentration of protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein. Therefore, the lesion was difficult to distinguish from hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, YST was diagnosed based on the results of a liver biopsy. Although chemotherapy was effective, the patient died of respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed primary mediastinal YST. In the current report, we describe this case of PIVKA-II-producing YST and review previous cases of PIVKA-II-producing tumors other than hepatoma. PMID:26073245

  5. Dihydromunduletone Is a Small-Molecule Selective Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Stoveken, Hannah M; Bahr, Laura L; Anders, M W; Wojtovich, Andrew P; Smrcka, Alan V; Tall, Gregory G

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) have emerging roles in development and tissue maintenance and is the most prevalent GPCR subclass mutated in human cancers, but to date, no drugs have been developed to target them in any disease. aGPCR extracellular domains contain a conserved subdomain that mediates self-cleavage proximal to the start of the 7-transmembrane domain (7TM). The two receptor protomers, extracellular domain and amino terminal fragment (NTF), and the 7TM or C-terminal fragment remain noncovalently bound at the plasma membrane in a low-activity state. We recently demonstrated that NTF dissociation liberates the 7TM N-terminal stalk, which acts as a tethered-peptide agonist permitting receptor-dependent heterotrimeric G protein activation. In many cases, natural aGPCR ligands are extracellular matrix proteins that dissociate the NTF to reveal the tethered agonist. Given the perceived difficulty in modifying extracellular matrix proteins to create aGPCR probes, we developed a serum response element (SRE)-luciferase-based screening approach to identify GPR56/ADGRG1 small-molecule inhibitors. A 2000-compound library comprising known drugs and natural products was screened for GPR56-dependent SRE activation inhibitors that did not inhibit constitutively active Gα13-dependent SRE activation. Dihydromunduletone (DHM), a rotenoid derivative, was validated using cell-free aGPCR/heterotrimeric G protein guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding reconstitution assays. DHM inhibited GPR56 and GPR114/ADGRG5, which have similar tethered agonists, but not the aGPCR GPR110/ADGRF1, M3 muscarinic acetylcholine, or β2 adrenergic GPCRs. DHM inhibited tethered peptide agonist-stimulated and synthetic peptide agonist-stimulated GPR56 but did not inhibit basal activity, demonstrating that it antagonizes the peptide agonist. DHM is a novel aGPCR antagonist and potentially useful chemical probe that may be developed as a future aGPCR therapeutic. PMID:27338081

  6. Antagonists of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 identified by modification of functionally critical NH2-terminal residues

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 analogues were designed to determine the role of the NH2-terminal region in structure and function. The NH2-terminal residue was important for function and receptor binding, as it could not be deleted or extended. However the NH2-terminal pyroglutamate residue of the wild type was not essential as it could be replaced by several other noncyclic amino acids without loss of activity. Residues 7-10 were essential for receptor desensitization, but were not sufficient for function, and the integrity of residues 1-6 were required for functional activity. A peptide corresponding to MCP-1, 1-10 lacked detectable receptor-binding activities, indicating that residues 1-10 are essential for MCP-1 function, but that other residues are also involved. Several truncated analogues, including 8-76, 9-76, and 10-76, desensitized MCP-1-induced Ca2+ induction, but were not significantly active. These analogues were antagonists of MCP-1 activity with the most potent being the 9-76 analogue (IC50 = 20 nM) The 9-76 specifically bound to MCP-1 receptors with a Kd of 8.3 nM, which was three-fold higher than MCP-1 (Kd 2.8 nM). The 9-76 analogue desensitized the Ca2+ response to MCP-1 and MCP- 3, but not to other CC chemokines, suggesting that it is MCP receptor specific. The availability of these compounds will be helpful in evaluating MCP receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:7836918

  7. Structure-Guided Discovery of Selective Antagonists for the Chromodomain of Polycomb Repressive Protein CBX7.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunyan; Smith, Steven G; Yap, Kyoko; Li, SiDe; Li, Jiaojie; Mezei, Mihaly; Rodriguez, Yoel; Vincek, Adam; Aguilo, Francesca; Walsh, Martin J; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2016-06-01

    The chromobox 7 (CBX7) protein of the polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) functions to repress transcription of tumor suppressor p16 (INK4a) through long noncoding RNA, ANRIL (antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus) directed chromodomain (ChD) binding to trimethylated lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3), resulting in chromatin compaction at the INK4a/ARF locus. In this study, we report structure-guided discovery of two distinct classes of small-molecule antagonists for the CBX7ChD. Our Class A compounds, a series including analogues of the previously reported MS452, inhibit CBX7ChD/methyl-lysine binding by occupying the H3K27me3 peptide binding site, whereas our Class B compound, the newly discovered MS351, appears to inhibit H3K27me3 binding when CBX7ChD is bound to RNA. Our crystal structure of the CBX7ChD/MS351 complex reveals the molecular details of ligand recognition by the aromatic cage residues that typically engage in methyl-lysine binding. We further demonstrate that MS351 effectively induces transcriptional derepression of CBX7 target genes, including p16 (INK4a) in mouse embryonic stem cells and human prostate cancer PC3 cells. Thus, MS351 represents a new class of ChD antagonists that selectively targets the biologically active form of CBX7 of the PRC1 in long noncoding RNA- and H3K27me3-directed gene transcriptional repression. PMID:27326334

  8. Transcriptional Regulation by Trithorax-Group Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, Robert E.; Tamkun, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The trithorax group of genes (trxG) was identified in mutational screens that examined developmental phenotypes and suppression of Polycomb mutant phenotypes. The protein products of these genes are primarily involved in gene activation, although some can also have repressive effects. There is no central function for these proteins. Some move nucleosomes about on the genome in an ATP-dependent manner, some covalently modify histones such as methylating lysine 4 of histone H3, and some directly interact with the transcription machinery or are a part of that machinery. It is interesting to consider why these specific members of large families of functionally related proteins have strong developmental phenotypes. PMID:25274705

  9. Competition between antagonistic complement factors for a single protein on N. meningitidis rules disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Caesar, Joseph JE; Lavender, Hayley; Ward, Philip N; Exley, Rachel M; Eaton, Jack; Chittock, Emily; Malik, Talat H; Goiecoechea De Jorge, Elena; Pickering, Matthew C; Tang, Christoph M; Lea, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have found variation within the complement factor H gene family links to host susceptibility to meningococcal disease caused by infection with Neisseria meningitidis (Davila et al., 2010). Mechanistic insights have been challenging since variation within this locus is complex and biological roles of the factor H-related proteins, unlike factor H, are incompletely understood. N. meningitidis subverts immune responses by hijacking a host-immune regulator, complement factor H (CFH), to the bacterial surface (Schneider et al., 2006; Madico et al., 2007; Schneider et al., 2009). We demonstrate that complement factor-H related 3 (CFHR3) promotes immune activation by acting as an antagonist of CFH. Conserved sequences between CFH and CFHR3 mean that the bacterium cannot sufficiently distinguish between these two serum proteins to allow it to hijack the regulator alone. The level of protection from complement attack achieved by circulating N. meningitidis therefore depends on the relative levels of CFH and CFHR3 in serum. These data may explain the association between genetic variation in both CFH and CFHR3 and susceptibility to meningococcal disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04008.001 PMID:25534642

  10. ABI4 mediates antagonistic effects of abscisic acid and gibberellins at transcript and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Shu, Kai; Chen, Qian; Wu, Yaorong; Liu, Ruijun; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Yanli; Wang, Shengfu; Tang, Sanyuan; Liu, Chunyan; Yang, Wenyu; Cao, Xiaofeng; Serino, Giovanna; Xie, Qi

    2016-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones which antagonistically mediate numerous physiological processes, and their optimal balance is essential for normal plant development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying ABA and GA antagonism still needs to be determined. Here, we report that ABA-INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4) is a central factor in GA/ABA homeostasis and antagonism in post-germination stages. ABI4 overexpression in Arabidopsis (OE-ABI4) leads to developmental defects including a decrease in plant height and poor seed production. The transcription of a key ABA biosynthetic gene, NCED6, and of a key GA catabolic gene, GA2ox7, is significantly enhanced by ABI4 overexpression. ABI4 activates NCED6 and GA2ox7 transcription by directly binding to the promoters, and genetic analysis revealed that mutation in these two genes partially rescues the dwarf phenotype of ABI4 overexpressing plants. Consistently, ABI4 overexpressing seedlings have a lower GA/ABA ratio than the wild type. We further show that ABA induces GA2ox7 transcription while GA represses NCED6 expression in an ABI4-dependent manner; and that ABA stabilizes the ABI4 protein whereas GA promotes its degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that ABA and GA antagonize each other by oppositely acting on ABI4 transcript and protein levels.

  11. Identification of a group of brominated flame retardants as novel androgen receptor antagonists and potential neuronal and endocrine disrupters.

    PubMed

    Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Pradhan, Ajay; Asnake, Solomon; Walstad, Anders; Ivarsson, Per; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) are used in industrial products to reduce the risk of fire. However, their continuous release into the environment is a concern as they are often persistent, bioaccumulating and toxic. Information on the impact these compounds have on human health and wildlife is limited and only a few of them have been identified to disrupt hormone receptor functions. In the present study we used in silico modeling to determine the interactions of selected BFRs with the human androgen receptor (AR). Three compounds were found to dock into the ligand-binding domain of the human AR and these were further tested using in vitro analysis. Allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE) and 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) were observed to act as AR antagonists. These BFRs have recently been detected in the environment, in house dust and in aquatic animals. The compounds have been detected at high concentrations in both blubber and brain of seals and we therefore also assessed their impact on the expression of L-type amino acid transporter system (LAT) genes, that are needed for amino acid uptake across the blood-brain barrier, as disruption of LAT gene function has been implicated in several brain disorders. The three BFRs down-regulated the expression of AR target genes that encode for prostate specific antigen (PSA), 5α-reductases and β-microseminoprotein. The potency of PSA inhibition was of the same magnitude as the common prostate cancer drugs, demonstrating that these compounds are strong AR antagonists. Western blot analysis of AR protein showed that ATE, BATE and DPTE decreased the 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced AR protein levels, further confirming that these BFRs act as AR antagonists. The transcription of the LAT genes was altered by the three BFRs, indicating an effect on amino-acid uptake across cellular membranes and blood-brain barrier. This study demonstrated that ATE, BATE

  12. Identification of a group of brominated flame retardants as novel androgen receptor antagonists and potential neuronal and endocrine disrupters.

    PubMed

    Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Pradhan, Ajay; Asnake, Solomon; Walstad, Anders; Ivarsson, Per; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) are used in industrial products to reduce the risk of fire. However, their continuous release into the environment is a concern as they are often persistent, bioaccumulating and toxic. Information on the impact these compounds have on human health and wildlife is limited and only a few of them have been identified to disrupt hormone receptor functions. In the present study we used in silico modeling to determine the interactions of selected BFRs with the human androgen receptor (AR). Three compounds were found to dock into the ligand-binding domain of the human AR and these were further tested using in vitro analysis. Allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE) and 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) were observed to act as AR antagonists. These BFRs have recently been detected in the environment, in house dust and in aquatic animals. The compounds have been detected at high concentrations in both blubber and brain of seals and we therefore also assessed their impact on the expression of L-type amino acid transporter system (LAT) genes, that are needed for amino acid uptake across the blood-brain barrier, as disruption of LAT gene function has been implicated in several brain disorders. The three BFRs down-regulated the expression of AR target genes that encode for prostate specific antigen (PSA), 5α-reductases and β-microseminoprotein. The potency of PSA inhibition was of the same magnitude as the common prostate cancer drugs, demonstrating that these compounds are strong AR antagonists. Western blot analysis of AR protein showed that ATE, BATE and DPTE decreased the 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced AR protein levels, further confirming that these BFRs act as AR antagonists. The transcription of the LAT genes was altered by the three BFRs, indicating an effect on amino-acid uptake across cellular membranes and blood-brain barrier. This study demonstrated that ATE, BATE

  13. Chemical synthesis and X-ray structure of a heterochiral {D-protein antagonist plus vascular endothelial growth factor} protein complex by racemic crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Uppalapati, Maruti; Ault-Riché, Dana; Kenney, John; Lowitz, Joshua; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2012-10-23

    Total chemical synthesis was used to prepare the mirror image (D-protein) form of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A). Phage display against D-VEGF-A was used to screen designed libraries based on a unique small protein scaffold in order to identify a high affinity ligand. Chemically synthesized D- and L- forms of the protein ligand showed reciprocal chiral specificity in surface plasmon resonance binding experiments: The L-protein ligand bound only to D-VEGF-A, whereas the D-protein ligand bound only to L-VEGF-A. The D-protein ligand, but not the L-protein ligand, inhibited the binding of natural VEGF{sub 165} to the VEGFR1 receptor. Racemic protein crystallography was used to determine the high resolution X-ray structure of the heterochiral complex consisting of {l_brace}D-protein antagonist + L-protein form of VEGF-A{r_brace}. Crystallization of a racemic mixture of these synthetic proteins in appropriate stoichiometry gave a racemic protein complex of more than 73 kDa containing six synthetic protein molecules. The structure of the complex was determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. Detailed analysis of the interaction between the D-protein antagonist and the VEGF-A protein molecule showed that the binding interface comprised a contact surface area of approximately 800 {angstrom}{sup 2} in accord with our design objectives, and that the D-protein antagonist binds to the same region of VEGF-A that interacts with VEGFR1-domain 2.

  14. Gremlin, a Bone Morphogenetic Protein Antagonist, Is a Crucial Angiogenic Factor in Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Daizo; Kim, Kyongsong; Ishii, Yudo; Tahara, Shigeyuki; Teramoto, Akira; Morita, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Gremlin is an antagonist of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and a major driving force in skeletal modeling in the fetal stage. Several recent reports have shown that Gremlin is also involved in angiogenesis of lung cancer and diabetic retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Gremlin in tumor angiogenesis in pituitary adenoma. Double fluorescence immunohistochemistry of Gremlin and CD34 was performed in pituitary adenoma tissues obtained during transsphenoidal surgery in 45 cases (7 PRLoma, 17 GHoma, 2 ACTHoma, and 2 TSHoma). Gremlin and microvascular density (MVD) were detected by double-immunofluorescence microscopy in CD34-positive vessels from tissue microarray analysis of 60 cases of pituitary adenomas (6 PRLoma, 23 GHoma, 22 NFoma, 5 ACTHoma, and 4 TSHoma). In tissue microarray analysis, MVD was significantly correlated with an increased Gremlin level (linear regression: P < 0.005,  r2 = 0.4958). In contrast, Gremlin expression showed no correlation with tumor subtype or Knosp score. The high level of expression of Gremlin in pituitary adenoma tissue with many CD34-positive vessels and the strong coherence of these regions indicate that Gremlin is associated with angiogenesis in pituitary adenoma cells. PMID:25834571

  15. Transcriptional Silencing by Polycomb-Group Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, Ueli; Paro, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb-group (PcG) genes encode chromatin proteins involved in stable and heritable transcriptional silencing. PcG proteins participate in distinct multimeric complexes that deposit, or bind to, specific histone modifications (e.g., H3K27me3 and H2AK119ub1) to prevent gene activation and maintain repressed chromatin domains. PcG proteins are evolutionary conserved and play a role in processes ranging from vernalization and seed development in plants, over X-chromosome inactivation in mammals, to the maintenance of stem cell identity. PcG silencing is medically relevant as it is often observed in human disorders, including cancer, and tissue regeneration, which involve the reprogramming of PcG-controlled target genes. PMID:25367972

  16. Discovery of potent heterodimeric antagonists of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) with sustained antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Perez, Heidi L; Chaudhry, Charu; Emanuel, Stuart L; Fanslau, Caroline; Fargnoli, Joseph; Gan, Jinping; Kim, Kyoung S; Lei, Ming; Naglich, Joseph G; Traeger, Sarah C; Vuppugalla, Ragini; Wei, Donna D; Vite, Gregory D; Talbott, Randy L; Borzilleri, Robert M

    2015-02-12

    The prominent role of IAPs in controlling cell death and their overexpression in a variety of cancers has prompted the development of IAP antagonists as potential antitumor therapies. We describe the identification of a series of heterodimeric antagonists with highly potent antiproliferative activities in cIAP- and XIAP-dependent cell lines. Compounds 15 and 17 further demonstrate curative efficacy in human melanoma and lung cancer xenograft models and are promising candidates for advanced studies.

  17. Bluetongue Virus NS4 Protein Is an Interferon Antagonist and a Determinant of Virus Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ratinier, Maxime; Shaw, Andrew E.; Barry, Gerald; Gu, Quan; Di Gialleonardo, Luigina; Janowicz, Anna; Varela, Mariana; Randall, Richard E.; Caporale, Marco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue, a major infectious disease of ruminants with serious consequences to both animal health and the economy. The clinical outcome of BTV infection is highly variable and dependent on a variety of factors related to both the virus and the host. In this study, we show that the BTV nonstructural protein NS4 favors viral replication in sheep, the animal species most affected by bluetongue. In addition, NS4 confers a replication advantage on the virus in interferon (IFN)-competent primary sheep endothelial cells and immortalized cell lines. We determined that in cells infected with an NS4 deletion mutant (BTV8ΔNS4), there is increased synthesis of type I IFN compared to cells infected with wild-type BTV-8. In addition, using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that NS4 modulates the host IFN response and downregulates mRNA levels of type I IFN and interferon-stimulated genes. Moreover, using reporter assays and protein synthesis assays, we show that NS4 downregulates the activities of a variety of promoters, such as the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter, the IFN-β promoter, and a promoter containing interferon-stimulated response elements (ISRE). We also show that the NS4 inhibitory activity on gene expression is related to its nucleolar localization. Furthermore, NS4 does not affect mRNA splicing or cellular translation. The data obtained in this study strongly suggest that BTV NS4 is an IFN antagonist and a key determinant of viral virulence. IMPORTANCE Bluetongue is one of the main infectious diseases of ruminants and is caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), an arthropod-borne virus transmitted from infected to susceptible animals by Culicoides biting midges. Bluetongue has a variable clinical outcome that can be related to both virus and host factors. It is therefore critical to understand the interplay between BTV and the host immune responses. In this study, we show that a nonstructural protein

  18. Synergy between an antiangiogenic integrin alphav antagonist and an antibody-cytokine fusion protein eradicates spontaneous tumor metastases.

    PubMed

    Lode, H N; Moehler, T; Xiang, R; Jonczyk, A; Gillies, S D; Cheresh, D A; Reisfeld, R A

    1999-02-16

    The suppression and eradication of primary tumors and distant metastases is a major goal of alternative treatment strategies for cancer, such as inhibition of angiogenesis and targeted immunotherapy. We report here a synergy between two novel monotherapies directed against vascular and tumor compartments, respectively, a tumor vasculature-specific antiangiogenic integrin alphav antagonist and tumor-specific antibody-interleukin 2 (IL-2) fusion proteins. Simultaneous and sequential combination of these monotherapies effectively eradicated spontaneous liver metastases in a poorly immunogenic syngeneic model of neuroblastoma. This was in contrast to controls subjected to monotherapies with either an antiangiogenic integrin alphav antagonist or antibody-IL-2 fusion proteins, which were only partially effective at the dose levels applied. Furthermore, simultaneous treatments with the integrin alphav antagonist and tumor-specific antibody-IL-2 fusion proteins induced dramatic primary tumor regressions in three syngeneic murine tumor models, i.e., melanoma, colon carcinoma, and neuroblastoma. However, each agent used as monotherapy induced only a delay in tumor growth. A mechanism for this synergism was suggested because the antitumor response was accompanied by a simultaneous 50% reduction in tumor vessel density and a 5-fold increase in inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment. Subsequently, tumor necrosis was demonstrated only in animals receiving the combination therapy, but not when each agent was applied as monotherapy. The results suggest that these synergistic treatment modalities may provide a novel and effective tool for future therapies of metastatic cancer.

  19. Expedient synthesis of highly potent antagonists of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) with unique selectivity for ML-IAP.

    PubMed

    Vamos, Mitchell; Welsh, Kate; Finlay, Darren; Lee, Pooi San; Mace, Peter D; Snipas, Scott J; Gonzalez, Monica L; Ganji, Santhi Reddy; Ardecky, Robert J; Riedl, Stefan J; Salvesen, Guy S; Vuori, Kristiina; Reed, John C; Cosford, Nicholas D P

    2013-04-19

    A series of novel, potent antagonists of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) were synthesized in a highly convergent and rapid fashion (≤6 steps) using the Ugi four-component reaction as the key step, thus enabling rapid optimization of binding potency. These IAP antagonists compete with caspases 3, 7, and 9 for inhibition by X chromosome-linked IAP (XIAP) and bind strongly (nanomolar binding constants) to several crucial members of the IAP family of cancer pro-survival proteins to promote apoptosis, with a particularly unique selectivity for melanoma IAP (ML-IAP). Experiments in cell culture revealed powerful cancer cell growth inhibitory activity in multiple (breast, ovarian, and prostate) cell lines with single agent toxicity at low nanomolar levels against SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma cells. Administration of the compounds to human foreskin fibroblast cells revealed no general toxicity to normal cells. Furthermore, computational modeling was performed, revealing key contacts between the IAP proteins and antagonists, suggesting a structural basis for the observed potency.

  20. A Network of Genes Antagonistic to the LIN-35 Retinoblastoma Protein of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Polley, Stanley R. G.; Fay, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans pRb ortholog, LIN-35, functions in a wide range of cellular and developmental processes. This includes a role of LIN-35 in nutrient utilization by the intestine, which it carries out redundantly with SLR-2, a zinc-finger protein. This and other redundant functions of LIN-35 were identified in genetic screens for mutations that display synthetic phenotypes in conjunction with loss of lin-35. To explore the intestinal role of LIN-35, we conducted a genome-wide RNA-interference-feeding screen for suppressors of lin-35; slr-2 early larval arrest. Of the 26 suppressors identified, 17 fall into three functional classes: (1) ribosome biogenesis genes, (2) mitochondrial prohibitins, and (3) chromatin regulators. Further characterization indicates that different categories of suppressors act through distinct molecular mechanisms. We also tested lin-35; slr-2 suppressors, as well as suppressors of the synthetic multivulval phenotype, to determine the spectrum of lin-35-synthetic phenotypes that could be suppressed following inhibition of these genes. We identified 19 genes, most of which are evolutionarily conserved, that can suppress multiple unrelated lin-35-synthetic phenotypes. Our study reveals a network of genes broadly antagonistic to LIN-35 as well as genes specific to the role of LIN-35 in intestinal and vulval development. Suppressors of multiple lin-35 phenotypes may be candidate targets for anticancer therapies. Moreover, screening for suppressors of phenotypically distinct synthetic interactions, which share a common altered gene, may prove to be a novel and effective approach for identifying genes whose activities are most directly relevant to the core functions of the shared gene. PMID:22542970

  1. Discovery of selective probes and antagonists for G-protein-coupled receptors FPR/FPRL1 and GPR30.

    PubMed

    Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Oprea, Tudor I; Prossnitz, Eric R; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A

    2009-01-01

    Recent technological advances in flow cytometry provide a versatile platform for high throughput screening of compound libraries coupled with high-content biological testing and drug discovery. The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest class of signaling molecules in the human genome with frequent roles in disease pathogenesis, yet many examples of orphan receptors with unknown ligands remain. The complex biology and potential for drug discovery within this class provide strong incentives for chemical biology approaches seeking to develop small molecule probes to facilitate elucidation of mechanistic pathways and enable specific manipulation of the activity of individual receptors. We have initiated small molecule probe development projects targeting two distinct families of GPCRs: the formylpeptide receptors (FPR/FPRL1) and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30). In each case the assay for compound screening involved the development of an appropriate small molecule fluorescent probe, and the flow cytometry platform provided inherently biological rich assays that enhanced the process of identification and optimization of novel antagonists. The contributions of cheminformatics analysis tools, virtual screening, and synthetic chemistry in synergy with the biomolecular screening program have yielded valuable new chemical probes with high binding affinity, selectivity for the targeted receptor, and potent antagonist activity. This review describes the discovery of novel small molecule antagonists of FPR and FPRL1, and GPR30, and the associated characterization process involving secondary assays, cell based and in vivo studies to define the selectivity and activity of the resulting chemical probes.

  2. Source memory in rats is impaired by an NMDA receptor antagonist but not by PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexandra E; Xu, Zhili; Lai, Yvonne Y; Kulkarni, Pushkar M; Thakur, Ganesh A; Hohmann, Andrea G; Crystal, Jonathon D

    2016-05-15

    Limitations of preclinical models of human memory contribute to the pervasive view that rodent models do not adequately predict therapeutic efficacy in producing cognitive impairments or improvements in humans. We used a source-memory model (i.e., a representation of the origin of information) we developed for use in rats to evaluate possible drug-induced impairments of both spatial memory and higher order memory functions in the same task. Memory impairment represents a major barrier to use of NMDAR antagonists as pharmacotherapies. The scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95kDa (PSD95) links NMDARs to the neuronal enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which catalyzes production of the signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO). Therefore, interrupting PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions downstream of NMDARs represents a novel therapeutic strategy to interrupt NMDAR-dependent NO signaling while bypassing unwanted side effects of NMDAR antagonists. We hypothesized that the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 would impair source memory. We also hypothesized that PSD95-nNOS inhibitors (IC87201 and ZL006) would lack the profile of cognitive impairment associated with global NMDAR antagonists. IC87201 and ZL006 suppressed NMDA-stimulated formation of cGMP, a marker of NO production, in cultured hippocampal neurons. MK-801, at doses that did not impair motor function, impaired source memory under conditions in which spatial memory was spared. Thus, source memory was more vulnerable than spatial memory to impairment. By contrast, PSD95-nNOS inhibitors, IC87201 and ZL006, administered at doses that are behaviorally effective in rats, spared source memory, spatial memory, and motor function. Thus, PSD95-nNOS inhibitors are likely to exhibit favorable therapeutic ratios compared to NMDAR antagonists. PMID:26909849

  3. Blockade of isoprenaline-induced fluid and protein secretion by the mandibular glands of the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus, with selective antagonists.

    PubMed

    Beal, A M

    2000-08-01

    Selective and non-selective beta-adrenoceptor antagonists were used to block the increases in fluid and protein secretion caused by sympathomimetic stimulation of the mandibular gland of red kangaroos during intracarotid infusion of isoprenaline. Atenolol or ICI118551 at antagonist:agonist ratios up to 300:1 caused increasing but incomplete blockade of fluid secretion and protein release. Both selective antagonists had equal potency and both antagonists were more effective at blocking protein release than at blocking fluid secretion. Consequently, the mechanisms underpinning fluid secretion are more sensitive to beta-sympathomimetic stimulation than those causing protein release. Propranolol at antagonist:agonist ratios of 300:1 was more potent than the selective antagonists, almost totally blocking the increases in fluid secretion and protein release. The data are consistent with the acini of the kangaroo mandibular gland having both beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptors and with the increased fluid secretion and protein release by isoprenaline being mediated by both receptor subtypes.

  4. Antagonistic functions of SET-2/SET1 and HPL/HP1 proteins in C. elegans development.

    PubMed

    Simonet, T; Dulermo, R; Schott, S; Palladino, F

    2007-12-01

    Cellular identity during metazoan development is maintained by epigenetic modifications of chromatin structure brought about by the activity of specific proteins which mediate histone variant incorporation, histone modifications, and nucleosome remodeling. HP1 proteins directly influence gene expression by modifying chromatin structure. We previously showed that the Caenorhabditis elegans HP1 proteins HPL-1 and HPL-2 are required for several aspects of post-embryonic development. To gain insight into how HPL proteins influence gene expression in a developmental context, we carried out a candidate RNAi screen to identify suppressors of hpl-1 and hpl-2 phenotypes. We identified SET-2, the homologue of yeast and mammalian SET1, as an antagonist of HPL-1 and HPL-2 activity in growth and somatic gonad development. Yeast Set1 and its mammalian counterparts SET1/MLL are H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) histone methyltransferases associated with gene activation as part of large multisubunit complexes. We show that the nematode counterparts of SET1/MLL complex subunits also antagonize HPL function in post-embryonic development. Genetic analysis is consistent with SET1/MLL complex subunits having both shared and unique functions in development. Furthermore, as observed in other species, we find that SET1/MLL complex homologues differentially affect global H3K4 methylation. Our results suggest that HP1 and a SET1/MLL-related complex may play antagonistic roles in the epigenetic regulation of specific developmental programs.

  5. Identification of Substrates of Protein-Group SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Psakhye, Ivan; Jentsch, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Protein modification by conjugation to the ubiquitin-related protein SUMO (SUMOylation) regulates numerous cellular functions and is reversible. However, unlike typical posttranslational modifications, SUMOylation often targets and regulates proteins of functionally and physically linked protein groups, rather than individual proteins. Functional studies of protein-group SUMOylation are thus particularly challenging, as they require the identification of ideally all members of a modified protein group. Here, we describe mass spectrometric approaches to detect SUMOylated protein groups in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yet the protocols can be readily adapted for studies of SUMOylation in mammalian cells. PMID:27631809

  6. Death-associated protein kinase: A molecule with functional antagonistic duality and a potential role in inflammatory bowel disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    STEINMANN, SARA; SCHEIBE, KRISTINA; ERLENBACH-WUENSCH, KATHARINA; NEUFERT, CLEMENS; SCHNEIDER-STOCK, REGINE

    2015-01-01

    The cytoskeleton-associated serine/threonine kinase death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) has been described as a cancer gene chameleon with functional antagonistic duality in a cell type and context specific manner. The broad range of interaction partners and substrates link DAPK to inflammatory processes especially in the gut. Herein we summarize our knowledge on the role of DAPK in different cell types that play a role under inflammatory conditions in the gut. Besides some promising experimental data suggesting DAPK as an interesting drug target in inflammatory bowel disease there are many open questions regarding direct evidence for a role of DAPK in intestinal inflammation. PMID:25963636

  7. Species-dependent enantioselective plasma protein binding of MK-571, a potent leukotriene D4 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lin, J H; deLuna, F A; Ulm, E H; Tocco, D J

    1990-01-01

    The plasma protein binding of the enantiomers of MK-571 was stereoselective and the stereoselectivity was species dependent. The 12 mammalian species studied could be classified into three groups: those that bind the S-(+)-enantiomer to a greater extent than the R-(-)-enantiomer (human, baboon, monkey, cow, dog, and cat); those that bind the R-(-)-enantiomer more extensively (rat, guinea pig, and sheep); and those that show no stereoselectivity (rabbit, hamster, and mouse). The stereoselective binding appears to have no phylogenetic relationship. Using serum albumin instead of plasma, a similar degree of stereoselective binding was observed for human, dog, sheep, and rat, suggesting that albumin is the major binding component for MK-571 enantiomers, and that species differences in stereoselective binding are likely due to structural differences in the albumin molecule. Displacement studies with [14C] diazepam, [14C]warfarin, and [3H]digitoxin indicated that the enantioselective differences in protein binding are most likely due to the differences in binding affinity rather than to different binding sites. PMID:1976072

  8. Plasma protein extravasation induced by mammalian tachykinins in rat skin: influence of anaesthetic agents and an acetylcholine antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Couture, R.; Kérouac, R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of mammalian tachykinins on plasma protein extravasation was assessed in the rat dorsal skin. Substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) increased vascular permeability in a dose-related manner with a threshold dose of about 0.07 pmol in sodium pentobarbitone-anaesthetized animals. Plasma protein extravasation induced by the tachykinins was 100-500 times less in magnitude in animals anaesthetized with urethane. Plasma protein extravasation induced by SP (66 pmol) was significantly reduced (63%; P less than 0.001) by atropine (a muscarinic inhibitor) while that induced by NKA or NKB was unaffected by the inhibitor suggesting that a cholinergic component might only be involved in the vascular permeability elicited by SP. The rank order of potency for the tachykinins on plasma protein extravasation was: NKB greater than SP greater than NKA (in absence of atropine) and NKB greater than NKA greater than SP (in presence of atropine), suggesting that this vascular response is mediated by a SP-E receptor type. The amplitudes of the plasma protein extravasation induced by NKB and its hydrophilic analogue [Arg degrees]NKB were similar, indicating that the lipophilic features of the native peptide cannot account for its potent biological activity. Plasma protein extravasation was enhanced by the SP analogue [D-Pro4,Lys6,D-Trp7,9,10,Phe11]SP (4-11), thus showing the limitation of such SP analogues (antagonists) for characterizing the tachykinin receptors involved in vascular permeability. PMID:3475146

  9. Plasma protein extravasation induced by mammalian tachykinins in rat skin: influence of anaesthetic agents and an acetylcholine antagonist.

    PubMed

    Couture, R; Kérouac, R

    1987-06-01

    The effect of mammalian tachykinins on plasma protein extravasation was assessed in the rat dorsal skin. Substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) increased vascular permeability in a dose-related manner with a threshold dose of about 0.07 pmol in sodium pentobarbitone-anaesthetized animals. Plasma protein extravasation induced by the tachykinins was 100-500 times less in magnitude in animals anaesthetized with urethane. Plasma protein extravasation induced by SP (66 pmol) was significantly reduced (63%; P less than 0.001) by atropine (a muscarinic inhibitor) while that induced by NKA or NKB was unaffected by the inhibitor suggesting that a cholinergic component might only be involved in the vascular permeability elicited by SP. The rank order of potency for the tachykinins on plasma protein extravasation was: NKB greater than SP greater than NKA (in absence of atropine) and NKB greater than NKA greater than SP (in presence of atropine), suggesting that this vascular response is mediated by a SP-E receptor type. The amplitudes of the plasma protein extravasation induced by NKB and its hydrophilic analogue [Arg degrees]NKB were similar, indicating that the lipophilic features of the native peptide cannot account for its potent biological activity. Plasma protein extravasation was enhanced by the SP analogue [D-Pro4,Lys6,D-Trp7,9,10,Phe11]SP (4-11), thus showing the limitation of such SP analogues (antagonists) for characterizing the tachykinin receptors involved in vascular permeability.

  10. SET antagonist enhances the chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells by reactivating protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Man-Hsin; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yen-Lin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Hsiao, Yung-Jen; Tai, Wei-Tien; Chao, Ting-Ting; Yu, Hui-Chuan; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    SET is known as a potent PP2A inhibitor, however, its oncogenic role including its tumorigenic potential and involvement in the development of chemoresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not yet been fully discussed. In present study, we investigated the oncogenic role of SET by SET-knockdown and showed that SET silencing impaired cell growth rate, colony formation and tumor sphere formation in A549 cells. Notably, silencing SET enhanced the pro-apoptotic effects of paclitaxel, while ectopic expression of SET diminished the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to paclitaxel. Since the SET protein was shown to affect chemosensitivity, we next examined whether combining a novel SET antagonist, EMQA, sensitized NSCLC cells to paclitaxel. Both the in vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that EMQA and paclitaxel combination treatment was synergistic. Importantly, we found that downregulating p-Akt by inhibiting SET-mediated protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inactivation determined the pro-apoptotic effects of EMQA and paclitaxel combination treatment. To dissect the critical site for EMQA functioning, we generated several truncated SET proteins. By analysis of the effects of EMQA on the binding affinities of different truncated SET proteins to PP2A-catalytic subunits, we revealed that the 227–277 amino-acid sequence is critical for EMQA-induced SET inhibition. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of SET in NSCLC, particularly in the development of chemoresistance. The synergistic effects of paclitaxel and the SET antagonist shown in current study encourage further validation of the clinical potential of this combination. PMID:26575017

  11. Synergistic activity of BET protein antagonist-based combinations in mantle cell lymphoma cells sensitive or resistant to ibrutinib

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baohua; Shah, Bhavin; Fiskus, Warren; Qi, Jun; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Coarfa, Cristian; Li, Li; Devaraj, Santhana G. T.; Sharma, Sunil; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Michael L.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Krieger, Stephanie; Bradner, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells exhibit increased B-cell receptor and nuclear factor (NF)-κB activities. The bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein bromodomain 4 is essential for the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. Here, we demonstrate that treatment with the BET protein bromodomain antagonist (BA) JQ1 attenuates MYC and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4/6, inhibits the nuclear RelA levels and the expression of NF-κB target genes, including Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) in MCL cells. Although lowering the levels of the antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma (BCL)2 family proteins, BA treatment induces the proapoptotic protein BIM and exerts dose-dependent lethality against cultured and primary MCL cells. Cotreatment with BA and the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib synergistically induces apoptosis of MCL cells. Compared with each agent alone, cotreatment with BA and ibrutinib markedly improved the median survival of mice engrafted with the MCL cells. BA treatment also induced apoptosis of the in vitro isolated, ibrutinib-resistant MCL cells, which overexpress CDK6, BCL2, Bcl-xL, XIAP, and AKT, but lack ibrutinib resistance-conferring BTK mutation. Cotreatment with BA and panobinostat (pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor) or palbociclib (CDK4/6 inhibitor) or ABT-199 (BCL2 antagonist) synergistically induced apoptosis of the ibrutinib-resistant MCL cells. These findings highlight and support further in vivo evaluation of the efficacy of the BA-based combinations with these agents against MCL, including ibrutinib-resistant MCL. PMID:26254443

  12. Effect of beta-antagonists on isoprenaline-induced secretion of fluid, amylase and protein by the parotid gland of the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus.

    PubMed

    Beal, A M

    2000-02-01

    Selective and non-selective beta-adrenoceptor antagonists were used to block the increases in fluid, protein and amylase secretion caused by sympathomimetic stimulation of the parotid gland of red kangaroos during intracarotid infusion of isoprenaline. ICI118551 at antagonist/agonist ratios up to 300:1 caused increasing but incomplete blockade of fluid secretion, and protein/amylase release. Atenolol at antagonist/agonist ratios up to 300:1 was only marginally more potent than ICI118551 at blocking the fluid, protein and amylase responses. Propranolol at antagonist/agonist ratios of 30:1 was as effective at blocking fluid and protein secretion as the highest ratios of either atenolol or ICI118551. Simultaneous administration of atenolol (30:1) with ICI118551 (30:1) was not as potent as propranolol (30:1). Thus, the beta-adrenoceptor/s in the acini of the kangaroo parotid gland appear to have antagonist-binding affinities atypical of those found for eutherian tissues. The data are consistent with the gland possessing either a single anomalous beta-adrenoceptor or functional beta(2)-receptors in addition to the beta(1)-receptors which are characteristic of eutherian salivary glands.

  13. Selective Allosteric Antagonists for the G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPRC6A Based on the 2-Phenylindole Privileged Structure Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Henrik; Boesgaard, Michael Worch; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Larsen, Inna; Kuhne, Sebastiaan; Gloriam, David E; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2015-11-25

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a biological target class of fundamental importance in drug therapy. The GPRC6A receptor is a newly deorphanized class C GPCR that we recently reported for the first allosteric antagonists based on the 2-arylindole privileged structure scaffold (e.g., 1-3). Herein, we present the first structure-activity relationship study for the 2-arylindole antagonist 3, comprising the design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of a focused library of 3-substituted 2-arylindoles. In a FRET-based inositol monophosphate (IP1) assay we identified compounds 7, 13e, and 34b as antagonists at the GPRC6A receptor in the low micromolar range and show that 7 and 34b display >9-fold selectivity for the GPRC6A receptor over related GPCRs, making 7 and 34b the most potent and selective antagonists for the GPRC6A receptor reported to date. PMID:26516782

  14. Apoptosis and the FLIP and NF-kappa B proteins as pharmacodynamic criteria for biosimilar TNF-alpha antagonists.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Paulo César Martins; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Azevedo, Valderilio Feijó

    2014-01-01

    Various criteria are necessary to assess the efficacy and safety of biological medications in order to grant companies the right to register these medications with the appropriate bodies that regulate their sale. The imminent expiration of the patents on reference biological products which block the cytokine TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) raises the possibility of bringing so-called biosimilars to the market (similar to the biologicals of reference products). This occurrence is inevitable, but criteria to adequately evaluate these medications are now needed. Even among controversy, there is a demand from publications correlating the pro-apoptotic mechanism of the original TNF-α antagonists (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab pegol) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases. In this article, the authors discuss the possibility of utilizing the pro-apoptotic effect correlated with the regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins FLIP and NF-κB as new criteria for analyzing the pharmacodynamics of possible biosimilar TNF-α antagonists which should be submitted to regulatory agencies for evaluation.

  15. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor 1/2 Antagonists Nonselectively Modulate Organic Anion Transport by Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRP1-4).

    PubMed

    Csandl, Mark A; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Cole, Susan P C

    2016-06-01

    Active efflux of both drugs and organic anion metabolites is mediated by the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs). MRP1 (ABCC1), MRP2 (ABCC2), MRP3 (ABCC3), and MRP4 (ABCC4) have partially overlapping substrate specificities and all transport 17β-estradiol 17-(β-d-glucuronide) (E217βG). The cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1R) antagonist MK-571 inhibits all four MRP homologs, but little is known about the modulatory effects of newer leukotriene modifiers (LTMs). Here we examined the effects of seven CysLT1R- and CysLT2R-selective LTMs on E217βG uptake into MRP1-4-enriched inside-out membrane vesicles. Their effects on uptake of an additional physiologic solute were also measured for MRP1 [leukotriene C4 (LTC4)] and MRP4 [prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)]. The two CysLT2R-selective LTMs studied were generally more potent inhibitors than CysLT1R-selective LTMs, but neither class of antagonists showed any MRP selectivity. For E217βG uptake, LTM IC50s ranged from 1.2 to 26.9 μM and were most comparable for MRP1 and MRP4. The LTM rank order inhibitory potencies for E217βG versus LTC4 uptake by MRP1, and E217βG versus PGE2 uptake by MRP4, were also similar. Three of four CysLT1R-selective LTMs also stimulated MRP2 (but not MRP3) transport and thus exerted a concentration-dependent biphasic effect on MRP2. The fourth CysLT1R antagonist, LY171883, only stimulated MRP2 (and MRP3) transport but none of the MRPs were stimulated by either CysLT2R-selective LTM. We conclude that, in contrast to their CysLTR selectivity, CysLTR antagonists show no MRP homolog selectivity, and data should be interpreted cautiously if obtained from LTMs in systems in which more than one MRP is present. PMID:27068271

  16. In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in Avena sativa L. coleoptiles: effects of Ca2+, calmodulin antagonists, and auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veluthambi, K.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylations in oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile segments were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In vitro phosphorylation of several polypeptides was distinctly promoted at 1 to 15 micromolar free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2(+)-stimulated phosphorylation was markedly reduced by trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, and naphthalene sulfonamide (W7). Two polypeptides were phosphorylated both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, but the patterns of phosphorylation of several other polypeptides were different under the two conditions indicating that the in vivo phosphorylation pattern of proteins is not truly reflected by in vitro phosphorylation studies. Trifluoperazine, W7, or ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + calcium ionophore A23187 treatments resulted in reduced levels of in vivo protein phosphorylation of both control and auxin-treated coleoptile segments. Analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis following in vivo phosphorylation revealed auxin-dependent changes of certain polypeptides. A general inhibition of phosphorylation by calmodulin antagonists suggested that both control and auxin-treated coleoptiles exhibited Ca2+, and calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in vivo.

  17. Human eosinophil major basic protein is an endogenous allosteric antagonist at the inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, D B; Gleich, G J; Fryer, A D

    1993-01-01

    The effect of human eosinophil major basic protein (MBP) as well as other eosinophil proteins, on binding of [3H]N-methyl-scopolamine ([3H]NMS: 1 x 10(-10) M) to muscarinic M2 receptors in heart membranes and M3 receptors in submandibular gland membranes was studied. MBP inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors. MBP also inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating that the interaction of MBP with the M2 muscarinic receptor is allosteric. This effect of MBP suggests that it may function as an endogenous allosteric inhibitor of agonist binding to the M2 muscarinic receptor. Inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by MBP was reversible by treatment with heparin, which binds and neutralizes MBP. Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) also inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors and inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes. On a molar basis, EPO is less potent than MBP. Neither eosinophil cationic protein nor eosinophil-derived neurotoxin affected binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors. Thus both MBP and EPO are selective allosteric antagonists at M2 receptors. The effects of these proteins may be important causes of M2 receptor dysfunction and enhanced vagally mediated bronchoconstriction in asthma. Images PMID:8473484

  18. ACTH Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing's disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome - especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia - as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  19. ACTH Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  20. [Target proteins and mechanisms of ochratoxin toxicity. A contribution to the identification of potential ochratoxin antagonists

    PubMed

    Vedani, Angelo; Zbinden, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Ochratoxins are mycotoxins released by moulds on grain, peanuts and vegetables. Toxicological investigations have shown that ochratoxin A displays nephrotoxic, genotoxic, teratogenic, cancerogenic and immunosuppressive effects. Increased blood levels observed in humans would seem to suggest a link to a kidney desease (Balcan Endemic Nephropaty) frequently observed in the Balkan countries. The adverse effects of ochratoxin A are mainly associated with its impact on phenylalanine-metabolizing enzymes. Based on the three-dimensional structure of phenylalanine-t-RNA-synthetase, its interactions with ochratoxins are analyzed as well as with Aspartam. In animal models, Aspartam has been shown to almost fully prevent toxic effects of ochratoxin A. The topology of the binding site of phenylalanine-t-RNA-synthetase would seem to be favorable towards a few affinity-enhancing modifications of the Aspartame molecule. A known molecular mechanism is a prerequisite for a systematic search of antagonizing substances for toxins. Based on a receptor structure, binding properties of such drugs can be identified and optimized using computer-aided drug design. Susequently, only the most potent candidate structures must be subjected to a determination of their biological activity, which can lead to a significant reduction of substances to be tested in vivo. Such experiments are particularly stressful as the animals must be intoxicated beforehand. The extent of an antagonistic impact on humans suffering from a chronical ochratoxin A intoxication must be subject of clinical studies. PMID:11178501

  1. [Target proteins and mechanisms of ochratoxin toxicity. A contribution to the identification of potential ochratoxin antagonists

    PubMed

    Vedani, Angelo; Zbinden, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Ochratoxins are mycotoxins released by moulds on grain, peanuts and vegetables. Toxicological investigations have shown that ochratoxin A displays nephrotoxic, genotoxic, teratogenic, cancerogenic and immunosuppressive effects. Increased blood levels observed in humans would seem to suggest a link to a kidney desease (Balcan Endemic Nephropaty) frequently observed in the Balkan countries. The adverse effects of ochratoxin A are mainly associated with its impact on phenylalanine-metabolizing enzymes. Based on the three-dimensional structure of phenylalanine-t-RNA-synthetase, its interactions with ochratoxins are analyzed as well as with Aspartam. In animal models, Aspartam has been shown to almost fully prevent toxic effects of ochratoxin A. The topology of the binding site of phenylalanine-t-RNA-synthetase would seem to be favorable towards a few affinity-enhancing modifications of the Aspartame molecule. A known molecular mechanism is a prerequisite for a systematic search of antagonizing substances for toxins. Based on a receptor structure, binding properties of such drugs can be identified and optimized using computer-aided drug design. Susequently, only the most potent candidate structures must be subjected to a determination of their biological activity, which can lead to a significant reduction of substances to be tested in vivo. Such experiments are particularly stressful as the animals must be intoxicated beforehand. The extent of an antagonistic impact on humans suffering from a chronical ochratoxin A intoxication must be subject of clinical studies.

  2. Enhanced Osteogenesis of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Regulating Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Antagonists and Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jiabing; Im, Choong Sung; Guo, Mian; Cui, Zhong-Kai; Fartash, Armita; Kim, Soyon; Patel, Nikhil; Bezouglaia, Olga; Wu, Benjamin M.; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Although adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are an attractive cell source for bone tissue engineering, direct use of ASCs alone has had limited success in the treatment of large bone defects. Although bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are believed to be the most potent osteoinductive factors to promote osteogenic differentiation of ASCs, their clinical applications require supraphysiological dosage, leading to high medical burden and adverse side effects. In the present study, we demonstrated an alternative approach that can effectively complement the BMP activity to maximize the osteogenesis of ASCs without exogenous application of BMPs by regulating levels of antagonists and agonists to BMP signaling. Treatment of ASCs with the amiloride derivative phenamil, a positive regulator of BMP signaling, combined with gene manipulation to suppress the BMP antagonist noggin, significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation of ASCs through increased BMP–Smad signaling in vitro. Furthermore, the combination approach of noggin suppression and phenamil stimulation enhanced the BMP signaling and bone repair in a mouse calvarial defect model by adding noggin knockdown ASCs to apatite-coated poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) scaffolds loaded with phenamil. These results suggest novel complementary osteoinductive strategies that could maximize activity of the BMP pathway in ASC bone repair while reducing potential adverse effects of current BMP-based therapeutics. Significance Although stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy offers a promising alternative to repair damaged bone, direct use of stem cells alone is not adequate for challenging healing environments such as in large bone defects. This study demonstrates a novel strategy to maximize bone formation pathways in osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and functional bone formation by combining gene manipulation with a small molecule activator toward osteogenesis. The findings indicate promising stem cell

  3. Recombinant TNF-binding protein from variola virus as a novel potential TNF antagonist.

    PubMed

    Gileva, I P; Nepomnyashchikh, T S; Ryazankin, I A; Shchelkunov, S N

    2009-12-01

    Gel-filtration chromatographic separation of the lysate of Sf21 insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus BVi67 containing the gene for TNF-binding protein (CrmB) of variola virus (VARV) revealed that hTNF-cytotoxicity neutralization activity is associated with a fraction corresponding mainly to high molecular weight proteins (above 500 kDa) and less with fractions corresponding to proteins of 270 or 90 kDa. The recombinant VARV-CrmB protein has been purified by affinity chromatography. Difference in the experimentally determined and estimated (according to amino acid composition) VARV-CrmB molecular weight is due to glycosylation of the recombinant protein expressed in the insect cells. VARV-CrmB neutralizes in vitro the cytotoxic effect of hTNF and hLTalpha, and its TNF-neutralizing activity is two to three orders of magnitude higher compared to the analogous effects of type I and II soluble TNF receptors, comparable with the activity of mAb MAK195, and somewhat lower than the effect of the commercial drug Remicade.

  4. Antagonist minigenes identify genes regulated by parathyroid hormone through G protein-selective and G protein co-regulated mechanisms in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Gilchrist, A; Stern, P H

    2011-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the major hormone regulating bone remodeling. Binding of PTH to the PTH1 receptor (PTH1R), a heterotrimeric G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), can potentially trigger multiple signal transduction pathways mediated through several different G proteins. In this study, we employed G protein antagonist minigenes inhibiting Gα(s), Gα(q) or Gα₁₂ to selectively dissect out which of these G proteins were responsible for effects of PTH(1-34) in targeted signaling and osteogenesis arrays consisting of 159 genes. Among the 32 genes significantly regulated by 24h PTH treatment in UMR-106 osteoblastic cells, 9 genes were exclusively regulated through G(s), 6 genes were solely mediated through G(q), and 3 genes were only controlled through G₁₂. Such findings support the concept that there is some absolute specificity in downstream responses initiated at the G protein level following binding of PTH to the PTH1R. On the other hand, 6 PTH-regulated genes were regulated by both G(s) and G(q), 3 genes were regulated by both G(s) and G₁₂, and 3 genes were controlled by G(s), G(q) and G₁₂. These findings indicate potential overlapping or sequential interactions among different G protein-mediated pathways. In addition, two PTH-regulated genes were not regulated through any of the G proteins examined, suggesting that additional signaling mechanisms may be involved. Selectivity was largely maintained over a 2-48-hour time period. The minigene effects were mimicked by downstream inhibitors. The dissection of the differential effects of multiple G protein pathways on gene regulation provides a more complete understanding of PTH signaling in osteoblastic cells.

  5. Bone morphogenetic proteins and their antagonists: current and emerging clinical uses

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Imran H A; Brazil, Derek P

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the TGFβ superfamily of secreted cysteine knot proteins that includes TGFβ1, nodal, activins and inhibins. BMPs were first discovered by Urist in the 1960s when he showed that implantation of demineralized bone into intramuscular tissue of rabbits induced bone and cartilage formation. Since this seminal discovery, BMPs have also been shown to play key roles in several other biological processes, including limb, kidney, skin, hair and neuronal development, as well as maintaining vascular homeostasis. The multifunctional effects of BMPs make them attractive targets for the treatment of several pathologies, including bone disorders, kidney and lung fibrosis, and cancer. This review will summarize current knowledge on the BMP signalling pathway and critically evaluate the potential of recombinant BMPs as pharmacological agents for the treatment of bone repair and tissue fibrosis in patients. PMID:24758361

  6. Live Borrelia burgdorferi preferentially activate interleukin-1 beta gene expression and protein synthesis over the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L C; Isa, S; Vannier, E; Georgilis, K; Steere, A C; Dinarello, C A

    1992-01-01

    Lyme arthritis is one of the few forms of chronic arthritis in which the cause is known with certainty. Because cytokines are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic arthritis, we investigated the effect of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, on the gene expression and synthesis of IL-1 beta and the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Live B. burgdorferi induced fivefold more IL-1 beta than IL-1 alpha and sevenfold more IL-1 beta than IL-1ra; LPS or sonicated B. burgdorferi induced similar amounts of all three cytokines. This preferential induction of IL-1 beta was most dramatic in response to a low passage, virulent preparation of B. burgdorferi vs. three high passage avirulent strains. No difference in induction of IL-1ra was seen between these strains. The marked induction of IL-1 beta was partially diminished by heat-treatment and abrogated by sonication; IL-1ra was not affected. This suggested that a membrane component(s) accounted for the preferential induction of IL-1 beta. However, recombinant outer surface protein beta induced little IL-1 beta. By 4 h after stimulation, B. burgdorferi induced sixfold more IL-1 beta protein than LPS. In contrast to LPS-induced IL-1 beta mRNA which reached maximal accumulation after 3 h, B. burgdorferi-induced IL-1 beta mRNA showed biphasic elevations at 3 and 18 h. B. burgdorferi-induced IL-1ra mRNA peaked at 12 h, whereas LPS-induced IL-1ra mRNA peaked at 9 h. IL-1 beta synthesis increased in response to increasing numbers of spirochetes, whereas IL-1ra synthesis did not. The preferential induction by B. burgdorferi of IL-1 beta over IL-1ra is an example of excess agonist over antagonist synthesis induced by a microbial pathogen, and may contribute to the destructive lesion of Lyme arthritis. Images PMID:1387885

  7. Antitarget Interaction, Acute Toxicity and Protein Binding Studies of Quinazolinedione Sulphonamides as GABA1 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Ajeet; Verma, Mansi; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Diseases characterized by recurrent seizures are known as epilepsy. One of the most important mechanisms for handling it is GABA1 receptor mediated inhibition. In the same context while studying the treatment of epilepsy we observed significant effects by derivatives of sulfonamides, which prompted us to design novel derivatives by means of in silico resources with antiepileptic effects. Molecular docking approaches are routinely used in modern drug design to help understand drug–receptor interaction. This study has been performed with the help of Chemdraw Ultra 7.0, GUSAR online tool for IC50 and LD50 predictions, AutoDock Vina (Python Prescription 0.8), and PaDEL software. Results revealed that ligand-protein interaction affinity of all 10 designed molecules ranges from -5.7 Kcal/mol to -5.2 Kcal/mol, which is approximately comparable to pre-existing GABA1 inhibitor i.e. phenytoin (CID: 1775, ligand-protein interaction affinity is -6.5 Kcal/mol). PMID:27168681

  8. Synergistically acting agonists and antagonists of G protein-coupled receptors prevent photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Palczewska, Grazyna; Masuho, Ikuo; Gao, Songqi; Jin, Hui; Dong, Zhiqian; Gieser, Linn; Brooks, Matthew J; Kiser, Philip D; Kern, Timothy S; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Swaroop, Anand; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell degeneration leads to visual impairment and blindness in several types of retinal disease. However, the discovery of safe and effective therapeutic strategies conferring photoreceptor cell protection remains challenging. Targeting distinct cellular pathways with low doses of different drugs that produce a functionally synergistic effect could provide a strategy for preventing or treating retinal dystrophies. We took a systems pharmacology approach to identify potential combination therapies using a mouse model of light-induced retinal degeneration. We showed that a combination of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs that act on different G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibited synergistic activity that protected retinas from light-induced degeneration even when each drug was administered at a low dose. In functional assays, the combined effects of these drugs were stimulation of Gi/o signaling by activating the dopamine receptors D2R and D4R, as well as inhibition of Gs and Gq signaling by antagonizing D1R and the α1A-adrenergic receptor ADRA1A, respectively. Moreover, transcriptome analyses demonstrated that such combined GPCR-targeted treatments preserved patterns of retinal gene expression that were more similar to those of the normal retina than did higher-dose monotherapy. Our study thus supports a systems pharmacology approach to identify treatments for retinopathies, an approach that could extend to other complex disorders. PMID:27460988

  9. Phosphorylation and calcium antagonistically tune myosin-binding protein C's structure and function.

    PubMed

    Previs, Michael J; Mun, Ji Young; Michalek, Arthur J; Previs, Samantha Beck; Gulick, James; Robbins, Jeffrey; Warshaw, David M; Craig, Roger

    2016-03-22

    During each heartbeat, cardiac contractility results from calcium-activated sliding of actin thin filaments toward the centers of myosin thick filaments to shorten cellular length. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is a component of the thick filament that appears to tune these mechanochemical interactions by its N-terminal domains transiently interacting with actin and/or the myosin S2 domain, sensitizing thin filaments to calcium and governing maximal sliding velocity. Both functional mechanisms are potentially further tunable by phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered, extensible region of cMyBP-C's N terminus, the M-domain. Using atomic force spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and mutant protein expression, we demonstrate that phosphorylation reduced the M-domain's extensibility and shifted the conformation of the N-terminal domain from an extended structure to a compact configuration. In combination with motility assay data, these structural effects of M-domain phosphorylation suggest a mechanism for diminishing the functional potency of individual cMyBP-C molecules. Interestingly, we found that calcium levels necessary to maximally activate the thin filament mitigated the structural effects of phosphorylation by increasing M-domain extensibility and shifting the phosphorylated N-terminal fragments back to the extended state, as if unphosphorylated. Functionally, the addition of calcium to the motility assays ablated the impact of phosphorylation on maximal sliding velocities, fully restoring cMyBP-C's inhibitory capacity. We conclude that M-domain phosphorylation may have its greatest effect on tuning cMyBP-C's calcium-sensitization of thin filaments at the low calcium levels between contractions. Importantly, calcium levels at the peak of contraction would allow cMyBP-C to remain a potent contractile modulator, regardless of cMyBP-C's phosphorylation state.

  10. Antagonist-induced micro-opioid receptor up-regulation decreases G-protein receptor kinase-2 and dynamin-2 abundance in mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Gomes, Benedict; Patel, Chintan; Yoburn, Byron C

    2002-06-20

    Chronic treatment with opioid receptor antagonists has been shown to increase the density of micro-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in cell culture and in the intact animal. Although opioid receptor antagonist-induced up-regulation is a robust phenomenon, the mechanisms responsible for the increase in receptor density remain unclear. In the present study, changes in a kinase and a GTPase that have been implicated in G-protein-coupled receptor regulation were examined following opioid receptor antagonist treatment. Mice were implanted s.c. with a naltrexone pellet or placebo pellet. On the eighth day following implantation, spinal cord was removed and G-protein receptor kinase-2 (GRK-2) and dynamin-2 abundance were determined using a quantitative immunoblot approach. Changes in micro-opioid receptor density were also determined. Naltrexone treatment produced a significant (145%) increase in micro-opioid receptor density. Naltrexone treatment was associated with a significant 36% decrease in GRK-2 and 30% decrease in dynamin-2 abundance in spinal cord. These data raise the possibility that opioid receptor antagonist-induced micro-opioid receptor up-regulation in the intact animal may be due to a reduction in constitutive internalization of opioid receptors.

  11. Discovery of the First α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Antagonist Dependent upon Transmembrane AMPA Receptor Regulatory Protein (TARP) γ-8.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon K; Ornstein, Paul L; Spinazze, Patrick; Stevens, F Craig; Hahn, Patric; Hollinshead, Sean P; Mayhugh, Daniel; Schkeryantz, Jeff; Khilevich, Albert; De Frutos, Oscar; Gleason, Scott D; Kato, Akihiko S; Luffer-Atlas, Debra; Desai, Prashant V; Swanson, Steven; Burris, Kevin D; Ding, Chunjin; Heinz, Beverly A; Need, Anne B; Barth, Vanessa N; Stephenson, Gregory A; Diseroad, Benjamin A; Woods, Tim A; Yu, Hong; Bredt, David; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-05-26

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are a family of scaffolding proteins that regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function. TARP γ-8 is one member of this family and is highly expressed within the hippocampus relative to the cerebellum. A selective TARP γ-8-dependent AMPA receptor antagonist (TDAA) is an innovative approach to modulate AMPA receptors in specific brain regions to potentially increase the therapeutic index relative to known non-TARP-dependent AMPA antagonists. We describe here, for the first time, the discovery of a noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist that is dependent on the presence of TARP γ-8. Three major iteration cycles were employed to improve upon potency, CYP1A2-dependent challenges, and in vivo clearance. An optimized molecule, compound (-)-25 (LY3130481), was fully protective against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in rats without the motor impairment associated with non-TARP-dependent AMPA receptor antagonists. Compound (-)-25 could be utilized to provide proof of concept for antiepileptic efficacy with reduced motor side effects in patients. PMID:27067148

  12. Screening and Characterization of Hydrate Forms of T-3256336, a Novel Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) Protein Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shoko; Kojima, Takashi; Hashimoto, Kentaro; Saito, Bunnai; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu; Ikeda, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Different crystal packing of hydrates from anhydrate crystals leads to different physical properties, such as solubility and stability. Investigation of the potential of varied hydrate formation, and understanding the stability in an anhydrous/hydrate system, are crucial to prevent an undesired transition during the manufacturing process and storage. Only one anhydrous form of T-3256336, a novel inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) protein antagonist, was discovered during synthesis, and no hydrate form has been identified. In this study, we conducted hydrate screening such as dynamic water vapor sorption/desorption (DVS), and the slurry experiment, and characterized the solid-state properties of anhydrous/hydrate forms to determine the most desirable crystalline form for development. New hydrate forms, both mono-hydrate and hemi-hydrate forms, were discovered as a result of this hydrate screening. The characterization of two new hydrate forms was conducted, and the anhydrous form was determined to be the most desirable development form of T-3256336 in terms of solid-state stability. In addition, the stability of the anhydrous form was investigated using the water content and temperature controlled slurry experiment to obtain the desirable crystal form in the crystallization process. The water content regions of the stable phase of the desired form, the anhydrous form, were identified for the cooling crystallization process. PMID:26521850

  13. Polycomb group protein bodybuilding: working out the routines.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Cem; Paro, Renato

    2013-09-30

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate gene expression by modifying chemical and structural properties of chromatin. Isono et al. (2013) now report in Developmental Cell a polymerization-dependent mechanism used by PcG proteins to form higher-order chromatin structures, referred to as Polycomb bodies, and demonstrate its necessity for gene silencing.

  14. Four Tomato FLOWERING LOCUS T-Like Proteins Act Antagonistically to Regulate Floral Initiation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Cui, Lirong; Zhou, Xiaoting; Ye, Lin; Zou, Zhirong; Deng, Shulin

    2015-01-01

    The transition from vegetative growth to floral meristems in higher plants is regulated through the integration of internal cues and environmental signals. We were interested to examine the molecular mechanism of flowering in the day-neutral plant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and the effect of environmental conditions on tomato flowering. Analysis of the tomato genome uncovered 13 PEBP (phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein) genes, and found six of them were FT-like genes which named as SlSP3D, SlSP6A, SlSP5G, SlSP5G1, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3. Six FT-like genes were analyzed to clarify their functional roles in flowering using transgenic and expression analyses. We found that SlSP5G, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3 proteins were floral inhibitors whereas only SlSP3D/SFT (SINGLE FLOWER TRUSS) was a floral inducer. SlSP5G was expressed at higher levels in long day (LD) conditions compared to short day (SD) conditions while SlSP5G2 and SlSP5G3 showed the opposite expression patterns. The silencing of SlSP5G by VIGS (Virus induced gene silencing) resulted in tomato plants that flowered early under LD conditions and the silencing of SlSP5G2 and SlSP5G3 led to early flowering under SD conditions. The higher expression levels of SlSP5G under LD conditions were not seen in phyB1 mutants, and the expression levels of SlSP5G2 and SlSP5G3 were increased in phyB1 mutants under both SD and LD conditions compared to wild type plants. These data suggest that SlSP5G, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3 are controlled by photoperiod, and the different expression patterns of FT-like genes under different photoperiod may contribute to tomato being a day neutral plant. In addition, PHYB1 mediate the expression of SlSP5G, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3 to regulate flowering in tomato.

  15. Four Tomato FLOWERING LOCUS T-Like Proteins Act Antagonistically to Regulate Floral Initiation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Cui, Lirong; Zhou, Xiaoting; Ye, Lin; Zou, Zhirong; Deng, Shulin

    2015-01-01

    The transition from vegetative growth to floral meristems in higher plants is regulated through the integration of internal cues and environmental signals. We were interested to examine the molecular mechanism of flowering in the day-neutral plant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and the effect of environmental conditions on tomato flowering. Analysis of the tomato genome uncovered 13 PEBP (phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein) genes, and found six of them were FT-like genes which named as SlSP3D, SlSP6A, SlSP5G, SlSP5G1, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3. Six FT-like genes were analyzed to clarify their functional roles in flowering using transgenic and expression analyses. We found that SlSP5G, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3 proteins were floral inhibitors whereas only SlSP3D/SFT (SINGLE FLOWER TRUSS) was a floral inducer. SlSP5G was expressed at higher levels in long day (LD) conditions compared to short day (SD) conditions while SlSP5G2 and SlSP5G3 showed the opposite expression patterns. The silencing of SlSP5G by VIGS (Virus induced gene silencing) resulted in tomato plants that flowered early under LD conditions and the silencing of SlSP5G2 and SlSP5G3 led to early flowering under SD conditions. The higher expression levels of SlSP5G under LD conditions were not seen in phyB1 mutants, and the expression levels of SlSP5G2 and SlSP5G3 were increased in phyB1 mutants under both SD and LD conditions compared to wild type plants. These data suggest that SlSP5G, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3 are controlled by photoperiod, and the different expression patterns of FT-like genes under different photoperiod may contribute to tomato being a day neutral plant. In addition, PHYB1 mediate the expression of SlSP5G, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3 to regulate flowering in tomato. PMID:26793202

  16. Four Tomato FLOWERING LOCUS T-Like Proteins Act Antagonistically to Regulate Floral Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Kai; Cui, Lirong; Zhou, Xiaoting; Ye, Lin; Zou, Zhirong; Deng, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    The transition from vegetative growth to floral meristems in higher plants is regulated through the integration of internal cues and environmental signals. We were interested to examine the molecular mechanism of flowering in the day-neutral plant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and the effect of environmental conditions on tomato flowering. Analysis of the tomato genome uncovered 13 PEBP (phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein) genes, and found six of them were FT-like genes which named as SlSP3D, SlSP6A, SlSP5G, SlSP5G1, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3. Six FT-like genes were analyzed to clarify their functional roles in flowering using transgenic and expression analyses. We found that SlSP5G, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3 proteins were floral inhibitors whereas only SlSP3D/SFT (SINGLE FLOWER TRUSS) was a floral inducer. SlSP5G was expressed at higher levels in long day (LD) conditions compared to short day (SD) conditions while SlSP5G2 and SlSP5G3 showed the opposite expression patterns. The silencing of SlSP5G by VIGS (Virus induced gene silencing) resulted in tomato plants that flowered early under LD conditions and the silencing of SlSP5G2 and SlSP5G3 led to early flowering under SD conditions. The higher expression levels of SlSP5G under LD conditions were not seen in phyB1 mutants, and the expression levels of SlSP5G2 and SlSP5G3 were increased in phyB1 mutants under both SD and LD conditions compared to wild type plants. These data suggest that SlSP5G, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3 are controlled by photoperiod, and the different expression patterns of FT-like genes under different photoperiod may contribute to tomato being a day neutral plant. In addition, PHYB1 mediate the expression of SlSP5G, SlSP5G2, and SlSP5G3 to regulate flowering in tomato. PMID:26793202

  17. Epigenetic inactivation of the canonical Wnt antagonist secreted frizzled-related protein 1 in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Li, J; Sun, C Y; Zhou, Y; Zhao, Y F; Zhang, S J

    2012-01-01

    Secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1), as one of most important Wnt antagonists, is frequently silenced by promoter hypermethylation in many types of tumor, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we aimed to investigate whether restoration of sFRP1 affected HCC metastatic behavior. sFRP1 mRNA expression and promoter methylation in HCC tissues and cell lines were examined using RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR), respectively. sFRP1 protein expression was assessed by Western Blot. We generated stable HCC cell line restoration of sFRP1 in HepG2 cells, which naturally do not express detectable sFRP1 mRNA. The effects of exogenous sFRP1 on HepG2 cell invasion were investigated using trans-well assay. Also the effects of sFRP1 re-expression on the β-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent transcription activity was measured by luciferase assay.sFRP1 promoter methylation was frequently observed in HCC tissues (60%) and cell lines (75%). All samples with sFRP1 methylation showed down-regulation of sFRP1 expression in HCC cell lines. Demethylation treatment with 5-aza-20-deoxycytidine in HCC cells restored sFRP1 expression. Restoration of sFRP1 substantially impaired the invasive potentials of HepG2 cells. Moreover, exogenous sFRP1 caused significant decrease of β-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent transcription activity.These findings demonstrate that sFRP1 silencing due to promoter hypermethylation is a major event during tumorigenesis. sFRP1 is also a negative modulator of canonical Wnt signaling, which could contribute to metastasis in HCC progression, thus providing a possible therapeutic strategy against HCC. PMID:22296502

  18. Kisspeptin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Roseweir, Antonia Kathryn; Millar, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin is now known to be an important regulator of the hypothalamic--pituitary-gonadal axis and is the target of a range of regulators, such as steroid hormone feedback, nutritional and metabolic regulation. Kisspeptin binds to its cognate receptor, KISS1R (also called GPR54), on GnRH neurons and stimulates their activity, which in turn provides an obligatory signal for GnRH secretion-thus gating down-stream events supporting reproduction. The development of peripherally active kisspeptin antagonists could offer a unique therapeutic agent for treating hormone-dependent disorders of reproduction, including precocious puberty, endometriosis, and metastatic prostate cancer. The following chapter discusses the advances made in the search for both peptide and small molecule kisspeptin antagonists and their use in delineating the role of kisspeptin within the reproductive system. To date, four peptide antagonists and one small molecule antagonist have been designed.

  19. Protein kinase C-alpha and -beta play antagonistic roles in the differentiation process of THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Dieter, P; Schwende, H

    2000-05-01

    The roles of protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes in the differentiation process of THP-1 cells are investigated. Inhibition of PKC by RO 31-8220 reduces the phagocytosis of latex particles and the release of superoxide, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. The proliferation of THP-1 cells is slightly enhanced by RO 31-8220. Stable transfection of THP-1 cells with asPKC-alpha, and incubation of THP-1 cells with antisense (as) PKC-alpha oligodeoxynucleotides reduces PKC-alpha levels and PKC activity. asPKC-alpha-transfected THP-1 cells show a decreased phagocytosis and a decreased release of superoxide, PGE(2) and TNF-alpha. The proliferation of asPKC-alpha-transfected THP-1 cells is enhanced. Stable transfection of THP-1 cells with asPKC-beta, and incubation of THP-1 cells with asPKC-beta oligodeoxynucleotides, reduces PKC-beta levels and PKC activity. asPKC-beta-transfected THP-1 cells show a decreased phagocytosis, a decreased TNF-alpha release, and a decreased proliferation. However, no difference is measured in the release of superoxide and PGE(2). These results suggest that: (1) PKC-alpha but not PKC-beta is involved in the release of superoxide and PGE(2); (2) TNF-alpha release and the phagocytosis of latex particles are mediated by PKC-alpha, PKC-beta, and other PKC isoenzymes; and (3) PKC-alpha and PKC-beta play antagonistic roles in the differentiation process of THP-1 cells. PKC-alpha promotes the differentiation process of THP-1 cells, PKC-beta retards the differentiation of THP-1 cells into macrophage-like cells. PMID:10822170

  20. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and tumor necrosis factor binding protein decrease osteoclast formation and bone resorption in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, R; Kimble, R B; Vannice, J L; Kung, V T; Pacifici, R

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of IL-1, IL-6, and TNF to the increased osteoclastogenesis induced by estrogen deficiency, ovariectomized (ovx) mice were treated with either IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), a competitive inhibitor of IL-1, TNF binding protein (TNFbp), an inhibitor of TNF, or the anti-IL-6 antibody (Ab) 20F3 for the first 2 wk after surgery. ovx increased the bone marrow cells secretion of IL-1 and TNF, but not IL-6, and the formation of TRAP-positive osteoclast-like multinucleated cells (MNCs) in bone marrow cultures treated with 1,25(OH)2D3. The increase in MNC formation induced by ovx was prevented by in vivo treatment with either 17 beta estradiol, IL-1ra, TNFbp, or anti-IL-6 Ab. However, the percent change in MNC formation induced by the anti-IL-6 Ab was similar in ovx and sham-operated animals, whereas IL-1ra and TNFbp were effective only in ovx mice. MNC formation was also decreased by in vitro treatment of bone marrow cultures with IL-1ra and TNFbp, but not with anti-IL-6 Ab. Ovx also increased bone resorption in vivo and in vitro, as assessed by the urinary excretion of pyridinoline cross links and the formation of resorption pits, respectively. IL-1ra, TNFbp and estrogen decreased bone resorption in vivo and in vitro whereas the anti-IL-6 Ab inhibited bone resorption in vitro but not in vivo. In conclusion, these data indicate that IL-1 and TNF play a direct role in mediating the effects of ovx on osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. The data also suggest that IL-6 is not essential for increasing bone resorption in the early postovariectomy period. Images PMID:7989596

  1. Classifying proteins into functional groups based on all-versus-all BLAST of 10 million proteins.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Natali; Higdon, Roger; Broomall, William; Stanberry, Larissa; Welch, Dean; Lu, Wei; Haynes, Winston; Barga, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    To address the monumental challenge of assigning function to millions of sequenced proteins, we completed the first of a kind all-versus-all sequence alignments using BLAST for 9.9 million proteins in the UniRef100 database. Microsoft Windows Azure produced over 3 billion filtered records in 6 days using 475 eight-core virtual machines. Protein classification into functional groups was then performed using Hive and custom jars implemented on top of Apache Hadoop utilizing the MapReduce paradigm. First, using the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database, a length normalized bit score (LNBS) was determined to be the best similarity measure for classification of proteins. LNBS achieved sensitivity and specificity of 98% each. Second, out of 5.1 million bacterial proteins, about two-thirds were assigned to significantly extended COG groups, encompassing 30 times more assigned proteins. Third, the remaining proteins were classified into protein functional groups using an innovative implementation of a single-linkage algorithm on an in-house Hadoop compute cluster. This implementation significantly reduces the run time for nonindexed queries and optimizes efficient clustering on a large scale. The performance was also verified on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This clustering assigned nearly 2 million proteins to approximately half a million different functional groups. A similar approach was applied to classify 2.8 million eukaryotic sequences resulting in over 1 million proteins being assign to existing KOG groups and the remainder clustered into 100,000 functional groups. PMID:21809957

  2. An intracellular allosteric site for a specific class of antagonists of the CC chemokine G protein-coupled receptors CCR4 and CCR5.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Glen; Jones, Carolyn; Wreggett, Keith A

    2008-03-01

    A novel mechanism for antagonism of the human chemokine receptors CCR4 and CCR5 has been discovered with a series of small-molecule compounds that seems to interact with an allosteric, intracellular site on the receptor. The existence of this site is supported by a series of observations: 1) intracellular access of these antagonists is required for their activity; 2) specific, saturable binding of a radiolabeled antagonist requires the presence of CCR4; and 3) through engineering receptor chimeras by reciprocal transfer of C-terminal domains between CCR4 and CCR5, compound binding and the selective structure-activity relationships for antagonism of these receptors seem to be associated with the integrity of that intracellular region. Published antagonists from other chemical series do not seem to bind to the novel site, and their interaction with either CCR4 or CCR5 is not affected by alteration of the C-terminal domain. The precise location of the proposed binding site remains to be determined, but the known close association of the C-terminal domain, including helix 8, as a proposed intracellular region that interacts with transduction proteins (e.g., G proteins and beta-arrestin) suggests that this could be a generic allosteric site for chemokine receptors and perhaps more broadly for class A G protein-coupled receptors. The existence of such a site that can be targeted for drug discovery has implications for screening assays for receptor antagonists, which would need, therefore, to consider compound properties for access to this intracellular site.

  3. Genetic Incorporation of a Reactive Isothiocyanate Group into Proteins.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Weimin; Li, Jack; Luo, Xiaozhou; Schultz, Peter G

    2016-08-16

    Methods for the site-specific modification of proteins are useful for introducing biological probes into proteins and engineering proteins with novel activities. Herein, we genetically encode a novel noncanonical amino acid (ncAA) that contains an aryl isothiocyanate group which can form stable thiourea crosslinks with amines under mild conditions. We show that this ncAA (pNCSF) allows the selective conjugation of proteins to amine-containing molecular probes through formation of a thiourea bridge. pNCSF was also used to replace a native salt bridge in myoglobin with an intramolecular crosslink to a proximal Lys residue, leading to increased thermal stability. Finally, we show that pNCSF can form stable intermolecular crosslinks between two interacting proteins. PMID:27418387

  4. The TRIM-NHL Protein LIN-41 and the OMA RNA-Binding Proteins Antagonistically Control the Prophase-to-Metaphase Transition and Growth of Caenorhabditis elegans Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Spike, Caroline A.; Coetzee, Donna; Eichten, Carly; Wang, Xin; Hansen, Dave; Greenstein, David

    2014-01-01

    In many animals, oocytes enter meiosis early in their development but arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this arrest period, enables the acquisition of meiotic competence and the capacity to produce healthy progeny. Meiotic resumption, or meiotic maturation, involves the transition to metaphase I (M phase) and is regulated by intercellular signaling and cyclin-dependent kinase activation. Premature meiotic maturation would be predicted to diminish fertility as the timing of this event, which normally occurs after oocyte growth is complete, is crucial. In the accompanying article in this issue, we identify the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 as a translational repressor that copurifies with OMA-1 and OMA-2, RNA-binding proteins redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. In this article, we show that LIN-41 enables the production of high-quality oocytes and plays an essential role in controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. lin-41 null mutants display a striking defect that is specific to oogenesis: pachytene-stage cells cellularize prematurely and fail to progress to diplotene. Instead, these cells activate CDK-1, enter M phase, assemble spindles, and attempt to segregate chromosomes. Translational derepression of the CDK-1 activator CDC-25.3 appears to contribute to premature M-phase entry in lin-41 mutant oocytes. Genetic and phenotypic analyses indicate that LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 exhibit an antagonistic relationship, and we suggest that translational regulation by these proteins could be important for controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. PMID:25261698

  5. The TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 and the OMA RNA-binding proteins antagonistically control the prophase-to-metaphase transition and growth of Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes.

    PubMed

    Spike, Caroline A; Coetzee, Donna; Eichten, Carly; Wang, Xin; Hansen, Dave; Greenstein, David

    2014-12-01

    In many animals, oocytes enter meiosis early in their development but arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this arrest period, enables the acquisition of meiotic competence and the capacity to produce healthy progeny. Meiotic resumption, or meiotic maturation, involves the transition to metaphase I (M phase) and is regulated by intercellular signaling and cyclin-dependent kinase activation. Premature meiotic maturation would be predicted to diminish fertility as the timing of this event, which normally occurs after oocyte growth is complete, is crucial. In the accompanying article in this issue, we identify the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 as a translational repressor that copurifies with OMA-1 and OMA-2, RNA-binding proteins redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. In this article, we show that LIN-41 enables the production of high-quality oocytes and plays an essential role in controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. lin-41 null mutants display a striking defect that is specific to oogenesis: pachytene-stage cells cellularize prematurely and fail to progress to diplotene. Instead, these cells activate CDK-1, enter M phase, assemble spindles, and attempt to segregate chromosomes. Translational derepression of the CDK-1 activator CDC-25.3 appears to contribute to premature M-phase entry in lin-41 mutant oocytes. Genetic and phenotypic analyses indicate that LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 exhibit an antagonistic relationship, and we suggest that translational regulation by these proteins could be important for controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation.

  6. The TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 and the OMA RNA-binding proteins antagonistically control the prophase-to-metaphase transition and growth of Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes.

    PubMed

    Spike, Caroline A; Coetzee, Donna; Eichten, Carly; Wang, Xin; Hansen, Dave; Greenstein, David

    2014-12-01

    In many animals, oocytes enter meiosis early in their development but arrest in meiotic prophase I. Oocyte growth, which occurs during this arrest period, enables the acquisition of meiotic competence and the capacity to produce healthy progeny. Meiotic resumption, or meiotic maturation, involves the transition to metaphase I (M phase) and is regulated by intercellular signaling and cyclin-dependent kinase activation. Premature meiotic maturation would be predicted to diminish fertility as the timing of this event, which normally occurs after oocyte growth is complete, is crucial. In the accompanying article in this issue, we identify the highly conserved TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 as a translational repressor that copurifies with OMA-1 and OMA-2, RNA-binding proteins redundantly required for normal oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. In this article, we show that LIN-41 enables the production of high-quality oocytes and plays an essential role in controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. lin-41 null mutants display a striking defect that is specific to oogenesis: pachytene-stage cells cellularize prematurely and fail to progress to diplotene. Instead, these cells activate CDK-1, enter M phase, assemble spindles, and attempt to segregate chromosomes. Translational derepression of the CDK-1 activator CDC-25.3 appears to contribute to premature M-phase entry in lin-41 mutant oocytes. Genetic and phenotypic analyses indicate that LIN-41 and OMA-1/2 exhibit an antagonistic relationship, and we suggest that translational regulation by these proteins could be important for controlling and coordinating oocyte growth and meiotic maturation. PMID:25261698

  7. Purification and partial characterization of a novel calcium-binding protein from Bacillus cereus T spores and inhibition of germination by calmodulin antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding protein has been purified from the dormant spores of Bacillus cereus T. B. cereus T spores were extensively washed, broken, and heated at 90{degree}C for 2 min. Using calcium-dependent hydrophobic interaction chromatography plus DEAE-cellulose and hydroxylapatite columns, a single protein was obtained which possessed calcium-binding capacity and some characteristics of calmodulin. This heat-stable protein was retained by hydrophobic matrices or a calmodulin antagonist in a calcium-dependent manner. The crude spore extract displaced bovine brain calmodulin from its antibody in a radioimmunoassay and the immunoreactive specific activity of the partially purified fraction which eluted from phenyl-Sepharose was ca. 200-fold greater than the crude spore extract. Purity of this protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. Calcium-binding ability was verified with a competitive calcium binding assay using Chelex-100 resin and {sup 45}Ca autoradiography. SDS-PAGE and amino acid composition indicated the molecular weight of the protein was 24-kDa. The effects of two calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) on L-alanine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus T spores were examined by measuring commitment to germination, loss of heat resistance, release of calcium, decrease in optical density at 660 nm and phase-contrast microscopy.

  8. Defining MC1R regulation in human melanocytes by its agonist α-melanocortin and antagonists agouti signaling protein and β-defensin 3.

    PubMed

    Swope, Viki B; Jameson, Joshua A; McFarland, Kevin L; Supp, Dorothy M; Miller, William E; McGraw, Dennis W; Patel, Mira A; Nix, Matthew A; Millhauser, Glenn L; Babcock, George F; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A

    2012-09-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a G(s) protein-coupled receptor, has an important role in human pigmentation. We investigated the regulation of expression and activity of the MC1R in primary human melanocyte cultures. Human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) acted as an antagonist for MC1R, inhibiting the α-melanocortin (α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH))-induced increase in the activities of adenylate cyclase and tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme for melanogenesis. α-Melanocortin and forskolin, which activate adenylate cyclase, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, which activates protein kinase C, increased, whereas exposure to UV radiation reduced, MC1R gene and membrane protein expression. Brief treatment with α-MSH resulted in MC1R desensitization, whereas continuous treatment up to 3 hours caused a steady rise in cAMP, suggesting receptor recycling. Pretreatment with agouti signaling protein or HBD3 prohibited responsiveness to α-MSH, but not forskolin, suggesting receptor desensitization by these antagonists. Melanocytes from different donors expressed different levels of the G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) 2, 3, 5, and 6, as well as β-arrestin 1. Therefore, in addition to the MC1R genotype, regulation of MC1R expression and activity is expected to affect human pigmentation and the responses to UV.

  9. The zipper groups of the amyloid state of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, James C.

    2013-04-01

    A formal derivation is provided of the 15 symmetry groups (zipper groups) available to the amyloid homosteric zipper. Fibrous proteins in the amyloid state are found both associated with numerous diseases and in the normal functions of cells. Amyloid fibers contain a repetitive spine, commonly built from a pair of β-sheets whose β-strands run perpendicular to the fiber direction and whose side chains interdigitate, much like the teeth of a zipper. In fiber spines known as homosteric zippers, identical protein segments sharing identical packing environments make the two β-sheets. In previous work based on atomic resolution crystal structures of homosteric zippers derived from a dozen proteins, the symmetries of homosteric zippers were categorized into eight classes. Here, it is shown through a formal derivation that each homosteric zipper class corresponds to a unique set of symmetry groups termed ‘zipper groups’. Furthermore, the eight previously identified classes do not account for all of the 15 possible zipper groups, which may be categorized into the complete set of ten classes. Because of their foundations in group theory, the 15 zipper groups provide a mathematically rigorous classification for homosteric zippers.

  10. Protein profiles and immunoreactivities of Acanthamoeba morphological groups and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pumidonming, Wilawan; Koehsler, Martina; Leitsch, David; Walochnik, Julia

    2014-11-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protozoan found in a wide variety of habitats. A classification of Acanthamoeba into currently eighteen genotypes (T1-T18) has been established, however, data on differences between genotypes on the protein level are scarce. The aim of this study was to compare protein and immunoreactivity profiles of Acanthamoeba genotypes. Thirteen strains, both clinical and non-clinical, from genotypes T4, T5, T6, T7, T9, T11 and T12, representing three morphological groups, were investigated for their protein profiles and IgG, IgM and IgA immunoreactivities. It was shown that protein and immunoreactivity profiles of Acanthamoeba genotypes T4, T5, T6, T7, T9, T11 and T12 are clearly distinct from each other, but the banding patterns correlate to the morphological groups. Normal human sera revealed anti-Acanthamoeba antibodies against isolates of all investigated genotypes, interestingly, however only very weak IgM and virtually no IgA immunoreactivity with T7 and T9, both representing morphological group I. The strongest IgG, IgM and IgA immunoreactivities were observed for genotypes T4, T5 and T6. Differences of both, protein and immunological patterns, between cytopathic and non-cytopathic strains, particularly within genotype T4, were not at the level of banding patterns, but rather in expression levels.

  11. Banana Ovate family protein MaOFP1 and MADS-box protein MuMADS1 antagonistically regulated banana fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juhua; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Wei; Miao, Hongxia; Zhang, Jianbin; Jia, Caihong; Wang, Zhuo; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The ovate family protein named MaOFP1 was identified in banana (Musa acuminata L.AAA) fruit by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) method using the banana MADS-box gene MuMADS1 as bait and a 2 day postharvest (DPH) banana fruit cDNA library as prey. The interaction between MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 was further confirmed by Y2H and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) methods, which showed that the MuMADS1 K domain interacted with MaOFP1. Real-time quantitative PCR evaluation of MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 expression patterns in banana showed that they are highly expressed in 0 DPH fruit, but present in low levels in the stem, which suggests that simultaneous but different expression patterns exist for both MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 in different tissues and developing fruits. Meanwhile, MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 expression was highly stimulated and greatly suppressed, respectively, by exogenous ethylene. In contrast, MaOFP1 expression was highly stimulated while MuMADS1 was greatly suppressed by the ethylene competitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP). These results indicate that MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 are antagonistically regulated by ethylene and might play important roles in postharvest banana fruit ripening. PMID:25886169

  12. Banana Ovate Family Protein MaOFP1 and MADS-Box Protein MuMADS1 Antagonistically Regulated Banana Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Miao, Hongxia; Zhang, Jianbin; Jia, Caihong; Wang, Zhuo; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The ovate family protein named MaOFP1 was identified in banana (Musa acuminata L.AAA) fruit by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) method using the banana MADS-box gene MuMADS1 as bait and a 2 day postharvest (DPH) banana fruit cDNA library as prey. The interaction between MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 was further confirmed by Y2H and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) methods, which showed that the MuMADS1 K domain interacted with MaOFP1. Real-time quantitative PCR evaluation of MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 expression patterns in banana showed that they are highly expressed in 0 DPH fruit, but present in low levels in the stem, which suggests that simultaneous but different expression patterns exist for both MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 in different tissues and developing fruits. Meanwhile, MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 expression was highly stimulated and greatly suppressed, respectively, by exogenous ethylene. In contrast, MaOFP1 expression was highly stimulated while MuMADS1 was greatly suppressed by the ethylene competitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP). These results indicate that MuMADS1 and MaOFP1 are antagonistically regulated by ethylene and might play important roles in postharvest banana fruit ripening. PMID:25886169

  13. pK values of the ionizable groups of proteins.

    PubMed

    Thurlkill, Richard L; Grimsley, Gerald R; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2006-05-01

    We have used potentiometric titrations to measure the pK values of the ionizable groups of proteins in alanine pentapeptides with appropriately blocked termini. These pentapeptides provide an improved model for the pK values of the ionizable groups in proteins. Our pK values determined in 0.1 M KCl at 25 degrees C are: 3.67+/-0.03 (alpha-carboxyl), 3.67+/-0.04 (Asp), 4.25+/-0.05 (Glu), 6.54+/-0.04 (His), 8.00+/-0.03 (alpha-amino), 8.55+/-0.03 (Cys), 9.84+/-0.11 (Tyr), and 10.40+/-0.08 (Lys). The pK values of some groups differ from the Nozaki and Tanford (N & T) pK values often used in the literature: Asp (3.67 this work vs. 4.0 N & T); His (6.54 this work vs. 6.3 N & T); alpha-amino (8.00 this work vs. 7.5 N & T); Cys (8.55 this work vs. 9.5 N & T); and Tyr (9.84 this work vs. 9.6 N & T). Our pK values will be useful to those who study pK perturbations in folded and unfolded proteins, and to those who use theory to gain a better understanding of the factors that determine the pK values of the ionizable groups of proteins. PMID:16597822

  14. The Meat and Protein Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the meat and protein group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words…

  15. Endothelin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Benigni, A; Remuzzi, G

    1999-01-01

    The very potent endogenous vasoconstrictor endothelin was discovered in 1988. We know now that there are three isoforms (1, 2, and 3) and two receptor subtypes (A and B). A whole range of peptide and non-peptide antagonists has been developed, some selective for A or B receptors and others with non-selective A/B antagonistic activity. So far the main application of these agents has been experimental--ie, endothelin blockers are used to throw light on disease mechanisms, most notably cardiovascular and renal. However, the non-selective antagonist bosentan and a few other agents have been studied clinically. Evidence so far from preclinical studies and healthy volunteers and from the limited number of investigations in patients permits a listing of the potential areas of clinical interest. These are mainly cardiovascular (eg, hypertension, cerebrovascular damage, and possibly heart failure) and renal. Clouds on the horizon are the need to show that these new agents are better than existing drugs; the possibility of conflicting actions if mixed A/B antagonists are used; and animal evidence hinting that endothelin blockade during development could be dangerous.

  16. Role of the alpha-amino group of protein in ubiquitin-mediated protein breakdown.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Heller, H; Eytan, E; Kaklij, G; Rose, I A

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the conjugation of ubiquitin to NH2 groups of proteins is required for protein breakdown. We now show that the selective modification of NH2-terminal alpha-NH2 groups of globin and lysozyme prevents their degradation by the ubiquitin proteolytic system from reticulocytes. The conjugation by ubiquitin of epsilon-NH2 groups of lysine residues, usually seen in multiples, was also inhibited in alpha-NH2-blocked proteins. Naturally occurring N alpha-acetylated proteins are not degraded by the ubiquitin system at a significant rate, while their nonacetylated counterparts from other species are good substrates. This suggests that one function of N alpha-acetylation of cellular proteins is to prevent their degradation by the ubiquitin system. alpha-NH2-blocked proteins can have their activity as substrates for degradation increased by incorporation of alpha-NH2 groups through the introduction of polyalanine side chains. Proteins in which most epsilon-NH2 groups are blocked but the alpha-NH2 group is free are degraded by the ubiquitin system, but at a reduced rate. It is therefore suggested that the exposure of a free NH2 terminus of proteins is required for degradation and probably initiates the formation of ubiquitin conjugates committed for degradation. Images PMID:6095265

  17. Binding of fusion protein FLSC IgG1 to CCR5 is enhanced by CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Latinovic, Olga; Schneider, Kate; Szmacinski, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Heredia, Alonso; Redfield, Robert R

    2014-12-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is crucial for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, acting as the principal coreceptor for HIV-1 entry and transmission and is thus an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Studies have suggested that CCR5 surface density and its conformational changes subsequent to virion engagement are rate limiting for entry, and consequently, infection. Not all CCR5 antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection, suggesting a need for more potent reagents. Here we evaluated full length single chain (FLSC) IgG1, a novel IgG-CD4-gp120(BAL) fusion protein with several characteristics that make it an attractive candidate for treatment of HIV-1 infections, including bivalency and a potentially increased serum half-life over FLSC, the parental molecule. FLSC IgG1 binds two domains on CCR5, the N-terminus and the second extracellular loop, lowering the levels of available CCR5 viral attachment sites. Furthermore, FLSC IgG1 synergizes with Maraviroc (MVC), the only licensed CCR5 antagonist. In this study, we used both microscopy and functional assays to address the mechanistic aspects of the interactions of FLSC IgG1 and MVC in the context of CCR5 conformational changes and viral infection. We used a novel stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), based on high resolution localization of photoswitchable dyes to visualize direct contacts between FLSC IgG1 and CCR5. We compared viral entry inhibition by FLSC IgG1 with that of other CCR5 blockers and showed FLSC IgG1 to be the most potent. We also showed that lower CCR5 surface densities in HIV-1 infected primary cells result in lower FLSC IgG1 EC50 values. In addition, CCR5 binding by FLSC IgG1, but not CCR5 Ab 2D7, was significantly increased when cells were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC allosterically increases exposure of the FLSC IgG1 binding site. These data have implications for future antiviral therapy development.

  18. A potent and orally active antagonist (SM-406/AT-406) of multiple inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in clinical development for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qian; Sun, Haiying; Peng, Yuefeng; Lu, Jianfeng; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; McEachern, Donna; Liu, Liu; Qiu, Su; Yang, Chao-Yie; Miller, Rebecca; Yi, Han; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Duxin; Kang, Sanmao; Guo, Ming; Leopold, Lance; Yang, Dajun; Wang, Shaomeng

    2011-04-28

    We report the discovery and characterization of SM-406 (compound 2), a potent and orally bioavailable Smac mimetic and an antagonist of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). This compound binds to XIAP, cIAP1, and cIAP2 proteins with K(i) of 66.4, 1.9, and 5.1 nM, respectively. Compound 2 effectively antagonizes XIAP BIR3 protein in a cell-free functional assay, induces rapid degradation of cellular cIAP1 protein, and inhibits cancer cell growth in various human cancer cell lines. It has good oral bioavailability in mice, rats, non-human primates, and dogs, is highly effective in induction of apoptosis in xenograft tumors, and is capable of complete inhibition of tumor growth. Compound 2 is currently in phase I clinical trials for the treatment of human cancer.

  19. Chromatin topology is coupled to Polycomb group protein subnuclear organization

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Ajazul H.; Boettiger, Alistair N.; Schorderet, Patrick; Ergun, Ayla; Münger, Christine; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Kingston, Robert E.; Francis, Nicole J.

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of metazoa are organized at multiple scales. Many proteins that regulate genome architecture, including Polycomb group (PcG) proteins, form subnuclear structures. Deciphering mechanistic links between protein organization and chromatin architecture requires precise description and mechanistic perturbations of both. Using super-resolution microscopy, here we show that PcG proteins are organized into hundreds of nanoscale protein clusters. We manipulated PcG clusters by disrupting the polymerization activity of the sterile alpha motif (SAM) of the PcG protein Polyhomeotic (Ph) or by increasing Ph levels. Ph with mutant SAM disrupts clustering of endogenous PcG complexes and chromatin interactions while elevating Ph level increases cluster number and chromatin interactions. These effects can be captured by molecular simulations based on a previously described chromatin polymer model. Both perturbations also alter gene expression. Organization of PcG proteins into small, abundant clusters on chromatin through Ph SAM polymerization activity may shape genome architecture through chromatin interactions. PMID:26759081

  20. The Antagonistic Effect of Selenium on Lead-Induced Inflammatory Factors and Heat Shock Proteins mRNA Expression in Chicken Livers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Li, Shu; Teng, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lead (Pb) poisoning on nitric oxide (NO) content, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of inflammatory factors (nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E synthases (PTGEs), and iNOS), heat shock proteins (HSPs) (HSP27, HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90), and the antagonistic effect of selenium (Se) on Pb in chicken livers. One hundred eighty 7-day-old male chickens were randomly divided into four groups and were fed commercial diet and drinking water, Na2SeO3-added commercial diet and drinking water, commercial diet and (CH3OO)2Pb-added drinking water, and Na2SeO3-added commercial diet and (CH3OO)2Pb-added drinking water, respectively, for 30, 60, and 90 days. Then, NO content, iNOS activity, and the mRNA levels of NF-κB, TNF-α, COX-2, PTGEs, iNOS, HSP27, HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 were examined in chicken livers. The results showed that Pb poisoning induced NO content, iNOS activity, and mRNA expression of inflammation factors and HSPs in chicken livers. In addition, Se alleviated Pb-induced increase of inflammation factor and HSP expression in chicken livers. PMID:26470710

  1. Bicyclic [3.3.0]-Octahydrocyclopenta[c]pyrrolo Antagonists of Retinol Binding Protein 4: Potential Treatment of Atrophic Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Stargardt Disease.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Racz, Boglarka; Freeman, Emily E; Conlon, Michael P; Chen, Ping; Stafford, Douglas G; Schwarz, Daniel M C; Zhu, Lei; Kitchen, Douglas B; Barnes, Keith D; Dobri, Nicoleta; Michelotti, Enrique; Cywin, Charles L; Martin, William H; Pearson, Paul G; Johnson, Graham; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2015-08-13

    Antagonists of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) impede ocular uptake of serum all-trans retinol (1) and have been shown to reduce cytotoxic bisretinoid formation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which is associated with the pathogenesis of both dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Stargardt disease. Thus, these agents show promise as a potential pharmacotherapy by which to stem further neurodegeneration and concomitant vision loss associated with geographic atrophy of the macula. We previously disclosed the discovery of a novel series of nonretinoid RBP4 antagonists, represented by bicyclic [3.3.0]-octahydrocyclopenta[c]pyrrolo analogue 4. We describe herein the utilization of a pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid fragment as a suitable isostere for the anthranilic acid appendage of 4, which led to the discovery of standout antagonist 33. Analogue 33 possesses exquisite in vitro RBP4 binding affinity and favorable drug-like characteristics and was found to reduce circulating plasma RBP4 levels in vivo in a robust manner (>90%). PMID:26181715

  2. The Cockayne syndrome group B protein is a functional dimer.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Mette; Thorslund, Tina; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2005-09-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare inherited human genetic disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities, UV sensitivity, and premature aging. The CS group B (CSB) protein belongs to the SNF2-family of DNA-dependent ATPases and is implicated in transcription elongation, transcription coupled repair, and base excision repair. It is a DNA stimulated ATPase and remodels chromatin in vitro. We demonstrate for the first time that full-length CSB positively cooperates in ATP hydrolysis as a function of protein concentration. We have investigated the quaternary structure of CSB using a combination of protein-protein complex trapping experiments and gel filtration, and found that CSB forms a dimer in solution. Chromatography studies revealed that enzymatically active CSB has an apparent molecular mass of approximately 360 kDa, consistent with dimerization of CSB. Importantly, in vivo protein cross-linking showed the presence of the CSB dimer in the nucleus of HeLa cells. We further show that dimerization occurs through the central ATPase domain of the protein. These results have implications for the mechanism of action of CSB, and suggest that other SNF2-family members might also function as dimers. PMID:16128801

  3. Polycomb group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell aging and malignancies.

    PubMed

    Klauke, Karin; de Haan, Gerald

    2011-07-01

    Protection of the transcriptional "stemness" network is important to maintain a healthy hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compartment during the lifetime of the organism. Recent evidence shows that fundamental changes in the epigenetic status of HSCs might be one of the driving forces behind many age-related HSC changes and might pave the way for HSC malignant transformation and subsequent leukemia development, the incidence of which increases exponentially with age. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are key epigenetic regulators of HSC cellular fate decisions and are often found to be misregulated in human hematopoietic malignancies. In this review, we speculate that PcG proteins balance HSC aging against the risk of developing cancer, since a disturbance in PcG genes and proteins affects several important cellular processes such as cell fate decisions, senescence, apoptosis, and DNA damage repair.

  4. Morphine withdrawal precipitated by specific mu, delta or kappa opioid receptor antagonists: a c-Fos protein study in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, Stéphanie; Gestreau, Christian; Besson, Jean-Marie

    2003-06-01

    We have recently shown concurrent changes in behavioural responses and c-Fos protein expression in the central nervous system in both naive and morphine-dependent rats after systemic administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone. However, because naloxone acts on the three major types of opioid receptors, the present study aimed at determining, in the same animals, both changes in behaviour and c-Fos-like immunoreactivity after intravenous injection of selective opioid antagonists, such as mu (beta-funaltrexamine, 10 mg/kg), delta (naltrindole, 4 mg/kg) or kappa (nor-binaltorphimine, 5 mg/kg) opioid receptor antagonists, in naive or morphine-dependent rats. In a first experimental series, only beta-funaltrexamine increased c-Fos expression in the eight central nervous system structures examined, whereas no effect was seen after naltrindole or nor-binaltorphimine administration in naive rats. These results suggest a tonic activity in the endogenous opioid peptides acting on mu opioid receptors in normal rats. A second experimental series in morphine-dependent rats showed that beta-funaltrexamine had the highest potency in the induction of classical signs of morphine withdrawal syndrome, as well as the increase in c-Fos expression in the 22 central nervous system structures studied, suggesting a major role of mu opioid receptors in opioid dependence. However, our results also demonstrated that naltrindole and, to a lesser extent, nor-binaltorphimine were able to induce moderate signs of morphine withdrawal and relatively weak c-Fos protein expression in restricted central nervous system structures. Therefore, delta and kappa opioid receptors may also contribute slightly to opioid dependence.

  5. Rapid, Structure-Based Exploration of Pipecolic Acid Amides as Novel Selective Antagonists of the FK506-Binding Protein 51.

    PubMed

    Gaali, Steffen; Feng, Xixi; Hähle, Andreas; Sippel, Claudia; Bracher, Andreas; Hausch, Felix

    2016-03-24

    The FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is a key regulator of stress hormone receptors and an established risk factor for stress-related disorders. Drug development for FKBP51 has been impaired by the structurally similar but functionally opposing homologue FKBP52. High selectivity between FKBP51 and FKBP52 can be achieved by ligands that stabilize a recently discovered FKBP51-favoring conformation. However, drug-like parameters for these ligands remained unfavorable. In the present study, we replaced the potentially labile pipecolic ester group of previous FKBP51 ligands by various low molecular weight amides. This resulted in the first series of pipecolic acid amides, which had much lower molecular weights without affecting FKBP51 selectivity. We discovered a geminally substituted cyclopentyl amide as a preferred FKBP51-binding motif and elucidated its binding mode to provide a new lead structure for future drug optimization. PMID:26954324

  6. Domain-specific modification of heparan sulfate by Qsulf1 modulates the binding of the bone morphogenetic protein antagonist Noggin.

    PubMed

    Viviano, Beth L; Paine-Saunders, Stephenie; Gasiunas, Nijole; Gallagher, John; Saunders, Scott

    2004-02-13

    We have reported previously that Noggin is a heparin-binding protein and associates with the cell surface through heparan sulfate proteoglycans, where it remains functional for the binding of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Here we report that the binding of Noggin to the cell surface is highly selective for heparan sulfate and that specific structural features are required for the interaction. Noggin binds most efficiently to heparin sequences composed of 10 or more monosaccharides; N-, 6-O-, and 2-O-sulfates contribute to this interaction. In addition, we have shown that the developmentally regulated endosulfatase Qsulf1 selectively removes sulfate groups from the 6-O position of sugars within the most highly sulfated S domains of heparan sulfate, whereas 6-O-sulfates in the NA/NS domains are not substrates for the enzyme. The activity of Qsulf1 in cells in culture results in the release of Noggin from the cell surface and a restoration of BMP responsiveness to the cells. This shows that Noggin binds to the S domains of heparan sulfate and provides evidence that, in addition to modulating Wnt signaling in vivo by the release of heparan sulfate bound Wnt, Qsulf1 also modulates BMP signaling by the release of surface-bound Noggin. PMID:14645250

  7. Classification epitopes in groups based on their protein family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The humoral immune system response is based on the interaction between antibodies and antigens for the clearance of pathogens and foreign molecules. The interaction between these proteins occurs at specific positions known as antigenic determinants or B-cell epitopes. The experimental identification of epitopes is costly and time consuming. Therefore the use of in silico methods, to help discover new epitopes, is an appealing alternative due the importance of biomedical applications such as vaccine design, disease diagnostic, anti-venoms and immune-therapeutics. However, the performance of predictions is not optimal been around 70% of accuracy. Further research could increase our understanding of the biochemical and structural properties that characterize a B-cell epitope. Results We investigated the possibility of linear epitopes from the same protein family to share common properties. This hypothesis led us to analyze physico-chemical (PCP) and predicted secondary structure (PSS) features of a curated dataset of epitope sequences available in the literature belonging to two different groups of antigens (metalloproteinases and neurotoxins). We discovered statistically significant parameters with data mining techniques which allow us to distinguish neurotoxin from metalloproteinase and these two from random sequences. After a five cross fold validation we found that PCP based models obtained area under the curve values (AUC) and accuracy above 0.9 for regression, decision tree and support vector machine. Conclusions We demonstrated that antigen's family can be inferred from properties within a single group of linear epitopes (metalloproteinases or neurotoxins). Also we discovered the characteristics that represent these two epitope groups including their similarities and differences with random peptides and their respective amino acid sequence. These findings open new perspectives to improve epitope prediction by considering the specific antigen

  8. Effect of antispastic agents (calcium antagonists and/or isosorbide dinitrate) on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with coronary vasospastic angina pectoris and no hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Jui; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Cheng, Chi-Wen; Yang, Ning-I

    2005-01-01

    Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured before and after 3 months of treatment with antispastic agents (calcium antagonists and/or isosorbide dinitrate) in 27 patients who had coronary vasospastic angina pectoris and no hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein decreased after treatment with antispastic agents.

  9. Performance of Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Screening in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rentao; Ding, Shitao; Tan, Wenting; Tan, Shun; Tan, Zhaoxia; Xiang, Shiqing; Zhou, Yi; Mao, Qing; Deng, Guohong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has long been used as an effective biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) screening; however, not all HCC patients can be detected with an elevated AFP level, especially in early HCC patients. Protein Induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) is another serum biomarker linked to HCC; however, sensitivity and specificity remain controversial and data in Chinese groups is even rarer. Objectives: To evaluate the performance of PIVKA-II alone and combined with AFP in HCC screening in Chinese population. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study enrolled 150 HCC patients in Southwest Hospital, of which 16 patients were excluded due to lack of basic information. A total of 347 patients with hepatitis B, 105 with non-HCC cancers and 53 healthy people were enrolled as controls. Levels of AFP and PIVKA-II were measured by chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) and chemiluminescent microparticle Immunoassay (CMIA), respectively. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of PIVKA-II were 74.6% and 67.8% at a cutoff of 40 mAU/mL and 64.2% and 89.7% at a cutoff of 200 mAU/mL. The sensitivity and specificity of AFP were 76.7% and 65.0% at a cutoff of 20 ng/mL and 60.4% and 88.9% at a cutoff of 195.23 ng/mL. The combination of two markers had a sensitivity and specificity of 91.1% and 41.0%, respectively. The area under the receiving operating curve (AUROC) for PIVKA-II (0.756, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.695 - 0.816) was less than the AUROC for AFP (0.823, 95% CI: 0.780 - 0.865), and in combination, the AUROC increased to 0.843 (95% CI: 0.801 - 0.885). Conclusions: PIVKA-II was as efficient as AFP when used as a single marker for HCC screening and the combination of two biomarkers gave a better performance. PMID:26300931

  10. A high-throughput small-molecule ligand screen targeted to agonists and antagonists of the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54.

    PubMed

    Kuohung, Wendy; Burnett, Maria; Mukhtyar, Deepa; Schuman, Eli; Ni, Jake; Crowley, William F; Glicksman, Marcie A; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2010-06-01

    Recent data have shown that the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54 (also known as KiSS-1 receptor) regulates GnRH release from the hypothalamus. This essential role of GPR54 in controlling the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in reproductive and cancer medicine. Currently, there are no small-molecule modulators of GPR54 function for experimental or clinical use. To identify small-molecule compounds that modify GPR54 signal transduction, the authors have adapted a cell-based functional assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) using a commercially available homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay for inositol phosphate accumulation. They generated stable Chinese hamster ovary cell transfectants that express human GPR54 for use in this assay. After optimization in an automated HTS environment, they screened a library of 110,000 small-molecule compounds using 2 protocols, one to identify agonists and one to identify antagonists. Hits obtained in the primary screen were confirmed to be active in secondary in vitro assays. Compounds identified as agonists or antagonists from HTS and secondary screening will be characterized to identify agents with the potential to be developed as novel orally active agents to treat hormone-dependent disorders such as abnormal puberty, infertility, endometriosis, and sex steroid-dependent tumors.

  11. Modeling G protein-coupled receptors for structure-based drug discovery using low-frequency normal modes for refinement of homology models: application to H3 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Rai, Brajesh K; Tawa, Gregory J; Katz, Alan H; Humblet, Christine

    2010-02-01

    G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are integral membrane proteins that play important role in regulating key physiological functions, and are targets of about 50% of all recently launched drugs. High-resolution experimental structures are available only for very few GPCRs. As a result, structure-based drug design efforts for GPCRs continue to rely on in silico modeling, which is considered to be an extremely difficult task especially for these receptors. Here, we describe Gmodel, a novel approach for building 3D atomic models of GPCRs using a normal mode-based refinement of homology models. Gmodel uses a small set of relevant low-frequency vibrational modes derived from Random Elastic Network model to efficiently sample the large-scale receptor conformation changes and generate an ensemble of alternative models. These are used to assemble receptor-ligand complexes by docking a known active into each of the alternative models. Each of these is next filtered using restraints derived from known mutation and binding affinity data and is refined in the presence of the active ligand. In this study, Gmodel was applied to generate models of the antagonist form of histamine 3 (H3) receptor. The validity of this novel modeling approach is demonstrated by performing virtual screening (using the refined models) that consistently produces highly enriched hit lists. The models are further validated by analyzing the available SAR related to classical H3 antagonists, and are found to be in good agreement with the available experimental data, thus providing novel insights into the receptor-ligand interactions.

  12. Cloning and characterization of IL-22 binding protein, a natural antagonist of IL-10-related T cell-derived inducible factor/IL-22.

    PubMed

    Dumoutier, L; Lejeune, D; Colau, D; Renauld, J C

    2001-06-15

    The class II cytokine receptor family includes the receptors for IFN-alphabeta, IFN-gamma, IL-10, and IL-10-related T cell-derived inducible factor/IL-22. By screening genomic DNA databases, we identified a gene encoding a protein of 231 aa, showing 33 and 34% amino acid identity with the extracellular domains of the IL-22 receptor and of the IL-20R/cytokine receptor family 2-8, respectively, but lacking the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. A lower but significant sequence identity was found with other members of this family such as the IL-10R (29%), cytokine receptor family 2-4/IL-10Rbeta (30%), tissue factor (26%), and the four IFN receptor chains (23-25%). This gene is located on chromosome 6q24, at 35 kb from the IFNGR1 gene, and is expressed in various tissues with maximal expression in breast, lungs, and colon. The recombinant protein was found to bind IL-10-related T cell-derived inducible factor/IL-22, and to inhibit the activity of this cytokine on hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells. We propose to name this natural cytokine antagonist IL-22BP for IL-22 binding protein.

  13. The complex of ASYMMETRIC LEAVES (AS) proteins plays a central role in antagonistic interactions of genes for leaf polarity specification in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Machida, Chiyoko; Nakagawa, Ayami; Kojima, Shoko; Takahashi, Hiro; Machida, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    Leaf primordia are born around meristem-containing stem cells at shoot apices, grow along three axes (proximal-distal, adaxial-abaxial, medial-lateral), and develop into flat symmetric leaves with adaxial-abaxial polarity. Axis development and polarity specification of Arabidopsis leaves require a network of genes for transcription factor-like proteins and small RNAs. Here, we summarize present understandings of adaxial-specific genes, ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 (AS1) and AS2. Their complex (AS1-AS2) functions in the regulation of the proximal-distal leaf length by directly repressing class 1 KNOX homeobox genes (BP, KNAT2) that are expressed in the meristem periphery below leaf primordia. Adaxial-abaxial polarity specification involves antagonistic interaction of adaxial and abaxial genes including AS1 and AS2 for the development of two respective domains. AS1-AS2 directly represses the abaxial gene ETTIN/AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 (ETT/ARF3) and indirectly represses ETT/ARF3 and ARF4 through tasiR-ARF. Modifier mutations have been identified that abolish adaxialization and enhance the defect in the proximal-distal patterning in as1 and as2. AS1-AS2 and its modifiers synergistically repress both ARFs and class 1 KNOXs. Repression of ARFs is critical for establishing adaxial-abaxial polarity. On the other hand, abaxial factors KANADI1 (KAN1) and KAN2 directly repress AS2 expression. These data delineate a molecular framework for antagonistic gene interactions among adaxial factors, AS1, AS2, and their modifiers, and the abaxial factors ARFs as key regulators in the establishment of adaxial-abaxial polarity. Possible AS1-AS2 epigenetic repression and activities downstream of ARFs are discussed.

  14. Cooperative and Antagonistic Contributions of Two Heterochromatin Proteins to Transcriptional Regulation of the Drosophila Sex Determination Decision

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Rodriguez, Janel; Yoo, Youngdong; Shareef, Momin Mohammed; Badugu, RamaKrishna

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic nuclei contain regions of differentially staining chromatin (heterochromatin), which remain condensed throughout the cell cycle and are largely transcriptionally silent. RNAi knockdown of the highly conserved heterochromatin protein HP1 in Drosophila was previously shown to preferentially reduce male viability. Here we report a similar phenotype for the telomeric partner of HP1, HOAP, and roles for both proteins in regulating the Drosophila sex determination pathway. Specifically, these proteins regulate the critical decision in this pathway, firing of the establishment promoter of the masterswitch gene, Sex-lethal (Sxl). Female-specific activation of this promoter, SxlPe, is essential to females, as it provides SXL protein to initiate the productive female-specific splicing of later Sxl transcripts, which are transcribed from the maintenance promoter (SxlPm) in both sexes. HOAP mutants show inappropriate SxlPe firing in males and the concomitant inappropriate splicing of SxlPm-derived transcripts, while females show premature firing of SxlPe. HP1 mutants, by contrast, display SxlPm splicing defects in both sexes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show both proteins are associated with SxlPe sequences. In embryos from HP1 mutant mothers and Sxl mutant fathers, female viability and RNA polymerase II recruitment to SxlPe are severely compromised. Our genetic and biochemical assays indicate a repressing activity for HOAP and both activating and repressing roles for HP1 at SxlPe. PMID:21695246

  15. Using the MCoTI-II Cyclotide Scaffold To Design a Stable Cyclic Peptide Antagonist of SET, a Protein Overexpressed in Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Charlotte; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Wang, Conan K; Cheneval, Olivier; Chan, Lai Yue; Bokil, Nilesh J; Sweet, Matthew J; Craik, David J

    2016-01-19

    The SET protein is a promising drug target in cancer therapy, because of its ability to inhibit the function of the tumor suppressor gene protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). COG peptides, derived from apolipoprotein E (apoE), are potent antagonists of SET; they induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells upon binding to intracellular SET and modulate the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. However, the therapeutic potential of COG peptides is limited, because of their poor proteolytic stability and low bioavailability. In this study, the COG peptide, COG1410, was stabilized by grafting it onto the ultrastable cyclic peptide scaffold, Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II). The grafted MCoTI-II peptides were cytotoxic to a cancer cell line and showed high stability in human serum. The most potent grafted MCoTI-II peptide inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated activation of NF-κB in murine macrophages. Overall, this study demonstrates the application of the MCoTI-II scaffold for the development of stable peptide drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:26685975

  16. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and their antagonists regulate spontaneous and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Conor J; Sheridan, Clare; Cullen, Sean P; Tynan, Graham A; Logue, Susan E; Afonina, Inna S; Vucic, Domagoj; Lavelle, Ed C; Martin, Seamus J

    2013-02-15

    Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) play a major role in determining whether cells undergo apoptosis in response to TNF as well as other stimuli. However, TNF is also highly proinflammatory through its ability to trigger the secretion of multiple inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which is arguably the most important role of TNF in vivo. Indeed, deregulated production of TNF-induced cytokines is a major driver of inflammation in several autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we show that IAPs are required for the production of multiple TNF-induced proinflammatory mediators. Ablation or antagonism of IAPs potently suppressed TNF- or RIPK1-induced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. Surprisingly, IAP antagonism also led to spontaneous production of chemokines, particularly RANTES, in vitro and in vivo. Thus, IAPs play a major role in influencing the production of multiple inflammatory mediators, arguing that these proteins are important regulators of inflammation in addition to apoptosis. Furthermore, small molecule IAP antagonists can modulate spontaneous as well as TNF-induced inflammatory responses, which may have implications for use of these agents in therapeutic settings.

  17. Activation of protein kinase C and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors antagonistically modulate voltage-gated sodium channels in striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hourez, Raphaël; Azdad, Karima; Vanwalleghem, Gilles; Roussel, Céline; Gall, David; Schiffmann, Serge N

    2005-10-19

    Regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels is crucial to firing patterns that constitute the output of medium spiny neurons (MSN), projecting neurons of the striatum. This modulation is thus critical for the final integration of information processed within the striatum. It has been shown that the adenylate cyclase pathway reduces sodium currents in MSN through channel phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, it is unknown whether a phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated signaling cascade could also modulate voltage-gated sodium channels within MSN. Using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, we investigated the effects of activation of two key components in PLC-mediated signaling cascades: protein kinase C (PKC) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)) receptors on voltage-dependent sodium current. Cellular dialysis with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, an activator of PKC, significantly reduced peak sodium current amplitude, while adenophostin A, an activator of IP(3) receptors, significantly increased peak sodium current amplitude. This effect of adenophostin was abolished by calcium chelation or by FK506, an inhibitor of calcineurin. These results suggest an antagonistic role of PKC and IP(3) in the modulation of striatal voltage-gated sodium channels, peak current amplitude being decreased through phosphorylation by PKC and increased through dephosphorylation by calcineurin.

  18. Using the MCoTI-II Cyclotide Scaffold To Design a Stable Cyclic Peptide Antagonist of SET, a Protein Overexpressed in Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Charlotte; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Wang, Conan K; Cheneval, Olivier; Chan, Lai Yue; Bokil, Nilesh J; Sweet, Matthew J; Craik, David J

    2016-01-19

    The SET protein is a promising drug target in cancer therapy, because of its ability to inhibit the function of the tumor suppressor gene protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). COG peptides, derived from apolipoprotein E (apoE), are potent antagonists of SET; they induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells upon binding to intracellular SET and modulate the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. However, the therapeutic potential of COG peptides is limited, because of their poor proteolytic stability and low bioavailability. In this study, the COG peptide, COG1410, was stabilized by grafting it onto the ultrastable cyclic peptide scaffold, Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II). The grafted MCoTI-II peptides were cytotoxic to a cancer cell line and showed high stability in human serum. The most potent grafted MCoTI-II peptide inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated activation of NF-κB in murine macrophages. Overall, this study demonstrates the application of the MCoTI-II scaffold for the development of stable peptide drugs for cancer therapy.

  19. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by small molecule antagonists of the E1-E2 protein interaction.

    PubMed

    White, Peter W; Titolo, Steve; Brault, Karine; Thauvette, Louise; Pelletier, Alex; Welchner, Ewald; Bourgon, Lise; Doyon, Louise; Ogilvie, William W; Yoakim, Christiane; Cordingley, Michael G; Archambault, Jacques

    2003-07-18

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA replication is initiated by recruitment of the E1 helicase by the E2 protein to the viral origin. Screening of our corporate compound collection with an assay measuring the cooperative binding of E1 and E2 to the origin identified a class of small molecule inhibitors of the protein interaction between E1 and E2. Isothermal titration calorimetry and changes in protein fluorescence showed that the inhibitors bind to the transactivation domain of E2, the region that interacts with E1. These compounds inhibit E2 of the low risk HPV types 6 and 11 but not those of high risk HPV types or of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus. Functional evidence that the transactivation domain is the target of inhibition was obtained by swapping this domain between a sensitive (HPV11) and a resistant (cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) E2 type and by identifying an amino acid substitution, E100A, that increases inhibition by approximately 10-fold. This class of inhibitors was found to antagonize specifically the E1-E2 interaction in vivo and to inhibit HPV DNA replication in transiently transfected cells. These results highlight the potential of the E1-E2 interaction as a small molecule antiviral target.

  20. Periparturient cortisol, acute phase cytokine, and acute phase protein profiles of gilts housed in groups or stalls during gestation.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, A D; Eicher, S D; Harris, M J; Pajor, E A; Richert, B T

    2007-07-01

    Use of gestation stalls in pork production remains a controversial topic in animal welfare. Immune status and measures are frequently used to assess stress levels and thus well-being of confined animals. The important welfare issue of close confinement among gestating gilts was tested by quantifying cortisol, acute phase cytokine, and acute phase protein pro-files before and after farrowing of gilts housed in 2 systems. Landrace x Yorkshire crossbred gilts housed in groups of 4 (group, n = 8) in pens (3.9 x 2.4 m with 4 individual feeding spaces, 9.36 m(2) total or 2.34 m(2)/gilt) were compared with gilts housed in standard industry stalls (stall, n = 16; 2.2 x 0.6 m, 1.32 m(2)/gilt). Floors were fully slatted, and a substrate was not provided for either system. Cortisol was determined from saliva on d 105 of gestation, 1 h after moving the gilts into farrowing stalls (d 111), and 24 h and 7 d after farrowing. Cortisol was greater (P = 0.04) for group gilts compared with stall gilts 1 h after moving them into farrowing stalls and 24 h after farrowing. Cortisol concentrations decreased (P = 0.001) over time. Leukocyte mRNA expression of IL-1, IL-1 receptor antagonist, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was determined by quantitative, reverse transcription PCR on d 35, 63, and 91 of gestation and 72 h after farrowing. Cytokine mRNA expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells did not differ between housing systems for IL-1, its receptor antagonist, or for tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Acute phase proteins, including fibrinogen, haptoglobin, and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein were determined for plasma samples taken at d 35, 63, and 91 of gestation and 72 h and 14 d after farrowing. In contrast to cortisol, plasma fibrinogen concentrations increased (P < 0.005) over time. Haptoglobin did not differ between treatments (P > 0.10). Stall gilts tended to have greater (P = 0.07) plasma alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein concentrations than group animals at d 35 of gestation and d 14

  1. Surface protein expression in group B streptococcal invasive isolates.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, P; Flores, A E

    1997-01-01

    Results from characterization of 211 GBS isolates from early-onset disease indicated that serotypes Ia, III and V accounted for almost 80% of the isolates, and that alpha was the protein most often expressed. Each of the common polysaccharide types had a characteristic predominant protein expression pattern: alpha for Ia, R4 for type III and R1+R4 for type V isolates. Expression of alpha protein was always mutually exclusive of R proteins. The presence of more than one species of R by a given isolate was confirmed by IEP. In addition, PAGE/WB studies verified the multiple MW forms of R1, and the variation from strain to strain in the highest form of R4 that we had previously reported. Our data not only showed the great complexity of the GBS cell surface but also demonstrated the advantage of using both type polysaccharides and surface-localized proteins as markers for characterization of GBS strains.

  2. Pepper protein phosphatase type 2C, CaADIP1 and its interacting partner CaRLP1 antagonistically regulate ABA signalling and drought response.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key phytohormone that regulates plant growth and developmental processes, including seed germination and stomatal closing. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of a novel type 2C protein phosphatase, CaADIP1 (Capsicum annuum ABA and Drought-Induced Protein phosphatase 1). The expression of CaADIP1 was induced in pepper leaves by ABA, drought and NaCl treatments. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing CaADIP1 (CaADIP1-OX) exhibited an ABA-hyposensitive and drought-susceptible phenotype. We used a yeast two-hybrid screening assay to identify CaRLP1 (Capsicum annuum RCAR-Like Protein 1), which interacts with CaADIP1 in the cytoplasm and nucleus. In contrast to CaADIP1-OX plants, CaRLP1-OX plants displayed an ABA-hypersensitive and drought-tolerant phenotype, which was characterized by low levels of transpirational water loss and increased expression of stress-responsive genes relative to those of wild-type plants. In CaADIP1-OX/CaRLP1-OX double transgenic plants, ectopic expression of the CaRLP1 gene led to strong suppression of CaADIP1-induced ABA hyposensitivity during the germinative and post-germinative stages, indicating that CaADIP1 and CaRLP1 act in the same signalling pathway and CaADIP1 functions downstream of CaRLP1. Our results indicate that CaADIP1 and its interacting partner CaRLP1 antagonistically regulate the ABA-dependent defense signalling response to drought stress. PMID:26825039

  3. The interferon signaling antagonist function of yellow fever virus NS5 protein is activated by type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Laurent-Rolle, Maudry; Morrison, Juliet; Rajsbaum, Ricardo; Macleod, Jesica M Levingston; Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Pham, Alissa; Ayllon, Juan; Miorin, Lisa; Martínez-Romero, Carles; tenOever, Benjamin R; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2014-09-10

    To successfully establish infection, flaviviruses have to overcome the antiviral state induced by type I interferon (IFN-I). The nonstructural NS5 proteins of several flaviviruses antagonize IFN-I signaling. Here we show that yellow fever virus (YFV) inhibits IFN-I signaling through a unique mechanism that involves binding of YFV NS5 to the IFN-activated transcription factor STAT2 only in cells that have been stimulated with IFN-I. This NS5-STAT2 interaction requires IFN-I-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and the K63-linked polyubiquitination at a lysine in the N-terminal region of YFV NS5. We identified TRIM23 as the E3 ligase that interacts with and polyubiquitinates YFV NS5 to promote its binding to STAT2 and trigger IFN-I signaling inhibition. Our results demonstrate the importance of YFV NS5 in overcoming the antiviral action of IFN-I and offer a unique example of a viral protein that is activated by the same host pathway that it inhibits.

  4. High affinity retinoic acid receptor antagonists: analogs of AGN 193109.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A T; Wang, L; Gillett, S J; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-02-22

    A series of high affinity retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonists were prepared based upon the known antagonist AGN 193109 (2). Introduction of various phenyl groups revealed a preference for substitution at the para-position relative to the meta-site. Antagonists with the highest affinities for the RARs possessed hydrophobic groups, however, the presence of polar functionality was also well tolerated.

  5. Role of bacterial infection in the epigenetic regulation of Wnt antagonist WIF1 by PRC2 protein EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Badal C.; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ahmed, Ishfaq; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.; Hester, Christina; Greiner, K. Allen; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Anant, Shrikant; Umar, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    The Enhancer of Zeste Homolog-2 (EZH2) represses gene transcription through histone H3 lysine-27-trimethylation (H3K27me3). Citrobacter rodentium (CR) promotes crypt hyperplasia and tumorigenesis by aberrantly regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We aimed at investigating EZH2’s role in epigenetically regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling following bacterial infection. NIH:Swiss outbred and ApcMin/+ mice were infected with CR (108cfu); BLT1−/−ApcMin/+ mice, AOM/DSS-treated mice and de-identified human adenocarcinoma samples were models of colon cancer. Following infection with wild type but not mutant CR, elevated EZH2 levels in the crypt at days-6 and 12 (peak hyperplasia) coincided with increases in H3K27me3 and β-catenin levels, respectively. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed EZH2 and H3K27me3’s occupancy on WIF1 (Wnt Inhibitory Factor-1) promoter resulting in reduced WIF1 mRNA and protein expression. Following EZH2 knockdown via siRNA or EZH2-inhibitor DZNep either alone or in combination with HDAC inhibitor SAHA, WIF1 promoter activity increased significantly while overexpression of EZH2 attenuated WIF1-reporter activity. Ectopic overexpression of SET domain mutant (F681Y) almost completely rescued WIF1 reporter activity and partially rescued WIF1 protein levels while H3K27me3 levels were significantly attenuated suggesting that an intact methyltransferases activity is required for EZH2-dependent effects. Interestingly, while β-catenin levels were lower in EZH2-knocked-down cells, F681Y mutants exhibited only partial reduction in β-catenin levels. Besides EZH2, increases in miR-203 expression in the crypts at days-6 and 12 post-infection correlated with reduced levels of its target WIF1; overexpression of miR-203 in primary colonocytes decreased WIF1 mRNA and protein levels. Elevated levels of EZH2 and β-catenin with concomitant decrease in WIF1 expression in the polyps of CR-infected ApcMin/+ mice paralleled changes recorded in BLT1

  6. Phylogenetic continuum indicates "galaxies" in the protein universe: preliminary results on the natural group structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ladunga, I

    1992-04-01

    The markedly nonuniform, even systematic distribution of sequences in the protein "universe" has been analyzed by methods of protein taxonomy. Mapping of the natural hierarchical system of proteins has revealed some dense cores, i.e., well-defined clusterings of proteins that seem to be natural structural groupings, possibly seeds for a future protein taxonomy. The aim was not to force proteins into more or less man-made categories by discriminant analysis, but to find structurally similar groups, possibly of common evolutionary origin. Single-valued distance measures between pairs of superfamilies from the Protein Identification Resource were defined by two chi 2-like methods on tripeptide frequencies and the variable-length subsequence identity method derived from dot-matrix comparisons. Distance matrices were processed by several methods of cluster analysis to detect phylogenetic continuum between highly divergent proteins. Only well-defined clusters characterized by relatively unique structural, intracellular environmental, organismal, and functional attribute states were selected as major protein groups, including subsets of viral and Escherichia coli proteins, hormones, inhibitors, plant, ribosomal, serum and structural proteins, amino acid synthases, and clusters dominated by certain oxidoreductases and apolar and DNA-associated enzymes. The limited repertoire of functional patterns due to small genome size, the high rate of recombination, specific features of the bacterial membranes, or of the virus cycle canalize certain proteins of viruses and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively, to organismal groups.

  7. Hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas producing protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP).

    PubMed

    Matsueda, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Yasuo; Notohara, Kenji

    2006-10-01

    We describe a rare case of hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas with production of protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). The patient was a 49-year-old woman admitted because of high serum levels of PIVKA-II (1.63 AU/ml) and AFP (623 ng/ml) and abnormal ultrasonographic findings of the pancreas, found incidentally at medical checkup. Both ultrasonography and computed tomography showed swelling of the pancreas with small areas of low density, but no hepatic lesions. The serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were not increased. A PIVKA-II and AFP-producing pancreatic cancer was strongly suspected, and total pancreatectomy was performed. Pathological examination showed that the tumor cells were arranged in trabecular and solid patterns with bile production, and were immunohistochemically positive for PIVKA-II and AFP, resembling hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The tumor was diagnosed as hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas, and the patient has survived 48 months after initial diagnosis. It is important that hepatoid carcinoma be considered as a possible malignant tumor of the pancreas, and simultaneous measurement of the serum levels of AFP and PIVKA-II will enable earlier diagnosis. This is the first report describing hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas producing PIVKA-II.

  8. Associations of erythrocyte membrane fatty acids with the concentrations of C-reactive protein, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist and adiponectin in 1373 men.

    PubMed

    Takkunen, M J; de Mello, V D F; Schwab, U S; Ågren, J J; Kuusisto, J; Uusitupa, M I J

    2014-10-01

    Dietary and endogenous fatty acids could play a role in low-grade inflammation. In this cross-sectional study the proportions of erythrocyte membrane fatty acids (EMFA) and the concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and adiponectin were measured and their confounder-adjusted associations examined in 1373 randomly selected Finnish men aged 45-70 years participating in the population based Metsim study in Eastern Finland. The sum of n-6 EMFAs, without linoleic acid (LA), was positively associated with concentrations of CRP and IL-1Ra (r partial=0.139 and r partial=0.115, P<0.001). These associations were especially strong among lean men (waist circumference <94 cm; r partial=0.156 and r partial=0.189, P<0.001). Total n-3 EMFAs correlated inversely with concentrations of CRP (r partial=-0.098, P<0.001). Palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7) correlated positively with CRP (r partial=0.096, P<0.001). Cis-vaccenic acid (18:1n-7) was associated with high concentrations of adiponectin (r partial=0.139, P<0.001). In conclusion, n-6 EMFAs, except for LA, correlated positively with the inflammatory markers. Palmitoleic acid was associated with CRP, whereas, interestingly, its elongation product, cis-vaccenic acid, associated with anti-inflammatory adiponectin.

  9. Prolonged Survival in a Case of Chemotherapy-Sensitive Gastric Cancer That Produced Alpha-Fetoprotein and Protein Induced by Vitamin K Antagonist-II.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Naotaka; Takahashi, Emiko; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Amaike, Manami; Nohara, Mako; Nagao, Kazuhiro; Ebi, Masahide; Funaki, Yasushi; Sasaki, Makoto; Kasugai, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    The number of reported cases of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing gastric cancer has gradually increased, with a reported prevalence of 1.3-1.5% of all gastric cancer cases. However, reports of gastric cancer accompanied by elevated serum levels of both AFP and protein induced by vitamin K antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) are rare. The prognosis of AFP- and PIVKA-II-producing gastric cancer has been reported to be very poor because the tumor cells were considered to have a high malignant potential and the cancer progressed rapidly. We described a case of gastric cancer producing AFP and PIVKA-II in which chemotherapy was effective and resulted in prolonged survival, and these two tumor markers were useful for monitoring the treatment response. Routine health screening using upper abdominal ultrasonography revealed hepatic tumors in an apparently healthy 65-year-old man. Whole-body computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple hepatic tumors, and an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a Bormann type 3 tumor in the lower stomach. A biopsy specimen confirmed that the tumor was immunohistochemically positive for AFP, PIVKA-II, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. After chemotherapy, the gastric tumor appeared as a small elevated lesion on EGD, and CT revealed a remarkable reduction in the size of the metastatic liver tumors. The patient is still alive, 35 months after the initial chemotherapy. PMID:26034473

  10. Cross-interactions of two p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors and two cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists with the CCK1 receptor and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Morel, Caroline; Ibarz, Géraldine; Oiry, Catherine; Carnazzi, Eric; Bergé, Gilbert; Gagne, Didier; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Martinez, Jean

    2005-06-01

    Although SB202190 and SB203580 are described as specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, several reports have indicated that other enzymes are also sensitive to SB203580. Using a pharmacological approach, we report for the first time that compounds SB202190 and SB203580 were able to directly and selectively interact with a G-protein-coupled receptor, namely the cholecystokinin receptor subtype CCK1, but not with the CCK2 receptor. We demonstrated that these compounds were non-competitive antagonists of the CCK1 receptor at concentrations typically used to inhibit protein kinases. By chimeric construction of the CCK2 receptor, we determined the involvement of two CCK1 receptor intracellular loops in the binding of SB202190 and SB203580. We also showed that two CCK antagonists, L364,718 and L365,260, were able to regulate p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Using a reporter gene strategy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrated that both CCK antagonists inhibited selectively the enzymatic activity of p38 MAP kinase. Kinase assays suggested that this inhibition resulted from a direct interaction with both CCK antagonists. Molecular modeling simulations suggested that this interaction occurs in the ATP binding pocket of p38 MAP kinase. These results suggest that SB202190 and SB203580 bind to the CCK1 receptor and, as such, these compounds should be used with caution in models that express this receptor. We also found that L364,718 and L365,260, two CCK receptor antagonists, directly interacted with p38 MAP kinase and inhibited its activity. These findings suggest that the CCK1 receptor shares structural analogies with the p38 MAP kinase ATP binding site. They open the way to potential design of either a new family of MAP kinase inhibitors from CCK1 receptor ligand structures or new CCK1 receptor ligands based on p38 MAP kinase inhibitor structures.

  11. The F-box-containing protein UFO and AGAMOUS participate in antagonistic pathways governing early petal development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Tim; Roe, Judith L; Sessions, R Allen; Inouye, Carla; Serikawa, Kyle; Feldmann, Kenneth A; Weigel, Detlef; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2003-07-01

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for multiple processes in the developing Arabidopsis flower, including the proper patterning and identity of both petals and stamens. The gene encodes an F-box-containing protein, UFO, which interacts physically and genetically with the Skp1 homolog, ASK1. In this report, we describe four ufo alleles characterized by the absence of petals, which uncover another role for UFO in promoting second whorl development. This UFO-dependent pathway is required regardless of the second whorl organ to be formed, arguing that it affects a basic process acting in parallel with those establishing organ identity. However, the pathway is dispensable in the absence of AGAMOUS (AG), a known inhibitor of petal development. In situ hybridization results argue that AG is not transcribed in the petal region, suggesting that it acts non-cell-autonomously to inhibit second whorl development in ufo mutants. These results are combined into a genetic model explaining early second whorl initiation/proliferation, in which UFO functions to inhibit an AG-dependent activity. PMID:12826617

  12. The F-box-containing protein UFO and AGAMOUS participate in antagonistic pathways governing early petal development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Durfee, Tim; Roe, Judith L.; Sessions, R. Allen; Inouye, Carla; Serikawa, Kyle; Feldmann, Kenneth A.; Weigel, Detlef; Zambryski, Patricia C.

    2003-01-01

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for multiple processes in the developing Arabidopsis flower, including the proper patterning and identity of both petals and stamens. The gene encodes an F-box-containing protein, UFO, which interacts physically and genetically with the Skp1 homolog, ASK1. In this report, we describe four ufo alleles characterized by the absence of petals, which uncover another role for UFO in promoting second whorl development. This UFO-dependent pathway is required regardless of the second whorl organ to be formed, arguing that it affects a basic process acting in parallel with those establishing organ identity. However, the pathway is dispensable in the absence of AGAMOUS (AG), a known inhibitor of petal development. In situ hybridization results argue that AG is not transcribed in the petal region, suggesting that it acts non-cell-autonomously to inhibit second whorl development in ufo mutants. These results are combined into a genetic model explaining early second whorl initiation/proliferation, in which UFO functions to inhibit an AG-dependent activity. PMID:12826617

  13. The F-box-containing protein UFO and AGAMOUS participate in antagonistic pathways governing early petal development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Tim; Roe, Judith L; Sessions, R Allen; Inouye, Carla; Serikawa, Kyle; Feldmann, Kenneth A; Weigel, Detlef; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2003-07-01

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for multiple processes in the developing Arabidopsis flower, including the proper patterning and identity of both petals and stamens. The gene encodes an F-box-containing protein, UFO, which interacts physically and genetically with the Skp1 homolog, ASK1. In this report, we describe four ufo alleles characterized by the absence of petals, which uncover another role for UFO in promoting second whorl development. This UFO-dependent pathway is required regardless of the second whorl organ to be formed, arguing that it affects a basic process acting in parallel with those establishing organ identity. However, the pathway is dispensable in the absence of AGAMOUS (AG), a known inhibitor of petal development. In situ hybridization results argue that AG is not transcribed in the petal region, suggesting that it acts non-cell-autonomously to inhibit second whorl development in ufo mutants. These results are combined into a genetic model explaining early second whorl initiation/proliferation, in which UFO functions to inhibit an AG-dependent activity.

  14. CD22-Antagonists with Nanomolar Potency: The Synergistic Effect of Hydrophobic Groups at C-2 and C-9 of Sialic Acid Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Abdu-Allah, Hajjaj H. M.; Watanabe, Kozo; Completo, Gladys C.; Sadagopan, Magesh; Hayashizaki, Koji; Takaku, Chiaki; Tamanaka, Taichi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Paulson, James C.; Tsubata, Takeshi; Ando, Hiromune; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    In earlier studies, we identified the C-9 amido derivative 1 (9-(4'-hydroxy-4-biphenyl)acetamido-9-deoxy-Neu5Gcα2-6GalOMP) and the C-9 amino derivative 2 (9-(4'-hydroxy-4-biphenyl)methylamino-9-deoxy-Neu5Gcα2-6GalOMP) have the most promising affinity for mouse CD22 and human CD22, respectively. Replacing the subterminal galactose residue (2-6Gal-OMP) of 1 with benzyl (5) or biphenylmethyl (6) as aglycone led to even higher potency for mCD22. In this study, both compounds showed improved potency and selectivity for CD22 (IC50 70 nM) and 712-fold more selective for CD22 than for MAG. The corresponding derivatives of 2, compounds 8 and 9, showed comparable activity to 2 but lower potency and selectivity than 5 and 6. Although compounds 5-9 are simple and small molecular weight antagonists, they showed much high potency and selectivity than the corresponding compounds having α 2-6Gal linkage. Both biological and computational docking simulation studies suggest that the 2-6Gal-OMP residues of 1 and 2 are not critical for binding process and could be replaced with hydrophobic non carbohydrate moieties. The data presented herein has significant implications for the design and discovery of next-generation CD22-antagonists PMID:21349726

  15. [Grouping of the NS1 nonstructural proteins of influenza A viruses].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, B P; Rudneva, I A; Zhdanov, V M

    1981-01-01

    Peptide mapping was used for comparative analysis of nonstructural proteins (NS1) of 21 strains of human and animal influenza A viruses. At least 4 groups of NS1 proteins could be distinguished by the analysis of the peptide maps; we designated these groups as 0, 1, 2, and 3. Group O includes NS1 proteins of human influenza virus serotype HON1, group 1 - NS1 proteins of viruses of serotypes H1N1 and H2N2, group 2 - NS1 proteins of viruses of serotype H3N2. NS1 proteins of avian influenza viruses A/duck Czechoslovakia/63, A/turkey Massachusetts/65, A/petrel Australia/1/71, A/duck Ukraine/63, and A/turkey Ontario/68 have been included into group 3. PMID:7336689

  16. Targeting the apoptotic machinery in pancreatic cancers using small-molecule antagonists of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    PubMed Central

    Karikari, Collins A.; Roy, Indrajit; Tryggestad, Eric; Feldmann, Georg; Pinilla, Clemencia; Welsh, Kate; Reed, John C.; Armour, Elwood P.; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph; Rakheja, Dinesh; Maitra, Anirban

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of many solid tumors, including pancreatic cancers, and may be the underlying basis for the suboptimal response to chemo-radiation therapies. Overexpression of a family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) is commonly observed in pancreatic malignancies. We determined the therapeutic efficacy of recently described small-molecule antagonists of the X-linked IAP (XIAP) in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. Primary pancreatic cancers were assessed for XIAP expression by immunohistochemistry, using a pancreatic cancer tissue microarray. XIAP small-molecule antagonists (“XAntag”; compounds 1396-11 and 1396-12) and the related compound 1396-28 were tested in vitro in a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc1, Capan1, and BxPC3) and in vivo in s.c. xenograft models for their ability to induce apoptosis and impede neoplastic growth. In addition, pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with XAntags in conjunction with either tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or with radiation to determine potential synergy for such dual targeting of the apoptotic machinery. XIAP was overexpressed in 14 of 18 (77%) of primary pancreatic cancers. The XAntags 1396-11 and 1396-12, but not the inactive isomer 1396-28, induced profound apoptosis in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines tested in vitro, with a IC50 in the range of 2 to 5 μmol/L. Mechanistic specificity of the XAntags for the baculoviral IAP repeat-2 domain of XIAP was shown by preferential activation of downstream “effector” caspases (caspase-3 and caspase-7) versus the upstream “initiator” caspase-9. S.c. BxPC3 xenograft growth in athymic mice was significantly inhibited by monotherapy with XAntags; treated xenografts showed marked apoptosis and increased cleavage of caspase-3. Notably, striking synergy was demonstrable when XAntags were combined with either TRAIL or radiation therapy, as measured by growth inhibition in

  17. High Mobility Group A proteins in esophageal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Palumbo Júnior, Antonio; Da Costa, Nathalia Meireles; Esposito, Francesco; Fusco, Alfredo; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro

    2016-09-16

    We have recently shown that HMGA2 is overexpressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its detection allows to discriminate between cancer and normal surrounding tissue proposing HMGA2 as a novel diagnostic marker. Interestingly, esophageal adenocarcinoma shows an opposite behavior with the overexpression of HMGA1 but not HMGA2. Moreover, we show that the suppression of HMGA2 in 2 ESCC cell lines reduces the malignant phenotype. Then, this paper highlights a differential induction of the HMGA proteins, depending on the cancer histological type, and reinforces the perspective of an innovative esophageal cancer therapy based on the suppression of the HMGA protein function and/or expression.

  18. Expression of group B protective surface protein (BPS) by invasive and colonizing isolates of group B streptococci.

    PubMed

    Flores, Aurea E; Chhatwal, G S; Hillier, Sharon L; Baker, Carol J; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Group B protective surface protein (BPS) is expressed on the cell surface of some group B streptococcal (GBS) (Streptococcus agalactiae) strains and adds to the identification by capsular polysaccharide (CPS), and c or R proteins. We investigated the prevalence of BPS among GBS clinical isolates (303 invasive, 4122 colonizing) collected over 11 years in four American cities. Hot HCl cell extracts were tested by immunoprecipitation in agarose with rabbit antisera to BPS; the alpha (α) and beta (β) components of c protein; R1, R3, and R4 species of R protein; and CPS serotypes Ia-VIII. BPS was found in 155 isolates (seven invasive, 148 colonizing). Of these, 87 were Ia, 37 II, 20 V; none were III. BPS was expressed usually with another protein: a species of R by 87 or a component of c by 39. The predominant CPS/protein profiles with BPS were Ia/R1,BPS and II/c(α + β),BPS. Thus, along with CPS serotype and other surface proteins, BPS can be a valuable marker for precise strain characterization of unique GBS clinical isolates with complex surface protein profiles.

  19. Polar Recognition Group Study of Keap1-Nrf2 Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng-Chen; Tan, Shi-Jie; Ji, Jian-Ai; Chen, Zhi-Yun; Yuan, Zhen-Wei; You, Qi-Dong; Jiang, Zheng-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Directly disrupting the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI) has emerged as an attractive way to activate Nrf2, and Keap1-Nrf2 PPI inhibitors have been proposed as potential agents to relieve inflammatory and oxidative stress diseases. In this work, we investigated the diacetic moiety around the potent Keap1-Nrf2 PPI inhibitor DDO1018 (2), which was reported by our group previously. Exploration of bioisosteric replacements afforded the ditetrazole analog 7, which maintains the potent PPI inhibition activity (IC50 = 15.8 nM) in an in vitro fluorescence polarization assay. Physicochemical property determination demonstrated that ditetrazole replacement can improve the drug-like property, including elevation of pK a, log D, and transcellular permeability. Additionally, 7 is more efficacious than 2 on inducing the expression of Nrf2-dependent gene products in cells. This study provides an alternative way to replace the diacetic moiety and occupy the polar subpockets in Keap1, which can benefit the subsequent development of Keap1-Nrf2 PPI inhibitor. PMID:27660687

  20. Conserved primary sequences of the DNA terminal proteins of five different human adenovirus groups.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Brackmann, K; Wold, W S; Cartas, M; Thornton, H; Elder, J H

    1979-09-01

    The 31 human adenoviruses (Ad) from five groups (A-E) whose DNAs are <20% homologous by molecular hybridization. Ad5 (group C) DNA contains a 55,000-dalton protein probably covalently bound to each 5' terminus. This covalently bound protein may be analogous to polypeptides found in other viral and nonviral systems that are covalently bound to genomic DNAs or RNAs and that are thought to function in DNA or RNA replication. Because of the importance of proteins linked to nucleic acids, we have investigated whether DNAs from all five groups of human adenoviruses have terminal proteins, as well as the peptide relationships among the different terminal proteins. We show here that DNAs from Ad12, 7, 2, 19, and 4, representing Ad groups A-E, respectively, all contain covalently bound proteins of about 55,000 daltons. To investigate the peptide relatedness among the terminal proteins, we prepared microgram quantities of covalently bound protein from Ads in groups A-E and compared their chymotryptic and tryptic (125)I-labeled peptide maps. We find that the covalently bound protein maps of the five Ad groups are highly related and possibly identical. On the other hand, the tryptic and chymotryptic peptide maps of the major virion protein II and the core proteins V and VII of groups B, C, and E Ads show considerable heterology. Assuming that the covalently bound protein is virally coded, the conserved primary sequence of these proteins suggests a major functional role for the protein in Ad replication. Because the genetic origin of the Ad covalently bound proteins is not established, our data are also consistent with the possibility that the protein is coded by a cellular gene.

  1. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1) Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Kudryavtsev, Denis; Bychkov, Maxim L; Kulbatskii, Dmitrii S; Kasheverov, Igor E; Astapova, Maria V; Feofanov, Alexey V; Thomsen, Morten S; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Tsetlin, Victor I; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2016-01-01

    SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and controls inflammation and malignant cell transformation. The majority of previous studies of SLURP-1 have been made using fusion constructs containing, in addition to the native protein, extra polypeptide sequences. Here we describe the activity and pharmacological profile of a recombinant analogue of human SLURP-1 (rSLURP-1) differing from the native protein only by one additional N-terminal Met residue. rSLURP-1 significantly inhibited proliferation (up to ~ 40%, EC50 ~ 4 nM) of human oral keratinocytes (Het-1A cells). Application of mecamylamine and atropine,--non-selective inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively to the α7-nAChRs. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7-nAChRs to rSLURP-1 caused a significant non-competitive inhibition of the response to acetylcholine (up to ~ 70%, IC50 ~ 1 μM). It was shown that rSLURP-1 binds to α7-nAChRs overexpressed in GH4Cl cells, but does not compete with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the receptor. These findings imply an allosteric antagonist-like mode of SLURP-1 interaction with α7-nAChRs outside the classical ligand-binding site. Contrary to rSLURP-1, other inhibitors of α7-nAChRs (mecamylamine, α-bungarotoxin and Lynx1) did not suppress the proliferation of keratinocytes. Moreover, the co-application of α-bungarotoxin with rSLURP-1 did not influence antiproliferative activity of the latter. This supports the hypothesis that

  2. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1) Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Kudryavtsev, Denis; Bychkov, Maxim L; Kulbatskii, Dmitrii S; Kasheverov, Igor E; Astapova, Maria V; Feofanov, Alexey V; Thomsen, Morten S; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Tsetlin, Victor I; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2016-01-01

    SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and controls inflammation and malignant cell transformation. The majority of previous studies of SLURP-1 have been made using fusion constructs containing, in addition to the native protein, extra polypeptide sequences. Here we describe the activity and pharmacological profile of a recombinant analogue of human SLURP-1 (rSLURP-1) differing from the native protein only by one additional N-terminal Met residue. rSLURP-1 significantly inhibited proliferation (up to ~ 40%, EC50 ~ 4 nM) of human oral keratinocytes (Het-1A cells). Application of mecamylamine and atropine,--non-selective inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively to the α7-nAChRs. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7-nAChRs to rSLURP-1 caused a significant non-competitive inhibition of the response to acetylcholine (up to ~ 70%, IC50 ~ 1 μM). It was shown that rSLURP-1 binds to α7-nAChRs overexpressed in GH4Cl cells, but does not compete with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the receptor. These findings imply an allosteric antagonist-like mode of SLURP-1 interaction with α7-nAChRs outside the classical ligand-binding site. Contrary to rSLURP-1, other inhibitors of α7-nAChRs (mecamylamine, α-bungarotoxin and Lynx1) did not suppress the proliferation of keratinocytes. Moreover, the co-application of α-bungarotoxin with rSLURP-1 did not influence antiproliferative activity of the latter. This supports the hypothesis that

  3. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1) Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kudryavtsev, Denis; Bychkov, Maxim L.; Kulbatskii, Dmitrii S.; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Astapova, Maria V.; Feofanov, Alexey V.; Thomsen, Morten S.; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Dolgikh, Dmitry A.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.

    2016-01-01

    SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and controls inflammation and malignant cell transformation. The majority of previous studies of SLURP-1 have been made using fusion constructs containing, in addition to the native protein, extra polypeptide sequences. Here we describe the activity and pharmacological profile of a recombinant analogue of human SLURP-1 (rSLURP-1) differing from the native protein only by one additional N-terminal Met residue. rSLURP-1 significantly inhibited proliferation (up to ~ 40%, EC50 ~ 4 nM) of human oral keratinocytes (Het-1A cells). Application of mecamylamine and atropine,—non-selective inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively to the α7-nAChRs. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7-nAChRs to rSLURP-1 caused a significant non-competitive inhibition of the response to acetylcholine (up to ~ 70%, IC50 ~ 1 μM). It was shown that rSLURP-1 binds to α7-nAChRs overexpressed in GH4Cl cells, but does not compete with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the receptor. These findings imply an allosteric antagonist-like mode of SLURP-1 interaction with α7-nAChRs outside the classical ligand-binding site. Contrary to rSLURP-1, other inhibitors of α7-nAChRs (mecamylamine, α-bungarotoxin and Lynx1) did not suppress the proliferation of keratinocytes. Moreover, the co-application of α-bungarotoxin with rSLURP-1 did not influence antiproliferative activity of the latter. This supports the hypothesis that

  4. The histamine H3 receptor antagonist clobenpropit enhances GABA release to protect against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity through the cAMP/protein kinase A pathway in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Dai, Haibin; Fu, Qiuli; Shen, Yao; Hu, Weiwei; Zhang, Zhongmiao; Timmerman, Henk; Leurs, Rob; Chen, Zhong

    2007-06-01

    Using the histamine H3 receptor antagonist clobenpropit, the roles of histamine H3 receptors in NMDA-induced necrosis were investigated in rat cultured cortical neurons. Clobenpropit reversed the neurotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner, and showed peak protection at a concentration of 10(-7) M. This protection was antagonized by the histamine H3 receptor agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine, but not by the histamine H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine or the histamine H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine. In addition, the protection by clobenpropit was inhibited by the GABAA receptor antagonists picrotoxin and bicuculline. Further study demonstrated that the protection by clobenpropit was due to increased GABA release. The inducible GABA release was also inhibited by (R)-alpha-methylhistamine, but not by pyrilamine or cimetidine. Furthermore, both the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536 and the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 reversed the protection and the GABA release by clobenpropit. In addition, clobenpropit reversed the NMDA-induced increase in intracellular calcium level, which was antagonized by (R)-alpha-methylhistamine. These results indicate that clobenpropit enhanced GABA release to protect against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity, which was induced through the cAMP/PKA pathway, and reduction of intracellular calcium level may also be involved.

  5. The Polycomb Group Protein EED Interacts with YY1, and Both Proteins Induce Neural Tissue in Xenopus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Satijn, David P. E.; Hamer, Karien M.; den Blaauwen, Jan; Otte, Arie P.

    2001-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form multimeric protein complexes which are involved in the heritable stable repression of genes. Previously, we identified two distinct human PcG protein complexes. The EED-EZH protein complex contains the EED and EZH2 PcG proteins, and the HPC-HPH PcG complex contains the HPC, HPH, BMI1, and RING1 PcG proteins. Here we show that YY1, a homolog of the Drosophila PcG protein pleiohomeotic (Pho), interacts specificially with the human PcG protein EED but not with proteins of the HPC-HPH PcG complex. Since YY1 and Pho are DNA-binding proteins, the interaction between YY1 and EED provides a direct link between the chromatin-associated EED-EZH PcG complex and the DNA of target genes. To study the functional significance of the interaction, we expressed the Xenopus homologs of EED and YY1 in Xenopus embryos. Both Xeed and XYY1 induce an ectopic neural axis but do not induce mesodermal tissues. In contrast, members of the HPC-HPH PcG complex do not induce neural tissue. The exclusive, direct neuralizing activity of both the Xeed and XYY1 proteins underlines the significance of the interaction between the two proteins. Our data also indicate a role for chromatin-associated proteins, such as PcG proteins, in Xenopus neural induction. PMID:11158321

  6. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) and IL-1-receptor antagonist (IL-1-RA) in middle ear cholesteatoma: an analysis of protein production and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Bujía, J; Kim, C; Ostos, P; Sudhoff, H; Kastenbauer, E; Hültner, L

    1996-01-01

    Cytokine networks are now presumed to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of middle ear cholesteatoma. Of the factors identified in cholesteatoma, interleukin-I (IL-1)-alpha appears to be especially important because of its stimulation of keratinocyte proliferation as well induction of bone resorption. To further characterize the possible role of IL-1 in the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma, we quantified the levels of IL-1 and IL-1-receptor antagonist (IL-1-RA) present using the bicinchonic acid protein assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on tissue extracts from 20 cholesteatoma specimens. The presence of biologically active IL-1 was also analyzed, using the cell line LBRM-33 and an ELISA for the detection of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Human skin obtained from the external ear canal was used as control. The amounts of IL-1-alpha in cholesteatoma (34.9 +/- 19.5) were higher than in human skin (6.7 +/- 2.8). The observed differences were statistically significant by Student's t-test (P < 0.01). Skin samples showed elevated concentrations of IL-1-RA (248.3 +/- 30.2) in comparison to that in the cholesteatoma (80.8 +/- 13.5). This was also statistically significant (P < 0.01). Whereas IL-1 activity was not detected in skin samples, all cholesteatoma specimens studied showed a stimulation effect on the production of IL-2 when incubated with the cell line LBRM-33. The results point to an over-expression of IL-1 concurrent with a decreased secretion of IL-1-RA in middle ear cholesteatoma. Furthermore IL-1-RA production is deficient relative to total IL-1 production, resulting in the presence of active IL-1.

  7. Control of Protein and Sterol Trafficking by Antagonistic Activities of a Type IV P-type ATPase and Oxysterol Binding Protein Homologue

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Baby-Periyanayaki; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Natarajan, Paramasivam; Abe, Fumiyoshi; Liu, Ke; Prinz, William A.

    2009-01-01

    The oxysterol binding protein homologue Kes1p has been implicated in nonvesicular sterol transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Kes1p also represses formation of protein transport vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) through an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that potential phospholipid translocases in the Drs2/Dnf family (type IV P-type ATPases [P4-ATPases]) are downstream targets of Kes1p repression. Disruption of KES1 suppresses the cold-sensitive (cs) growth defect of drs2Δ, which correlates with an enhanced ability of Dnf P4-ATPases to functionally substitute for Drs2p. Loss of Kes1p also suppresses a drs2-ts allele in a strain deficient for Dnf P4-ATPases, suggesting that Kes1p antagonizes Drs2p activity in vivo. Indeed, Drs2-dependent phosphatidylserine translocase (flippase) activity is hyperactive in TGN membranes from kes1Δ cells and is potently attenuated by addition of recombinant Kes1p. Surprisingly, Drs2p also antagonizes Kes1p activity in vivo. Drs2p deficiency causes a markedly increased rate of cholesterol transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and redistribution of endogenous ergosterol to intracellular membranes, phenotypes that are Kes1p dependent. These data suggest a homeostatic feedback mechanism in which appropriately regulated flippase activity in the Golgi complex helps establish a plasma membrane phospholipid organization that resists sterol extraction by a sterol binding protein. PMID:19403696

  8. Control of protein and sterol trafficking by antagonistic activities of a type IV P-type ATPase and oxysterol binding protein homologue.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Baby-Periyanayaki; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Natarajan, Paramasivam; Abe, Fumiyoshi; Liu, Ke; Prinz, William A; Graham, Todd R

    2009-06-01

    The oxysterol binding protein homologue Kes1p has been implicated in nonvesicular sterol transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Kes1p also represses formation of protein transport vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) through an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that potential phospholipid translocases in the Drs2/Dnf family (type IV P-type ATPases [P4-ATPases]) are downstream targets of Kes1p repression. Disruption of KES1 suppresses the cold-sensitive (cs) growth defect of drs2Delta, which correlates with an enhanced ability of Dnf P4-ATPases to functionally substitute for Drs2p. Loss of Kes1p also suppresses a drs2-ts allele in a strain deficient for Dnf P4-ATPases, suggesting that Kes1p antagonizes Drs2p activity in vivo. Indeed, Drs2-dependent phosphatidylserine translocase (flippase) activity is hyperactive in TGN membranes from kes1Delta cells and is potently attenuated by addition of recombinant Kes1p. Surprisingly, Drs2p also antagonizes Kes1p activity in vivo. Drs2p deficiency causes a markedly increased rate of cholesterol transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and redistribution of endogenous ergosterol to intracellular membranes, phenotypes that are Kes1p dependent. These data suggest a homeostatic feedback mechanism in which appropriately regulated flippase activity in the Golgi complex helps establish a plasma membrane phospholipid organization that resists sterol extraction by a sterol binding protein.

  9. Macroevolutionary trends of atomic composition and related functional group proportion in eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Juan; Yang, Chun-Lin; Hao, You-Jin; Li, Ying; Chen, Bin; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2014-01-25

    To fully explore the trends of atomic composition during the macroevolution from prokaryote to eukaryote, five atoms (oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen) and related functional groups in prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins were surveyed and compared. Genome-wide analysis showed that eukaryotic proteins have more oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen atoms than prokaryotes do. Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) analysis revealed that oxygen, sulfur, carbon and hydrogen frequencies are higher in eukaryotic proteins than in their prokaryotic orthologs. Furthermore, functional group analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic proteins tend to have higher proportions of sulfhydryl, hydroxyl and acylamino, but lower of sulfide and carboxyl. Taken together, an apparent trend of increase was observed for oxygen and sulfur atoms in the macroevolution; the variation of oxygen and sulfur compositions and their related functional groups in macroevolution made eukaryotic proteins carry more useful functional groups. These results will be helpful for better understanding the functional significances of atomic composition evolution.

  10. Volumetric characterization of interactions of glycine betaine with protein groups.

    PubMed

    Shek, Yuen Lai; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2011-10-01

    We report the partial molar volumes and adiabatic compressibilities of N-acetyl amino acid amides and oligoglycines at glycine betaine (GB) concentrations ranging from 0 to 4 M. We use these results to evaluate the volumetric contributions of amino acid side chains and the glycyl unit (-CH(2)CONH-) as a function of GB concentration. We analyze the resulting GB dependences within the framework of a statistical thermodynamic model and evaluate the equilibrium constant for the reaction in which a GB molecule binds each of the functionalities under study replacing four water molecules. We calculate the free energy of the transfer of functional groups from water to concentrated GB solutions, ΔG(tr), as the sum of a change in the free energy of cavity formation, ΔΔG(C), and the differential free energy of solute-solvent interactions, ΔΔG(I), in a concentrated GB solution and water. Our results suggest that the transfer free energy, ΔG(tr), results from a fine balance between the large ΔΔG(C) and ΔΔG(I) contributions. The range of the magnitudes and the shape of the GB dependence of ΔG(tr) depend on the identity of a specific solute group. The interplay between ΔΔG(C) and ΔΔG(I) results in pronounced maxima in the GB dependences of ΔG(tr) for the Val, Leu, Ile, Trp, Tyr, and Gln side chains as well as the glycyl unit. This observation is in qualitative agreement with the experimental maxima in the T(M)-versus-GB concentration plots reported for ribonuclease A and lysozyme.

  11. High mobility group-like proteins of the insect Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed

    Aleporou-Marinou, Vassiliki; Drosos, Yianis; Ninios, Yiannis; Agelopoulou, Barbara; Patargias, Theocharis

    2003-02-01

    Nuclei from Plodia interpunctella larvae contain four major proteins, which are extracted by 5% perchloric acid and 0.35 M NaCl. The proteins have been designated PL1, PL2, PL3, and PL4. The amino acid analyses of these proteins show that they have high proportions of acidic and basic amino acid residues, a property characteristic of the high mobility group (HMG) proteins isolated from vertebrate tissues. Immunological characterication of these proteins clearly shows that PL1, PL2, and PL4 are more closely related to HMG1 dipteran proteins, while PL3 is more closely related to HMG1 dipteran proteins. The possible relatedness of these proteins to HMG proteins is discussed.

  12. Turnover of the 4'-phosphopantetheine prosthetic group of acyl carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, S; Rock, C O

    1984-02-10

    Acyl carrier protein is an essential cofactor in fatty acid biosynthesis, and in contrast to the stability of the protein moiety during growth, its 4'-phosphopantetheine prosthetic group is metabolically active. The biosynthetic incorporation of deuterium into nonexchangeable positions of acyl carrier protein was found to enhance the sensitivity of the protein to pH-induced hydrodynamic expansion. This constitutional isotope effect was exploited to separate deuterated from normal acyl carrier protein by conformationally sensitive gel electrophoresis, thus providing the analytical framework for separating pre-existing (deuterated) from newly synthesized acyl carrier protein in pulse-chase experiments. The rate of acyl carrier protein prosthetic group turnover was found to depend on the intracellular concentration of coenzyme A. At low coenzyme A levels, prosthetic group turnover was four times faster than the rate of new acyl carrier protein biosynthesis but at the higher coenzyme A concentrations characteristic of logarithmic growth, turnover was an order of magnitude slower, amounting to approximately 25% of the acyl carrier protein pool per generation. These observations suggest that the acyl carrier protein prosthetic group turnover cycle may be related to coenzyme A metabolism rather than to lipid biosynthesis.

  13. Vagal modulation of high mobility group box-1 protein mediates electroacupuncture-induced cardioprotection in ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Yong, Yue; Li, Xing; Hu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong-qiang; Song, Wei; Chen, Wen-ting; Xie, Jian; Chen, Xue-mei; Lv, Xin; Hou, Li-li; Wang, Ke; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Xiang-rui; Song, Jian-gang

    2015-01-01

    Excessive release of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein from ischemic cardiomyocytes activates inflammatory cascades and enhances myocardial injury after reperfusion. Here we report evidence that electroacupuncture of mice at Neiguan acupoints can inhibit the up-regulation of cardiac HMGB1 following myocardial ischemia and attenuate the associated inflammatory responses and myocardial injury during reperfusion. These benefits of electroacupuncture were partially reversed by administering recombinant HMGB1 to the mice, and further potentiated by administering anti-HMGB1 antibody. Electroacupuncture-induced inhibition of HMGB1 release was markedly reduced by unilateral vagotomy or administration of nicotinic receptor antagonist, but not by chemical sympathectomy. The cholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine mimicked the effects of electroacupuncture on HMGB1 release and myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Culture experiments with isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes showed that acetylcholine, but not noradrenaline, inhibited hypoxia-induced release of HMGB1 via a α7nAchR-dependent pathway. These results suggest that electroacupuncture acts via the vagal nerve and its nicotinic receptor-mediated signaling to inhibit HMGB1 release from ischemic cardiomyocytes. This helps attenuate pro-inflammatory responses and myocardial injury during reperfusion. PMID:26499847

  14. Pho85p, a cyclin-dependent protein kinase, and the Snf1p protein kinase act antagonistically to control glycogen accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, D; Farkas, I; Roach, P J

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient levels control multiple cellular processes. Cells lacking the SNF1 gene cannot express glucose-repressible genes and do not accumulate the storage polysaccharide glycogen. The impaired glycogen synthesis is due to maintenance of glycogen synthase in a hyperphosphorylated, inactive state. In a screen for second site suppressors of the glycogen storage defect of snf1 cells, we identified a mutant gene that restored glycogen accumulation and which was allelic with PHO85, which encodes a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family. In cells with disrupted PHO85 genes, we observed hyperaccumulation of glycogen, activation of glycogen synthase, and impaired glycogen synthase kinase activity. In snf1 cells, glycogen synthase kinase activity was elevated. Partial purification of glycogen synthase kinase activity from yeast extracts resulted in the separation of two fractions by phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, both of which phosphorylated and inactivated glycogen synthase. The activity of one of these, GPK2, was inhibited by olomoucine, which potently inhibits cyclin-dependent protein kinases, and contained an approximately 36-kDa species that reacted with antibodies to Pho85p. Analysis of Ser-to-Ala mutations at the three potential Gsy2p phosphorylation sites in pho85 cells implicated Ser-654 and/or Thr-667 in PHO85 control of glycogen synthase. We propose that Pho85p is a physiological glycogen synthase kinase, possibly acting downstream of Snf1p. PMID:8754836

  15. Random antagonistic matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, Giovanni M.; Molinari, Luca Guido

    2016-09-01

    The ensemble of antagonistic matrices is introduced and studied. In antagonistic matrices the entries {{ A }}i,j and {{ A }}j,i are real and have opposite signs, or are both zero, and the diagonal is zero. This generalization of antisymmetric matrices is suggested by the linearized dynamics of competitive species in ecology.

  16. Divergence of function in sequence-related groups of Escherichia coli proteins.

    PubMed

    Nahum, L A; Riley, M

    2001-08-01

    The most prominent mechanism of molecular evolution is believed to have been duplication and divergence of genes. Proteins that belong to sequence-related groups in any one organism are candidates to have emerged from such a process and to share a common ancestor. Groups of proteins in Escherichia coli having sequence similarity are mostly composed of proteins with closely related function, but some groups comprise proteins with unrelated functions. In order to understand how function can change while sequences remain similar, we have examined some of these groups in detail. The enzymes analyzed in this work include representatives of amidotransferases, phosphotransferases, decarboxylases, and others. Most sequence-related groups contain enzymes that are in the same classes of Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers. We have concentrated on groups that are heterogeneous in that respect, and also on groups containing more than one enzyme of any pathway. We find that although the EC number may differ, the reaction chemistry of these sequence-related proteins is the same or very similar. Some of these families illustrate how diversification has taken place in evolution, using common features of either reaction chemistry or ligand specificity, or both, to create catalysts for different kinds of biochemical reactions. This information has relevance to the area of functional genomics in which the activities of gene products of unknown reading frames are attributed by analogy to the functions of sequence-related proteins of known function.

  17. Isotope-Encoded Carboxyl Group Footprinting for Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Conformational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    We report an isotope-encoding method coupled with carboxyl-group footprinting to monitor protein conformational changes. The carboxyl groups of aspartic/glutamic acids and of the C-terminus of proteins can serve as reporters for protein conformational changes when labeled with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) mediated by carbodiimide. In the new development, isotope-encoded "heavy" and "light" GEE are used to label separately the two states of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) from cyanobacteria. Two samples are mixed (1:1 ratio) and analyzed by a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The differences in labeling extent between the two states are represented by the ratio of the "heavy" and "light" peptides, providing information about protein conformational changes. Combining isotope-encoded MS quantitative analysis and carboxyl-group footprinting reduces the time of MS analysis and improves the sensitivity of GEE and other footprinting.

  18. Cotranscriptional splicing of a group I intron is facilitated by the Cbp2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.S.; Thomas, J. Jr.; Tirupati, H.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates the coupling between transcription and splicing of a mitochondrial group I intron in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the effect of the Cbp2 protein on splicing. 65 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Successful Conversion of the Bacillus subtilis BirA Group II Biotin Protein Ligase into a Group I Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Sarah K.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Group II biotin protein ligases (BPLs) are characterized by the presence of an N-terminal DNA binding domain that allows transcriptional regulation of biotin biosynthetic and transport genes whereas Group I BPLs lack this N-terminal domain. The Bacillus subtilis BPL, BirA, is classified as a Group II BPL based on sequence predictions of an N-terminal helix-turn-helix motif and mutational alteration of its regulatory properties. We report evidence that B. subtilis BirA is a Group II BPL that regulates transcription at three genomic sites: bioWAFDBI, yuiG and yhfUTS. Moreover, unlike the paradigm Group II BPL, E. coli BirA, the N-terminal DNA binding domain can be deleted from Bacillus subtilis BirA without adverse effects on its ligase function. This is the first example of successful conversion of a Group II BPL to a Group I BPL with retention of full ligase activity. PMID:24816803

  20. Conserved patterns hidden within group A Streptococcus M protein hypervariability recognize human C4b-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Buffalo, Cosmo Z; Bahn-Suh, Adrian J; Hirakis, Sophia P; Biswas, Tapan; Amaro, Rommie E; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2016-01-01

    No vaccine exists against group A Streptococcus (GAS), a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. A severe hurdle is the hypervariability of its major antigen, the M protein, with >200 different M types known. Neutralizing antibodies typically recognize M protein hypervariable regions (HVRs) and confer narrow protection. In stark contrast, human C4b-binding protein (C4BP), which is recruited to the GAS surface to block phagocytic killing, interacts with a remarkably large number of M protein HVRs (apparently ∼90%). Such broad recognition is rare, and we discovered a unique mechanism for this through the structure determination of four sequence-diverse M proteins in complexes with C4BP. The structures revealed a uniform and tolerant 'reading head' in C4BP, which detected conserved sequence patterns hidden within hypervariability. Our results open up possibilities for rational therapies that target the M-C4BP interaction, and also inform a path towards vaccine design. PMID:27595425

  1. 2-Phenylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-containing ligands of the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) behave as agonists and antagonists of steroidogenesis in a mouse leydig tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Midzak, Andrew; Denora, Nunzio; Laquintana, Valentino; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Lopedota, Angela; Franco, Massimo; Altomare, Cosimo D; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-08-30

    Ligands of 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) are known for their ability to potently and dose-dependently stimulate steroid biosynthesis in steroidogenic cells. In this study, we investigated a number of 2-phenyl-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamide derivatives, analogs of alpidem, for their ability to bind TSPO and to affect steroidogenesis in a mouse Leydig tumor cell line. We observed that not only some compounds behaved as agonists, stimulating steroidogenesis (e.g., 3 and 4) with EC50 values (15.9 and 6.99μM) close to that determined for FGIN-1-27 used as positive control (7.24μM), but two compounds, namely 5 and 6, which on the other hand are the most lipophilic ones in the investigated series, behaved as antagonists, by significantly inhibiting steroid production at concentrations at least twenty times lower than the cytotoxic ones. To our surprise, the newly synthesized compound 3, which is a strict analog of alpidem bearing at the para position of the 2-phenyl group a methoxy group instead of chlorine, achieved a ten-fold stimulation of the steroid production (for comparison FGIN-1-27 achieved 1.6-fold stimulation). Within the limits of the examined property space, some unprecedented SARs were unveiled, which can help in understanding the key molecular factors underlying the transition from agonism to antagonism in the steroidogenesis process. Besides the substitution pattern and the physicochemical features (mainly hydrogen bonding potential) of the substituents at the positions C(6) and C(8) of the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine nucleus, and at the para position of the 2-phenyl group, the structure-activity relationship analysis suggested lipophilicity, whose increase seems to be generally related to steroidogenesis inhibition, and steric hindrance, which appeared as a stimulation-limiting factor, as two main properties to control in the design or optimization of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-based TSPO ligands endowed with potential in modulating the

  2. Effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and CXCR4 antagonist on tumor growth and angiogenesis in rat glioma model: MRI and protein analysis study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Meser M; Kumar, Sanath; Shankar, Adarsh; Varma, Nadimpalli R S; Iskander, A S M; Janic, Branislava; Chwang, Wilson B; Jain, Rajan; Babajeni-Feremi, Abbas; Borin, Thaiz F; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Brown, Stephen L; Ewing, James R; Arbab, Ali S

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the antiangiogenic efficacy of vatalanib, sunitinib, and AMD3100 in an animal model of human glioblastoma (GBM) by using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and tumor protein expression analysis. Orthotopic GBM-bearing animals were randomly assigned either to control group or vatalanib, sunitinib, and AMD3100 treatment groups. Following 2 weeks of drug treatment, tumor growth and vascular parameters were measured using DCE-MRI. Expression of different angiogenic factors in tumor extracts was measured using a membrane-based human antibody array kit. Tumor angiogenesis and invasion were determined by immunohistochemistry. DCE-MRI showed a significant increase in tumor size after vatalanib treatment. AMD3100-treated group showed a significant decrease in a number of vascular parameters determined by DCE-MRI. AMD3100 significantly decreased the expression of different angiogenic factors compared to sunitinib or vatalanib; however, there were no significant changes in vascular density among the groups. Sunitinib-treated animals showed significantly higher migration of the invasive cells, whereas in both vatalanib- and AMD3100-treated animals the invasive cell migration distance was significantly lower compared to that of control. Vatalanib and sunitinib resulted in suboptimal therapeutic effect, but AMD3100 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth, permeability, interstitial space volume, and invasion of tumor cells in an animal model of GBM. PMID:24466368

  3. Structure-Based Optimization of a Small Molecule Antagonist of the Interaction Between WD Repeat-Containing Protein 5 (WDR5) and Mixed-Lineage Leukemia 1 (MLL1).

    PubMed

    Getlik, Matthäus; Smil, David; Zepeda-Velázquez, Carlos; Bolshan, Yuri; Poda, Gennady; Wu, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Marcellus, Richard; Senisterra, Guillermo; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Hajian, Taraneh; Kiyota, Taira; Schapira, Matthieu; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Brown, Peter J; Vedadi, Masoud; Al-Awar, Rima

    2016-03-24

    WD repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5) is an important component of the multiprotein complex essential for activating mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1). Rearrangement of the MLL1 gene is associated with onset and progression of acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemias, and targeting the WDR5-MLL1 interaction may result in new cancer therapeutics. Our previous work showed that binding of small molecule ligands to WDR5 can modulate its interaction with MLL1, suppressing MLL1 methyltransferase activity. Initial structure-activity relationship studies identified N-(2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-substituted-phenyl) benzamides as potent and selective antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. Guided by crystal structure data and supported by in silico library design, we optimized the scaffold by varying the C-1 benzamide and C-5 substituents. This allowed us to develop the first highly potent (Kdisp < 100 nM) small molecule antagonists of the WDR5-MLL1 interaction and demonstrate that N-(4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-3'-(morpholinomethyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl)-6-oxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1,6-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide 16d (OICR-9429) is a potent and selective chemical probe suitable to help dissect the biological role of WDR5. PMID:26958703

  4. Structure-Based Optimization of a Small Molecule Antagonist of the Interaction Between WD Repeat-Containing Protein 5 (WDR5) and Mixed-Lineage Leukemia 1 (MLL1).

    PubMed

    Getlik, Matthäus; Smil, David; Zepeda-Velázquez, Carlos; Bolshan, Yuri; Poda, Gennady; Wu, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Marcellus, Richard; Senisterra, Guillermo; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Hajian, Taraneh; Kiyota, Taira; Schapira, Matthieu; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Brown, Peter J; Vedadi, Masoud; Al-Awar, Rima

    2016-03-24

    WD repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5) is an important component of the multiprotein complex essential for activating mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1). Rearrangement of the MLL1 gene is associated with onset and progression of acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemias, and targeting the WDR5-MLL1 interaction may result in new cancer therapeutics. Our previous work showed that binding of small molecule ligands to WDR5 can modulate its interaction with MLL1, suppressing MLL1 methyltransferase activity. Initial structure-activity relationship studies identified N-(2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-substituted-phenyl) benzamides as potent and selective antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. Guided by crystal structure data and supported by in silico library design, we optimized the scaffold by varying the C-1 benzamide and C-5 substituents. This allowed us to develop the first highly potent (Kdisp < 100 nM) small molecule antagonists of the WDR5-MLL1 interaction and demonstrate that N-(4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-3'-(morpholinomethyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl)-6-oxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1,6-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide 16d (OICR-9429) is a potent and selective chemical probe suitable to help dissect the biological role of WDR5.

  5. Effects of surface functional groups on the formation of nanoparticle-protein corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podila, R.; Chen, R.; Ke, P. C.; Brown, J. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Herein, we examined the dependence of protein adsorption on the nanoparticle surface in the presence of functional groups. Our UV-visible spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering measurements evidently suggested that the functional groups play an important role in the formation of nanoparticle-protein corona. We found that uncoated and surfactant-free silver nanoparticles derived from a laser ablation process promoted a maximum protein (bovine serum albumin) coating due to increased changes in entropy. On the other hand, bovine serum albumin displayed a relatively lower affinity for electrostatically stabilized nanoparticles due to the constrained entropy changes.

  6. Generation of a Potent Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Antagonist by Engineering a Stable Form of the Receptor-associated Protein (RAP) D3 Domain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Migliorini, Mary; Galisteo, Rebeca; Strickland, Dudley K

    2015-07-10

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family and plays important roles in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Expression of LRP1 requires the receptor-associated protein (RAP), a molecular chaperone that binds LRP1 and other low density lipoprotein receptor family members in the endoplasmic reticulum and traffics with them to the Golgi where the acidic environment causes its dissociation. Exogenously added RAP is a potent LRP1 antagonist and binds to LRP1 on the cell surface, preventing ligands from binding. Following endocytosis, RAP dissociates in the acidic endosome, allowing LRP1 to recycle back to the cell surface. The acid-induced dissociation of RAP is mediated by its D3 domain, a relatively unstable three-helical bundle that denatures at pH <6.2 due to protonation of key histidine residues on helices 2 and 3. To develop an LRP1 inhibitor that does not dissociate at low pH, we introduced a disulfide bond between the second and third helices in the RAP D3 domain. By combining this disulfide bond with elimination of key histidine residues, we generated a stable RAP molecule that is resistant to both pH- and heat-induced denaturation. This molecule bound to LRP1 with high affinity at both neutral and acidic pH and proved to be a potent inhibitor of LRP1 function both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that our stable RAP molecule may be useful in multiple pathological settings where LRP1 blockade has been shown to be effective.

  7. Influence of additional load on the moments of the agonist and antagonist muscle groups at the knee joint during closed chain exercise.

    PubMed

    Rao, Guillaume; Amarantini, David; Berton, Eric

    2009-06-01

    The present study investigated the influence of additional loads on the knee net joint moment, flexor and extensor muscle group moments, and cocontraction index during a closed chain exercise. Loads of 8, 28, or 48 kg (i.e., respectively, 11.1+/-1.5%, 38.8+/-5.3%, and 66.4+/-9.0% of body mass) were added to subjects during dynamic half squats. The flexor and extensor muscular moments and the amount of cocontraction were estimated at the knee joint using an EMG-and-optimization model that includes kinematics, ground reaction, and EMG measurements as inputs. In general, our results showed a significant influence of the Load factor on the net knee joint moment, the extensor muscular moment, and the flexor muscle group moment (all Anova p<.05). Hence we confirmed an increase in muscle moments with increasing load and moreover, we also showed an original "more than proportional" evolution of the flexor and extensor muscle group moments relative to the knee net joint moment. An influence of the Phase (i.e., descent vs. ascent) factor was also seen, revealing different activation strategies from the central nervous system depending on the mode of contraction of the agonist muscle group. The results of the present work could find applications in clinical fields, especially for rehabilitation protocols.

  8. Membrane cofactor protein (CD46) is a keratinocyte receptor for the M protein of the group A streptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, N; Liszewski, M K; Atkinson, J P; Caparon, M

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is the causative agent of numerous suppurative diseases of human skin. The M protein of S. pyogenes mediates the adherence of the bacterium to keratinocytes, the most numerous cell type in the epidermis. In this study, we have constructed and analyzed a series of mutant M proteins and have shown that the C repeat domain of the M molecule is responsible for cell recognition. The binding of factor H, a serum regulator of complement activation, to the C repeat region of M protein blocked bacterial adherence. Factor H is a member of a large family of complement regulatory proteins that share a homologous structural motif termed the short consensus repeat. Membrane cofactor protein (MCP), or CD46, is a short consensus repeat-containing protein found on the surface of keratinocytes, and purified MCP could competitively inhibit the adherence of S. pyogenes to these cells. Furthermore, the M protein was found to bind directly to MCP, whereas mutant M proteins that lacked the C repeat domain did not bind MCP, suggesting that recognition of MCP plays an important role in the ability of the streptococcus to adhere to keratinocytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708671

  9. Colorimetric analysis of protein sulfhydryl groups in milk: applications and processing effects.

    PubMed

    Owusu-Apenten, R

    2005-01-01

    Methods for protein sulfhydryl (SH) group analysis in food systems have been largely overlooked. Nevertheless, changes in SH group concentration affect both physical and nutritional characteristics of high protein foods and ingredients. Food scientists and technologists require improved understanding of protein SH chemistry in order to design processes that minimize loss of thiol groups. This article surveys colorimetric methods for food protein SH group analysis with applications to fluid milk and dried milk powder. Most colorimetric assays (chloromeribenzoate, pyridine disulfide, Nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole, papain reactivation assay, etc.) were found to be inferior to the Ellman method based on the use of 5,5'dithio (bis-2 nitro benzoic acid). Techniques for SH group analysis in fluid milk and dried milk powder are described, along with typical results, their interpretations, and current research related to processing effects and the role of milk SH content on a wider range of technological issues, such as development of cooked flavors, fouling and cleaning of plate heat exchanges, protein-protein interactions, and the storage stability. Finally, a number of areas requiring further research are presented.

  10. Identification and baculovirus expression of the VP4 protein of the human group B rotavirus ADRV.

    PubMed Central

    Mackow, E R; Werner-Eckert, R; Fay, M E; Tao, H; Chen, G

    1993-01-01

    A complete cDNA copy of the fourth RNA segment of the human group B rotavirus adult diarrheal rotavirus (ADRV) has been cloned into lambda phage and excised into plasmid pSK Bluescript. Gene segment 4 contains 2,303 bases and encodes one long open reading frame beginning at base 16 and terminating at base 2263. The encoded protein contains 749 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 84.4 kDa and a pI of 6.1. Gene 4 cDNA was inserted into a recombinant baculovirus via homologous recombination. The gene 4 polypeptide migrates at 84 kDa when expressed either by a recombinant baculovirus or in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate. The gene 4 protein is immunoprecipitable by hyperimmune serum to ADRV, human ADRV convalescent-phase serum, a porcine group B rotavirus infection serum, and a monoclonal antibody made to ADRV virion. Guinea pig hyperimmune serum to the baculovirus-expressed ADRV VP4 protein recognizes virus and immunoprecipitates an 84-kDa protein from in vitro translations of total ADRV mRNA. In addition, the gene 4-encoded protein shares significant amino acid identity and similarity with the group A rotavirus VP4 protein. This information, together with our previous identification of an 84-kDa protein present on iodinated intact virion but not EDTA-treated ADRV, suggests that gene 4 encodes the VP4 protein equivalent present on the outer capsid of ADRV. The ADRV VP4 protein is also 58% identical to the IDIR rat group B rotavirus gene segment 3 protein. The substantial differences between these two group B VP4 proteins suggests that they are distantly related and likely to define two different group B rotavirus VP4 serotypes. The baculovirus-expressed VP4 protein should be useful for developing serotyping reagents and tests for human and animal group B rotaviruses as well as for addressing the role of VP4 in ADRV neutralization. Images PMID:8386274

  11. Kicking against the PRCs – A Domesticated Transposase Antagonises Silencing Mediated by Polycomb Group Proteins and Is an Accessory Component of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Pumi; Mora-García, Santiago; de Leau, Erica; Thornton, Harry; de Alves, Flavia Lima; Rapsilber, Juri; Yang, Suxin; James, Geo Velikkakam; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Finnegan, E. Jean; Turck, Franziska; Goodrich, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) genes play crucial roles in development by regulating expression of homeotic and other genes controlling cell fate. Both groups catalyse modifications of chromatin, particularly histone methylation, leading to epigenetic changes that affect gene activity. The trxG antagonizes the function of PcG genes by activating PcG target genes, and consequently trxG mutants suppress PcG mutant phenotypes. We previously identified the ANTAGONIST OF LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (ALP1) gene as a genetic suppressor of mutants in the Arabidopsis PcG gene LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). Here, we show that ALP1 interacts genetically with several other PcG and trxG components and that it antagonizes PcG silencing. Transcriptional profiling reveals that when PcG activity is compromised numerous target genes are hyper-activated in seedlings and that in most cases this requires ALP1. Furthermore, when PcG activity is present ALP1 is needed for full activation of several floral homeotic genes that are repressed by the PcG. Strikingly, ALP1 does not encode a known chromatin protein but rather a protein related to PIF/Harbinger class transposases. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ALP1 is broadly conserved in land plants and likely lost transposase activity and acquired a novel function during angiosperm evolution. Consistent with this, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry (IP-MS) show that ALP1 associates, in vivo, with core components of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX 2 (PRC2), a widely conserved PcG protein complex which functions as a H3K27me3 histone methyltransferase. Furthermore, in reciprocal pulldowns using the histone methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF), we identify not only ALP1 and the core PRC2 components but also plant-specific accessory components including EMBRYONIC FLOWER 1 (EMF1), a transcriptional repressor previously associated with PRC1-like complexes. Taken together our data suggest that ALP1 inhibits Pc

  12. Trapping Open and Closed Forms of FitE-A Group III Periplasmic Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, R.; Proteau, A; Wagner, J; Cui, Q; Purisima, E; Matte, A; Cygler, M

    2009-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are essential components of bacterial transport systems, necessary for bacterial growth and survival. The two-domain structures of PBPs are topologically classified into three groups based on the number of crossovers or hinges between the globular domains: group I PBPs have three connections, group II have two, and group III have only one. Although a large number of structures for group I or II PBPs are known, fewer group III PBPs have been structurally characterized. Group I and II PBPs exhibit significant domain motions during transition from the unbound to ligand-bound form, however, no large conformational changes have been observed to date in group III PBPs. We have solved the crystal structure of a periplasmic binding protein FitE, part of an iron transport system, fit, recently identified in a clinical E. coli isolate. The structure, determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, shows that FitE is a group III PBP containing a single {alpha}-helix bridging the two domains. Among the individual FitE molecules present in two crystal forms we observed three different conformations (open, closed, intermediate). Our crystallographic and molecular dynamics results strongly support the notion that group III PBPs also adopt the same Venus flytrap mechanism as do groups I and II PBPs. Unlike other group III PBPs, FitE forms dimers both in solution and in the crystals. The putative siderophore binding pocket is lined with arginine residues, suggesting an anionic nature of the iron-containing siderophore.

  13. Ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow in the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.): an Hev b 7-like protein acts as a universal antagonist of rubber particle aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min-Jing; Cai, Fu-Ge; Tian, Wei-Min

    2016-02-01

    Ethrel is the most effective stimuli in prolonging the latex flow that consequently increases yield per tapping. This effect is largely ascribed to the enhanced lutoid stability, which is associated with the decreased release of initiators of rubber particle (RP) aggregation from lutoid bursting. However, the increase in both the bursting index of lutoids and the duration of latex flow after applying ethrel or ethylene gas in high concentrations suggests that a new mechanism needs to be introduced. In this study, a latex allergen Hev b 7-like protein in C-serum was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). In vitro analysis showed that the protein acted as a universal antagonist of RP aggregating factors from lutoids and C-serum. Ethrel treatment obviously weakened the effect of C-serum on RP aggregation, which was closely associated with the increase in the level of the Hev b 7-like protein and the decrease in the level of the 37 kDa protein, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), western blotting analysis and antibody neutralization. Thus, the increase of the Hev b 7-like protein level or the ratio of the Hev b 7-like protein to the 37 kDa protein in C-serum should be primarily ascribed to the ethrel-stimulated prolongation of latex flow duration. PMID:26381537

  14. Leukotriene receptor antagonist therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, O

    2000-01-01

    Leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA) are a new class of drugs for asthma treatment, available in tablet form. Their unique mechanism of action results in a combination of both bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory effects. While their optimal place in asthma management is still under review, LTRA represent an important advance in asthma pharmacotherapy.


Keywords: leukotriene receptor antagonist; asthma; montelukast; zafirlukast PMID:11085767

  15. A Semiautomated Assignment Protocol for Methyl Group Side Chains in Large Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonggul; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Geoffrey; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    The developments of biosynthetic specific labeling strategies for side-chain methyl groups have allowed structural and dynamic characterization of very large proteins and protein complexes. However, the assignment of the methyl-group resonances remains an Achilles' heel for NMR, as the experiments designed to correlate side chains to the protein backbone become rather insensitive with the increase of the transverse relaxation rates. In this chapter, we outline a semiempirical approach to assign the resonances of methyl-group side chains in large proteins. This method requires a crystal structure or an NMR ensemble of conformers as an input, together with NMR data sets such as nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) and paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), to be implemented in a computational protocol that provides a probabilistic assignment of methyl-group resonances. As an example, we report the protocol used in our laboratory to assign the side chains of the 42-kDa catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Although we emphasize the labeling of isoleucine, leucine, and valine residues, this method is applicable to other methyl group side chains such as those of alanine, methionine, and threonine, as well as reductively methylated cysteine side chains.

  16. High mobility group box 1 protein as a late-acting mediator of acute lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Waldemar; Stetkiewicz, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Acute inflammatory lung injury is often a delayed complication of critical illness and is associated with increased mortality. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, in addition to its role as a transcriptional regulator factor, has been identified as a late mediator of endotoxin lethality and might be also involved in the development and progression of acute lung injury. HMGB1 protein itself can cause an acute inflammatory response manifested by increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil accumulation. The delayed kinetics of HMGB1 protein release indicate that this protein is a distal mediator of acute inflamatory lung injury. Anti-HMGB1 protein antibodies attenuated endotoxin-induced lung injury, but not the early release of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, indicating that HMGB1 protein is a late mediator of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. HMGB1 protein is not released by apoptotic cells but is passively released by necrotic or damaged somatic and immune cells and it functions as a major stimulus of necrosis-induced inflammation. HMGB1 protein is also released by activated monocytes/macrophages and induces delayed and biphasic release of proinflammatory mediators from these cells. HMGB1 protein failed to stimulate cytokines release in lymphocytes, indicating that cellular stimulation is specific. We would like to suggest that HMGB1 protein may be also a primary mediator of the inflammatory responses to lung cells injury caused by toxic environmental chemicals.

  17. Mapping functional group free energy patterns at protein occluded sites: nuclear receptors and G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Yu, Wenbo; Raman, E Prabhu; Hershfeld, Alena V; Fang, Lei; Deshpande, Deepak A; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-03-23

    Occluded ligand-binding pockets (LBP) such as those found in nuclear receptors (NR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) represent a significant opportunity and challenge for computer-aided drug design. To determine free energies maps of functional groups of these LBPs, a Grand-Canonical Monte Carlo/Molecular Dynamics (GCMC/MD) strategy is combined with the Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) methodology. SILCS-GCMC/MD is shown to map functional group affinity patterns that recapitulate locations of functional groups across diverse classes of ligands in the LBPs of the androgen (AR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated-γ (PPARγ) NRs and the metabotropic glutamate (mGluR) and β2-adreneric (β2AR) GPCRs. Inclusion of protein flexibility identifies regions of the binding pockets not accessible in crystal conformations and allows for better quantitative estimates of relative ligand binding affinities in all the proteins tested. Differences in functional group requirements of the active and inactive states of the β2AR LBP were used in virtual screening to identify high efficacy agonists targeting β2AR in Airway Smooth Muscle (ASM) cells. Seven of the 15 selected ligands were found to effect ASM relaxation representing a 46% hit rate. Hence, the method will be of use for the rational design of ligands in the context of chemical biology and the development of therapeutic agents.

  18. Polycomb Group (PcG) Proteins and Human Cancers: Multifaceted Functions and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Voruganti, Sukesh; Nag, Subhasree; Zhou, Jianwei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors that regulate several crucial developmental and physiological processes in the cell. More recently, they have been found to play important roles in human carcinogenesis and cancer development and progression. The deregulation and dysfunction of PcG proteins often lead to blocking or inappropriate activation of developmental pathways, enhancing cellular proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis, and increasing the cancer stem cell population. Genetic and molecular investigations of PcG proteins have long been focused on their PcG functions. However, PcG proteins have recently been shown to exert non-polycomb functions, contributing to the regulation of diverse cellular functions. We and others have demonstrated that PcG proteins regulate the expression and function of several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in a PcG-independent manner, and PcG proteins are associated with the survival of patients with cancer. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the research on PcG proteins, including both the polycomb-repressive and non-polycomb functions. We specifically focus on the mechanisms by which PcG proteins play roles in cancer initiation, development, and progression. Finally, we discuss the potential value of PcG proteins as molecular biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer, and as molecular targets for cancer therapy. PMID:26227500

  19. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wan-Ting; Dai, Ming-Xiang; Xue, Fang-Zheng

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonistic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all of the agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all of the agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups and that agents in the same group collaborate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61203080 and 61473051) and the Natural Science Foundation of Chongqing City (Grant No. CSTC 2011BB0081).

  20. Stabilization of charges on isolated ionic groups sequestered in proteins by polarized peptide units.

    PubMed

    Quiocho, F A; Sack, J S; Vyas, N K

    Electrostatic interactions are of considerable importance in protein structure and function, and in a variety of cellular and biochemical processes. Here we report three similar findings from highly refined atomic structures of periplasmic binding proteins. Hydrogen bonds, acting primarily through backbone peptide units, are mainly responsible for the involvement of the positively charged arginine 151 residue in the ligand site of the arabinose-binding protein, for the association between teh sulphate-binding protein and the completely buried sulphate dianion, and for the formation of the complex of the leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding protein with the leucine zwitterion. We propose a general mechanism in which the isolated charges on the various buried, desolvated ionic groups are stabilized by the polarized peptide units. This mechanism also has broad application to processes requiring binding of uncompensated ions and charged ligands and stabilization of enzyme reaction charged intermediates, as well as activation of catalytic residues.

  1. Functional gene group analysis indicates no role for heterotrimeric G proteins in cognitive ability.

    PubMed

    Hill, W David; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Davies, Gail; Liewald, David Cherry McLachlan; Payton, Anthony; Craig, Leone C A; Whalley, Lawrence J; Horan, Mike; Ollier, William; Starr, John M; Pendleton, Neil; Posthuma, Danielle; Bates, Timothy C; Deary, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Previous functional gene group analyses implicated common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in heterotrimeric G protein coding genes as being associated with differences in human intelligence. Here, we sought to replicate this finding using five independent cohorts of older adults including current IQ and childhood IQ, and using both gene- and SNP-based analytic strategies. No significant associations were found between variation in heterotrimeric G protein genes and intelligence in any cohort at either of the two time points. These results indicate that, whereas G protein systems are important in cognition, common genetic variation in these genes is unlikely to be a substantial influence on human intelligence differences. PMID:24626473

  2. In Vivo Models to Address the Function of Polycomb Group Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bantignies, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Initially discovered as repressors of homeotic gene expression in Drosophila, Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have now been shown to be involved in a plethora of biological processes. Indeed, by repressing a large number of target genes, including specific lineage genes, these chromatin factors play major roles in a multitude of cellular functions, such as pluripotency, differentiation, reprogramming, tissue regeneration, and nuclear organization. In this book chapter are presented in vivo approaches and technologies, which have been used in both mammalian and Drosophila systems to study the cellular functions of Polycomb group proteins. PMID:27659991

  3. Lipoteichoic acid-binding and biological properties of T protein of group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R H; Simpson, W A; Dale, J B; Ofek, I; Beachey, E H

    1980-08-01

    T protein was extracted with trypsin from an avirulent, M protein-deficient, type 1 group A Streptococcus and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange chromatography. The latter procedure removed contaminating lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from the T protein, which consisted of a heterogeneous mixture of polypeptides resistant to digestion by trypsin and ranged in molecular size from 160,000 to 200,000 daltons. Threonine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, and valine were the most predominant amino acids. The binding of LTA to an affinity column of T protein was reversible with increasing concentrations of ethanol but not with increasing ionic strength. T protein bound less palmitic acid and LTA than did fatty acid-free bovine albumin and did not stimulate human peripheral lymphocytes. Because the surface and cell wall distribution of the T proteins and LTA appear similar, the possibility exists that T proteins and LTA may interact in situ by weakly hydrophobic bonds. Such ligand-ligand interaction may be indirectly involved in the adherence of group A streptococci to host cell membranes that is known to be mediated by LTA.

  4. Quantitative toxicoproteomic analysis of zebrafish embryos exposed to a retinoid X receptor antagonist UVI3003.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liang; Yu, Jianlan; Shi, Huahong; Xia, Liang; Xin, Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Heng; Luo, Ji; Jin, Wenhai; Li, Daoji; Zhou, Junliang

    2015-09-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) antagonists, including some environmental endocrine disruptors, have a teratogenic effect on vertebrate embryos. To investigate the toxicological mechanism on the protein expression level, a quantitative proteomic study was conducted to analyze the proteome alterations of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos exposed to gradient concentrations of a representative RXR antagonist UVI3003. Using isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling coupled nano high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano HPLC-MS/MS), in total 6592 proteins were identified, among which 195 proteins were found to be differentially expressed by more than a two-fold change in exposed groups compared with the control. Gene ontology analysis showed that these differential proteins were mostly involved in anatomical structure development, biosynthetic process, ion binding and oxidoreductase activity. Moreover, the biological pathways of translation, lipoprotein metabolism, cell survival and gluconeogenesis were intensively inhibited after exposure. Some significantly downregulated proteins such as apolipoprotein A-I and vitellogenin and upregulated proteins such as calcium activated nucleotidase 1b, glutathione S-transferase and glucose 6-dehydrogenases showed a strong dose-dependent response. The results provided new insight into the molecular details of RXR antagonist-induced teratogenicity and added novel information of pathways and potential biomarkers for evaluation of RXR interfering activity. PMID:25581642

  5. Ago-Antagonistic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard-Weil, Élie

    Today, bio-medical sciences and human sciences in general are demanding some new epistemological paradigms, in the same manner that quantum physics began to proceed to a renewal of this kind eighteen years ago. Such paradigms seem to be connected with systems science, and especially a special branch of it, called agonistic-antagonistic systemics (AAS), combining co-operativity and conflict between two poles. AAS is under the necessity of considering, at the same time, both sides of whatever phenomenon—which may appear as contradictory, opposite or only different—and, finally, of taking into account the unity to which both sides belong. The dynamics study of the behavior of these couples, or of the so-called agonistic-antagonistic networks, allows to better understand the occurrence of amazing phenomena, as well as to consider special types of control, when agonistic antagonistic unbalances have occurred.

  6. Mitochondrial protein import: modification of sulfhydryl groups of the inner mitochondrial membrane import machinery in Solanum tuberosum inhibits protein import.

    PubMed

    von Stedingk, E M; Pavlov, P F; Grinkevich, V A; Glaser, E

    1997-12-01

    Protein import into mitochondria involves several components of the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes as well as molecular chaperones located inside mitochondria. Here, we have investigated the effect of sulfhydryl group reagents on import of the in vitro transcribed/translated precursor of the F1 beta subunit of the ATP synthase (pF1 beta) into Solanum tuberosum mitochondria. We have used a reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT), a membrane-permeant alkylating agent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), a non-permeant alkylating agent, 3-(N-maleimidopropionyl)biocytin (MPB), an SH-group specific agent and cross-linker 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) as well as an oxidizing cross-linker, copper sulfate. DTT stimulated the mitochondrial protein import, whereas NEM, MPB, DTNB and Cu2+ were inhibitory. Inhibition by Cu2+ could be reversed by addition of DTT. The efficiency of inhibition was higher in energized mitochondrial than in non-energized. We have dissected the effect of the SH-group reagents on binding, unfolding and transport of the precursor into mitochondria. Our results demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of NEM, DTNB and Cu2+ on the efficiency of import was not due to the interaction of the SH-group reagents with import receptors. Modification of pF1 beta with NEM prior to the import resulted in stimulation of import, whereas DTNB and Cu2+ were inhibitory. NEM, MPB, DTNB and Cu2+ inhibited import of the NEM-modified pF1 beta into intact mitochondria. Import of pF1 beta through a receptor-independent bypass-route as well as import into mitoplasts were sensitive to DTT, NEM, MPB, DTNB and Cu2+ in a similar manner as import into mitochondria. As MPB does not cross the inner membrane, these results indicated that redox and conformational status of SH groups located on the outer surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane were essential for protein import.

  7. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for.

  8. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for. PMID:25604388

  9. Trapping open and closed forms of FitE: a group III periplasmic binding protein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong; Proteau, Ariane; Wagner, John; Cui, Qizhi; Purisima, Enrico O; Matte, Allan; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2009-05-15

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are essential components of bacterial transport systems, necessary for bacterial growth and survival. The two-domain structures of PBPs are topologically classified into three groups based on the number of crossovers or hinges between the globular domains: group I PBPs have three connections, group II have two, and group III have only one. Although a large number of structures for group I or II PBPs are known, fewer group III PBPs have been structurally characterized. Group I and II PBPs exhibit significant domain motions during transition from the unbound to ligand-bound form, however, no large conformational changes have been observed to date in group III PBPs. We have solved the crystal structure of a periplasmic binding protein FitE, part of an iron transport system, fit, recently identified in a clinical E. coli isolate. The structure, determined at 1.8 A resolution, shows that FitE is a group III PBP containing a single alpha-helix bridging the two domains. Among the individual FitE molecules present in two crystal forms we observed three different conformations (open, closed, intermediate). Our crystallographic and molecular dynamics results strongly support the notion that group III PBPs also adopt the same Venus flytrap mechanism as do groups I and II PBPs. Unlike other group III PBPs, FitE forms dimers both in solution and in the crystals. The putative siderophore binding pocket is lined with arginine residues, suggesting an anionic nature of the iron-containing siderophore. PMID:19004000

  10. The selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 decreases immobility time in the forced swim test and affects cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Cornelius G; Bilang-Bleuel, Alicia; De Carli, Sonja; Linthorst, Astrid C E; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists can block the retention of the immobility response in the forced swimming test. Recently, we showed that forced swimming evokes a distinct spatiotemporal pattern of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and neocortex. In the present study, we found that chronic treatment of rats with the selective GR antagonist ORG 34116 decreased the immobility time in the forced swim test, increased baseline levels of phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) in the DG and neocortex and affected the forced swimming-induced changes in P-CREB levels in a time- and site-specific manner. Overall, we observed that, in control rats, forced swimming evoked increases in P-CREB levels in the DG and neocortex, whereas in ORG 34116-treated animals a major dephosphorylation of P-CREB was observed. These observations underscore an important role of GRs in the control of the phosphorylation state of CREB which seems to be of significance for the immobility response in the forced swim test and extend the molecular mechanism of action of GRs in the brain.

  11. A novel integrin {alpha}5{beta}1 antagonistic peptide, A5-1, screened by Protein Chip system as a potent angiogenesis inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eung-Yoon; Bang, Ji Young; Chang, Soo-Ik; Kang, In-Cheol

    2008-12-26

    Integrin {alpha}5{beta}1 immobilized on a ProteoChip was used to screen new antagonistic peptides from multiple hexapeptide sub-libraries of the positional scanning synthetic peptide combinatorial library (PS-SPCL). The integrin {alpha}5{beta}1-Fibronectin interaction was demonstrated on the chip. A novel peptide ligand, A5-1 (VILVLF), with high affinity to integrin {alpha}5{beta}1 was identified from the hexapeptide libraries with this chip-based screening method on the basis of a competitive inhibition assay. A5-1 inhibits the integrin-fibronectin interaction in a dose-dependent manner (IC{sub 50}; 1.56 {+-} 0.28 {mu}M. In addition, it inhibits human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, tubular network formation, and bFGF-induced neovascularization in a chick chorioallantoic membrane. These results suggest that A5-1 will be a potent inhibitor of neovascularization.

  12. Use of an N-terminal half truncated IE1 as an antagonist of IE1, an essential regulatory protein in baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoji; Matsuyama, Takahiro; Quan, Guo-Xing; Kanda, Toshio; Tamura, Toshiki; Sahara, Ken; Asano, Shin-ichiro; Bando, Hisanori

    2002-12-01

    An immediate-early gene product of baculovirus, IE1, is essential for viral gene expression and for viral DNA replication. It has been demonstrated for Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) that the C-terminal region of IE1 is required for dimerization. And the acidic N-terminal region of IE1 has been identified as the activation domain. We constructed an N-terminal 267 amino acid (a.a.) truncated mutant of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) IE1, which was defective as a transactivator of a viral early gene (p35) promoter. We then examined possible IE1 antagonistic functions of this defective IE1, IE1TN, in BmNPV-infected cells. A transient expression experiment demonstrated that IE1TN strongly repressed the activation of the hr5-dependent p35 promoter derived from BmNPV infection. In addition, DpnI assay elucidated an inhibitory effect of IE1TN on the hr5-dependent replication of plasmid in BmN cells induced by NPV infection. A marked reduction in the production of virus was observed when the BmN cells were infected with BmNPV after transfection with IE1TN-expression plasmids. These results suggested that IE1TN could act as an IE1 antagonist in silkworm cells infected with BmNPV. We then analyzed the ability of IE1TN to inhibit the multiplication of BmNPV using transgenic silkworms. The BmNPV-resistance of the transgenic silkworms was very weak, suggesting insufficient expression of the transgene product, IE1TN. PMID:12457979

  13. Reptin and Pontin function antagonistically with PcG and TrxG complexes to mediate Hox gene control

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Soda Balla; Bertaux, Karine; Vasanthi, Dasari; Sarkeshik, Ali; Goirand, Benjamin; Aragnol, Denise; Tolwinski, Nicholas S; Cole, Michael D; Pradel, Jacques; Yates, John R; Mishra, Rakesh K; Graba, Yacine; Saurin, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Pontin (Pont) and Reptin (Rept) are paralogous ATPases that are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. They are recruited in multiprotein complexes that function in various aspects of DNA metabolism. They are essential for viability and have antagonistic roles in tissue growth, cell signalling and regulation of the tumour metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, indicating that the balance of Pont and Rept regulates epigenetic programmes critical for development and cancer progression. Here, we describe Pont and Rept as antagonistic mediators of Drosophila Hox gene transcription, functioning with Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group proteins to maintain correct patterns of expression. We show that Rept is a component of the PRC1 PcG complex, whereas Pont purifies with the Brahma complex. Furthermore, the enzymatic functions of Rept and Pont are indispensable for maintaining Hox gene expression states, highlighting the importance of these two antagonistic factors in transcriptional output. PMID:18259215

  14. Modifications in the low mobility group nuclear proteins by reactive metabolites of diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Roy, D; Pathak, D N

    1993-12-01

    In this study we have investigated the potential of nuclear activation system to convert diethylstilbestrol (DES) to reactive metabolites, which bind to low mobility nonhistone nuclear proteins. Reaction of DES with nuclei in the presence of cumene hydroperoxide or NADPH revealed binding of DES in low mobility group (LMG) nonhistone nuclear proteins analyzed by both organic solvent extraction and gel electrophoresis methods. Gel electrophoresis experiments revealed that five LMG proteins of MW 130, 108, 72, 51, and 45 KDa were irreversibly bound to 3H-DES. The kinetic constants, Km and Vmax, of this binding reaction in the presence of cumene hydroperoxide were 39 uM and 1225 pmol/mg protein/30 min, respectively. This binding was significantly inhibited by cytochromes P450 inhibitors. Low molecular weight thiols, i.e., glutathione and cysteine, or thiol modifiers such as n-ethylmaleimide, dithionitrobenzoic acid, and hydroxymercuric benzoate, drastically inhibited binding. The binding of DES metabolites to both transcriptionally active and inactive chromatins LMG proteins was observed. In summary, DES is metabolized to transcriptionally active chromatin LMG protein binding metabolites presumably by nuclear cytochromes P450. These data suggest that an analogous in vivo modification in the transcriptionally active chromatin LMG nonhistone proteins by DES metabolites may influence gene transcription.

  15. The neuroprotective activity of group-II metabotropic glutamate receptors requires new protein synthesis and involves a glial-neuronal signaling.

    PubMed

    Bruno, V; Sureda, F X; Storto, M; Casabona, G; Caruso, A; Knopfel, T; Kuhn, R; Nicoletti, F

    1997-03-15

    The group-II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonists (2S,1'R, 2'R,3'R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV), S-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (4C3HPG), and (2S,1'S, 2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I) protected mouse cortical neurons grown in mixed cultures against excitotoxic degeneration induced by a 10 min pulse with NMDA. Protection was observed not only when agonists were added in combination with NMDA but also when they were transiently applied to cultures 6-20 hr before the NMDA pulse. In both cases, neuroprotection was reduced by the group-II mGlu receptor antagonist (2S,1'S,2'S,3'R)-2-(2'-carboxy-3'-phenylcyclopropyl)glycine (PCCG-IV), as well as by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX). Both neurons and astrocytes in mixed cultures were immunostained with an antibody that recognized mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors in recombinant cells. To determine whether astrocytes played any role in the neuroprotection mediated by group-II mGlu receptors, we exposed pure cultures of cortical astrocytes to DCG-IV, 4C3HPG, or L-CCG-I for 10 min. The astrocyte medium collected 2-20 hr after the exposure to any of these drugs was highly neuroprotective when transferred to mixed cultures treated with NMDA. This protective activity was reduced when CHX was applied to astrocyte cultures immediately after the transient exposure to group-II mGlu receptor agonists. We conclude that neuroprotection mediated by group-II mGlu receptors in cultured cortical cells requires new protein synthesis and involves an interaction between neurons and astrocytes. PMID:9045718

  16. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  17. Comparison of the effects of diazepam, the CRF1 antagonist CP-154,526 and the group II mGlu receptor agonist LY379268 on stress-evoked extracellular norepinephrine levels.

    PubMed

    Lorrain, Daniel S; Baccei, Christopher S; Correa, Lucia D; Bristow, Linda J

    2005-06-01

    The present study used an elevated platform procedure to investigate the effects of diazepam, a CRF1 antagonist CP-154,526 and a group II mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 on stress-evoked increase in extracellular norepinephrine (NE). Pretreatment with either diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.), CP-154,526 (20 mg/kg, i.p.) or LY379268 (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reduced platform stress-evoked NE. Interestingly, at the highest dose tested (10 mg/kg) LY379268 caused a marked increase in baseline NE levels. We tested whether this effect would diminish after repeated dosing. In contrast to acute administration, a challenge injection of LY379268 after repeated dosing (10 mg/kg x days) did not alter basal NE. Importantly, although less effective, LY379268 still significantly reduced stress-evoked NE. We further show that this increase in basal NE may involve mGlu2/3 receptor regulation of the GABAergic system. To this end, administration of the GABAB agonist, baclofen (4 mg/kg, i.p.), 2 h after dosing with LY379268, reversed the increase in baseline NE. These data suggest that, like diazepam and CP-154,526, group II mGlu2/3 receptor agonists can attenuate stress-evoked increase in extracellular NE in the rat prefrontal cortex. In addition they reveal a 'stress-like' increase in NE after high doses of LY379268 which may reflect mGlu3 receptor modulation of GABAergic transmission. PMID:15857619

  18. Construction and analysis of a profile library characterizing groups of structurally known proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ogiwara, A.; Uchiyama, I.; Takagi, T.; Kanehisa, M.

    1996-01-01

    A new sequence motif library StrProf was constructed characterizing the groups of related proteins in the PDB three-dimensional structure database. For a representative member of each protein family, which was identified by cross-referencing the PDB with the PIR superfamily classification, a group of related sequences was collected by the BLAST search against the nonredundant protein sequence database. For every group, the motifs were identified automatically according to the criteria of conservation and uniqueness of pentapeptide patterns and with a dual dynamic programming algorithm. In the StrProf library, motifs are represented by profile matrices rather than consensus patterns to allow more flexible search capabilities. Another dynamic programming algorithm was then developed to search this motif library. When the computationally derived StrProf was compared with PROSITE, which is a manually derived motif library in the best consensus pattern representation, the numbers of identified patterns were comparable. StrProf missed about one third of the PROSITE motifs, but there were also new motifs lacking in PROSITE. The new library was incorporated in SMART (Sequence Motif Analysis and Retrieval Tool), a computer tool designed to help search and annotate biologically important sites in an unknown protein sequence. The client program is available free of charge through the Internet. PMID:8897599

  19. Effect of Hofmeister ions on protein thermal stability: roles of ion hydration and peptide groups?

    PubMed

    Sedlák, Erik; Stagg, Loren; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-11-01

    We have systematically explored the Hofmeister effects of cations and anions (0.3-1.75 M range) for acidic Desulfovibrio desulfuricans apoflavodoxin (net charge -19, pH 7) and basic horse heart cytochrome c (net charge +17, pH 4.5). The Hofmeister effect of the ions on protein thermal stability was assessed by the parameter dT trs/d[ion] (T trs; thermal midpoint). We show that dT trs/d[ion] correlates with ion partition coefficients between surface and bulk water and ion surface tension effects: this suggests direct interactions between ions and proteins. Surprisingly, the stability effects of the different ions on the two model proteins are similar, implying a major role of the peptide backbone, instead of charged groups, in mediation of the interactions. Upon assessing chemical/physical properties of the ions responsible for the Hofmeister effects on protein stability, ion charge density was identified as most important. Taken together, our study suggests key roles for ion hydration and the peptide group in facilitating interactions between Hofmeister ions and proteins.

  20. Effect of Hofmeister ions on protein thermal stability: roles of ion hydration and peptide groups?

    PubMed

    Sedlák, Erik; Stagg, Loren; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-11-01

    We have systematically explored the Hofmeister effects of cations and anions (0.3-1.75 M range) for acidic Desulfovibrio desulfuricans apoflavodoxin (net charge -19, pH 7) and basic horse heart cytochrome c (net charge +17, pH 4.5). The Hofmeister effect of the ions on protein thermal stability was assessed by the parameter dT trs/d[ion] (T trs; thermal midpoint). We show that dT trs/d[ion] correlates with ion partition coefficients between surface and bulk water and ion surface tension effects: this suggests direct interactions between ions and proteins. Surprisingly, the stability effects of the different ions on the two model proteins are similar, implying a major role of the peptide backbone, instead of charged groups, in mediation of the interactions. Upon assessing chemical/physical properties of the ions responsible for the Hofmeister effects on protein stability, ion charge density was identified as most important. Taken together, our study suggests key roles for ion hydration and the peptide group in facilitating interactions between Hofmeister ions and proteins. PMID:18782555

  1. Clinical evaluation of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) levels in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma following interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Minakuchi, K; Murata, K; Kaminoh, T; Takada, K; Takashima, S; Nakamura, K; Onoyama, Y

    1993-01-01

    Fourteen patients with unrespectable HCC were treated with various interventional radiology (IVR) procedures. The initial therapeutic response was determined using computed tomography (CT) findings, and determinations of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and protein induced by Vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) levels. When CT studies of the initial response to IVR were compared with changes in the serum AFP and PIVKA-II levels, the AFP level was found to correlate more closely than the PIVKA-II levels. The PIVKA-II level correlated more closely than the AFP level in cases with poor response to IVR. Both of these tumor markers should be measured in combination with the diagnostic imagings for follow-up studies of IVR.

  2. Hydrogen bonding motifs of protein side chains: descriptions of binding of arginine and amide groups.

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, L.; Glusker, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    The modes of hydrogen bonding of arginine, asparagine, and glutamine side chains and of urea have been examined in small-molecule crystal structures in the Cambridge Structural Database and in crystal structures of protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein complexes. Analysis of the hydrogen bonding patterns of each by graph-set theory shows three patterns of rings (R) with one or two hydrogen bond acceptors and two donors and with eight, nine, or six atoms in the ring, designated R2(2)(8), R2(2)(9), and R1(2)(6). These three patterns are found for arginine-like groups and for urea, whereas only the first two patterns R2(2)(8) and R2(2)(9) are found for asparagine- and glutamine-like groups. In each case, the entire system is planar within 0.7 A or less. On the other hand, in macromolecular crystal structures, the hydrogen bonding patterns in protein-nucleic acid complexes between the nucleic acid base and the protein are all R2(2)(9), whereas hydrogen bonding between Watson-Crick-like pairs of nucleic acid bases is R2(2)(8). These two hydrogen bonding arrangements [R2(2)(9)] and R2(2)(8)] are predetermined by the nature of the groups available for hydrogen bonding. The third motif identified, R1(2)(6), involves hydrogen bonds that are less linear than in the other two motifs and is found in proteins. PMID:7773178

  3. An mTERF domain protein functions in group II intron splicing in maize chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Hammani, Kamel; Barkan, Alice

    2014-04-01

    The mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) proteins are nucleic acid binding proteins characterized by degenerate helical repeats of ∼30 amino acids. Metazoan genomes encode a small family of mTERF proteins whose members influence mitochondrial gene expression and DNA replication. The mTERF family in higher plants consists of roughly 30 members, which localize to mitochondria or chloroplasts. Effects of several mTERF proteins on plant development and physiology have been described, but molecular functions of mTERF proteins in plants are unknown. We show that a maize mTERF protein, Zm-mTERF4, promotes the splicing of group II introns in chloroplasts. Zm-mTERF4 coimmunoprecipitates with many chloroplast introns and the splicing of some of these introns is disrupted even in hypomorphic Zm-mterf4 mutants. Furthermore, Zm-mTERF4 is found in high molecular weight complexes that include known chloroplast splicing factors. The splicing of two transfer RNAs (trnI-GAU and trnA-UGC) and one ribosomal protein messenger RNA (rpl2) is particularly sensitive to the loss of Zm-mTERF4, accounting for the loss of plastid ribosomes in Zm-mTERF4 mutants. These findings extend the known functional repertoire of the mTERF family to include group II intron splicing and suggest that a conserved role in chloroplast RNA splicing underlies the physiological defects described for mutations in BSM/Rugosa2, the Zm-mTERF4 ortholog in Arabidopsis.

  4. Prediction of functional sites in proteins using conserved functional group analysis.

    PubMed

    Innis, C Axel; Anand, A Prem; Sowdhamini, R

    2004-04-01

    A detailed knowledge of a protein's functional site is an absolute prerequisite for understanding its mode of action at the molecular level. However, the rapid pace at which sequence and structural information is being accumulated for proteins greatly exceeds our ability to determine their biochemical roles experimentally. As a result, computational methods are required which allow for the efficient processing of the evolutionary information contained in this wealth of data, in particular that related to the nature and location of functionally important sites and residues. The method presented here, referred to as conserved functional group (CFG) analysis, relies on a simplified representation of the chemical groups found in amino acid side-chains to identify functional sites from a single protein structure and a number of its sequence homologues. We show that CFG analysis can fully or partially predict the location of functional sites in approximately 96% of the 470 cases tested and that, unlike other methods available, it is able to tolerate wide variations in sequence identity. In addition, we discuss its potential in a structural genomics context, where automation, scalability and efficiency are critical, and an increasing number of protein structures are determined with no prior knowledge of function. This is exemplified by our analysis of the hypothetical protein Ydde_Ecoli, whose structure was recently solved by members of the North East Structural Genomics consortium. Although the proposed active site for this protein needs to be validated experimentally, this example illustrates the scope of CFG analysis as a general tool for the identification of residues likely to play an important role in a protein's biochemical function. Thus, our method offers a convenient solution to rapidly and automatically process the vast amounts of data that are beginning to emerge from structural genomics projects. PMID:15033369

  5. Detailed computational analysis of a comprehensive set of group A rotavirus NSP4 proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuo Liang; Tian, Peng

    2003-05-01

    Rotavirus infection causes diarrhea to humans, animals and birds. The NSP4 protein of Group A rotavirus has been recognized as a viral enterotoxin. This single protein plays important roles in viral pathogenesis and morphogenesis. Domains involved in structure and biologic functions have been proposed mainly based on the SA11 strain, a prototype of group A rotavirus. NSP4 has been classified into different genotypes based on sequence homology. These analyses are based on representative strains selected but not comprehensive. In this paper, we collected all NSP4 sequences in the GenBank and performed a detailed computational analysis. Our analysis of 176 NSP4 proteins in Groups A, B and C rotaviruses confirms that the recently published avian NSP4 sequences belong to a new genotype (Mori Y., Borgan M.A., Ito N., Sugiyama M. and Minamoto N., Virus Res 89, 145-151, 2002), besides the four known NSP4 genotypes of Group A mammalian rotaviruses. Significant differences were discovered in the physicochemical properties between the avian and mammalian NSP4 proteins. In particular, lack of a highly probable coiled-coil region in the avian sequences implies a diversion of the NSP4 quaternary structure from the latter, although the secondary and tertiary structures may be similar. Fourteen amino acids are found absolutely conserved in the Group A NSP4 sequences, regardless of genotype. Of the conserved residues, two are glycosylation sites, one is in the middle of the transmembrane segment, seven span the VP4 binding domain, and five are clustered in the middle of the toxic peptide region, indicating the functional importance of the conservation. PMID:12876455

  6. Genetic linkage of capsid protein-encoding RNA segments in group A equine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Miño, Samuel; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana; Parra, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus virions are formed by three concentric protein layers that enclose the 11 dsRNA genome segments and the viral proteins VP1 and VP3. Interactions amongst the capsid proteins (VP2, VP6, VP7 and VP4) have been described to play a major role in viral fitness, whilst restricting the reassortment of the genomic segments during co-infection with different rotavirus strains. In this work we describe and characterize the linkage between VP6 and VP7 proteins based on structural and genomic analyses of group A rotavirus strains circulating in Argentinean horses. Strains with the VP7 genotype G3 showed a strong association with the VP6 genotype I6, whilst strains with G14 were associated with the I2 genotype. Most of the differences on the VP6 and VP7 proteins were observed in interactive regions between the two proteins, suggesting that VP6 : VP7 interactions may drive the co-evolution and co-segregation of their respective gene segments.

  7. Genetic linkage of capsid protein-encoding RNA segments in group A equine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Miño, Samuel; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana; Parra, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus virions are formed by three concentric protein layers that enclose the 11 dsRNA genome segments and the viral proteins VP1 and VP3. Interactions amongst the capsid proteins (VP2, VP6, VP7 and VP4) have been described to play a major role in viral fitness, whilst restricting the reassortment of the genomic segments during co-infection with different rotavirus strains. In this work we describe and characterize the linkage between VP6 and VP7 proteins based on structural and genomic analyses of group A rotavirus strains circulating in Argentinean horses. Strains with the VP7 genotype G3 showed a strong association with the VP6 genotype I6, whilst strains with G14 were associated with the I2 genotype. Most of the differences on the VP6 and VP7 proteins were observed in interactive regions between the two proteins, suggesting that VP6 : VP7 interactions may drive the co-evolution and co-segregation of their respective gene segments. PMID:26758293

  8. Attachment of group B streptococci to macrophages is mediated by a 21-kDa protein.

    PubMed

    Smith, L M; Laganas, V; Pistole, T G

    1998-02-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is able to bind to human macrophages in vitro in the absence of exogenous opsonins. The exact mechanisms that mediate this attachment are unclear. This study was undertaken to determine what protein adhesins are present on the surface of GBS that mediate attachment to macrophages. We have identified a 21-kDa protein from the envelope of GBS type III that directly binds to macrophages as determined by Western blot analysis. Antiserum against this protein was able to inhibit binding of GBS to macrophages by greater than 80% as measured by flow cytometry. Antiserum against the 21-kDa protein cross-reacted with 21-kDa proteins from GBS type Ib, type II, type III (COH31 and MR732) and type IV, as well as Staphyloccus epidermidis, but not GBS type Ia, Listeria monocytogenes or Enterococcus faecalis. This protein may be important in mediating the attachment of GBS to macrophages in an opsonin-poor environment.

  9. High mobility group protein-mediated transcription requires DNA damage marker γ-H2AX

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Indrabahadur; Ozturk, Nihan; Cordero, Julio; Mehta, Aditi; Hasan, Diya; Cosentino, Claudia; Sebastian, Carlos; Krüger, Marcus; Looso, Mario; Carraro, Gianni; Bellusci, Saverio; Seeger, Werner; Braun, Thomas; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Barreto, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into chromatins, the physiological template for DNA-dependent processes including replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. Chromatin-mediated transcription regulation involves DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling, and histone modifications. However, chromatin also contains non-histone chromatin-associated proteins, of which the high-mobility group (HMG) proteins are the most abundant. Although it is known that HMG proteins induce structural changes of chromatin, the processes underlying transcription regulation by HMG proteins are poorly understood. Here we decipher the molecular mechanism of transcription regulation mediated by the HMG AT-hook 2 protein (HMGA2). We combined proteomic, ChIP-seq, and transcriptome data to show that HMGA2-induced transcription requires phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX at S139 (H2AXS139ph; γ-H2AX) mediated by the protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Furthermore, we demonstrate the biological relevance of this mechanism within the context of TGFβ1 signaling. The interplay between HMGA2, ATM, and H2AX is a novel mechanism of transcription initiation. Our results link H2AXS139ph to transcription, assigning a new function for this DNA damage marker. Controlled chromatin opening during transcription may involve intermediates with DNA breaks that may require mechanisms that ensure the integrity of the genome. PMID:26045162

  10. Synthesis of a select group of proteins by Neisseria gonorrhoeae in response to thermal stress.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, M L; Bonfiglioli, R; McGee, Z A; Georgopoulos, C

    1990-01-01

    We report the thermal conditions that induce the heat shock response in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Under conditions of thermal stress, Neisseria gonorrhoeae synthesizes heat shock proteins (hsps), which differ quantitatively from conventionally studied gonococcal proteins. Gonococci accelerate the rate of synthesis of the hsps as early as 5 min after the appropriate stimulus is applied, with synthesis continuing for 30 min, as demonstrated by in vivo labeling experiments with L-[35S]methionine. Two of the gonococcal hsps are immunologically cross-reactive with the hsps of Escherichia coli, DnaK and GroEL, as demonstrated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. Ten hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of whole gonococci (total protein). Four hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of 1% N-lauroylsarcosine (sodium salt) (Sarkosyl)-insoluble membrane fractions. Two of the hsps from the 1% Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction are found exclusively in this fraction, suggesting that they are membrane proteins. The identification of this group of proteins will facilitate further study of the function of these proteins and provide insight into the possible role of hsps in disease pathogenesis. Images PMID:2106493

  11. Synthesis of a select group of proteins by Neisseria gonorrhoeae in response to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Woods, M L; Bonfiglioli, R; McGee, Z A; Georgopoulos, C

    1990-03-01

    We report the thermal conditions that induce the heat shock response in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Under conditions of thermal stress, Neisseria gonorrhoeae synthesizes heat shock proteins (hsps), which differ quantitatively from conventionally studied gonococcal proteins. Gonococci accelerate the rate of synthesis of the hsps as early as 5 min after the appropriate stimulus is applied, with synthesis continuing for 30 min, as demonstrated by in vivo labeling experiments with L-[35S]methionine. Two of the gonococcal hsps are immunologically cross-reactive with the hsps of Escherichia coli, DnaK and GroEL, as demonstrated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. Ten hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of whole gonococci (total protein). Four hsps can be identified on two-dimensional autoradiograms of 1% N-lauroylsarcosine (sodium salt) (Sarkosyl)-insoluble membrane fractions. Two of the hsps from the 1% Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction are found exclusively in this fraction, suggesting that they are membrane proteins. The identification of this group of proteins will facilitate further study of the function of these proteins and provide insight into the possible role of hsps in disease pathogenesis.

  12. High-mobility group A1 proteins are overexpressed in human leukaemias.

    PubMed Central

    Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Agosti, Valter; Fedele, Monica; Bond, Heather; Caliendo, Irene; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Lo Coco, Francesco; Pane, Fabrizio; Turco, Maria Caterina; Morrone, Giovanni; Venuta, Salvatore; Fusco, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    High-mobility group A (HMGA) proteins are non-histone nuclear proteins that bind DNA and several transcription factors. They are involved in the regulation of chromatin structure and function. HMGA protein expression is low in normal adult tissues, but abundant during embryonic development and in several human tumours. Rearrangements of the HMGA genes have been frequently detected in human benign tumours of mesenchymal origin, e.g. lipomas, lung hamartomas and uterine leiomiomas. HMGA proteins have been implicated in the control of cell growth and differentiation of the pre-adipocytic cell line 3T3-L1. In an attempt to better understand the role of HMGA1 proteins in haematological neoplasias and in the differentiation of haematopietic cells, we have investigated their expression in human leukaemias and in leukaemic cell lines induced to terminal differentiation. Here we report HMGA1 overexpression in most fresh human leukaemias of different origin and in several leukaemic cell lines. Moreover, differentiation of three cell lines towards the megakaryocytic phenotype was associated with HMGA1 protein induction, whereas induction of erythroid and monocytic differentiation generally resulted in reduced HMGA1 expression. PMID:12573034

  13. Behavioral effects of nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine in a rat model of depression: prefrontal cortex level of BDNF protein and monoaminergic neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Fotouh, Sawsan

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have pointed to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonists, such as mecamylamine (MEC), as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of depression. The present study evaluated the behavioral and neurochemical effects of chronic administration of MEC (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) in Wistar rats exposed to chronic restraint stress (CRS, 4 h × 6 W). MEC prevented CRS-induced depressive-like behavior via increasing sucrose preference, body weight, and forced swim test (FST) struggling and swimming while reducing immobility in FST and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity (adrenal gland weight and serum corticosterone). At the same time, MEC amended CRS-induced anxiety as indicated by decreasing central zone duration in open field test and increasing active interaction duration. Additionally, MEC modulated the prefrontal cortex (PFC) level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE). In conclusion, the present data suggest that MEC possesses antidepressant and anxiolytic-like activities in rats exposed to CRS. These behavioral effects may be in part mediated by reducing HPA axis hyperactivity and increasing PFC level of BDNF and monoamines. Accordingly, these findings further support the hypothesis that nAChRs blockade might afford a novel promising strategy for pharmacotherapy of depression. PMID:25315361

  14. [Induction of amnesia induced by disturbance of memory consolidation by antagonists of glutamate or serotonin receptors will be suppressed by the protein synthesis inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Solntseva, S V; Nikitin, V P

    2010-12-01

    We have previously found two stages of amnesia evoked by disruption of memory reconsolidation with MK-801 (NMDA glutamate receptors antagonists) application in food aversion conditioned snails. Repeated conditioning restored the food aversion at early stage of amnesia development (<10 days), whereas repeated conditioning 10 days after MK-801 application did not restore the food aversion. In present work, amnesia was induced with MK-801/reminding 24 hours after food aversion conditioning, and antiamnestic effects of NMDA receptor glycine site agonist d-cycloserine were studied at early (3rd day) or late (12th day) stages of amnesia development. D-cycloserine injection and reminding restored memory only 3 days after amnesia induction whereas d-cycloserine injection without reminding was ineffective. D-cycloserine injection and reminding as well as repeated learning 12 days after amnesia induction were also ineffective in memory restoration. Thus, for the first time, it is revealed that NMDA receptor agonist d-cycloserine influences the memory restoration processes only at early but not the later stages of amnesia development.

  15. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; Pérez, José Luis García; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells. PMID:26244523

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of homoserine lactone derived ureas as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Frezza, Marine; Castang, Sandra; Estephane, Jane; Soulère, Laurent; Deshayes, Christian; Chantegrel, Bernard; Nasser, William; Queneau, Yves; Reverchon, Sylvie; Doutheau, Alain

    2006-07-15

    A series of 15 racemic alkyl- and aryl-N-substituted ureas, derived from homoserine lactone, were synthesized and tested for their ability to competitively inhibit the action of 3-oxohexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone, the natural inducer of bioluminescence in the bacterium Vibrio fischeri. N-alkyl ureas with an alkyl chain of at least 4 carbon atoms, as well as certain ureas bearing a phenyl group at the extremity of the alkyl chain, were found to be significant antagonists. In the case of N-butyl urea, it has been shown that the antagonist activity was related to the inhibition of the dimerisation of the N-terminal domain of ExpR, a protein of the receptor LuxR family. Molecular modelling suggested that this would result from the formation of an additional hydrogen bond in the protein acylhomoserine lactone binding cavity.

  17. Group I intron located in PR protein homologue gene in Youngia japonica.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Ogura, A; Yokota, A; Yamaguchi, I; Sugiyama, J

    2000-03-01

    A Youngia japonica strain had a group I intron that was suggested to have been transferred from Protomyces inouyei, a pathogenic fungus of Y. japonica. It was located in the miraculin homologue coding gene by reverse complementation. The deduced amino acid sequence of this miraculin homologue of Y. japonica was similar to the amino acid sequences of tobacco and tomato pathogenesis-related proteins. PMID:10803963

  18. Determination of Polycomb Group of Protein Compartmentalization Through Chromatin Fractionation Procedure.

    PubMed

    Marasca, Federica; Marullo, Fabrizia; Lanzuolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms modulate and maintain the transcriptional state of the genome acting at various levels on chromatin. Emerging findings suggest that the position in the nuclear space and the cross talk between components of the nuclear architecture play a role in the regulation of epigenetic signatures. We recently described a cross talk between the Polycomb group of proteins (PcG) epigenetic repressors and the nuclear lamina. This interplay is important for the maintenance of transcriptional repression at muscle-specific genes and for the correct timing of muscle differentiation. To investigate the synergism between PcG factors and nuclear architecture we improved a chromatin fractionation protocol with the aim to analyze the PcG nuclear compartmentalization. We thus separated PcG proteins in different fractions depending on their solubility. We surprisingly found a consistent amount of PcG proteins in the matrix-associated fraction. In this chapter we describe the chromatin fractionation procedure, a method that can be used to study the nuclear compartmentalization of Polycomb group of proteins and/or PcG targets in murine and Drosophila cells. PMID:27659984

  19. R4 regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) identify an ancient MHC-linked synteny group

    PubMed Central

    Suurväli, Jaanus; Robert, Jacques; Boudinot, Pierre; Boudinot, Sirje Rüütel

    2012-01-01

    Regulators of G Protein Signaling (RGS) are key regulators of G protein signaling. RGS proteins of the R4 RGS group are composed of a mere RGS domain and are mainly involved in immune response modulation. In both human and mouse, most genes encoding the R4 RGS proteins are located in the same region of chromosome 1. We show here that the RGS1/RGS16 neighborhood constitutes a synteny group well conserved across tetrapods, and closely linked to the MHC paralogon of chromosome 1. Genes located in the RGS1/RGS16 region have paralogs close to the MHC on chromosome 6 or close to the other MHC paralogons. In amphioxus, a cephalochordate, these genes possess orthologs that are located in the same scaffolds as a number of markers defining the proto-MHC in this species (Abi-Rached et al. 2002). We therefore propose that the RGS1/RGS16 region provides useful markers to investigate the origins and the evolution of the MHC. In addition, we show that some genes of the region appear to have immune functions not only in human, but also in Xenopus. PMID:23129146

  20. Hindered rotation of a cofactor methyl group as a probe for protein-cofactor interaction.

    PubMed

    Brosi, Richard; Illarionov, Boris; Mathes, Tilo; Fischer, Markus; Joshi, Monika; Bacher, Adelbert; Hegemann, Peter; Bittl, Robert; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2010-07-01

    Exploring protein-cofactor interactions on a molecular level is one of the major challenges in modern biophysics. Based on structural data alone it is rarely possible to identify how subtle interactions between a protein and its cofactor modulate the protein's reactivity. In the case of enzymatic processes in which paramagnetic molecules play a certain role, EPR and related methods such as ENDOR are suitable techniques to unravel such important details. In this contribution, we describe how cryogenic-temperature ENDOR spectroscopy can be applied to various LOV domains, the blue-light sensing domains of phototropin photoreceptors, to gain information on the direct vicinity of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor by analyzing the temperature dependence of methyl-group rotation attached to C(8) of the FMN's isoalloxazine ring. More specifically, mutational studies of three amino acids surrounding the methyl group led to the identification of Asn425 as an important amino acid that critically influences the dark-state recovery of Avena sativa LOV2 domains. Consequently, it is possible to probe protein-cofactor interactions on a sub-angstrom level by following the temperature dependencies of hyperfine couplings.

  1. Quinone-induced protein modifications: Kinetic preference for reaction of 1,2-benzoquinones with thiol groups in proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuting; Jongberg, Sisse; Andersen, Mogens L; Davies, Michael J; Lund, Marianne N

    2016-08-01

    Oxidation of polyphenols to quinones serves as an antioxidative mechanism, but the resulting quinones may induce damage to proteins as they react through a Michael addition with nucleophilic groups, such as thiols and amines to give protein adducts. In this study, rate constants for the reaction of 4-methylbenzoquinone (4MBQ) with proteins, thiol and amine compounds were determined under pseudo first-order conditions by UV-vis stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The chemical structures of the adducts were identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Proteins with free thiols were rapidly modified by 4MBQ with apparent second order rate constants, k2 of (3.1±0.2)×10(4)M(-1)s(-1) for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and (4.8±0.2)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1) for human serum albumin at pH 7.0. These values are at least 12-fold greater than that for α-lactalbumin (4.0±0.2)×10(2)M(-1)s(-1), which does not contain any free thiols. Reaction of Cys-34 of BSA with N-ethylmaleimide reduced the thiol concentration by ~59%, which resulted in a decrease in k2 by a similar percentage, consistent with rapid adduction at Cys-34. Reaction of 4MBQ with amines (Gly, Nα-acetyl-l-Lys, Nε-acetyl-l-Lys and l-Lys) and the guanidine group of Nα-acetyl-l-Arg was at least 5×10(5) slower than with low-molecular-mass thiols (l-Cys, Nα-acetyl-l-Cys, glutathione). The thiol-quinone interactions formed colorless thiol-phenol products via an intermediate adduct, while the amine-quinone interactions generated colored amine-quinone products that require oxygen involvement. These data provide strong evidence for rapid modification of protein thiols by quinone species which may be of considerable significance for biological and food systems. PMID:27212016

  2. High Mobility Group B Proteins, Their Partners, and Other Redox Sensors in Ovarian and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro-Alonso, Aida; Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Vizoso-Vázquez, Ángel; Quindós, María; Cerdán, M. Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells try to avoid the overproduction of reactive oxygen species by metabolic rearrangements. These cells also develop specific strategies to increase ROS resistance and to express the enzymatic activities necessary for ROS detoxification. Oxidative stress produces DNA damage and also induces responses, which could help the cell to restore the initial equilibrium. But if this is not possible, oxidative stress finally activates signals that will lead to cell death. High mobility group B (HMGB) proteins have been previously related to the onset and progressions of cancers of different origins. The protein HMGB1 behaves as a redox sensor and its structural changes, which are conditioned by the oxidative environment, are associated with different functions of the protein. This review describes recent advances in the role of human HMGB proteins and other proteins interacting with them, in cancerous processes related to oxidative stress, with special reference to ovarian and prostate cancer. Their participation in the molecular mechanisms of resistance to cisplatin, a drug commonly used in chemotherapy, is also revised. PMID:26682011

  3. Polycomb Group Protein PHF1 Regulates p53-dependent Cell Growth Arrest and Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Chenji; Zhang, Pingzhao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Dejie; Yu, Hongxiu; Zhang, Ting; Jiang, Sirui; Hexige, Saiyin; Hong, Zehui; Yasui, Akira; Liu, Jun O.; Huang, Haojie; Yu, Long

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group protein PHF1 is well known as a component of a novel EED-EZH2·Polycomb repressive complex 2 complex and plays important roles in H3K27 methylation and Hox gene silencing. PHF1 is also involved in the response to DNA double-strand breaks in human cells, promotes nonhomologous end-joining processes through interaction with Ku70/Ku80. Here, we identified another function of PHF1 as a potential p53 pathway activator in a pathway screen using luminescence reporter assay. Subsequent studies showed PHF1 directly interacts with p53 proteins both in vivo and in vitro and co-localized in nucleus. PHF1 binds to the C-terminal regulatory domain of p53. Overexpression of PHF1 elevated p53 protein level and prolonged its turnover. Knockdown of PHF1 reduced p53 protein level and its target gene expression both in normal state and DNA damage response. Mechanically, PHF1 protects p53 proteins from MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation. Furthermore, we showed that PHF1 regulates cell growth arrest and etoposide-induced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Finally, PHF1 expression was significantly down-regulated in human breast cancer samples. Taken together, we establish PHF1 as a novel positive regulator of the p53 pathway. These data shed light on the potential roles of PHF1 in tumorigenesis and/or tumor progression. PMID:23150668

  4. Mutant Cockayne syndrome group B protein inhibits repair of DNA topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex.

    PubMed

    Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Saijo, Masafumi; Bay, Mui N; Lan, Li; Kuraoka, Isao; Brooks, Philip J; Honma, Masamitsu; Nohmi, Takehiko; Yasui, Akira; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2011-01-01

    Two UV-sensitive syndrome patients who have mild photosensitivity without detectable somatic abnormalities lack detectable Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) protein because of a homozygous null mutation in the CSB gene. In contrast, mutant CSB proteins are produced in CS-B patients with the severe somatic abnormalities of Cockayne syndrome and photosensitivity. It is known that the piggyBac transposable element derived 3 is integrated within the CSB intron 5, and that CSB-piggyBac transposable element derived 3 fusion (CPFP) mRNA is produced by alternative splicing. We found that CPFP or truncated CSB protein derived from CPFP mRNA was stably produced in CS-B patients, and that wild-type CSB, CPFP, and truncated CSB protein interacted with DNA topoisomerase I. We also found that CPFP inhibited repair of a camptothecin-induced topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex. The inhibition was suppressed by the presence of wild-type CSB, consistent with the autosomal recessive inheritance of Cockayne syndrome. These results suggested that reduced repair of a DNA topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex because of truncated CSB proteins is involved in the pathogenesis of CS-B. PMID:21143350

  5. Biophysical characterization of G protein ectodomain of group B human respiratory syncytial virus from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wajihul Hasan; Srungaram, V L N Raghuram; Islam, Asimul; Beg, Ilyas; Haider, Md Shakir H; Ahmad, Faizan; Broor, Shobha; Parveen, Shama

    2016-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is an important pathogen of acute respiratory tract infection. The G protein of hRSV is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is a neutralizing antigen and is thus a vaccine candidate. In this study, synthetic codon optimized ectodomain G protein [G(ΔTM)] of BA genotype of group B hRSV was cloned, expressed, and characterized using biophysical techniques. The molar absorption coefficient and mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm ([θ]222) of G (ΔTM) was found to be 7950 M(-1) cm(-1) and -19701.7 deg cm(2) dmol(-1) respectively. It was concluded that G(ΔTM) mainly consist of α-helix (74.9%) with some amount of β-sheet (4%). The protein was stable up to 85°C without any transition curve. However, heat-induced denaturation of G(ΔTM) resulted in total loss of β-sheet whereas not much change was observed in the α-helix part of the secondary structure. It was concluded that G(ΔTM) is an α-helical protein and it is highly stable at high temperature, but could be easily denatured using high concentrations of GdmCl/urea or acidic condition. This is the first investigation of cloning, expression, and characterization of G(ΔTM) of BA viruses from India. Structural characterization of G protein will assist in drug designing and vaccine development for hRSV.

  6. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein Loads as a Separate Factor onto DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Suzanne; Volker, Marcel; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Nigg, Alex L.; Moné, Martijn J.; van Zeeland, Albert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main DNA repair pathway in mammals for removal of UV-induced lesions. NER involves the concerted action of more than 25 polypeptides in a coordinated fashion. The xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) has been suggested to function as a central organizer and damage verifier in NER. How XPA reaches DNA lesions and how the protein is distributed in time and space in living cells are unknown. Here we studied XPA in vivo by using a cell line stably expressing physiological levels of functional XPA fused to green fluorescent protein and by applying quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The majority of XPA moves rapidly through the nucleoplasm with a diffusion rate different from those of other NER factors tested, arguing against a preassembled XPA-containing NER complex. DNA damage induced a transient (∼5-min) immobilization of maximally 30% of XPA. Immobilization depends on XPC, indicating that XPA is not the initial lesion recognition protein in vivo. Moreover, loading of replication protein A on NER lesions was not dependent on XPA. Thus, XPA participates in NER by incorporation of free diffusing molecules in XPC-dependent NER-DNA complexes. This study supports a model for a rapid consecutive assembly of free NER factors, and a relatively slow simultaneous disassembly, after repair. PMID:12897146

  7. Experimental transmission of AA amyloidosis by injecting the AA amyloid protein into interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Uchida, K; Chambers, J K; Tei, M; Shoji, A; Ushio, N; Nakayama, H

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of AA amyloidosis is high in humans with rheumatoid arthritis and several animal species, including cats and cattle with prolonged inflammation. AA amyloidosis can be experimentally induced in mice using severe inflammatory stimuli and a coinjection of AA amyloid; however, difficulties have been associated with transmitting AA amyloidosis to a different animal species, and this has been attributed to the "species barrier." The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mouse, a rodent model of human rheumatoid arthritis, has been used in the transmission of AA amyloid. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with mouse AA amyloid together with a subcutaneous pretreatment of 2% AgNO3, all mice from both strains that were injected with crude or purified murine AA amyloid developed AA amyloidosis. However, the amyloid index, which was determined by the intensity of AA amyloid deposition, was significantly higher in IL-1raKO mice than in BALB/c mice. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified bovine AA amyloid together with the pretreatment, 83% (5/6 cases) and 38% (3/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 17% (1/6 cases) and 0% (0/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. Similarly, when IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified feline AA amyloid, 33% (2/6 cases) and 88% (7/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 0% (0/6 cases) and 29% (2/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. These results indicated that IL-1raKO mice are a useful animal model for investigating AA amyloidogenesis.

  8. Identification and Characterization of an Antigen I/II Family Protein Produced by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhen; Green, Nicole M.; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; LeFebvre, Rance B.; Musser, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a gram-positive human bacterial pathogen that causes infections ranging in severity from pharyngitis to life-threatening invasive disease, such as necrotizing fasciitis. Serotype M28 strains are consistently isolated from invasive infections, particularly puerperal sepsis, a severe infection that occurs during or after childbirth. We recently sequenced the genome of a serotype M28 GAS strain and discovered a novel 37.4-kb foreign genetic element designated region of difference 2 (RD2). RD2 is similar in gene content and organization to genomic islands found in group B streptococci (GBS), the major cause of neonatal infections. RD2 encodes seven proteins with conventional gram-positive secretion signal sequences, six of which have not been characterized. Herein, we report that one of these six proteins (M28_Spy1325; Spy1325) is a member of the antigen I/II family of cell surface-anchored molecules produced by oral streptococci. PCR and DNA sequence analysis found that Spy1325 is very well conserved in GAS strains of distinct M protein serotypes. As assessed by real-time TaqMan quantitative PCR, the Spy1325 gene was expressed in vitro, and Spy1325 protein was present in culture supernatants and on the GAS cell surface. Western immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicated that Spy1325 was produced by GAS in infected mice and humans. Importantly, the immunization of mice with recombinant Spy1325 fragments conferred protection against GAS-mediated mortality. Similar to other antigen I/II proteins, recombinant Spy1325 bound purified human salivary agglutinin glycoprotein. Spy1325 may represent a shared virulence factor among GAS, GBS, and oral streptococci. PMID:16790795

  9. Oral Debio1143 (AT406), an antagonist of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, in combination with daunorubicin and cytarabine in patients with poor-risk acute myeloid leukemia - results of a phase I dose escalation study

    PubMed Central

    Erba, Harry P.; Larson, Richard A.; Luger, Selina M.; Tallman, Martin S.; Brill, Jeffrey M.; Vuagniaux, Gregoire; Rouits, Elisabeth; Sorensen, J. Mel; Zanna, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains difficult due to the development of treatment resistance which might be overcome through antagonists of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). Patients and methods This multi-center, open-label, dose escalation study aimed to evaluate tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and efficacy of Debio1143 (formerly AT-406), a new IAP antagonist, when given along with a standard "7 plus 3 regimen" of daunorubicin and cytarabine to poor-risk patients with AML during the induction cycle. Consecutive patient cohorts received once daily 100, 200, 300, or 400 mg of oral Debio1143 on treatment days 1–5. Blood samples were collected regularly until hematological recovery or response; bone marrow samples on day 0, 14, and 29; and PK and PD samples on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 1, 2, 8, respectively. Results Of 29 enrolled patients, 23 completed the study. Most common adverse events of any grade deemed related to treatment were nausea (31% of patients), diarrhea (14%), and febrile neutropenia (14%). Exposure exceeded dose-proportionality, without accumulation over 5 days. Inhibition of cIAP-1 was detectable in CD34/CD117+ cells and blasts. A total of 11 (38%) patients achieved complete remission, the majority in the 100 mg dose cohort. Of these, 6 (56%) relapsed still within the study period. Responders more frequently showed plasma increases of TNFα and IL-8 post-first dose of Debio1143. Conclusion Debio1143 up to 400 mg/day showed good tolerability in combination with daunorubicin and cytarabine; further studies in subsets of patients with AML are warranted. PMID:25842225

  10. β1-adrenergic receptor antagonists signal via PDE4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Wito; Mika, Delphine; Blanchard, Elise; Day, Peter; Conti, Marco

    2013-03-01

    It is generally assumed that antagonists of Gs-coupled receptors do not activate cAMP signalling, because they do not stimulate cAMP production via Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase activation. Here, we report a new signalling pathway whereby antagonists of β1-adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) increase cAMP levels locally without stimulating cAMP production directly. Binding of antagonists causes dissociation of a preformed complex between β1ARs and Type-4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4s). This reduces the local concentration of cAMP-hydrolytic activity, thereby increasing submembrane cAMP and PKA activity. Our study identifies receptor/PDE4 complex dissociation as a novel mechanism of antagonist action that contributes to the pharmacological properties of β1AR antagonists and might be shared by other receptor subtypes.

  11. Entropy Loss of Hydroxyl Groups of Balanol upon Binding to Protein Kinase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidofalvi, Gergely; Wong, Chung F.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2002-09-01

    This article describes a short project for an undergraduate to learn several techniques for computer-aided drug design. The project involves estimating the loss of the rotational entropy of the hydroxyl groups of balanol upon its binding to the enzyme protein kinase A (PKA), as the entropy loss can significantly influence PKA balanol binding affinity. This work employs semiempirical quantum mechanical techniques for estimating the potential energy curves for the rotation of the hydroxyl groups of balanol in vacuum and in PKA, and solves the Poisson equation to correct the potential energy curves for hydration effects. Statistical mechanical principles are then applied to estimate the desired entropy loss from the potential energy curves. The analysis examines the influence of hydration effects on the rotational preference of the hydroxyl groups and the significance of the rotational entropy in determining binding affinity.

  12. Trapping of excess electrons at the microhydrated protonated amino groups in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenchao; Zhang, Zhenwei; Yang, Hongfang; Wu, Xiuxiu; Liu, Jinxiang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2012-03-01

    We present a combined first-principles calculation and molecular dynamics simulation study of an excess electron (EE) in condensed phase of a microhydrated protonated amino group in proteins in this work. The protonated amino group, -NH3+, is modeled by a CH3NH3+ and an amount of water molecules are included to form various microhydrated CH3NH3+ clusters, and the states and the dynamics of the trapped EE are analyzed. In addition to the localized and delocalized states observed, the N-H/O-H bond cleavage phenomena followed by escape of a H atom are also observed for some hydrated clusters in which the -NH3+ group exposes on the surface of the cluster and directly participates in binding an EE. The state-to-state conversion is controlled by thermal motion of molecules in the clusters, and the cleavage of the N-H or the O-H bond and the H escape are determined by the binding modes of the EE. The H-escape nature could be attributed to the dissociation of the N-H or O-H bond induced by the trapped EE which transfers to their antibonding orbitals. This work provides a microscopical picture of the EE trapping at a microhydrated hydrophilic group in proteins, long-range electron migration, and the H-evolving mechanisms relevant for the lesions or damages of proteins or DNA. This is the first step in considering increasingly larger peptide fragments for further investigation of the detailed lesion/damage or charge migration mechanisms. Further work about this topic is underway.

  13. Identification of a group of Haemophilus influenzae penicillin-binding proteins that may have complementary physiological roles

    SciTech Connect

    Malouin, F.; Parr, T.R. Jr.; Bryan, L.E. )

    1990-02-01

    (35S)penicillin bound to different Haemophilus influenzae proteins in assays performed at 20, 37, or 42{degrees}C. Penicillin-binding proteins 3a, 3b, 4, and 4' formed a group characterized by their affinity for moxalactam, cefotaxime, and piperacillin. Penicillin-binding protein 4' showed specific properties that may reflect its complementary role in septation.

  14. [3H]-LY341495 as a novel antagonist radioligand for group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors: characterization of binding to membranes of mGlu receptor subtype expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B G; Wright, R A; Arnold, M B; Wheeler, W J; Ornstein, P L; Schoepp, D D

    1999-10-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are a family of eight known subtypes termed mGlu1-8. Currently, few ligands are available to study the pharmacology of mGlu receptor subtypes. In functional assays, we previously described LY341495 as a highly potent and selective mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor antagonist. In this study, radiolabeled [3H]-LY341495 was used to investigate the characteristics of receptor binding to membranes from cells expressing human mGlu receptor subtypes. Using membranes from cells expressing human mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors, [3H]-LY341495 (1 nM) specific binding was > 90% of total binding. At an approximate K(D) concentration for [3H]-LY341495 binding to human mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors (1 nM), no appreciable specific binding of [3H-]LY341495 was found in membranes of cells expressing human mGlu1a, mGlu5a, mGlu4a, mGlu6, or mGlu7a receptors. However, modest (approximately 20% of mGlu2/3) specific [3H]-LY341495 (1 nM) binding was observed in human mGlu8 expressing cells. [3H]-LY341495 bound to membranes expressing human mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors in a reversible and saturable manner with relatively high affinities (Bmax 20.5 +/- 5.4 and 32.0 +/- 7.0 pmol/mg protein; and K(D) = 1.67 +/- 0.20 and 0.75 +/- 0.43 nM, respectively). The pharmacology of [3H]-LY341495 binding in mGlu2 and mGlu3 expressing cells was consistent with that previously described for LY341495 in functional assays. [3H]-LY341495 binding provides a useful way to further investigate regulation of receptor expression and pharmacological properties of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor subtypes in recombinant systems. PMID:10530814

  15. An E3 ligase complex regulates SET-domain polycomb group protein activity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Cheol Woong; Roh, Hyungmin; Dang, Tuong Vi; Choi, Yang Do; Fischer, Robert L.; Lee, Jong Seob; Choi, Yeonhee

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional repression via methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) by the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is conserved in higher eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis PRC2 controls homeotic gene expression, flowering time, and gene imprinting. Although downstream target genes and the regulatory mechanism of PRC2 are well understood, much less is known about the significance of posttranslational regulation of PRC2 protein activity. Here, we show the posttranslational regulation of CURLY LEAF (CLF) SET-domain polycomb group (PcG) protein by the F-box protein, UPWARD CURLY LEAF1 (UCL1). Overexpression of UCL1 generates mutant phenotypes similar to those observed in plants with a loss-of-function mutation in the CLF gene. Leaf curling and early flowering phenotypes of UCL1 overexpression mutants, like clf mutants, are rescued by mutations in the AGAMOUS and FLOWERING LOCUS T genes, which is consistent with UCL1 and CLF functioning in the same genetic pathway. Overexpression of UCL1 reduces the level of CLF protein and alters expression and H3K27 methylation of CLF-target genes in transgenic plants, suggesting that UCL1 negatively regulates CLF. Interaction of UCL1 with CLF was detected in plant nuclei and in the yeast two-hybrid system. The UCL1 F-box binds in vivo to components of the E3 ligase complex, which ubiquitylate proteins that are subsequently degraded via the ubiquitin-26S proteasome pathway. Taken together, these results demonstrate the posttranslational regulation of the CLF SET-domain PcG activity by the UCL1 F-box protein in the E3 ligase complex. PMID:21518870

  16. High mobility group nucleosome-binding family proteins promote astrocyte differentiation of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Motoshi; Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Yusuke; Ogata, Toru; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the mammalian brain and are important for the functions of the central nervous system. Although previous studies have shown that the STAT signaling pathway or its regulators promote the generation of astrocytes from multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the developing mammalian brain, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the astrocytic fate decision have still remained largely unclear. Here, we show that the high mobility group nucleosome-binding (HMGN) family proteins, HMGN1, 2, and 3, promote astrocyte differentiation of NPCs during brain development. HMGN proteins were expressed in NPCs, Sox9(+) glial progenitors, and GFAP(+) astrocytes in perinatal and adult brains. Forced expression of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs in cultures or in the late embryonic neocortex increased the generation of astrocytes at the expense of neurons. Conversely, knockdown of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs suppressed astrocyte differentiation and promoted neuronal differentiation. Importantly, overexpression of HMGN proteins did not induce the phosphorylation of STAT3 or activate STAT reporter genes. In addition, HMGN family proteins did not enhance DNA demethylation and acetylation of histone H3 around the STAT-binding site of the gfap promoter. Moreover, knockdown of HMGN family proteins significantly reduced astrocyte differentiation induced by gliogenic signal ciliary neurotrophic factor, which activates the JAK-STAT pathway. Therefore, we propose that HMGN family proteins are novel chromatin regulatory factors that control astrocyte fate decision/differentiation in parallel with or downstream of the JAK-STAT pathway through modulation of the responsiveness to gliogenic signals. PMID:25069414

  17. Energy-sensing factors coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α) and AMP-activated protein kinase control expression of inflammatory mediators in liver: induction of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Buler, Marcin; Aatsinki, Sanna-Mari; Skoumal, Réka; Komka, Zsolt; Tóth, Miklós; Kerkelä, Risto; Georgiadi, Anastasia; Kersten, Sander; Hakkola, Jukka

    2012-01-13

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with chronic, low grade inflammation. Moreover, regulation of energy metabolism and immunity are highly integrated. We hypothesized that energy-sensitive coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) may modulate inflammatory gene expression in liver. Microarray analysis revealed that PGC-1α up-regulated expression of several cytokines and cytokine receptors, including interleukin 15 receptor α (IL15Rα) and, even more importantly, anti-inflammatory interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1Rn). Overexpression of PGC-1α and induction of PGC-1α by fasting, physical exercise, glucagon, or cAMP was associated with increased IL1Rn mRNA and protein expression in hepatocytes. Knockdown of PGC-1α by siRNA down-regulated cAMP-induced expression of IL1Rn in mouse hepatocytes. Furthermore, knockdown of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) attenuated IL1Rn induction by PGC-1α. Overexpression of PGC-1α, at least partially through IL1Rn, suppressed interleukin 1β-induced expression of acute phase proteins, C-reactive protein, and haptoglobin. Fasting and exercise also induced IL15Rα expression, whereas glucagon and cAMP resulted in reduction in IL15Rα mRNA levels. Finally, AMPK activator metformin and adenoviral overexpression of AMPK up-regulated IL1Rn and down-regulated IL15Rα in primary hepatocytes. We conclude that PGC-1α and AMPK alter inflammatory gene expression in liver and thus integrate energy homeostasis and inflammation. Induction of IL1Rn by PGC-1α and AMPK may be involved in the beneficial effects of exercise and caloric restriction and putative anti-inflammatory effects of metformin.

  18. A short PPR protein required for the splicing of specific group II introns in angiosperm chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Khrouchtchova, Anastassia; Monde, Rita-Ann; Barkan, Alice

    2012-06-01

    A maize gene designated thylakoid assembly 8 (tha8) emerged from a screen for nuclear mutations that cause defects in the biogenesis of chloroplast thylakoid membranes. The tha8 gene encodes an unusual member of the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family, a family of helical repeat proteins that participate in various aspects of organellar RNA metabolism. THA8 localizes to chloroplasts, where it associates specifically with the ycf3-2 and trnA group II introns. The splicing of ycf3-2 is eliminated in tha8 mutants, and trnA splicing is strongly compromised. Reverse-genetic analysis of the tha8 ortholog in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that these molecular functions are conserved, although null alleles are embryo lethal in Arabidopsis and seedling lethal in maize. Whereas most PPR proteins have more than 10 PPR motifs, THA8 belongs to a subfamily of plant PPR proteins with only four PPR motifs and little else. THA8 is the first member of this subfamily with a defined molecular function, and illustrates that even small PPR proteins have the potential to mediate specific intermolecular interactions in vivo.

  19. Group 3 LEA protein model peptides protect enzymes against desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    Furuki, Takao; Sakurai, Minoru

    2016-09-01

    We tested whether model peptides for group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (G3LEA) proteins, which we developed previously, are capable of maintaining the catalytic activities of enzymes dried in their presence. Three different peptides were compared: 1) PvLEA-22, which consists of two tandem repeats of the 11-mer motif found in G3LEA proteins from an African sleeping chironomid; 2) PvLEA-44, which is made of four tandem repeats of the same 11-mer motif; and 3) a peptide whose amino acid composition is the same as that of PvLEA-22, but whose sequence is scrambled. We selected two enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and β-d-galactosidase (BDG), as targets because they have different isoelectric point (pI) values, in the alkaline and acidic range, respectively. While these enzymes were almost inactivated when dried alone, their catalytic activity was preserved at ≥70% of native levels in the presence of any of the above three peptides. This degree of protection is comparable to that conferred by several full-length G3LEA proteins, as reported previously for LDH. Interestingly, the protective activity of the peptides was enhanced slightly when they were mixed with trehalose, especially when the molar content of the peptides was low. On the basis of these results, the G3LEA model peptides show promise as protectants for the dry preservation of enzymes/proteins with a wide range of pI values. PMID:27131872

  20. Structure and assembly of group B streptococcus pilus 2b backbone protein.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization.

  1. Structure and Assembly of Group B Streptococcus Pilus 2b Backbone Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J.; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C. Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization. PMID:25942637

  2. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 2. Transport studies, photoaffinity labeling, and identification of the membrane carrier protein for methotrexate from murine L1210 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1987-07-28

    A membrane-derived component of the methotrexate/one-carbon-reduced folate transport system in murine L1210 cells has been identified by using a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate. The compound, a radioiodinated 4-azidosalicylyl derivative of the lysine analogue of methotrexate, is transported into murine L1210 cells in a temperature-dependent, sulfhydryl reagent inhibitable manner with a K/sub t/ of 506 +/- 79 nM and a V/sub max/ of 17.9 +/- 4.2 pmol min/sup -1/ (mg of total cellular protein)/sup -1/. Uptake of the iodinated compound at 200 nM is inhibited by low amounts of methotrexate. The parent compounds of the iodinated photoprobe inhibit (/sup 3/H)methotrexate uptake, with the uniodinated 4-azidosalicylyl derivative exhibiting a K/sub i/ of 66 +/- 21 nM. UV irradiation, at 4 /sup 0/C, of a cell suspension that had been incubated with the probe results in the covalent modification of a 46K-48K protein. This can be demonstrated when the plasma membranes from the labeled cells are analyzed via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Labeling of this protein occurs half-maximally at a reagent concentration that correlates with the K/sub t/ for transport of the iodinated compound. Protection against labeling of this protein by increasing amounts of methotrexate parallels the concentration dependence of inhibition of photoprobe uptake by methotrexate. Evidence that, in the absence of irradiation and at 37/sup 0/C, the iodinated probe is actually internalized is demonstrated by the labeling of two soluble proteins (M/sub r/ 38K and 21K) derived from the cell homogenate supernatant.

  3. Tetraspanin18 is a FoxD3-responsive antagonist of cranial neural crest epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition that maintains cadherin-6B protein

    PubMed Central

    Fairchild, Corinne L.; Gammill, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary During epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tightly associated, polarized epithelial cells become individual mesenchymal cells capable of migrating. Here, we investigate the role of the transmembrane protein tetraspanin18 (Tspan18) in chick cranial neural crest EMT. Tspan18 mRNA is expressed in premigratory cranial neural crest cells, but is absent from actively migrating neural crest cells. Tspan18 knockdown leads to a concomitant loss of cadherin-6B (Cad6B) protein, whereas Cad6B protein persists when Tspan18 expression is extended. The temporal profile of Cad6B mRNA downregulation is unaffected in these embryos, which indicates that Tspan18 maintains Cad6B protein levels and reveals that Cad6B is regulated by post-translational mechanisms. Although downregulation of Tspan18 is necessary, it is not sufficient for neural crest migration: the timing of neural crest emigration, basal lamina breakdown and Cad7 upregulation proceed normally in Tspan18-deficient cells. This emphasizes the need for coordinated transcriptional and post-translational regulation of Cad6B during EMT and illustrates that Tspan18-antagonized remodeling of cell–cell adhesions is only one step in preparation for cranial neural crest migration. Unlike Cad6B, which is transcriptionally repressed by Snail2, Tspan18 expression is downstream of the winged-helix transcription factor FoxD3, providing a new transcriptional input into cranial neural crest EMT. Together, our data reveal post-translational regulation of Cad6B protein levels by Tspan18 that must be relieved by a FoxD3-dependent mechanism in order for cranial neural crest cells to migrate. These results offer new insight into the molecular mechanisms of cranial neural crest EMT and expand our understanding of tetraspanin function relevant to metastasis. PMID:23418345

  4. O-GlcNAcylation, an Epigenetic Mark. Focus on the Histone Code, TET Family Proteins, and Polycomb Group Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dehennaut, Vanessa; Leprince, Dominique; Lefebvre, Tony

    2014-01-01

    There are increasing evidences that dietary components and metabolic disorders affect gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. These observations support the notion that epigenetic reprograming-linked nutrition is connected to the etiology of metabolic diseases and cancer. During the last 5 years, accumulating data revealed that the nutrient-sensing O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) may be pivotal in the modulation of chromatin remodeling and in the regulation of gene expression by being part of the “histone code,” and by identifying OGT (O-GlcNAc transferase) as an interacting partner of the TET family proteins of DNA hydroxylases and as a member of the polycomb group proteins. Thus, it is suggested that O-GlcNAcylation is a post-translational modification that links nutrition to epigenetic. This review summarizes recent findings about the interplay between O-GlcNAcylation and the epigenome and enlightens the contribution of the glycosylation to epigenetic reprograming. PMID:25309514

  5. [Differential therapy with calcium antagonists].

    PubMed

    Scholze, Jürgen E

    2003-12-01

    EFFICACY OF CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS: Calcium-channel blockers (CCBs) have long been recognized as potent agents for hypertensive therapy, with substantial blood pressure reduction in all age groups and races. CCBs improve endothelial function, may positively influence atherosclerosis in carotid arteries, reduce left ventricular hypertrophy, and hypertrophy of the resistance vessels, and improve arterial compliance. They do not adversely affect lipids and serum glucose. USE IN PRACTICE: CCBs are also a heterogenous class of drugs composed of the phenylalkylamine verapamil, the benzothiazepine diltiazem, and the large group of dihydropyridines (DHPs) with the prototype nifedipine, and an increasing number of newer agents (e. g. nitrendipine, nisoldipine, amlodipine, felodipine, lacidipine and lercanidipine). DHPs are primarily vasodilators, lowering blood pressure by decreasing peripheral vascular resistance at the level of the small arterioles which can be followed by an autonomic counterregulation especially in drugs with a rapid onset of action. This is markedly reduced or abolished in the treatment with the modern long acting DHPs and is also not the case in the treatment with non-DHPs. Prospective randomized controlled outcome studies demonstrated a significant reduction in stroke in elderly patients with isolated systolic hypertension compared with placebo (Syst-Eur [Syst-China]), and no significant differences in cardiovascular mortality and combined morbidity compared with diuretics, beta blockers or ACE-Inhibitors (STOP-2, INSIGHT, NORDIL, ALLHAT, INVEST). To normalize the blood pressure it is mostly necessary to combine antihypertensive drugs. Here are CCBs ideal partners for a therapy with ACE-inhibitors, AT1 antagonists or beta blockers (DHP) and diuretics (verapamil). With respect to the antihypertensive differential therapy the author recommends CCBs based on studies with the evidence grade 1-3; especially for elderly hypertensives (with isolated systolic

  6. A dangerous duo in adipose tissue: high-mobility group box 1 protein and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Marek

    2014-06-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein first made headlines 40 years ago as a non-histone nuclear protein that regulates gene expression. Not so long ago, it was also shown that HMGB1 has an additional surprising function. When released into the extracellular milieu, HMGB1 triggers an inflammatory response by serving as an endogenous danger signal. The pro-inflammatory role of HMGB1 is now well-established and has been associated with several diseases, including sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. Yet very little is known about its role in obesity, wherein adipose tissue is typified by a persistent, smoldering inflammatory response instigated by high macrophage infiltrate that potentiates the risk of obesity-associated comorbidities. This mini-review focuses on the putative causal relationship between HMGB1 and macrophage pro-inflammatory activation in pathologically altered adipose tissue associated with obesity.

  7. A dangerous duo in adipose tissue: high-mobility group box 1 protein and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Marek

    2014-06-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein first made headlines 40 years ago as a non-histone nuclear protein that regulates gene expression. Not so long ago, it was also shown that HMGB1 has an additional surprising function. When released into the extracellular milieu, HMGB1 triggers an inflammatory response by serving as an endogenous danger signal. The pro-inflammatory role of HMGB1 is now well-established and has been associated with several diseases, including sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. Yet very little is known about its role in obesity, wherein adipose tissue is typified by a persistent, smoldering inflammatory response instigated by high macrophage infiltrate that potentiates the risk of obesity-associated comorbidities. This mini-review focuses on the putative causal relationship between HMGB1 and macrophage pro-inflammatory activation in pathologically altered adipose tissue associated with obesity. PMID:24910558

  8. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  9. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses. PMID:21869692

  10. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Caitlin L; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A; Moseley, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P-protein

  11. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Caitlin L.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P-protein

  12. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Caitlin L; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A; Moseley, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P-protein

  13. In-vitro Relationship between Protein-binding and Free Drug Concentrations of a Water-soluble Selective Beta-adrenoreceptor Antagonist (Atenolol) and Its Interaction with Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Awal, M.A.; Subhan, N.; Mostofa, M.

    2009-01-01

    The degree of binding of a drug to plasma proteins has a marked effect on its distribution, elimination, and pharmacological effect since only the unbound fraction is available for distribution into extra-vascular space. The protein-binding of atenolol was measured by equilibrium dialysis in the bovine serum albumin (BSA). Free atenolol concentration was increased due to addition of arsenic which reduced the binding of the compounds to BSA. During concurrent administration, arsenic displaced atenolol from its high-affinity binding Site I, and free concentration of atenolol increased from 4.286±0.629% and 5.953±0.605% to 82.153±1.924% and 85.486±1.158% in absence and presence of Site I probe respectively. Thus, it can be suggested that arsenic displaced atenolol from its binding site resulting in an increase of the free atenolol concentration in plasma. PMID:19248645

  14. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  15. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  16. Molecular determinants of agonist and antagonist signaling through the IL-36 receptor.

    PubMed

    Günther, Sebastian; Sundberg, Eric J

    2014-07-15

    The IL-1 family consists of 11 cytokines that control a complex network of proinflammatory signals critical for regulating immune responses to infections. They also play a central role in numerous chronic inflammatory disorders. Accordingly, inhibiting the activities of these cytokines is an important therapeutic strategy for treating autoimmune diseases and lymphomas. Agonist cytokines in the IL-1 family activate signaling by binding their cognate receptor and then recruiting a receptor accessory protein. Conversely, antagonist cytokines bind their cognate receptor but prohibit recruitment of receptor accessory protein, which precludes functional signaling complexes. The IL-36 subfamily of cytokines is the most diverse, including three agonists and at least one antagonist, and is the least well-characterized group within this family. Signaling through the IL-36 receptor directly stimulates dendritic cells and primes naive CD4 T cells for Th1 responses. Appropriately balanced IL-36 signaling is a critical determinant of skin and lung health. IL-36 signaling has been presumed to function analogously to IL-1 signaling. In this study, we have defined molecular determinants of agonist and antagonist signaling through the IL-36 receptor. We present the crystal structure of IL-36γ, which, to our knowledge, is the first reported structure of an IL-36 agonist. Using this structure as a guide, we designed a comprehensive series of IL-36 agonist/antagonist chimeric proteins for which we measured binding to the IL-36 receptor/IL-1 receptor accessory protein complex and functional activation and inhibition of signaling. Our data reveal how the fine specificity of IL-36 signaling is distinct from that of IL-1.

  17. Group 1 LEA proteins contribute to the desiccation and freeze tolerance of Artemia franciscana embryos during diapause.

    PubMed

    Toxopeus, Jantina; Warner, Alden H; MacRae, Thomas H

    2014-11-01

    Water loss either by desiccation or freezing causes multiple forms of cellular damage. The encysted embryos (cysts) of the crustacean Artemia franciscana have several molecular mechanisms to enable anhydrobiosis-life without water-during diapause. To better understand how cysts survive reduced hydration, group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, hydrophilic unstructured proteins that accumulate in the stress-tolerant cysts of A. franciscana, were knocked down using RNA interference (RNAi). Embryos lacking group 1 LEA proteins showed significantly lower survival than control embryos after desiccation and freezing, or freezing alone, demonstrating a role for group 1 LEA proteins in A. franciscana tolerance of low water conditions. In contrast, regardless of group 1 LEA protein presence, cysts responded similarly to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure, indicating little to no function for these proteins in diapause termination. This is the first in vivo study of group 1 LEA proteins in an animal and it contributes to the fundamental understanding of these proteins. Knowing how LEA proteins protect A. franciscana cysts from desiccation and freezing may have applied significance in aquaculture, where Artemia is an important feed source, and in the cryopreservation of cells for therapeutic applications. PMID:24846336

  18. "Velcro" engineering of high affinity CD47 ectodomain as signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) antagonists that enhance antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia Chi M; Guo, Nan; Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Ring, Aaron M; Weiskopf, Kipp; Özkan, Engin; Mori, Yasuo; Weissman, Irving L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2015-05-15

    CD47 is a cell surface protein that transmits an anti-phagocytic signal, known as the "don't-eat-me" signal, to macrophages upon engaging its receptor signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα). Molecules that antagonize the CD47-SIRPα interaction by binding to CD47, such as anti-CD47 antibodies and the engineered SIRPα variant CV1, have been shown to facilitate macrophage-mediated anti-tumor responses. However, these strategies targeting CD47 are handicapped by large antigen sinks in vivo and indiscriminate cell binding due to ubiquitous expression of CD47. These factors reduce bioavailability and increase the risk of toxicity. Here, we present an alternative strategy to antagonize the CD47-SIRPα pathway by engineering high affinity CD47 variants that target SIRPα, which has restricted tissue expression. CD47 proved to be refractive to conventional affinity maturation techniques targeting its binding interface with SIRPα. Therefore, we developed a novel engineering approach, whereby we augmented the existing contact interface via N-terminal peptide extension, coined "Velcro" engineering. The high affinity variant (Velcro-CD47) bound to the two most prominent human SIRPα alleles with greatly increased affinity relative to wild-type CD47 and potently antagonized CD47 binding to SIRPα on human macrophages. Velcro-CD47 synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to enhance macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells in vitro, with similar potency as CV1. Finally, Velcro-CD47 interacts specifically with a subset of myeloid-derived cells in human blood, whereas CV1 binds all myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid populations interrogated. This is consistent with the restricted expression of SIRPα compared with CD47. Herein, we have demonstrated that "Velcro" engineering is a powerful protein-engineering tool with potential applications to other systems and that Velcro-CD47 could be an alternative adjuvant to CD47-targeting agents for cancer immunotherapy.

  19. “Velcro” Engineering of High Affinity CD47 Ectodomain as Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Antagonists That Enhance Antibody-dependent Cellular Phagocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chia Chi M.; Guo, Nan; Sockolosky, Jonathan T.; Ring, Aaron M.; Weiskopf, Kipp; Özkan, Engin; Mori, Yasuo; Weissman, Irving L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a cell surface protein that transmits an anti-phagocytic signal, known as the “don't-eat-me” signal, to macrophages upon engaging its receptor signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα). Molecules that antagonize the CD47-SIRPα interaction by binding to CD47, such as anti-CD47 antibodies and the engineered SIRPα variant CV1, have been shown to facilitate macrophage-mediated anti-tumor responses. However, these strategies targeting CD47 are handicapped by large antigen sinks in vivo and indiscriminate cell binding due to ubiquitous expression of CD47. These factors reduce bioavailability and increase the risk of toxicity. Here, we present an alternative strategy to antagonize the CD47-SIRPα pathway by engineering high affinity CD47 variants that target SIRPα, which has restricted tissue expression. CD47 proved to be refractive to conventional affinity maturation techniques targeting its binding interface with SIRPα. Therefore, we developed a novel engineering approach, whereby we augmented the existing contact interface via N-terminal peptide extension, coined “Velcro” engineering. The high affinity variant (Velcro-CD47) bound to the two most prominent human SIRPα alleles with greatly increased affinity relative to wild-type CD47 and potently antagonized CD47 binding to SIRPα on human macrophages. Velcro-CD47 synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to enhance macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells in vitro, with similar potency as CV1. Finally, Velcro-CD47 interacts specifically with a subset of myeloid-derived cells in human blood, whereas CV1 binds all myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid populations interrogated. This is consistent with the restricted expression of SIRPα compared with CD47. Herein, we have demonstrated that “Velcro” engineering is a powerful protein-engineering tool with potential applications to other systems and that Velcro-CD47 could be an alternative adjuvant to CD47-targeting agents for cancer immunotherapy

  20. Extracellular High-Mobility Group Box 1 Protein (HMGB1) as a Mediator of Persistent Pain

    PubMed Central

    Agalave, Nilesh M; Svensson, Camilla I

    2014-01-01

    Although originally described as a highly conserved nuclear protein, high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) has emerged as a danger-associated molecular pattern molecule protein (DAMP) and is a mediator of innate and specific immune responses. HMGB1 is passively or actively released in response to infection, injury and cellular stress, providing chemotactic and cytokine-like functions in the extracellular environment, where it interacts with receptors such as receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and several Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Although HMGB1 was first revealed as a key mediator of sepsis, it also contributes to a number of other conditions and disease processes. Chronic pain arises as a direct consequence of injury, inflammation or diseases affecting the somatosensory system and can be devastating for the affected patients. Emerging data indicate that HMGB1 is also involved in the pathology of persistent pain. Here, we give an overview of HMGB1 as a proinflammatory mediator, focusing particularly on the role of HMGB1 in the induction and maintenance of hypersensitivity in experimental models of pain and discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting HMGB1 in conditions of chronic pain. PMID:25222915

  1. Combining Ultracentrifugation and Peptide Termini Group-specific Immunoprecipitation for Multiplex Plasma Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Sonja; Schreiber, Thomas D.; Eisen, David; Wiese, Calvin; Planatscher, Hannes; Pynn, Christopher J.; Stoll, Dieter; Templin, Markus F.; Joos, Thomas O.; Pötz, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Blood plasma is a valuable source of potential biomarkers. However, its complexity and the huge dynamic concentration range of its constituents complicate its analysis. To tackle this problem, an immunoprecipitation strategy was employed using antibodies directed against short terminal epitope tags (triple X proteomics antibodies), which allow the enrichment of groups of signature peptides derived from trypsin-digested plasma. Isolated signature peptides are subsequently detected using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Sensitivity of the immunoaffinity approach was, however, compromised by the presence of contaminant peaks derived from the peptides of nontargeted high abundant proteins. A closer analysis of the enrichment strategy revealed nonspecific peptide binding to the solid phase affinity matrix as the major source of the contaminating peptides. We therefore implemented a sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation separation step into the procedure. This yielded a 99% depletion of contaminating peptides from a sucrose fraction containing 70% of the peptide-antibody complexes and enabled the detection of the previously undetected low abundance protein filamin-A. Assessment of this novel approach using 15 different triple X proteomics antibodies demonstrated a more consistent detection of a greater number of targeted peptides and a significant reduction in the intensity of nonspecific peptides. Ultracentrifugation coupled with immunoaffinity MS approaches presents a powerful tool for multiplexed plasma protein analysis without the requirement for demanding liquid chromatography separation techniques. PMID:22527512

  2. High-mobility Group Box-1 Protein Promotes Granulomatous Nephritis in Adenine-induced nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Yoko; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Taniguchi, Noboru; Tancharoen, Salunya; Uchimura, Tomonori; Biswas, Kamal K.; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Nitanda, Takao; Umekita, Yoshihisa; Lotz, Martin; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2011-01-01

    Granulomatous nephritis can be triggered by diverse factors and results in kidney failure. However, despite accumulating data about granulomatous inflammation, pathogenetic mechanisms in nephritis remain unclear. The DNA-binding high-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) initiates and propagates inflammation when released by activated macrophages, functions as an “alarm cytokine” signaling tissue damage. In this study, we demonstrated elevated HMGB1 expression in renal granulomas in rats with crystal-induced granulomatous nephritis caused by feeding an adenine-rich diet. HMGB1 levels were also raised in urine and serum, as well as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a mediator of granulomatous inflammation. Injection of HMGB1 worsened renal function and upregulated MCP-1 in rats with crystal-induced granulomatous nephritis. HMGB1 also induced MCP-1 secretion through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways in rat renal tubular epithelial cells in vitro. Hmgb1+/− mice with crystal-induced nephritis displayed reduced MCP-1 expression in the kidneys and in urine and the number of macrophages in the kidneys was significantly decreased. We conclude that HMGB1 is a new mediator involved in crystal-induced nephritis that amplifies granulomatous inflammation in a cycle where MCP-1 attracts activated macrophages, resulting in excessive and sustained HMGB1 release. HMGB1 could be a novel target for inhibiting chronic granulomatous diseases. PMID:20231821

  3. Group A Streptococcal M1 Protein Sequesters Cathelicidin to Evade Innate Immune Killing

    PubMed Central

    LaRock, Christopher N.; Döhrmann, Simon; Todd, Jordan; Corriden, Ross; Olson, Joshua; Johannssen, Timo; Lepenies, Bernd; Gallo, Richard L.; Ghosh, Partho; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is generated upon proteolytic cleavage of cathelicidin and limits invading pathogens by directly targeting microbial membranes as well as stimulating innate immune cell function. However, some microbes evade LL-37-mediated defense. Notably, Group A Streptococcus (GAS) strains belonging to the hypervirulent M1T1 serogroup are more resistant to human LL-37 than other GAS serogroups. We show that the GAS surface-associated M1 protein sequesters and neutralizes LL-37 antimicrobial activity through its N-terminal domain. M1 protein also binds the cathelicidin precursor hCAP-18, preventing its proteolytic maturation into antimicrobial forms. Exogenous M1 protein rescues M1-deficient GAS from killing by neutrophils and within neutrophil extracellular traps and neutralizes LL-37 chemotactic properties. M1 also binds murine cathelicidin, and its virulence contribution in a murine model of necrotizing skin infection is largely driven by its ability to neutralize this host defense peptide. Thus, cathelicidin resistance is essential for the pathogenesis of hyperinvasive M1T1 GAS. PMID:26468750

  4. High mobility group protein DSP1 negatively regulates HSP70 transcription in Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zongyu; Xu, Delin; Cui, Miao; Zhang, Qizhong

    2016-06-10

    HSP70 acts mostly as a molecular chaperone and plays important roles in facilitating the folding of nascent peptides as well as the refolding or degradation of the denatured proteins. Under stressed conditions, the expression level of HSP70 is upregulated significantly and rapidly, as is known to be achieved by various regulatory factors controlling the transcriptional level. In this study, a high mobility group protein DSP1 was identified by DNA-affinity purification from the nuclear extracts of Crassostrea hongkongensis using the ChHSP70 promoter as a bait. The specific interaction between the prokaryotically expressed ChDSP1 and the FITC-labeled ChHSP70 promoter was confirmed by EMSA analysis. ChDSP1 was shown to negatively regulate ChHSP70 promoter expression by Luciferase Reporter Assay in the heterologous HEK293T cells. Both ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were induced by either thermal or CdCl2 stress, while the accumulated expression peaks of ChDSP1 were always slightly delayed when compared with that of ChHSP70. This indicates that ChDSP1 is involved, very likely to exert its suppressive role, in the recovery of the ChHSP70 expression from the induced level to its original state. This study is the first to report negative regulator of HSP70 gene transcription, and provides novel insights into the mechanisms controlling heat shock protein expression. PMID:27154224

  5. p53 protein overexpression identifies a group of central primitive neuroectodermal tumours with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jaros, E; Lunec, J; Perry, R H; Kelly, P J; Pearson, A D

    1993-10-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNET's) or medulloblastomas are common primary brain tumours of childhood. Current treatment protocols achieve 50-60% cures. However, it has proved difficult to develop better treatment for the remaining patients because prognostic factors are not established. We have investigated the prognostic value of p53 protein expression in 87 PNET's using immunohistochemistry with DO-7 and CM-1 antibodies on biopsy paraffin sections. Eight patients (9%) had intensely reactive tumour cell nuclei, and a significantly reduced survival (P = 0.002); only one survives and this with a recurrent tumour 50 months following diagnosis. Sixty eight per cent of patients had faintly reactive tumour cell nuclei, a reduced survival up to 4 years but a long term survival not significantly different (P = 0.41) from 23% of patients with p53 negative PNET's; the 10 year survival rates were 37% and 40%, respectively. Males had a reduced survival (P = 0.04) with a 2-fold relative risk of death compared to females. Multivariate analysis showed that intense overexpression of p53 protein identifies a group of PNET patients with a 7-fold relative risk of death compared to all other cases, irrespective of sex. This marked difference suggests the involvement of p53 in the pathogenesis of PNET's which have a particularly poor response to treatment, and should help to develop new therapies for this group of patients.

  6. Double protein knockdown of cIAP1 and CRABP-II using a hybrid molecule consisting of ATRA and IAPs antagonist.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Minoru; Kitaguchi, Risa; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Naito, Mikihiko; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2012-07-01

    Protein knockdown can be achieved by the use of a small molecule that possesses affinity for both the target protein and ubiquitin ligase. We have designed such a degradation-inducing molecule targeting cIAP1 and CRABP-II, which are involved in proliferation of several cancer cell lines and in neuroblastoma growth, respectively. As a CRABP-II-recognizing moiety, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, 3), a physiological ligand of CRABP, was chosen. As a cIAP1-recognizing moiety, MV1 (5), which is a cIAP1/cIAP2/XIAP pan-ligand, was chosen. Although cIAP1 itself possesses ubiquitin ligase activity, we expected that its decomposition would be efficiently mediated by related molecules, including cIAP2 and XIAP, which also possess ubiquitin ligase activity. The designed degradation inducer 6, in which ATRA (3) and MV1 (5) moieties are connected via a linker, was synthesized and confirmed to induce efficient degradation of both cIAP1 and CRABP-II. It showed potently inhibited the proliferation of IMR32 cells.

  7. Identification of two auto-cleavage products of nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infected cells: nsp1 function as interferon antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Lawson, S.; Sun, Z.; Zhou, X.; Guan, X.; Christopher-Hennings, J.; Nelson, E.A.; Fang, Y.

    2010-03-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nsp1 is predicted to be auto-cleaved from the replicase polyprotein into nsp1alpha and nsp1beta subunits. In infected cells, we detected the actual existence of nsp1alpha and nsp1beta. Cleavage sites between nsp1alpha/nsp1beta and nsp1beta/nsp2 were identified by protein microsequencing analysis. Time course study showed that nsp1alpha and nsp1beta mainly localize into the cell nucleus after 10 h post infection. Further analysis revealed that both proteins dramatically inhibited IFN-beta expression. The nsp1beta was observed to significantly inhibit expression from an interferon-stimulated response element promoter after Sendai virus infection or interferon treatment. It was further determined to inhibit nuclear translocation of STAT1 in the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. These results demonstrated that nsp1beta has ability to inhibit both interferon synthesis and signaling, while nsp1alpha alone strongly inhibits interferon synthesis. These findings provide important insights into mechanisms of nsp1 in PRRSV pathogenesis and its impact in vaccine development.

  8. Antagonistic control of the turnover pathway for the global regulatory sRNA CsrB by the CsrA and CsrD proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Leng, Yuanyuan; Abe, Hazuki; Amaki, Takumi; Okayama, Akihiro; Babitzke, Paul; Suzuki, Kazushi; Romeo, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The widely conserved protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator A) globally regulates bacterial gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In many species, CsrA activity is governed by untranslated sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC in Escherichia coli, which bind to multiple CsrA dimers, sequestering them from lower affinity mRNA targets. Both the synthesis and turnover of CsrB/C are regulated. Their turnover requires the housekeeping endonuclease RNase E and is activated by the presence of a preferred carbon source via the binding of EIIAGlc of the glucose transport system to the GGDEF-EAL domain protein CsrD. We demonstrate that the CsrB 3′ segment contains the features necessary for CsrD-mediated decay. RNase E cleavage in an unstructured segment located immediately upstream from the intrinsic terminator is necessary for subsequent degradation to occur. CsrA stabilizes CsrB against RNase E cleavage by binding to two canonical sites adjacent to the necessary cleavage site, while CsrD acts by overcoming CsrA-mediated protection. Our genetic, biochemical and structural studies establish a molecular framework for sRNA turnover by the CsrD-RNase E pathway. We propose that CsrD evolution was driven by the selective advantage of decoupling Csr sRNA decay from CsrA binding, connecting it instead to the availability of a preferred carbon source. PMID:27235416

  9. The implication and potential applications of high-mobility group box 1 protein in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sohun, Moonindranath; Shen, Huiling

    2016-06-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, non-histone and ubiquitous chromosomal protein found enriched in active chromatin forming part of the high mobility group family of proteins and is encoded by the HMGB1 gene (13q12) in human beings. It has various intranuclear and extracellular functions. It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. In 2012, there was approximately 1.67 million new breast cancer cases diagnosed which makes it the second most frequent cancer in the world after lung cancer (25% of all cancers) and the commonest cancer among women. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that HMGB1 might be a useful target in the management of breast cancer. This review summarises the structure and functions of HMGB1 and its dual role in carcinogenesis both as a pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic factor. It also sums up evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies using breast cancer cell lines and samples which demonstrate its influence in radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy in breast cancer. It may have particular importance in HER2 positive and metastatic breast cancer. It might pave the way for new breast cancer treatments through development of novel drugs, use of microRNAs (miRNAs), targeting breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and breast cancer immunotherapy. It may also play a role in determining breast cancer prognosis. Thus HMGB1 may open up novel avenues in breast cancer management.

  10. The implication and potential applications of high-mobility group box 1 protein in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sohun, Moonindranath

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, non-histone and ubiquitous chromosomal protein found enriched in active chromatin forming part of the high mobility group family of proteins and is encoded by the HMGB1 gene (13q12) in human beings. It has various intranuclear and extracellular functions. It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. In 2012, there was approximately 1.67 million new breast cancer cases diagnosed which makes it the second most frequent cancer in the world after lung cancer (25% of all cancers) and the commonest cancer among women. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that HMGB1 might be a useful target in the management of breast cancer. This review summarises the structure and functions of HMGB1 and its dual role in carcinogenesis both as a pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic factor. It also sums up evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies using breast cancer cell lines and samples which demonstrate its influence in radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy in breast cancer. It may have particular importance in HER2 positive and metastatic breast cancer. It might pave the way for new breast cancer treatments through development of novel drugs, use of microRNAs (miRNAs), targeting breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and breast cancer immunotherapy. It may also play a role in determining breast cancer prognosis. Thus HMGB1 may open up novel avenues in breast cancer management. PMID:27386491

  11. The implication and potential applications of high-mobility group box 1 protein in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sohun, Moonindranath; Shen, Huiling

    2016-06-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a highly conserved, non-histone and ubiquitous chromosomal protein found enriched in active chromatin forming part of the high mobility group family of proteins and is encoded by the HMGB1 gene (13q12) in human beings. It has various intranuclear and extracellular functions. It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. In 2012, there was approximately 1.67 million new breast cancer cases diagnosed which makes it the second most frequent cancer in the world after lung cancer (25% of all cancers) and the commonest cancer among women. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that HMGB1 might be a useful target in the management of breast cancer. This review summarises the structure and functions of HMGB1 and its dual role in carcinogenesis both as a pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic factor. It also sums up evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies using breast cancer cell lines and samples which demonstrate its influence in radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy in breast cancer. It may have particular importance in HER2 positive and metastatic breast cancer. It might pave the way for new breast cancer treatments through development of novel drugs, use of microRNAs (miRNAs), targeting breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and breast cancer immunotherapy. It may also play a role in determining breast cancer prognosis. Thus HMGB1 may open up novel avenues in breast cancer management. PMID:27386491

  12. Therapeutic approach to target mesothelioma cancer cells using the Wnt antagonist, secreted frizzled-related protein 4: Metabolic state of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Vanathi; Pohl, Sebastian; Keane, Kevin N; Arfuso, Frank; Newsholme, Philip; Fox, Simon; Dharmarajan, Arun

    2016-02-15

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer, characterized by rapid progression, along with late metastasis and poor patient prognosis. It is resistant to many forms of standard anti-cancer treatment. In this study, we determined the effect of secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (sFRP4), a Wnt pathway inhibitor, on cancer cell proliferation and metabolism using the JU77 mesothelioma cell line. Treatment with sFRP4 (250 pg/ml) resulted in a significant reduction of cell proliferation. The addition of the Wnt activator Wnt3a (250 pg/ml) or sFRP4 had no significant effect on ATP production and glucose utilisation in JU77 cells at both the 24 and 48 h time points examined. We also examined their effect on Akt and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β) phosphorylation, which are both important components of Wnt signalling and glucose metabolism. We found that protein phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β varied over the 24h and 48 h time points, with constitutive phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473 (pAkt) decreasing to its most significant level when treated with Wnt3a+sFRP4 at the 24h time point. A significant reduction in the level of Cytochrome c oxidase was observed at the 48 h time point, when sFRP4 and Wnt3a were added in combination. We conclude that sFRP4 may function, in part, to reduce/alter cancer cell metabolism, which may lead to sensitisation of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics, or even cell death. PMID:26868304

  13. Selective inclusion of proteins into urinary calcium oxalate crystals: comparison between stone-prone and stone-free population groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, D.; Rodgers, A. L.; Sturrock, E. D.

    2003-11-01

    This study investigated whether incorporation of proteins into calcium oxalate urinary crystals is different in the black and white populations in South Africa and whether such differences could provide insight into the former group's remarkably low stone incidence. CaOx monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals were precipitated from each group's urine after adjustment of the calcium concentrations to 0.5 and 12 mmol/l, respectively. Crystals were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Intracrystalline proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE and immunodetected for urinary prothrombin fragment 1 (UPTF1) and osteopontin. Crystals precipitated from the black and white groups' control urines comprised mainly COM and COD, respectively. In both race groups UPTF1 was the major protein included in pure COM crystals while in pure COD it was osteopontin, but in the black group osteopontin was also included in COM. The black group's urine crystals incorporated significantly more intracrystalline protein. Selective inclusion of UPTF1 and osteopontin may be due to the unique crystal structure of COM and COD and the proteins' conformation at the different calcium concentrations at which these hydrates precipitate. The greater amount of intracrystalline inhibitory protein in the black group may be a factor in their low stone incidence.

  14. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 Correlates with Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    PubMed Central

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, LiHong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to determine whether HMGB-1 serum levels are elevated in CKD patients. The study groups were categorized as follows: 110 patients starting dialysis defined as CKD 5; 67 patients with moderately to severely reduced renal function or CKD 3–4; and 48 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum-albumin (S-albumin), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), hemoglobin, subjective global nutritional assessment (SGA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups and Spearman’s rank correlation test was used for continuous variables. HMGB-1, measured by Western blot, was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in CKD 5 (146.7 ± 58.6 ng/mL) and CKD 3–4 (85.6 ± 31.8) compared with controls (10.9 ± 10.5). HMGB-1 levels were correlated positively with TNF (Rho = 0.52; P < 0.001), hs-CRP (Rho = 0.38; P < 0.001), IL-6 (Rho = 0.30; P < 0.001), HbA1c (Rho = 0.14; P = 0.02) and SGA (Rho = 0.21; P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with GFR (Rho = –0.69; P = 0.0001), Hb (Rho = –0.60; P < 0.001), S-albumin (Rho = –0.31; P < 0.001). The current study has revealed that HMGB-1 is elevated significantly in CKD patients and correlates with GFR as well as markers of inflammation and malnutrition. Future studies may delineate whether HMGB-1 is also a marker of disease activity and severity as well as a predictor of outcome in CKD. PMID:18317568

  15. PAF receptor and "Cache-oreilles" effect. Simple PAF antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lamotte-Brasseur, J; Heymans, F; Dive, G; Lamouri, A; Batt, J P; Redeuilh, C; Hosford, D; Braquet, P; Godfroid, J J

    1991-12-01

    Nine simple and structurally flexible PAF antagonists were synthesized and their inhibitory effects on PAF induced platelet aggregation were measured. Compounds with PAF antagonistic activity exhibited a negative electrostatic potential generated by two trimethoxyphenyl groups (isocontour at -10 Kcal/mole) at various distances between the negative clouds. The optimal distance between the atoms generating the "cache-oreilles" system for exhibiting potent PAF antagonistic activity is estimated to be 11-13 A. In the flexible molecules studied, the dispersion of the electronic distribution is not necessarily favorable for anti-PAF activity. The data support the simple bipolarized model for the PAF receptor that has been proposed by the authors.

  16. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Shu Ki; Smeesters, Pierre R; Frost, Hannah R C; Licciardi, Paul; Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates. PMID:26101780

  17. Methyl group turnover on methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins during chemotaxis by Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Thoelke, M.S.; Casper, J.M.; Ordal, G.W. )

    1990-02-05

    The addition of attractant to Bacillus subtilis briefly exposed to radioactive methionine causes an increase of labeling of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. The addition of attractant to cells radiolabeled for longer times shows no change in the extent of methylation. Therefore, the increase in labeling for the briefly labeled cells is due to an increased turnover of methyl groups caused by attractant. All amino acids gave enhanced turnover. This turnover lasted for a prolonged time, probably spanning the period of smooth swimming caused by the attractant addition. Repellent did not affect the turnover when added alone or simultaneously with attractant. Thus, for amino acid attractants, the turnover is probably the excitatory signal, which is seen to extend long into or throughout the adaptation period, not just at the start of it.

  18. A summary of the measured pK values of the ionizable groups in folded proteins.

    PubMed

    Grimsley, Gerald R; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2009-01-01

    We tabulated 541 measured pK values reported in the literature for the Asp, Glu, His, Cys, Tyr, and Lys side chains, and the C and N termini of 78 folded proteins. The majority of these values are for the Asp, Glu, and His side chains. The average pK values are Asp 3.5 +/- 1.2 (139); Glu 4.2 +/- 0.9 (153); His 6.6 +/- 1.0 (131); Cys 6.8 +/- 2.7 (25); Tyr 10.3 +/- 1.2 (20); Lys 10.5 +/- 1.1 (35); C-terminus 3.3 +/- 0.8 (22) and N-terminus 7.7 +/- 0.5 (16). We compare these results with the measured pK values of these groups in alanine pentapeptides, and comment on our overall findings. PMID:19177368

  19. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Shu Ki; Smeesters, Pierre R; Frost, Hannah R C; Licciardi, Paul; Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates.

  20. High mobility group 1 (HMG1) protein in mouse preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Spada, F; Brunet, A; Mercier, Y; Renard, J P; Bianchi, M E; Thompson, E M

    1998-08-01

    High mobility group 1 protein (HMG1) has traditionally been considered a structural component of chromatin, possibly similar in function to histone H1. In fact, at the onset of Xenopus and Drosophila development, HMG1 appears to substitute for histone H1: HMG1 is abundant when histone H1 is absent after the midblastula transition histone H1 largely replaces HMG1. We show that in early mouse embryos the expression patterns of HMG1 and histone H1 are not complementary. Instead, HMG1 content increases after zygotic genome activation at the same time as histone H1. HMG1 does not remain associated to mitotic chromosomes either in embryos or somatic cells. These results argue against a shared structural role for HMG1 and histone H1 in mammalian chromatin.

  1. A summary of the measured pK values of the ionizable groups in folded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grimsley, Gerald R; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2009-01-01

    We tabulated 541 measured pK values reported in the literature for the Asp, Glu, His, Cys, Tyr, and Lys side chains, and the C and N termini of 78 folded proteins. The majority of these values are for the Asp, Glu, and His side chains. The average pK values are Asp 3.5 ± 1.2 (139); Glu 4.2 ± 0.9 (153); His 6.6 ± 1.0 (131); Cys 6.8 ± 2.7 (25); Tyr 10.3 ± 1.2 (20); Lys 10.5 ± 1.1 (35); C-terminus 3.3 ± 0.8 (22) and N-terminus 7.7 ± 0.5 (16). We compare these results with the measured pK values of these groups in alanine pentapeptides, and comment on our overall findings. PMID:19177368

  2. DETECTION OF EXTRA-NUCLEAR HIGH MOBILITY GROUP BOX-1 PROTEIN IN A CANINE MODEL OF MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB-1) is a well-characterized nuclear protein recently shown to be involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and injury. Studies have linked HMGB-1 release to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines; however, a role for HMGB-1 in other disorders involvi...

  3. Yurt, Coracle, Neurexin IV and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase form a novel group of epithelial polarity proteins.

    PubMed

    Laprise, Patrick; Lau, Kimberly M; Harris, Kathryn P; Silva-Gagliardi, Nancy F; Paul, Sarah M; Beronja, Slobodan; Beitel, Greg J; McGlade, C Jane; Tepass, Ulrich

    2009-06-25

    The integrity of polarized epithelia is critical for development and human health. Many questions remain concerning the full complement and the function of the proteins that regulate cell polarity. Here we report that the Drosophila FERM proteins Yurt (Yrt) and Coracle (Cora) and the membrane proteins Neurexin IV (Nrx-IV) and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase are a new group of functionally cooperating epithelial polarity proteins. This 'Yrt/Cora group' promotes basolateral membrane stability and shows negative regulatory interactions with the apical determinant Crumbs (Crb). Genetic analyses indicate that Nrx-IV and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase act together with Cora in one pathway, whereas Yrt acts in a second redundant pathway. Moreover, we show that the Yrt/Cora group is essential for epithelial polarity during organogenesis but not when epithelial polarity is first established or during terminal differentiation. This property of Yrt/Cora group proteins explains the recovery of polarity in embryos lacking the function of the Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) group of basolateral polarity proteins. We also find that the mammalian Yrt orthologue EPB41L5 (also known as YMO1 and Limulus) is required for lateral membrane formation, indicating a conserved function of Yrt proteins in epithelial polarity. PMID:19553998

  4. A Nuclear Factor of High Mobility Group Box Protein in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Lei, Tao; Liu, Jing; Li, Muzi; Nan, Huizhu; Liu, Qun

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear factor that usually binds DNA and modulates gene expression in multicellular organisms. Three HMGB1 orthologs were predicted in the genome of Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan pathogen, termed TgHMGB1a, b and c. Phylogenetic and bioinformatic analyses indicated that these proteins all contain a single HMG box and which shared in three genotypes. We cloned TgHMGB1a, a 33.9 kDa protein that can stimulates macrophages to release TNF-α, and, we demonstrated that the TgHMGB1a binds distorted DNA structures such as cruciform DNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Immunofluorescence assay indicated TgHMGB1a concentrated in the nucleus of intracellular tachyzoites but translocated into the cytoplasm while the parasites release to extracellular. There were no significant phenotypic changes when the TgHMGB1a B box was deleted, while transgenic parasites that overexpressed TgHMGB1a showed slower intracellular growth and caused delayed death in mouse, further quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed that the expression levels of many important genes, including virulence factors, increased when TgHMGB1a was overexpressed, but no significant changes were observed in TgHMGB1a B box-deficient parasites. Our findings demonstrated that TgHMGB1a is indeed a nuclear protein that maintains HMG box architectural functions and is a potential proinflammatory factor during the T.gondii infection. Further studies that clarify the functions of TgHMGB1s will increase our knowledge of transcriptional regulation and parasite virulence, and might provide new insight into host–parasite interactions for T. gondii infection. PMID:25369210

  5. High mobility group protein 1: A collaborator in nucleosome dynamics and estrogen-responsive gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Scovell, William M

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that interacts with DNA and chromatin to influence the regulation of transcription, DNA replication and repair and recombination. We show that HMGB1 alters the structure and stability of the canonical nucleosome (N) in a nonenzymatic, adenosine triphosphate-independent manner. As a result, the canonical nucleosome is converted to two stable, physically distinct nucleosome conformers. Although estrogen receptor (ER) does not bind to its consensus estrogen response element within a nucleosome, HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate strong ER binding. The isolated HMGB1-restructured nucleosomes (N’ and N’’) remain stable and exhibit a number of characteristics that are distinctly different from the canonical nucleosome. These findings complement previous studies that showed (1) HMGB1 stimulates in vivo transcriptional activation at estrogen response elements and (2) knock down of HMGB1 expression by siRNA precipitously reduced transcriptional activation. The findings indicate that a major facet of the mechanism of HMGB1 action involves a restructuring of aspects of the nucleosome that appear to relax structural constraints within the nucleosome. The findings are extended to reveal the differences between ER and the other steroid hormone receptors. A working proposal outlines mechanisms that highlight the multiple facets that HMGB1 may utilize in restructuring the nucleosome. PMID:27247709

  6. Polycomb-group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell regulation and hematopoietic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Radulović, V; de Haan, G; Klauke, K

    2013-03-01

    The equilibrium between self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms. In particular, Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins have been shown to be involved in this process by repressing genes involved in cell-cycle regulation and differentiation. PcGs are histone modifiers that reside in two multi-protein complexes: Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 and 2 (PRC1 and PRC2). The existence of multiple orthologs for each Polycomb gene allows the formation of a multitude of distinct PRC1 and PRC2 sub-complexes. Changes in the expression of individual PcG genes are likely to cause perturbations in the composition of the PRC, which affect PRC enzymatic activity and target selectivity. An interesting recent development is that aberrant expression of, and mutations in, PcG genes have been shown to occur in hematopoietic neoplasms, where they display both tumor-suppressor and oncogenic activities. We therefore comprehensively reviewed the latest research on the role of PcG genes in normal and malignant blood cell development. We conclude that future research to elucidate the compositional changes of the PRCs and methods to intervene in PRC assembly will be of great therapeutic relevance to combat hematological malignancies.

  7. Nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C and Polycomb group of proteins: An evolutionarily conserved interplay

    PubMed Central

    Marullo, F.; Cesarini, E.; Antonelli, L.; Gregoretti, F.; Oliva, G.; Lanzuolo, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear lamins are the main components of the nuclear lamina at the nuclear periphery, providing mechanical support to the nucleus. However, recent findings suggest that lamins also reside in the nuclear interior, as a distinct and dynamic pool with critical roles in transcriptional regulation. In our work we found a functional and evolutionary conserved crosstalk between Lamin A/C and the Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, this being required for the maintenance of the PcG repressive functions. Indeed, Lamin A/C knock-down causes PcG foci dispersion and defects in PcG-mediated higher order structures, thereby leading to impaired PcG mediated transcriptional repression. By using ad-hoc algorithms for image analysis and PLA approaches we hereby show that PcG proteins are preferentially located in the nuclear interior where they interact with nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C. Taken together, our findings suggest that nuclear components, such as Lamin A/C, functionally interact with epigenetic factors to ensure the correct transcriptional program maintenance. PMID:26930442

  8. Pluripotency factors and Polycomb Group proteins repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression in murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chia-I; Wang, Qin; Fan, Yunxia; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor and environmental sensor that regulates expression of genes involved in drug-metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, Ahr ablation in mice and studies with orthologous genes in invertebrates suggest that AHR may also play a significant role in embryonic development. To address this hypothesis, we studied the regulation of Ahr expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny. In ES cells, interactions between OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and Polycomb Group proteins at the Ahr promoter repress AHR expression, which can also be repressed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors in hepatoma cells. In ES cells, unproductive RNA polymerase II binds at the Ahr transcription start site and drives the synthesis of short abortive transcripts. Activation of Ahr expression during differentiation follows from reversal of repressive marks in Ahr promoter chromatin, release of pluripotency factors and PcG proteins, binding of Sp factors, establishment of histone marks of open chromatin, and engagement of active RNAPII to drive full-length RNA transcript elongation. Our results suggest that reversible Ahr repression in ES cells holds the gene poised for expression and allows for a quick switch to activation during embryonic development.

  9. Cockayne syndrome group B protein (CSB) plays a general role in chromatin maintenance and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John C.; Bailey, Arnold D.; Weiner, Alan M.

    2006-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is an inherited neurodevelopmental disorder with progeroid features. Although the genes responsible for CS have been implicated in a variety of DNA repair- and transcription-related pathways, the nature of the molecular defect in CS remains mysterious. Using expression microarrays and a unique method for comparative expression analysis called L2L, we sought to define this defect in cells lacking a functional CS group B (CSB) protein, the SWI/SNF-like ATPase responsible for most cases of CS. Remarkably, many of the genes regulated by CSB are also affected by inhibitors of histone deacetylase and DNA methylation, as well as by defects in poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase function and RNA polymerase II elongation. Moreover, consistent with these microarray expression data, CSB-null cells are sensitive to inhibitors of histone deacetylase or poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase. Our data indicate a general role for CSB protein in maintenance and remodeling of chromatin structure and suggest that CS is a disease of transcriptional deregulation caused by misexpression of growth-suppressive, inflammatory, and proapoptotic pathways. PMID:16772382

  10. Nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C and Polycomb group of proteins: An evolutionarily conserved interplay.

    PubMed

    Marullo, F; Cesarini, E; Antonelli, L; Gregoretti, F; Oliva, G; Lanzuolo, C

    2016-04-25

    Nuclear lamins are the main components of the nuclear lamina at the nuclear periphery, providing mechanical support to the nucleus. However, recent findings suggest that lamins also reside in the nuclear interior, as a distinct and dynamic pool with critical roles in transcriptional regulation. In our work we found a functional and evolutionary conserved crosstalk between Lamin A/C and the Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, this being required for the maintenance of the PcG repressive functions. Indeed, Lamin A/C knock-down causes PcG foci dispersion and defects in PcG-mediated higher order structures, thereby leading to impaired PcG mediated transcriptional repression. By using ad-hoc algorithms for image analysis and PLA approaches we hereby show that PcG proteins are preferentially located in the nuclear interior where they interact with nucleoplasmic Lamin A/C. Taken together, our findings suggest that nuclear components, such as Lamin A/C, functionally interact with epigenetic factors to ensure the correct transcriptional program maintenance. PMID:26930442

  11. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    SciTech Connect

    de Castro, Sonia; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Hong, Kunlun; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Costanzi, Stefano; Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor antagonist to a PAMAM dendrimer to

  12. Role of the ATPase domain of the Cockayne syndrome group B protein in UV induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Balajee, A S; Proietti De Santis, L; Brosh, R M; Selzer, R; Bohr, V A

    2000-01-27

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human autosomal recessive disorder characterized by many neurological and developmental abnormalities. CS cells are defective in the transcription coupled repair (TCR) pathway that removes DNA damage from the transcribed strand of active genes. The individuals suffering from CS do not generally develop cancer but show increased neurodegeneration. Two genetic complementation groups (CS-A and CS-B) have been identified. The lack of cancer formation in CS may be due to selective elimination of cells containing DNA damage by a suicidal pathway. In this study, we have evaluated the role of the CSB gene in UV induced apoptosis in human and hamster cells. The hamster cell line UV61 carries a mutation in the homolog of the human CSB gene. We show that both human CS-B and hamster UV61 cells display increased apoptotic response following UV exposure compared with normal cells. The increased sensitivity of UV61 cells to apoptosis is complemented by the transfection of the wild type human CSB gene. In order to determine which functional domain of the CSB gene participates in the apoptotic pathway, we constructed stable cell lines with different CSB domain disruptions. UV61 cells were stably transfected with the human CSB cDNA containing a point mutation in the highly conserved glutamic acid residue in ATPase motif II. This cell line (UV61/ pc3.1-CSBE646Q) showed the same increased apoptosis as the UV61 cells. In contrast, cells containing a deletion in the acidic domain at the N-terminal end of the CSB protein had no effect on apoptosis. This indicates that the integrity of the ATPase domain of CSB protein is critical for preventing the UV induced apoptotic pathway. In primary human CS-B cells, the induction and stabilization of the p53 protein seems to correlate with their increased apoptotic potential. In contrast, no change in the level of either p53 or activation of mdm2 protein by p53 was observed in hamster UV61 cells after UV exposure. This

  13. Polycomb Group Protein Pcgf6 Acts as a Master Regulator to Maintain Embryonic Stem Cell Identity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Shun; Chang, Kung-Yen; Dang, Jason; Rana, Tariq M.

    2016-01-01

    The polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) is a multi-subunit complex that plays critical roles in the epigenetic modulation of gene expression. Here, we show that the PRC1 component polycomb group ring finger 6 (Pcgf6) is required to maintain embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity. In contrast to canonical PRC1, Pcgf6 acts as a positive regulator of transcription and binds predominantly to promoters bearing active chromatin marks. Pcgf6 is expressed at high levels in ESCs, and knockdown reduces the expression of the core ESC regulators Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog. Conversely, Pcgf6 overexpression prevents downregulation of these factors and impairs differentiation. In addition, Pcgf6 enhanced reprogramming in both mouse and human somatic cells. The genomic binding profile of Pcgf6 is highly similar to that of trithorax group proteins, but not of PRC1 or PRC2 complexes, suggesting that Pcgf6 functions atypically in ESCs. Our data reveal novel roles for Pcgf6 in directly regulating Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Lin28 expression to maintain ESC identity. PMID:27247273

  14. A Proteomic approach to discover and compare interacting partners of Papillomavirus E2 proteins from diverse phylogenetic groups

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Moon Kyoo; Anderson, D. Eric; van Doorslaer, Koenraad; McBride, Alison A.

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are a very successful group of viruses that replicate persistently in localized regions of the stratified epithelium of their specific host. Infection results in pathologies ranging from asymptomatic infection, benign warts, to malignant carcinomas. Despite this diversity, papillomavirus genomes are small (7-8 kbp) and contain at most eight genes. To sustain the complex papillomaviral life cycle, each viral protein has multiple functions and interacts with and manipulates a plethora of cellular proteins. In this study, we use tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify host factors that interact with eleven different papillomavirus E2 proteins from diverse phylogenetic groups. The E2 proteins function in viral transcription and replication and correspondingly interact with host proteins involved in transcription, chromatin remodeling and modification, replication and RNA processing. PMID:25758368

  15. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  16. High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) neutralization ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew P; Caldis, Matthew W; Harp, Christopher T; Goings, Gwendolyn E; Miller, Stephen D

    2013-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune, demyelinating disease and as such, the gold standard of treatment is to selectively suppress the pathogenic autoimmune response without compromising the entire arm of the adaptive immune response. One target of this strategy lying upstream of the pathologic adaptive immune response is the local, innate immune signaling that initiates and drives autoimmunity and sterile injury. High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a ubiquitous nuclear protein that when released from necrotic cells, such as damaged oligodendrocytes in MS lesions, drives pro-inflammatory responses. Here we demonstrate that HMGB1 drives neuroinflammatory responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model for MS, and that inhibition of HMGB1 signaling ameliorates disease. Specifically i.v. injection of an HMGB1 neutralizing antibody in the C57BL/6 model of chronic EAE or SJL/J model of relapsing-remitting EAE ameliorated clinical disease prophylactically or during ongoing disease, blocked T cell infiltration of the central nervous system, and inhibited systemic CD4(+) T cell responses to myelin epitopes. Additionally, lymphocytes from EAE mice restimulated in vitro in the presence of recombinant HMGB1 exhibited increased proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, an effect that was blocked by anti-HMGB1 antibody. Similarly recombinant HMGB1 promoted proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated in vitro, and anti-HMGB1 antibody blocked this effect. These findings indicate that HMGB1 contributes to neuroinflammatory responses that drive EAE pathogenesis and that HMGB1 blockade may be a novel means to selectively disrupt the pro-inflammatory loop that drives MS autoimmunity.

  17. Myelin-specific proteins: a structurally diverse group of membrane-interacting molecules.

    PubMed

    Han, Huijong; Myllykoski, Matti; Ruskamo, Salla; Wang, Chaozhan; Kursula, Petri

    2013-01-01

    The myelin sheath is a multilayered membrane in the nervous system, which has unique biochemical properties. Myelin carries a set of specific high-abundance proteins, the structure and function of which are still poorly understood. The proteins of the myelin sheath are involved in a number of neurological diseases, including autoimmune diseases and inherited neuropathies. In this review, we briefly discuss the structural properties and functions of selected myelin-specific proteins (P0, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, myelin-associated glycoprotein, myelin basic protein, myelin-associated oligodendrocytic basic protein, P2, proteolipid protein, peripheral myelin protein of 22 kDa, 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, and periaxin); such properties include, for example, interactions with lipid bilayers and the presence of large intrinsically disordered regions in some myelin proteins. A detailed understanding of myelin protein structure and function at the molecular level will be required to fully grasp their physiological roles in the myelin sheath.

  18. Direct correlation of consecutive C'-N groups in proteins: a method for the assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Santoro, Jorge

    2013-09-01

    Two novel 3D (13)C-detected experiments, hNcocaNCO and hnCOcaNCO, are proposed to facilitate the resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins. The experiments correlate the (15)N and (13)C' chemical shifts of two consecutive amide moieties without involving other nuclei, thus taking advantage of the good dispersion shown by the (15)N-(13)C' correlations, even for proteins that lack a well defined tertiary structure. The new pulse sequences were successfully tested using Nupr1, an intrinsically disordered protein of 93 residues.

  19. A Group 6 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Common Bean Is a Disordered Protein with Extended Helical Structure and Oligomer-forming Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y.; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O.; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M.; Reyes, José L.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  20. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  1. Structure-Guided Rescaffolding of Selective Antagonists of BCL-XL

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Because of the promise of BCL-2 antagonists in combating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), interest in additional selective antagonists of antiapoptotic proteins has grown. Beginning with a series of selective, potent BCL-XL antagonists containing an undesirable hydrazone functionality, in silico design and X-ray crystallography were utilized to develop alternative scaffolds that retained the selectivity and potency of the starting compounds. PMID:24944740

  2. Characterization of the spore surface and exosporium proteins of Clostridium sporogenes; implications for Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    PubMed

    Janganan, Thamarai K; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B; Stringer, Sandra; Fagan, Robert P; Hobbs, Jamie K; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a non-pathogenic close relative and surrogate for Group I (proteolytic) neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strains. The exosporium, the sac-like outermost layer of spores of these species, is likely to contribute to adhesion, dissemination, and virulence. A paracrystalline array, hairy nap, and several appendages were detected in the exosporium of C. sporogenes strain NCIMB 701792 by EM and AFM. The protein composition of purified exosporium was explored by LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides from major individual SDS-PAGE-separated protein bands, and from bulk exosporium. Two high molecular weight protein bands both contained the same protein with a collagen-like repeat domain, the probable constituent of the hairy nap, as well as cysteine-rich proteins CsxA and CsxB. A third cysteine-rich protein (CsxC) was also identified. These three proteins are also encoded in C. botulinum Prevot 594, and homologues (75-100% amino acid identity) are encoded in many other Group I strains. This work provides the first insight into the likely composition and organization of the exosporium of Group I C. botulinum spores. PMID:27375261

  3. Application of encoded library technology (ELT) to a protein-protein interaction target: discovery of a potent class of integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, Christopher S; Bai, Xiaopeng; Tsai, Ching-Hsuan; Yang, Hongfang; Lind, Kenneth E; Skinner, Steven R; Zhu, Zhengrong; Israel, David I; Cuozzo, John W; Morgan, Barry A; Yuki, Koichi; Xie, Can; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Evindar, Ghotas

    2014-04-01

    The inhibition of protein-protein interactions remains a challenge for traditional small molecule drug discovery. Here we describe the use of DNA-encoded library technology for the discovery of small molecules that are potent inhibitors of the interaction between lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 and its ligand intercellular adhesion molecule 1. A DNA-encoded library with a potential complexity of 4.1 billion compounds was exposed to the I-domain of the target protein and the bound ligands were affinity selected, yielding an enriched small-molecule hit family. Compounds representing this family were synthesized without their DNA encoding moiety and found to inhibit the lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1/intercellular adhesion molecule-1 interaction with submicromolar potency in both ELISA and cell adhesion assays. Re-synthesized compounds conjugated to DNA or a fluorophore were demonstrated to bind to cells expressing the target protein. PMID:24593905

  4. Does high-mobility-group non-histone protein HMG 1 interact specifically with histone H1 subfractions?

    PubMed Central

    Cary, P D; Shooter, K V; Goodwin, G H; Johns, E W; Olayemi, J Y; Hartman, P G; Bradbury, E M

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of the non-histone chromosomal protein HMG (high-mobility group) 1 with histone H1 subfractions was investigated by equilibrium sedimentation and n.m.r. sectroscopy. In contrast with a previous report [Smerdon & Isenberg (1976) Biochemistry 15, 4242--4247], it was found, by using equilibrium-sedimentation analysis, that protein HMG 1 binds to all three histone H1 subfractions CTL1, CTL2, and CTL3, arguing against there being a specific interaction between protein HMG 1 and only two of the subfractions, CTL1 and CTL2. Raising the ionic strength of the solutions prevents binding of protein HMG 1 to total histone H1 and the three subfractions, suggesting that the binding in vitro is simply a non-specific ionic interaction between acidic regions of the non-histone protein and the basic regions of the histone. Protein HMG 1 binds to histone H5 also, supporting this view. The above conclusions are supported by n.m.r. studies of protein HMG 1/histone H1 subfraction mixtures. When the two proteins were mixed, there was little perturbation of the n.m.r. spectra and there was no evidence for specific interaction of protein HMG 1 with any of the subfractions. It therefore remains an open question as to whether protein HMG 1 and histone H1 are complexed together in chromatin. PMID:540037

  5. Use of fluorescein hydrazide and fluorescein thiosemicarbazide reagents for the fluorometric determination of protein carbonyl groups and for the detection of oxidized protein on polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Ahn, B; Rhee, S G; Stadtman, E R

    1987-03-01

    Highly fluorescent thiosemicarbazide and hydrazide prepared by reaction of fluorescein isothiocyanate with hydrazine or adipic acid dihydrazide have been used to monitor the presence of carbonyl groups in oxidatively modified proteins. After oxidation, proteins react with these reagents under anaerobic conditions in the dark to yield fluorescent protein conjugates (presumably thiosemicarbazones or hydrazones) which can be visualized as fluorescent bands following electrophoresis (0-4 degrees C) on lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. These reagents do not react with unoxidized proteins. The conjugates formed dissociate readily at room temperature but are fairly stable at pH 6-9, 0 degrees C. Current data suggest that these reagents will be useful in the detection and quantitation of oxidatively modified proteins in biological systems. PMID:2883911

  6. Molecular characterization of an acidic region deletion mutant of Cockayne syndrome group B protein.

    PubMed

    Sunesen, M; Selzer, R R; Brosh, R M; Balajee, A S; Stevnsner, T; Bohr, V A

    2000-08-15

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human genetic disorder characterized by post-natal growth failure, neurological abnormalities and premature aging. CS cells exhibit high sensitivity to UV light, delayed RNA synthesis recovery after UV irradiation and defective transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Two genetic complementation groups of CS have been identified, designated CS-A and CS-B. The CSB gene encodes a helicase domain and a highly acidic region N-terminal to the helicase domain. This study describes the genetic characterization of a CSB mutant allele encoding a full deletion of the acidic region. We have tested its ability to complement the sensitivity of UV61, the hamster homolog of human CS-B cells, to UV and the genotoxic agent N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (NA-AAF). Deleting 39 consecutive amino acids, of which approximately 60% are negatively charged, did not impact on the ability of the protein to complement the sensitive phenotype of UV61 cells to either UV or NA-AAF. Our data indicate that the highly acidic region of CSB is not essential for the TCR and general genome repair pathways of UV- and NA-AAF-induced DNA lesions. PMID:10931931

  7. Cockayne syndrome group B protein has novel strand annealing and exchange activities.

    PubMed

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Sharma, Sudha; Thorslund, Tina; Stevnsner, Tinna; Soerensen, Martin M; Brosh, Robert M; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2006-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare inherited human genetic disorder characterized by UV sensitivity, severe neurological abnormalities and prageroid symptoms. The CS complementation group B (CSB) protein is involved in UV-induced transcription coupled repair (TCR), base excision repair and general transcription. CSB also has a DNA-dependent ATPase activity that may play a role in remodeling chromatin in vivo. This study reports the novel finding that CSB catalyzes the annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules with high efficiency, and has strand exchange activity. The rate of CSB-catalyzed annealing of complementary ssDNA is 25-fold faster than the rate of spontaneous ssDNA annealing under identical in vitro conditions and the reaction occurs with a high specificity in the presence of excess non-homologous ssDNA. The specificity and intrinsic nature of the reaction is also confirmed by the observation that it is stimulated by dephosphorylation of CSB, which occurs after UV-induced DNA damage, and is inhibited in the presence of ATPgammaS. Potential roles of CSB in cooperation with strand annealing and exchange activities for TCR and homologous recombination are discussed. PMID:16410611

  8. The role of high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Sun, Wei; Gao, Rongfen; Su, Yuying; Umehara, Hisanori; Dong, Lingli; Gong, Feili

    2013-10-01

    High mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) is a ubiquitous highly conserved single polypeptide in all mammal eukaryotic cells. HMGB1 exists mainly within the nucleus and acts as a DNA chaperone. When passively released from necrotic cells or actively secreted into the extracellular milieu in response to appropriate signal stimulation, HMGB1 binds to related cell signal transduction receptors, such as RAGE, TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9, and becomes a proinflammatory cytokine that participates in the development and progression of many diseases, such as arthritis, acute lung injury, graft rejection immune response, ischaemia reperfusion injury and autoimmune liver damage. Only a small amount of HMGB1 release occurs during apoptosis, which undergoes oxidative modification on Cys106 and delivers tolerogenic signals to suppress immune activity. This review focuses on the important role of HMGB1 in the pathogenesis of RA, mainly manifested as the aberrant expression of HMGB1 in the serum, SF and synovial tissues; overexpression of signal transduction receptors; abnormal regulation of osteoclastogenesis and bone remodelling leading to the destruction of cartilage and bones. Intervention with HMGB1 may ameliorate the pathogenic conditions and attenuate disease progression of RA. Therefore administration of an HMGB1 inhibitor may represent a promising clinical approach for the treatment of RA.

  9. High-mobility group box 1 protein and its role in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao; Li, Wei-Qin

    2015-02-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which belongs to the subfamily of HMG-1/-2, is a highly conserved single peptide chain consisting of 215 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of approximately 24894 Da. HMGB1 is a ubiquitous nuclear protein in mammals and plays a vital role in inflammatory diseases. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain with a poor prognosis. Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas (duration of less than six months), for which the severe form is called severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). More and more studies have shown that HMGB1 has a bidirectional effect in the pathogenesis of SAP. Extracellular HMGB1 can aggravate the pancreatic inflammatory process, whereas intracellular HMGB1 has a protective effect against pancreatitis. The mechanism of HMGB1 is multiple, mainly through the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Receptors for advanced glycation end-products and toll-like receptors (TLR), especially TLR-2 and TLR-4, are two major types of receptors mediating the inflammatory process triggered by HMGB1 and may be also the main mediators in the pathogenesis of SAP. HMGB1 inhibitors, such as ethyl pyruvate, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, can decrease the level of extracellular HMGB1 and are the promising targets in the treatment of SAP.

  10. The surface protein HvgA mediates group B streptococcus hypervirulence and meningeal tropism in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, Asmaa; Disson, Olivier; Bellais, Samuel; Bouaboud, Abdelouhab; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Khun, Huot; Mechler, Charlotte; Tardieux, Isabelle; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS) is a normal constituent of the intestinal microflora and the major cause of human neonatal meningitis. A single clone, GBS ST-17, is strongly associated with a deadly form of the infection called late-onset disease (LOD), which is characterized by meningitis in infants after the first week of life. The pathophysiology of LOD remains poorly understood, but our epidemiological and histopathological results point to an oral route of infection. Here, we identify a novel ST-17–specific surface-anchored protein that we call hypervirulent GBS adhesin (HvgA), and demonstrate that its expression is required for GBS hypervirulence. GBS strains that express HvgA adhered more efficiently to intestinal epithelial cells, choroid plexus epithelial cells, and microvascular endothelial cells that constitute the blood–brain barrier (BBB), than did strains that do not express HvgA. Heterologous expression of HvgA in nonadhesive bacteria conferred the ability to adhere to intestinal barrier and BBB-constituting cells. In orally inoculated mice, HvgA was required for intestinal colonization and translocation across the intestinal barrier and the BBB, leading to meningitis. In conclusion, HvgA is a critical virulence trait of GBS in the neonatal context and stands as a promising target for the development of novel diagnostic and antibacterial strategies. PMID:20956545

  11. Associations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in schizophrenia and comparison groups.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jamie; Depp, Colin; Martin, Averria Sirkin; Daly, Rebecca E; Glorioso, Danielle K; Palmer, Barton W; Jeste, Dilip V

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by physical (mainly metabolic and cardiovascular) comorbidity and shortened lifespan. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), an inflammatory marker of hepatic origin linked to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and mortality in the general population, has been reported to be elevated in people with schizophrenia. However, the relationship of hs-CRP to psychiatric and medical risk factors, after controlling for potentially confounding variables such as smoking, is not well established in schizophrenia. We assessed hs-CRP levels along with various demographic, psychiatric, and metabolic measures in 88 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 71 age epoch-matched comparison subjects with no history of a major psychiatric illness. hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in individuals with schizophrenia than in comparison subjects. Higher hs-CRP levels in the schizophrenia group were associated with female gender, more severe negative symptoms, greater medical comorbidity, and worse metabolic risk factors including BMI, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1c levels. hs-CRP was not related to age, race, education, smoking status, antipsychotic dosage, or cognitive impairment. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the relationship between hs-CRP and long-term health outcomes including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and mortality in schizophrenia. PMID:26341579

  12. Piwi maintains germline stem cells and oogenesis in Drosophila through negative regulation of Polycomb group proteins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jamy C; Valouev, Anton; Liu, Na; Lin, Haifan

    2016-03-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster Piwi protein regulates both niche and intrinsic mechanisms to maintain germline stem cells, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that Piwi interacts with Polycomb group complexes PRC1 and PRC2 in niche and germline cells to regulate ovarian germline stem cells and oogenesis. Piwi physically interacts with the PRC2 subunits Su(z)12 and Esc in the ovary and in vitro. Chromatin coimmunoprecipitation of Piwi, the PRC2 enzymatic subunit E(z), histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) and RNA polymerase II in wild-type and piwi mutant ovaries demonstrates that Piwi binds a conserved DNA motif at ∼ 72 genomic sites and inhibits PRC2 binding to many non-Piwi-binding genomic targets and H3K27 trimethylation. Moreover, Piwi influences RNA polymerase II activities in Drosophila ovaries, likely via inhibiting PRC2. We hypothesize that Piwi negatively regulates PRC2 binding by sequestering PRC2 in the nucleoplasm, thus reducing PRC2 binding to many targets and influencing transcription during oogenesis. PMID:26780607

  13. Piwi maintains germline stem cells and oogenesis in Drosophila through negative regulation of Polycomb Group proteins

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jamy C.; Valouev, Anton; Liu, Na; Lin, Haifan

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila Piwi protein regulates both niche and intrinsic mechanisms to maintain germline stem cells, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that Piwi cooperates with Polycomb Group complexes PRC1 and PRC2 in niche and germline cells to regulate ovarian germline stem cells and oogenesis. Piwi physically interacts with PRC2 subunits Su(z)12 and Esc in the ovary and in vitro. Chromatin co-immunoprecipitation of Piwi, the PRC2 enzymatic subunit E(z), lysine-27-tri-methylated histone 3 (H3K27m3), and RNA polymerase II in wild-type and piwi mutant ovaries reveals that Piwi binds a conserved DNA motif at ~72 genomic sites, and inhibits PRC2 binding to many non-Piwi-binding genomic targets and H3K27 tri-methylation. Moreover, Piwi influences RNA Polymerase II activities in Drosophila ovaries likely via inhibiting PRC2. We hypothesize that Piwi negatively regulates PRC2 binding by sequestering PRC2 in the nucleoplasm, thus reducing PRC2 binding to many targets and influences transcription during oogenesis. PMID:26780607

  14. The urotensin II receptor antagonist, urantide, protects against atherosclerosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, JUAN; YU, QUAN-XIN; KONG, WEI; GAO, HAI-CHENG; SUN, BO; XIE, YA-QIN; REN, LI-QUN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the use of urantide as an antagonist of the urotensin II (UII) receptor, G protein-coupled receptor 14 (GPR14), to protect against atherosclerosis (AS) in rats. The AS rat model was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of vitamin D3 (VD3) into rats fed with a high-fat diet for four weeks. Urantide was then injected into the rats. Immunohistochemical staining, serum biochemical assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting were used to investigate the expression of UII and its receptor GPR14 in the AS rat model. Four weeks after induction, pathological changes typical of AS were observed in the AS rat model. In the plaques of the aortic tunica intima and tunica media, expression of UII and GPR14 was observed. The protein and gene expression levels of UII and GPR14 in the model group were significantly increased compared with those in the normal group (P<0.01). Urantide ameliorated the pathological changes of AS in the rat model and reduced the gene and protein expression levels of UII and GPR14 (P<0.05 or P<0.01). UII is associated with AS and the UII receptor GPR14-specific antagonist, urantide, demonstrates the ability to protect against AS. Thus, this study provides new insight and experimental theories for the clinical application of urantide to treat AS. PMID:23837070

  15. MLL repression domain interacts with histone deacetylases, the polycomb group proteins HPC2 and BMI-1, and the corepressor C-terminal-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhen-Biao; Anderson, Melanie; Diaz, Manuel O.; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.

    2003-01-01

    The MLL (mixed-lineage leukemia) gene is involved in many chromosomal translocations associated with acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. We previously identified a transcriptional repression domain in MLL, which contains a region with homology to DNA methyltransferase. In chromosomal translocations, the MLL repression domain is retained in the leukemogenic fusion protein and is required for transforming activity of MLL fusion proteins. We explored the mechanism of action of the MLL repression domain. Histone deacetylase 1 interacts with the MLL repression domain, partially mediating its activity; binding of Cyp33 to the adjacent MLL-PHD domain potentiates this binding. Because the MLL repression domain activity was only partially relieved with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, we explored other protein interactions with this domain. Polycomb group proteins HPC2 and BMI-1 and the corepressor C-terminal-binding protein also bind the MLL repression domain. Expression of exogenous BMI-1 potentiates MLL repression domain activity. Functional antagonism between Mll and Bmi-1 has been shown genetically in murine knockout models for Mll and Bmi-1. Our new data suggest a model whereby recruitment of BMI-1 to the MLL protein may be able to modulate its function. Furthermore, repression mediated by histone deacetylases and that mediated by polycomb group proteins may act either independently or together for MLL function in vivo. PMID:12829790

  16. Skin T cell proliferative response to M protein and other cell wall and membrane proteins of group A streptococci in chronic plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Baker, B S; Brown, D W; Fischetti, V A; Ovigne, J M; Porter, W; Powles, A; Fry, L

    2001-06-01

    To determine and compare the T cell response to M protein and other group A streptococcal (GAS) antigens, T cell lines (TCL) were cultured from the lesional skin of 33 psoriatic patients and 17 disease controls. GAS-reactive skin TCL were tested in proliferation assays with recombinant M6 protein, and extracts of cell wall and membrane from type M6 GAS and its corresponding M gene deletion mutant. Initially, GAS-reactive skin TCL were obtained from 16 of 25 (64%) psoriasis, and from seven of 17 (41%) control patients. Eleven psoriatic and four control GAS-reactive TCL proliferated to M6 cell wall extract, whereas all the TCL from both groups responded to the extract of M6 membrane proteins. This difference in response to the two extracts was significant for both groups of patients (psoriasis, P = 0.0335, controls, P = 0.0156). GAS-reactive TCL from a further eight psoriasis patients showed no difference in response to cell wall extract from M6 GAS (containing the M protein minus its C-terminus) compared to that of its corresponding M gene deletion mutant. Furthermore, GAS-reactive TCL did not proliferate to recombinant M6 protein. However, a small, but significant reduction in proliferation by the eight psoriatic GAS-reactive TCL to the M-negative (lacking the M protein C-terminus) compared to M6-positive membrane extract was observed (P = 0.01). These findings suggest that GAS-reactive T cells in skin lesions of chronic plaque psoriasis proliferate to streptococcal membrane and, to a lesser extent, cell wall proteins. However, psoriatic skin T cells do not recognize cell wall M protein.

  17. Xerostomia: prevalence and pharmacotherapy. With special reference to beta-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nederfors, T

    1996-01-01

    -sublingual glands. Salivary composition but not saliva flow rates were affected by the beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, and the most pronounced effects were observed for total protein composition and amylase activity, both being significantly decreased during treatment with any of the antagonists, however, more accentuated during treatment with atenolol. Twelve hypertensive patients who were well-controlled in their blood-pressure by means of monotherapy with metoprolol, a beta 1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist, were observed during four weeks of withdrawal and after re-exposure to this antihypertensive treatment. The observed effects on salivary composition were essentially the same as those found in healthy volunteers. In the hypertensive group, however, whole saliva flow rates increased significantly on drug withdrawal and decreased again on re-exposure to metoprolol.

  18. High-mobility group box protein 1 promotes the survival of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Parker, Katherine H; Horn, Lucas A; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are immune-suppressive cells that are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. As myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit anti-tumor immunity and promote tumor progression, we are determining how their viability is regulated. Previous studies have established that the damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high-mobility group box protein 1 drives myeloid-derived suppressor cell accumulation and suppressive potency and is ubiquitously present in the tumor microenvironment. As high-mobility group box protein 1 also facilitates tumor cell survival by inducing autophagy, we sought to determine if high-mobility group box protein 1 regulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival through induction of autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy increased the quantity of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, demonstrating that autophagy extends the survival and increases the viability of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Inhibition of high-mobility group box protein 1 similarly increased the level of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cell autophagy, demonstrating that in addition to inducing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, high-mobility group box protein 1 sustains myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a default autophagic phenotype, and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells are more autophagic, consistent with the concept that inflammatory and hypoxic conditions within the microenvironment of solid tumors contribute to tumor progression by enhancing immune-suppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that in addition to previously recognized protumor effects, high-mobility group box protein 1 contributes to tumor progression by increasing myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability by

  19. Paraformaldehyde Fixation May Lead to Misinterpretation of the Subcellular Localization of Plant High Mobility Group Box Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Wah; Zhou, Liang; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis High Mobility Group Box (HMBG) proteins were previously found associated with the interphase chromatin but not the metaphase chromosome. However, these studies are usually based on immunolocalization analysis involving paraformaldehyde fixation. Paraformaldehyde fixation has been widely adapted to preserved cell morphology before immunofluorescence staining. On one hand, the processed cells are no longer living. On the other hand, the processing may lead to misinterpretation of localization. HMGBs from Arabidopsis were fused with enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and transformed into tobacco BY-2 cells. Basically, the localization of these HMGB proteins detected with EGFP fluorescence in interphase agreed with previous publications. Upon 4% paraformaldehyde fixation, AtHMGB1 was found associated with interphase but not the metaphase chromosomes as previously reported. However, when EGFP fluorescence signal was directly observed under confocal microscope without fixation, association of AtHMGB1 with metaphase chromosomes can be detected. Paraformaldehyde fixation led to dissociation of EGFP tagged AtHMBG1 protein from metaphase chromosomes. This kind of pre-processing of live specimen may lead to dissociation of protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interaction. Therefore, using of EGFP fusion proteins in live specimen is a better way to determine the correct localization and interaction of proteins. PMID:26270959

  20. Alpha C Protein as a Carrier for Type III Capsular Polysaccharide and as a Protective Protein in Group B Streptococcal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia; Kasper, Dennis L.; Paoletti, Lawrence C.; Madoff, Lawrence C.

    1999-01-01

    The alpha C protein, a protective surface protein of group B streptococci (GBS), is present in most non-type III GBS strains. Conjugate vaccines composed of the alpha C protein and type III capsular polysaccharide (CPS) might be protective against most GBS infections. In this study, the type III CPS was covalently coupled to full-length, nine-repeat alpha C protein (resulting in III-α9r conjugate vaccine) or to two-repeat alpha C protein (resulting in III-α2r conjugate vaccine) by reductive amination. Initial experiments with the III-α9r vaccine showed that it was poorly immunogenic in mice with respect to both vaccine antigens and was suboptimally efficacious in providing protection in mice against challenge with GBS. Therefore, modified vaccination protocols were used with the III-α2r vaccine. Female mice were immunized three times with 0.5, 5, or 20 μg of the III-α2r vaccine with an aluminum hydroxide adjuvant and bred. Ninety-five percent of neonatal mice born to dams immunized with the III-α2r vaccine survived challenge with GBS expressing type III CPS, and 60% survived challenge with GBS expressing wild-type (nine-repeat) alpha C protein; 18 and 17%, respectively, of mice in the negative control groups survived (P, <0.0001). These protection levels did not differ significantly from those obtained with the type III CPS-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine and the unconjugated two-repeat alpha C protein, which protected 98 and 58% of neonates from infection with GBS expressing type III CPS or the alpha C protein, respectively. Thus, the two-repeat alpha C protein in the vaccine was immunogenic and simultaneously enhanced the immunogenicity of type III CPS. III-α vaccines may be alternatives to GBS polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid vaccines, eliciting additional antibodies protective against GBS infection. PMID:10225912

  1. Proteomic identification of differentially-expressed proteins in esophageal cancer in three ethnic groups in Xinjiang.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zan; Feng, Jun-Guo; Tuersun, Aerziguli; Liu, Tao; Liu, Hui; Liu, Qing; Zheng, Shu-Tao; Huang, Cong-Gai; Lv, Guo-Dong; Sheyhidin, Ilyar; Lu, Xiao-Mei

    2011-06-01

    The Objective is to identify candidate biomarkers for Squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in three ethnics in Xinjiang as well as reveal molecular mechanism. Proteins from 15 pairs of ESCC and matching adjacent normal esophageal tissues (five pairs in each ethnic of Kazakh, Uygur and Han) were separated by 2-DE and differentially proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS. After identified by Mascot database, some of interesting proteins were confirmed in the other 175 pairs of ESCC by immuno histochemistry. Comparison of patterns revealed 20 proteins significantly changed, of which 12 protein with concordantly increased, such as ACTB protein, COMT protein, Syntaxin binding protein Pyruvate Kinase (PKM2), Cathepsin D, Chromosome 1 open reading frame 8, Heat shock protein 27, Cdc42, Proteosome, LLDBP, Immunoglobulin, TNF receptor associated factor 7; and eight protein spots with concordantly decreased intensity in ESCC, such as Adenylate kinase 1, General transcription factor II H, Smooth muscle protein, Trangelin, Early endosome antigen 1, Annexin A2, Fibrin beta, Tropomyosin. There were a significant difference in protein overexpression of PKM2 (74.9%) and Cathepsin D (85.1%) in ESCC compared to adjacent tissues (P < 0.05) by immunohistochemistry. Further, overexpression of Cathepsin D was obvious difference in Hazakh ESCC (94.7%) than that in Uygur (78.6%) (P < 0.05). Interestingly, the overexpression of Cathepsin D was reversely associated with ESCC differentiation (P < 0.05). Twenty proteins differentially-expressed between ESCC and normal tissues were identified. Cathepsin D and PKM2 were for the first time observed to be dysregulated in Kazakh's ESCC. Moreover, Cathepsin D may play a complicated role both in carcinogenesis and cell-differentiation of ESCC. PMID:21125333

  2. Serum antibody response to recombinant major inner capsid protein following human infection with group B rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Eiden, J J; Mouzinho, A; Lindsay, D A; Glass, R I; Fang, Z Y; Taylor, J L

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant major inner capsid protein (VP6) of the IDIR strain of group B rotavirus (GBR) was incorporated in a solid-phase immunoassay to access antibody response to infection in humans. Expression of VP6 in insect cells permitted design of a highly sensitive assay that avoided the contaminants present in GBR antigens obtained from fecal specimens. Among patients infected with the ADRV strain of GBR in China, increased reactivity with recombinant VP6 was observed in convalescent-phase sera in comparison with sera obtained shortly after infection (P = 0.0084). Anti-VP6 antibodies were detectable as soon as 7 days after onset of gastrointestinal symptoms, and serum reactivity persisted in specimens drawn more than 1 year after infection. Solid-phase immunoassay with recombinant VP6 was next employed in order to assess anti-GBR antibody in 513 serum specimens obtained from 423 Maryland residents (ages, 7 months to 96 years; median age, 42 years). Four individuals (< 1%) exhibited serum antibodies directed against the recombinant VP6 (ages, 54 to 95 years; mean age, 77 years). Examination of 129 additional serum specimens including some from other geographic regions of the United States failed to reveal the presence of anti-GBR antibody. Anti-GBR antibody was also not detected in any of 131 serum specimens from 60 staff and residents of a nursing home in Switzerland. While infection of humans with GBR has been uncommon in these locations outside of China, the detection of serum antibodies in older individuals in the United States either indicated an unknown, age-related risk factor or may have indicated infection in the more distant past. The availability of these reagents should allow surveys for GBR infection among additional populations that have not previously been investigated. PMID:8077413

  3. Regulation of Cell Death by IAPs and Their Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Deepika; Ryoo, Hyung Don

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) family of genes encode baculovirus IAP-repeat domain-containing proteins with antiapoptotic function. These proteins also contain RING or UBC domains and act by binding to major proapoptotic factors and ubiquitylating them. High levels of IAPs inhibit caspase-mediated apoptosis. For these cells to undergo apoptosis, IAP function must be neutralized by IAP-antagonists. Mammalian IAP knockouts do not exhibit obvious developmental phenotypes, but the cells are more sensitized to apoptosis in response to injury. Loss of the mammalian IAP-antagonist ARTS results in reduced stem cell apoptosis. In addition to the antiapoptotic properties, IAPs regulate the innate immune response, and the loss of IAP function in humans is associated with immunodeficiency. The roles of IAPs in Drosophila apoptosis regulation are more apparent, where the loss of IAP1, or the expression of IAP-antagonists in Drosophila cells, is sufficient to trigger apoptosis. In this organism, apoptosis as a fate is conferred by the transcriptional induction of the IAP-antagonists. Many signaling pathways often converge on shared enhancer regions of IAP-antagonists. Cell death sensitivity is further regulated by posttranscriptional mechanisms, including those regulated by kinases, miRs, and ubiquitin ligases. These mechanisms are employed to eliminate damaged or virus-infected cells, limit neuroblast (neural stem cell) numbers, generate neuronal diversity, and sculpt tissue morphogenesis.

  4. Relationship of the xeroderma pigmentosum group E DNA repair defect to the chromatin and DNA binding proteins UV-DDB and replication protein A.

    PubMed

    Rapić Otrin, V; Kuraoka, I; Nardo, T; McLenigan, M; Eker, A P; Stefanini, M; Levine, A S; Wood, R D

    1998-06-01

    Cells from complementation groups A through G of the heritable sun-sensitive disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) show defects in nucleotide excision repair of damaged DNA. Proteins representing groups A, B, C, D, F, and G are subunits of the core recognition and incision machinery of repair. XP group E (XP-E) is the mildest form of the disorder, and cells generally show about 50% of the normal repair level. We investigated two protein factors previously implicated in the XP-E defect, UV-damaged DNA binding protein (UV-DDB) and replication protein A (RPA). Three newly identified XP-E cell lines (XP23PV, XP25PV, and a line formerly classified as an XP variant) were defective in UV-DDB binding activity but had levels of RPA in the normal range. The XP-E cell extracts did not display a significant nucleotide excision repair defect in vitro, with either UV-irradiated DNA or a uniquely placed cisplatin lesion used as a substrate. Purified UV-DDB protein did not stimulate repair of naked DNA by DDB- XP-E cell extracts, but microinjection of the protein into DDB- XP-E cells could partially correct the repair defect. RPA stimulated repair in normal, XP-E, or complemented extracts from other XP groups, and so the effect of RPA was not specific for XP-E cell extracts. These data strengthen the connection between XP-E and UV-DDB. Coupled with previous results, the findings suggest that UV-DDB has a role in the repair of DNA in chromatin. PMID:9584159

  5. Study of model systems to test the potential function of Artemia group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins.

    PubMed

    Warner, Alden H; Guo, Zhi-hao; Moshi, Sandra; Hudson, John W; Kozarova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, are genetically programmed to develop either ovoviparously or oviparously depending on environmental conditions. Shortly upon their release from the female, oviparous embryos enter diapause during which time they undergo major metabolic rate depression while simultaneously synthesize proteins that permit them to tolerate a wide range of stressful environmental events including prolonged periods of desiccation, freezing, and anoxia. Among the known stress-related proteins that accumulate in embryos entering diapause are the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. This large group of intrinsically disordered proteins has been proposed to act as molecular shields or chaperones of macromolecules which are otherwise intolerant to harsh conditions associated with diapause. In this research, we used two model systems to study the potential function of the group 1 LEA proteins from Artemia. Expression of the Artemia group 1 gene (AfrLEA-1) in Escherichia coli inhibited growth in proportion to the number of 20-mer amino acid motifs expressed. As well, clones of E. coli, transformed with the AfrLEA-1 gene, expressed multiple bands of LEA proteins, either intrinsically or upon induction with isopropyl-β-thiogalactoside (IPTG), in a vector-specific manner. Expression of AfrLEA-1 in E. coli did not overcome the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of NaCl and KCl but modulated growth inhibition resulting from high concentrations of sorbitol in the growth medium. In contrast, expression of the AfrLEA-1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not alter the growth kinetics or permit yeast to tolerate high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, or sorbitol. However, expression of AfrLEA-1 in yeast improved its tolerance to drying (desiccation) and freezing. Under our experimental conditions, both E. coli and S. cerevisiae appear to be potentially suitable hosts to study the function of Artemia group 1 LEA proteins under environmentally

  6. Newly identified RNAs of raspberry leaf blotch virus encoding a related group of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuwen; McGavin, Wendy; Cock, Peter J A; Schnettler, Esther; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping; MacFarlane, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    Members of the genus Emaravirus, including Raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV), are enveloped plant viruses with segmented genomes of negative-strand RNA, although the complete genome complement for any of these viruses is not yet clear. Currently, wheat mosaic virus has the largest emaravirus genome comprising eight RNAs. Previously, we identified five genomic RNAs for RLBV; here, we identify a further three RNAs (RNA6-8). RNA6-8 encode proteins that have clear homologies to one another, but not to any other emaravirus proteins. The proteins self-interacted in yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) experiments, and the P8 protein interacted with the virus nucleocapsid protein (P3) using BiFC. Expression of two of the proteins (P6 and P7) using potato virus X led to an increase in virus titre and symptom severity, suggesting that these proteins may play a role in RLBV pathogenicity; however, using two different tests, RNA silencing suppression activity was not detected for any of the RLBV proteins encoded by RNA2-8.

  7. Multiple GPCR conformations and signalling pathways: implications for antagonist affinity estimates

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jillian G.; Hill, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Antagonist affinity measurements have traditionally been considered important in characterizing the cell-surface receptors present in a particular cell or tissue. A central assumption has been that antagonist affinity is constant for a given receptor–antagonist interaction, regardless of the agonist used to stimulate that receptor or the downstream response that is measured. As a consequence, changes in antagonist affinity values have been taken as initial evidence for the presence of novel receptor subtypes. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that receptors can possess multiple binding sites and the same receptor can show different antagonist affinity measurements under distinct experimental conditions. Here, we discuss several mechanisms by which antagonists have different affinities for the same receptor as a consequence of allosterism, coupling to different G proteins, multiple (but non-interacting) receptor sites, and signal-pathway-dependent pharmacology (where the pharmacology observed varies depending on the signalling pathway measured). PMID:17629959

  8. Gonadotrophin releasing hormone antagonist in IVF/ICSI

    PubMed Central

    MS, Kamath; AM, Mangalraj; KM, Muthukumar; K, George

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist in In-vitro-fertilization/Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) cycles. TYPE OF STUDY: Observational study. SETTING: Reproductive Medicine Unit, Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, Tamil Nadu. MATERIALS AND METHODS: GnRH antagonists were introduced into our practice in November 2005. Fifty-two women undergoing the antagonist protocol were studied and information gathered regarding patient profile, treatment parameters (total gonadotrophin dosage, duration of treatment, and oocyte yield), and outcomes in terms of embryological parameters (cleavage rates, implantation rates) and clinical pregnancy. These parameters were compared with 121 women undergoing the standard long protocol. The costs between the two groups were also compared. MAIN OUTCOME: Clinical pregnancy rate. RESULTS: The clinical pregnancy rate per embryo transfer in the antagonist group was 31.7% which was comparable to the clinical pregnancy rate in women undergoing the standard long protocol (30.63%). The costs between the two groups were comparable. CONCLUSIONS: GnRH antagonist protocol was found to be effective and comparable to the standard long protocol regimen. In addition it was simple, convenient, and patient friendly. PMID:19562061

  9. Phylogeny of replication initiator protein TrfA reveals a highly divergent clade of incompatibility group P1 plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incompatibility group P-1 (incP-1) includes broad host range plasmids of Gram negative bacteria and are classified into five subgroups (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon). The incP-1 replication module consists of the trfA gene, encoding the replication initiator protein TrfA, and the origin o...

  10. Sexually antagonistic genes: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Rice, W R

    1992-06-01

    When selection differs between the sexes, a mutation beneficial to one sex may be harmful to the other (sexually antagonistic). Because the sexes share a common gene pool, selection in one sex can interfere with the other's adaptive evolution. Theory predicts that sexually antagonistic mutations should accumulate in tight linkage with a new sex-determining gene, even when the harm to benefit ratio is high. Genetic markers and artificial selection were used to make a pair of autosomal genes segregate like a new pair of sex-determining genes in a Drosophila melanogaster model system. A 29-generation study provides experimental evidence that sexually antagonistic genes may be common in nature and will accumulate in response to a new sex-determining gene. PMID:1604317

  11. Intracellular localization of group 3 LEA proteins in embryos of Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Leaf C; Hand, Steven C

    2014-12-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are accumulated by anhydrobiotic organisms in response to desiccation and improve survivorship during water stress. In this study we provide the first direct evidence for the subcellular localizations of AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m (and its subforms) in anhydrobiotic embryos of Artemia franciscana. Immunohistochemistry shows AfrLEA2 to reside in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and the four AfrLEA3m proteins to be localized to the mitochondrion. Cellular locations are supported by Western blots of mitochondrial, nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. The presence of LEA proteins in multiple subcellular compartments of A. franciscana embryos suggests the need to protect biological structures in many areas of a cell in order for an organism to survive desiccation stress, and may explain in part why a multitude of different LEA proteins are expressed by a single organism. PMID:25311474

  12. Characterization of protoberberine analogs employed as novel human P2X{sub 7} receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ga Eun; Lee, Won-Gil; Lee, Song-Yi; Lee, Cho-Rong; Park, Chul-Seung; Chang, Sunghoe; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Kim, Yong-Chul

    2011-04-15

    The P2X{sub 7} receptor (P2X{sub 7}R), a member of the ATP-gated ion channel family, is regarded as a promising target for therapy of immune-related diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and chronic pain. A group of novel protoberberine analogs (compounds 3-5), discovered by screening of chemical libraries, was here investigated with respect to their function as P2X{sub 7}R antagonists. Compounds 3-5 non-competitively inhibited BzATP-induced ethidium ion influx into hP2X{sub 7}-expressing HEK293 cells, with IC{sub 50} values of 100-300 nM. This antagonistic action on the channel further confirmed that both BzATP-induced inward currents and Ca{sup 2+} influx were strongly inhibited by compounds 3-5 in patch-clamp and Ca{sup 2+} influx assays. The antagonists also effectively suppressed downstream signaling of P2X{sub 7} receptors including IL-1{beta} release and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 proteins in hP2X{sub 7}-expressing HEK293 cells or in differentiated human monocytes (THP-1 cells). Moreover, IL-2 secretion from CD3/CD28-stimulated Jurkat T cell was also dramatically inhibited by the antagonist. These results imply that novel protoberberine analogs may modulate P2X{sub 7} receptor-mediated immune responses by allosteric inhibition of the receptor. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted

  13. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins.

    PubMed

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie; Hamelin, Olivier; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D2O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d10. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  14. Antagonistic functional duality of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, A A; Vassetzky, Y S; Kavsan, V M

    2013-10-25

    Cancer evolution is a stochastic process both at the genome and gene levels. Most of tumors contain multiple genetic subclones, evolving in either succession or in parallel, either in a linear or branching manner, with heterogeneous genome and gene alterations, extensively rewired signaling networks, and addicted to multiple oncogenes easily switching with each other during cancer progression and medical intervention. Hundreds of discovered cancer genes are classified according to whether they function in a dominant (oncogenes) or recessive (tumor suppressor genes) manner in a cancer cell. However, there are many cancer "gene-chameleons", which behave distinctly in opposite way in the different experimental settings showing antagonistic duality. In contrast to the widely accepted view that mutant NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases 1/2 (IDH1/2) and associated metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (R)-enantiomer are intrinsically "the drivers" of tumourigenesis, mutant IDH1/2 inhibited, promoted or had no effect on cell proliferation, growth and tumorigenicity in diverse experiments. Similar behavior was evidenced for dozens of cancer genes. Gene function is dependent on genetic network, which is defined by the genome context. The overall changes in karyotype can result in alterations of the role and function of the same genes and pathways. The diverse cell lines and tumor samples have been used in experiments for proving gene tumor promoting/suppressive activity. They all display heterogeneous individual karyotypes and disturbed signaling networks. Consequently, the effect and function of gene under investigation can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genomes that may explain antagonistic duality of cancer genes and the cell type- or the cellular genetic/context-dependent response to the same protein. Antagonistic duality of cancer genes might contribute to failure of chemotherapy. Instructive examples of unexpected activity of cancer genes and

  15. Analysis of core-periphery organization in protein contact networks reveals groups of structurally and functionally critical residues.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Arnold Emerson; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2015-10-01

    The representation of proteins as networks of interacting amino acids, referred to as protein contact networks (PCN), and their subsequent analyses using graph theoretic tools, can provide novel insights into the key functional roles of specific groups of residues. We have characterized the networks corresponding to the native states of 66 proteins (belonging to different families) in terms of their core-periphery organization. The resulting hierarchical classification of the amino acid constituents of a protein arranges the residues into successive layers - having higher core order - with increasing connection density, ranging from a sparsely linked periphery to a densely intra-connected core (distinct from the earlier concept of protein core defined in terms of the three-dimensional geometry of the native state, which has least solvent accessibility). Our results show that residues in the inner cores are more conserved than those at the periphery. Underlining the functional importance of the network core, we see that the receptor sites for known ligand molecules of most proteins occur in the innermost core. Furthermore, the association of residues with structural pockets and cavities in binding or active sites increases with the core order. From mutation sensitivity analysis, we show that the probability of deleterious or intolerant mutations also increases with the core order. We also show that stabilization centre residues are in the innermost cores, suggesting that the network core is critically important in maintaining the structural stability of the protein. A publicly available Web resource for performing core-periphery analysis of any protein whose native state is known has been made available by us at http://www.imsc.res.in/ ~sitabhra/proteinKcore/index.html.

  16. Synthesis of potential mescaline antagonists.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, F; Nieforth, K A

    1976-10-01

    1-[2-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-3-pyrroline, 2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, N-n-propylmescaline, N-cyclopropylmethylmescaline, and N-allylmescaline were synthesized as potential mescaline antagonists. The ability of these compounds to antagonize mescaline-induced disruption of swim behavior is also given.

  17. Group 3 LEA Protein, ZmLEA3, Is Involved in Protection from Low Temperature Stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liang, Jianan; Sun, Liping; Yang, Xinghong; Li, Dequan

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a family of small highly hydrophilic proteins that accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to adverse conditions such as drought, salinity, low temperature, or water deficit. In previous studies, we demonstrated that ZmLEA3 could enhance the transgenic tobacco tolerance to osmotic and oxidative stresses. Here, we demonstrated that the transcription of ZmLEA3 in the maize stems could be significantly induced by low temperature and osmotic stresses and by treatment with abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2. Further study indicated that ZmLEA3 is a single copy gene in the maize genome. The ZmLEA3 protein could protect lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity at low temperatures. The overexpression of ZmLEA3 conferred tolerance to low-temperature stress to transgenic tobacco, yeast (GS115) and E. coli (BL21). PMID:27471509

  18. Group 3 LEA Protein, ZmLEA3, Is Involved in Protection from Low Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liang, Jianan; Sun, Liping; Yang, Xinghong; Li, Dequan

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a family of small highly hydrophilic proteins that accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to adverse conditions such as drought, salinity, low temperature, or water deficit. In previous studies, we demonstrated that ZmLEA3 could enhance the transgenic tobacco tolerance to osmotic and oxidative stresses. Here, we demonstrated that the transcription of ZmLEA3 in the maize stems could be significantly induced by low temperature and osmotic stresses and by treatment with abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2. Further study indicated that ZmLEA3 is a single copy gene in the maize genome. The ZmLEA3 protein could protect lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity at low temperatures. The overexpression of ZmLEA3 conferred tolerance to low-temperature stress to transgenic tobacco, yeast (GS115) and E. coli (BL21). PMID:27471509

  19. Effect of Oxygen-containing Functional Groups on Protein Stability in Ionic Liquid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Megan B.; Holbrey, John D.; Spear, Scott K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Rogers, Robin D.

    2004-01-01

    The ability of functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) to provide an environment of increased stability for biomolecules has been studied. Serum albumin is an inexpensive, widely available protein that contributes to the overall colloid osmotic blood pressure within the vascular system. Albumin is used in the present study as a marker of biomolecular stability in the presence of various ILs in a range of concentrations. The incorporation of hydroxyl functionality into the methylimidazolium-based cation leads to increased protein stability detected by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroic (CD) spectrometry.

  20. Activins and activin antagonists in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Deli, Alev; Kreidl, Emanuel; Santifaller, Stefan; Trotter, Barbara; Seir, Katja; Berger, Walter; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf; Rodgarkia-Dara, Chantal; Grusch, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In many parts of the world hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the leading causes of cancer-related mortality but the underlying molecular pathology is still insufficiently understood. There is increasing evidence that activins, which are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of growth and differentiation factors, could play important roles in liver carcinogenesis. Activins are disulphide-linked homo- or heterodimers formed from four different β subunits termed βA, βB, βC, and βE, respectively. Activin A, the dimer of two βA subunits, is critically involved in the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, and tissue architecture in the liver, while the hepatic function of other activins is largely unexplored so far. Negative regulators of activin signals include antagonists in the extracellular space like the binding proteins follistatin and FLRG, and at the cell membrane antagonistic co-receptors like Cripto or BAMBI. Additionally, in the intracellular space inhibitory Smads can modulate and control activin activity. Accumulating data suggest that deregulation of activin signals contributes to pathologic conditions such as chronic inflammation, fibrosis and development of cancer. The current article reviews the alterations in components of the activin signaling pathway that have been observed in HCC and discusses their potential significance for liver tumorigenesis. PMID:18350601

  1. In Silico Discovery of Androgen Receptor Antagonists with Activity in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Howard C.; Shanmugasundaram, Kumaran; Simon, Nicholas I.; Cai, Changmeng; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Sen; Rigby, Alan C.

    2012-01-01

    Previously available androgen receptor (AR) antagonists (bicalutamide, flutamide, and nilutamide) have limited activity against AR in prostate cancers that relapse after castration [castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)]. However, recent AR competitive antagonists such as MDV3100, generated through chemical modifications to the current AR ligands, appear to have increased activity in CRPC and have novel mechanisms of action. Using pharmacophore models and a refined homology model of the antagonist-liganded AR ligand binding domain, we carried out in silico screens of small molecule libraries and report here on the identification of a series of structurally distinct nonsteroidal small molecule competitive AR antagonists. Despite their unique chemical architectures, compounds representing each of six chemotypes functioned in vitro as pure AR antagonists. Moreover, similarly to MDV3100 and in contrast to previous AR antagonists, these compounds all prevented AR binding to chromatin, consistent with each of the six chemotypes stabilizing a similar AR antagonist conformation. Additional studies with the lead chemotype (chemotype A) showed enhanced AR protein degradation, which was dependent on helix 12 in the AR ligand binding domain. Significantly, chemotype A compounds functioned as AR antagonists in vivo in normal male mice and suppressed AR activity and tumor cell proliferation in human CRPC xenografts. These data indicate that certain ligand-induced structural alterations in the AR ligand binding domain may both impair AR chromatin binding and enhance AR degradation and support continued efforts to develop AR antagonists with unique mechanisms of action and efficacy in CRPC. PMID:23023563

  2. Phylogenetic relationships and protein modelling revealed two distinct subfamilies of group II HKT genes between crop and model grasses.

    PubMed

    Ariyarathna, H A Chandima K; Francki, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    Molecular evolution of large protein families in closely related species can provide useful insights on structural functional relationships. Phylogenetic analysis of the grass-specific group II HKT genes identified two distinct subfamilies, I and II. Subfamily II was represented in all species, whereas subfamily I was identified only in the small grain cereals and possibly originated from an ancestral gene duplication post divergence from the coarse grain cereal lineage. The core protein structures were highly analogous despite there being no more than 58% amino acid identity between members of the two subfamilies. Distinctly variable regions in known functional domains, however, indicated functional divergence of the two subfamilies. The subsets of codons residing external to known functional domains predicted signatures of positive Darwinian selection potentially identifying new domains of functional divergence and providing new insights on the structural function and relationships between protein members of the two subfamilies. PMID:27203707

  3. Antagonistic effects of abscisic acid and jasmonates on salt stress-inducible transcripts in rice roots.

    PubMed Central

    Moons, A; Prinsen, E; Bauw, G; Van Montagu, M

    1997-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonates have been implicated in responses to water deficit and wounding. We compared the molecular and physiological effects of jasmonic acid (JA) (< or = 10 microM), ABA, and salt stress in roots of rice. JA markedly induced a cationic peroxidase, two novel 32- and 28-kD proteins, acidic PR-1 and PR-10 pathogenesis-related proteins, and the salt stress-responsive SalT protein in roots. Most JA-responsive proteins (JIPs) from roots also accumulated when plants were subjected to salt stress. None of the JIPs accumulated when plants were treated with ABA. JA did not induce an ABA-responsive group 3 late-embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein. Salt stress and ABA but not JA induced oslea3 transcript accumulation. By contrast, JA, ABA, and salt stress induced transcript accumulation of salT and osdrr, which encodes a rice PR-10 protein. However, ABA also negatively affected salT transcript accumulation, whereas JA negatively affected ABA-induced oslea3 transcript levels. Endogenous root ABA and methyl jasmonate levels showed a differential increase with the dose and the duration of salt stress. The results indicate that ABA and jasmonates antagonistically regulated the expression of salt stress-inducible proteins associated with water deficit or defense responses. PMID:9437865

  4. Shr of group A streptococcus is a new type of composite NEAT protein involved in sequestering haem from methaemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Mahamoudou; Cunha, Elizabeth Bentley; Li, Xueru; Huang, Ya-Shu; Dixon, Dabney; Eichenbaum, Zehava

    2010-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that surface or secreted proteins with NEAr Transporter (NEAT) domains play a central role in haem acquisition and trafficking across the cell envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. Group A streptococcus (GAS), a β-haemolytic human pathogen, expresses a NEAT protein, Shr, which binds several haemoproteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Shr is a complex, membrane-anchored protein, with a unique N-terminal domain (NTD) and two NEAT domains separated by a central leucine-rich repeat region. In this study we have carried out an analysis of the functional domains in Shr. We show that Shr obtains haem in solution and furthermore reduces the haem iron; this is the first report of haem reduction by a NEAT protein. More specifically, we demonstrate that both of the constituent NEAT domains of Shr are responsible for binding haem, although they are missing a critical tyrosine residue found in the ligand-binding pocket of other haem-binding NEAT domains. Further investigations show that a previously undescribed region within the Shr NTD interacts with methaemoglobin. Shr NEAT domains, however, do not contribute significantly to the binding of methaemoglobin but mediate binding to the ECM components fibronectin and laminin. A protein fragment containing the NTD plus the first NEAT domain was found to be sufficient to sequester haem directly from methaemoglobin. Correlating these in vitro findings to in vivo biological function, mutants analysis establishes the role of Shr in GAS growth with methaemoglobin as a sole source of iron, and indicates that at least one NEAT domain is necessary for the utilization of methaemoglobin. We suggest that Shr is the prototype of a new group of NEAT composite proteins involved in haem uptake found in pyogenic streptococci and Clostridium novyi.

  5. Shr of Group A Streptococcus is a new type of composite NEAT protein involved in sequestering heme from methemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Mahamoudou; Cunha, Elizabeth Bentley; Li, Xueru; Huang, Ya-Shu; Dixon, Dabney; Eichenbaum, Zehava

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY A growing body of evidence suggests that surface or secreted proteins with NEAr Transporter (NEAT) domains play a central role in heme acquisition and trafficking across the cell envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. Group A Streptococcus (GAS), a β-hemolytic human pathogen, expresses a NEAT protein, Shr, which binds several hemoproteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Shr is a complex, membrane-anchored protein, with a unique N-terminal domain (NTD) and two NEAT domains separated by a central leucine-rich repeat region. In this study we have carried out an analysis of the functional domains in Shr. We show that Shr obtains heme in solution and furthermore reduces the heme iron; this is the first report of heme reduction by a NEAT protein. More specifically, we demonstrate that both of the constituent NEAT domains of Shr are responsible for binding heme, although they are missing a critical tyrosine residue found in the ligand-binding pocket of other heme-binding NEAT domains. Further investigations show that a previously undescribed region within the Shr NTD interacts with methemoglobin. Shr NEAT domains, however, do not contribute significantly to the binding of methemoglobin but mediate binding to the ECM components fibronectin and laminin. A protein fragment containing the NTD plus the first NEAT domain was found to be sufficient to sequester heme directly from methemoglobin. Correlating these in vitro findings to in vivo biological function, mutants analysis establishes the role of Shr in GAS growth with methemoglobin as a sole source of iron, and indicates that at least one NEAT domain is necessary for the utilization of methemoglobin. We suggest that Shr is the prototype of a new group of NEAT composite proteins involved in heme uptake found in pyogenic streptococci and Clostridium novyi. PMID:20807204

  6. Insights into the evolution of Archaea and eukaryotic protein modifier systems revealed by the genome of a novel archaeal group.

    PubMed

    Nunoura, Takuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kakuta, Jungo; Nishi, Shinro; Sugahara, Junichi; Kazama, Hiromi; Chee, Gab-Joo; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Akio; Atomi, Haruyuki; Takai, Ken; Takami, Hideto

    2011-04-01

    The domain Archaea has historically been divided into two phyla, the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Although regarded as members of the Crenarchaeota based on small subunit rRNA phylogeny, environmental genomics and efforts for cultivation have recently revealed two novel phyla/divisions in the Archaea; the 'Thaumarchaeota' and 'Korarchaeota'. Here, we show the genome sequence of Candidatus 'Caldiarchaeum subterraneum' that represents an uncultivated crenarchaeotic group. A composite genome was reconstructed from a metagenomic library previously prepared from a microbial mat at a geothermal water stream of a sub-surface gold mine. The genome was found to be clearly distinct from those of the known phyla/divisions, Crenarchaeota (hyperthermophiles), Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Korarchaeota. The unique traits suggest that this crenarchaeotic group can be considered as a novel archaeal phylum/division. Moreover, C. subterraneum harbors an ubiquitin-like protein modifier system consisting of Ub, E1, E2 and small Zn RING finger family protein with structural motifs specific to eukaryotic system proteins, a system clearly distinct from the prokaryote-type system recently identified in Haloferax and Mycobacterium. The presence of such a eukaryote-type system is unprecedented in prokaryotes, and indicates that a prototype of the eukaryotic protein modifier system is present in the Archaea. PMID:21169198

  7. Insights into the evolution of Archaea and eukaryotic protein modifier systems revealed by the genome of a novel archaeal group

    PubMed Central

    Nunoura, Takuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kakuta, Jungo; Nishi, Shinro; Sugahara, Junichi; Kazama, Hiromi; Chee, Gab-Joo; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Akio; Atomi, Haruyuki; Takai, Ken; Takami, Hideto

    2011-01-01

    The domain Archaea has historically been divided into two phyla, the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Although regarded as members of the Crenarchaeota based on small subunit rRNA phylogeny, environmental genomics and efforts for cultivation have recently revealed two novel phyla/divisions in the Archaea; the ‘Thaumarchaeota’ and ‘Korarchaeota’. Here, we show the genome sequence of Candidatus ‘Caldiarchaeum subterraneum’ that represents an uncultivated crenarchaeotic group. A composite genome was reconstructed from a metagenomic library previously prepared from a microbial mat at a geothermal water stream of a sub-surface gold mine. The genome was found to be clearly distinct from those of the known phyla/divisions, Crenarchaeota (hyperthermophiles), Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Korarchaeota. The unique traits suggest that this crenarchaeotic group can be considered as a novel archaeal phylum/division. Moreover, C. subterraneum harbors an ubiquitin-like protein modifier system consisting of Ub, E1, E2 and small Zn RING finger family protein with structural motifs specific to eukaryotic system proteins, a system clearly distinct from the prokaryote-type system recently identified in Haloferax and Mycobacterium. The presence of such a eukaryote-type system is unprecedented in prokaryotes, and indicates that a prototype of the eukaryotic protein modifier system is present in the Archaea. PMID:21169198

  8. Haploinsufficiency screen highlights two distinct groups of ribosomal protein genes essential for embryonic stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Simon; MacRae, Tara; Bilodeau, Mélanie; Sargeant, Tobias; Sauvageau, Guy

    2015-01-01

    In a functional genomics screen of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with nested hemizygous chromosomal deletions, we reveal that ribosomal protein (RP) genes are the most significant haploinsufficient determinants for embryoid body (EB) formation. Hemizygocity for three RP genes (Rps5, Rps14, or Rps28), distinguished by the proximity of their corresponding protein to the ribosome's mRNA exit site, is associated with the most profound phenotype. This EB phenotype was fully rescued by BAC or cDNA complementation but not by the reduction of p53 levels, although such reduction was effective with most other RP-deleted clones corresponding to non-mRNA exit-site proteins. RNA-sequencing studies further revealed that undifferentiated ESCs hemizygous for Rps5 showed reduced expression levels of several mesoderm-specific genes as compared with wild-type counterparts. Together, these results reveal that RP gene dosage limits the differentiation, not the self-renewal, of mouse ESCs. They also highlight two separate mechanisms underlying this process, one of which is p53 independent. PMID:25646475

  9. A Drosophila ESC-E(Z) protein complex is distinct from other polycomb group complexes and contains covalently modified ESC.

    PubMed

    Ng, J; Hart, C M; Morgan, K; Simon, J A

    2000-05-01

    The extra sex combs (ESC) and Enhancer of zeste [E(Z)] proteins, members of the Polycomb group (PcG) of transcriptional repressors, interact directly and are coassociated in fly embryos. We report that these two proteins are components of a 600-kDa complex in embryos. Using gel filtration and affinity chromatography, we show that this complex is biochemically distinct from previously described complexes containing the PcG proteins Polyhomeotic, Polycomb, and Sex comb on midleg. In addition, we present evidence that ESC is phosphorylated in vivo and that this modified ESC is preferentially associated in the complex with E(Z). Modified ESC accumulates between 2 and 6 h of embryogenesis, which is the developmental time when esc function is first required. We find that mutations in E(z) reduce the ratio of modified to unmodified ESC in vivo. We have also generated germ line transformants that express ESC proteins bearing site-directed mutations that disrupt ESC-E(Z) binding in vitro. These mutant ESC proteins fail to provide esc function, show reduced levels of modification in vivo, and are still assembled into complexes. Taken together, these results suggest that ESC phosphorylation normally occurs after assembly into ESC-E(Z) complexes and that it contributes to the function or regulation of these complexes. We discuss how biochemically separable ESC-E(Z) and PC-PH complexes might work together to provide PcG repression. PMID:10757791

  10. Biochemical and biological properties of the binding of human fibrinogen to M protein in group A streptococci

    SciTech Connect

    Whitnack, E.; Beachey, E.H.

    1985-10-01

    Fibrinogen is known to bind to group A streptococci and precipitate with extracts containing streptococcal M protein. The authors have previously shown that the binding of fibrinogen to M-positive streptococci prevents opsonization by complement and protects that organism from phagocytosis in nonimmune blood. In the present study, they used TH-labeled fibrinogen, a highly purified peptide fragment of type 24 M protein (pep M24), and anti-pep M sera to show that fibrinogen binds to M-positive streptococci with high affinity; occupation of the high-affinity binding sites suffices to protect the organism from phagocytosis; proteolytic treatments that remove M protein from streptococcal cells abolish binding; binding is competitively inhibited by anti-pep M sera; pep M24 precipitates fibrinogen; and binding to type 24 cells is inhibited by pep M24. They conclude that M protein is the cell surface structure principally responsible for binding fibrinogen on the surface of M-positive streptococci and that this binding contributes to the known antiopsonic property of M proteins.

  11. Single-molecule kinetics reveal microscopic mechanism by which High-Mobility Group B proteins alter DNA flexibility

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Micah J.; Rueter, Emily M.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Maher, L. James; Williams, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic High-Mobility Group B (HMGB) proteins alter DNA elasticity while facilitating transcription, replication and DNA repair. We developed a new single-molecule method to probe non-specific DNA interactions for two HMGB homologs: the human HMGB2 box A domain and yeast Nhp6Ap, along with chimeric mutants replacing neutral N-terminal residues of the HMGB2 protein with cationic sequences from Nhp6Ap. Surprisingly, HMGB proteins constrain DNA winding, and this torsional constraint is released over short timescales. These measurements reveal the microscopic dissociation rates of HMGB from DNA. Separate microscopic and macroscopic (or local and non-local) unbinding rates have been previously proposed, but never independently observed. Microscopic dissociation rates for the chimeric mutants (∼10 s−1) are higher than those observed for wild-type proteins (∼0.1–1.0 s−1), reflecting their reduced ability to bend DNA through short-range interactions, despite their increased DNA-binding affinity. Therefore, transient local HMGB–DNA contacts dominate the DNA-bending mechanism used by these important architectural proteins to increase DNA flexibility. PMID:23143110

  12. Bridging of partially negative atoms by hydrogen bonds from main-chain NH groups in proteins: The crown motif.

    PubMed

    Leader, David P; Milner-White, E James

    2015-11-01

    The backbone NH groups of proteins can form N1N3-bridges to δ-ve or anionic acceptor atoms when the tripeptide in which they occur orients them appropriately, as in the RL and LR nest motifs, which have dihedral angles 1,2-αR αL and 1,2-αL αR , respectively. We searched a protein database for structures with backbone N1N3-bridging to anionic atoms of the polypeptide chain and found that RL and LR nests together accounted for 92% of examples found (88% RL nests, 4% LR nests). Almost all the remaining 8% of N1N3-bridges were found within a third tripeptide motif which has not been described previously. We term this a "crown," because of the disposition of the tripeptide CO groups relative to the three NH groups and the acceptor oxygen anion, and the crown together with its bridged anion we term a "crown bridge." At position 2 of these structures the dihedral angles have a tight αR distribution, but at position 1 they have a wider distribution, with ϕ and ψ values generally being lower than those at position 1. Over half of crown bridges involve the backbone CO group three residues N-terminal to the tripeptide, the remainder being to other main-chain or side-chain carbonyl groups. As with nests, bridging of crowns to oxygen atoms within ligands was observed, as was bridging to the sulfur atom of an iron-sulfur cluster. This latter property may be of significance for protein evolution.

  13. C-terminal extension of calmodulin-like 3 protein from Oryza sativa L.: interaction with a high mobility group target protein.

    PubMed

    Chinpongpanich, Aumnart; Phean-O-Pas, Srivilai; Thongchuang, Mayura; Qu, Li-Jia; Buaboocha, Teerapong

    2015-11-01

    A large number of calmodulin-like (CML) proteins are present in plants, but there is little detailed information on the functions of these proteins in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Here, the CML3 protein from rice (OsCML3) and its truncated form lacking the C-terminal extension (OsCML3m) were found to exhibit a Ca2+-binding property and subsequent conformational change, but the ability to bind the CaM kinase II peptide was only observed for OsCML3m. Changes in their secondary structure upon Ca2+-binding measured by circular dichroism revealed that OsCML3m had a higher helical content than OsCML3. Moreover, OsCML3 was mainly localized in the plasma membrane, whereas OsCML3m was found in the nucleus. The rice high mobility group B1 (OsHMGB1) protein was identified as one of the putative OsCML3 target proteins. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that OsHMGB1 bound OsCML3, OsCML3m or OsCML3s (cysteine to serine mutation at the prenylation site) in the nucleus presumably through the methionine and phenylalanine-rich hydrophobic patches, confirming that OsHMGB1 is a target protein in planta. The effect of OsCML3 or OsCML3m on the DNA-binding ability of OsHMGB1 was measured using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. OsCML3m decreased the level of OsHMGB1 binding to pUC19 double-stranded DNA whereas OsCML3 did not. Taken together, OsCML3 probably provides a mechanism for manipulating the DNA-binding ability of OsHMGB1 in the nucleus and its C-terminal extension provides an intracellular Ca2+ regulatory switch. PMID:26423116

  14. C-terminal extension of calmodulin-like 3 protein from Oryza sativa L.: interaction with a high mobility group target protein.

    PubMed

    Chinpongpanich, Aumnart; Phean-O-Pas, Srivilai; Thongchuang, Mayura; Qu, Li-Jia; Buaboocha, Teerapong

    2015-11-01

    A large number of calmodulin-like (CML) proteins are present in plants, but there is little detailed information on the functions of these proteins in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Here, the CML3 protein from rice (OsCML3) and its truncated form lacking the C-terminal extension (OsCML3m) were found to exhibit a Ca2+-binding property and subsequent conformational change, but the ability to bind the CaM kinase II peptide was only observed for OsCML3m. Changes in their secondary structure upon Ca2+-binding measured by circular dichroism revealed that OsCML3m had a higher helical content than OsCML3. Moreover, OsCML3 was mainly localized in the plasma membrane, whereas OsCML3m was found in the nucleus. The rice high mobility group B1 (OsHMGB1) protein was identified as one of the putative OsCML3 target proteins. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that OsHMGB1 bound OsCML3, OsCML3m or OsCML3s (cysteine to serine mutation at the prenylation site) in the nucleus presumably through the methionine and phenylalanine-rich hydrophobic patches, confirming that OsHMGB1 is a target protein in planta. The effect of OsCML3 or OsCML3m on the DNA-binding ability of OsHMGB1 was measured using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. OsCML3m decreased the level of OsHMGB1 binding to pUC19 double-stranded DNA whereas OsCML3 did not. Taken together, OsCML3 probably provides a mechanism for manipulating the DNA-binding ability of OsHMGB1 in the nucleus and its C-terminal extension provides an intracellular Ca2+ regulatory switch.

  15. Chirality of ordered molecular complexes consisting of protein with fixed prosthetic group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancoska, Petr; Bednarova, Lucie; Kapsa, Vojtech

    1992-04-01

    The changes of properties of an achiral prosthetic group upon its fixation on the chiral molecular matrix are discussed using the concept of chirality. We analyze the difference Δ< overlineA> = < overlineA> R - < overlineA> L in the expectation values of an operator describing the change of the prosthetic group property when it is bonded in two orientations, enatiomorphous with respect to the chiral molecular matrix. The wavefunctions of Barron and a density matrix formalism are used to show that Δ< overlineA> is nonzero for both parity odd and even observables, thus distinguishing molecular complexes from enantiomeric species. The examples demonstrate the interconnection of Δ< overlineA> with the energetics of interaction between the matrix and the prosthetic group.

  16. Invasion of protein coding genes by green algal ribosomal group I introns.

    PubMed

    McManus, Hilary A; Lewis, Louise A; Fučíková, Karolina; Haugen, Peik

    2012-01-01

    The spread of group I introns depends on their association with intron-encoded homing endonucleases. Introns that encode functional homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are highly invasive, whereas introns that only encode the group I ribozyme responsible for self-splicing are generally stably inherited (i.e., vertical inheritance). A number of recent case studies have provided new knowledge on the evolution of group I introns, however, there are still large gaps in understanding of their distribution on the tree of life, and how they have spread into new hosts and genic sites. During a larger phylogenetic survey of chlorophyceaen green algae, we found that 23 isolates contain at least one group I intron in the rbcL chloroplast gene. Structural analyses show that the introns belong to one of two intron lineages, group IA2 intron-HEG (GIY-YIG family) elements inserted after position 462 in the rbcL gene, and group IA1 introns inserted after position 699. The latter intron type sometimes encodes HNH homing endonucleases. The distribution of introns was analyzed on an exon phylogeny and patterns were recovered that are consistent with vertical inheritance and possible horizontal transfer. The rbcL 462 introns are thus far reported only within the Volvocales, Hydrodictyaceae and Bracteacoccus, and closely related isolates of algae differ in the presence of rbcL introns. Phylogenetic analysis of the intron conserved regions indicates that the rbcL699 and rbcL462 introns have distinct evolutionary origins. The rbcL699 introns were likely derived from ribosomal RNA L2449 introns, whereas the rbcL462 introns form a close relationship with psbA introns.

  17. KIAA1530 protein is recruited by Cockayne syndrome complementation group protein A (CSA) to participate in transcription-coupled repair (TCR).

    PubMed

    Fei, Jia; Chen, Junjie

    2012-10-12

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is the major pathway involved in the removal of UV-induced photolesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. Two Cockayne syndrome (CS) complementation group proteins, CSA and CSB, are important for TCR repair. The molecular mechanisms by which CS proteins regulate TCR remain elusive. Here, we report the characterization of KIAA1530, an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in this pathway through its interaction with CSA and the TFIIH complex. We found that UV irradiation led to the recruitment of KIAA1530 onto chromatin in a CSA-dependent manner. Cells lacking KIAA1530 were highly sensitive to UV irradiation and displayed deficiency in TCR. In addition, KIAA1530 depletion abrogated stability of the CSB protein following UV irradiation. More excitingly, we found that a unique CSA mutant (W361C), which was previously identified in a patient with UV(s)S syndrome, showed defective KIAA1530 binding and resulted in a failure of recruiting KIAA1530 and stabilizing CSB after UV treatment. Together, our data not only reveal that KIAA1530 is an important player in TCR but also lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying UV(s)S syndrome. PMID:22902626

  18. KIAA1530 Protein Is Recruited by Cockayne Syndrome Complementation Group Protein A (CSA) to Participate in Transcription-coupled Repair (TCR)

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Jia; Chen, Junjie

    2012-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is the major pathway involved in the removal of UV-induced photolesions from the transcribed strand of active genes. Two Cockayne syndrome (CS) complementation group proteins, CSA and CSB, are important for TCR repair. The molecular mechanisms by which CS proteins regulate TCR remain elusive. Here, we report the characterization of KIAA1530, an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in this pathway through its interaction with CSA and the TFIIH complex. We found that UV irradiation led to the recruitment of KIAA1530 onto chromatin in a CSA-dependent manner. Cells lacking KIAA1530 were highly sensitive to UV irradiation and displayed deficiency in TCR. In addition, KIAA1530 depletion abrogated stability of the CSB protein following UV irradiation. More excitingly, we found that a unique CSA mutant (W361C), which was previously identified in a patient with UVsS syndrome, showed defective KIAA1530 binding and resulted in a failure of recruiting KIAA1530 and stabilizing CSB after UV treatment. Together, our data not only reveal that KIAA1530 is an important player in TCR but also lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying UVsS syndrome. PMID:22902626

  19. Variable Tick Protein in Two Genomic Groups of the Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia hermsii in Western North America

    PubMed Central

    Porcella, Stephen F.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Anderson, Donald E.; Gilk, Stacey D.; Bono, James L.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2005-01-01

    Borrelia hermsii is the primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in North America. When its tick vector, Ornithodoros hermsi, acquires these spirochetes from the blood of an infected mammal, the bacteria switch their outer surface from one of many bloodstream variable major proteins (Vmps) to a unique protein, Vtp (Vsp33). Vtp may be critical for successful tick transmission of B. hermsii; however, the gene encoding this protein has been described previously in only one isolate. Here we identified and sequenced the vtp gene in 31 isolates of B. hermsii collected over 40 years from localities throughout much of its known geographic distribution. Seven major Vtp types were found. Little or no sequence variation existed within types, but between them significant variation was observed, similar to the pattern of diversity described for the outer surface protein C (OspC) gene in Lyme disease spirochetes. The pattern of sequence relatedness among the Vtp types was incongruent in two branches compared to two genomic groups identified among the isolates by multilocus sequence typing of the 16S rRNA, flaB, gyrB, and glpQ genes. Therefore, both horizontal transfer and recombination within and between the two genomic groups were responsible for some of the variation observed in the vtp gene. O. hermsi ticks were capable of transmitting spirochetes in the newly identified genomic group. Therefore, given the longevity of the tick vector and persistent infection of spirochetes in ticks, these arthropods rather than mammals may be the likely host where the exchange of spirochetal DNA occurs. PMID:16177341

  20. Farnesol-mediated shift in the metabolic origin of prenyl groups used for protein prenylation in plants.

    PubMed

    Huchelmann, Alexandre; Brahim, Mathieu Semir; Gerber, Esther; Tritsch, Denis; Bach, Thomas J; Hemmerlin, Andréa

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about how plant cells regulate the exchange of prenyl diphosphates between the two compartmentalized isoprenoid biosynthesis pathways. Prenylation of proteins is a suitable model to study such interactions between the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) and the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathways because prenyl moieties used to modify proteins rely on both origins. Tobacco cells expressing a prenylatable GFP were treated with specific MEP and/or MVA pathways inhibitors to block the formation of prenyl diphosphates and therefore the possibility to modify the proteins. Chemical complementation assays using prenyl alcohol precursors restore the prenylation. Indeed, geranylgeraniol (C20 prenyl alcohol) and to a lesser but significant level C15-farnesol restored the prenylation of a protein bearing a geranylgeranylation CaaX motif, which under standard conditions is modified by a MEP-derived prenyl group. However, the restoration takes place in different ways. While geranylgeraniol operates directly as a metabolic precursor, the C15-prenyl alcohol functions indirectly as a signal that leads to shift the metabolic origin of prenyl groups in modified proteins, here from the plastidial MEP pathway in favor of the cytosolic MVA pathway. Furthermore, farnesol interferes negatively with the MEP pathway in an engineered Escherichia coli strain synthesizing isoprenoids either starting from MVA or from MEP. Following the cellular uptake of a fluorescent analog of farnesol, we showed its close interaction with tobacco plastids and modification of plastid homeostasis. As a consequence, in tobacco farnesol supposedly inhibits the plastidial MEP pathway and activates the cytosolic MVA pathway, leading to the shift in the metabolic origin and thereby acts as a potential regulator of crosstalk between the two pathways. Together, those results suggest a new role for farnesol (or a metabolite thereof) as a central molecule for the regulation of isoprenoid

  1. Evidence for methyl group transfer between the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins in Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Bedale, W.A.; Nettleton, D.O.; Sopata, C.S.; Thoelke, M.S.; Ordal, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present evidence for methyl (as methyl or methoxy) transfer from the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins H1 and possibly H3 of Bacillus subtilis to the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein H2. This methyl transfer, which has been observed in vitro was strongly stimulated by the chemoattractant aspartate and thus may plan an important role in the sensory processing system of this organism. Although radiolabeling of H1 and H3 began at once after the addition of (/sup 3/H) methionine, radiolabeling of H2 showed a lag. Furthermore, the addition of excess nonradioactive methionine caused immediate exponential delabeling of H1 and H3 while labeling of H2 continued to increase. Methylation of H2 required the chemotactic methyltransferase, probably to first methylate H1 and H3. Aspartate caused increased labeling of H2 and strongly decreased labeling of H1 and H3 after the addition of nonradioactive methionine. Without the addition of nonradioactive methionine, aspartate caused demethylation of H1 and to a lesser extent H3, with an approximately equal increase of methylation of H2.

  2. Cohesion Group Approach for Evolutionary Analysis of TyrA, a Protein Family with Wide-Ranging Substrate Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Carol A.; Disz, Terrence; Hwang, Kaitlyn; Song, Jian; Vonstein, Veronika; Overbeek, Ross; Jensen, Roy A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Many enzymes and other proteins are difficult subjects for bioinformatic analysis because they exhibit variant catalytic, structural, regulatory, and fusion mode features within a protein family whose sequences are not highly conserved. However, such features reflect dynamic and interesting scenarios of evolutionary importance. The value of experimental data obtained from individual organisms is instantly magnified to the extent that given features of the experimental organism can be projected upon related organisms. But how can one decide how far along the similarity scale it is reasonable to go before such inferences become doubtful? How can a credible picture of evolutionary events be deduced within the vertical trace of inheritance in combination with intervening events of lateral gene transfer (LGT)? We present a comprehensive analysis of a dehydrogenase protein family (TyrA) as a prototype example of how these goals can be accomplished through the use of cohesion group analysis. With this approach, the full collection of homologs is sorted into groups by a method that eliminates bias caused by an uneven representation of sequences from organisms whose phylogenetic spacing is not optimal. Each sufficiently populated cohesion group is phylogenetically coherent and defined by an overall congruence with a distinct section of the 16S rRNA gene tree. Exceptions that occasionally are found implicate a clearly defined LGT scenario whereby the recipient lineage is apparent and the donor lineage of the gene transferred is localized to those organisms that define the cohesion group. Systematic procedures to manage and organize otherwise overwhelming amounts of data are demonstrated. PMID:18322033

  3. Genetic and Biochemical Assays Reveal a Key Role for Replication Restart Proteins in Group II Intron Retrohoming

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Truong, David M.; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile group II introns retrohome by an RNP-based mechanism in which the intron RNA reverse splices into a DNA site and is reverse transcribed by the associated intron-encoded protein. The resulting intron cDNA is then integrated into the genome by cellular mechanisms that have remained unclear. Here, we used an Escherichia coli genetic screen and Taqman qPCR assay that mitigate indirect effects to identify host factors that function in retrohoming. We then analyzed mutants identified in these and previous genetic screens by using a new biochemical assay that combines group II intron RNPs with cellular extracts to reconstitute the complete retrohoming reaction in vitro. The genetic and biochemical analyses indicate a retrohoming pathway involving degradation of the intron RNA template by a host RNase H and second-strand DNA synthesis by the host replicative DNA polymerase. Our results reveal ATP-dependent steps in both cDNA and second-strand synthesis and a surprising role for replication restart proteins in initiating second-strand synthesis in the absence of DNA replication. We also find an unsuspected requirement for host factors in initiating reverse transcription and a new RNA degradation pathway that suppresses retrohoming. Key features of the retrohoming mechanism may be used by human LINEs and other non-LTR-retrotransposons, which are related evolutionarily to mobile group II introns. Our findings highlight a new role for replication restart proteins, which function not only to repair DNA damage caused by mobile element insertion, but have also been co-opted to become an integral part of the group II intron retrohoming mechanism. PMID:23637634

  4. SpyAD, a Moonlighting Protein of Group A Streptococcus Contributing to Bacterial Division and Host Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Gallotta, Marilena; Gancitano, Giovanni; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Mora, Marirosa; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Tuscano, Giovanna; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Taddei, Anna Rita; Rindi, Simonetta; Speziale, Pietro; Soriani, Marco; Bensi, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen causing a wide repertoire of mild and severe diseases for which no vaccine is yet available. We recently reported the identification of three protein antigens that in combination conferred wide protection against GAS infection in mice. Here we focused our attention on the characterization of one of these three antigens, Spy0269, a highly conserved, surface-exposed, and immunogenic protein of unknown function. Deletion of the spy0269 gene in a GAS M1 isolate resulted in very long bacterial chains, which is indicative of an impaired capacity of the knockout mutant to properly divide. Confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the protein was mainly localized at the cell septum and could interact in vitro with the cell division protein FtsZ, leading us to hypothesize that Spy0269 is a member of the GAS divisome machinery. Predicted structural domains and sequence homologies with known streptococcal adhesins suggested that this antigen could also play a role in mediating GAS interaction with host cells. This hypothesis was confirmed by showing that recombinant Spy0269 could bind to mammalian epithelial cells in vitro and that Lactococcus lactis expressing Spy0269 on its cell surface could adhere to mammalian cells in vitro and to mice nasal mucosa in vivo. On the basis of these data, we believe that Spy0269 is involved both in bacterial cell division and in adhesion to host cells and we propose to rename this multifunctional moonlighting protein as SpyAD (Streptococcus pyogenes Adhesion and Division protein). PMID:24778116

  5. Target of rapamycin signaling regulates high mobility group protein association to chromatin, which functions to suppress necrotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is an evolutionarily conserved signal transduction pathway activated by environmental nutrients that regulates gene transcription to control cell growth and proliferation. How TORC1 modulates chromatin structure to control gene expression, however, is largely unknown. Because TORC1 is a major transducer of environmental information, defining this process has critical implications for both understanding environmental effects on epigenetic processes and the role of aberrant TORC1 signaling in many diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Results To elucidate the role of TORC1 signaling in chromatin regulation, we screened a budding yeast histone H3 and H4 mutant library using the selective TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin to identify histone residues functionally connected to TORC1. Intriguingly, we identified histone H3 lysine 37 (H3K37) as a residue that is essential during periods of limited TORC1 activity. An H3K37A mutation resulted in cell death by necrosis when TORC1 signaling was simultaneously impaired. The induction of necrosis was linked to alterations in high mobility group (HMG) protein binding to chromatin. Furthermore, the necrotic phenotype could be recapitulated in wild-type cells by deregulating the model HMG proteins, Hmo1 or Ixr1, thus implicating a direct role for HMG protein deregulation as a stimulus for inducing necrosis. Conclusions This study identifies histone H3 and H4 residues functionally required for TORC1-dependent cell growth and proliferation that are also candidate epigenetic pathways regulated by TORC1 signaling. It also demonstrates a novel role for H3K37 and TORC1 in regulating the binding of select HMG proteins to chromatin and that HMG protein deregulation can initiate a necrotic cell death response. Overall, the results from this study suggest a possible model by which chromatin anchors HMG proteins during periods of limited TORC1 signaling, such as that

  6. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphism and mortality in patients with severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Arnalich, F; López-Maderuelo, D; Codoceo, R; Lopez, J; Solis-Garrido, L M; Capiscol, C; Fernandez-Capitán, C; Madero, R; Montiel, C

    2002-02-01

    This study aims to determine the influence of the polymorphism within the intron 2 of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene (IL-1RN*) on the outcome of severe sepsis, and to assess its functional significance by correlating this polymorphism with the total production of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) protein determined in stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A group of 78 patients with severe sepsis (51 survivors and 27 nonsurvivors) was compared with a healthy control group of 130 blood donors, and 56 patients with uncomplicated pneumonia. We found a significant association between IL-1RN* polymorphism and survival. Thus, after adjusting for age and APACHE II score, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that patients homozygotes for the allele *2 had a 6.47-fold increased risk of death (95% CI 1.01--41.47, P = 0.04). Besides, compared with patients homozygous or heterozygous for the allele *1, IL-1RN*2 homozygotes produced significantly lower levels of IL-1Ra from their PBMC. Our results suggest that insufficient production of this cytokine might contribute, among other factors, to the higher mortality rate found in severe sepsis patients with the IL-1RN*2 homozygous genotype.

  7. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphism and mortality in patients with severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    ARNALICH, F; LÓPEZ-MADERUELO, D; CODOCEO, R; LOPEZ, J; SOLIS-GARRIDO, L M; CAPISCOL, C; FERNANDEZ-CAPITÁN, C; MADERO, R; MONTIEL, C

    2002-01-01

    This study aims to determine the influence of the polymorphism within the intron 2 of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene (IL-1RN*) on the outcome of severe sepsis, and to assess its functional significance by correlating this polymorphism with the total production of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) protein determined in stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A group of 78 patients with severe sepsis (51 survivors and 27 nonsurvivors) was compared with a healthy control group of 130 blood donors, and 56 patients with uncomplicated pneumonia. We found a significant association between IL-1RN* polymorphism and survival. Thus, after adjusting for age and APACHE II score, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that patients homozygotes for the allele *2 had a 6·47-fold increased risk of death (95% CI 1·01–41·47, P = 0·04). Besides, compared with patients homozygous or heterozygous for the allele *1, IL-1RN*2 homozygotes produced significantly lower levels of IL-1Ra from their PBMC. Our results suggest that insufficient production of this cytokine might contribute, among other factors, to the higher mortality rate found in severe sepsis patients with the IL-1RN*2 homozygous genotype. PMID:11876758

  8. Characterization of group A streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes): correlation of M-protein and emm-gene type with T-protein agglutination pattern and serum opacity factor.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Dwight R; Kaplan, Edward L; VanGheem, Amy; Facklam, Richard R; Beall, Bernard

    2006-02-01

    Strain characterization of group A streptococci (GAS) has traditionally been based on serological identification of M protein. Additional tests to determine T-protein serotype and production of streptococcal serum opacity factor (SOF) provide important information both to aid in and to supplement M-protein serotyping. Advances in DNA-sequencing technology in the late twentieth century resulted in the development of a method for determining the M type of GAS from the sequence of the gene encoding M protein, the emm gene. Although emm-sequence typing has largely replaced M typing in many laboratories, information provided by T typing and SOF determination continues to provide valuable supplementary information for strain characterization. A comprehensive summary of the correlation of T pattern and SOF production with M type was last published in 1993, several years before emm typing became widely available. Since then, the ease of M-type identification afforded by emm typing has resulted in an increase in the number of confirmed M/emm types of more than 50 %. However, comprehensive information about T-protein serotype and the correlation of SOF production with these new M/emm types is not widely available. This report presents a comprehensive summary of this information, not only for newly described types, but also updated information for previously described types. This information was extracted from combined records from streptococcal reference laboratories at the University of Minnesota and at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Data from more than 40,000 strains (representing uncomplicated GAS infections, systemic invasive infections and strains associated with non-suppurative sequelae, collected from the US and diverse locations worldwide) were analysed.

  9. Deregulated Expression of the Polycomb-Group Protein SUZ12 Target Genes Characterizes Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Pérez, Daniel; Sánchez, Esther; Maestre, Lorena; Suela, Javier; Vargiu, Pierfrancesco; Di Lisio, Lorena; Martínez, Nerea; Alves, Javier; Piris, Miguel A.; Sánchez-Beato, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb proteins are known to be of great importance in human cancer pathogenesis. SUZ12 is a component of the Polycomb PRC2 complex that, along with EZH2, is involved in embryonic stem cell differentiation. EZH2 plays an essential role in many cancer types, but an equivalent involvement of SUZ12 has not been as thoroughly demonstrated. Here we show that SUZ12 is anomalously expressed in human primary tumors, especially in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), pulmonary carcinomas and melanoma, and is associated with gene locus amplification in some cases. Using MCL as a model, functional and genomic studies demonstrate that SUZ12 loss compromises cell viability, increases apoptosis, and targets genes involved in central oncogenic pathways associated with MCL pathogenesis. Our results support the hypothesis that the abnormal expression of SUZ12 accounts for some of the unexplained features of MCL, such as abnormal DNA repair and increased resistance to apoptosis. PMID:20558579

  10. Upregulation of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 and Proinflammatory Cytokines by the Major Surface Proteins of Treponema maltophilum and Treponema lecithinolyticum, the Phylogenetic Group IV Oral Spirochetes Associated with Periodontitis and Endodontic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Kack-Kyun; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2005-01-01

    Treponema maltophilum and Treponema lecithinolyticum belong to the group IV oral spirochetes and are associated with endodontic infections, as well as periodontitis. Recently, the genes encoding the major surface proteins (Msps) of these bacteria (MspA and MspTL, respectively) were cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequences of these proteins showed significant similarity. In this study we analyzed the functional role of these homologous proteins in human monocytic THP-1 cells and primary cultured periodontal ligament (PDL) cells using recombinant proteins. The complete genes encoding MspA and MspTL without the signal sequence were cloned into Escherichia coli by using the expression vector pQE-30. Fusion proteins tagged with N-terminal hexahistidine (recombinant MspA [rMspA] and rMspTL) were obtained, and any possible contamination of the recombinant proteins with E. coli endotoxin was removed by using polymyxin B-agarose. Flow cytometry showed that rMspA and rMspTL upregulated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in both THP-1 and PDL cells. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8, was also induced significantly in both cell types by the Msps, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas IL-1β synthesis could be detected only in the THP-1 cells. The upregulation of ICAM-1, IL-6, and IL-8 was completely inhibited by pretreating the cells with an NF-κB activation inhibitor, l-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone. This suggests involvement of NF-κB activation. The increased ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression in the THP-1 cells obtained with rMsps was not inhibited in the presence of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1. Our results show that the Msps of the group IV oral spirochetes may play an important role in amplifying the local immune response by continuous inflammatory cell recruitment and retention at an

  11. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  12. Function of high-mobility group A proteins in the DNA damage signaling for the induction of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fujikane, Ryosuke; Komori, Kayoko; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo; Hidaka, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    O6-Methylguanine produced in DNA can pair with thymine during DNA replication, thus leading to a G-to-A transition mutation. To prevent such outcomes, cells harboring O6-methylguanine-containing mispair undergo apoptosis that requires the function of mismatch repair (MMR) protein complex. To identify the genes involved in the induction of apoptosis, we performed gene-trap mutagenesis and isolated a clone of mouse cells exhibiting an increased resistance to the killing effect of an alkylating agent, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). The mutant carries an insertion in the Hmga2 gene, which belongs to a gene family encoding the high-mobility group A non-histone chromatin proteins. To elucidate the function of HMGA proteins in the apoptosis pathway, we introduced siRNAs for HMGA1 and/or HMGA2 into human HeLa MR cells defective in O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase. HMGA1- and HMGA2-single knockdown cells showed an increased resistance to MNU, and HMGA1/HMGA2-double knockdown cells exhibited further increased tolerance compared to the control. The phosphorylation of ATR and CHK1, the appearance of a sub-G1 population, and caspase-9 activation were suppressed in the knockdown cells, although the formation of mismatch recognition complex was unaffected. These results suggest that HMGA family proteins function at the step following the damage recognition in the process of apoptosis triggered by O6-methylguanine. PMID:27538817

  13. Identification of a conserved domain of the HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41 which interacts with cholesteryl groups.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Nadine; Genin, Christian; Malvoisin, Etienne

    2002-12-23

    A soluble form of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp160 devoid of the transmembrane anchor domain was found to bind to cholesteryl-hemisuccinate agarose. The external subunit gp120 failed to bind to the resin, suggesting that the site responsible for the binding to cholesterol was located in the transmembrane protein gp41. We constructed a series of maltose binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins representing overlapping fragments of the gp41 molecule and we studied their capacity to bind to cholesteryl beads. The domain responsible for binding to cholesterol was localised within the residues 668 to 684 immediately adjacent to the membrane spanning domain. We identified a short sequence (LWYIK, aa 678-683) comparable to the cholesterol interaction amino acid consensus pattern published by Li and Papadopoulos [Endocrinology 139 (1998) 4991]. We demonstrated that the sequence LWYIK synthesized fused to the MBP was able to bind to cholesteryl groups. A synthetic peptide containing the sequence LWYIK was found to inhibit the interaction between cholesteryl beads and MBP44, an MBP fusion HIV-1 envelope protein that contains the putative cholesterol binding domain. Human sera obtained from HIV-1 seropositive patients did not react in ELISA to the LWYIK sequence, suggesting that this region is not exposed to the immune system. The biological significance of the interaction between gp41 and cholesterol is discussed.

  14. Erysipelas caused by group A streptococcus activates the contact system and induces the release of heparin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Linder, Adam; Johansson, Linda; Thulin, Pontus; Hertzén, Erika; Mörgelin, Matthias; Christensson, Bertil; Björck, Lars; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Akesson, Per

    2010-05-01

    Bacterial skin infections, such as erysipelas or cellulitis, are characterized by fever and a painful erythematous rash. Despite the high prevalence of these infections, little is known about the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. This is partly due to the fact that a bacterial diagnosis is often difficult to attain. To gain insight into the pathogenesis of erysipelas, we investigated the samples obtained from infected and noninfected areas of skin from 12 patients with erysipelas. Bacterial cultures, detection of specific streptococcal antibodies in convalescent sera, and immunohistochemical analyses of biopsies indicated group A streptococcal etiology in 11 of the 12 patients. Also, electron micrographs of erythematous skin confirmed the presence of group A streptococcal cells and showed a limited solubilization of the surface-attached M protein. Degradation of high-molecular-weight kininogen and upregulation of the bradykinin-1 receptor in inflamed tissues indicated activation of the contact system in 11 patients. Analyses of release of the vasoactive heparin-binding protein (HBP) showed increased levels in the infected as compared with the noninfected areas. The results suggest that group A streptococci induce contact activation and HBP release during skin infection, which likely contribute to the symptoms seen in erysipelas: fever, pain, erythema, and edema.

  15. High Mobility Group Box1 Protein Is Involved in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induced by Clostridium difficile Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ji; Ma, Yi; Sun, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    High Mobility Group Box1 (HMGB1), a damage-associated inflammatory factor, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study, the role of the HMGB1 in TcdA-induced ER stress was identified. Clostridium difficile toxin A is one of the major virulence factors of C. difficile infection (CDI) and has been proved to induce apoptotic cell death through ER stress. Our results showed that HMGB1 might play an important role in the TcdA-induced ER stress and unfolded protein response. HMGB1 activated molecular markers and induced the C/EBP homologous protein upregulation (CHOP). This study may provide the essential information for better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in CDI. PMID:27579314

  16. High Mobility Group Box1 Protein Is Involved in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induced by Clostridium difficile Toxin A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji; Ma, Yi; Sun, Chun-Li; Li, Shan; Wang, Ju-Fang

    2016-01-01

    High Mobility Group Box1 (HMGB1), a damage-associated inflammatory factor, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study, the role of the HMGB1 in TcdA-induced ER stress was identified. Clostridium difficile toxin A is one of the major virulence factors of C. difficile infection (CDI) and has been proved to induce apoptotic cell death through ER stress. Our results showed that HMGB1 might play an important role in the TcdA-induced ER stress and unfolded protein response. HMGB1 activated molecular markers and induced the C/EBP homologous protein upregulation (CHOP). This study may provide the essential information for better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in CDI. PMID:27579314

  17. The brown algae Pl.LSU/2 group II intron-encoded protein has functional reverse transcriptase and maturase activities.

    PubMed

    Zerbato, Madeleine; Holic, Nathalie; Moniot-Frin, Sophie; Ingrao, Dina; Galy, Anne; Perea, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing mobile elements found in prokaryotes and eukaryotic organelles. These introns propagate by homing into precise genomic locations, following assembly of a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the spliced intron RNA. Engineered group II introns are now commonly used tools for targeted genomic modifications in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. We speculate that the catalytic activation of currently known group II introns is limited in eukaryotic cells. The brown algae Pylaiella littoralis Pl.LSU/2 group II intron is uniquely capable of in vitro ribozyme activity at physiological level of magnesium but this intron remains poorly characterized. We purified and characterized recombinant Pl.LSU/2 IEP. Unlike most IEPs, Pl.LSU/2 IEP displayed a reverse transcriptase activity without intronic RNA. The Pl.LSU/2 intron could be engineered to splice accurately in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and splicing efficiency was increased by the maturase activity of the IEP. However, spliced transcripts were not expressed. Furthermore, intron splicing was not detected in human cells. While further tool development is needed, these data provide the first functional characterization of the PI.LSU/2 IEP and the first evidence that the Pl.LSU/2 group II intron splicing occurs in vivo in eukaryotes in an IEP-dependent manner.

  18. Myofascial force transmission via extramuscular pathways occurs between antagonistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Huijing, Peter A; Baan, Guus C

    2008-01-01

    Most often muscles (as organs) are viewed as independent actuators. To test if this is true for antagonistic muscles, force was measured simultaneously at: (1) the proximal and distal tendons of the extensor digitorum muscle (EDL) to quantify any proximo-distal force differences, as an indicator of myofascial force transmission, (2) at the distal tendons of the whole antagonistic peroneal muscle group (PER) to test if effects of EDL length changes are present and (3) at the proximal end of the tibia to test if myofascially transmitted force is exerted there. EDL length was manipulated either at the proximal or distal tendons. This way equal EDL lengths are attained at two different positions of the muscle with respect to the tibia and antagonistic muscles. Despite its relatively small size, lengthening of the EDL changed forces exerted on the tibia and forces exerted by its antagonistic muscle group. Apart from its extramuscular myofascial connections, EDL has no connections to either the tibia or these antagonistic muscles. Proximal EDL lengthening increased distal muscular forces (active PER DeltaF approximately +1.7%), but decreased tibial forces (passive from 0.3 to 0 N; active DeltaF approximately -5%). Therefore, it is concluded that these antagonistic muscles do not act independently, because of myofascial force transmission between them. Such a decrease in tibial force indicates release of pre-strained connections. Distal EDL lengthening had opposite effects (tripling passive force exerted on tibia; active PER force DeltaF approximately -3.6%). It is concluded that the length and relative position of the EDL is a co-determinant of passive and active force exerted at tendons of nearby antagonistic muscle groups. These results necessitate a new view of the locomotor apparatus, which needs to take into account the high interdependence of muscles and muscle fibres as force generators, as well as proximo-distal force differences and serial and parallel

  19. Myofascial force transmission via extramuscular pathways occurs between antagonistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Huijing, Peter A; Baan, Guus C

    2008-01-01

    Most often muscles (as organs) are viewed as independent actuators. To test if this is true for antagonistic muscles, force was measured simultaneously at: (1) the proximal and distal tendons of the extensor digitorum muscle (EDL) to quantify any proximo-distal force differences, as an indicator of myofascial force transmission, (2) at the distal tendons of the whole antagonistic peroneal muscle group (PER) to test if effects of EDL length changes are present and (3) at the proximal end of the tibia to test if myofascially transmitted force is exerted there. EDL length was manipulated either at the proximal or distal tendons. This way equal EDL lengths are attained at two different positions of the muscle with respect to the tibia and antagonistic muscles. Despite its relatively small size, lengthening of the EDL changed forces exerted on the tibia and forces exerted by its antagonistic muscle group. Apart from its extramuscular myofascial connections, EDL has no connections to either the tibia or these antagonistic muscles. Proximal EDL lengthening increased distal muscular forces (active PER DeltaF approximately +1.7%), but decreased tibial forces (passive from 0.3 to 0 N; active DeltaF approximately -5%). Therefore, it is concluded that these antagonistic muscles do not act independently, because of myofascial force transmission between them. Such a decrease in tibial force indicates release of pre-strained connections. Distal EDL lengthening had opposite effects (tripling passive force exerted on tibia; active PER force DeltaF approximately -3.6%). It is concluded that the length and relative position of the EDL is a co-determinant of passive and active force exerted at tendons of nearby antagonistic muscle groups. These results necessitate a new view of the locomotor apparatus, which needs to take into account the high interdependence of muscles and muscle fibres as force generators, as well as proximo-distal force differences and serial and parallel

  20. Coordinated regulation of Myc trans-activation targets by Polycomb and the Trithorax group protein Ash1

    PubMed Central

    Goodliffe, Julie M; Cole, Michael D; Wieschaus, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background The Myc oncoprotein is a transcriptional regulator whose function is essential for normal development. Myc is capable of binding to 10% of the mammalian genome, and it is unclear how a developing embryo controls the DNA binding of its abundant Myc proteins in order to avoid Myc's potential for inducing tumorigenesis. Results To identify chromatin binding proteins with a potential role in controlling Myc activity, we established a genetic assay for dMyc activity in Drosophila. We conducted a genome-wide screen using this assay, and identified the Trithorax Group protein Ash1 as a modifier of dMyc activity. Ash1 is a histone methyltransferase known for its role in opposing repression by Polycomb. Using RNAi in the embryo and Affymetrix microarrays, we show that ash1 RNAi causes the increased expression of many genes, suggesting that it is directly or indirectly required for repression in the embryo, in contrast to its known role in maintenance of activation. Many of these genes also respond similarly upon depletion of Pc and pho transcripts, as determined by concurrent microarray analysis of Pc and pho RNAi embryos, suggesting that the three are required for low levels of expression of a common set of targets. Further, many of these overlapping targets are also activated by Myc overexpression. We identify a second group of genes whose expression in the embryo requires Ash1, consistent with its previously established role in maintenance of activation. We find that this second group of Ash1 targets overlaps those activated by Myc and that ectopic Myc overcomes their requirement for Ash1. Conclusion Genetic, genomic and chromatin immunoprecipitation data suggest a model in which Pc, Ash1 and Pho are required to maintain a low level of expression of embryonic targets of activation by Myc, and that this occurs, directly or indirectly, by a combination of disparate chromatin modifications. PMID:17519021

  1. Cockayne syndrome group B protein regulates DNA double-strand break repair and checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    Batenburg, Nicole L; Thompson, Elizabeth L; Hendrickson, Eric A; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of CSB account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome (CS), a devastating hereditary disorder characterized by physical impairment, neurological degeneration and segmental premature aging. Here we report the generation of a human CSB-knockout cell line. We find that CSB facilitates HR and represses NHEJ. Loss of CSB or a CS-associated CSB mutation abrogating its ATPase activity impairs the recruitment of BRCA1, RPA and Rad51 proteins to damaged chromatin but promotes the formation of 53BP1-Rif1 damage foci in S and G2 cells. Depletion of 53BP1 rescues the formation of BRCA1 damage foci in CSB-knockout cells. In addition, knockout of CSB impairs the ATM- and Chk2-mediated DNA damage responses, promoting a premature entry into mitosis. Furthermore, we show that CSB accumulates at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a transcription-dependent manner. The kinetics of DSB-induced chromatin association of CSB is distinct from that of its UV-induced chromatin association. These results reveal novel, important functions of CSB in regulating the DNA DSB repair pathway choice as well as G2/M checkpoint activation. PMID:25820262

  2. Deformations of the Heme Group of Different Ferrocytochrome c Proteins Probed by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagarman, Andrew; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Wallace, Carmichael; Laberge, Monique

    2008-11-14

    We measured the low-frequency polarized resonance Raman spectra of horse heart, chicken, and yeast(C102T) ferrocytochromes c with Soret excitation. We examined the out-of-plane deformations of the heme groups by determining the relative intensities and depolarization ratios of a variety of out-of-plane and in-plane Raman active bands. Analysis of relative Raman intensities shows differences in non-planarity of the heme groups of yeast(C102T), horse heart and chicken cytochrome c. Cytochrome c has been shown to have a dominant ruffling (B{sub 1u}) deformation by means of normal coordinate structural decomposition (NSD) analysis of the heme group in crystal structures. The presence and intensity of B{sub 1u} modes, {gamma}{sub 10}-{gamma}{sub 12}, support the indication of ruffling being the major contribution to the non-planar deformations in cytochrome c. Other types of non-planar deformations like doming (A{sub 2U}) and waving (E{sub g}) can be deduced from the Raman activity of {gamma}{sub 5} (A{sub 2u}), {gamma}{sub 21} and {gamma}{sub 22} (E{sub g}). The depolarization ratios of {gamma}{sub 5}, {gamma}{sub 10}, {gamma}{sub 11} and {gamma}{sub 12} are larger than 0.125, indicating the presence of other deformations such as saddling (B{sub 2u}) and propellering (A{sub 1u}), which is again in agreement with the crystal structures of horse heart and yeast ferrocytochrome c. An analysis of the intensities and depolarization ratios of out-of-plane modes revealed that ruffling is comparable in yeast and horse heart cytochrome c, saddling is larger and doming as well as propellering are lower in yeast cytochrome c. With respect to doming and ruffling our results contradict values obtained from the NSD analysis of the corresponding crystal structures. With respect to saddling, our data are in agreement with the crystal structure. The NSD analysis of heme structures resulting from MD simulations did not correlate very well with the spectroscopically obtained results

  3. Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana: structural properties and protective abilities during desiccation.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Leaf C; Menze, Michael A; Hand, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are highly hydrophilic, and their expression is associated with desiccation tolerance in both plants and animals. Here we show that two LEA proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana, AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m, are intrinsically disordered in solution but upon desiccation gain secondary structure, as measured by circular dichroism. Trifluoroethanol and sodium dodecyl sulfate are both shown to induce α-helical structure in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. Bioinformatic predictions of secondary-structure content for both proteins correspond most closely to conformations measured in the dry state. Because some LEA proteins afford protection to desiccation-sensitive proteins during drying and subsequent rehydration, we tested for this capacity in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. The protective capacities vary, depending on the target enzyme. For the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, neither AfrLEA2 nor AfrLEA3m, with or without trehalose present, was able to afford protection better than that provided by bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the same conditions. However, for another cytoplasmic enzyme, phosphofructokinase, both AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m in the presence of trehalose were able to afford protection far greater than that provided by BSA with trehalose. Finally, for the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase, 400-μg/mL AfrLEA3m without trehalose provided significantly more protection than the same concentration of either AfrLEA2 or BSA. PMID:25244376

  4. Nucleosome remodeling by the SWI/SNF complex is enhanced by yeast high mobility group box (HMGB) proteins.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Matias I; Alarcon, Valentina; Dutta, Arnob; Workman, Jerry L; Gutiérrez, José L

    2014-09-01

    The regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription involves the concerted action of several proteins and protein complexes committed to dynamically alter the surrounding chromatin environment of a gene being activated or repressed. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes are key factors in chromatin remodeling, and the SWI/SNF complex is the founding member. While many studies have linked the action of these complexes to specific transcriptional regulation of a large number of genes and much is known about their catalytic activity, less is known about the nuclear elements that can enhance or modulate their activity. A number of studies have found that certain High Mobility Group (HMG) proteins are able to stimulate ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity, but their influence on the different biochemical outcomes of this activity is still unknown. In this work we studied the influence of the yeast Nhp6A, Nhp6B and Hmo1 proteins (HMGB family members) on different biochemical outcomes of yeast SWI/SNF remodeling activity. We found that all these HMG proteins stimulate the sliding activity of ySWI/SNF, while transient exposure of nucleosomal DNA and octamer transfer catalyzed by this complex are only stimulated by Hmo1. Consistently, only Hmo1 stimulates SWI/SNF binding to the nucleosome. Additionally, the sliding activity of another chromatin remodeling complex, ISW1a, is only stimulated by Hmo1. Further analyses show that these differential stimulatory effects of Hmo1 are dependent on the presence of its C-terminal tail, which contains a stretch of acidic and basic residues.

  5. [Establishment of stable subline of K562 cells overexpressing high mobility group B1 protein].

    PubMed

    Yan, Fan-Zhi; Yan, Jin-Song; Zhao, Jia; Li, Wei-Ping; Chen, Xue-Yu; Yang, Yan; Rao, Shu-Mei; Jin, Jing

    2011-02-01

    This study was aimed to establish a stable subline of K562 cells (K562-HMGB1) overexpressing HMGB1 protein and K562-HMGB1 sublines served as control, so as to provide a basis for exploring the role of hmgb1 gene in occurrence and development of leukemia and their mechanism. Protein-coding gene of hmgb1 was amplified by PCR with cDNA as template, which was synthesized by reverse transcription from total RNA extracted from U937 cells. The PCR-amplified hmgb1 gene was ligated into PMD18-T vector (PMD18-T-HMGB1 vector), and then transformed into E. coli strain DH5α. DH5α containing PMD18-T-HMGB1 vector were grown on LB agar plate supplemented with 100 µg/ml ampicillin overnight. The single ampicillin-selected DH5α clone was picked for culturing overnight and then harvested for plasmid extraction. The extracted plasmid was characterized to contain hmgb1 gene digested with the desired restriction enzymes of KpnI/XhoI. The correctness of hmgb1 sequence was confirmed with DNA sequencing. The insert of hmgb1 gene contained in PMD18-T-HMGB1 vector was cut out with restriction enzymes of KpnI/XhoI and then ligated into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1 to form pcDNA3.1-HMGB1 vector. 10µg of pcDNA3.1-HMGB1 or pcDNA3.1 plasmid was separately electroporated into K562 cells. At 48 hours after electroporation the cells were cultured with G418 at a final concentration of 800 µg/ml for over 2 weeks. Finally stably transfected sublines of K562 cells containing hmgb1 gene (K562-HMGB1), and of K562 containing pcDNA3.1 vector (K562-pcDNA3.1) served as a control, were obtained. The transcriptional or translational expression of hmgb1 gene was detected with RT-PCR or Western blot, respectively, to testify transfected efficiency and validity of stable subline of K562-HMGB1. The results indicated that the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1-HMGB1 plasmid was successfully constructed and was electroporated into K562 cells. The transcriptional or translational expression of hmgb1

  6. Mineralcorticoid antagonists in heart failure.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Emilia; Krum, Henry

    2014-10-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) have become mandated therapy in patients with reduced ejection fraction (systolic) heart failure (HF) across all symptom classes. These agents should also be prescribed in the early post-myocardial infarction setting in those with reduced ejection fraction and either HF symptoms or diabetes. This article explores the pathophysiological role of aldosterone, an endogenous ligand for the mineralcorticoid receptor (MR), and summarizes the clinical data supporting guideline recommendations for these agents in systolic HF. The use of MRAs in novel areas beyond systolic HF ejection is also explored. Finally, the current status of newer agents will be examined. PMID:25217431

  7. The Polycomb Group Protein EZH2 Impairs DNA Damage Repair Gene Expression in Human Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Nair, Sangeeta; Laknaur, Archana; Ismail, Nahed; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-03-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign, smooth muscle tumors that occur in approximately 70%-80% of women by age 50 yr. The cellular and molecular mechanism(s) by which uterine fibroids (UFs) develop are not fully understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that several genetic abnormalities, including deletions, rearrangements, translocations, as well as mutations, have been found in UFs. These genetic anomalies suggest that low DNA damage repair capacity may be involved in UF formation. The objective of this study was to determine whether expression levels of DNA damage repair-related genes were altered, and how they were regulated in the pathogenesis of UFs. Expression levels of DNA repair-related genes RAD51 and BRCA1 were deregulated in fibroid tissues as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues. Expression levels of chromatin protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) were higher in a subset of fibroids as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Treatment with an inhibitor of EZH2 markedly increased expression levels of RAD51 and BRCA1 in fibroid cells and inhibited cell proliferation paired with cell cycle arrest. Restoring the expression of RAD51 and BRCA1 by treatment with EZH2 inhibitor was dependent on reducing the enrichment of trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 epigenetic mark in their promoter regions. This study reveals the important role of EZH2-regulated DNA damage-repair genes via histone methylation in fibroid biology, and may provide novel therapeutic targets for the medical treatment of women with symptomatic UFs. PMID:26888970

  8. Isolation of the Rhizobium leguminosarum NodF nodulation protein: NodF carries a 4'-phosphopantetheine prosthetic group.

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, O; Spaink, H P; Kennedy, E P

    1991-01-01

    Rhizobium species produce a protein product of the nodF gene that has a limited but recognizable homology to the well-characterized acyl carrier protein (ACP) of Escherichia coli. NodF functions together with NodE in generating a host-specific response to the plant host in the interchange of signals leading to the effective nodulation of roots (H.P. Spaink, J. Weinman, M.A. Djordjevic, C.A. Wijffelman, R.J.H. Okker, and B. J.J. Lugtenberg, EMBO J. 8:2811-2818, 1989; B. Scheres, C. van de Wiel, A. Zalensky, B. Horvath, H. Spaink, H. van Eck, F. Zwartkruis, A.M. Wolters, T. Gloudemans, A. van Kammen, and T. Bisseling, Cell 60:281-294, 1990). The nodFE region of Rhizobium leguminosarum has been cloned into a multicopy plasmid and has been shown in R. leguminosarum to code for a flavonoid-inducible protein that is effectively labeled by radioactive beta-alanine added to the growth medium. After purification, the labeled protein migrates as a single band with an apparent molecular weight of 5,000 during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, more rapidly than E. coli ACP. In contrast, in native gels the protein is resolved into two bands, both identified as NodF by analysis of the amino terminus and both migrating more slowly than E. coli ACP. Pulse-chase experiments with labeled beta-alanine suggested that the slower-moving band may be the precursor of the faster band. The NodF protein carries a 4'-phosphopantetheine as a prosthetic group. A NodF fusion protein under the control of the lac promoter is expressed in E. coli and is labeled with beta-alanine, indicating that it is recognized by the ACP synthase of E. coli. The ACP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, which catalyzes the release of phosphopantetheine from E. coli ACP, does not remove phosphopantetheine from NodF. Images PMID:2019559

  9. Cockayne syndrome group B protein prevents the accumulation of damaged mitochondria by promoting mitochondrial autophagy.

    PubMed

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Ramamoorthy, Mahesh; Sykora, Peter; Maynard, Scott; Lin, Ping-Chang; Minor, Robin K; Wilson, David M; Cooper, Marcus; Spencer, Richard; de Cabo, Rafael; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a devastating autosomal recessive disease characterized by neurodegeneration, cachexia, and accelerated aging. 80% of the cases are caused by mutations in the CS complementation group B (CSB) gene known to be involved in DNA repair and transcription. Recent evidence indicates that CSB is present in mitochondria, where it associates with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We report an increase in metabolism in the CSB(m/m) mouse model and CSB-deficient cells. Mitochondrial content is increased in CSB-deficient cells, whereas autophagy is down-regulated, presumably as a result of defects in the recruitment of P62 and mitochondrial ubiquitination. CSB-deficient cells show increased free radical production and an accumulation of damaged mitochondria. Accordingly, treatment with the autophagic stimulators lithium chloride or rapamycin reverses the bioenergetic phenotype of CSB-deficient cells. Our data imply that CSB acts as an mtDNA damage sensor, inducing mitochondrial autophagy in response to stress, and that pharmacological modulators of autophagy are potential treatment options for this accelerated aging phenotype.

  10. Systemic involvement of high-mobility group box 1 protein and therapeutic effect of anti-high-mobility group box 1 protein antibody in a rat model of crush injury.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Junya; Matsumoto, Naoya; Ogura, Hiroshi; Muroya, Takashi; Kuwagata, Yasuyuki; Nakagawa, Junichiro; Yamakawa, Kazuma; Hosotsubo, Hideo; Imamura, Yukio; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    Patients with crush injury often present systemic inflammatory response syndrome and fall into multiple organ failure. The mechanism by which the local tissue damage induces distant organ failure is still unclear. We focused on high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) as one of the damage-associated molecular pattern molecules that cause systemic inflammation in crush injury. We investigated involvement of HMGB1 and the effects of treatment with anti-HMGB1 antibody in a rat model of crush injury. Both hindlimbs of rats were compressed for 6 h and then released. In the crush injury group, the level of serum HMGB1 peaked at 3 h after releasing compression, followed by the increasing in the serum levels of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed substantial damage in the lung 24 h after the crush injury, with upregulation of the expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products, as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis. Intravenous administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody improved survival (n = 20 each group) and significantly suppressed serum levels of HMGB1, interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor α compared with the untreated crush injury group (n = 6-9 each group). Histological findings of lung damage were ameliorated, and the expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products was hampered by the treatment. These results indicate that HMGB1 is released in response to damage immediately after crush injury and acts as a proinflammatory mediator. Administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody reduced inflammatory reactions and improved survival by blocking extracellular HMGB1. Thus, HMGB1 appears to be a therapeutic target, and anti-HMGB1 antibody may become a promising novel therapy against crush injury to prevent the progression to multiple organ failure.

  11. Molecular Epidemiology and Distribution of Serotypes, Surface Proteins, and Antibiotic Resistance among Group B Streptococci in Italy▿

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, Giovanni; Imperi, Monica; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Pataracchia, Marco; Alfarone, Giovanna; Recchia, Simona; Orefici, Graziella; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Creti, Roberta

    2007-01-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) comprising three different sets of isolates (31 invasive, 36 noninvasive, and 24 colonizing isolates) were collected in Italy during the years 2002 to 2005. Clonal groups were established by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and selected isolates were studied by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). GBS isolates were also characterized by classical and molecular techniques for serotyping and protein gene and antibiotic resistance profiling. Some serotypes were significantly associated with a particular isolate population: serotype Ia more frequently corresponded to invasive strains than other strains, serotype V was more frequently encountered among noninvasive strains, and nontypeable strains were more common among isolates from carriers. Four major clonal groups accounted for 52.7% of all isolates: PFGE type 1/clonal complex 1 (CC1) comprised mainly serotype V isolates carrying the alp3 gene, PFGE type 2/CC23 encompassed serotype Ia isolates with the alp1 or alpha gene, PFGE type 3/CC17 comprised serotype III isolates carrying the rib gene, and PFGE type 4/CC19 consisted mainly of serotype II isolates possessing the rib gene. The same serotypes were shared by isolates of different clonal groups, and conversely, isolates belonging to the same clonal groups were found to be of different serotypes, presumably due to capsular switching by the horizontal transfer of capsular genes. Erythromycin resistance (prevalence, 16.5%; 15 resistant isolates of 91) was restricted to strains isolated from patients with noninvasive infections and carriers, while tetracycline resistance was evenly distributed (prevalence, 68.1%; 62 resistant isolates of 91). Most erythromycin-resistant GBS strains were of serotype V, were erm(B) positive, and belonged to the PFGE type 1/CC1 group, suggesting that macrolide resistance may have arisen both by clonal dissemination and by the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. PMID:17634303

  12. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael N.; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Thompson, J. Will; Dubois, Laura G.; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Brosnan, M. Julia; Rolph, Timothy P.; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation (AcK), a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK. PMID:26748706

  13. Bradykinin antagonists with dehydrophenylalanine analogues at position 5.

    PubMed

    Greiner, G; Dornberger, U; Paegelow, I; Schölkens, B A; Liebmann, C; Reissmann, S

    1998-04-01

    Continuing the studies on structural requirements of bradykinin antagonists, it has been found that analogues with dehydrophenylalanine (deltaPhe) or its ring-substituted analogues (deltaPhe(X)) at position 5 act as antagonists on guinea pig pulmonary artery, and on guinea pig ileum. Because both organs are considered to be bradykinin B2 receptor tissues, the analogues with deltaPhe or deltaPhe(X) at position 5, but without any replacement at position 7, seem to represent a new structural type of B2 receptor antagonist. All the analogues investigated act as partial antagonists; they inhibit the bradykinin-induced contraction at low concentrations and act as agonists at higher concentrations. Ring substitutions by methyl groups or iodine reduce both the agonistic and antagonistic activity. Only substitution by fluorine gives a high potency. Incorporation of deltaPhe into different representative antagonists with key modifications at position 7 does not enhance the antagonist activity of the basic structures, with one exception. Only the combination of deltaPhe at position 5 with DPhe at position 7 increases the antagonistic potency on guinea pig ileum by about one order of magnitude. Radioligand binding studies indicate the importance of position 5 for the discrimination of B2 receptor subtypes. The binding affinity to the low-affinity binding site (KL) was not significantly changed by replacement of Phe by deltaPhe. In contrast, ring-methylation of deltaPhe results in clearly reduced binding to KL. The affinity to the high-affinity binding site (KH) was almost unchanged by the replacement of Phe in position 5 by deltaPhe, whereas the analogue with 2-methyl-dehydrophenylalanine completely failed to detect the KH-site. The peptides were synthesized on the Wang-resin according to the Fmoc/Bu(t) strategy using Mtr protection for the side chain of Arg. The dehydrophenylalanine analogues were prepared by a strategy involving PyBop couplings of the dipeptide unit Fmoc

  14. [Relationship of food groups intake and C-reactive protein in healthy adults from Mexicali, Baja California, México].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Esparza, Josefina; Robinson-Navarro, Octavio; Ortega-Vélez, María Isabel; Diaz-Molina, Raúl; Carrillo-Cedillo, Eugenia Gabriela; Soria-Rodriguez, Carmen G

    2013-09-01

    The high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an important biomarker in inflammatory processes. The objective was to analyze the relationship between the concentrations of hs-CRP in adults from a northern Mexico region with their typical food intake patterns. A sample of 72 university professors underwent clinical and anthropometric assessments and their hs-CRP levels were quantified with an immunoenzymometric assay. Additionally, they filled out a food intake frequency questionnaire, from which the servings of different food groups were obtained with the ESHA software. The average age of participants was 49.75 +/- 10.05 years and the average hs-CRP concentration was 1.66 (0.97, 3.52) mg/L. The value of the association between fruit consumption and hs-CRP level was protective, according to the logistic regression analysis, being the Odds Ratio (OR) 0.23 (95% CI: 0.05, 1.03); while for vegetables the OR was 0.66 (95% CI: 0.12, 3.68). Furthermore, high protein content foods, dairy products, oils and fats were associated with elevated levels of hs-CRP. In conclusion, in our study, the intake of some food groups like fruits and vegetables, and to a lesser extent cereals, were associated with low values of hs-PCR. PMID:24354239

  15. Cellular Mechanisms of High Mobility Group 1 (HMGB-1) Protein Action in the Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Andrea Rachelle C.; Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Li, Yiwen; Mohammad, Ghulam; Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Wen, Rong; Ivanov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the main microvascular complications of diabetes and remains one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Recent studies have revealed an important role of inflammatory and proangiogenic high mobility group 1 (HMGB-1) cytokine in diabetic retinopathy. To elucidate cellular mechanisms of HMGB-1 activity in the retina, we performed this study. The histological features of diabetic retinopathy include loss of blood-vessel pericytes and endothelial cells, as well as abnormal new blood vessel growth. To establish the role of HMGB-1 in vulnerability of endothelial cells and pericytes, cultures of these cells, or co-cultures with glial cells, were treated with HMGB-1 and assessed for survival after 24 hours. The expression levels of the cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion molecules in glial and endothelial cells were tested by quantitative RT-PCR to evaluate changes in these cells after HMGB-1 treatment. Animal models of neovascularization were also used to study the role of HMGB-1 in the retina. We report that pericyte death is mediated by HMGB-1-induced cytotoxic activity of glial cells, while HMGB-1 can directly mediate death of endothelial cells. We also found that HMGB-1 affects endothelial cell activity. However, we did not observe a difference in the levels of neovascularization between HMGB-1-treated eyes compared to the control eyes, nor in the levels of proangiogenic cytokine VEGF-A expression between glial cells treated with HMGB-1 and control cells. Our data also indicate that HMGB-1 is not involved in retinal neovascularization in the oxygen-induced retinopathy model. Thus, our data suggest that retinal pericyte and endothelial injury and death in diabetic retinopathy may be due to HMGB-1-induced cytotoxic activity of glial cells as well as the direct effect of HMGB-1 on endothelial cells. At the same time, our findings indicate that HMGB-1 plays an insignificant role in retinal and choroidal neovascularization. PMID

  16. The Cockayne syndrome group B DNA repair protein as an anti-cancer target.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Mani, S; Kandimalla, E R; Yu, D; Agrawal, S; States, J C; Bregman, D B

    2001-12-01

    Cells from individuals with Cockayne syndrome (CS) have a defect in transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR), which rapidly corrects certain DNA lesions located on the transcribed strand of active genes. Despite this DNA repair defect, individuals with CS (of which there are two complementation groups, CSA and CSB) do not demonstrate an elevated incidence of cancer. Recently, we demonstrated that disruption of the CSB gene reduces the spontaneous tumor rate in cancer predisposed Ink4a/ARF-/- mice as well as causing their embryo fibroblasts to proliferate more slowly and be more sensitive to UV-induced apoptosis. In the present study we characterized phosphorothioate backbone antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AOs) that reduced the levels of CSB mRNA in A2780/CP70 ovarian carcinoma cells. The AOs caused the cells to proliferate more slowly and made them more sensitive to either cisplatin or oxaliplatin. The AOs also enhanced the cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide and gamma-radiation, both of which can induce oxidative DNA lesions, which are subject to TCR. The AOs did not potentiate the cytotoxicity of topotecan, which induces DNA strand breaks. Chemically modified () AOs (MBOs) targeting CSB were able to potentiate the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin against A2780/CP70 tumor xenografts formed in nude mice. The MBOs enabled a non-toxic (3 mg/kg) dose of cisplatin to have the same degree of anti-tumor efficacy as a more toxic (5 mg/kg) cisplatin dose. Collectively, these results suggest that the CSB gene product may be viewed as an anti-cancer target. PMID:11713576

  17. Fabrication of Nanometer- and Micrometer-Scale Protein Structures by Site-Specific Immobilization of Histidine-Tagged Proteins to Aminosiloxane Films with Photoremovable Protein-Resistant Protecting Groups.

    PubMed

    Xia, Sijing; Cartron, Michaël; Morby, James; Bryant, Donald A; Hunter, C Neil; Leggett, Graham J

    2016-02-23

    The site-specific immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins to patterns formed by far-field and near-field exposure of films of aminosilanes with protein-resistant photolabile protecting groups is demonstrated. After deprotection of the aminosilane, either through a mask or using a scanning near-field optical microscope, the amine terminal groups are derivatized first with glutaraldehyde and then with N-(5-amino-1-carboxypentyl)iminodiacetic acid to yield a nitrilo-triacetic-acid-terminated surface. After complexation with Ni(2+), this surface binds histidine-tagged GFP and CpcA-PEB in a site-specific fashion. The chemistry is simple and reliable and leads to extensive surface functionalization. Bright fluorescence is observed in fluorescence microscopy images of micrometer- and nanometer-scale patterns. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study quantitatively the efficiency of photodeprotection and the reactivity of the modified surfaces. The efficiency of the protein binding process is investigated quantitatively by ellipsometry and by fluorescence microscopy. We find that regions of the surface not exposed to UV light bind negligible amounts of His-tagged proteins, indicating that the oligo(ethylene glycol) adduct on the nitrophenyl protecting group confers excellent protein resistance; in contrast, exposed regions bind His-GFP very effectively, yielding strong fluorescence that is almost completely removed on treatment of the surface with imidazole, confirming a degree of site-specific binding in excess of 90%. This simple strategy offers a versatile generic route to the spatially selective site-specific immobilization of proteins at surfaces. PMID:26820378

  18. Fabrication of Nanometer- and Micrometer-Scale Protein Structures by Site-Specific Immobilization of Histidine-Tagged Proteins to Aminosiloxane Films with Photoremovable Protein-Resistant Protecting Groups

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The site-specific immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins to patterns formed by far-field and near-field exposure of films of aminosilanes with protein-resistant photolabile protecting groups is demonstrated. After deprotection of the aminosilane, either through a mask or using a scanning near-field optical microscope, the amine terminal groups are derivatized first with glutaraldehyde and then with N-(5-amino-1-carboxypentyl)iminodiacetic acid to yield a nitrilo-triacetic-acid-terminated surface. After complexation with Ni2+, this surface binds histidine-tagged GFP and CpcA-PEB in a site-specific fashion. The chemistry is simple and reliable and leads to extensive surface functionalization. Bright fluorescence is observed in fluorescence microscopy images of micrometer- and nanometer-scale patterns. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study quantitatively the efficiency of photodeprotection and the reactivity of the modified surfaces. The efficiency of the protein binding process is investigated quantitatively by ellipsometry and by fluorescence microscopy. We find that regions of the surface not exposed to UV light bind negligible amounts of His-tagged proteins, indicating that the oligo(ethylene glycol) adduct on the nitrophenyl protecting group confers excellent protein resistance; in contrast, exposed regions bind His-GFP very effectively, yielding strong fluorescence that is almost completely removed on treatment of the surface with imidazole, confirming a degree of site-specific binding in excess of 90%. This simple strategy offers a versatile generic route to the spatially selective site-specific immobilization of proteins at surfaces. PMID:26820378

  19. Hotspots of damage by antagonists shape the spatial structure of plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, María C; Jordano, Pedro; Valido, Alfredo

    2015-08-01

    The balance between mutualistic and antagonistic plant-animal interactions and their spatial variation results in a highly dynamic mosaic of reproductive success within plant populations. Yet, the ecological drivers of this small-scale heterogeneity of interaction patterns and their outcomes remain virtually unexplored. We analyzed spatial structure in the frequency and intensity of interactions that vertebrate pollinators (birds and lizards) and invertebrate antagonists (florivores, nectar larcenists, and seed predators) had when interacting with the insular plant Isoplexis canariensis, and their effect on plant fitness. Spatially autocorrelated variation in plant reproductive success (fruit and viable seed set) emerged from the combined action of mutualists and antagonists, rather than reflecting the spatial pattern of any specific animal group. However, the influence of antagonists on plant fitness was stronger primarily due to the florivores' action on earlier reproductive stages, consuming and damaging floral structures before the arrival of pollinators. Our results indicate that the early action of antagonists creates hotspots of increased plant damage, where the effects of later acting mutualists are not translated into increased reproductive benefits. We foresee the potential for antagonists to shape the intra-population mosaics of plant fitness in situations where antagonists outnumber mutualists, when their interactions occur before those of mutualists, and when mutualists can detect and avoid damaged plants while foraging. Severely damaged plants in antagonistic hotspots might be excluded from the mating network and render a limited production of viable seeds, reducing both the growth rate of the plant population and the effective population size. PMID:26405743

  20. Single exposure of dopamine D1 antagonist prevents and D2 antagonist attenuates methylphenidate effect

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Catherine M; Witte, Lindsey J; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a readily prescribed drug for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and moreover is used illicitly by youths for its cognitive-enhancing effects and recreation. MPD exposure in rodents elicits increased locomotor activity. Repetitive MPD exposure leads to further augmentation of their locomotor activity. This behavioral response is referred to as behavioral sensitization. Behavioral sensitization is used as an experimental marker for a drug’s ability to elicit dependence. There is evidence that dopamine (DA) is a key player in the acute and chronic MPD effect; however, the role of DA in the effects elicited by MPD is still debated. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of D1 and/or D2 DA receptors in the acute and chronic effect of MPD on locomotor activity. The study lasted for 12 consecutive days. Seven groups of male Sprague Dawley® rats were used. A single D1 or D2 antagonist was given before and after acute and chronic MPD administration. Single injection of D1 DA antagonist was able to significantly attenuate the locomotor activity when given prior to the initial MPD exposure and after repetitive MPD exposure, while the D2 DA antagonist partially attenuated the locomotor activity only when given before the second MPD exposure. The results show the role, at least in part, of the D1 DA receptor in the mechanism of behavioral sensitization, whereas the D2 DA receptor only partially modulates the response to acute and chronic MPD. PMID:27186140

  1. Calcium-dependent binding of rabbit C-reactive protein to supported lipid monolayers containing exposed phosphorylcholine group.

    PubMed Central

    Sui, S F; Sun, Y T; Mi, L Z

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of rabbit C-reactive protein (rCRP) with a supported monolayer containing a phosphorylcholine moiety was studied. Three types of phospholipids were synthesized, each containing a insertion spacer of eight, six, or three atoms between the phosphorylcholine group and hydrophobic tail. By varying the length of the insertion spacer, we can vary the extension of the phosphorylcholine group from the membrane surface. By varying the monolayer composition, we can control the lateral distance between the exposed phosphorylcholine groups. Using the surface plasmon resonance technique (SPR), we demonstrated that the calcium-dependent binding of rCRP to the model membrane is governed not only by the ability of the ligand to access the binding pocket fully (spacer length), but also by lateral hindrance within the two-dimensional plane of the membrane. The value of the apparent binding constant was estimated by theoretical analysis, which is obviously dependent on the composition of the lipid mixture, and a maximum of (9.9 +/- 1.5) x 10(6) M-1 was obtained. PMID:9876145

  2. Inhibition of ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors by antagonists: strategy to estimate the association and the dissociation rate constant of antagonists with very strong affinity to the receptors.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, H; Inoue, Y; Hori, K

    1992-10-01

    Since binding of an agonist to an ionotropic neurotransmitter receptor causes not only channel opening, but also desensitization of the receptor, inhibition of the receptor by the antagonist sometimes becomes very complicated. The transient state kinetics of ligand association and dissociation, and desensitization of the receptor were considered on the basis of the minimal model proposed by Hess' group, and the following possibilities were proposed. 1) When an agonist is simultaneously applied to the receptor with an antagonist whose affinity to the receptor is extremely strong and different from that of the agonist, it is usually impossible to estimate the real inhibition constant exactly from the responses because desensitization of the receptor proceeds before the equilibrium of the ligand binding. Simultaneous addition of the antagonist with strong affinity to the receptor may apparently accelerate inactivation (desensitization) of the receptor. The association rate constant of the antagonist can be estimated by analyses of the rate of the inactivation in the presence and the absence of the antagonist. 2) A preincubated antagonist with a slow dissociation rate constant, i.e., a very effective inhibitor, may cause apparent noncompetitive inhibition of the receptor, since the receptor is desensitized by an agonist as soon as the antagonist dissociates from the receptor and the dissociation of the antagonist from the receptor becomes the rate-determining step. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting mRNA prepared from Electrophorus electricus electroplax and used for the experiments on inhibition by an antagonist.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1337082

  3. mGlu5 receptor antagonists: a novel class of anxiolytics?

    PubMed

    Spooren, Will; Gasparini, Fabrizio

    2004-05-01

    In the early 1990s, a new family of receptors were cloned that were found to mediate the intracellular metabolic effects of glutamate via coupling to secondary messenger systems, that is, the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. Eight such receptors (mGlu1 to mGlu8) have been cloned to date, and according to their amino acid sequence, pharmacology and second-messenger coupling, these receptors have been clustered into three groups (I-III). In contrast to the glutamate-gated ion channels (NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors), which are responsible for fast excitatory transmission, mGlu receptors have been shown to play a modulatory role in the glutamatergic synaptic transmission either by modulating the ion channel activity or by influencing neurotransmitter release. Given the fact that the mGlu receptors are G-protein- coupled, they obviously constitute a new attractive group of "drugable" targets for the treatment of various CNS disorders. The recent discovery of small molecules that selectively bind to receptors of group I (mGlu1 and mGlu5) and group II (mGlu2 and mGlu3) allowed significant advances in our understanding of the roles of these receptors in brain physiology and pathophysiology. The identification of MPEP (2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine), a highly selective and brain-penetrant mGlu5 receptor antagonist, allowed the exploration of the therapeutic potential of this class of compounds. Subsequent behavior studies revealed that--with the exception of benzodiazepines--mGlu5 receptor antagonists exhibit the widest and most robust anxiolytic activity in preclinical models seen to date. Upcoming clinical studies will soon indicate if the preclinical anxiolytic-like efficacy translates into anxiolytic activity in humans. PMID:15334174

  4. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Melani, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of COPD pharmacological treatment. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are a major class of inhaled bronchodilators. Some LAMA/device systems with different characteristics and dosing schedules are currently approved for maintenance therapy of COPD and a range of other products are being developed. They improve lung function and patient-reported outcomes and reduce acute bronchial exacerbations with good safety. LAMAs are used either alone or associated with long-acting β₂-agonists, eventually in fixed dose combinations. Long-acting β₂-agonist/LAMA combinations assure additional benefits over the individual components alone. The reader will obtain a view of the safety and efficacy of the different LAMA/device systems in COPD patients. PMID:26109098

  5. A new alcohol antagonist: Phaclofen

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, A.M. ); Harris, R.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The ability of the GABA{sub B} receptor antagonist, phaclofen to alter behavioral effects of ethanol was evaluated by loss of righting reflex (sleep time), motor incoordination (bar holding), spontaneous locomotion (open field activity) and hypothermia. Pretreatment with phaclofen significantly decreased the effects of ethanol on motor incoordination, locomotor activity and hypothermia. However, phaclofen had no effect on either pentobarbital- or diazepam-induced motor incoordination. Phaclofen slightly increased the ED{sub 50} for loss of the righting reflex but did not alter either the duration of reflex loss produced by ethanol or blood ethanol levels at awakening. Our results suggest phaclofen is rapidly inactivated resulting in difficulty in observing antagonism of long duration ethanol effects. These findings suggest that the GABA{sub B} system may play a role in mediating several important actions of ethanol.

  6. Disubstituted piperidines as potent Orexin (hypocretin) receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rong; Song, Xinyi; Bali, Purva; Smith, Anthony; Bayona, Claudia Ruiz; Lin, Li; Cameron, Michael D.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Kenny, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    A series of orexin receptor antagonists was synthesized based on a substituted piperidine scaffold. Through traditional medicinal chemistry structure activity relationships (SAR), installation of various groups at the 3–6-positions of the piperidine led to modest enhancement in receptor selectivity. Compounds were profiled in vivo for plasma and brain levels in order to identify candidates suitable for efficacy in a model of drug addiction. PMID:22617492

  7. Competitive molecular docking approach for predicting estrogen receptor subtype α agonists and antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous compounds that interfere with the endocrine system of vertebrates, often through direct or indirect interactions with nuclear receptor proteins. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are particularly important protein targets and many EDCs are ER binders, capable of altering normal homeostatic transcription and signaling pathways. An estrogenic xenobiotic can bind ER as either an agonist or antagonist to increase or inhibit transcription, respectively. The receptor conformations in the complexes of ER bound with agonists and antagonists are different and dependent on interactions with co-regulator proteins that vary across tissue type. Assessment of chemical endocrine disruption potential depends not only on binding affinity to ERs, but also on changes that may alter the receptor conformation and its ability to subsequently bind DNA response elements and initiate transcription. Using both agonist and antagonist conformations of the ERα, we developed an in silico approach that can be used to differentiate agonist versus antagonist status of potential binders. Methods The approach combined separate molecular docking models for ER agonist and antagonist conformations. The ability of this approach to differentiate agonists and antagonists was first evaluated using true agonists and antagonists extracted from the crystal structures available in the protein data bank (PDB), and then further validated using a larger set of ligands from the literature. The usefulness of the approach was demonstrated with enrichment analysis in data sets with a large number of decoy ligands. Results The performance of individual agonist and antagonist docking models was found comparable to similar models in the literature. When combined in a competitive docking approach, they provided the ability to discriminate agonists from antagonists with good accuracy, as well as the ability to efficiently select true agonists and antagonists from

  8. Possible participation of brain-specific proteins of the S100 group in the regulation of processes of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of endogenous substrates of nerve tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Gruden, M.A.; Poletaev, A.B.

    1986-06-10

    The influence of brain-specific proteins of the S-100 group (BSP S100) and their endogenous cationic and anionic protein ligands on the phosphorylation of macromolecular substrates of the rat brain and liver was investigated. It was shown that BSP S100 has a substantial influence both on the phosphorylation and on the dephosphorylation of various substrates, primarily of nerve tissue; moreover, this action depends on endogenous protein ligands of BSP S100 and has characteristics of organ specificity.

  9. Cytoplasmic Dynein Antagonists with Improved Potency and Isoform Selectivity.

    PubMed

    See, Stephanie K; Hoogendoorn, Sascha; Chung, Andrew H; Ye, Fan; Steinman, Jonathan B; Sakata-Kato, Tomoyo; Miller, Rand M; Cupido, Tommaso; Zalyte, Ruta; Carter, Andrew P; Nachury, Maxence V; Kapoor, Tarun M; Chen, James K

    2016-01-15

    Cytoplasmic dyneins 1 and 2 are related members of the AAA+ superfamily (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) that function as the predominant minus-end-directed microtubule motors in eukaryotic cells. Dynein 1 controls mitotic spindle assembly, organelle movement, axonal transport, and other cytosolic, microtubule-guided processes, whereas dynein 2 mediates retrograde trafficking within motile and primary cilia. Small-molecule inhibitors are important tools for investigating motor protein-dependent mechanisms, and ciliobrevins were recently discovered as the first dynein-specific chemical antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that ciliobrevins directly target the heavy chains of both dynein isoforms and explore the structure-activity landscape of these inhibitors in vitro and in cells. In addition to identifying chemical motifs that are essential for dynein blockade, we have discovered analogs with increased potency and dynein 2 selectivity. These antagonists effectively disrupt Hedgehog signaling, intraflagellar transport, and ciliogenesis, making them useful probes of these and other cytoplasmic dynein 2-dependent cellular processes.

  10. Client Perceptions of Two Antagonist Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reports results of a questionnaire administered to participants in an antagonist drug outpatient clinic and an antagonist drug work-release program to obtain awareness of acceptance of the program participants. Naltrexone patients recommended an alternative method of administering the drug and changing the money system to award deserving inmates…

  11. Screening of matrix metalloproteinases available from the protein data bank: insights into biological functions, domain organization, and zinc binding groups.

    PubMed

    Nicolotti, Orazio; Miscioscia, Teresa Fabiola; Leonetti, Francesco; Muncipinto, Giovanni; Carotti, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    A total of 142 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) X-ray crystallographic structures were retrieved from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and analyzed by an automated and efficient routine, developed in-house, with a series of bioinformatic tools. Highly informative heat maps and hierarchical clusterograms provided a reliable and comprehensive representation of the relationships existing among MMPs, enlarging and complementing the current knowledge in the field. Multiple sequence and structural alignments permitted better location and display of key MMP motifs and quantification of the residue consensus at each amino acid position in the most critical binding subsites of MMPs. The MMP active site consensus sequences, the C-alpha root-mean-square deviation (RMSd) analysis of diverse enzymatic subsites, and the examination of the chemical nature, binding topologies, and zinc binding groups (ZBGs) of ligands extracted from crystallographic complexes provided useful insights on the structural arrangements of the most potent MMP inhibitors.

  12. Peptide-Recombinant VP6 Protein Based Enzyme Immunoassay for the Detection of Group A Rotaviruses in Multiple Host Species

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Subhankar; Saurabh, Sharad; Gulati, Baldev R.; Singh, Neeraj; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Joshi, Vinay G.; Banyai, Krisztian; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel enzyme immunoassay for the detection of group A rotavirus (RVA) antigen in fecal samples of multiple host species. The assay is based on the detection of conserved VP6 protein using anti-recombinant VP6 antibodies as capture antibodies and anti-multiple antigenic peptide (identified and constructed from highly immunodominant epitopes within VP6 protein) antibodies as detector antibodies. The clinical utility of the assay was evaluated using a panel of 914 diarrhoeic fecal samples from four different host species (bovine, porcine, poultry and human) collected from diverse geographical locations in India. Using VP6- based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as the gold standard, we found that the diagnostic sensitivity (DSn) and specificity (DSp) of the new assay was high [bovine (DSn = 94.2% & DSp = 100%); porcine (DSn = 94.6% & DSp = 93.3%); poultry (DSn = 74.2% & DSp = 97.7%) and human (DSn = 82.1% & DSp = 98.7%)]. The concordance with RT-PCR was also high [weighted kappa (k) = 0.831–0.956 at 95% CI = 0.711–1.0] as compared to RNA-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (RNA-PAGE). The performance characteristics of the new immunoassay were comparable to those of the two commercially available ELISA kits. Our results suggest that this peptide-recombinant protein based assay may serve as a preliminary assay for epidemiological surveillance of RVA antigen and for evaluation of vaccine effectiveness especially in low and middle income settings. PMID:27391106

  13. High-mobility Group Box 1 Protein Initiates Postoperative Cognitive Decline by Engaging Bone Marrow-derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Vacas, Susana; Degos, Vincent; Tracey, Kevin J.; Maze, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Background Aseptic trauma engages the innate immune response to trigger a neuroinflammatory reaction that results in postoperative cognitive decline. We sought to determine whether high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), an ubiquitous nucleosomal protein, initiates this process through activation and trafficking of circulating bone marrow-derived macrophages to the brain. Methods The effects of HMGB1 on memory (using trace fear conditioning) were tested in adult C57BL/6J male mice; separate cohorts were tested after bone marrow-derived macrophages were depleted by clodrolip. The effect of anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody on the inflammatory and behavioral responses to tibial surgery were investigated. Results A single injection of HMGB1 caused memory decline, as evidenced by a decrease in freezing time (52 ± 11% vs. 39 ± 5%; n = 16-17); memory decline was prevented when bone marrow-derived macrophages were depleted (39 ± 5% vs. 50 ± 9%; n = 17). Disabling HMGB1 with a blocking monoclonal antibody, before surgery, reduced postoperative memory decline (52 ± 11% vs. 29 ± 5%, n = 15-16); also, hippocampal expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) was prevented by the neutralizing antibody (n = 6). Neither the systemic nor the hippocampal inflammatory responses to surgery occurred in mice pre-treated with anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody (n = 6). Discussion Postoperative neuroinflammation and cognitive decline can be prevented by abrogating the effects of HMGB1. Following the earlier characterization of the resolution of surgery-induced memory decline, the mechanisms of its initiation are now described. Together, these data may be used to preoperatively test the risk to surgical patients for the development of exaggerated and prolonged postoperative memory decline that is reflected in delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction, respectively. PMID:24162463

  14. Binding of antagonists of H1 and H2 histamine receptors to peripheral blood lymphocytes of atopic and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Zak-Nejmark, T; Małolepszy, J; Osos, M; Nadobna, G; Jutel, M

    1991-01-01

    The binding of the antagonists of histamine H1 and H2 receptors by peripheral blood lymphocytes from atopic and healthy subjects was investigated. We found that lymphocytes from atopic subjects showed statistically significant decrease in the binding of H2 receptor antagonist - ranitidine. In addition, lymphocytes from atopic and control subjects had similar capacity of binding of H1 receptor antagonist - promethazine. The ratio of the amount of H1 and H2 antagonists, bound to lymphocytes from atopic and healthy subjects, was calculated. The difference between the values in the group of atopic (2.55) and control subjects (1.55) was statistically significant. PMID:1841552

  15. Are CB1 Receptor Antagonists Nootropic or Cognitive Impairing Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Varvel, Stephen A.; Wise, Laura E.; Lichtman, Aron H.

    2010-01-01

    For more than a decade, a considerable amount of research has examined the effects of rimonabant (SR 141716) and other CB1 receptor antagonists in both in vivo and in vitro models of learning and memory. In addition to its utility in determining whether the effects of drugs are mediated though a CB1 receptor mechanism of action, these antagonists are useful in providing insight into the physiological function of the endogenous cannabinoid system. Several groups have reported that CB1 receptor antagonists enhance memory duration in a variety of spatial and operant paradigms, but not in all paradigms. Conversely, disruption of CB1 receptor signaling also impairs extinction learning in which the animal actively suppresses a learned response when reinforcement has been withheld. These extinction deficits occur in aversively motivated tasks, such as in fear conditioning or escape behavior in the Morris water maze task, but not in appetitively motivated tasks. Similarly, in electrophysiological models, CB1 receptor antagonists elicit a variety of effects, including enhancement of long-term potentiation (LTP), while disrupting long-term depression (LTD) and interfering with transient forms of plasticity, including depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) and depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE). The collective results of the in vivo and in vitro studies employing CB1 receptor antagonists, demonstrate that these receptors play integral roles in different components of cognitive processing. Functionally, pharmacological blockade of CB1 receptors may strengthen memory duration, but interferes with extinction of learned behaviors that are associated with traumatic or aversive memories. PMID:20539824

  16. Outer membrane β-barrel protein folding is physically controlled by periplasmic lipid head groups and BamA.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Dennis; Chung, Yong Hee; Danoff, Emily J; Plummer, Ashlee M; Sandlin, Clifford W; Zaccai, Nathan R; Fleming, Karen G

    2014-04-22

    Outer membrane β-barrel proteins (OMPs) are crucial for numerous cellular processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Despite extensive studies on OMP biogenesis, it is unclear why OMPs require assembly machineries to fold into their native outer membranes, as they are capable of folding quickly and efficiently through an intrinsic folding pathway in vitro. By investigating the folding of several bacterial OMPs using membranes with naturally occurring Escherichia coli lipids, we show that phosphoethanolamine and phosphoglycerol head groups impose a kinetic barrier to OMP folding. The kinetic retardation of OMP folding places a strong negative pressure against spontaneous incorporation of OMPs into inner bacterial membranes, which would dissipate the proton motive force and undoubtedly kill bacteria. We further show that prefolded β-barrel assembly machinery subunit A (BamA), the evolutionarily conserved, central subunit of the BAM complex, accelerates OMP folding by lowering the kinetic barrier imposed by phosphoethanolamine head groups. Our results suggest that OMP assembly machineries are required in vivo to enable physical control over the spontaneously occurring OMP folding reaction in the periplasm. Mechanistic studies further allowed us to derive a model for BamA function, which explains how OMP assembly can be conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  17. Outer membrane β-barrel protein folding is physically controlled by periplasmic lipid head groups and BamA

    PubMed Central

    Gessmann, Dennis; Chung, Yong Hee; Danoff, Emily J.; Plummer, Ashlee M.; Sandlin, Clifford W.; Zaccai, Nathan R.; Fleming, Karen G.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane β-barrel proteins (OMPs) are crucial for numerous cellular processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Despite extensive studies on OMP biogenesis, it is unclear why OMPs require assembly machineries to fold into their native outer membranes, as they are capable of folding quickly and efficiently through an intrinsic folding pathway in vitro. By investigating the folding of several bacterial OMPs using membranes with naturally occurring Escherichia coli lipids, we show that phosphoethanolamine and phosphoglycerol head groups impose a kinetic barrier to OMP folding. The kinetic retardation of OMP folding places a strong negative pressure against spontaneous incorporation of OMPs into inner bacterial membranes, which would dissipate the proton motive force and undoubtedly kill bacteria. We further show that prefolded β-barrel assembly machinery subunit A (BamA), the evolutionarily conserved, central subunit of the BAM complex, accelerates OMP folding by lowering the kinetic barrier imposed by phosphoethanolamine head groups. Our results suggest that OMP assembly machineries are required in vivo to enable physical control over the spontaneously occurring OMP folding reaction in the periplasm. Mechanistic studies further allowed us to derive a model for BamA function, which explains how OMP assembly can be conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:24715731

  18. Effect of CXCL10 receptor antagonist on islet cell apoptosis in a type I diabetes rat model.

    PubMed

    He, Jinshui; Lian, Chaowei; Fang, Yanling; Wu, Jinzhi; Weng, Jianning; Ye, Xiaoling; Zhou, Huowang

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has been increasing. The role of CXCL10 and its receptor, CXCR3, in the occurrence of T1DM has drawn lots of research interests, as the disease incidence was correlated with their expression levels. We thus used an antagonist of CXCR3, NBI-74330, to block the specific binding, for further observation of islet cell apoptosis in a T1MD rat model. A total of 80 SD rats were given STZ intraperitoneally for generating T1DM model. Different concentrations of NBI-74330 were then applied, followed by the collection of blood and pancreatic tissue samples. CXCL10 and CXCR3 levels were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), followed by expressional assays in pancreatic tissues by real-time PCR, Western blotting and flow cytometry. Compared to control group, model rats had significantly elevated blood glucose level (>16.7 mmol/L), with depressed CXCL10 and CXCR3 levels compared to model group (P<0.05). After NBI-74330 treatment, mRNA and protein levels of CXCL10 and CXCR3 were significantly lowered, with significantly decreased apoptotic cell ratios compared to model group (P<0.05). CXCL10 receptor antagonist NBI-74330 can inhibit the apoptosis of pancreatic islet cells in T1DM rats.

  19. Aldosterone antagonist improves diastolic function in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Anna M; Imperiale, Daniela; Santillo, Rosa; Barlocco, Elena; Bertolini, Andrea; Guasti, Luigina; Venco, Achille

    2002-11-01

    Experimental studies demonstrated that mineralocorticoid antagonists prevent or reverse myocardial fibrosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the aldosterone antagonist canrenone can improve left ventricular diastolic function in essential hypertension. Using digitized M-mode echocardiography and 24-hour blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), we realized a prospective, randomized, controlled study on 34 never-treated essential hypertensives with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Echocardiogram and ABPM were repeated after 6 months of effective antihypertensive treatment with ACE inhibitors and calcium antagonists (second evaluation) and then after a 6-month period with 17 patients randomly assigned to add canrenone 50 mg/d to the previous treatment (third evaluation). At the basal evaluation 32 patients had left ventricular concentric hypertrophy, and 2 patients had left ventricular concentric remodeling. All the patients had normal left ventricular systolic function. At the second evaluation blood pressure was reduced (P<0.0001), left ventricular mass index decreased (P<0.0001), and diastolic function improved (P<0.0001). After randomization, the canrenone and control groups had similar 24-hour blood pressure and left ventricular morpho-functional characteristics. At the third evaluation, despite unchanged blood pressure and similar decrease of left ventricular mass index, the canrenone group, compared with control group, showed a significantly greater increase in left ventricular diastolic indices. In essential hypertension, a low dose of aldosterone antagonist added to antihypertensive treatment significantly improved left ventricular diastolic function. This improvement, not accounted for by changes in blood pressure and left ventricular mass, can be therefore ascribed to a direct action of the drug on the myocardium. PMID:12411457

  20. Arthrobacter D-xylose isomerase: chemical modification of carboxy groups and protein engineering of pH optimum.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, K S; Loviny-Anderton, T; Rangarajan, M; Hartley, B S

    1993-01-01

    To try to lower the pH optimum, the carboxy groups of Arthrobacter D-xylose isomerase were coupled to glycinamide using a water-soluble carbodi-imide. In conditions that substituted all of the 59 carboxy groups in the denatured monomer, a maximum of 30 groups/monomer reacted in the native enzyme, whether in presence or absence of ligands, and the enzyme remained fully active and tetrameric throughout the coupling reaction. Purification by f.p.l.c. ion-exchange chromatography gave broad symmetrical peaks with increased pI, suggesting that the modified enzymes are essentially homogeneous. However, they are less stable than native enzyme in 8 M urea or on heating ('melting points' of 59 degrees versus 73 degrees C for the apoenzymes and 67 degrees versus 81.5 degrees C for the Mg(2+)-enzymes). Kinetic studies of the D-fructose isomerase activity at 30 degrees C showed that the glycinamidylated enzyme had unaltered activation constant for Mg2+, and Km was also similar to that of the native enzyme at pH 7.3, but increased rapidly at higher pH rather than remaining constant. Vmax. was constant from pH 6.2 to 8.0, suggesting a reduced pKa for His-219, which controls Vmax. in the native enzyme (normally 6.0). Three mutants were constructed by protein engineering with a view to reducing the pH optimum of enzyme activity. Two of these, Glu140-->Lys and Asp189-->Lys, could be detected in crude extracts of Escherichia coli by SDS/PAGE, but could not be purified, whereas mutant Trp136-->Glu was produced as a tetramer in amounts similar to the wild-type enzyme. However, it did not show any enzyme activity and was less stable in 0-9 M urea gradient PAGE. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:7904154

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of proteinase-binding of pregnancy zone protein (PZP). Appearance of sulfhydryl groups in reactions with proteinases.

    PubMed

    Christensen, U; Sottrup-Jensen, L; Simonsen, M

    1992-01-01

    Proteinase binding by pregnancy zone protein (PZP), an alpha-macroglobulin involves bait region cleavages, association of dimeric-PZP into tetrameric and reaction of internal gamma-glutamyl-beta-cysteinyl thiol esters of PZP with proteinase side chains. The product is an equimolar enzyme-PZP(tetramer) covalently linked complex with four free sulfhydryl groups. The kinetics of the appearances of sulfhydryl groups during the reaction of PZP with chymotrypsin has been investigated using stopped-flow and conventional mixing techniques over a broad concentration range. Thiol ester cleavages followed double exponential decays corresponding with two steps. The faster one resulted in the appearance of three sulfhydryl groups with an observed rate constant, k(obs) = k1.1 + k1.2 delta E, dependent on the excess concentration of chymotrypsin, delta E, and k1.1 = 0.03 s-1 and k1.2 = 4 x 10(4) M-1 s-1. The last sulfhydryl group appeared in a slower step, with similar concentration dependence and k2.1 approximately 0.003 s-1 and k2.2 approximately 5 x 10(3) M-1s-1. Covalent binding of the enzyme apparently was simultaneous with the faster thiol ester cleavage step. Based on these and previous results a model of the reaction mechanism of the proteinase binding reaction of PZP is proposed. It consists of four major steps: (i) Bait region cleavage of PZP-dimers by the enzyme, (ii) fast association of enzyme-PZP(dimer) species with native PZP or with another enzyme-PZP(dimer) compound resulting in release of one of the associated enzyme molecules (iii) reaction of an average of three thiol esters of the enzyme-PZP(tetramer) intermediate with the associated internal enzyme molecule or with an external one. In this step one enzyme molecule becomes covalently linked to the PZP-(tetramer), three sulfhydryl groups appear and the enzymic activity of the bound enzyme molecule decreases to the level of that of the final complex. (iv) Hydrolysis of the last thiol ester and in the presence of

  2. The Unstructured N-terminal Region of Arabidopsis Group 4 Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Proteins Is Required for Folding and for Chaperone-like Activity under Water Deficit.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Velazquez, Cesar L; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Reyes, José Luis; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2016-05-13

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a conserved group of proteins widely distributed in the plant kingdom that participate in the tolerance to water deficit of different plant species. In silico analyses indicate that most LEA proteins are structurally disordered. The structural plasticity of these proteins opens the question of whether water deficit modulates their conformation and whether these possible changes are related to their function. In this work, we characterized the secondary structure of Arabidopsis group 4 LEA proteins. We found that they are disordered in aqueous solution, with high intrinsic potential to fold into α-helix. We demonstrate that complete dehydration is not required for these proteins to sample ordered structures because milder water deficit and macromolecular crowding induce high α-helix levels in vitro, suggesting that prevalent conditions under water deficit modulate their conformation. We also show that the N-terminal region, conserved across all group 4 LEA proteins, is necessary and sufficient for conformational transitions and that their protective function is confined to this region, suggesting that folding into α-helix is required for chaperone-like activity under water limitation. We propose that these proteins can exist as different conformers, favoring functional diversity, a moonlighting property arising from their structural dynamics. PMID:27006402

  3. Group 5 LEA protein, ZmLEA5C, enhance tolerance to osmotic and low temperature stresses in transgenic tobacco and yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Li; Jiang, Shanshan; Pan, Jiaowen; Cai, Guohua; Li, Dequan

    2014-11-01

    Group 5 LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) proteins contain a significantly higher proportion of hydrophobic residues but lack significant signature motifs or consensus sequences. This group is considered as an atypical group of LEA proteins. Up to now, there is little known about group 5C LEA proteins in maize. Here, we identified a novel group 5C LEA protein from maize. The accumulation of transcripts demonstrated that ZmLEA5C displayed similar induced characteristics in leaves and roots. Transcription of ZmLEA5C could be induced by low temperature, osmotic and oxidative stress and some signaling molecules, such as abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA). However, transcription of ZmLEA5C was significantly inhibited by high salinity. Further study indicated that the ZmLEA5C protein could be phosphorylated by the protein kinase CKII. ZmLEA5C could protect the activity of LDH under water deficit and low temperature stresses. Overexpression of ZmLEA5C conferred to transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) and yeast (GS115) tolerance to osmotic and low temperature stresses. PMID:25240107

  4. Group 5 LEA protein, ZmLEA5C, enhance tolerance to osmotic and low temperature stresses in transgenic tobacco and yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Li; Jiang, Shanshan; Pan, Jiaowen; Cai, Guohua; Li, Dequan

    2014-11-01

    Group 5 LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) proteins contain a significantly higher proportion of hydrophobic residues but lack significant signature motifs or consensus sequences. This group is considered as an atypical group of LEA proteins. Up to now, there is little known about group 5C LEA proteins in maize. Here, we identified a novel group 5C LEA protein from maize. The accumulation of transcripts demonstrated that ZmLEA5C displayed similar induced characteristics in leaves and roots. Transcription of ZmLEA5C could be induced by low temperature, osmotic and oxidative stress and some signaling molecules, such as abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA). However, transcription of ZmLEA5C was significantly inhibited by high salinity. Further study indicated that the ZmLEA5C protein could be phosphorylated by the protein kinase CKII. ZmLEA5C could protect the activity of LDH under water deficit and low temperature stresses. Overexpression of ZmLEA5C conferred to transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) and yeast (GS115) tolerance to osmotic and low temperature stresses.

  5. Maternal immunization of mice with group B streptococcal type III polysaccharide-beta C protein conjugate elicits protective antibody to multiple serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Madoff, L C; Paoletti, L C; Tai, J Y; Kasper, D L

    1994-01-01

    Group B streptococcal infection is a major cause of neonatal mortality. Antibody to the capsular polysaccharide protects against invasive neonatal disease, but immunization with capsular polysaccharides fails to elicit protective antibody in many recipients. Conjugation of the polysaccharide to tetanus toxoid has been shown to increase immune response to the polysaccharide. In animal models, C proteins of group B streptococci are also protective determinants. We examined the ability of the beta C protein to serve in the dual role of carrier for the polysaccharide and protective immunogen. Type III polysaccharide was covalently coupled to beta C protein by reductive amination. Immunization of rabbits with the polysaccharide-protein conjugate elicited high titers of antibody to both components, and the serum induced opsonophagocytic killing of type III, Ia/C, and Ib/C strains of group B streptococci. Female mice were immunized with the conjugate vaccine and then bred; 93% of neonatal pups born to these dams vaccinated with conjugate survived type III group B streptococcal challenge and 76% survived type Ia/C challenge, compared with 3% and 8% survival, respectively, in controls (P < 0.001). The beta C protein acted as an effective carrier for the type III polysaccharide while simultaneously induced protective immunity against beta C protein--containing strains of group B streptococci. Images PMID:7518832

  6. Expression and Significance of High-Mobility Group Protein B1 (HMGB1) and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Product (RAGE) in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xue-Hui; Liu, Ying; Han, Yun; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was performed with the aim to explore the expression of high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) and the receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and its clinical significance. Material/Methods A total of 108 synovial tissues selected from KOA patients were included in the experimental group. Seventy-five synovial tissues of knee joints, selected from patients who were clinically and pathologically confirmed without joint lesion, were included in the control group. The mRNA and protein expressions of HMGB1 and RAGE were determined by using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Western blotting was used for measuring relative protein expression. An ROC curve was drawn to evaluate the diagnostic value of HMGB1 and RAGE for KOA. Results The positive cell number and positive expression intensity of HMGB1 and RAGE in synovial tissue was higher in the experimental group than in the control group. PI for HMGB1 and RAGE expression in KOA patients was positively correlated with clinical classification of X-ray films (P<0.05). HMGB1 and RAGE mRNA expressions, as well as relative protein expression of HMGB1 and RAGE in synovial tissue, were higher in the experimental group than in the control group (all P<0.05). The sensitivity of HMGB1 protein, RAGE protein, HMGB1 mRNA, and RAGE mRNA were 76.9%, 64.8%, 86.1%, and 64.8%, respectively; and the specificity was 100%, 96%, 74.7%, and 80%, respectively. Conclusions The protein and mRNA expressions of HMGB1 and RAGE are both increased in KOA patients, suggesting that they are involved in KOA. PMID:27320800

  7. The high mobility group box 1 protein of Sciaenops ocellatus is a secreted cytokine that stimulates macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Hu, Yong-Hua; Sun, Jin-Sheng; Sun, Li

    2011-10-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin-associated nonhistone protein that is involved in nucleosome formation and transcriptional regulation. In addition, HMGB1 is also known as an extracellular cytokine that triggers inflammation and immune responses. HMGB1-like sequences have been identified in a number of fish species, however, the function of piscine HMGB1 remains uninvestigated. In this study, we reported the identification and analysis of SoHMGB1, an HMGB1 homologue from red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). SoHMGB1 is 206 residues in length and contains two basic HMG boxes and a highly acidic C-terminal domain. SoHMGB1 shares 71-87% overall sequence identities with the HMGB1 counterparts from human, rat, and several fish species. Quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis showed that constitutive SoHMGB1 expression was detected in various tissues, with the lowest and highest levels found in kidney and muscle respectively. Bacterial challenge upregulated SoHMGB1 expression in head kidney (HK) and HK macrophages and induced extracellular secretion of SoHMGB1 by the activated macrophages. Recombinant SoHMGB1 (rSoHMGB1) purified from yeast exhibited no direct antimicrobial effect but was significantly stimulatory on the proliferation, activation, and bactericidal activity of HK macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that a fish HMGB1, SoHMGB1, can function as a secreted cytokine in the event of bacterial infection and promote innate defense through the activation of macrophages. PMID:21527276

  8. Complementary Activities of TELOMERE REPEAT BINDING Proteins and Polycomb Group Complexes in Transcriptional Regulation of Target Genes[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Benjamin; James, Geo Velikkakam

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) and PRC2 repress target genes through histone modification and chromatin compaction. Arabidopsis thaliana mutants strongly compromised in the pathway cannot develop differentiated organs. LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1) is so far the only known plant PRC1 component that directly binds to H3K27me3, the histone modification set by PRC2, and also associates genome-wide with trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3). Surprisingly, lhp1 mutants show relatively mild phenotypic alterations. To explain this paradox, we screened for genetic enhancers of lhp1 mutants to identify novel components repressing target genes together with, or in parallel to, LHP1. Two enhancing mutations were mapped to TELOMERE REPEAT BINDING PROTEIN1 (TRB1) and its paralog TRB3. We show that TRB1 binds to thousands of genomic sites containing telobox or related cis-elements with a significant increase of sites and strength of binding in the lhp1 background. Furthermore, in combination with lhp1, but not alone, trb1 mutants show increased transcription of LHP1 targets, such as floral meristem identity genes, which are more likely to be bound by TRB1 in the lhp1 background. By contrast, expression of a subset of LHP1-independent TRB1 target genes, many involved in primary metabolism, is decreased in the absence of TRB1 alone. Thus, TRB1 is a bivalent transcriptional modulator that maintains downregulation of Polycomb Group (PcG) target genes in lhp1 mutants, while it sustains high expression of targets that are regulated independently of PcG. PMID:26721861

  9. High mobility group box-1 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C zeta and secreted in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hanna; Park, Minhee; Shin, Nara; Kim, Gamin; Kim, Yun Gi; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Kim, Hoguen

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific enzyme for HMGB1 phosphorylation and its secretion is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of PKC-{zeta} leads to significant reduction of the secreted HMGB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation of specific site of HMGB1 redirects its secretion in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of PKC-{zeta} in cancers explains the enhanced HMGB1 secretion. -- Abstract: High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, is overexpressed and secreted in cancer cells. Phosphorylation on two different nuclear localization signal regions are known to be important for the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transport and secretion of HMGB1. However, little is known about the biochemical mechanism of HMGB1 modifications and its subsequent secretion from cancer cells. To identify the specific enzyme and important sites for HMGB1 phosphorylation, we screened the protein kinase C (PKC) family in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116) for HMGB1 binding by pull-down experiments using a 3XFLAG-HMGB1 construct. Strong interactions between atypical PKCs (PKC-{zeta}, {lambda}, and {iota}) and cytoplasmic HMGB1 were observed in HCT116 cells. We further identified the most critical PKC isotype that regulates HMGB1 secretion is PKC-{zeta} by using PKC inhibitors and siRNA experiments. The serine residues at S39, S53 and S181 of HMGB1 were related to enhancing HMGB1 secretion. We also demonstrated overexpression and activation of PKC-{zeta} in colon cancer tissues. Our findings suggest that PKC-{zeta} is involved in the phosphorylation of HMGB1, and the phosphorylation of specific serine residues in the nuclear localization signal regions is related to enhanced HMGB1 secretion in colon cancer cells.

  10. Antagonists of the kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2014-05-01

    The research community has increasingly focused on the development of OPRK antagonists as pharmacotherapies for the treatment of depression, anxiety, addictive disorders and other psychiatric conditions produced or exacerbated by stress. Short-acting OPRK antagonists have been recently developed as a potential improvement over long-acting prototypic ligands including nor-BNI and JDTic. Remarkably the short-acting LY2456302 is undergoing phase II clinical trials for the augmentation of the antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression. This Letter reviews relevant chemical and pharmacological advances in the identification and development of OPRK antagonists.

  11. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  12. Interleukin-1 antagonists in the treatment of autoinflammatory syndromes, including cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Quartier, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) include a group of rare autoinflammatory disorders, the spectrum of which ranges from the mildest form, ie, familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome to more severe phenotypes, ie, Muckle-Wells syndrome, and chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome, also known as neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease. Three interleukin (IL)-1 antagonists have been tested in adults and children with CAPS, ie, anakinra, a recombinant homolog of the human IL-1 receptor antagonist; rilonacept, a fusion protein comprising the extracellular domains of IL-1 receptor I and the IL-1 adaptor protein, IL-1RAcP, attached to a human immunoglobulin G molecule; and canakinumab, the anti-IL-1β monoclonal antibody. Following rapid clinical development, rilonacept and canakinumab were approved by both the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in adults and children. This review describes how the study of CAPS has helped us to understand better the way the innate immune system works, the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes, and the key role of IL-1. It also reviews the effects of IL-1 blockade in CAPS and other disorders, in particular systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, adult-onset Still’s disease, and gout. Finally, this review covers some issues addressed by very recent and ongoing work regarding treatment indications, from orphan diseases to common disorders, continuous versus intermittent treatment, the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and optimal dosages of the different drugs, as well as the need for Phase IV trials, exhaustive registries, and long-term follow-up of several patient cohorts.

  13. Analysis of the binding of high mobility group protein 17 to the nucleosome core particle by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cook, G R; Minch, M; Schroth, G P; Bradbury, E M

    1989-01-25

    The binding of high mobility group (HMG) protein 17 to the nucleosome core particle has been studied in D2O solution using 1H NMR at 500 MHz. Spectra were obtained for purified HMG 17, purified nucleosome core particles, and the reconstituted HMG 17-nucleosome core particle complex at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 M NaCl. Subtraction of the core particle spectra from spectra of the core particle reconstituted with HMG 17 demonstrated those regions of HMG 17 which interact with the nucleosome at different ionic strengths; the resonance peaks of interacting groups are broadened due to their restricted mobility. At 0.1 M NaCl, the mobility of all the amino acid side chains of HMG 17 was restricted, indicating complete binding of HMG 17 to the much larger nucleosome core particle. At 0.2 M NaCl most of the amino acids were free with the exception of arginine and proline which are confined to or predominant in the basic central region of HMG 17. These amino acids were completely free only at 0.4 M NaCl. We conclude that the entire HMG 17 molecule interacts with the nucleosome core particle at physiological ionic strength. The acidic COOH-terminal region of HMG 17 is released from interaction with the core histones at an NaCl concentration between 0.1 and 0.2 M and so binds weakly at physiological ionic strength. The basic central region binds more strongly to the core particle DNA, being completely released only at much higher ionic strength, between 0.3 and 0.4 M NaCl.

  14. High-mobility group AT-hook protein 2 expression and its prognostic significance in MGMT methylated and unmethylated glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schwarm, Frank P; Uhle, Florian; Schänzer, Anne; Acker, Till; Stein, Marco; Reinges, Marcus H T; Weischer, Cornelia; Weigand, Marcus A; Uhl, Eberhard; Kolodziej, Malgorzata A

    2016-04-01

    High-mobility group AT-hook protein 2 (HMGA 2) is a transcription factor associated with malignancy and poor prognosis in a variety of human cancers. We correlated HMGA 2 expression with clinical parameters, survival, and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation status (MGMT) in glioblastoma patients. HMGA 2 expression was determined by performing quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 44 glioblastoma patients and 5 non-tumorous brain specimens as controls. Gene expression levels of MGMT methylated vs. unmethylated patients, and gene expression levels between patient groups, both for qPCR and IHC data were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The relationship between HMGA 2 expression, progression-free survival and overall survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. P-values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant throughout the analyses. The mean age of patients at diagnosis was 57.4 ± 15.7 years, and the median survival was 16 months (SE 2.8; 95% CI, 10.6-21.4). HMGA 2 gene expression was significantly higher in glioblastoma compared to normal brain tissue on qPCR (mean, 0.35; SD, 0.27 vs. 0.03, SD, 0.05) and IHC levels (IRS mean, 17.21; SD, 7.43 vs. 3.20; SD, 1.68) (p=0.001). Survival analysis revealed that HMGA 2 overexpression was associated with a shorter progression-free and overall survival time in patients with methylation (n=24). The present study shows a tendency that HMGA 2 overexpression correlates with a poor prognosis of glioblastoma patients independent of MGMT methylation status. The results suggest that HMGA 2 could play an important role in the treatment of glioblastoma and could have a function in prognosis of this type of cancer. PMID:26892260

  15. Conformation of a Group 2 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Soybean. Evidence of Poly (l-Proline)-type II Structure1

    PubMed Central

    Soulages, Jose L.; Kim, Kangmin; Arrese, Estela L.; Walters, Christina; Cushman, John C.

    2003-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are members of a large group of hydrophilic, glycine-rich proteins found in plants, algae, fungi, and bacteria known collectively as hydrophilins that are preferentially expressed in response to dehydration or hyperosmotic stress. Group 2 LEA (dehydrins or responsive to abscisic acid) proteins are postulated to stabilize macromolecules against damage by freezing, dehydration, ionic, or osmotic stress. However, the structural and physicochemical properties of group 2 LEA proteins that account for such functions remain unknown. We have analyzed the structural properties of a recombinant form of a soybean (Glycine max) group 2 LEA (rGmDHN1). Differential scanning calorimetry of purified rGmDHN1 demonstrated that the protein does not display a cooperative unfolding transition upon heating. Ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the protein is in a largely hydrated and unstructured conformation in solution. However, ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism measurements collected at different temperatures showed that the protein exists in equilibrium between two extended conformational states: unordered and left-handed extended helical or poly (l-proline)-type II structures. It is estimated that 27% of the residues of rGmDHN1 adopt or poly (l-proline)-type II-like helical conformation at 12°C. The content of extended helix gradually decreases to 15% as the temperature is increased to 80°C. Studies of the conformation of the protein in solution in the presence of liposomes, trifluoroethanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that rGmDHN1 has a very low intrinsic ability to adopt α-helical structure and to interact with phospholipid bilayers through amphipathic α-helices. The ability of the protein to remain in a highly extended conformation at low temperatures could constitute the basis of the functional role of GmDHN1 in the prevention of freezing, desiccation, ionic, or osmotic

  16. Role of an endothelin type A receptor antagonist in regulating torsion-induced testicular apoptosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Cayli, Sevil; Ocakli, Seda; Senel, Ufuk; Karaca, Zafer; Erdemir, Fikret; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2016-05-01

    Testicular torsion is a well-known medical emergency that can lead to pathological changes in the testicular tissues and male infertility. This investigation was undertaken to gain insight into the effects of an endothelin type A receptor antagonist (BQ123) on torsion-induced germ cell loss. Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups. In group I (control group), a sham operation to the left testis was performed. In group II (I/R injury), I/R injury was created by rotating the left testis 720° in a clockwise direction for 2 h and detorsing the testis after 2 h. In group III (I/R injury+BQ123), the rats were subjected to I/R injury and BQ123 injection (1 mg/kg, intravenous). In group IV (control+BQ123), the sham operated rats were subjected to BQ123. The testes of the rats were removed in all groups. Torsion-induced apoptosis and the effects of BQ123 were examined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick end labelling (TUNEL) technique, immunohistochemistry and western blotting. In group II, the number of TUNEL-positive cells increased after testicular torsion. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting showed that apoptotic proteins (active caspase 3 and Bax) were upregulated, and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 was downregulated in I/R injury. The administration of BQ123 caused a significant decrease in the number of apoptotic cells and the expression of apoptotic proteins (p<0.05) when compared with the I/R injury group. No significant effect of BQ123 was observed in the testicular cells of group IV. This animal study provides evidence of the regulatory effects of BQ123 on torsion-induced testicular apoptosis.

  17. Prenatal alcohol exposure and cellular differentiation: a role for Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins in FAS phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Veazey, Kylee J; Muller, Daria; Golding, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to alcohol significantly alters the developmental trajectory of progenitor cells and fundamentally compromises tissue formation (i.e., histogenesis). Emerging research suggests that ethanol can impair mammalian development by interfering with the execution of molecular programs governing differentiation. For example, ethanol exposure disrupts cellular migration, changes cell-cell interactions, and alters growth factor signaling pathways. Additionally, ethanol can alter epigenetic mechanisms controlling gene expression. Normally, lineage-specific regulatory factors (i.e., transcription factors) establish the transcriptional networks of each new cell type; the cell's identity then is maintained through epigenetic alterations in the way in which the DNA encoding each gene becomes packaged within the chromatin. Ethanol exposure can induce epigenetic changes that do not induce genetic mutations but nonetheless alter the course of fetal development and result in a large array of patterning defects. Two crucial enzyme complexes--the Polycomb and Trithorax proteins--are central to the epigenetic programs controlling the intricate balance between self-renewal and the execution of cellular differentiation, with diametrically opposed functions. Prenatal ethanol exposure may disrupt the functions of these two enzyme complexes, altering a crucial aspect of mammalian differentiation. Characterizing the involvement of Polycomb and Trithorax group complexes in the etiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders will undoubtedly enhance understanding of the role that epigenetic programming plays in this complex disorder.

  18. A Multi-Serotype Approach Clarifies the Catabolite Control Protein A Regulon in the Major Human Pathogen Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    DebRoy, Sruti; Saldaña, Miguel; Travisany, Dante; Montano, Andrew; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Horstmann, Nicola; Yao, Hui; González, Mauricio; Maass, Alejandro; Latorre, Mauricio; Shelburne, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Catabolite control protein A (CcpA) is a highly conserved, master regulator of carbon source utilization in gram-positive bacteria, but the CcpA regulon remains ill-defined. In this study we aimed to clarify the CcpA regulon by determining the impact of CcpA-inactivation on the virulence and transcriptome of three distinct serotypes of the major human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (GAS). CcpA-inactivation significantly decreased GAS virulence in a broad array of animal challenge models consistent with the idea that CcpA is critical to gram-positive bacterial pathogenesis. Via comparative transcriptomics, we established that the GAS CcpA core regulon is enriched for highly conserved CcpA binding motifs (i.e. cre sites). Conversely, strain-specific differences in the CcpA transcriptome seems to consist primarily of affected secondary networks. Refinement of cre site composition via analysis of the core regulon facilitated development of a modified cre consensus that shows promise for improved prediction of CcpA targets in other medically relevant gram-positive pathogens. PMID:27580596

  19. High Mobility Group Box Protein 1 Boosts Endothelial Albumin Transcytosis through the RAGE/Src/Caveolin-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Dan; Peng, Tao; Gou, Shanmiao; Li, Yiqing; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou; Yang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), an inflammatory mediator, has been reported to destroy cell-cell junctions, resulting in vascular endothelial hyperpermeability. Here, we report that HMGB1 increases the endothelial transcytosis of albumin. In mouse lung vascular endothelial cells (MLVECs), HMGB1 at a concentration of 500 ng/ml or less did not harm cell-cell junctions but rapidly induced endothelial hyperpermeability to 125I-albumin. HMGB1 induced an increase in 125I-albumin and AlexaFluor 488-labeled albumin internalization in endocytosis assays. Depletion of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not TLR2 or TLR4, suppressed HMGB1-induced albumin transcytosis and endocytosis. Genetic and pharmacological destruction of lipid rafts significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced albumin endocytosis and transcytosis. HMGB1 induced the rapid phosphorylation of caveolin (Cav)-1 and Src. Either RAGE gene silencing or soluble RAGE suppressed Cav-1 Tyr14 phosphorylation and Src Tyr418 phosphorylation. The Src inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl) pyrazolo[3,4-d] pyrimidine (PP2) blocked HMGB1-induced Cav-1 Tyr14 phosphorylation. PP2 and overexpression of Cav-1 with a T14F mutation significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced transcytosis and albumin endocytosis. Our findings suggest that HMGB1 induces the transcytosis of albumin via RAGE-dependent Src phosphorylation and Cav-1 phosphorylation. These studies revealed a new mechanism of HMGB1-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. PMID:27572515

  20. The Polycomb Group Protein Pcgf1 Is Dispensable in Zebrafish but Involved in Early Growth and Aging.

    PubMed

    Dupret, Barbara; Völkel, Pamela; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Angrand, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex (PRC) 1 regulates the control of gene expression programs via chromatin structure reorganization. Through mutual exclusion, different PCGF members generate a variety of PRC1 complexes with potentially distinct cellular functions. In this context, the molecular function of each of the PCGF family members remains elusive. The study of PCGF family member expression in zebrafish development and during caudal fin regeneration reveals that the zebrafish pcgf genes are subjected to different regulations and that all PRC1 complexes in terms of Pcgf subunit composition are not always present in the same tissues. To unveil the function of Pcgf1 in zebrafish, a mutant line was generated using the TALEN technology. Mutant pcgf1-/- fish are viable and fertile, but the growth rate at early developmental stages is reduced in absence of pcgf1 gene function and a significant number of pcgf1-/- fish show signs of premature aging. This first vertebrate model lacking Pcgf1 function shows that this Polycomb Group protein is involved in cell proliferation during early embryogenesis and establishes a link between epigenetics and aging. PMID:27442247

  1. Interactions with RNA direct the Polycomb group protein SCML2 to chromatin where it represses target genes

    PubMed Central

    Bonasio, Roberto; Lecona, Emilio; Narendra, Varun; Voigt, Philipp; Parisi, Fabio; Kluger, Yuval; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) is essential for the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. SCML2 is a mammalian homolog of Drosophila SCM, a Polycomb-group protein that associates with PRC1. In this study, we show that SCML2A, an SCML2 isoform tightly associated to chromatin, contributes to PRC1 localization and also directly enforces repression of certain Polycomb target genes. SCML2A binds to PRC1 via its SPM domain and interacts with ncRNAs through a novel RNA-binding region (RBR). Targeting of SCML2A to chromatin involves the coordinated action of the MBT domains, RNA binding, and interaction with PRC1 through the SPM domain. Deletion of the RBR reduces the occupancy of SCML2A at target genes and overexpression of a mutant SCML2A lacking the RBR causes defects in PRC1 recruitment. These observations point to a role for ncRNAs in regulating SCML2 function and suggest that SCML2 participates in the epigenetic control of transcription directly and in cooperation with PRC1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02637.001 PMID:24986859

  2. High Mobility Group Box Protein 1 Boosts Endothelial Albumin Transcytosis through the RAGE/Src/Caveolin-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Shang, Dan; Peng, Tao; Gou, Shanmiao; Li, Yiqing; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou; Yang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), an inflammatory mediator, has been reported to destroy cell-cell junctions, resulting in vascular endothelial hyperpermeability. Here, we report that HMGB1 increases the endothelial transcytosis of albumin. In mouse lung vascular endothelial cells (MLVECs), HMGB1 at a concentration of 500 ng/ml or less did not harm cell-cell junctions but rapidly induced endothelial hyperpermeability to (125)I-albumin. HMGB1 induced an increase in (125)I-albumin and AlexaFluor 488-labeled albumin internalization in endocytosis assays. Depletion of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not TLR2 or TLR4, suppressed HMGB1-induced albumin transcytosis and endocytosis. Genetic and pharmacological destruction of lipid rafts significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced albumin endocytosis and transcytosis. HMGB1 induced the rapid phosphorylation of caveolin (Cav)-1 and Src. Either RAGE gene silencing or soluble RAGE suppressed Cav-1 Tyr14 phosphorylation and Src Tyr418 phosphorylation. The Src inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl) pyrazolo[3,4-d] pyrimidine (PP2) blocked HMGB1-induced Cav-1 Tyr14 phosphorylation. PP2 and overexpression of Cav-1 with a T14F mutation significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced transcytosis and albumin endocytosis. Our findings suggest that HMGB1 induces the transcytosis of albumin via RAGE-dependent Src phosphorylation and Cav-1 phosphorylation. These studies revealed a new mechanism of HMGB1-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. PMID:27572515

  3. A Multi-Serotype Approach Clarifies the Catabolite Control Protein A Regulon in the Major Human Pathogen Group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Sruti; Saldaña, Miguel; Travisany, Dante; Montano, Andrew; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Horstmann, Nicola; Yao, Hui; González, Mauricio; Maass, Alejandro; Latorre, Mauricio; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    Catabolite control protein A (CcpA) is a highly conserved, master regulator of carbon source utilization in gram-positive bacteria, but the CcpA regulon remains ill-defined. In this study we aimed to clarify the CcpA regulon by determining the impact of CcpA-inactivation on the virulence and transcriptome of three distinct serotypes of the major human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (GAS). CcpA-inactivation significantly decreased GAS virulence in a broad array of animal challenge models consistent with the idea that CcpA is critical to gram-positive bacterial pathogenesis. Via comparative transcriptomics, we established that the GAS CcpA core regulon is enriched for highly conserved CcpA binding motifs (i.e. cre sites). Conversely, strain-specific differences in the CcpA transcriptome seems to consist primarily of affected secondary networks. Refinement of cre site composition via analysis of the core regulon facilitated development of a modified cre consensus that shows promise for improved prediction of CcpA targets in other medically relevant gram-positive pathogens. PMID:27580596

  4. The Polycomb Group Protein Pcgf1 Is Dispensable in Zebrafish but Involved in Early Growth and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Angrand, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex (PRC) 1 regulates the control of gene expression programs via chromatin structure reorganization. Through mutual exclusion, different PCGF members generate a variety of PRC1 complexes with potentially distinct cellular functions. In this context, the molecular function of each of the PCGF family members remains elusive. The study of PCGF family member expression in zebrafish development and during caudal fin regeneration reveals that the zebrafish pcgf genes are subjected to different regulations and that all PRC1 complexes in terms of Pcgf subunit composition are not always present in the same tissues. To unveil the function of Pcgf1 in zebrafish, a mutant line was generated using the TALEN technology. Mutant pcgf1-/- fish are viable and fertile, but the growth rate at early developmental stages is reduced in absence of pcgf1 gene function and a significant number of pcgf1-/- fish show signs of premature aging. This first vertebrate model lacking Pcgf1 function shows that this Polycomb Group protein is involved in cell proliferation during early embryogenesis and establishes a link between epigenetics and aging. PMID:27442247

  5. Dipolar dynamic frequency shifts in multiple-quantum spectra of methyl groups in proteins: correlation with side-chain motion.

    PubMed

    Tugarinov, Vitali; Ollerenshaw, Jason E; Kay, Lewis E

    2006-07-01

    Small deviations from the expected relative positions of multiplet components in double- and zero-quantum 1H-13C methyl correlation maps have been observed in spectra recorded on a 7-kDa protein. These dynamic frequency shifts (DFS) are the result of dipolar cross-correlations that derive from fields produced by the spins within the methyl groups. The shifts have been quantified and compared with values calculated from a Redfield analysis. Good agreement is noted between the signs of the predicted and experimentally observed relative shifts of lines in both F1 and F2 dimensions of spectra, as well as between the magnitudes of the calculated and observed shifts in the F2 (1H) dimension. The experimental DFS values show a reasonable correlation with 2H relaxation-derived measures of methyl side-chain dynamics, as expected from theory. This suggests that in cases where such shifts can be quantified, they can serve as qualitative measures of motion. PMID:16826549

  6. Cytoplasmic translocation of high-mobility group box-1 protein is induced by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the involvement of the high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Rat primary retinal pericytes were exposed to 25 mmol/l D-glucose for 48 h. Diabetic retinal vessels were prepared from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats 12 weeks following the induction of diabetes. The expression of HMGB1 was detected using immunofluorescence staining. The expression of RAGE and the activity of NF-κB were analyzed using western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, respectively. The results showed that HMGB1 was translocated to the cytoplasm of the high glucose-treated pericytes and diabetic retinal pericytes, whereas, in the control cells and the normal retinas, HMGB1 was expressed in the cell nuclei only. The expression of RAGE, a potential receptor for HMGB1, and the activity of NF-κB were also increased in the high glucose-treated pericytes, compared with the normal control cells. In addition, high glucose increased the binding of NF-κB to the RAGE promoter. These findings suggested that the cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 may be caused by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes, and that the pathogenic role of HMGB1 may be dependent on the expression of RAGE and activation of NF-κB. PMID:27599553

  7. Cytoplasmic translocation of high-mobility group box-1 protein is induced by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the involvement of the high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Rat primary retinal pericytes were exposed to 25 mmol/l D‑glucose for 48 h. Diabetic retinal vessels were prepared from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats 12 weeks following the induction of diabetes. The expression of HMGB1 was detected using immunofluorescence staining. The expression of RAGE and the activity of NF‑κB were analyzed using western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, respectively. The results showed that HMGB1 was translocated to the cytoplasm of the high glucose‑treated pericytes and diabetic retinal pericytes, whereas, in the control cells and the normal retinas, HMGB1 was expressed in the cell nuclei only. The expression of RAGE, a potential receptor for HMGB1, and the activity of NF‑κB were also increased in the high glucose‑treated pericytes, compared with the normal control cells. In addition, high glucose increased the binding of NF‑κB to the RAGE promoter. These findings suggested that the cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 may be caused by diabetes and high glucose in retinal pericytes, and that the pathogenic role of HMGB1 may be dependent on the expression of RAGE and activation of NF‑κB. PMID:27599553

  8. Structural, signalling and regulatory properties of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors: prototypic family C G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, E; Challiss, R A

    2001-01-01

    In 1991 a new type of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was cloned, the type 1a metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor, which, despite possessing the defining seven-transmembrane topology of the GPCR superfamily, bore little resemblance to the growing number of other cloned GPCRs. Subsequent studies have shown that there are eight mammalian mGlu receptors that, together with the calcium-sensing receptor, the GABA(B) receptor (where GABA is gamma-aminobutyric acid) and a subset of pheromone, olfactory and taste receptors, make up GPCR family C. Currently available data suggest that family C GPCRs share a number of structural, biochemical and regulatory characteristics, which differ markedly from those of the other GPCR families, most notably the rhodopsin/family A GPCRs that have been most widely studied to date. This review will focus on the group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5). This subgroup of receptors is widely and differentially expressed in neuronal and glial cells within the brain, and receptor activation has been implicated in the control of an array of key signalling events, including roles in the adaptative changes needed for long-term depression or potentiation of neuronal synaptic connectivity. In addition to playing critical physiological roles within the brain, the mGlu receptors are also currently the focus of considerable attention because of their potential as drug targets for the treatment of a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:11672421

  9. Overexpression of OsEm1 encoding a group I LEA protein confers enhanced drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Lai, Yongmin; Wu, Xi; Wu, Gang; Guo, Changkui

    2016-09-16

    Drought is the greatest threat for crops, including rice. In an effort to identify rice genes responsible for drought tolerance, a drought-responsive gene OsEm1 encoding a group I LEA protein, was chosen for this study. OsEm1 was shown at vegetative stages to be responsive to various abiotic stresses, including drought, salt, cold and the hormone ABA. In this study, we generated OsEm1-overexpressing rice plants to explore the function of OsEm1 under drought conditions. Overexpression of OsEm1 increases ABA sensitivity and enhances osmotic tolerance in rice. Compared with wild type, the OsEm1-overexpressing rice plants showed enhanced plant survival ratio at the vegetative stage; moreover, over expression of OsEm1 in rice increased the expression of other LEA genes, including RAB16A, RAB16C, RAB21, and LEA3, likely protecting organ integrity against harsh environments. Interestingly, the elevated level of OsEm1 had no different phenotype compared with wild type under normal condition. Our findings suggest that OsEm1 is a positive regulator of drought tolerance and is potentially promising for engineering drought tolerance in rice. PMID:27524243

  10. Plant Evolution: Evolving Antagonistic Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Endymion D

    2016-06-20

    Developing a structurally complex phenotype requires a complex regulatory network. A new study shows how gene duplication provides a potential source of antagonistic interactions, an important component of gene regulatory networks. PMID:27326708

  11. Plant Evolution: Evolving Antagonistic Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Endymion D

    2016-06-20

    Developing a structurally complex phenotype requires a complex regulatory network. A new study shows how gene duplication provides a potential source of antagonistic interactions, an important component of gene regulatory networks.

  12. Hydrophobic Variations of N-Oxide Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Manipulation: Importance of Non-hydrocarbon Groups in the Hydrophobic Portion

    PubMed Central

    Aiman, Sadaf; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces several N-oxide amphiphiles evaluated for a large membrane protein assembly. Among these N-oxide amphiphiles, cholate-based agents (CAO and CAO-1) displayed the most favorable behaviors for membrane protein stabilization. This result raises the possibility that the identity and number of non-hydrocarbon groups present in the hydrophobic region plays a critical role in determining detergent properties. PMID:24347070

  13. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of an antagonist (SM-406/AT-406) of multiple inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Yu, Jing-yu; McEachern, Donna; Wang, Shaomeng; Sun, Duxin

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are a class of key apoptosis regulators overexpressed or dysregulated in cancer. SM-406/AT-406 is a potent and selective small molecule mimetic of Smac that antagonizes the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model was developed to predict the tissue concentration-time profiles of SM-406, the related onco-protein levels in tumor, and the tumor growth inhibition in a mouse model bearing human breast cancer xenograft. In the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for pharmacokinetics characterization, a well stirred (perfusion rate-limited) model was used to describe SM-406 pharmacokinetics in the lung, heart, kidney, intestine, liver and spleen, and a diffusion rate-limited (permeability limited) model was used for tumor. Pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to correlate the SM-406 concentration in tumor to the cIAP1 degradation, pro-caspase 8 decrease, CL-PARP accumulation and tumor growth inhibition. The PBPK-PD model well described the experimental pharmacokinetic data, the pharmacodynamic biomarker responses and tumor growth. This model may be helpful to predict tumor and plasma SM-406 concentrations in the clinic.

  14. Preparation of ultrathin, robust protein microcapsules through template-mediated interfacial reaction between amine and catechol groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Shi, Jiafu; Jiang, Zhongyi; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Wenyan; Song, Xiaokai; Ai, Qinghong; Wu, Hong

    2013-11-11

    A novel approach to the synthesis of protein microcapsules is developed through template-mediated interfacial reaction. Protein-doped CaCO3 templates are first synthetized via coprecipitation and then coated with a catechol-containing alginate (AlgDA) layer. Afterward, the templates are exposed to ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid disodium (EDTA) solution to dissolve CaCO3. During CaCO3 dissolution, the generated CO2 gas pushes protein molecules moving to the AlgDA layer, and thereby Michael addition and Schiff base reactions proceed, forming the shell of protein microcapsules. Three kinds of proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin, catalase, and protamine sulfate, are utilized. The shell thickness of microcapsule varies from 25 to 82 nm as the doping amount of protein increased from 2 to 6 mg per 66 mg CaCO3. The protein microcapsules have a robust but flexible shell and can be reversibly deformed upon exposure to osmotic pressure. The bioactivity of protein microcapsules is demonstrated through enzymatic catalysis experiments. The protein microcapsules remain about 80% enzymatic activity of the equivalent free protein. Hopefully, our approach could be extended to many other applications such as drug/gene delivery, tissue scaffolds, and catalysis due to the universality of Michael reaction and Schiff base reactions.

  15. Serotonin 2C receptor antagonists induce fast-onset antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Opal, M D; Klenotich, S C; Morais, M; Bessa, J; Winkle, J; Doukas, D; Kay, L J; Sousa, N; Dulawa, S M

    2014-10-01

    Current antidepressants must be administered for several weeks to produce therapeutic effects. We show that selective serotonin 2C (5-HT2C) antagonists exert antidepressant actions with a faster-onset (5 days) than that of current antidepressants (14 days) in mice. Subchronic (5 days) treatment with 5-HT2C antagonists induced antidepressant behavioral effects in the chronic forced swim test (cFST), chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm and olfactory bulbectomy paradigm. This treatment regimen also induced classical markers of antidepressant action: activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). None of these effects were induced by subchronic treatment with citalopram, a prototypical selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Local infusion of 5-HT2C antagonists into the ventral tegmental area was sufficient to induce BDNF in the mPFC, and dopamine D1 receptor antagonist treatment blocked the antidepressant behavioral effects of 5-HT2C antagonists. 5-HT2C antagonists also activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) in the mPFC, effects recently linked to rapid antidepressant action. Furthermore, 5-HT2C antagonists reversed CMS-induced atrophy of mPFC pyramidal neurons. Subchronic SSRI treatment, which does not induce antidepressant behavioral effects, also activated mTOR and eEF2 and reversed CMS-induced neuronal atrophy, indicating that these effects are not sufficient for antidepressant onset. Our findings reveal that 5-HT2C antagonists are putative fast-onset antidepressants, which act through enhancement of mesocortical dopaminergic signaling. PMID:24166413

  16. Cell attachment protein VP8* of a human rotavirus specifically interacts with A-type histo-blood group antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liya; Crawford, Sue E.; Czako, Rita; Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas W; Smith, David F.; Le Pendu, Jacques; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2012-01-01

    As with many other viruses, the initial cell attachment of rotaviruses, major causative agent of infantile gastroenteritis, is mediated by interactions with specific cellular glycans1–4. The distally located VP8* domain of the rotavirus spike protein VP45 mediates such interactions. The existing paradigm is that ‘sialidase-sensitive’ animal rotavirus strains bind to glycans with terminal sialic acid (Sia), whereas ‘sialidase-insensitive’ human rotavirus (HR) strains bind to glycans with internal Sia such as GM13. Although the involvement of Sia in the animal strains is firmly supported by crystallographic studies1,3,6,7, it is not yet known how VP8* of HRs interacts with Sia and whether their cell attachment necessarily involves sialoglycans. We found that VP8* of a HR strain specifically recognizes A-type histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) using a glycan array screen comprised of 511 glycans, and that virus infectivity in HT-29 cells is abrogated by anti-Atype antibodies as well as significantly enhanced in CHO cells genetically modified to express the A-type HBGA, providing a novel paradigm for initial cell attachment of HR. HBGAs are genetically determined glycoconjugates present in mucosal secretions, epithelial and on red blood cells8, and are recognized as susceptibility and cell attachment factors for gastric pathogens like H. pylori9 and noroviruses10. Our crystallographic studies show that the A-type HBGA binds to the HR VP8* at the same location as the Sia in the VP8* of animal rotavirus, and suggest how subtle changes within the same structural framework allow for such receptor switching. These results raise the possibility that host susceptibility to specific HR strains and pathogenesis are influenced by genetically controlled expression of different HBGAs among the world’s population. PMID:22504179

  17. Extra-helical binding site of a glucagon receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Ali; Doré, Andrew S; Lamb, Daniel; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Southall, Stacey M; Baig, Asma H; Bortolato, Andrea; Koglin, Markus; Robertson, Nathan J; Errey, James C; Andrews, Stephen P; Teobald, Iryna; Brown, Alastair J H; Cooke, Robert M; Weir, Malcolm; Marshall, Fiona H

    2016-05-12

    Glucagon is a 29-amino-acid peptide released from the α-cells of the islet of Langerhans, which has a key role in glucose homeostasis. Glucagon action is transduced by the class B G-protein-coupled glucagon receptor (GCGR), which is located on liver, kidney, intestinal smooth muscle, brain, adipose tissue, heart and pancreas cells, and this receptor has been considered an important drug target in the treatment of diabetes. Administration of recently identified small-molecule GCGR antagonists in patients with type 2 diabetes results in a substantial reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations. Although an X-ray structure of the transmembrane domain of the GCGR has previously been solved, the ligand (NNC0640) was not resolved. Here we report the 2.5 Å structure of human GCGR in complex with the antagonist MK-0893 (ref. 4), which is found to bind to an allosteric site outside the seven transmembrane (7TM) helical bundle in a position between TM6 and TM7 extending into the lipid bilayer. Mutagenesis of key residues identified in the X-ray structure confirms their role in the binding of MK-0893 to the receptor. The unexpected position of the binding site for MK-0893, which is structurally similar to other GCGR antagonists, suggests that glucagon activation of the receptor is prevented by restriction of the outward helical movement of TM6 required for G-protein coupling. Structural knowledge of class B receptors is limited, with only one other ligand-binding site defined--for the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRF1R)--which was located deep within the 7TM bundle. We describe a completely novel allosteric binding site for class B receptors, providing an opportunity for structure-based drug design for this receptor class and furthering our understanding of the mechanisms of activation of these receptors. PMID:27111510

  18. Evidence-based recommendations for optimal dietary protein intake in older people: a position paper from the PROT-AGE Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jürgen; Biolo, Gianni; Cederholm, Tommy; Cesari, Matteo; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Morley, John E; Phillips, Stuart; Sieber, Cornel; Stehle, Peter; Teta, Daniel; Visvanathan, Renuka; Volpi, Elena; Boirie, Yves

    2013-08-01

    New evidence shows that older adults need more dietary protein than do younger adults to support good health, promote recovery from illness, and maintain functionality. Older people need to make up for age-related changes in protein metabolism, such as high splanchnic extraction and declining anabolic responses to ingested protein. They also need more protein to offset inflammatory and catabolic conditions associated with chronic and acute diseases that occur commonly with aging. With the goal of developing updated, evidence-based recommendations for optimal protein intake by older people, the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS), in cooperation with other scientific organizations, appointed an international study group to review dietary protein needs with aging (PROT-AGE Study Group). To help older people (>65 years) maintain and regain lean body mass and function, the PROT-AGE study group recommends average daily intake at least in the range of 1.0 to 1.2 g protein per kilogram of body weight per day. Both endurance- and resistance-type exercises are recommended at individualized levels that are safe and tolerated, and higher protein intake (ie, ≥ 1.2 g/kg body weight/d) is advised for those who are exercising and otherwise active. Most older adults who have acute or chronic diseases need even more dietary protein (ie, 1.2-1.5 g/kg body weight/d). Older people with severe kidney disease (ie, estimated GFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), but who are not on dialysis, are an exception to this rule; these individuals may need to limit protein intake. Protein quality, timing of ingestion, and intake of other nutritional supplements may be relevant, but evidence is not yet sufficient to support specific recommendations. Older people are vulnerable to losses in physical function capacity, and such losses predict loss of independence, falls, and even mortality. Thus, future studies aimed at pinpointing optimal protein intake in specific populations of older people

  19. Structure-based prediction of subtype-selectivity of Histamine H3 receptor selective antagonists in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Fristrup, Peter; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Histamine receptors (HRs) are excellent drug targets for the treatment of diseases such as schizophrenia, psychosis, depression, migraine, allergies, asthma ulcers, and hypertension. Among them, the human H3 Histamine receptor (hH3HR) antagonists have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), epilepsy, and obesity.1 However, many of these drug candidates cause undesired side effects through the cross-reactivity with other histamine receptor subtypes. In order to develop improved selectivity and activity for such treatments it would be useful to have the three dimensional structures for all four HRs. We report here the predicted structures of four HR subtypes (H1, H2, H3, and H4) using the GEnSeMBLE (GPCR Ensemble of Structures in Membrane BiLayer Environment) Monte Carlo protocol.2 sampling ~ 35 million combinations of helix packings to predict the 10 most stable packings for each of the four subtypes. Then we used these best 10 protein structures with the DarwinDock Monte Carlo protocol to sample ~ 50,000*20 poses to predict the optimum ligand-protein structures for various agonists and antagonists. We find that E2065.46 contributes most in binding H3 selective agonists (5, 6, 7) in agreement with experimental mutation studies. We also find that conserved E5.46/ S5.43 in both of hH3HR and hH4HR are involved in H3/ H4 subtype selectivity. In addition, we find that M3786.55 in hH3HR provides additional hydrophobic interactions different from hH4HR (the corresponding amino acid of T3236.55 in hH4HR) to provide additional subtype bias. From these studies we developed a pharmacophore model based on our predictions for known hH3HR selective antagonists in clinical study [ABT-239 1, GSK-189,254 2, PF-3654746 3, and BF2.649 (Tiprolisant) 4] that suggests critical selectivity directing elements are: the basic proton interacting with D1143.32, the spacer, the aromatic

  20. A Polymorphism in the Retinol Binding Protein 4 Gene is Not Associated with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Several Different Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Urschitz, Johann; Sultan, Omar; Ward, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Objective Various Asian and Pacifific Islander groups have higher prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. This increased incidence is likely to include genetic factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the retinol binding protein 4 gene have been linked to the occurrence of type 2 diabetes. Hypothesizing a link between retinol binding protein 4 and gestational diabetes, we performed a candidate gene study to look for an association between an important retinol binding protein gene polymorphism (rs3758539) and gestational diabetes. Study Design Blood was collected from Caucasian, Asian, and Pacific Islander women diagnosed with gestational diabetes and from ethnically matched non-diabetic controls. DNA was extracted and real time PCR technology (TaqMan, Applied Biosystems) used to screen for the rs3758539 single nucleotide polymorphism located 5′ of exon 1 of the retinol binding protein 4 gene. Results Genotype and allele frequencies in the controls and gestational diabetes cases were tested using chi-square contingency tests. Genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was no association between the rs3758539 retinol binding protein 4 single nucleotide polymorphism and gestational diabetes in the Caucasian, Filipino, or Pacific Islander groups. Conclusion Interestingly, the rs3758539 retinol binding protein 4 single nucleotide polymorphism was not found to be associated with gestational diabetes. The absence of association suggests that gestational and type 2 diabetes may have more divergent molecular pathophysiology than previously suspected. PMID:21886308

  1. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphorylation and reduction of cellular sulfhydryl groups in cell death induced by 1' -acetoxychavicol acetate in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Jerry; Kennedy, David Opare; Kojima, Akiko; Hasuma, Tadayoshi; Yano, Yoshihisa; Otani, Shuzo; Murakami, Akira; Koshimizu, Koichi; Ohigashi, Hajime; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao

    2002-02-20

    Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying potential anticancer drugs continues and unraveling these mechanisms would not only provide a conceptual framework for drug design but also promote use of natural products for chemotherapy. To further evaluate the efficacy of the anticancer activity of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), this study investigates the underlying mechanisms by which ACA induces death of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. ACA treatment induced loss of cell viability, and Western blotting analysis revealed that the compound stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins with 27 and 70 kDa proteins being regulated in both dose- and time-dependent manner prior to loss of viability. Protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A moderately protected cells from ACA-induced toxicity. In addition, cellular glutathione and protein sulfydryl groups were also significantly reduced both dose- and time-dependently during evidence of cell death. Replenishing thiol levels by antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an excellent supplier of glutathione and precursor of glutathione, substantially recovered the viability loss, but the recovery being time-dependent, as late addition of NAC (at least 30 min after ACA addition to cultures) was, however, ineffective. Addition of NAC to ACA treated cultures also abolished tyrosine phosphorylation of the 27 kDa protein. These results, at least partly, identify cellular sulfhydryl groups and protein tyrosine phosphorylation as targets of ACA cytotoxicity in tumor cells.

  2. Comparison of the neuropsychological mechanisms of 2,6-diisopropylphenol and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist against electroconvulsive therapy-induced learning and memory impairment in depressed rats

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GANG; LIU, CHAO; NING-ZHANG, XUE

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the neurophysiological mechanisms of the 2,6-diisopropylphenol and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist against learning and memory impairment, induced by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A total of 48 adult depressed rats without olfactory bulbs were randomly divided into six experimental groups: i) saline; ii) 10 mg/kg MK-801; iii) 10 mg/kg MK-801 and a course of ECT; iv) 200 mg/kg 2,6-diisopropylphenol; v) 200 mg/kg 2,6-diisopropylphenol and a course of ECT; and vi) saline and a course of ECT. The learning and memory abilities of the rats were assessed using a Morris water maze 1 day after a course of ECT. The hippocampus was removed 1 day after assessment using the Morris water maze assessment. The content of glutamate in the hippocampus was detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression levels of p-AT8Ser202 and GSK-3β1H8 in the hippocampus were determined using immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that the 2,6-diisopropylphenol NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 and ECT induced learning and memory impairment in the depressed rats. The glutamate content was significantly upregulated by ECT, reduced by 2,6-diisopropylphenol, and was unaffected by the NMDA receptor antagonist in the hippocampus of the depressed rats. Tau protein hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus was upregulated by ECT, but was reduced by 2,6-diisopropylphenol and the MK-801 NMDA receptor antagonist. It was also demonstrated that 2,6-diisopropylphenol prevented learning and memory impairment and reduced the hyperphosphorylation of the Tau protein, which was induced by eECT. GSK-3β was found to be the key protein involved in this signaling pathway. The ECT reduced the learning and memory impairment, caused by hyperphosphorylation of the Tau protein, in the depressed rats by upregulating the glutamate content. PMID:25998151

  3. TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage

    DOEpatents

    Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

  4. TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage

    DOEpatents

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H.

    1997-01-01

    A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

  5. Genetic linkage between the Kell blood group system and prolactin-inducible protein loci: provisional assignment of KEL to chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Zelinski, T; Coghlan, G; Myal, Y; Shiu, R P; Philipps, S; White, L; Lewis, M

    1991-05-01

    The Kell blood group locus (KEL) is tightly linked to the prolactin-inducible protein locus (PIP) with zeta = 9.12 at theta = 0.00 for combined paternal and maternal meioses. In view of the regional localization of PIP to 7q32-q36 (Myal et al. 1989a), a similar assignment for KEL is favoured.

  6. Localization of reducing group activity in the structural protein ribbons of the egg capsule of the gastropod mollusc Buccinum undatum L.

    PubMed

    Hunt, S; Price, N R

    1977-01-01

    Egg capsules of the gastropod molluse Buccinum undatum L. show a staining reaction with silver-methenamine reagent with prior treatment with periodate. The reactivity is specifically localized on the striated structural protein ribbons which form the capsule walls. The staining is in the region of ribbon most resistant to chemical degradation and where the constituent protein monomers are believed to overlap and be cross-linked. Since the proteins contain little cysteine it is likely that the staining originates in aldehyde groups. Staining is abolished by borohydride reduction. It is suggested that the aldehyde groups are a locus of stabilization and cross-linking since previous work has also shown association of an aldehyde secretion with hardening of the capsules.

  7. Substituted Tetrahydroisoquinolines as Selective Antagonists for the Orexin 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Perrey, David A.; German, Nadezhda A.; Gilmour, Brian P.; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L.; Thomas, Brian F.; Zhang, Yanan

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates the orexin 1 (OX1) receptor in reward processes, sugge