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Sample records for growing skull fracture

  1. Skull fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have been drinking alcohol or is otherwise impaired. Alternative Names Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture Images Skull of an adult Skull fracture Skull fracture ...

  2. Prevention of growing skull fractures: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Robert A

    2010-02-01

    The author describes 2 cases of children with growing skull fractures (GSFs). Surgical exploration of the widened fracture shortly after the head injury failed to reveal a dural tear because the neuroimaging studies (MR images, CT scans, and skull radiographs) had not been accurately interpreted, thereby allowing the development of a GSF at the site of the actual dural injury. In both cases, the dural and bony defect and the leptomeningeal cyst were successfully repaired. To prevent GSFs associated with progressive neurological deficit, seizure, ventricular porencephaly, and encephalomalacia, the author surgically explores wide skull fractures in young children with head injury whose MR images demonstrate brain herniation through the dura mater. The importance of a brief delay in surgical exploration is emphasized to allow cerebral edema to resolve and the patient's condition to become medically stabilized.

  3. [Growing skull fracture in childhood. Presentation of 12 cases].

    PubMed

    Mierez, R; Guillén, A; Brell, M; Cardona, E; Claramunt, E; Costa, J M

    2003-06-01

    Growing skull fractures (GSF) are rare complications of head injury (HI) in childhood. This entity consists of a skull fracture with an underlying dural tear that courses with a progressive enlargement of the fracture to produce a cranial defect. The pathophysiology and some aspects of its management are still controversial. In this review we present 12 patients diagnosedd and treated for a GSF at our institution between 1980 and 2002. 11 patients were under the age of 3 years and one patient was 5 years old at the moment of HI. The most common cause of injury was a fall from height. In the initial plain x-rayfilms, 11 patients showed a diastatic skull fracture and one patient only had a linear fracture. At this time, CT scan showed cortical contussion underlying the fracture in every case. The mean time between injury and presentation of GSF was 11.6 weeks. Diagnosis was made by palpation of the cranial defect and confirmed with skull x-rayfilms. The most frecuent location of GSF was in the parietal region. Associated lesions like hydrocephalus, encephalomalacia, lepto-menigeal cysts, brain tissue herniation and ipsilateral ventricular dilatation, were found in the preoperative CT or MRI. All patients underwent a dural repair with pericranium or fascia lata. The cranial defect was covered with local calvarial bone fragments in every case. Only one patient needed a cranioplasty with titanium mesh. Every child with a skull fracture must be followed until the fracture heals. Patients under the age of 3 years with a diastatic fracture and a dural tear, demostrated by TC or MRI, are more prone to develop GSF. In these cases, early repair must be adviced in order to prevent progressive brain damage.

  4. Growing skull fracture in a 5-month old child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yu, Michael; Schmidt, John H; Trenton, Brooke A; Sheets, Nicholas W

    2010-01-01

    Growing skull fractures are a rare complication of linear skull fractures in children. The authors report a case of a growing skull fracture in a 5-month-old patient with a review of the literature. CT and MRI scans revealed a growing skull fracture with complication of leptomeningeal cyst formation. Surgical removal of the cyst, duraplasty and cranial reconstruction were performed. Follow up showed that the patient was stable neurologically and had improving left upper extremity weakness.

  5. Remote intracranial hemorrhage following surgery for giant orbitofrontal growing skull fracture: A lesson learnt.

    PubMed

    Baldawa, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Growing skull fracture is an extremely rare complication of pediatric head injury, especially in infants. Repair of the dural tear early in the course of development of growing skull fracture has been suggested for a better outcome. Surgical repair of large, tense growing skull fractures, especially those in the communication of the ventricles can lead to potentially life-threatening complications. The author reports a rare case of remote intracranial hemorrhage following surgery for large, tense growing skull fracture in a 12-year-old girl and discusses the likely pathogenesis and possible ways to avoid this life-threatening complication.

  6. Growing skull fracture in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Rush, E Marie; Shores, Andrew; Meintel, Sarah; Hathcock, John T

    2014-09-01

    Growing skull fractures have been reported in humans for many years, usually resulting from injury to the soft skull during the rapid growth period of an infant's life. Nestling raptors have thin, fragile skulls, a rapid growth rate, and compete aggressively for food items. Skull trauma may occur, which may lead to the development of a growing skull fracture. Growing skull fractures may be under-diagnosed in raptor rehabilitation facilities that do not have access to advanced technologic equipment. Three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography was used to diagnose a growing skull fracture in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis). The lesion was surgically repaired and the animal was eventually returned to the wild. This is the first report of a growing skull fracture in an animal. In this case, 3-D computed topographic imaging was utilized to diagnose a growing skull fracture in a red-tailed hawk, surgical repair was performed, and the bird recovered completely and was ultimately released.

  7. A Meningoencephalocele Caused by a Chronic Growing Skull Fracture in a 76-Year-Old Patient.

    PubMed

    Moudrous, Walid; Boogaarts, Hieronymus D; Grotenhuis, J André

    2016-12-01

    We present a case of a growing skull fracture in adult male, with an interval of 43 years after initial trauma. This finding is extremely rare, especially because growing skull fractures are mostly seen as an uncommon complication of pediatric head trauma with calvarial fracture. In our patient, this finding was incidental, existed for many years, and had no clinical consequences. Therefore, we advised a conservative treatment for our patient.

  8. Infant skull fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent ... or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by injury to the ...

  9. [Iatrogenic evolutive skull fracture (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Villarejo, F; Pascual Castroviejo, I; Dabdoub, C; Bordes, M; Jover, P

    1977-03-01

    A case of growing skull fracture secondary to a maxilofacial operation is reported. Frequency, clinical symptoms, phisiopathology and treatment of growing skull fractures are reviewed and the rarity of the iatrogenic mechanism is stressed.

  10. Everted skull fracture.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Tyagi, Devendra K; Savant, Hemant V

    2011-11-01

    Skull bone fractures are common in trauma. They are usually linear undisplaced or depressed; however, a distinct possibility of elevated fracture remains. We describe an entity of everted fracture skull in which the fracture segment is totally everted. The nature of trauma, management, and complications of this unique case are discussed. A 21-year-old woman involved in a railway accident presented to us with a primary dressing on her wound. Investigations revealed an everted fracture skull. She underwent surgery with good results. We would like to add everted fracture skull to the nomenclature describing skull fractures in addition to elevated compound fracture skull as a new entity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of magnetic resonance imaging to identify the edge of a dural tear in an infant with growing skull fracture: a case study.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hideki; Omama, Shinichi; Yoshida, Yuki; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Honda, Takayuki; Akasaka, Manami; Kamei, Atsushi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2012-11-01

    Growing skull fractures can be a challenging surgical problem facing pediatric neurosurgeons. The goal of this manuscript was to describe an effective surgical method used to treat a growing skull fracture. We present a case study of a 2-month-old boy who fell from his mother's arms and hit his head on the floor; he underwent X-ray, magnetic resonance (MR), and computed tomography (CT) imaging before cranioplasty with dural plasty. X-ray performed on admission revealed a diastatic fracture with a gap of 8 mm in the right frontal bone and a linear fracture in the right occipital bone. X-ray performed 37 days after injury demonstrated that the gap had increased to 25 mm, and the patient was diagnosed with a growing skull fracture of the right parietal bone. Cranioplasty with dural plasty was performed on day 39. A combination of MR and CT images enabled the edge of the dural tear to be plotted on a three-dimensional image of the skull, and this was used to estimate the location of the edge of the dural tear on the scalp. We achieved excellent outcomes in terms of bony coverage and dural plasty. The combination of MR and CT images may be recommended for surgical repair of growing skull fracture in children.

  12. Keyhole Fracture of the Skull

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    gunshot wounds to the skull and direction of fire. J Forensic Sci 1982;27:555-66. 3. Berryman HE, Gunther WM. Keyhole defect production in tubular bone.J...Keyhole Fracture of the Skull Radiology Corner Keyhole Fracture of the Skull Guarantor...abbreviated answer in the December 2008 issue. 1 The authors present the case of a soldier wounded in Iraq with a gunshot wound to the skull

  13. Anisotropic composite human skull model and skull fracture validation against temporo-parietal skull fracture.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2013-12-01

    A composite material model for skull, taking into account damage is implemented in the Strasbourg University finite element head model (SUFEHM) in order to enhance the existing skull mechanical constitutive law. The skull behavior is validated in terms of fracture patterns and contact forces by reconstructing 15 experimental cases. The new SUFEHM skull model is capable of reproducing skull fracture precisely. The composite skull model is validated not only for maximum forces, but also for lateral impact against actual force time curves from PMHS for the first time. Skull strain energy is found to be a pertinent parameter to predict the skull fracture and based on statistical (binary logistical regression) analysis it is observed that 50% risk of skull fracture occurred at skull strain energy of 544.0mJ.

  14. An accessory skull suture mimicking a skull fracture.

    PubMed

    Wiedijk, J E F; Soerdjbalie-Maikoe, V; Maat, G J R; Maes, A; van Rijn, R R; de Boer, H H

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the sudden and unexpected death of a five-and-a-half-month-old boy. As in every Dutch case of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI), a multidisciplinary diagnostic approach was used. This included post-mortem radiography, showing a linear discontinuity of the parietal bone. Originally this was interpreted as a skull fracture, but autopsy indicated no signs of mechanical trauma. Instead the defect was defined as a unilateral accessory suture of the parietal bone. The initial erroneous diagnosis had severe adverse consequences and thus every health care professional or forensic specialist dealing with paediatric mechanical traumas should be cautious of this rare anomaly.

  15. Clinical Presentations and Outcomes of Children With Basilar Skull Fractures After Blunt Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Tunik, Michael G; Powell, Elizabeth C; Mahajan, Prashant; Schunk, Jeff E; Jacobs, Elizabeth; Miskin, Michelle; Zuspan, Sally Jo; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra; Atabaki, Shireen M; Hoyle, John D; Holmes, James F; Dayan, Peter S; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    We describe presentations and outcomes of children with basilar skull fractures in the emergency department (ED) after blunt head trauma. This was a secondary analysis of an observational cohort of children with blunt head trauma. Basilar skull fracture was defined as physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture without basilar skull fracture on computed tomography (CT), or basilar skull fracture on CT regardless of physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture. Other definitions included isolated basilar skull fracture (physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture or basilar skull fracture on CT with no other intracranial injuries on CT) and acute adverse outcomes (death, neurosurgery, intubation for >24 hours, and hospitalization for ≥2 nights with intracranial injury on CT). Of 42,958 patients, 558 (1.3%) had physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture, basilar skull fractures on CT, or both. Of the 525 (94.1%) CT-imaged patients, 162 (30.9%) had basilar skull fracture on CT alone, and 104 (19.8%) had both physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture and basilar skull fracture on CT; 269 patients (51.2%) had intracranial injuries other than basilar skull fracture on CT. Of the 363 (91.7%) CT-imaged patients with physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture, 104 (28.7%) had basilar skull fracture on CT. Of 266 patients with basilar skull fracture on CT, 104 (39.1%) also had physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture. Of the 256 CT-imaged patients who had isolated basilar skull fracture, none had acute adverse outcomes (0%; 95% confidence interval 0% to 1.4%), including none (0%; 95% confidence interval 0% to 6.1%) of 59 with isolated basilar skull fractures on CT. Approximately 1% of children with blunt head trauma have physical examination signs of basilar skull fracture or basilar skull fracture on CT. The latter increases the risk of acute adverse outcomes more than physical examination signs of

  16. Fracture of skull base with delayed multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Altan; Gurelik, Mustafa; Gumus, Cesur; Kunt, Tanfer

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a pediatric case of delayed glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, and facial nerve palsies after a head injury. Computed tomography scan of the skull base revealed the fracture of the petrous part of the temporal bone, and the fracture involved the tip of petrous pyramid, in front of the jugular foramen. The anatomical features, mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed.

  17. Management and outcome of pediatric skull base fractures.

    PubMed

    Perheentupa, Ulla; Kinnunen, Ilpo; Grénman, Reidar; Aitasalo, Kalle; Mäkitie, Antti A

    2010-11-01

    The management of skull base fractures in the pediatric age group continues to be a major challenge even for experienced multidisciplinary teams. This retrospective study was undertaken at a tertiary care academic hospital to evaluate the management and outcome of pediatric skull base fractures. Retrospective analysis covering a period of 13.5 years (from 1996 to 2009) and 63 patients (mean age 10.7 years; range 1-18 years) was performed. A road traffic accident was the most frequent etiological factor (38%). The most common skull base fracture type was temporal bone fracture (64%). Longitudinal temporal fractures were observed in 45% and transversal in 23% of these patients; in 10 cases (25%) the fracture was comminuted or mixed type. A fracture involving the spheno-ethmoidal complex was the second most common type of basilar skull fracture (41%) followed by fracture through the orbital bone (35%). Forty-three percent of the patients had a concomitant intracranial injury. Early neurological deficits were diagnosed in 21 patients (33%) and 10 patients (16%) had permanent neurological deficits. One patient died after 1 week of intensive care treatment. Fifty-four patients (86%) were discharged home and 8 patients (13%) were discharged for further rehabilitation. Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or lower correlated with moderate to poor outcome. We conclude that skull base fracture is a rare injury in childhood. Mortality is uncommon, but this trauma is commonly associated with intracranial injury. Early neurological deficits are caused by traumatic brain injury and were observed in one-third of the patients. However, only less than one-sixth suffered from permanent neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Recurring post-traumatic growing skull fracture].

    PubMed

    San Martín-García, Isabel; Aguilera-Albesa, Sergio; Zazpe-Cenoz, Idoya; Yoldi-Petri, M Eugenia

    2015-04-16

    Introduccion. La fractura craneal evolutiva, tambien llamada absorcion osea postraumatica o quiste leptomeningeo, es una rara complicacion de los traumatismos craneoencefalicos y ocurre de forma casi exclusiva en ninos menores de 3 anos. Caso clinico. Nino de 6 meses que presentaba, dos meses despues de un traumatismo craneal aparentemente banal, persistencia de cefalohematoma temporooccipital izquierdo sin otros signos. El estudio de ecografia transfontanelar revelo un defecto oseo con herniacion cerebral, y la tomografia computarizada y la resonancia magnetica confirmaron, ademas, una fractura evolutiva. Se realizo reseccion del quiste encefalomeningeo, cierre dural y reparacion del defecto oseo con placas y material de lactato. Tres meses despues de la intervencion, presentaba persistencia de coleccion liquida y se confirmo recidiva de la fractura evolutiva. Tras la reintervencion, se coloco casco ortesico para evitar nuevas recidivas. Un ano despues del traumatismo, el paciente continua asintomatico. Conclusiones. Todo nino menor de 3 anos con cefalohematoma postraumatico deberia ser revisado de forma periodica hasta comprobar la resolucion de la coleccion, en particular si presenta fractura craneal. La presencia de un cefalohematoma persistente mas de dos semanas despues de un traumatismo craneoencefalico debe hacernos sospechar un proceso de fractura creciente, y son necesarias la reparacion de la duramadre y una craneoplastia para su tratamiento. La colocacion de material reabsorbible permite su remodelacion con el crecimiento craneal del paciente, pero su fragilidad conlleva riesgo de recidiva. La colocacion de un casco ortesico tras la intervencion podria prevenir complicaciones.

  19. Isolated linear skull fractures in children with blunt head trauma.

    PubMed

    Powell, Elizabeth C; Atabaki, Shireen M; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra; Wisner, David; Mahajan, Prashant; Glass, Todd; Miskin, Michelle; Stanley, Rachel M; Jacobs, Elizabeth; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-04-01

    Children and adolescents with minor blunt head trauma and isolated skull fractures are often admitted to the hospital. The objective of this study was to describe the injury circumstances and frequency of clinically important neurologic complications among children with minor blunt head trauma and isolated linear skull fractures. This study was a planned secondary analysis of a large prospective cohort study in children <18 years old with blunt head trauma. Data were collected in 25 emergency departments. We analyzed patients with Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 14 or 15 and isolated linear skull fractures. We ascertained acute neurologic outcomes through clinical information collected during admission or via telephone or mail at least 1 week after the emergency department visit. In the parent study, we enrolled 43,904 children (11,035 [25%] <2 years old). Of those with imaging studies, 350 had isolated linear skull fractures. Falls were the most common injury mechanism, accounting for 70% (81% for ages <2 years old). Of 201 hospitalized children, 42 had computed tomography or MRI repeated; 5 had new findings but none required neurosurgical intervention. Of 149 patients discharged from the hospital, 20 had repeated imaging, and none had new findings. Children with minor blunt head trauma and isolated linear skull fractures are at very low risk of evolving other traumatic findings noted in subsequent imaging studies or requiring neurosurgical intervention. Hospital admission for neurologically normal children with isolated linear skull fractures after minor blunt head trauma for monitoring is typically unnecessary. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Surveillance for work-related skull fractures in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Kica, Joanna; Rosenman, Kenneth D

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to develop a multisource surveillance system for work-related skull fractures. Records on work-related skull fractures were obtained from Michigan's 134 hospitals, Michigan's Workers' Compensation Agency and death certificates. Cases from the three sources were matched to eliminate duplicates from more than one source. Workplaces where the most severe injuries occurred were referred to OSHA for an enforcement inspection. There were 318 work related skull fractures, not including facial fractures, between 2010 and 2012. In 2012, after the inclusion of facial fractures, 316 fractures were identified of which 218 (69%) were facial fractures. The Bureau of Labor Statistic's (BLS) 2012 estimate of skull fractures in Michigan, which includes facial fractures, was 170, which was 53.8% of those identified from our review of medical records. The inclusion of facial fractures in the surveillance system increased the percentage of women identified from 15.4% to 31.2%, decreased severity (hospitalization went from 48.7% to 10.6% and loss of consciousness went from 56.5% to 17.8%), decreased falls from 48.2% to 27.6%, and increased assaults from 5.0% to 20.2%, shifted the most common industry from construction (13.3%) to health care and social assistance (15.0%) and the highest incidence rate from males 65+ (6.8 per 100,000) to young men, 20-24 years (9.6 per 100,000). Workplace inspections resulted in 45 violations and $62,750 in penalties. The Michigan multisource surveillance system of workplace injuries had two major advantages over the existing national system: (a) workplace investigations were initiated hazards identified and safety changes implemented at the facilities where the injuries occurred; and (b) a more accurate count was derived, with 86% more work-related skull fractures identified than BLS's employer based estimate. A more comprehensive system to identify and target interventions for workplace injuries was implemented using hospital and

  1. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism due to a Hidden Skull Fracture Secondary to Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Ai; Yamaguchi, Tetsuto; Yamamoto, Fumiko; Shibagaki, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous air embolism is sometimes caused by head trauma. One of the paths of air entry is considered a skull fracture. We report a case of cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma. The patient was a 55-year-old man who fell and hit his head. A head computed tomography (CT) scan showed the air in the superior sagittal sinus; however, no skull fractures were detected. Follow-up CT revealed a fracture line in the right temporal bone. Cerebral venous air embolism following head trauma might have occult skull fractures even if CT could not show the skull fractures. PMID:26693366

  2. Biomechanical analysis of skull fractures after uncontrolled hanging release.

    PubMed

    Thollon, Lionel; Llari, Maxime; André, Lucile; Adalian, Pascal; Leonetti, Georges; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique

    2013-12-10

    In forensic research, biomechanical analyses of falls are widely reported. However, no study on falls consecutive to uncontrolled hanging release, when a hanging body is cut down, has ever been published. In such cases, the presence of cranial trauma can raise interpretation issues, and there may be doubt as to whether the fall was an accident or a crime disguised as suicide. The problem remains as to whether or not a fall after a free hanging release can lead to a skull fracture. To address this question, numerical simulations, post-mortem human subject tests and parametric studies were performed. We first recreated the kinematics and velocity of this atypical fall with post-mortem human subject tests and multibody simulations. We then tested the influence of biological variability on fracture production using a finite element model of the head. Our results show that fall severity depends largely on the direction of the fall. The risk of fracture is highest in the occipital region and with a backward fall. Our study also highlights the frequent occurrence of lower limb trauma in a free hanging release. Most importantly, we show that a fracture is produced in only 3.4% of falls that occur in a 10-90 cm height range. The overall findings of this study provide tools for pathologists and magistrates to decide on the most likely scenario and to justify further forensic investigations if required.

  3. Standardized descriptive method for the anthropological evaluation of pediatric skull fractures.

    PubMed

    Wiersema, Jason M; Love, Jennifer C; Derrick, Sharon M; Pinto, Deborrah C; Donaruma-Kwoh, Marcella; Greeley, Christopher S

    2014-11-01

    The literature pertaining to pediatric skull fracture is primarily clinically based and thus motivated by the need for effective assessment of both fracture characteristics (type, frequency, location, and mechanics) and context (severity of injury, associated soft tissue damage, and prognosis). From a strictly descriptive standpoint, these schemas employ overlapping levels of detail that confound the nonclinical description of fractures in the forensic context. For this reason, application of these schemas in the forensic anthropological interpretation of skull fractures is inappropriate. We argue that forensic anthropological interpretation of skull fractures requires a standard classification system that reflects fracture morphology alone, and we suggest a three-stepped classification system that conveys increasing detail with each additional step. A retrospective application of the method to a sample of 31 children aged 1 month to 2 years demonstrated its efficacy in the description of pediatric skull fractures.

  4. Revival of non-surgical management of neonatal depressed skull fractures.

    PubMed

    Pollak, L; Raziel, A; Ariely, S; Schiffer, J

    1999-02-01

    The management of depressed skull fractures in the newborn infant can be controversial. We report on a neonate, born by Caesarean section with difficult head extraction, complicated by a parietal depressed fracture. This 'ping-pong' fracture was treated by elevation with an obstetrical vacuum extractor. No complications occurred. The possible treatment modalities for neonatal depressed fractures, being conservative or operative, will be discussed.

  5. Creation of a High-fidelity, Low-cost Pediatric Skull Fracture Ultrasound Phantom.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Zachary P; Mills, Lisa; Rose, John S; Kelley, Kenneth; Ramirez, Francisco; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, point-of-care ultrasound has become a common tool used for both procedures and diagnosis. Developing high-fidelity phantoms is critical for training in new and novel point-of-care ultrasound applications. Detecting skull fractures on ultrasound imaging in the younger-than-2-year-old patient is an emerging area of point-of-care ultrasound research. Identifying a skull fracture on ultrasound imaging in this age group requires knowledge of the appearance and location of sutures to distinguish them from fractures. There are currently no commercially available pediatric skull fracture models. We outline a novel approach to building a cost-effective, simple, high-fidelity pediatric skull fracture phantom to meet a unique training requirement.

  6. The Comprehensive AOCMF Classification: Skull Base and Cranial Vault Fractures – Level 2 and 3 Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Ieva, Antonio Di; Audigé, Laurent; Kellman, Robert M.; Shumrick, Kevin A.; Ringl, Helmut; Prein, Joachim; Matula, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The AOCMF Classification Group developed a hierarchical three-level craniomaxillofacial classification system with increasing level of complexity and details. The highest level 1 system distinguish four major anatomical units, including the mandible (code 91), midface (code 92), skull base (code 93), and cranial vault (code 94). This tutorial presents the level 2 and more detailed level 3 systems for the skull base and cranial vault units. The level 2 system describes fracture location outlining the topographic boundaries of the anatomic regions, considering in particular the endocranial and exocranial skull base surfaces. The endocranial skull base is divided into nine regions; a central skull base adjoining a left and right side are divided into the anterior, middle, and posterior skull base. The exocranial skull base surface and cranial vault are divided in regions defined by the names of the bones involved: frontal, parietal, temporal, sphenoid, and occipital bones. The level 3 system allows assessing fracture morphology described by the presence of fracture fragmentation, displacement, and bone loss. A documentation of associated intracranial diagnostic features is proposed. This tutorial is organized in a sequence of sections dealing with the description of the classification system with illustrations of the topographical skull base and cranial vault regions along with rules for fracture location and coding, a series of case examples with clinical imaging and a general discussion on the design of this classification. PMID:25489394

  7. Skull fracture with effacement of the superior sagittal sinus following drone impact: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chung, Lawrance K; Cheung, Yuri; Lagman, Carlito; Au Yong, Nicholas; McBride, Duncan Q; Yang, Isaac

    2017-06-22

    The popularity of unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, raises safety concerns as they become increasingly common for commercial, personal, and recreational use. Collisions between drones and people may result in serious injuries. A 13-year-old male presented with a comminuted depressed skull fracture causing effacement of the superior sagittal sinus secondary to a racing drone impact. The patient experienced a brief loss of consciousness and reported lower extremity numbness and weakness after the accident. Imaging studies revealed bone fragments crossing the superior sagittal sinus with a short, focal segment of blood flow interruption. Neurosurgical intervention was deferred given the patient's improving neurological deficits, and the patient was treated conservatively. He was discharged home in stable condition. Drones may represent a hazard when operated inappropriately due to their capacity to fly at high speeds and altitudes. Impacts from drones can carry enough force to cause skull fractures and significant head injuries. The rising popularity of drones likely translates to an increased incidence of drone-related injuries. Thus, clinicians should be aware of this growing trend.

  8. Fracture pattern interpretation in the skull: differentiating blunt force from ballistics trauma using concentric fractures.

    PubMed

    Hart, Gina O

    2005-11-01

    There have been several anthropological studies on trauma analysis in recent literature, but few studies have focused on the differences between the three mechanisms of trauma (sharp force trauma, blunt force trauma and ballistics trauma). The hypothesis of this study is that blunt force and ballistics fracture patterns in the skull can be differentiated using concentric fractures. Two-hundred and eleven injuries from skulls exhibiting concentric fractures were examined to determine if the mechanism of trauma could be determined by beveling direction. Fractures occurring in buttressed and non-buttressed regions were examined separately. Contingency tables and Pearson's Chi-Square were used to evaluate the relationship between the two variables (the mechanism of trauma and the direction of beveling), while Pearson's r correlation was used to determine the strength of the relationship. Contingency tables and Chi-square tests among the entire sample, the buttressed areas, and the non-buttressed areas led to the null hypothesis (no relationship) to be rejected. Pearson's r correlation indicated that the relationship between the variables studied is greater than chance allocation.

  9. Comparative evaluation of digital radiography versus conventional radiography of fractured skulls.

    PubMed

    Langen, H J; Klein, H M; Wein, B; Stargardt, A; Günther, R W

    1993-08-01

    The authors assessed the relative efficacy of conventional and digital storage-phosphor radiographs for the detection of skull fractures. Fifty conventional film-screen radiographs (FSR) and 50 digital storage-phosphor radiographs (DR) with 66 fractures were compared. Five radiologists evaluated image quality and fracture detectability. The results were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. With a standard exposure, the ability to evaluate skull fractures was equally good with either technique (ROC area for DR, 0.8954; for FSR, 0.8870). Digital radiography was superior in evaluating nasal bone. For petrosal bone, the DR image simulates an underexposure. This disadvantage compared with FSR can be compensated by image postprocessing. In evaluation of skull fractures, radiologists performance with DR is equivalent to FSR.

  10. Pediatric skull fractures: the need for surgical intervention, characteristics, complications, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, Christopher M; Naran, Sanjay; Adetayo, Oluwaseun A; Pollack, Ian F; Losee, Joseph E

    2014-08-01

    Head trauma is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population and often results in a skull fracture. Pediatric skull fractures are distinct from adult fractures. Pediatric fractures have a greater capacity to remodel, but the pediatric brain and craniofacial skeleton are still developing. Although pediatric head trauma has been extensively studied, there is sparse literature regarding skull fractures. The authors' aim was to investigate the characteristics, injuries, complications, and outcomes of the patients in whom surgical intervention was needed for skull fractures. The authors performed a retrospective review of patients presenting to the emergency department of a pediatric Level I trauma center between 2000 and 2005 with skull fractures. Patient demographics, mechanism of injury, associated injuries, fracture bone involvement, surgical intervention, complications, and outcomes were analyzed. Groups treated nonoperatively, for skull fracture repair, and for traumatic brain injury were compared. A total of 897 patients with a skull fracture were analyzed. Most patients (n = 772, 86.1%) were treated nonoperatively (Non-Op group). Fifty-eight patients (6.5%) underwent repair of the fracture (Repair group) and 67 (7.5%) required intervention for treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI group). The Non-Op group was significantly younger, and the TBI group had a lower initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. A fall (51.2%) was the most common mechanism of injury in the Non-Op group, whereas a motor vehicle crash (23.9%) and being hit in the head with an object (48.2%) were most prevalent in the TBI and Repair groups, respectively. Associated injuries were seen in all 3 groups, with brain injury (hematoma) being the most common. Frontal bone fracture was seen most in the Repair and TBI groups, and the parietal bone was the most frequent bone fractured in the Non-Op group. Patients in the TBI group were much more likely to have 2 or 3 skull

  11. Skull wounds linked with blunt trauma (hammer example). A report of two depressed skull fractures--elements of biomechanical explanation.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Yann; Becart, Anne; Colard, Thomas; Delille, Rémi; Tournel, Gilles; Hedouin, Valéry; Gosset, Didier

    2012-09-01

    The lesions of the skull following perforating traumas can create complex fractures. The blunt traumas can, according to the swiftness and the shape of the object used, create a depressed fracture. The authors describe through two clinical cases the lesional characteristic of the blunt traumas, perforating the skull using a hammer. In both cases the cranial lesions were very typical: they were geometrical, square shaped, of the same size than the tool (head and tip of the hammer). On the outer table of the skull, the edges of the wounds were sharp and regular. On the inner table, the edges of the wounds were beveled and irregular. The bony penetration in the depressed fracture results from a rupture of the outer table of the bone under tension, in periphery, by the bend of the bone to the impact (outbending) and then, from the inner table with comminuted bony fragmentation. Breeding on the fractures of the size and the shape of the blunt objects used is inconstant and differs, that it is the objects of flat surface or wide in opposition to those of small surface area. Fractures morphologies depend on one hand on these extrinsic factors and on the other hand, of intrinsic factors (structure of the bone). To identify them, we had previously conducted experimental work on cranial bone samples. The bone was submitted to a device for three-point bending. This work had shown properties of thickness and stiffness of the various areas of the vault. Our cases are consistent with these results and illustrate the variability of bone lesions according to region and mode of use of blunt weapons. Many studies have identified criteria for identification of the weapons and the assistance of digital and biomechanical models will be an invaluable contribution with this aim in the future.

  12. Management of uncomplicated skull fractures in children: is hospital admission necessary?

    PubMed

    Vogelbaum, M A; Kaufman, B A; Park, T S; Winthrop, A L

    1998-08-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the necessity for routine hospital admission of children with skull fractures, a normal neurological exam, a normal head CT, and no other injuries ('uncomplicated skull fracture'). A prospective study of closed-head injuries in children was done over a 2-year period at St. Louis Children's Hospital. All patients with closed head injuries underwent skull radiographs and a head CT scan. From this cohort, children with uncomplicated skull fractures were identified and studied. For comparison, a retrospective analysis was also performed of the hospital admission records of children admitted over a 5-year period (1990-1994) with the diagnosis of epidural hematoma (EDH) to identify the typical time intervals between injury and documentation of the lesion in these cases. Forty-four patients with uncomplicated skull fractures were identified; all had been admitted for observation. Mean age was 1.8 years. Average time between injury and hospital admission was 6.35 h with half of this time being spent in the emergency room. Average LOS was 35 h, but 50% of patients were hospitalized less than 24 h. No patient in this study group suffered a complication related to their inury. Twenty-three patients with EDH had been admitted during the 5-year review period. Slightly more than one-half of patients had their EDH detected within 6 h of injury. The others were diagnosed more than 6 h after injury due to a delay in medical evaluation or a delay in obtaining a computed tomographic (CT) scan after an initial medical evaluation. Patients with uncomplicated skull fractures, in the absence of recurrent emesis and/or evidence of child abuse, can be considered for discharge home. The definition of an uncomplicated skull fracture requires that a head CT be performed on these patients.

  13. Transfer of children with isolated linear skull fractures: is it worth the cost?

    PubMed

    White, Ian K; Pestereva, Ecaterina; Shaikh, Kashif A; Fulkerson, Daniel H

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Children with skull fractures are often transferred to hospitals with pediatric neurosurgical capabilities. Historical data suggest that a small percentage of patients with an isolated skull fracture will clinically decline. However, recent papers have suggested that the risk of decline in certain patients is low. There are few data regarding the financial costs associated with transporting patients at low risk for requiring specialty care. In this study, the clinical outcomes and financial costs of transferring of a population of children with isolated skull fractures to a Level 1 pediatric trauma center over a 9-year period were analyzed. METHODS A retrospective review of all children treated for head injury at Riley Hospital for Children (Indianapolis, Indiana) between 2005 and 2013 was performed. Patients with a skull fracture were identified based on ICD-9 codes. Patients with intracranial hematoma, brain parenchymal injury, or multisystem trauma were excluded. Children transferred to Riley Hospital from an outside facility were identified. The clinical and radiographic outcomes were recorded. A cost analysis was performed on patients who were transferred with an isolated, linear, nondisplaced skull fracture. RESULTS Between 2005 and 2013, a total of 619 pediatric patients with isolated skull fractures were transferred. Of these, 438 (70.8%) patients had a linear, nondisplaced skull fracture. Of these 438 patients, 399 (91.1%) were transferred by ambulance and 39 (8.9%) by helicopter. Based on the current ambulance and helicopter fees, a total of $1,834,727 (an average of $4188.90 per patient) was spent on transfer fees alone. No patient required neurosurgical intervention. All patients recovered with symptomatic treatment; no patient suffered late decline or epilepsy. CONCLUSIONS This study found that nearly $2 million was spent solely on transfer fees for 438 pediatric patients with isolated linear skull fractures over a 9-year period. All patients

  14. Healed Depressed Parasagittal Skull Fractures-A Feature of Archaic Australian Aboriginal Remains.

    PubMed

    Walshe, Keryn; Brophy, Brian; Cornish, Brian; Byard, Roger W

    2016-11-01

    The skeletal remains of eight Australian Aboriginals with healed depressed skull fractures were examined. Male:female ratio 5:3; age range 20-60 yrs. Burial dates by (14) C dating in three cases were 500 years BP (n = 2) and 1300 BP. There were 13 healed depressed skull fractures manifested by shallow indentations of cortical bone and thinning of diploe, with no significant disturbance of the inner skull tables. Nine (69%) were located within 35 mm of the sagittal suture/midline. These lesions represent another acquired feature that might be helpful in suggesting that a skull is from a tribal Aboriginal individual and may be particularly useful if the remains are represented by only fragments of calvarium. While obviously not a finding specific to this population, these healed injuries would be consistent with the possible results of certain types of conflict behavior reported in traditional Aboriginal groups that involved formalized inflicted blunt head trauma.

  15. Development of skull fracture criterion based on real-world head trauma simulations using finite element head model.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance an existing finite element (FE) head model with composite modeling and a new constitutive law for the skull. The response of the state-of-the-art FE head model was validated in the time domain using data from 15 temporo-parietal impact experiments, conducted with postmortem human surrogates. The new model predicted skull fractures observed in these tests. Further, 70 well-documented head trauma cases were reconstructed. The 15 experiments and 70 real-world head trauma cases were combined to derive skull fracture injury risk curves. The skull internal energy was found to be the best candidate to predict skull failure based on an in depth statistical analysis of different mechanical parameters (force, skull internal energy), head kinematic-based parameter, the head injury criterion (HIC), and skull fracture correlate (SFC). The proposed tolerance limit for 50% risk of skull fracture was associated with 453mJ of internal energy. Statistical analyses were extended for individual impact locations (frontal, occipital and temporo-parietal) and separate injury risk curves were obtained. The 50% risk of skull fracture for each location: frontal: 481mJ, occipital: 457mJ, temporo-parietal: 456mJ of skull internal energy.

  16. A novel classification of frontal bone fractures: The prognostic significance of vertical fracture trajectory and skull base extension.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravi K; Afifi, Ahmed M; Gassner, Jennifer; Hartman, Michael J; Leverson, Glen; King, Timothy W; Bentz, Michael L; Gentry, Lindell R

    2015-05-01

    The broad spectrum of frontal bone fractures, including those with orbital and skull base extension, is poorly understood. We propose a novel classification scheme for frontal bone fractures. Maxillofacial CT scans of trauma patients were reviewed over a five year period, and frontal bone fractures were classified: Type 1: Frontal sinus fracture without vertical extension. Type 2: Vertical fracture through the orbit without frontal sinus involvement. Type 3: Vertical fracture through the frontal sinus without orbit involvement. Type 4: Vertical fracture through the frontal sinus and ipsilateral orbit. Type 5: Vertical fracture through the frontal sinus and contralateral or bilateral orbits. We also identified the depth of skull base extension, and performed a chart review to identify associated complications. 149 frontal bone fractures, including 51 non-vertical frontal sinus (Type 1, 34.2%) and 98 vertical (Types 2-5, 65.8%) fractures were identified. Vertical fractures penetrated the middle or posterior cranial fossa significantly more often than non-vertical fractures (62.2 v. 15.7%, p = 0.0001) and had a significantly higher mortality rate (18.4 v. 0%, p < 0.05). Vertical fractures with frontal sinus and orbital extension, and fractures that penetrated the middle or posterior cranial fossa had the strongest association with intracranial injuries, optic neuropathy, disability, and death (p < 0.05). Vertical frontal bone fractures carry a worse prognosis than frontal bone fractures without a vertical pattern. In addition, vertical fractures with extension into the frontal sinus and orbit, or with extension into the middle or posterior cranial fossa have the highest complication rate and mortality. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Longitudinal brainstem laceration associated with complex basilar skull fractures due to a fall: an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bao Li; Quan, Li; Ishida, Kaori; Taniguchi, Mari; Oritani, Shigeki; Fujita, Masaki Q; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2002-03-28

    This report describes an autopsy case of a rare longitudinal brainstem laceration associated with complex basilar skull fractures. The victim was a 40-year-old male who died immediately after falling from a roof (9.2m in height) of a factory onto a concrete floor. The postmortem examination revealed an incomplete ring fracture of the base of the skull with longitudinal fractures of the sphenoid (clivus of the dorsum sellae turcicae) and occipital bones, cerebral contusions in the frontal and temporal poles, a longitudinal brainstem laceration at the posterior median sulcus of the pons accompanied with multiple contusional hemorrhages in the brainstem and corpus callosum. Related blunt-force injuries were observed in the parieto-occipital region of the head, shoulder and upper back involving the fractures of the cervical and thoracic vertebrae, and sternum and ribs, indicating a huge impact to the occiput and subsequent impression of the vertebral column into the base of the skull due to violent anteroflexion of the neck, which caused the complex basilar skull fractures, contusions and longitudinal laceration of the brainstem.

  18. Depressed Skull Fractures: A Pattern of Abusive Head Injury in Three Older Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Anselm C. W.; Ou, Yvonne; Fong, Dawson

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe a pattern of abusive head injury in a series of children older than 4 years of age. Methods: A hospital chart review of abused children with skull fractures from 1999 to 2001 was carried out. The clinical features, social background, and subsequent outcome and management are described. Results: An 11-year-old girl and a pair…

  19. Depressed Skull Fractures: A Pattern of Abusive Head Injury in Three Older Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Anselm C. W.; Ou, Yvonne; Fong, Dawson

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe a pattern of abusive head injury in a series of children older than 4 years of age. Methods: A hospital chart review of abused children with skull fractures from 1999 to 2001 was carried out. The clinical features, social background, and subsequent outcome and management are described. Results: An 11-year-old girl and a pair…

  20. Growing skull hemangioma: first and unique description in a patient with Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Loo, Lars E; Beckervordersandforth, Jan; Colon, Albert J; Schijns, Olaf E M G

    2017-02-01

    We present the first and unique case of a rapid-growing skull hemangioma in a patient with Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome. This case report provides evidence that not all rapid-growing, osteolytic skull lesions need to have a malignant character but certainly need a histopathological verification. This material offers insight into the list of rare pathological diagnoses in an infrequent syndrome.

  1. Secondary skull fractures in head wounds inflicted by captive bolt guns: autopsy findings and experimental simulation.

    PubMed

    Perdekamp, Markus Grosse; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Ishikawa, Takaki; Nadjem, Hadi; Kromeier, Jan; Pollak, Stefan; Thierauf, Annette

    2010-11-01

    Apart from one article published by Rabl and Sigrist in 1992 (Rechtsmedizin 2:156-158), there are no further reports on secondary skull fractures in shots from captive bolt guns. Up to now, the pertinent literature places particular emphasis on the absence of indirect lesions away from the impact point, when dealing with the wounding capacity of slaughterer's guns. The recent observation of two suicidal head injuries accompanied by skull fractures far away from the bolt's path gave occasion to experimental studies using simulants (glycerin soap, balls from gelatin) and skull–brain models. As far as ballistic soap was concerned, the dimensions of the bolt's channel were assessed by multi-slice computed tomography before cutting the blocks open. The test shots to gelatin balls and to skull-brain models were documented by means of a high-speed motion camera. As expected, the typical temporary cavity effect of bullets fired from conventional guns could not be observed when captive bolt stunners were discharged. Nevertheless, the visualized transfer of kinetic energy justifies the assumption that the secondary fractures seen in thin parts of the skull were caused by a hydraulic burst effect.

  2. Radiolucent hair accessories causing depressed skull fracture following blunt cranial trauma.

    PubMed

    Syed, Omar N; Hankinson, Todd C; Mack, William J; Feldstein, Neil A; Anderson, Richard C E

    2008-12-01

    Pediatric neurosurgeons frequently care for children with traumatic scalp and skull injury. Foreign objects are often observed on imaging and may influence the clinician's decision-making process. The authors report on 2 cases of poorly visualized hair beads that had become embedded into the skull during blunt trauma. In both cases, skull radiography and CT scanning demonstrated depressed, comminuted fractures with poorly demonstrated spherical radiolucencies in the overlying scalp. The nature of these objects was initially unclear, and they could have represented air that entered the scalp during trauma. In one case, scalp inspection demonstrated no evidence of the bead. In the other case, a second bead was observed at the site of scalp laceration. In both cases, the beads were surgically removed, the fractures were elevated, and the patients recovered uneventfully. Radiolucent fashion accessories, such as hair beads, may be difficult to appreciate on clinical examination and may masquerade as clinically insignificant air following cranial trauma. If they are not removed, these foreign bodies may pose the risk of an infection. Pediatric neurosurgeons should consider hair accessories in the differential diagnosis of foreign bodies that may produce skull fracture following blunt trauma.

  3. Penetrating skull fracture by a wooden object: Management dilemmas and literature review.

    PubMed

    Arifin, Muhammad Zafrullah; Gill, Arwinder Singh; Faried, Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    Most penetrating skull injuries are caused by gun shot wounds or missiles. The compound depressed skull fracture represents an acute neurosurgical emergency. Management and diagnosis of such cases have been described, but its occurence following a fall onto a piece of wood is quite unusual. A 75-year-old female fell onto a piece of wood that penetrated her skull on the left frontal region and was treated in our department. The patient had no neurological deficits during presentation. She was managed surgically and removal of the wooden object was performed to prevent early or late infection complications. Wooden foreign bodies often pose a different set of challenges as far as penetrating injuries to the brain are concerned. Radiological difficulties and increased rates of infection due to its porous nature make these types of injuries particularly interesting. Their early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can minimize the risk of complications.

  4. Posttraumatic Intracranial Tuberculous Subdural Empyema in a Patient with Skull Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiha; Kim, Choonghyo; Ryu, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial tuberculous subdural empyema (ITSE) is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only four cases of microbiologically confirmed ITSE have been reported in the English literature to date. Most cases have arisen in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis regardless of trauma. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department after a fall. On arrival, he complained of pain in his head, face, chest and left arm. He was alert and oriented. An initial neurological examination was normal. Radiologic evaluation revealed multiple fractures of his skull, ribs, left scapula and radius. Though he had suffered extensive skull fractures of his cranium, maxilla, zygoma and orbital wall, the sustained cerebral contusion and hemorrhage were mild. Eighteen days later, he suddenly experienced a general tonic-clonic seizure. Radiologic evaluation revealed a subdural empyema in the left occipital area that was not present on admission. We performed a craniotomy, and the empyema was completely removed. Microbiological examination identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). After eighteen months of anti-tuberculous treatment, the empyema disappeared completely. This case demonstrates that tuberculosis can induce empyema in patients with skull fractures. Thus, we recommend that M. tuberculosis should be considered as the probable pathogen in cases with posttraumatic empyema. PMID:27226867

  5. The validation and application of a finite element human head model for frontal skull fracture analysis.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Z; Baumgartner, D; Willinger, R; Graw, M; Peldschus, S

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic head injuries can result from vehicular accidents, sports, falls or assaults. The current advances in computational methods and the detailed finite element models of the human head provide a significant opportunity for biomechanical study of human head injuries. The biomechanical characteristics of the human head through head impact scenarios can be studied in detail by using the finite element models. Skull fracture is one of the most frequent occurring types of head injuries. The purpose of this study is to analyse the experimental head impacts on cadavers by means of the Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model (SUFEHM). The results of the numerical model and experimental data are compared for validation purpose. The finite element model has also been applied to predict the skull bone fracture in frontal impacts. The head model includes the scalp, the facial bone, the skull, the cerebral spinal fluid, the meninges, the cerebrum and the cerebellum. The model is used to simulate the experimental frontal head impact tests using a cylindrical padded impactor. Results of the computational simulation shows that the model correlated well with a number of experimental data and a global fracture pattern has been predicted well by the model. Therefore the presented numerical model could be used for reconstruction of head impacts in different impact conditions also the forensic application of the head model would provide a tool for investigation of the causes and mechanism of head injuries.

  6. Minor head trauma and linear skull fracture in infants: cranial ultrasound or computed tomography?

    PubMed

    Trenchs, Victoria; Curcoy, Ana I; Castillo, Marta; Badosa, Josep; Luaces, Carles; Pou, Jordi; Navarro, Ramon

    2009-06-01

    To determine the clinical evolution of children with skull fractures as a result of a minor head trauma from a witnessed accidental fall that have been studied by transfontanellar ultrasound (TFUS). Observational study for 2 years (2004-2006) of children up to 1 year of age who suffered a skull fracture after minor head trauma and for whom a TFUS was carried out as the first neuroimaging test to rule out intracranial injuries. One hundred and twenty-three children were evaluated. The mean age was 5.7 months (SD 2.9) and the most common mechanism of injury was rolling off the bed. In seven (5.7%) patients, a computed tomography (CT) was eventually performed after TFUS; in two of these patients, this was because of the detection of possible intracranial alterations and in the others, it was because of a small fontanelle. Both patients with abnormal TFUS had a small epidural haematoma on the CT scan that did not need surgery. The clinical course for all patients was uneventful. TFUS is a valid and reliable alternative to CT for minor head trauma in infants with skull fractures. Its innocuousness and cost-effectiveness in comparison with CT makes it a good choice in this situation.

  7. Depressed skull fractures: a pattern of abusive head injury in three older children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anselm C W; Ou, Yvonne; Fong, Dawson

    2003-11-01

    To describe a pattern of abusive head injury in a series of children older than 4 years of age. A hospital chart review of abused children with skull fractures from 1999 to 2001 was carried out. The clinical features, social background, and subsequent outcome and management are described. An 11-year-old girl and a pair of brothers of ages 7 and 9 were identified. The girl was attacked with a hammer during sleep by her stepmother, who committed suicide shortly afterwards. After craniotomy and intensive care, the child survived her multiple depressed fractures, intracranial bleeding, and brain contusion. Two brothers from a second family were attacked from behind with a hammer by their biological father, who was subsequently found to have undiagnosed schizophrenia. A depressed occipital fracture, without intracranial injury, was found in each child. The elder brother also had metacarpal fractures. Both children recovered without surgical intervention. A pattern of abusive head injury was described in older children with depressed skull fractures from blunt injury. The abusing parents were seriously mentally disturbed, and the abusive acts closely resembled child homicide.

  8. A simple depressed skull fracture in an old man with Paget disease: forensic implications in a rare case.

    PubMed

    Gitto, Lorenzo; Arunkumar, Ponni; Maiese, Aniello; Bolino, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Skull fractures occur when forces striking the head exceed the mechanical integrity of the calvarium. A depressed skull fracture is a break in a cranial bone with depression of the bone into the brain. A depressed fracture may be open (compound), with a skin laceration over the fracture, or closed (simple), when the overlying tissue is not disrupted. The association between simple depressed fracture of the skull and elderly is rare. Paget disease of the bone is a chronic disease characterized by the deposition of abnormal bone tissue, more fragile than normal bone. We report a case of a 92-year-old man who was found supine on the floor in his residence, showing multiple signs of trauma. X-rays and computed tomography scans were performed, showing a simple depressed skull fracture on the right occipital-temporal area and even the characteristics of Paget disease of the skull. The first hypothesis was death due to voluntary homicide. A detailed study of clinical reports, laboratory tests, radiograph scans, and post mortem examination data allowed us to reconstruct the event. Death was finally ruled due to a mild passive trauma, suggesting the unlawful killing of a human without criminal intent, meaning involuntary manslaughter.

  9. [Skull fracture and cephalhematoma in a newborn--a case report].

    PubMed

    Zakanj, Zora

    2014-01-01

    Skull fractures and cephalhematoma in newborns belong to the group of birth injuries of the head and neck, accounting for 11.4 to 15% of the total number of birth injuries. We presented a fracture of the parietal bones in a newborn, associated with parietal cephalhematoma. The newborn had transient and mild neurological symptoms: vomiting and changes in muscle tone. Clinical examination confirmed a positive "ping-pong" phenomen, craniogram confirmed the fracture of parietal bones and shown cephalhematoma, as well as ultrasound (US) examinations of the brain showed peri-interventricular bleeding grade II. After the disappearance of all clinical symptoms in a newborn, we observed total bone healing at the end of the second week of life, and good perinatal outcome. Successful recovery from injury contributes to the ability of rapid bone modeling and remodeling, and brain plasticity. Further interdisciplinary monitoring is very important.

  10. Tip of an Iceberg: Skull Fracture as an Adult Presentation of Encephalocraniocutaneous Lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Barras, Christen D.; Looby, Seamus; Brennan, Paul; Kok, Hong Kuan

    2016-01-01

    The severity of seizures presenting to the emergency department ranges from benign to life threatening. There are also a wide number of possible etiologies. Computed tomography (CT) emergency imaging may be required at presentation to elucidate a possible cause and assess signs of intracranial trauma. This case describes a serious seizure episode in a young man while on holiday. A CT brain showed a skull fracture as a consequence of seizure-related head trauma but unexpectedly there were image findings consistent with encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis. The important radiological features of encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis and a differential diagnosis are presented. PMID:27882255

  11. Skull fracture and haemorrhage pattern among fatal and nonfatal head injury assault victims – a critical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Tripathi, Chandrabhal

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Background: The global incidence of fatal head injuries as the result of assault is greater than the number of non-fatal cases. The important factors that determine the outcome in terms of survival of such head injury cases include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intra cranial haemorrhage and the brain injury. The present study aims to highlight the role of skull fractures as an indirect indicator of force of impact and the intra cranial haemorrhage by a comparative study of assault victims with fatal and nonfatal head injuries. Methods: 91 head injury cases resulting from assault were studied in the Department of Forensic Medicine, IMS, BHU Varanasi over a period of 2 years from which 18 patients survived and 73 cases had a lethal outcome. Details of the fatal cases were obtained from the police inquest and an autopsy while examination of the surviving patients was done after obtaining an informed consent. The data so obtained were analyzed and presented in the study. Results: Assault with firearms often led to fatality whereas with assault involving blunt weapons the survival rate was higher. Multiple cranial bones were involved in 69.3% cases while comminuted fracture of the skull was common among the fatal cases. Fracture of the base of the skull was noted only in the fatal cases and a combination of subdural and subarachnoid haemorrhage was found in the majority of the fatal cases. Conclusions: The present study shows skull fractures to be an important indicator of severity of trauma in attacks to the head. Multiple bone fracture, comminuted fracture and base fractures may be considered as high risk factors in attempted homicide cases. PMID:21483205

  12. Skull fracture during infancy: a five-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Nigel V; Whitehead, Gabrielle

    2005-04-01

    A group of 19 children, who had received a skull fracture during infancy, were assessed at least 5 years following injury. The majority of the group (89%) had received a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), with the remaining two (11%) having a moderate injury. The neuropsychological, academic, and psychosocial functioning of the TBI group was compared to that of 20 orthopedic subjects. The two groups were matched on the variables of gender, age, and socio-economic status. The TBI group was impaired on tests of visual attention and memory for faces. The two groups did not differ significantly on measures of language, sensorimotor functions, or visuospatial functioning. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups on academic performance, or parent and teacher reports of psychosocial functioning. It is concluded that while there is an absence of deficits in the vast majority of functions, skull fracture in infancy can result in enduring impairment in specific cognitive skills related to the processing of complex nonverbal stimuli.

  13. Association between cervical spine and skull-base fractures and blunt cerebrovascular injury.

    PubMed

    Buch, Karen; Nguyen, Thanh; Mahoney, Eric; Libby, Brandon; Calner, Paul; Burke, Peter; Norbash, Alex; Mian, Asim

    2016-02-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) are associated with high morbidity and mortality and can lead to neurological deficits. The established criteria for patients undergoing CT angiography (CTA) for BCVI are broad, and can expose patients to radiation unnecessarily. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of BCVI in patients on CTA and determine presentations associated with the highest rates of BCVI. With IRB approval, patients were selected for CTA screening for BCVI according to a predefined set of criteria at our hospital between 2007 and 2010. Patients were identified from our institution's trauma database. CTAs were retrospectively reviewed for BCVI including vasospasm and dissection. Electronic medical records were reviewed for clinical presentation and hospital course. Of 432 patients, vasospasm (n = 10) and/or dissection (n = 36) were found in 46 patients (10.6%). BCVI was associated with cervical spine and/or skull-base fracture in 40/46 patients (87%, P < 0.0001). Significant correlations were seen between dissection and fracture in 31/36 patients (86.2%, p < 0.0001) and between BCVI and both neurological deficits and fractures (27/44, P < 0.0001). BCVI was significantly associated with cervical and/or skullbase fractures and neurological deficits with coexistent fractures. Patients with these injuries should be prioritized for rapid CTA evaluation for BCVI. • CTA screening is important to identify patients with underlying BCVI • Cervical spine and/or skullbase fractures were significantly associated with BCVI • BCVI may occur in up to 11% of patients with blunt trauma injuries.

  14. Why Most Traumatic Brain Injuries are Not Caused by Linear Acceleration but Skull Fractures are

    PubMed Central

    Kleiven, Svein

    2013-01-01

    Injury statistics have found the most common accident situation to be an oblique impact. An oblique impact will give rise to both linear and rotational head kinematics. The human brain is most sensitive to rotational motion. The bulk modulus of brain tissue is roughly five to six orders of magnitude larger than the shear modulus so that for a given impact it tends to deform predominantly in shear. This gives a large sensitivity of the strain in the brain to rotational loading and a small sensitivity to linear kinematics. Therefore, rotational kinematics should be a better indicator of traumatic brain injury risk than linear acceleration. To illustrate the difference between radial and oblique impacts, perpendicular impacts through the center of gravity of the head and 45° oblique impacts were simulated. It is obvious that substantially higher strain levels in the brain are obtained for an oblique impact, compared to a corresponding perpendicular one, when impacted into the same padding using an identical impact velocity. It was also clearly illustrated that the radial impact causes substantially higher stresses in the skull with an associated higher risk of skull fractures, and traumatic brain injuries secondary to those. PMID:25022321

  15. Why Most Traumatic Brain Injuries are Not Caused by Linear Acceleration but Skull Fractures are.

    PubMed

    Kleiven, Svein

    2013-01-01

    Injury statistics have found the most common accident situation to be an oblique impact. An oblique impact will give rise to both linear and rotational head kinematics. The human brain is most sensitive to rotational motion. The bulk modulus of brain tissue is roughly five to six orders of magnitude larger than the shear modulus so that for a given impact it tends to deform predominantly in shear. This gives a large sensitivity of the strain in the brain to rotational loading and a small sensitivity to linear kinematics. Therefore, rotational kinematics should be a better indicator of traumatic brain injury risk than linear acceleration. To illustrate the difference between radial and oblique impacts, perpendicular impacts through the center of gravity of the head and 45° oblique impacts were simulated. It is obvious that substantially higher strain levels in the brain are obtained for an oblique impact, compared to a corresponding perpendicular one, when impacted into the same padding using an identical impact velocity. It was also clearly illustrated that the radial impact causes substantially higher stresses in the skull with an associated higher risk of skull fractures, and traumatic brain injuries secondary to those.

  16. Management of skull fractures in children less than 1 year of age.

    PubMed

    Addioui, Anissa; Saint-Vil, Dickens; Crevier, Louis; Beaudin, Marianne

    2016-07-01

    Management of skull fracture (SF) in pediatric patients varies from observation in the emergency department (ED) to floor admission. Since 2010, a protocol for admitting children with SF specifically to the trauma service was implemented at our institution. The purpose of our study was to review the management of children with SF younger than 1 year of age. Retrospective chart review of all patients between 0 and 1year of age seen in our ED for a SF was done from 2010 to 2013. A total of 180 patients with a mean age of 4.5months (1day-12months) were identified. Of these, 131 patients (73%) were admitted. Mean length of stay was 1.6days. Admitted patients had more depressed (21 vs. 8%) and diastatic (43 vs. 14%) fractures. Fifty-seven children had intracranial hemorrhages (32%) but only 8 patients required non-emergent surgery for depressed fractures. Admission to the trauma service increased from none to 76% with phone follow-ups increasing from 12% to 91%. Instituting a protocol allowed a safer management of patients with SF. Moreover, we argue that asymptomatic infants with isolated SF can be safely discharged home after brief observation in the ED. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Extensive traumatic anterior skull base fractures with cerebrospinal fluid leak: classification and repair techniques using combined vascularized tissue flaps.

    PubMed

    Archer, Jacob B; Sun, Hai; Bonney, Phillip A; Zhao, Yan Daniel; Hiebert, Jared C; Sanclement, Jose A; Little, Andrew S; Sughrue, Michael E; Theodore, Nicholas; James, Jeffrey; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam

    2016-03-01

    This article introduces a classification scheme for extensive traumatic anterior skull base fracture to help stratify surgical treatment options. The authors describe their multilayer repair technique for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak resulting from extensive anterior skull base fracture using a combination of laterally pediculated temporalis fascial-pericranial, nasoseptal-pericranial, and anterior pericranial flaps. Retrospective chart review identified patients treated surgically between January 2004 and May 2014 for anterior skull base fractures with CSF fistulas. All patients were treated with bifrontal craniotomy and received pedicled tissue flaps. Cases were classified according to the extent of fracture: Class I (frontal bone/sinus involvement only); Class II (extent of involvement to ethmoid cribriform plate); and Class III (extent of involvement to sphenoid bone/sinus). Surgical repair techniques were tailored to the types of fractures. Patients were assessed for CSF leak at follow-up. The Fisher exact test was applied to investigate whether the repair techniques were associated with persistent postoperative CSF leak. Forty-three patients were identified in this series. Thirty-seven (86%) were male. The patients' mean age was 33 years (range 11-79 years). The mean overall length of follow-up was 14 months (range 5-45 months). Six fractures were classified as Class I, 8 as Class II, and 29 as Class III. The anterior pericranial flap alone was used in 33 patients (77%). Multiple flaps were used in 10 patients (3 salvage) (28%)--1 with Class II and 9 with Class III fractures. Five (17%) of the 30 patients with Class II or III fractures who received only a single anterior pericranial flap had persistent CSF leak (p < 0.31). No CSF leak was found in patients who received multiple flaps. Although postoperative CSF leak occurred only in high-grade fractures with single anterior flap repair, this finding was not significant. Extensive anterior skull base

  18. Treatise on skull fractures by Berengario da Carpi (1460-1530).

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Riccardo F; Mazzola, Isabella C

    2009-11-01

    Jacopo Berengario was born in Carpi, a medieval city close to Modena (northern Italy), circa 1460. He studied medicine at Bologna University and, in 1489, graduated in philosophy and medicine. He was appointed lecturer in anatomy and surgery at the same university, a position that he maintained for 24 years. Between 1514 and 1523, Berengario published some important anatomic and surgical works, which gave considerable fame to him.Commentaria... supra Anatomiam Mundini (Commentary... on the Anatomy of Mondino), published in 1521, constitutes the first example of an illustrated anatomic textbook ever printed. The anatomic illustrations were intended for explaining the text. Artistically speaking, the plates are typical examples of the Renaissance period and worthy of the greatest consideration.De Fractura Calvae sive Cranei (On Fracture of the Calvaria or Cranium), published in Bologna in 1518, is the first treatise devoted to head injuries ever printed. It is a landmark in the development of cranial surgery that went through numerous editions. The text was prepared in 2 months and dedicated to Lorenzo de' Medici, Duke of Urbino, who experienced a skull injury in the occipital region. Berengario wanted to demonstrate to other physicians his knowledge of anatomy and his expertise on the brain and head traumas. The book includes the illustration of an entire surgical kit or a corpus instrumentorum for performing cranial operations, which appeared for the first time in a printed book. However, Berengario's highly commendable aim was to indicate to the reader the step-by-step procedure of craniotomy for management of skull fractures along with the sequential use of the previously presented instruments.

  19. Spontaneous slow drainage of epidural hematoma into the subgaleal space through a skull fracture in an infant--case report.

    PubMed

    Chida, Kohei; Yukawa, Hirotsugu; Mase, Tomohiko; Endo, Hideo; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2011-01-01

    A 4-month-old girl fell off a table onto the floor. Computed tomography performed 4 hours after the trauma showed a left parietal epidural hematoma (EDH) with an omega-shaped fracture line in the left parietal region. The EDH was enlarged after another 4 hours. However, the EDH showed drainage into the subgaleal space through the skull fracture 2 days after the trauma and was almost completely discharged into the subgaleal space by 5 days after trauma. Both the EDH and the subgaleal hematoma had resolved completely by 12 days after the trauma. No symptoms or signs were observed during the course. This case suggests that EDH can drain slowly and spontaneously into the subgaleal space through a skull fracture in an infant.

  20. Four-film X-ray series is more sensitive than 2-film for diagnosis of skull fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica; Mâsse, Benoît; Ouellet, Philippe; Décarie, Jean-Claude; Gravel, Jocelyn

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of 2- and 4-film x-ray series when interpreted by pediatric emergency medicine physicians in the diagnosis of skull fracture in children. A noninferiority crossover study was performed. The skull radiographs of the 50 most recent cases of skull fracture for which a 4-film radiography series was available and 50 controls matched for age were reviewed. Two modules, containing a random sequence of 2- and 4-film series of each child, were constructed to have all children evaluated twice (once with 2 films and once with 4 films). Pediatric emergency physicians evaluated both modules 2 to 4 weeks apart. The interpretation of the 4-film series by a pediatric radiologist served as the criterion standard. The sensitivity and specificity of the 2-film versus the 4-film skull x-ray series, in the identification of fracture, were compared. Thirteen pediatric emergency physicians participated in the study. For sensitivity, the mean difference between the 2- and 4-view series was higher than the noninferiority margin of 0.055 with an absolute mean difference of 0.060 (4-view minus 2-view series) and a 1-sided 95% higher confidence limit of 0.099. However for specificity, the mean difference was within the margin with an absolute mean difference of 0.011 and a 1-sided 95% higher confidence limit of 0.033. For children sustaining a head trauma, the 2-film skull radiography series is not as sensitive as the 4-film series in the detection of fracture, when interpreted by pediatric emergency physicians.

  1. Role of preoperative 3-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction in depressed skull fractures treated with craniectomy: a case report of forensic interest.

    PubMed

    Viel, Guido; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Manara, Renzo; Cecchetto, Attilio; Montisci, Massimo

    2011-06-01

    Patients affected by cranial trauma with depressed skull fractures and increased intracranial pressure generally undergo neurosurgical intervention. Because craniotomy and craniectomy remove skull fragments and generate new fracture lines, they complicate forensic examination and sometimes prevent a clear identification of skull fracture etiology. A 3-dimensional reconstruction based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans, giving a picture of the injuries before surgical intervention, can help the forensic examiner in identifying skull fracture origin and the means of production.We report the case of a 41-year-old-man presenting at the emergency department with a depressed skull fracture at the vertex and bilateral subdural hemorrhage. The patient underwent 2 neurosurgical interventions (craniotomy and craniectomy) but died after 40 days of hospitalization in an intensive care unit. At autopsy, the absence of various bone fragments did not allow us to establish if the skull had been stricken by a blunt object or had hit the ground with high kinetic energy. To analyze bone injuries before craniectomy, a 3-dimensional CT reconstruction based on preoperative scans was performed. A comparative analysis between autoptic and radiological data allowed us to differentiate surgical from traumatic injuries. Moreover, based on the shape and size of the depressed skull fracture (measured from the CT reformations), we inferred that the man had been stricken by a cylindric blunt object with a diameter of about 3 cm.

  2. Dermatosparaxis (Ehlers-Danlos type VIIC): prenatal diagnosis following a previous pregnancy with unexpected skull fractures at delivery.

    PubMed

    Solomons, Joyce; Coucke, Paul; Symoens, Sofie; Cohen, Marta C; Pope, F Michael; Wagner, Bart E; Sobey, Glenda; Black, Rebecca; Cilliers, Deirdre

    2013-05-01

    Dermatosparaxis Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (or EDS VIIC), a rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder, is characterized by extreme skin fragility, premature rupture of membranes in pregnancy, and spontaneous rupture of internal organs. Here we report a second patient with EDS VIIC presenting with congenital skull fractures and skin lacerations at birth, complications which may occur more frequently than previously thought in this condition. We also discuss the role of prenatal diagnosis in the management of a subsequent normal pregnancy.

  3. Prediction of skull fracture risk for children 0-9 months old through validated parametric finite element model and cadaver test reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Liu, Weiguo; Zhang, Jinhuan; Hu, Jingwen

    2015-09-01

    Skull fracture is one of the most common pediatric traumas. However, injury assessment tools for predicting pediatric skull fracture risk is not well established mainly due to the lack of cadaver tests. Weber conducted 50 pediatric cadaver drop tests for forensic research on child abuse in the mid-1980s (Experimental studies of skull fractures in infants, Z Rechtsmed. 92: 87-94, 1984; Biomechanical fragility of the infant skull, Z Rechtsmed. 94: 93-101, 1985). To our knowledge, these studies contained the largest sample size among pediatric cadaver tests in the literature. However, the lack of injury measurements limited their direct application in investigating pediatric skull fracture risks. In this study, 50 pediatric cadaver tests from Weber's studies were reconstructed using a parametric pediatric head finite element (FE) model which were morphed into subjects with ages, head sizes/shapes, and skull thickness values that reported in the tests. The skull fracture risk curves for infants from 0 to 9 months old were developed based on the model-predicted head injury measures through logistic regression analysis. It was found that the model-predicted stress responses in the skull (maximal von Mises stress, maximal shear stress, and maximal first principal stress) were better predictors than global kinematic-based injury measures (peak head acceleration and head injury criterion (HIC)) in predicting pediatric skull fracture. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using age- and size/shape-appropriate head FE models to predict pediatric head injuries. Such models can account for the morphological variations among the subjects, which cannot be considered by a single FE human model.

  4. Analysis of the reliability of clinical examination in predicting traumatic cerebral lesions and skull fractures in patients with mild and moderate head trauma.

    PubMed

    Zyluk, Andrzej; Mazur, Agnieszka; Piotuch, Bernard; Safranow, Krzysztof

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the reliability of neurological examination and other factors in predicting traumatic cerebral lesions and skull fractures in patients with mild and moderate head trauma (GCS 10-15). Over a one-year period, 227 patients: 145 male and 82 female, aged a mean of 51 years who sustained mild or moderate head trauma (GSC 10-15) were examined neurologically and had performed head CT scans. The neurological examination as a whole and each finding of the neurological examination were tested as predictors of the presence of traumatic abnormalities in the head CT scan. Post-traumatic lesions in head CT scan were found in 109 patients (48%): skull fractures in 66 of these and brain injuries in 94; fifty-eight patients had skull fracture combined with brain injury. Seventeen patients required neurosurgical intervention (hematoma evacuation). Abnormal neurological examination showed the highest reliability in identifying patients with brain injuries in CT (sensitivity 87%, specificity 79%). Of single findings, gait abnormalities and consciousness disturbances, present in sober patients, were the strongest predictors of cerebral lesions. Likewise, abnormal neurological examination was the best indicator of skull fractures (sensitivity 77%, specificity 63%). Gait abnormalities and "raccoon eyes" present in alcohol intoxicated patients were the strongest individual predictors of skull fractures. Results of our study show neurological abnormalities as the most reliable (although not 100% accurate) in identifying patients who are likely to have brain injuries and/or skull fracture following head trauma. Use of clinical decision rules may reduce the number of head CT scans performed "just in case".

  5. Delayed intracranial hypertension and cerebellar tonsillar necrosis associated with a depressed occipital skull fracture compressing the superior sagittal sinus. Case report.

    PubMed

    Vender, John R; Bierbrauer, Karin

    2005-11-01

    Depressed skull fractures overlying the major venous sinus are often managed nonoperatively because of the high associated risks of surgery in these locations. In the presence of clinical and radiographic evidence of sinus occlusion, however, surgical therapy may be necessary. The authors present the case of a 9-year-old boy with a depressed skull fracture overlying the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus. After initial conservative treatment, delayed signs of intracranial hypertension and a symptomatic tonsillar herniation with tonsillar necrosis developed. Possible causes as well as diagnostic and treatment options are reviewed.

  6. The oldest anatomical handmade skull of the world c. 1508: 'the ugliness of growing old' attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

    PubMed

    Missinne, Stefaan J

    2014-06-01

    The author discusses a previously unknown early sixteenth-century renaissance handmade anatomical miniature skull. The small, naturalistic skull made from an agate (calcedonia) stone mixture (mistioni) shows remarkable osteologic details. Dr. Saban was the first to link the skull to Leonardo. The three-dimensional perspective of and the search for the senso comune are discussed. Anatomical errors both in the drawings of Leonardo and this skull are presented. The article ends with the issue of physiognomy, his grotesque faces, the Perspective Communis and his experimenting c. 1508 with the stone mixture and the human skull. Evidence, including the Italian scale based on Crazie and Braccia, chemical analysis leading to a mine in Volterra and Leonardo's search for the soul in the skull are presented. Written references in the inventory of Salai (1524), the inventory of the Villa Riposo (Raffaello Borghini 1584) and Don Ambrogio Mazenta (1635) are reviewed. The author attributes the skull c. 1508 to Leonardo da Vinci.

  7. Does preliminary optimisation of an anatomically correct skull-brain model using simple simulants produce clinically realistic ballistic injury fracture patterns?

    PubMed

    Mahoney, P F; Carr, D J; Delaney, R J; Hunt, N; Harrison, S; Breeze, J; Gibb, I

    2017-03-07

    Ballistic head injury remains a significant threat to military personnel. Studying such injuries requires a model that can be used with a military helmet. This paper describes further work on a skull-brain model using skulls made from three different polyurethane plastics and a series of skull 'fills' to simulate brain (3, 5, 7 and 10% gelatine by mass and PermaGel™). The models were subjected to ballistic impact from 7.62 × 39 mm mild steel core bullets. The first part of the work compares the different polyurethanes (mean bullet muzzle velocity of 708 m/s), and the second part compares the different fills (mean bullet muzzle velocity of 680 m/s). The impact events were filmed using high speed cameras. The resulting fracture patterns in the skulls were reviewed and scored by five clinicians experienced in assessing penetrating head injury. In over half of the models, one or more assessors felt aspects of the fracture pattern were close to real injury. Limitations of the model include the skull being manufactured in two parts and the lack of a realistic skin layer. Further work is ongoing to address these.

  8. [Hole fracture of the base of the skull following a fall on the chin].

    PubMed

    Metzner, G; Stichnoth, E; Brinkmann, B

    1984-01-01

    A 26-year-old healthy female died a few hours after having fallen on her chin. Death had been caused by an epidural hematoma which originated from a hole fracture following impression of the condyle of the mandible through the socket of the temporo mandibular joint.

  9. Investigation of the force associated with the formation of lacerations and skull fractures.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, E J; Cassidy, M; Brady, J; Gilchrist, M D; NicDaeid, N

    2012-11-01

    Post-mortem examination is often relied upon in order to determine whether a suspicious death was natural, accidental, suicidal or homicidal. However, in many cases the mechanism by which a single injury has been inflicted cannot be determined with certainty based on pathological examination alone. Furthermore the current method of assessing applied force relating to injury is restricted to an arbitrary and subjective scale (mild, moderate, considerable, or severe). This study investigates the pathophysiological nature of head injuries caused by blunt force trauma, specifically in relation to the incidence and formation of a laceration. An experimental model was devised to assess the force required to cause damage to the scalp and underlying skull of porcine specimens following a single fronto-parietal impact. This was achieved using a drop tower equipped with adapted instrumentation for data acquisition. The applied force and implement used could be correlated with resultant injuries and as such aid pathological investigation in the differentiation between falls and blows. Experimentation revealed prevalent patterns of injury specific to the reconstructed mechanism involved. It was found that the minimum force for the occurrence of a laceration was 4,000 N.

  10. A history of depressed skull fractures from ancient times to 1800.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C; Arndt, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The story of managing depressed fractures illustrates how knowledge of proven value does not always get handed down. Celsus was the first to describe sensible management for depressed fractures. As he wrote in Latin this was forgotten. Galen's Greek writings survived forming the basis of management until the sixteenth century. In 1517, Hans von Gersdorff published a formidable illustrated surgical text. One illustration depicts an instrument for elevating depressed bone fragments. It looked dramatic but could not work and its defects were finally defined in the eighteenth century. Ambroise Paré used a bone punch just as we do today, but no later surgeon mentions this, though the instrument was well known. Elements of chance, fashion, emotionally powerful illustrations, and perhaps stubbornness had a profound effect on management delaying rational treatment for centuries.

  11. [Forensic medical assessment of the skull bone fractures owing to blow impacts depending on anatomical characteristics and a nature of a trauma-causing objects].

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, A O; Shadymov, A B; Sarkisian, B A

    2003-01-01

    Fractures in bones of the skull base (BSB) are preconditioned by the contact zone of interaction between the two below surfaces, i.e. the trace-forming one (object) and the trace-receiving one (bone). On the basis of their independent research, the authors suggest a set of criteria for the expert evaluation of fractures in BSB for the purpose of specifying the properties of the trauma-causing object, which is made with due regard for the anatomic specific features of the trauma zone.

  12. Occurrence and pattern of long bone fractures in growing dogs with normal and osteopenic bones.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Mogha, I V; Aithal, H P; Kinjavdekar, P; Singh, G R; Pawde, A M; Kushwaha, R B

    2007-11-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to record the occurrence and pattern of long bone fractures, and the efficacy of Intramedullary (IM) Steinmann pin fixing in growing dogs. All the records of growing dogs during a 10-year-period were screened to record the cause of trauma, the age and sex of the animal, the bone involved, the type and location of the fracture, the status of fixation, alignment, maintenance of fixation and fracture healing. The results were analysed and comparisons were made between growing dogs with normal and osteopenic bones. Among the 310 cases of fractures recorded, the bones were osteopenic in 91 cases (29%). Minor trauma was the principal cause of fracture in dogs with osteopenia (25%), and indigenous breeds were most commonly affected (38%). Fractures in dogs with osteopenic bones were most commonly recorded in the age group of 2-4 months (53%), whereas fractures in normal dogs were almost equally distributed between 2 and 8 months of age. Male dogs were affected significantly more often in both groups. In osteopenic bones, most fractures were recorded in the femur (56%), and they were distributed equally along the length of the bone. Whereas in normal bones, fractures were almost equally distributed in radius/ulna, femur and tibia, and were more often recorded at the middle and distal third of long bones. Oblique fractures were most common in both groups; however, comminuted fractures were more frequent in normal bones, whereas incomplete fractures were more common in osteopenic bones. Ninety-nine fracture cases treated with IM pinning (66 normal, 33 osteopenic) were evaluated for the status of fracture reduction and healing. In a majority of the cases (61%) with osteopenic bones, the diameter of the pin was relatively smaller than the diameter of the medullary cavity (<70-75%), whereas in 68% of the cases in normal bones the pin diameter was optimum. The status of fracture fixing was satisfactory to good in significantly more

  13. Influence of a combo side airbag on the risk for basilar skull fracture in a far-side occupant.

    PubMed

    Viano, David C; Burnett, Roger; Parenteau, Chantal S

    2014-01-01

    The impact force to the head and neck were measured in sled tests with and without inflation of a combo airbag for a far-side occupant to determine the risk for basilar skull fracture. Sled tests were run at 24 and 32 km/h (15 and 20 mph) with and without inflation of a combo side airbag to analyze the effect of cross-car diving into the side interior. The matched tests involved one pair at 24 km/h and another at 32 km/h. The 24 km/h pair involved a lap-shoulder-belted 5th percentile female Hybrid III and the series at 32 km/h involved an unbelted 5th percentile Hybrid III. The dummy was ballasted to 69.5 kg (153 lb) and laid on the right side. The dummy was positioned 30.5 cm (12(″)) from the far-side interior to ensure the full sled delta V occurred before head impact. The buck consisted of a 2001 Ford Taurus. The combo thorax-head side airbag was stored in the seatback. The airbag was triggered about 120 ms before the head impact. The head, chest, and pelvis were instrumented with triaxial accelerometers and the upper and lower neck, thoracic spine, and lumbar spine had transducers measuring triaxial loads and moments. High-speed video recorded different views of the dummy motion. Dummy kinematics and biomechanical responses were compared to study the influence of inflating the side airbag on the head and neck. The top of the head impacted the far side. The force of impact was similar with and without the airbag as the head compressed the airbag and loaded the vehicle interior trim behind the airbag. The peak force on the head was primarily from neck load as torso augmentation occurred. For the 24 km/h (15 mph) tests, the peak force was 4.7 kN (1055 lb) without and 4.8 kN (1088 lb) with the airbag and there was over 2.67 kN (600 lb) of lap belt load. The peak head acceleration was 93 g without and 72 g with the airbag. For the 32 km/h (20 mph) tests, the force on the head was 15.3 kN (3433 lb) without and 15.2 kN (3406 lb) with the airbag, although the

  14. Skull (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The skull is anterior to the spinal column and is the bony structure that encases the brain. Its purpose ... the facial muscles. The two regions of the skull are the cranial and facial region. The cranial ...

  15. Skull Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1988-01-01

    Disguises a lesson about skulls with some fun to cause less fear among students. Outlines strategies, questions, and answers for use. Includes a skull mask which can be photocopied and distributed to students as a learning tool and a fun Halloween treat. Also shown is a picture of skull parts. (RT)

  16. Skull Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1988-01-01

    Disguises a lesson about skulls with some fun to cause less fear among students. Outlines strategies, questions, and answers for use. Includes a skull mask which can be photocopied and distributed to students as a learning tool and a fun Halloween treat. Also shown is a picture of skull parts. (RT)

  17. Influence of stiffness and shape of contact surface on skull fractures and biomechanical metrics of the human head of different population underlateral impacts.

    PubMed

    Shaoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the responses of 5th-percentile female, and 50th- and 95th-percentile male human heads during lateral impacts at different velocities and determine the role of the stiffness and shape of the impacting surface on peak forces and derived skull fracture metrics. A state-of-the-art validated finite element (FE) head model was used to study the influence of different population human heads on skull fracture for lateral impacts. The mass of the FE head model was altered to match the adult size dummies. Numerical simulations of lateral head impacts for 45 cases (15 experiments×3 different population human heads) were performed at velocities ranging from 2.4 to 6.5m/s and three impacting conditions (flat and cylindrical 90D; and flat 40D padding). The entire force-time signals from simulations were compared with experimental mean and upper/lower corridors at each velocity, stiffness (40 and 90 durometer) and shapes (flat and cylindrical) of the impacting surfaces. Average deviation of peak force from the 50th male to 95th male and 5th female were 6.4% and 10.6% considering impacts on the three impactors. These results indicate hierarchy of variables which can be used in injury mitigation efforts.

  18. Discrimination of falls and blows in blunt head trauma: systematic study of the hat brim line rule in relation to skull fractures.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Célia; Racette, Stéphanie; Dionne, Charles-Antoine; Sauvageau, Anny

    2008-05-01

    In the discrimination of falls from blows in blunt head trauma, the hat brim line rule is one of the most often used criteria. The present study assesses the validity of the hat brim line rule for skull fractures and looks at other possible criteria. All autopsy cases were retrospectively analyzed on a 5-year period. Cases selected consisted of downstairs falls (n = 13), falls from one's own height (n = 23), and homicidal blows (n = 44). Results show that fractures above the hat brim line are more in favor of blows, while fractures in the hat brim line zone are more difficult to distinguish. The majority of fractures were located on the left side for homicidal blows and on the right side for falls. A higher average number of lacerations was revealed for homicidal blows. In conclusion, this study establishes three criteria in favor of blows: (i) localization of a wound above the hat brim line; (ii) left side lateralization; and (iii) a high number of lacerations.

  19. Vaccination as primary prevention? The effect of anti-pneumococcal vaccination on the outcome of patients suffering traumatic skull base fractures.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Kachel, Alon; Levi, Leon; Zaaroor, Menashe

    2017-06-01

    As many as 360,000 people suffer yearly from skull base fractures (SBF). These may be associated with a dural tear, hemosinus, otorrhea or rhinorrhea. The most common causative agent of post-traumatic meningitis is Streptococcus Pneumonia (Pneumococcus). PNEUMOVAX 23 is a potent vaccine against Pneumococcus, but head trauma involving any skull fractures are not defined indications for its use. Our aim was to identify the effect of PNEUMOVAX on the natural course and incidence of infections and infectious prognosis following SBF. A retrospective review of patients suffering a traumatic SBF who were admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery at a single tertiary hospital referred from the entire north of Israel during 2002-2009 were characterized. Six hundred and two patients patients were included in the study; 99 patients received the PNEUMOVAX in the first few days of hospitalization, while 503 patients did not. Demographic data, presenting symptoms, chronic illnesses and radiologic features were logged. Treatment regimens were logged as well, including the use of PNEUMOVAX vaccine. Outcome parameters including infectious complications and functional state were logged at different set time points after admission. The group receiving the vaccine had a significantly older mean age, higher incidence of obesity, higher rate of headache or confusion on presentation, and a significantly higher incidence of additional cranial injuries. All these factors, known to worsen the outcome of SBF patients did not manifest in the vaccinated group. There was no statistically significant differences between the groups in the outcome parameters measured (fever, meningitis, mortality or length of hospitalization). We suggest that patients with a more severe status upon admission may benefit from a prophylactic treatment with the PNEUMOVAX vaccine.

  20. [Application of modified traction arch of skull in skull traction].

    PubMed

    Lei, Xing; Wang, Huan; Song, Yang; Qu, Yanlong

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of the modified traction arch of skull (crossbar traction arch) for skull traction in treating cervical spine injury by comparing with traditional traction arch of skull. Between June 2009 and June 2013, 90 patients with cervical vertebrae fractures or dislocation were treated with modified skull traction surgery (trial group, n=45) and traditional skull traction surgery (control group, n=45). There was no significant difference in gender, age, injury types, injury level, the interval between injury and admission, and Frankel grading of spinal injury between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The clinical efficacy was evaluated after operation by the indexes such as traction arch slippage times, operation time, the infection incidence of the pin hole, incidence of skull perforation, visual analogue scale (VAS), and reduction status of cervical dislocation. The traction arch slippage times, the infection incidence of the pin hole, operation time, blood loss, and postoperative VAS score in trial group were significantly lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the incidence of skull perforation caused by clamp crooks of traction arch between 2 groups (P=1.000). At 2 weeks after operation, the patients had no headaches, infections, or other complications in 2 groups. In patients with cervical dislocation, 4 of the trial group and 6 of the control group failed to be reset, the reduction rate was 83.33% (20/24) and 68.42% (13/19) respectively, showing no significant difference (χ2=0.618, P=0.432). The operation with modified traction arch of skull has significant advantages to reduce postoperative complication compared with tradition traction arch of skull.

  1. A region-growing approach for automatic outcrop fracture extraction from a three-dimensional point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zou, Lejun; Shen, Xiaohua; Ren, Yupeng; Qin, Yi

    2017-02-01

    Conventional manual surveys of rock mass fractures usually require large amounts of time and labor; yet, they provide a relatively small set of data that cannot be considered representative of the study region. Terrestrial laser scanners are increasingly used for fracture surveys because they can efficiently acquire large area, high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) point clouds from outcrops. However, extracting fractures and other planar surfaces from 3D outcrop point clouds is still a challenging task. No method has been reported that can be used to automatically extract the full extent of every individual fracture from a 3D outcrop point cloud. In this study, we propose a method using a region-growing approach to address this problem; the method also estimates the orientation of each fracture. In this method, criteria based on the local surface normal and curvature of the point cloud are used to initiate and control the growth of the fracture region. In tests using outcrop point cloud data, the proposed method identified and extracted the full extent of individual fractures with high accuracy. Compared with manually acquired field survey data, our method obtained better-quality fracture data, thereby demonstrating the high potential utility of the proposed method.

  2. Solitary plasmocytoma of the skull.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Mehmet Sabri; Akmil, Mehmet Ufuk; Akar, Ezgi; Aker, Fügen Vardar

    2013-08-08

    A 63-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of a slowly growing soft mass at his right parieto-occipital region. Neuroradiological examinations revealed an osteolytic extradural tumour of the skull vault. The outer and inner tables of the skull were partially destroyed by the tumour, but the dura was not involved. The tumour and the invaded bone were totally removed and the skull defect was reconstructed using the outer table of the adjacent intact skull. Histopathological examination confirmed plasmocytoma. Laboratory investigations revealed no systemic myelomatosis. It is very important to differentiate solitary plasmocytoma from systemic myelomatosis since their treatment and prognosis are different. Although the prognosis of solitary plasmocytoma is good, regular follow-up examinations are required for any possibility to progress to systemic myelomatosis.

  3. Skull x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Radiography of skull, chest, and cervical spine - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. ...

  4. Kirschner wire fixation of Salter-Harris type IV fracture of the lateral aspect of the humeral condyle in growing dogs. A retrospective study of 35 fractures.

    PubMed

    Cinti, Filippo; Pisani, Guido; Vezzoni, Luca; Peirone, Bruno; Vezzoni, Aldo

    2017-01-16

    To evaluate the use of Kirschner wires for treatment of fractures of the lateral aspect of the humeral condyle in growing dogs. Retrospective analysis of 35 elbow fractures (33 dogs) of the lateral aspect of the humeral condyle treated by insertion of multiple transcondylar and one anti-rotational Kirschner wires. Radiographic and clinical re-evaluations were carried out immediately after surgery, at four weeks and, when required, at eight weeks postoperatively. Long-term follow-up was planned after a minimum of six months. The relationship between different implant configurations and clinical outcome was analysed statistically. Complete functional recovery was seen in 31 elbows (30 dogs), three elbows (2 dogs) had reduction in the range of motion, and one elbow (1 dog) had persistent grade 1 lameness two months postoperatively. Major complications occurred in eight elbows (8 dogs) and all were resolved by implant removal. Implant configuration did not affect outcome. Long-term evaluation in 12 cases with a mean follow-up of four years showed absence of lameness, normal function and no or mild radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis in 11 cases. Fracture of the lateral aspect of the humeral condyle in growing dogs can be successfully treated by multiple transcondylar convergent or parallel Kirschner wires, resulting in adequate fracture healing.

  5. Condyle and mandibular bone change after unilateral condylar neck fracture in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Yang, H-f; Li, S; Chen, J-z; Luo, Y-w; Yang, C

    2012-08-01

    Unilateral fracture of the condylar neck in immature subjects might lead to mandible asymmetry and condyle remodelling. A rat model was used to investigate mandibular deviation and condylar remodelling associated with condyle fracture. 72 4-week-old male rats were randomly divided into three groups: an experimental group (unilateral transverse condylar fracture induced surgically), a sham operation group (surgical exposure but no fracture), and a non-operative control group (no operation). The rats were killed at intervals up to 9weeks after surgery, and outcomes were assessed using various measures of mandible deviation, histological and X-ray observation, and immunohistochemical measures of expression levels of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and type II collagen (Col II). The fracture led to the degeneration of mandibular size, associated with atrophy of fractured condylar process. Progressive remodelling of cartilage and increasing expression levels of CTGF and Col II were found. The authors conclude that condylar fracture can lead to asymmetries in mandible and condyle remodelling and expression of CTGF and Col II in condylar cartilage on both the ipsilateral and the contralateral sides.

  6. A growing problem: acetabular fractures in the elderly and the combined hip procedure.

    PubMed

    Buller, Leonard T; Lawrie, Charles M; Vilella, Fernando E

    2015-04-01

    Acetabular fractures in the elderly are most frequently the result of low-energy trauma and present unique management challenges to orthopedic surgeons. Evaluation and treatment should be performed in a multidisciplinary fashion with early involvement of internal medicine subspecialists and geriatricians. Distinct fracture patterns and pre-existing osteoarthritis and osteoporosis necessitate careful preoperative planning. The role of total hip arthroplasty should also be considered when surgical treatment is indicated. The outcomes of acetabular fractures in the elderly have improved, but complications remain higher and results less satisfactory than in younger individuals. The lack of randomized controlled trials has limited the ability to establish an evidence-based treatment algorithm.

  7. Skull base tumours part I: imaging technique, anatomy and anterior skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-06-01

    Advances in cross-sectional imaging, surgical technique and adjuvant treatment have largely contributed to ameliorate the prognosis, lessen the morbidity and mortality of patients with skull base tumours and to the growing medical investment in the management of these patients. Because clinical assessment of the skull base is limited, cross-sectional imaging became indispensable in the diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of patients with suspected skull base pathology and the radiologist is increasingly responsible for the fate of these patients. This review will focus on the advances in imaging technique; contribution to patient's management and on the imaging features of the most common tumours affecting the anterior skull base. Emphasis is given to a systematic approach to skull base pathology based upon an anatomic division taking into account the major tissue constituents in each skull base compartment. The most relevant information that should be conveyed to surgeons and radiation oncologists involved in patient's management will be discussed.

  8. Dimensional, Geometrical, and Physical Constraints in Skull Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weickenmeier, Johannes; Fischer, Cedric; Carter, Dennis; Kuhl, Ellen; Goriely, Alain

    2017-06-01

    After birth, the skull grows and remodels in close synchrony with the brain to allow for an increase in intracranial volume. Increase in skull area is provided primarily by bone accretion at the sutures. Additional remodeling, to allow for a change in curvatures, occurs by resorption on the inner surface of the bone plates and accretion on their outer surfaces. When a suture fuses too early, normal skull growth is disrupted, leading to a deformed final skull shape. The leading theory assumes that the main stimulus for skull growth is provided by mechanical stresses. Based on these ideas, we first discuss the dimensional, geometrical, and kinematic synchrony between brain, skull, and suture growth. Second, we present two mechanical models for skull growth that account for growth at the sutures and explain the various observed dysmorphologies. These models demonstrate the particular role of physical and geometrical constraints taking place in skull growth.

  9. Skull anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The skull is anterior to the spinal column and is the bony structure that encases the brain. Its purpose ... the facial muscles. The two regions of the skull are the cranial and facial region. The cranial ...

  10. Lipoma involving the skull. Case report.

    PubMed

    Tomabechi, M; Sako, K; Daita, G; Yonemasu, Y

    1992-02-01

    The case of an intraosseous lipoma involving the left frontal bone is reported. Lipomas of the bone are rare; only three cases of lipomas involving the skull have previously been reported. The differential diagnosis includes a healing bone infarction or fracture, meningioma, hemangioma, and fibrous dysplasia. Diagnosis prior to surgery is difficult.

  11. Cranioplasty with split lateral skull plate segments for reconstruction of skull defects.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, K; Hayakawa, K; Tanabe, H Y; Inoue, Y; Tai, Y; Shigemori, M; Tokutomi, T

    1998-12-01

    This paper reports the use of cranioplasty using segments of split lateral skull plate to correct large skull defects (larger than 8 x 8 cm). The subjects consisted of 10 patients with head trauma who had undergone decompression surgery, and two patients who had undergone tumour resection. Bone grafts were obtained by cutting approximately 2 cm wide strips from the lateral skull plate using a bone saw that was inserted from a free margin of the bone defects. By cutting strips laterally from the bone defect, the necessary amount of split lateral skull plate can be obtained without performing craniotomy. The pieces of split lateral skull plate are then fixed to the defect using wire or titanium mini-plates. At this point, the selection of bone grafts that match the curvature of the dura mater is important, so that no dead spaces are created between the dura mater and the bone grafts. Infection was not detected in any of the 12 patients, and all bone grafts took completely. One of the 12 patients suffered from a pathological fracture and bone resorption 6 months after surgery. The fracture occurred because the use of basket-shaped reconstruction plates resulted in large spaces between the plate segments, and in addition the intracranial pressure was kept low by a V-P shunt, thus rendering the patient more vulnerable to atmospheric pressure.

  12. The Royal Book by Haly Abbas from the 10th century: one of the earliest illustrations of the surgical approach to skull fractures.

    PubMed

    Aciduman, Ahmet; Arda, Berna; Kahya, Esin; Belen, Deniz

    2010-12-01

    Haly Abbas was one of the pioneering physicians and surgeons of the Eastern world in the 10th century who influenced the Western world by his monumental work, The Royal Book. The book was first partly translated into Latin by Constantinus Africanus in the 11th century without citing the author's name. Haly Abbas was recognized in Europe after full translation of The Royal Book by Stephen of Antioch in 1127. The Royal Book has been accepted as an early source of jerrah-names (surgical books) in the Eastern world. The chapters regarding cranial fractures in Haly Abbas' work include unique management strategies for his period with essential quotations from Paul of Aegina's work Epitome. Both authors preferred free bone flap craniotomy in cranial fractures. Although Paul of Aegina, a Byzantine physician and surgeon, was a connection between ancient traditions and Islamic interpretation, Haly Abbas seemed to play a bridging role between the Roman-Byzantine and the School of Salerno in Europe.

  13. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  14. [Endonasal skull base endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Simal-Julián, Juan Antonio; Miranda-Lloret, Pablo; Pancucci, Giovanni; Evangelista-Zamora, Rocío; Pérez-Borredá, Pedro; Sanromán-Álvarez, Pablo; Perez-de-Sanromán, Laila; Botella-Asunción, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal techniques used in skull base surgery have evolved greatly in recent years. Our study objective was to perform a qualitative systematic review of the likewise systematic reviews in published English language literature, to examine the evidence and conclusions reached in these studies comparing transcranial and endoscopic approaches in skull base surgery. We searched the references on the MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases selecting the systematic reviews, meta-analyses and evidence based medicine reviews on skull based pathologies published from January 2000 until January 2013. We focused on endoscopic impact and on microsurgical and endoscopic technique comparisons. Full endoscopic endonasal approaches achieved gross total removal rates of craniopharyngiomas and chordomas higher than those for transcranial approaches. In anterior skull base meningiomas, complete resections were more frequently achieved after transcranial approaches, with a trend in favour of endoscopy with respect to visual prognosis. Endoscopic endonasal approaches minimised the postoperative complications after the treatment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, encephaloceles, meningoceles, craniopharyngiomas and chordomas, with the exception of postoperative CSF leaks. Randomized multicenter studies are necessary to resolve the controversy over endoscopic and microsurgical approaches in skull base surgery. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling skull electrical properties

    PubMed Central

    Sadleir, R. J.; Argibay, A.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate representations and measurements of skull electrical conductivity are essential in developing appropriate forward models for applications such as inverse EEG or Electrical Impedance Tomography of the head. Because of its layered structure, it is often assumed that skull is anisotropic, with an anisotropy ratio around 10. However, no detailed investigation of skull anisotropy has been performed. In this paper we investigate four-electrode measurements of conductivities and their relation to tissue anisotropy ratio (ratio of tangential to radial conductivity) in layered or anisotropic biological samples similar to bone. It is shown here that typical values for the thicknesses and radial conductivities of individual skull layers produce tissue with much smaller anisotropy ratios than 10. Moreover, we show that there are very significant differences between the field patterns formed in a three-layered isotropic structure plausible for bone, and those formed assuming that bone is homogeneous and anisotropic.We performed a measurement of conductivity using an electrode configuration sensitive to the distinction between three-layered and homogeneous anisotropic composition and found results consistent with the sample being three-layered. We recommend that the skull be more appropriately represented as three isotropic layers than as homogeneous and anisotropic. PMID:17629793

  16. Modeling skull electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Sadleir, R J; Argibay, A

    2007-10-01

    Accurate representations and measurements of skull electrical conductivity are essential in developing appropriate forward models for applications such as inverse EEG or Electrical Impedance Tomography of the head. Because of its layered structure, it is often assumed that skull is anisotropic, with an anisotropy ratio around 10. However, no detailed investigation of skull anisotropy has been performed. In this paper we investigate four-electrode measurements of conductivities and their relation to tissue anisotropy ratio (ratio of tangential to radial conductivity) in layered or anisotropic biological samples similar to bone. It is shown here that typical values for the thicknesses and radial conductivities of individual skull layers produce tissue with much smaller anisotropy ratios than 10. Moreover, we show that there are very significant differences between the field patterns formed in a three-layered isotropic structure plausible for bone, and those formed assuming that bone is homogeneous and anisotropic. We performed a measurement of conductivity using an electrode configuration sensitive to the distinction between three-layered and homogeneous anisotropic composition and found results consistent with the sample being three-layered. We recommend that the skull be more appropriately represented as three isotropic layers than as homogeneous and anisotropic.

  17. The effects of skull thickness variations on human head dynamic impact responses.

    PubMed

    Ruan, J; Prasad, P

    2001-11-01

    Variations in human skull thickness affecting human head dynamic impact responses were studied by finite element modeling techniques, experimental measurements, and histology examinations. The aims of the study were to better understand the influences of skull thickness variations on human head dynamic impact responses and the injury mechanisms of human head during direct impact. The thicknesses of the frontal bone of seven human cadaver skulls were measured using ultrasonic technology. These measurements were compared with previous experimental data. Histology of the skull was recorded and examined. The measured data were analyzed and then served as a reference to vary the skull thickness of a previously published three-dimensional finite element human head model to create four models with different skull thickness. The skull thicknesses modeled are 4.6 mm, 5.98 mm, 7.68 mm, and 9.61 mm. These models were impacted by a cylinder with a mass of 5.23 kg and an initial velocity of 6.33 m/s. Model responses were compared between models in terms of intracranial pressures, head impact accelerations, brain shear stresses, and skull von Mises stresses. It has been shown that the thickness of the skull influenced the dynamic responses of the head during direct impact. As skull thickness increased, skull deformation decreased as the skull absorbed less impact energy. However, this relationship cannot be linearly interpolated to the other parameters such as head acceleration and intracranial pressure responses. Based on model responses to half-sine wave pulses, skull and brain iso-stress curves were constructed for the thicker and thinner skulls. Thresholds for skull fracture and reversible concussion were established for the population represented by these skulls.

  18. Lateral Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Manolidis, Spiros; Jackson, C. Gary; Von Doersten, Peter G.; Pappas, Dennis; Glasscock, Michael E.

    1997-01-01

    Lateral skull base surgery has remained the surgical frontier of new developments in the treatment of lesions heretofore difficult to access. Examination of surgical results stimulates technical innovation and provides an intervention risk-benefit ratio assessment for particular lesions useful in management planning. With this in mind, we report the updated collective experience with lateral skull base surgery at the Otology Group over the past 20 years. Two hundred ninety-eight patients underwent surgical intervention for lateral skull base lesions. In 81 patients these lesions were malignant; in 217, benign. Of the benign lesions, 165 were glomus tumors: 139 glomus jugulare, 19 glomus vagale, and 7 glomus tympanicum. The remainder comprised 21 menigniomas, 14 neuromas, two neurofibromas, and a small group of much rarer entities. The philosophy of surgical approach, results, and follow-up are discussed. PMID:17171022

  19. Skull Base Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag R; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Wei-Hsin; Wang, Eric W

    2016-02-01

    The anatomy of the skull base is complex with multiple neurovascular structures in a small space. Understanding all of the intricate relationships begins with understanding the anatomy of the sphenoid bone. The cavernous sinus contains the carotid artery and some of its branches; cranial nerves III, IV, VI, and V1; and transmits venous blood from multiple sources. The anterior skull base extends to the frontal sinus and is important to understand for sinus surgery and sinonasal malignancies. The clivus protects the brainstem and posterior cranial fossa. A thorough appreciation of the anatomy of these various areas allows for endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Conservative Approach to Unilateral Condylar Fracture in a Growing Patient: A 2.5-Year Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Elif Bahar; Dündar, Aysun; Çankaya, Abdülkadir Burak; Gençay, Koray

    2012-01-01

    Condylar fractures in children are especially important because of the risk of a mandibular growth-center being affected in the condylar head, which can lead to growth retardation and facial asymmetry. The purpose of this article is to follow up the two and half year clinical and radiological evaluation of the conservative treatment of a 10 year-old patient, who had a unilateral green-stick type fracture. The patient presented with painful facial swelling localized over the left condylar region, limited mouth-opening and mandibular deviation to the left. Panoramic radiography and computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis of incomplete fracture on the left condyle with one side of the bone fractured and the other bent. Closed reduction was chosen to allow for initial fibrous union of the fracture segments and remodeling with a normal functional stimulus. A non-rigid mandibular splint was applied in order to remove the direct pressure on the fracture side of the mandible. Clinical and radiologic examination after 30 months revealed uneventful healing with reduction of the condylar head and remodeling of the condylar process following conservative treatment. PMID:22276078

  1. Skull Base Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  2. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Issing, Peter R.; Hemmanouil, Ilias; Stöver, Timo; Kempf, Hans-Georg; Wilkens, L.; Heermann, R.; Lenarz, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a slowly growing tumor with a particular tendency to infiltrate the surrounding tissue by perineural spread. The clinical diagnosis may prove difficult due to the submucons extension of the tumor, especially at the skull base. This article outlines the clinical characteristics, diagnostics, and treatment modalities in a series of 56 patients with an ACC in the head and neck diagnosed between 1970 and 1998 in 32 females and 24 males. The youngest patient was aged 24 years, the oldest 77 years. The average age was 54 years. In 16 patients the tumor originated in the paranasal sinuses or the nasopharynx and involved the skull base. As a rule, several months passed between the manifestation of the first symptoms such as pain, blocked nose, epistaxis, or diplopia and the initial clinical diagnosis. All patients received surgical treatment, however, complete microscopical resection could only be achieved in approximately one third of the cases. Therefore, nine patients were postoperatively treated with radiotherapy. The average survival rates of the patients with an ACC of the skull base were only 99 months as compared to 144 months in the patients without skull base involvement. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:17171116

  3. Investigation of the elastic modulus, tensile and flexural strength of five skull simulant materials for impact testing of a forensic skin/skull/brain model.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Waddell, J Neil; Chun Li, Kai; Tong, Darryl; Brunton, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Conducting in vitro research for forensic, impact and injury simulation modelling generally involves the use of a skull simulant with mechanical properties similar to those found in the human skull. For this study epoxy resin, fibre filled epoxy resin, 3D-printing filaments (PETG, PLA) and self-cure acrylic denture base resin were used to fabricate the specimens (n=20 per material group), according to ISO 527-2 IBB and ISO20795-1. Tensile and flexural testing in a universal testing machine was used to measure their tensile/flexural elastic modulus and strength. The results showed that the epoxy resin and fibre filled epoxy resin had similar tensile elastic moduli (no statistical significant difference) with lower values observed for the other materials. The fibre filled epoxy resin had a considerably higher flexural elastic modulus and strength, possibly attributed to the presence of fibres. Of the simulants tested, epoxy resin had an elastic modulus and flexural strength close to that of mean human skull values reported in the literature, and thus can be considered as a suitable skull simulant for a skin/skull/brain model for lower impact forces that do not exceed the fracture stress. For higher impact forces a 3D printing filament (PLA) may be a more suitable skull simulant material, due to its closer match to fracture stresses found in human skull bone. Influencing factors were also anisotropy, heterogeneity and viscoelasticity of human skull bone and simulant specimens.

  4. Osteomyelitis of the skull.

    PubMed

    Bullitt, E; Lehman, R A

    1979-03-01

    This retrospective study includes 18 patients who underwent 28 admissions for treatment of osteomyelitis of the skull. Each admission was reviewed separately. Systemic symptoms were rare and signalled the presence of an associated collection of pus. Films of the skull, polytomography and bone scans were all useful in establishing the diagnosis, whereas white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and brain scans were of little value. Complete surgical debridement was found to be of significantly greater value than limited surgical debridement. The surgical results appeared to be improved when surgery was followed by long courses of antibiotics. Each patient who received complete surgical debridement followed by at least six weeks of antibiotic therapy was cured.

  5. Blunt force trauma to skull with various instruments.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Nur Amirah; Osman, Khairul; Hamzah, Noor Hazfalinda; Amir, Sri Pawita Albakri

    2014-04-01

    Deaths due to blunt force trauma to the head as a result of assault are some of the most common cases encountered by the practicing forensic pathologist. Previous studies have shown inflicting injury to the head region is one of the most effective methods of murder. The important factors that determine severity of trauma include the type of weapon used, type and site of skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage and severity of brain injury. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of blunt force trauma to the skull produced by different instruments. Nine adult monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) skulls were used as models. Commonly found blunt objects comprising of Warrington hammer, hockey stick and open face helmet were used in this study. A machine calibrated force generator was used to hold the blunt object in place and to hit the skulls at forces of 12.5N and 25N. Resultant traumatic effects and fractures (linear, depressed, basilar, comminuted, and distastic) were analyzed according to type of blunt object used; surface area of contact and absolute force (N/cm(2)) delivered. Results showed that all investigated instruments were capable of producing similar injuries. The severity of trauma was not related to the surface area of contact with the blunt objects. However, only high absolute forces produced comminuted fractures. These findings were observational, as the samples were too small for statistical conclusions.

  6. Analysis of the traction forces in different skull traction systems.

    PubMed

    Nyström, B; Allard, H; Karlsson, H

    1988-03-01

    During transportation of patients under skull traction, swinging of the weights produces acceleration forces that not only can cause pain and discomfort for the patient, but also can cause worsening of the cervical fracture or dislocation. Skull traction systems also involve friction forces. In a system with one pulley, the friction forces were 10 to 21.5% of the weight applied but, in a system with three pulleys (Stryker SurgiBed 965), they were as much as 65%. A new spring traction device that permits traction during transportation showed better physical characteristics than the hanging weight systems.

  7. The infant Apert skull.

    PubMed

    Kreiborg, S; Cohen, M M

    1991-07-01

    During early infancy, the Apert skull is literally wide open. It is characterized by a gaping midline calvarial defect that extends almost from the root of the nose through the metopic suture area, anterior fontanelle, and sagittal suture area to a widely patent posterior fontanelle. Only the coronal suture area is prematurely fused. During the first 2 to 4 years of life, bony islands that have formed in the midline enlarge and coalesce, obliterating the midline calvarial defect without any evidence of suture formation.

  8. [The skull of Combe Capelle].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Almut; Wegner, Dietrich

    2002-12-01

    Since the end of World War II two of the most important anthropological artefacts of the Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte in Berlin, the skulls and skeletons of Le Moustier and Combe Capelle, were believed to be missing or destroyed, respectively. The postcrania were severely damaged during a fire after the museum was bombed in February 1945, while the skulls were brought to the Soviet Union in 1945. In 1965, the skull of the Neanderthal man from Le Moustier and the chain of the grave of Combe Capelle were found amongst the art objects returned by the Soviet Union into the German Democratic Republic in 1958. However, the Combe Capelle skull was still missing. In the end of 2001 this skull could be found and identified in a store-house of the museum. Now, one the oldest known representatives of Homo sapiens sapiens is again available for scientific research and public exhibitions.

  9. Skull base tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  10. 21 CFR 882.4750 - Skull punch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Skull punch. 882.4750 Section 882.4750 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4750 Skull punch. (a) Identification. A skull punch is a device used to punch holes through a patient's skull to allow fixation of cranioplasty plates...

  11. 21 CFR 882.4750 - Skull punch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Skull punch. 882.4750 Section 882.4750 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4750 Skull punch. (a) Identification. A skull punch is a device used to punch holes through a patient's skull to allow fixation of cranioplasty plates...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4750 - Skull punch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Skull punch. 882.4750 Section 882.4750 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4750 Skull punch. (a) Identification. A skull punch is a device used to punch holes through a patient's skull to allow fixation of cranioplasty plates...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4750 - Skull punch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Skull punch. 882.4750 Section 882.4750 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4750 Skull punch. (a) Identification. A skull punch is a device used to punch holes through a patient's skull to allow fixation of cranioplasty plates...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4750 - Skull punch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skull punch. 882.4750 Section 882.4750 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4750 Skull punch. (a) Identification. A skull punch is a device used to punch holes through a patient's skull to allow fixation of cranioplasty plates...

  15. Skull lichens: a curious chapter in the history of phytotherapy.

    PubMed

    Modenesi, P

    2009-04-01

    Lichens growing on skulls were known in late medieval times as usnea or moss of a dead man's skull and were recommended as highly beneficial in various diseases. They were, in addition, the main ingredient of Unguentum armariun, a liniment used in a curious medical practice: the magnetic cure of wounds. We can place this chapter of the history of phytotherapy within the wider cultural context of the period, which saw the definition of nature become increasingly more fluid and open to a variety of novel interpretations.

  16. Effect of skull flexural properties on brain response during dynamic head loading - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, T P; Roberts, J C; Ward, E E; Carneal, C M; Merkle, A C

    2013-01-01

    The skull-brain complex is typically modeled as an integrated structure, similar to a fluid-filled shell. Under dynamic loads, the interaction of the skull and the underlying brain, cerebrospinal fluid, and other tissue produces the pressure and strain histories that are the basis for many theories meant to describe the genesis of traumatic brain injury. In addition, local bone strains are of interest for predicting skull fracture in blunt trauma. However, the role of skull flexure in the intracranial pressure response to blunt trauma is complex. Since the relative time scales for pressure and flexural wave transmission across the skull are not easily separated, it is difficult to separate out the relative roles of the mechanical components in this system. This study uses a finite element model of the head, which is validated for pressure transmission to the brain, to assess the influence of skull table flexural stiffness on pressure in the brain and on strain within the skull. In a Human Head Finite Element Model, the skull component was modified by attaching shell elements to the inner and outer surfaces of the existing solid elements that modeled the skull. The shell elements were given the properties of bone, and the existing solid elements were decreased so that the overall stiffness along the surface of the skull was unchanged, but the skull table bending stiffness increased by a factor of 2.4. Blunt impact loads were applied to the frontal bone centrally, using LS-Dyna. The intracranial pressure predictions and the strain predictions in the skull were compared for models with and without surface shell elements, showing that the pressures in the mid-anterior and mid-posterior of the brain were very similar, but the strains in the skull under the loads and adjacent to the loads were decreased 15% with stiffer flexural properties. Pressure equilibration to nearly hydrostatic distributions occurred, indicating that the important frequency components for typical

  17. Anterior Skull Base Glomangioma-Induced Osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Gresham, Malia S.; Shen, Steven; Zhang, Yi J.; Gallagher, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Oncogenic osteomalacia (OO) is an uncommon but treatable cause of osteomalacia related to tumor production of FGF23, usually caused by benign mesenchymal neoplasms. Paranasal sinus glomangiomas are a rare cause of OO, with only one previously reported case. Here we describe a second case (first reported in English) of paranasal sinus glomangioma-induced osteomalacia in a 42-year-old man. He presented with weakness and multiple spontaneous fractures, and was found to have an ethmoid sinus glomangioma with intracranial extension. The tumor was removed via endoscopic endonasal approach to the anterior skull base, which resulted in complete resolution of symptoms and no further evidence of disease 1 year postoperatively. PMID:28180054

  18. Evaluation of Skull Cortical Thickness Changes With Age and Sex From Computed Tomography Scans.

    PubMed

    Lillie, Elizabeth M; Urban, Jillian E; Lynch, Sarah K; Weaver, Ashley A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2016-02-01

    Head injuries resulting from motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are extremely common, yet the details of the mechanism of injury remain to be well characterized. Skull deformation is believed to be a contributing factor to some types of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Understanding biomechanical contributors to skull deformation would provide further insight into the mechanism of head injury resulting from blunt trauma. In particular, skull thickness is thought be a very important factor governing deformation of the skull and its propensity for fracture. Previously, age- and sex-based skull cortical thickness changes were difficult to evaluate based on the need for cadaveric skulls. In this cross-sectional study, skull thickness changes with age and sex have been evaluated at homologous locations using a validated cortical density-based algorithm to accurately quantify cortical thickness from 123 high-resolution clinical computed tomography (CT) scans. The flat bones of the skull have a sandwich structure; therefore, skull thickness was evaluated for the inner and outer tables as well the full thickness. General trends indicated an increase in the full skull thickness, mostly attributed to an increase in the thickness of the diploic layer; however, these trends were not found to be statistically significant. There was a significant relationship between cortical thinning and age for both tables of the frontal, occipital, and parietal bones ranging between a 36% and 60% decrease from ages 20 to 100 years in females, whereas males exhibited no significant changes. Understanding how cortical and full skull thickness changes with age from a wide range of subjects can have implications in improving the biofidelity of age- and sex-specific finite element models and therefore aid in the prediction and understanding of TBI from impact and blast injuries.

  19. [Trephined skulls in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Józsa, László G; Fóthi, Erzsébet

    2007-01-01

    Trephination of the cranial vault is the oldest known surgical procedure and has often been reported in literature. Residuals of ancient trephinations have been found all over Europe. In present study both the recorded and unpublished trephined cases found in Hungary are reviewed. Four Neolithic, two Copper Age, eight Bronze Age, seven Covering Age (4th-6th century AD), twelve Awar Age (7th-9th century AD) seventy one Conquest Age (10th century AD) and eleven Arpadian Age (11th-13th century) cases are found. On the base of archeological, historical and paleopathologic aspects trephination is mainly (67%) connected with the Hungarians of the 10th century. The finds in our study are from whole territories of country (North-East Hungary, the zone of Great Plain, Northern Highlands, Danube-Tisza Mid-Region, the broader geographical vicinity of Budapest, Transdanubia and Transylvania). The surgical trepanation was practiced on both males (75.6%), females (15.7%), from the second period of infancy (2.6%) until the beginning senility, and persons. with undetermined age and gender. Considering the presumed time of the trephination and the time of death, trephinations were employed for every age, while the majority of investigations were performed on persons between 21 and 50 years of age. The majority of trephinations (84.4%) were performed in the parietal and/or frontoparietal regions. The long time surviving rate is 63% among the pre-Hungarians, while 84% among the 10th century Hungarian cases. The records of trephined cases excavated in Hungary are published in Hungarian, mostly in the annals of museums, but no cases were published in international periodicals. Consequently, the giant great trephined material (115 cases) of Hungary is unknown in the international scientific literature, although, in their detailed study Piek et al. (1999) counted altogether 450 trephined skulls found in Europe.

  20. A biomechanical evaluation of skull-brain surrogates to blunt high-rate impacts to postmortem human subjects.

    PubMed

    Raymond, David E; Bir, Cynthia A

    2015-03-01

    The field of forensic injury biomechanics is an emerging field. Biomechanically validated tools may assist interdisciplinary teams of investigators in assessing mechanisms of blunt head trauma resulting in skull fractures. The objective of this study is to assess the biofidelity of spherical, frangible skull-brain (SB) surrogates. Blunt impacts were conducted at 20 m/s, using an instrumented 103 g rigid impactor, to the temporo-parietal region of four defleshed cephalic postmortem human subjects (PMHS). Force-deformation response, fracture tolerance, and fracture patterns were recorded for comparison to spherical skull-brain surrogates. Three brain substitutes were assessed: 10% gelatin, lead shot with Styrofoam and water. Force-deformation response of the skull-brain surrogates was similar to defleshed PMHS up to the point of fracture; however, none of the surrogates fractured at tolerance levels comparable to the PMHS. Fracture patterns of the skull-brain surrogates were linear and radiating, while PMHS fractures were all depressed, comminuted.

  1. Incidence and pattern of direct blunt neurovascular injury associated with trauma to the skull base.

    PubMed

    Feiz-Erfan, Iman; Horn, Eric M; Theodore, Nicholas; Zabramski, Joseph M; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D; Lekovic, Gregory P; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Partovi, Shahram; Goslar, Pamela W; Petersen, Scott R

    2007-08-01

    Skull base fractures are often associated with potentially devastating injuries to major neural arteries in the head and neck, but the incidence and pattern of this association are unknown. Between April and September 2002, 1738 Level 1 trauma patients were admitted to St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona. Among them, a skull base fracture was diagnosed in 78 patients following computed tomography (CT) scans. Seven patients had no neurovascular imaging performed and were excluded. Altogether, 71 patients who received a diagnosis of skull base fractures after CT and who also underwent a neurovascular imaging study were included (54 men and 17 women, mean age 29 years, range 1-83 years). Patients underwent CT angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, or digital subtraction angiography of the head and craniovertebral junction, or combinations thereof. Nine neurovascular injuries were identified in six (8.5%) of the 71 patients. Fractures of the clivus were very likely to be associated with neurovascular injury (p < 0.001). A high risk of neurovascular injury showed a strong tendency to be associated with fractures of the sella turcica-sphenoid sinus complex (p = 0.07). The risk of associated blunt neurovascular injury appears to be significant in Level 1 trauma patients in whom a diagnosis of skull base fracture has been made using CT. The incidence of neurovascular trauma is particularly high in patients with clival fractures. The authors recommend neurovascular imaging for Level 1 trauma patients with a high-risk fracture pattern of the central skull base to rule out cerebrovascular injuries.

  2. Imaging of skull base lesions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Hillary R; Curtin, Hugh D

    2016-01-01

    Skull base imaging requires a thorough knowledge of the complex anatomy of this region, including the numerous fissures and foramina and the major neurovascular structures that traverse them. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play complementary roles in imaging of the skull base. MR is the preferred modality for evaluation of the soft tissues, the cranial nerves, and the medullary spaces of bone, while CT is preferred for demonstrating thin cortical bone structure. The anatomic location and origin of a lesion as well as the specific CT and MR findings can often narrow the differential diagnosis to a short list of possibilities. However, the primary role of the imaging specialist in evaluating the skull base is usually to define the extent of the lesion and determine its relationship to vital neurovascular structures. Technologic advances in imaging and radiation therapy, as well as surgical technique, have allowed for more aggressive approaches and improved outcomes, further emphasizing the importance of precise preoperative mapping of skull base lesions via imaging. Tumors arising from and affecting the cranial nerves at the skull base are considered here. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The skull of Chios: trepanation in Hippocratic medicine.

    PubMed

    Tsermoulas, Georgios; Aidonis, Asterios; Flint, Graham

    2014-08-01

    Cranial trepanation is the oldest neurosurgical operation and its roots date back to prehistory. For many centuries, religion and mysticism were strongly linked to the cause of diseases, and trepanation was associated with superstitions such as releasing evil spirits from inside the skull. The Hippocratic treatise "On injuries of the head" was therefore a revolutionary work, as it presented a systematic approach to the management of cranial trauma, one that was devoid of spiritual elements. Unfortunately, there are only a limited number of skeletal findings that confirm that the practice of trepanation was performed as part of Hippocratic medicine. In this historical vignette, the authors present a trepanned skull that was found in Chios, Greece, as evidence of the procedure having been performed in accordance with the Hippocratic teaching. The skull bears a parietal bur hole in association with a linear fracture, and it is clear that the patient survived the procedure. In this analysis, the authors examine the application of the original Hippocratic teaching to the skull of Chios. The rationalization of trepanation was clearly a significant achievement in the evolution of neurosurgery.

  4. Landmark measurement of human skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yu Jia; Ouyang, Jianfei; Cao, Xiaochun

    2010-06-01

    The landmark measurement of human skull is fundamental to geometric morphometry of palaeoanthropology. The landmarks are geometry points which can describe anatomically the homology of species group. They play an important role in palaeoanthropology. A structured-light based method is used to measure and make the 3D digital model of skull. The distances between all pairs of landmarks and interior angles from triangulations of the landmarks can be measured fast and accurately by the digital model. Other important geometric parameters of the skull, such as curvature, surface area, volume can also be measured. In order to validate and certificate the proposed method, 9 standard balls, which are embed at the landmarks, are measured by using Coordinate Measuring Arm (CMA). The experiment shows that the measuring errors of the distances and angles are less than 0.08 mm and 5' respectively.

  5. Skull base approaches in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The skull base surgery is one of the most demanding surgeries. There are different structures that can be injured easily, by operating in the skull base. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to choose the right approach in order to reach the lesion without harming the other intact structures. Due to the pioneering work of Cushing, Hirsch, Yasargil, Krause, Dandy and other dedicated neurosurgeons, it is possible to address the tumor and other lesions in the anterior, the mid-line and the posterior cranial base. With the transsphenoidal, the frontolateral, the pterional and the lateral suboccipital approach nearly every region of the skull base is exposable. In the current state many different skull base approaches are described for various neurosurgical diseases during the last 20 years. The selection of an approach may differ from country to country, e.g., in the United States orbitozygomaticotomy for special lesions of the anterior skull base or petrosectomy for clivus meningiomas, are found more frequently than in Europe. The reason for writing the review was the question: Are there keyhole approaches with which someone can deal with a vast variety of lesions in the neurosurgical field? In my opinion the different surgical approaches mentioned above cover almost 95% of all skull base tumors and lesions. In the following text these approaches will be described. These approaches are: 1) pterional approach 2) frontolateral approach 3) transsphenoidal approach 4) suboccipital lateral approach These approaches can be extended and combined with each other. In the following we want to enhance this philosophy. PMID:20602753

  6. Normal anatomy of the skull base.

    PubMed

    Lustrin, E S; Robertson, R L; Tilak, S

    1994-08-01

    CT and MR imaging increasingly are being used for the evaluation of the skull base. New innovative techniques have revolutionized radiologic understanding of normal skull base anatomy. Thus, normal anatomic relationships with radiographic correlation are vital for accurate pathologic assessment.

  7. Characteristics of the infant Apert skull and its subsequent development.

    PubMed

    Kreiborg, S; Cohen, M M

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe and analyze the infant Apert skull with emphasis on the calvaria and its early postnatal development. Skull radiographs of 16 Apert syndrome patients were examined (12 American, 4 Danish; 8 males, 8 females). The criterion for inclusion in the study was that the first skull film had to be obtained before 1 year of age. Study methods employed included plain skull radiographs, roentgencephalometric films in several projections, CT-scans, and 3-D reconstructions. Data from 2 dry skulls and 2 early cases from the literature were also evaluated The following findings were common to all cases during early infancy (less than 3 months): The coronal suture area was prematurely closed and was represented by a bone condensation line beginning at the cranial base, extending upwards, and having a characteristic posterior convexity. Anterior and posterior fontanelles were widely patent. The midline of the calvaria had a gaping defect which extended from the glabellar area to the posterior fontanelle via the metopic suture area, anterior fontanelle, and sagittal suture area. Bony islands of varying sizes were observed in the midline defect. The calvaria was hypomineralized. During the first 2-4 years of life, the midline defect was obliterated by coalescence of the enlarging bony islands without evidence of any proper formation of sutures. The calvaria became thicker with time and several cases developed increased digital markings and enlargement of the sella turcica. During infancy, the Apert skull with its gaping midline defect appears to permit adequate accommodation of the growing brain, albeit distorted in shape. Normal metopic, sagittal, and coronal sutures with interdigitations were not observed in a single instance; in contrast, the lambdoidal sutures appeared normal in all cases. The invariable findings of an extremely short squama and orbital part of the frontal bone together with the posterior convexity of the coronal bone

  8. Imaging of the Posterior Skull Base.

    PubMed

    Job, Joici; Branstetter, Barton F

    2017-01-01

    The posterior skull base can be involved by a variety of pathologic processes. They can be broadly classified as: traumatic, neoplastic, vascular, and inflammatory. Pathology in the posterior skull base usually involves the lower cranial nerves, either as a source of pathology or a secondary source of symptoms. This review will categorize pathology arising in the posterior skull base and describe how it affects the skull base itself and surrounding structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Submental intubation in maxillofacial fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It can be challenging to create a safe airway in maxilla facial fracture and some skull surgeries. In this case study, the patient experienced jaw fractures that disturbed the dental occlusion and associated fracture of the base of the skull. Neither nasal nor oral intubation was possible based on the side effects of tracheotomy; therefore, submental intubation was applied successfully. The procedure and results are presented in the text. PMID:27429940

  10. Cloverleaf skull syndrome: case report*

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Junio Marcos; Borém, Luciana Mendes Araújo

    2014-01-01

    The present report is aimed at describing a rare case of cranial malformation - cloverleaf skull syndrome -, whose presence was noticed after the birth of a child with signs of abnormality. Imaging diagnosis methods such as computed tomography and conventional radiography were used to characterize the syndrome. PMID:25741078

  11. Skull trepanation in the Bismarck archipelago.

    PubMed

    Watters, David A K

    2007-01-01

    Skull trepanation is an ancient art and has been recognized in many, if not most, primitive societies. Papua New Guinea came into contact with Europeans in the late 1800s and therefore it was possible for the art to be documented at a time when cranial surgery in Europe was still in its infancy. A reviewof published articles and accounts of those who observed skull trepanation or spoke to those who had. Review of a video of trepanation as practised today in Lihir. Richard Parkinson was a trader turned amateur anthropologist who was able to observe the surgical procedure being practised in Blanche Bay (New Britain). Trepanation was also witnessed by Rev. J.A. Crump in the Duke of Yorks. In New Britain the operation was performed for trauma but in New Ireland it was also employed on conscious patients for epilepsy or severe headache, particularly in the first five years of life. There was, however, a tendency to operate on frontal depressed and open fractures, rather than temporoparietal ones. Once the decision to operate was made the wound was irrigated in coconut juice and this was also used to wash the hands of the surgeon. Anaesthesia was not required as the traumatized patient was unconscious. The procedure is described and the tools included local materials such as obsidian, shark's tooth, a sharpened shell, rattan, coconut shell and bamboo. Of particular interest is the observation of brain pulsations and their relationship to a successful outcome. The outcomes were good, in that 70% of patients were thought to survive, contrasting with a 75% mortality for cranial surgery in London in the 1870s. There is supporting evidence in that many trepanned skulls show evidence of healing and life long after the procedure was completed. Other societies have reported similar survival rates. The good outcomes may have been due to wise case selection as well as a high level of surgical skill following sound principles of wound debridement without necessarily being able to

  12. Effects of the freezing and thawing process on biomechanical properties of the human skull.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Nishida, Yoshifumi; Takano, Tachio; Koizumi, Yoshinori; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if biomechanical investigations of skull samples are reliable after skulls have been subjected to a freezing and thawing process. The skulls were obtained from 105 Japanese cadavers (66 males, 39 females) of known age that were autopsied in our department between October 2012 and June 2013. We obtained bone specimens from eight sites (four bilaterally symmetrical pairs) of each skull and measured the mass of each specimen. They were then classified into three groups (A, B, C) based on the duration of freezing of the experimental samples. The left-side samples were subjected to frozen storage (experimental group). The corresponding right-side samples were their controls. Bending tests were performed on the controls immediately after they were obtained. The experimental samples were preserved by refrigeration at -20 °C for 1 day (group A), 1 month (group B), or 3 months (group C). Following refrigeration, these samples were placed at 37 °C to thaw for 1 h and then were subjected to bending tests using a three-point-bending apparatus attached to a Handy force gauge. The device recorded the fracture load automatically when the specimen fractured. Statistical analyses revealed that there were no significant differences in sample fracture loads between the frozen preserved/thawed samples and the unfrozen controls for each of the cryopreservation intervals. We eliminated any possible sample mass bias by using controls from the same skull in each case. The results suggest that the freezing/thawing process has little effect on the mechanical properties of human skulls. Thus, frozen storage for up to 3 months is a good method for preserving human skulls.

  13. Unilateral compressive optic neuropathy due to skull hyperostosis secondary to nutritional vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Mohammed G; Hickman, Simon J; Batty, Ruth; McCloskey, Eugene V; Pepper, Irene M

    2015-01-01

    We report a 17-year-old boy who presented with a chronic left unilateral optic neuropathy. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated compression of the left optic nerve due to skull hyperostosis. He was found to be profoundly vitamin A deficient secondary to an unusual diet consisting predominantly of potato chips and crisps. Skull hyperostosis with cranial neuropathies and other neurological abnormalities has been described in growing animals fed vitamin A deficient diets but has not been previously reported in humans.

  14. Derivation of the mammalian skull vault

    PubMed Central

    MORRISS-KAY, GILLIAN M.

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the evolutionary history of the mammalian skull vault as a basis for understanding its complex structure. Current information on the developmental tissue origins of the skull vault bones (mesoderm and neural crest) is assessed for mammals and other tetrapods. This information is discussed in the context of evolutionary changes in the proportions of the skull vault bones at the sarcopterygian-tetrapod transition. The dual tissue origin of the skull vault is considered in relation to the molecular mechanisms underlying osteogenic cell proliferation and differentiation in the sutural growth centres and in the proportionate contributions of different sutures to skull growth. PMID:11523816

  15. High-resolution interferometric imaging of stress propagation in pediatric and adult skulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conerty, Michelle D.; Castracane, James; Clow, Lawrence P., Jr.; Koltai, Peter J.; Mouzakes, Jason

    1997-05-01

    Variations based on bone growth and development make stress and fracture propagation differ greatly in pediatric skulls as compared to adult skulls. Differentiating the stress propagation between the pediatric and adult skulls can improve diagnostic prediction when presented with direct frontal impact on a pediatric skull, a fairly common occurrence in the clinical environment. Critical diagnostic information can be learned from an in depth study of stress propagation as a function of impact force at critical locations on the periorbital region of the human skull. The Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology at Albany Medical College and InterScience, Inc. are utilizing electronic speckle pattern interferometry detection (ESPI) and high resolution imaging to evaluate and compare stress propagation in pediatric and adult skulls. A dual detection ESPI system was developed which integrates a medium resolution (2/3') CCD capable of real-time image processing, with a high resolution, megapixel detector capable of limited real time acquisition and image processing in software. Options to allow for high speed detection include integrating a custom, high performance image intensifier with the megapixel detector leg to be used as a high speed gate. The dual optical layout will allow for continuous and pulsed ESPI evaluation of calibrated impacts at specific landmarks on the skull. The goal of this work is to produce a full quantitative analysis of the stress propagation in pediatric versus adult skulls for a better understanding of bone dynamics. The work presented below concentrates on the development of the dual detection ESPI system and initial results achieved with an adult cadaver skull.

  16. How to get in and out of the skull: from tumi to "hammer and chisel" to the Gigli saw and the osteoplastic flap.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, James Tait

    2014-04-01

    Making "holes in the skull" is an ancient art and by some is considered the second oldest profession in the world-the first being prostitution. Early surgeons, and later on neurosurgeons, devised a number of ingenious ways to make a hole in the skull or elevate a depressed skull fracture. Trephined skulls from antiquity have now been found in most parts of world, showing that the art of trephining is not only ancient but clearly widespread. Beginning with antiquity the author traces the development of this surgical skill by reviewing the various tools used and surgical designs to perform what is now called a craniotomy.

  17. Biomaterials in skull base surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Reconstruction materials and techniques for the base of the skull have undergone rapid developments and differentiation in recent years. While mostly autotransplants, collagens or resorbable alloplastic materials are preferred for duraplasties, pronounced organ-specific differences can be observed in the reconstruction of hard tissues. The use of polymethylmethacryl bone cement, once wide-spread, has decreased greatly due to the release of toxic monomers. Bony autotransplants are still used primarily for smaller skull-base defects, intraoperatively formable titanium nets may be also used for larger fronto- or laterobasal reconstructions of bony defects. Defects in visible areas are increasingly closed with preformed titanium or ceramic implants, which are planned and fitted to the individual patient using preoperative CT imaging. At the skull base, this applies especially to reconstructions of the frontal sinus. For extensive reconstructions of the orbita, titanium nets and non-resorbable plastics have proven valuable; in closing smaller defects especially of the orbital floor, resorbable implants based on Polyglactin 901 are also used. PMID:22073100

  18. Magnetoencephalography signals are influenced by skull defects.

    PubMed

    Lau, S; Flemming, L; Haueisen, J

    2014-08-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals had previously been hypothesized to have negligible sensitivity to skull defects. The objective is to experimentally investigate the influence of conducting skull defects on MEG and EEG signals. A miniaturized electric dipole was implanted in vivo into rabbit brains. Simultaneous recording using 64-channel EEG and 16-channel MEG was conducted, first above the intact skull and then above a skull defect. Skull defects were filled with agar gels, which had been formulated to have tissue-like homogeneous conductivities. The dipole was moved beneath the skull defects, and measurements were taken at regularly spaced points. The EEG signal amplitude increased 2-10 times, whereas the MEG signal amplitude reduced by as much as 20%. The EEG signal amplitude deviated more when the source was under the edge of the defect, whereas the MEG signal amplitude deviated more when the source was central under the defect. The change in MEG field-map topography (relative difference measure, RDM(∗)=0.15) was geometrically related to the skull defect edge. MEG and EEG signals can be substantially affected by skull defects. MEG source modeling requires realistic volume conductor head models that incorporate skull defects. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stories, skulls, and colonial collections.

    PubMed

    Roque, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    The essay explores the hypothesis of colonial collecting processes involving the active addition of the colonial context and historical past to museum objects through the production of short stories. It examines the emergent historicity of collections through a focus on the "histories" that museum workers and colonial agents have been attaching to scientific collections of human skulls. Drawing on the notions of collection trajectory and historiographical work, it offers an alternative perspective from which to approach the creation of singular histories and individual archives for objects in collections.

  20. Aspergillus Osteomyelitis of the Skull.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Simon; King, Richard; Chumas, Paul; Russell, John; Liddington, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Osteomyelitis of the craniofacial skeleton is rare, with fungal pathogens least commonly implicated. The authors present 2 patients of osteomyelitis of the skull caused by Aspergillus spp. and discuss the diagnosis, clinicopathological course, and management strategies.Late recurrence seen in this type of infection warrants long-term follow-up and a high index of suspicion for the clinical signs associated with recurrence.Such patients would benefit from their surgical debridement being planned and managed via a specialist craniofacial unit, so as to utilize the most aesthetically sensitive approach and the experience of specialists from several surgical disciplines.

  1. Skull base tumours Part II. Central skull base tumours and intrinsic tumours of the bony skull base.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-06-01

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  2. Swallowing disorders following skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Levine, T M

    1988-11-01

    The modern otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeon has the technical ability to perform a wide range of surgical procedures at the skull base. Associated with some of these operations are swallowing deficits secondary to cranial nerve paralyses or anatomic disturbances. The skull base surgeon must physically and emotionally prepare patients preoperatively for these functional disabilities.

  3. Highly cited works in skull base neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nickalus R; Lee, Siang Liao; Brown, Matthew; Reding, Jonathan; Angotti, Jonathan; Lepard, Jacob; Gabrick, Kyle; Klimo, Paul; Michael, L Madison

    2015-04-01

    Citation analysis can be used to evaluate an article's impact on its discipline. This study characterizes the most-cited articles related to skull base surgery. The 100 most-cited skull base neurosurgery articles in all journals were examined. A separate listing of the top 100 most-cited articles in dedicated skull base journals was also examined. The following information was recorded for each article: number of authors, country of origin, citation-count adjusted for number of years in print, topic, and level of evidence. The 100 overall most-cited articles appeared in 25 journals. The top 100 most-cited articles in dedicated skull base journals appeared in 3 journals. Publication dates ranged from 1965-2006 for the overall list and 1993-2010 for the dedicated skull base list. Citations ranged from 11-59 (mean, 19) for the dedicated skull base list and 115-487 for the overall list (mean, 175). The average time-adjusted citation count was 8.4 for the overall list and 2 for the dedicated skull base journal list. An original article in a nondedicated skull base journal related to the subspecialty of skull base with a citation count of 150 or more and time-adjusted citation count of 10 can be considered a high-impact publication. An original article in a dedicated skull base periodical having a total citation count of 20 or more and an average citation count of 2 per year or more can be considered a high impact publication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimation of skull table thickness with clinical CT and validation with microCT.

    PubMed

    Lillie, Elizabeth M; Urban, Jillian E; Weaver, Ashley A; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Brain injuries resulting from motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are extremely common yet the details of the mechanism of injury remain to be well characterized. Skull deformation is believed to be a contributing factor to some types of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Understanding biomechanical contributors to skull deformation would provide further insight into the mechanism of head injury resulting from blunt trauma. In particular, skull thickness is thought be a very important factor governing deformation of the skull and its propensity for fracture. Current computed tomography (CT) technology is limited in its ability to accurately measure cortical thickness using standard techniques. A method to evaluate cortical thickness using cortical density measured from CT data has been developed previously. This effort validates this technique for measurement of skull table thickness in clinical head CT scans using two postmortem human specimens. Bone samples were harvested from the skulls of two cadavers and scanned with microCT to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated cortical thickness measured from clinical CT. Clinical scans were collected at 0.488 and 0.625 mm in plane resolution with 0.625 mm thickness. The overall cortical thickness error was determined to be 0.078 ± 0.58 mm for cortical samples thinner than 4 mm. It was determined that 91.3% of these differences fell within the scanner resolution. Color maps of clinical CT thickness estimations are comparable to color maps of microCT thickness measurements, indicating good quantitative agreement. These data confirm that the cortical density algorithm successfully estimates skull table thickness from clinical CT scans. The application of this technique to clinical CT scans enables evaluation of cortical thickness in population-based studies.

  5. Estimation of skull table thickness with clinical CT and validation with microCT

    PubMed Central

    Lillie, Elizabeth M; Urban, Jillian E; Weaver, Ashley A; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Brain injuries resulting from motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are extremely common yet the details of the mechanism of injury remain to be well characterized. Skull deformation is believed to be a contributing factor to some types of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Understanding biomechanical contributors to skull deformation would provide further insight into the mechanism of head injury resulting from blunt trauma. In particular, skull thickness is thought be a very important factor governing deformation of the skull and its propensity for fracture. Current computed tomography (CT) technology is limited in its ability to accurately measure cortical thickness using standard techniques. A method to evaluate cortical thickness using cortical density measured from CT data has been developed previously. This effort validates this technique for measurement of skull table thickness in clinical head CT scans using two postmortem human specimens. Bone samples were harvested from the skulls of two cadavers and scanned with microCT to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated cortical thickness measured from clinical CT. Clinical scans were collected at 0.488 and 0.625 mm in plane resolution with 0.625 mm thickness. The overall cortical thickness error was determined to be 0.078 ± 0.58 mm for cortical samples thinner than 4 mm. It was determined that 91.3% of these differences fell within the scanner resolution. Color maps of clinical CT thickness estimations are comparable to color maps of microCT thickness measurements, indicating good quantitative agreement. These data confirm that the cortical density algorithm successfully estimates skull table thickness from clinical CT scans. The application of this technique to clinical CT scans enables evaluation of cortical thickness in population-based studies. PMID:25441171

  6. Birds have paedomorphic dinosaur skulls.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Racimo, Fernando; Bever, Gabe S; Rowe, Timothy B; Norell, Mark A; Abzhanov, Arhat

    2012-07-12

    The interplay of evolution and development has been at the heart of evolutionary theory for more than a century. Heterochrony—change in the timing or rate of developmental events—has been implicated in the evolution of major vertebrate lineages such as mammals, including humans. Birds are the most speciose land vertebrates, with more than 10,000 living species representing a bewildering array of ecologies. Their anatomy is radically different from that of other vertebrates. The unique bird skull houses two highly specialized systems: the sophisticated visual and neuromuscular coordination system allows flight coordination and exploitation of diverse visual landscapes, and the astonishing variations of the beak enable a wide range of avian lifestyles. Here we use a geometric morphometric approach integrating developmental, neontological and palaeontological data to show that the heterochronic process of paedomorphosis, by which descendants resemble the juveniles of their ancestors, is responsible for several major evolutionary transitions in the origin of birds. We analysed the variability of a series of landmarks on all known theropod dinosaur skull ontogenies as well as outgroups and birds. The first dimension of variability captured ontogeny, indicating a conserved ontogenetic trajectory. The second dimension accounted for phylogenetic change towards more bird-like dinosaurs. Basally branching eumaniraptorans and avialans clustered with embryos of other archosaurs, indicating paedomorphosis. Our results reveal at least four paedomorphic episodes in the history of birds combined with localized peramorphosis (development beyond the adult state of ancestors) in the beak. Paedomorphic enlargement of the eyes and associated brain regions parallels the enlargement of the nasal cavity and olfactory brain in mammals. This study can be a model for investigations of heterochrony in evolutionary transitions, illuminating the origin of adaptive features and inspiring

  7. Early medical skull surgery for treatment of post-traumatic osteomyelitis 5,000 years ago.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Pierpaolo; Niola, Massimo; Di Lorenzo, Pierpaolo; Paternoster, Mariano; Graziano, Vincenzo; Quaremba, Giuseppe; Buccelli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the findings of a unique example of the early techniques adopted in neurosurgery around 5000 years ago, consisting in a double well healed skull trephination associated with a post-cranial traumatic event occurring intra vitam to a young male from the Early Chalcolithic cemetery of Pontecagnano (South Italy, ca. 4,900 - 4,500 cal BP). Morphological, X-ray and 3D-CT scan skull-cap evaluation revealed that the main orifice was produced by scraping, obtained by clockwise rotary motion of a right-handed surgeon facing the patient, while the partial trephination was carried out by using a stone point as a drilling tool. In both cases, bone regrowth is indicative of the individual's prolonged postoperative survival and his near-complete recovery. The right femur shows a poorly healed mid-shaft fracture presumably induced by a high energy injury, and a resulting chronic osteomyelitis, affecting both femurs by hematogenous spread of the infection. Our observations on the visual and radiological features of skull and femur lesions, along with evidence on the timing of experimental bone regrowth vs. healing of lower limb fractures associated to long-term bone infections now suggest that this young man underwent a double skull trephination in order to alleviate his extremely painful condition induced by chronic osteomyelitis, which is thought to have been the cause of death.

  8. Early Medical Skull Surgery for Treatment of Post-Traumatic Osteomyelitis 5,000 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Pierpaolo; Niola, Massimo; Di Lorenzo, Pierpaolo; Paternoster, Mariano; Graziano, Vincenzo; Quaremba, Giuseppe; Buccelli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the findings of a unique example of the early techniques adopted in neurosurgery around 5000 years ago, consisting in a double well healed skull trephination associated with a post-cranial traumatic event occurring intra vitam to a young male from the Early Chalcolithic cemetery of Pontecagnano (South Italy, ca. 4,900 - 4,500 cal BP). Morphological, X-ray and 3D-CT scan skull-cap evaluation revealed that the main orifice was produced by scraping, obtained by clockwise rotary motion of a right-handed surgeon facing the patient, while the partial trephination was carried out by using a stone point as a drilling tool. In both cases, bone regrowth is indicative of the individual's prolonged postoperative survival and his near-complete recovery. The right femur shows a poorly healed mid-shaft fracture presumably induced by a high energy injury, and a resulting chronic osteomyelitis, affecting both femurs by hematogenous spread of the infection. Our observations on the visual and radiological features of skull and femur lesions, along with evidence on the timing of experimental bone regrowth vs. healing of lower limb fractures associated to long-term bone infections now suggest that this young man underwent a double skull trephination in order to alleviate his extremely painful condition induced by chronic osteomyelitis, which is thought to have been the cause of death. PMID:26018014

  9. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  10. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-07

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  11. Cerebrovascular bypass and aneurysm trapping for the treatment of an A2-segment anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm and herniation through a skull base defect following trauma.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Nahed, Brian V; Kahle, Kristopher T; Sekhar, Laligam N; Ferreira, Manuel J

    2012-01-01

    Fractures of the anterior skull base can lead to pseudoaneurysm formation as a result of direct injury to a vessel wall. Pseudoaneurysms in this location are challenging to treat, as both perforator and distal blood supply must be maintained. Additionally, traumatic skull base fractures can lead to a rare condition of cerebral blood vessel herniation through the bony defect, further complicating treatment planning. Treatment of these lesions is essential to (1) prevent the occurrence of potentially fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage and (2) prevent dissection from propagating and compromising blood flow to distal vessels, perforators, and even parent vessels. We present a unique case of a traumatic proximal anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm, herniating through a skull base defect. Treatment consisted of aneurysm trapping and bypass with skull base reconstruction.

  12. Identification of skulls by video superimposition.

    PubMed

    Iten, P X

    1987-01-01

    A method of matching skulls with photographic portraits or impressions of the face in clay by video superimposition is described. Two different practical cases are presented. The first one deals with the identification of a skull of a six-year-old girl, the second with the identification of the skull of the famous Swiss Pedagogue Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi, who died about 160 years ago. The advantages and versatility of this method are shown; also the setup of the equipment and the working technique.

  13. Primary Intraosseous Cavernous Hemangioma in the Skull

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Guan, Jian; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Ren, Zuyuan; Su, Changbao; Wang, Renzhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas (PICHs) are benign vascular tumors that may involve any part of the body. PICH occurs more frequently in the spine and less commonly in skull. The earliest description in the English literature was in 1845 by Toynbee, who reported a vascular tumor arising in the confines of the parietal bone. Skull PICHs do not always have typical radiologic features and should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant skull lesions. We now reviewed and analyzed related literatures in detail with reporting a rare case of PICH in the left front bone that was surgically resected. PMID:26986133

  14. The Genetics of Canine Skull Shape Variation

    PubMed Central

    Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2013-01-01

    A dog’s craniofacial diversity is the result of continual human intervention in natural selection, a process that began tens of thousands of years ago. To date, we know little of the genetic underpinnings and developmental mechanisms that make dog skulls so morphologically plastic. In this Perspectives, we discuss the origins of dog skull shapes in terms of history and biology and highlight recent advances in understanding the genetics of canine skull shapes. Of particular interest are those molecular genetic changes that are associated with the development of distinct breeds. PMID:23396475

  15. PET Imaging of Skull Base Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Erik S; Iagaru, Andrei; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy

    2007-10-01

    The utility of 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT for the evaluation of skull base tumors is incompletely investigated, as a limited number of studies specifically focus on this region with regard to PET imaging. Several patterns can be ascertained, however, by synthesizing the data from various published reports and cases of primary skull base malignancies, as well as head and neck malignancies that extend secondarily to the skull base, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma, nasal cavity and paranasal sinus tumors, parotid cancers, and orbital tumors.

  16. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  17. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  18. 21 CFR 882.4030 - Skull plate anvil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Skull plate anvil. 882.4030 Section 882.4030 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4030 Skull plate anvil. (a) Identification. A skull plate anvil is a device used to form alterable skull plates in the proper shape to...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  20. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  1. 21 CFR 882.4030 - Skull plate anvil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skull plate anvil. 882.4030 Section 882.4030 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4030 Skull plate anvil. (a) Identification. A skull plate anvil is a device used to form alterable skull plates in the proper shape to...

  2. 21 CFR 882.4460 - Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp). 882.4460... holder (skull clamp). (a) Identification. A neurosurgical head holder (skull clamp) is a device used to clamp the patient's skull to hold head and neck in a particular position during surgical procedures....

  3. 21 CFR 882.4030 - Skull plate anvil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Skull plate anvil. 882.4030 Section 882.4030 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4030 Skull plate anvil. (a) Identification. A skull plate anvil is a device used to form alterable skull plates in the proper shape to...

  4. 21 CFR 882.4030 - Skull plate anvil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Skull plate anvil. 882.4030 Section 882.4030 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4030 Skull plate anvil. (a) Identification. A skull plate anvil is a device used to form alterable skull plates in the proper shape to...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4030 - Skull plate anvil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Skull plate anvil. 882.4030 Section 882.4030 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4030 Skull plate anvil. (a) Identification. A skull plate anvil is a device used to form alterable skull plates in the proper shape to...

  6. [Skull vibration induced nystagmus test].

    PubMed

    Dumas, G; De Waele, C; Hamann, K F; Cohen, B; Negrevergne, M; Ulmer, E; Schmerber, S

    2007-09-01

    To establish during a consensus meeting the fundamental basis, the validity criteria, the main indications and results of the skull vibration induced nystagmus test (SVINT) which explores the vestibule high frequencies. The SVINT is applied on the mastoid process (right and left sides) at 100 Hz during 10 seconds on a sitting upright subject. Total unilateral peripheral lesions (tUVL: operated vestibular shwannomas, vestibular neurectomies) and partial unilateral peripheral lesions (pUVL: preoperative neuromas, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuritis, chemical labyrinthectomies) were studied. Thirty-six patients had brainstem lesions and 173 normal subjects were used as controls. The SVINT is considered positive when the application of the vibrator produces a reproducible sustained nystagmus always beating in the same direction following several trials in various stimulation topographies (on the right and left mastoid). The skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) begins and ends with the stimulation; the direction of the nystagmus has no secondary reversal. The slow phase velocity (SPV) is>2 degrees /second. In tUVL the SVINT always reveals a lesional nystagmus beating toward the safe side at all frequencies. The mean SVN SPV is 10.8 degrees /s+/-7.5 SD (N=45). The mastoid site was more efficient than the cervical or vertex sites. Mastoïd stimulation efficiency is not correlated with the side of stimulation. The SVN SPV is correlated with the total caloric efficiency on the healthy ear. In pUVL the SVINT is positive in 71 to 76% of cases; the mean SVN. SPV (6.7 degrees /s+/-4.7 SD)(N=30) is significantly lower than in tUVL (P=0.0004). SVINT is positive in 6 to 10% of the normal population, 31% of brain stem lesions and negative in total bilateral vestibular peripheral lesions. SVINT is an effective, rapid and non invasive test used to detect vestibular asymmetry between 20 to 150 Hz stimulation. This test used in important cohorts of patients during the ten last years has

  7. Photoacoustic investigation of a neonatal skull phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volinski, Bridget; Hariri, Ali; Fatima, Afreen; Xu, Qiuyun; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    There is a need for continued research into the diagnosis, prevention and cure of neonatal brain disease and disorders. These disorders lead to fatalities and developmental disorders in infants. Non-invasive imaging techniques are being researched for this purpose. However, the availability of neonatal skull samples for this work is very low. A phantom can be used to simulate the neonatal skull and brain to improve imaging techniques. This study selects a phantom of polyurethane and titanium dioxide and proves its value as a replacement for neonatal skull in research. The methods used for this proof are validation of choice against the literature, transmissivity and acoustic experimentation compared to existing literature, and finally photoacoustic evaluation of the final choice to show its usefulness as a neonatal skull phantom.

  8. The Skull of Phyllomedusa sauvagii (Anura, Hylidae).

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Monachesi, Mario R; Lavilla, Esteban O; Montero, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    The hylid genus Phyllomedusa comprises charismatic frogs commonly known as monkey, leaf or green frogs, and is the most diverse genus of the subfamily Phyllomedusinae, including about 31 species. Although there is some information about the anatomy of these frogs, little is known about the osteology. Here the adult skull of Phyllomedusa sauvagii, both articulated and disarticulated, is described and the intraspecific variation is reported. Additionally, cartilage associated with the adult skull, such as the nasal capsules, auditory apparatus, and hyobranchial apparatus, are included in the analysis. Further examination of disarticulated bones reveals their remarkable complexity, specifically in the sphenethmoid and of the oocipital region. The description of disarticulated bones is useful for the identification of fossil remains as well as providing morphological characteristics that are phylogenetically informative. When comparing the skull morphology with the available information of other species of the genus, Phyllomesusa sauvagii skull resembles more that of P. vaillantii and P. venusta than P. atelopoides.

  9. The skull of Homo naledi.

    PubMed

    Laird, Myra F; Schroeder, Lauren; Garvin, Heather M; Scott, Jill E; Dembo, Mana; Radovčić, Davorka; Musiba, Charles M; Ackermann, Rebecca R; Schmid, Peter; Hawks, John; Berger, Lee R; de Ruiter, Darryl J

    2017-03-01

    The species Homo naledi was recently named from specimens recovered from the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system in South Africa. This large skeletal sample lacks associated faunal material and currently does not have a known chronological context. In this paper, we present comprehensive descriptions and metric comparisons of the recovered cranial and mandibular material. We describe 41 elements attributed to Dinaledi Hominin (DH1-DH5) individuals and paratype U.W. 101-377, and 32 additional cranial fragments. The H. naledi material was compared to Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominins using qualitative and quantitative analyses including over 100 linear measurements and ratios. We find that the Dinaledi cranial sample represents an anatomically homogeneous population that expands the range of morphological variation attributable to the genus Homo. Despite a relatively small cranial capacity that is within the range of australopiths and a few specimens of early Homo, H. naledi shares cranial characters with species across the genus Homo, including Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis, Homo erectus, and Middle Pleistocene Homo. These include aspects of cranial form, facial morphology, and mandibular anatomy. However, the skull of H. naledi is readily distinguishable from existing species of Homo in both qualitative and quantitative assessments. Since H. naledi is currently undated, we discuss the evolutionary implications of its cranial morphology in a range of chronological frameworks. Finally, we designate a sixth Dinaledi Hominin (DH6) individual based on a juvenile mandible.

  10. [Anterior skull-base schwannoma].

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Miranda, Miguel; De la O Ríos, Elier; Vargas-Valenciano, Emmanuelle; Moreno-Medina, Eva

    2017-06-24

    Schwannomas are nerve sheath tumours that originate in Schwann cells. They are usually solitary and sporadic and manifest on peripheral, spinal or cranial nerves. Intracranial schwannomas tend to manifest on the eighth cranial nerve, particularly in patients with neurofibromatosis type2. Anterior skull-base schwannomas represent less than 1% of all intracranial schwannomas. They are more frequent in young people and are typically benign. These tumours represent a diagnostic challenge due to their rarity and difficult differential diagnosis, and numerous theories have been postulated concerning their origin and development. In this article, we present the case of a 13-year-old male with a single anterior cranial-base tumour not associated with neurofibromatosis who presented with headache, papilloedema, eye pain and loss of visual acuity. Complete resection of the tumour was performed, which was histopathologically diagnosed as a schwannoma. The patient made a complete clinical recovery with abatement of all symptoms. We conducted a review of the literature and found 66 cases worldwide with this diagnosis. We describe the most relevant epidemiological and clinical characteristics of this kind of tumour and its relation with the recently discovered and similar olfactory schwannoma. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. First nimravid skull from Asia

    PubMed Central

    Averianov, Alexander; Obraztsova, Ekaterina; Danilov, Igor; Skutschas, Pavel; Jin, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Maofelis cantonensis gen. and sp. nov. is described based on a complete cranium from the middle-upper Eocene Youganwo Formation of Maoming Basin, Guangdong Province, China. The new taxon has characters diagnostic for Nimravidae such as a short cat-like skull, short palate, ventral surface of petrosal dorsal to that of basioccipital, serrations on the distal carina of canine, reduced anterior premolars, and absence of posterior molars (M2-3). It is plesiomorphic nimravid taxon similar to Nimravidae indet. from Quercy (France) in having the glenoid pedicle and mastoid process without ventral projections, a planar basicranium in which the lateral rim is not ventrally buttressed, and P1 present. The upper canine is less flattened than in other Nimravidae. Maofelis cantonensis gen. and sp. nov. exemplifies the earliest stage of development of sabertooth specialization characteristic of Nimravidae. This taxon, together with other middle-late Eocene nimravid records in South Asia, suggests origin and initial diversification of Nimravidae in Asia. We propose that this group dispersed to North America in the late Eocene and to Europe in the early Oligocene. The subsequent Oligocene diversification of Nimravidae took place in North America and Europe, while in Asia this group declined in the Oligocene, likely because of the earlier development of open habitats on that continent. PMID:27161785

  12. Penetrating skull injury with six inch fence rod

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Kamlesh; Singh, Amit Kumar; Das, Shishir

    2012-01-01

    In this study we are describing an unusual case of the boundary fence (6 inch long) penetrating through the skull vault and lodging into the middle cranial fossa. A 10 years old male child fell onto his house fence while playing on the terrace. The metal fence penetrated through the scalp, parietal bone, midbrain and the midface, fracturing the parietal and the midfacial bones. CT-scans were obtained to view the trajectory and the position of the fence. The amount of midbrain injury was also accessed. The degree of morbidity vis-à-vis the type of injury was surprisingly low. Safe access to the fence was made through a bicoronal incision and modified bifrontal craniectomy to retrieve the lodged portion of the fence. These kind of penetrating injuries are rare considering the thickness of the vault. Proper preoperative planning and team approach is required for the safe surgical removal of the objects. PMID:23833500

  13. Endoscopic skull base training using 3D printed models with pre-existing pathology.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Vairavan; Narayanan, Prepageran; Rajagopalan, Raman; Karuppiah, Ravindran; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Wormald, Peter-John; Van Hasselt, Charles Andrew; Waran, Vicknes

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic base of skull surgery has been growing in acceptance in the recent past due to improvements in visualisation and micro instrumentation as well as the surgical maturing of early endoscopic skull base practitioners. Unfortunately, these demanding procedures have a steep learning curve. A physical simulation that is able to reproduce the complex anatomy of the anterior skull base provides very useful means of learning the necessary skills in a safe and effective environment. This paper aims to assess the ease of learning endoscopic skull base exposure and drilling techniques using an anatomically accurate physical model with a pre-existing pathology (i.e., basilar invagination) created from actual patient data. Five models of a patient with platy-basia and basilar invagination were created from the original MRI and CT imaging data of a patient. The models were used as part of a training workshop for ENT surgeons with varying degrees of experience in endoscopic base of skull surgery, from trainees to experienced consultants. The surgeons were given a list of key steps to achieve in exposing and drilling the skull base using the simulation model. They were then asked to list the level of difficulty of learning these steps using the model. The participants found the models suitable for learning registration, navigation and skull base drilling techniques. All participants also found the deep structures to be accurately represented spatially as confirmed by the navigation system. These models allow structured simulation to be conducted in a workshop environment where surgeons and trainees can practice to perform complex procedures in a controlled fashion under the supervision of experts.

  14. Contrecoup fractures of the anterior cranial fossae as a consequence of blunt force caused by a fall.

    PubMed

    Hein, P M; Schulz, E

    1990-01-01

    Contrecoup fractures of the base of the skull are regarded as rare in the clinical literature. In our material (n = 171 falls on the same level and on or from stairs), the overall frequency of contrecoup fractures of the anterior cranial fossa in fatal cranio-cerebral trauma due to falls was 12%, as compared to 24% with occipital point of impact of the head. The relationships between the impact site on the head, form of fracture at the point of impact with involvement of the skull cap and/or the base of the skull, coup and contrecoup injuries of the brain, localization of contrecoup fractures in the anterior cranial fossa and the occurrence of monocle and spectacle haematomas display a major variability. Fractures occur in the form of simple fractures and as impression fractures (fracture fragments or fracture boundaries displaced to the inside). Clinical diagnosis is difficult because of the concealed position of the anterior skull base. Contrecoup fractures become of forensic medical significance when symptoms of a frontobasal injury occur for the first time after trauma which has occurred some time in the past and when the question arises as to the causal connection with the original trauma. In investigation of living persons, it may be difficult to decide whether haemorrhages in the region of the orbit and its vicinity result from a direct blunt force or derive from fractures of the base of the skull, especially contrecoup fractures.

  15. Management Strategies for Skull Base Inverted Papilloma.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Jessica W; Khichi, Sunny S; Cho, Do-Yeon; Riley, Kristen O; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-07-01

    Inverted papilloma attached to the ventral skull base presents a surgical dilemma because surgical removal of the bony pedicle is critical to decrease risk of recurrence. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic management of skull base inverted papilloma. Case series with planned data collection. Tertiary medical center. Patients with skull base inverted papilloma. Over 7 years, 49 patients with skull base inverted papilloma were referred for surgical resection. Demographics, operative technique, pathology, complications, recurrence, and postoperative follow-up were evaluated. Average age at presentation was 57 years. Twenty-six patients (53%) had prior attempts at resection elsewhere, and 5 had squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) arising in an inverted papilloma. Six patients (12%) suffered major complications, including skull base osteomyelitis in 2 previously irradiated patients, cerebrospinal fluid leak with pneumocephalus (n = 1), meningitis (n = 1), invasive fungal sinusitis (n = 1), and cerebrovascular accident (n = 1). The mean disease-free interval was 29 months (range, 10-78 months). One patient with SCCA recurred in the nasopharynx (overall 2% recurrence rate). He is disease-free 3 years following endoscopic nasopharyngectomy. Three patients with SCCA had endoscopic resection of the skull base, while 1 subject with inverted papilloma pedicled on the superior orbital roof had an osteoplastic flap in conjunction with a Draf III procedure. All others received endoscopic resection. Removal of the bony pedicle resulted in excellent local control of skull base inverted papillomas. Our experience demonstrates that disease eradication with limited morbidity is attainable with this approach. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  16. Emergency skull radiography: the effect of restrictive criteria on skull radiography and CT use

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.R.; Gaylord, G.M.; Lantos, G.; Tabaddor, K.; Gallagher, E.J.

    1985-08-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the effect of restrictive criteria on the use of emergency skull radiography and computed tomography (CT) of the head. Emergency skull radiography required the completion of a special requisition form. Emergency CT of the head was done at the request of senior consultants and was available on a full-time basis. Over 1 year, 2758 skull studies were performed, a decrease of 39.1% when compared with the year before restrictive criteria were instituted, during which 4587 skull examinations were done. In the same period, the number of emergency CT scans of the head increased by 45.7%, from 471 in the control year to 686 in the experimental year. With the use of restrictive criteria, a net savings of $164,000 was achieved. Our results suggest that the use of restrictive criteria is a cost-effective means of limiting skull radiography when CT of the head is readily available.

  17. Functional Relationship between Skull Form and Feeding Mechanics in Sphenodon, and Implications for Diapsid Skull Development

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Neil; Jones, Marc E. H.; Shi, Junfen; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E.; Fagan, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate skull evolved to protect the brain and sense organs, but with the appearance of jaws and associated forces there was a remarkable structural diversification. This suggests that the evolution of skull form may be linked to these forces, but an important area of debate is whether bone in the skull is minimised with respect to these forces, or whether skulls are mechanically “over-designed” and constrained by phylogeny and development. Mechanical analysis of diapsid reptile skulls could shed light on this longstanding debate. Compared to those of mammals, the skulls of many extant and extinct diapsids comprise an open framework of fenestrae (window-like openings) separated by bony struts (e.g., lizards, tuatara, dinosaurs and crocodiles), a cranial form thought to be strongly linked to feeding forces. We investigated this link by utilising the powerful engineering approach of multibody dynamics analysis to predict the physiological forces acting on the skull of the diapsid reptile Sphenodon. We then ran a series of structural finite element analyses to assess the correlation between bone strain and skull form. With comprehensive loading we found that the distribution of peak von Mises strains was particularly uniform throughout the skull, although specific regions were dominated by tensile strains while others were dominated by compressive strains. Our analyses suggest that the frame-like skulls of diapsid reptiles are probably optimally formed (mechanically ideal: sufficient strength with the minimal amount of bone) with respect to functional forces; they are efficient in terms of having minimal bone volume, minimal weight, and also minimal energy demands in maintenance. PMID:22216358

  18. Posttraumatic skull films: who needs them

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, H.A.

    1986-03-01

    An effort has been under way for years to make the ordering of skull films in trauma more medically rational. Because the vast majority of skull films have no significant impact on patient management, effort had centered on increasing the yield by limiting radiographs to those who have one or more ''high-yield criteria.'' The publically promulgated high-yield criteria, however, were insufficiently sensitive to pick up some rare occult injuries. Emphasis recently has shifted to low-yield findings (scalp laceration, scalp hematoma, dizziness, headache, and asymptomatic). Although by common practice the presence of one or more of these low-yield findings often results in a skull film, omitting them appears to be extremely safe provided that the patient has no other clinically suspicious findings. Additionally, skull films are no longer the procedure of choice in patients with a neurosurgical emergency. A patient management strategy reflecting recent research is soon to be released with the FDA Skull Panel's final report.

  19. Human skull translucency: post mortem studies

    PubMed Central

    Sawosz, P.; Wojtkiewicz, S.; Kacprzak, M.; Weigl, W.; Borowska-Solonynko, A.; Krajewski, P.; Bejm, K.; Milej, D.; Ciszek, B.; Maniewski, R.; Liebert, A.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of optical translucency of human skulls were carried out. An incandescent light source and a CCD camera were used to measure the distribution of light transmitted through the skull in 10 subjects post-mortem. We noticed that intra-individual differences in optical translucency may be up to 100 times but inter-individual translucency differences across the skull reach 105 times. Based on the measurement results, a “theoretical” experiment was simulated. Monte-Carlo calculations were used in order to evaluate the influence of the differences in optical translucency of the skull on results of NIRS measurements. In these calculations a functional stimulation was done, in which the oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in the brain cortex change by 5μM and −5μM respectively. The maximal discrepancies between assumed hemoglobin concentration changes and hemoglobin concentration changes estimated with Monte-Carlo simulation may reach 50% depending of the translucency of the skull. PMID:28018721

  20. [Injury by skull osteolytic secundary syphilis].

    PubMed

    Alessandro, Lucas; Camporro, Julieta Piar; Arakaki, Naomi; Orellana, Nora; Mora, Claudia Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Bone involvement of syphilis can be observed in tertiary and congenital syphilis. It is infrequent during the secondary stage. The skull is the most affected bone in secondary syphilis, and its most frequent form of presentation is proliferative osteitis. If the skull is affected, headache is usual and can be as intense as in meningitis. Osteolyitic lesions may be seen in complimentary imaging studies, with a moth eaten aspect. These lesions raise concern over a number of differential diagnoses, among which are infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. The definitive diagnosis is made by bone biopsy of the compromised bone. Molecular techniques in the affected tissues increases diagnostic performance. There is no standardized treatment protocol for syphilis since there are no guidelines available. We report a case of a 19 year old female, presenting with a unique osteolytic lesion in the skull due to secondary syphilis.

  1. Influences of skull segmentation inaccuracies on EEG source analysis.

    PubMed

    Lanfer, B; Scherg, M; Dannhauer, M; Knösche, T R; Burger, M; Wolters, C H

    2012-08-01

    The low-conducting human skull is known to have an especially large influence on electroencephalography (EEG) source analysis. Because of difficulties segmenting the complex skull geometry out of magnetic resonance images, volume conductor models for EEG source analysis might contain inaccuracies and simplifications regarding the geometry of the skull. The computer simulation study presented here investigated the influences of a variety of skull geometry deficiencies on EEG forward simulations and source reconstruction from EEG data. Reference EEG data was simulated in a detailed and anatomically plausible reference model. Test models were derived from the reference model representing a variety of skull geometry inaccuracies and simplifications. These included erroneous skull holes, local errors in skull thickness, modeling cavities as bone, downward extension of the model and simplifying the inferior skull or the inferior skull and scalp as layers of constant thickness. The reference EEG data was compared to forward simulations in the test models, and source reconstruction in the test models was performed on the simulated reference data. The finite element method with high-resolution meshes was employed for all forward simulations. It was found that large skull geometry inaccuracies close to the source space, for example, when cutting the model directly below the skull, led to errors of 20mm and more for extended source space regions. Local defects, for example, erroneous skull holes, caused non-negligible errors only in the vicinity of the defect. The study design allowed a comparison of influence size, and guidelines for modeling the skull geometry were concluded.

  2. Usefulness of an Osteotomy Template for Skull Tumorectomy and Simultaneous Skull Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Oji, Tomito; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Miwa, Tomoru; Nakagawa, Yu; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous tumor resection and cranioplasty with hydroxyapatite osteosynthesis are sometimes necessary in patients of skull neoplasms or skull-invasive tumors. However, the disadvantage of simultaneous surgery is that mismatches often occur between the skull defect and the hydroxyapatite implant. To solve this problem, the authors developed a customized template for designing the craniotomy line. Before each operation, the craniotomy design was discussed with a neurosurgeon. Based on the discussion, 2 hydroxyapatite implants were customized for each patient on the basis of models prepared using computed tomography data. The first implant was an onlay template for the preoperative cranium, which was customized for designing the osteotomy line. The other implant was used for the skull defect. Using the template, the osteotomy line was drawn along the template edge, osteotomy was performed along this line, and the implant was placed in the skull defect. This technique was performed in 3 patients. No implant or defect trimming was required in any patient, good cosmetic outcomes were noted in all patients, and no complications occurred. Use of predesigned hydroxyapatite templates for craniotomy during simultaneous skull tumor resection and cranioplasty has some clinical advantages: the precise craniotomy line can be designed, the implant and skull defect fit better and show effective osteoconduction, trimming of the implant or defect is minimized, and the operation time is shortened.

  3. CT of Normal Developmental and Variant Anatomy of the Pediatric Skull: Distinguishing Trauma from Normality.

    PubMed

    Idriz, Sanjin; Patel, Jaymin H; Ameli Renani, Seyed; Allan, Rosemary; Vlahos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice has been increasing rapidly, with the number of CT examinations performed in adults and children rising by 10% per year in England. Because the radiology community strives to reduce the radiation dose associated with pediatric examinations, external factors, including guidelines for pediatric head injury, are raising expectations for use of cranial CT in the pediatric population. Thus, radiologists are increasingly likely to encounter pediatric head CT examinations in daily practice. The variable appearance of cranial sutures at different ages can be confusing for inexperienced readers of radiologic images. The evolution of multidetector CT with thin-section acquisition increases the clarity of some of these sutures, which may be misinterpreted as fractures. Familiarity with the normal anatomy of the pediatric skull, how it changes with age, and normal variants can assist in translating the increased resolution of multidetector CT into more accurate detection of fractures and confident determination of normality, thereby reducing prolonged hospitalization of children with normal developmental structures that have been misinterpreted as fractures. More important, the potential morbidity and mortality related to false-negative interpretation of fractures as normal sutures may be avoided. The authors describe the normal anatomy of all standard pediatric sutures, common variants, and sutural mimics, thereby providing an accurate and safe framework for CT evaluation of skull trauma in pediatric patients.

  4. Molding of top skull in the treatment of Apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weimin; Cui, Jie; Chen, Jianbin; Weiping, Shen

    2015-03-01

    Patients with Apert syndrome have bilateral coronal craniosynostosis, along with a distinguishing feature of their many deformity, called tower skull. Surgical correction of this deformity is the mainstay of treatment. We describe 3 patients molded top skull after front bone osteotomy orbital bar advancement. This successfully restricted growth of their top skull while allowing growth in other dimensions. Utilization of top-skull molding after cranial surgery shows promise of satisfaction in this setting.

  5. Correlation between live and post mortem skull conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Wendel, Katrina; Malmivuo, Jaakko

    2006-01-01

    The skull is a tissue with a widely controversial range of conductivity values. This article correlates live skull conductivity measurements with post mortem conductivity measurements with a scaling factor ranging between 2.5 and 4. The scaling factor is validated by a mathematical model that determines the skull conductivity using saline and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) conductivities and correlated with published physical live and post mortem skull conductivity measurements which show support for this live-to-post mortem scale factor.

  6. The epidemiology of fractures in infants--Which accidents are preventable?

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Helmut; Orendi, Ingrid; Singer, Georg; Eberl, Robert; Castellani, Christoph; Schalamon, Johannes; Till, Holger

    2016-01-01

    In children, fractures have a huge impact on the health care system. In order to develop effective prevention strategies exact knowledge about the epidemiology of fractures is mandatory. This study aims to describe clinical and epidemiological data of fractures diagnosed in infants. A retrospective analysis of all infants (children<1 year of age) presenting with fractures in an 11 years period (2001-2011) was performed. Information was obtained regarding the location of the fractures, sites of the accident, circumstances and mechanisms of injury and post-injury care. 248 infants (54% male, 46% female) with a mean age of 7 months presented with 253 fractures. In more than half of the cases skull fractures were diagnosed (n=151, 61%). Most frequently the accidents causing fractures happened at home (67%). Falls from the changing table, from the arm of the care-giver and out of bed were most commonly encountered (n=92, 37%). While the majority of skull fractures was caused from falls out of different heights, external impacts tended to lead to fractures of the extremities. 6 patients (2%) were victims of maltreatment and sustained 10 fractures (2 skull fractures, 4 proximal humeral fractures, 2 rib fractures, and 2 tibial fractures). Falls from the changing table, the arms of the caregivers and out of bed caused the majority of fractures (especially skull fracture) in infants. Therefore, awareness campaigns and prevention strategies should focus on these mechanisms of accident in order to decrease the rate of fractures in infants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 21 CFR 882.5960 - Skull tongs for traction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Skull tongs for traction. 882.5960 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5960 Skull tongs for traction. (a) Identification. Skull tongs for traction is an instrument used to immobilize a patient with...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5960 - Skull tongs for traction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Skull tongs for traction. 882.5960 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5960 Skull tongs for traction. (a) Identification. Skull tongs for traction is an instrument used to immobilize a patient with...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5960 - Skull tongs for traction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skull tongs for traction. 882.5960 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5960 Skull tongs for traction. (a) Identification. Skull tongs for traction is an instrument used to immobilize a patient with...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5960 - Skull tongs for traction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Skull tongs for traction. 882.5960 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5960 Skull tongs for traction. (a) Identification. Skull tongs for traction is an instrument used to immobilize a patient with...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5960 - Skull tongs for traction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Skull tongs for traction. 882.5960 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5960 Skull tongs for traction. (a) Identification. Skull tongs for traction is an instrument used to immobilize a patient with...

  12. Growth of the skull in young children in Baotou, China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hai-dong; Liu, Ming; Gong, Ke-rui; Shao, Guo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2014-09-01

    There are some controversies about the optimal time to perform skull repair in very young Chinese children because of the rapid skull growth in this stage of life. The purpose of this current study is to describe the characteristics of skull growth and to discuss the optimal time for skull repair in young Chinese children with skull defects. A total of 112 children born in the First Affiliated Hospital of Baotou Medical College were measured for six consecutive years starting in 2006. Cranial length (CL, linear distance between the eyebrows to the pillow tuberosity), cranial width (CW, double-sided linear distance of connection of external auditory canal), ear over the top line (EOTL), the eyebrows-the posterior tuberosity line (EPTL), and head circumference (HC) were measured to describe the skull growth. The most rapid period of skull growth occurs during the first year of life. The second and third most rapid periods are the second and third years, respectively. Then, the skull growth slowed and the values of the skull growth index of 6-year-old children were close to those of adults. Children 0-1 years old should not receive skull repair due to their rapid skull growth. The indexes of children 3 years old or older were close to those of the adult; therefore, 3 years old or older may receive skull repair.

  13. Radiopathological evaluation of primary malignant skull tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Gangadhar, Kiran; Santhosh, Deepa

    2012-09-01

    Skull tumors comprise a wide variety of entities, ranging from chronic inflammatory disease to primary and secondary neoplasms. There is no valid incidence or data about the incidence of skull tumors in general. Primary malignant skull tumors are rare, with most articles reporting single cases. We would discuss some of the frequent tumors in this group and review of the literature for the same.

  14. In vivo pons motion within the skull.

    PubMed

    Ji, Songbai; Margulies, Susan S

    2007-01-01

    Finite element (FE) models are used to identify head injury mechanisms and design new and improved injury prevention schemes. Although brain-skull boundary conditions strongly influence the model mechanical responses, limited experimental data are available to develop an informed representation. We hypothesize that the spinal cord tension and gravity contribute to the pons displacement in vivo. Static high-resolution T1-weighted sagittal MR images of the inferior portion of the head in neutral and flexion positions were acquired in 15 human volunteers in both supine and prone postures. Boundaries of the pons and clivus were extracted with a gradient-based algorithm, and the pontes were fitted into ellipses. Assuming rigid body motion of the skull, image pairs in different postures were co-registered with an autocorrelation technique. By comparing images before and after the motion, we found that while the rotation of the pons is negligible relative to the skull, the pons displaces significantly at the foramen magnum, on the order of approximately 2 mm. When the spinal cord tension and gravity act in concert, the pons moves caudally; when opposed, superiorly, such that the influence of gravity on the pons is six times that of the spinal cord tension. Based on these findings, we recommend that the brainstem-skull interface be treated as a sliding (with or without friction) boundary condition in FE models of the human head.

  15. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach.

  16. Forensic and anthropological analysis of human skulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzl, Hans-Peter; Schreiber, Holger

    1990-11-01

    In biology and medicine there are many problems concrninq in vestigations of the human skeleton Beside the long bones the skull is the most important part of the skeleton for m.surement and iden tifiction The fc:e part9 the brain part and the mandibular part of the skul I are qenetical ly determined sectors with high percritage of individual characteristics

  17. Porotic hyperostosis and the Gelligaer skull

    PubMed Central

    Cule, John; Evans, I. Lynn

    1968-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of the bony lesions known as porotic hyperostosis found on a Bronze Age child's skull is discussed. Keith and Shattock gave an opinion in 1923 that the cause was rickets. A firm conclusion is not reached in this paper, but it is suggested that it was more likely to have been an iron-deficiency anaemia. Images PMID:5717547

  18. Malignant PEComa of the skull base.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Norman L

    2004-09-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are rare, usually benign lesions comprising a family of neoplasms including angiomyolipoma, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, clear cell "sugar" tumors, and clear cell myomelanocytic tumors. This report describes an apparent case of a malignant PEComa of the skull base in a 49-year-old woman, a previously undescribed location for this lesion.

  19. Gliosarcoma with Primary Skull Base Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Avital; Graffeo, Christopher S.; Nesvick, Cody L.; Raghunathan, Aditya; Jentoft, Mark E.; O'Neill, Brian P.; Morris, Padraig P.; Morris, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Gliosarcoma is an uncommon variant of glioblastoma, which commonly demonstrates dural attachment. However, skull base invasion is rarely seen with this entity. Herein, we report a 44-year-old female patient diagnosed with primary intracranial gliosarcoma extensively invading the skull base and muscles of mastication. She presented to our institution with a three-month history of difficult right jaw opening and retro-orbital pressure and one week of severe right-sided postauricular headache. Head CT demonstrated a 6 cm mass with marked bony erosion. Brain MRI at a one-week interval more clearly characterized tumor extension through the right orbit and muscles of mastication, with overall growth to 7 cm and worsening midline shift. The patient underwent a right frontotemporal craniotomy for gross total resection. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of gliosarcoma, IDH-wildtype (WHO grade IV). Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged at preoperative neurologic baseline. To our knowledge, this is the third reported case of a primary intracranial gliosarcoma with direct invasion of skull base, brain parenchyma, and extracranial compartment. However, this is the first report case of primary GS invading the surrounding musculature and orbit. This case report highlights the rapid aggressiveness of gliosarcomas and further a prior undescribed radiographic and anatomic finding of skull base invasion with this entity. PMID:28053799

  20. Surgical Resectability of Skull Base Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Takeo; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in surgical technology such as preoperative imaging, neuro-monitoring, and surgical instruments, the surgical resectability of intracranial meningiomas has increased over the last two decades. This study reviewed clinical articles regarding the surgical treatment of meningiomas to clarify the role of surgical excision, with a focus on skull base meningiomas. We sub-classified clinical articles about skull base meningiomas into two categories (anterior and middle fossa meningiomas; and posterior fossa meningiomas) and reviewed papers in each category. In cases with anterior and middle fossa meningiomas, surgical resectability has reached a sufficient level to maximize functional preservation. In cases of posterior fossa meningioma, however, surgical respectability remains insufficient even with full use of recent surgical modalities. Continuous refining of operative procedures is required to obtain more satisfactory outcomes, especially for posterior fossa meningioma. In addition, recent long-term outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were acceptable for controlling the skull base meningiomas. Therefore, combination with surgical excision and SRS should be considered in complicated skull base meningiomas. PMID:27076382

  1. Osteoconductive capacity of hydroxyapatite implanted into the skull of diabetics.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcelo Rodrigues; Gushiken, Veronica Ozaki; Mardegan Issa, João Paulo; Iatecola, Amilton; Pettian, Mariane; Santos, Arnaldo Rodrigues

    2011-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus can cause various diseases, including loss of bone mineral density as a characteristic manifestation of osteoporosis. In this condition, bone is more vulnerable to pathologic fractures that can be treated by implantation of biomaterial grafts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic capacity of hydroxyapatite implanted into bone defects in the skull of nonobese diabetic mice. Fifteen nonobese diabetic mice were divided into 3 groups: control (nondiabetic), spontaneously diabetic, and spontaneously diabetic receiving insulin replacement applied subcutaneously into the dorsum. Defects were created experimentally in the skull with a surgical bur and filled with hydroxyapatite granules. The animals were killed 4 weeks after surgery, and samples were obtained for analysis. Quantitative methods were used for measurement of the new bone formation. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by the Tukey test (P < 0.05). Radiographic results showed good radiopacity of the hydroxyapatite; however, radiolucent spots were seen between the hydroxyapatite granules in the diabetic groups, indicating infiltration of connective tissue. Microscopic results showed projections of newly formed bone from the margin of bone defect toward the implant. The quantity of newly formed bone was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that observed in the diabetic groups. The recipient area of diabetic groups contained a larger amount of connective tissue as demonstrated by radiographic analyses. In conclusion, the osteogenesis guided by the properties of hydroxyapatite may even occur in bone suffering from the effects of diabetes, but the quantity of newly formed bone is lower, and the process is slower.

  2. Endoscopic skull base surgery practice patterns: survey of the North American Skull Base Society.

    PubMed

    Batra, Pete S; Lee, Jivianne; Barnett, Samuel L; Senior, Brent A; Setzen, Michael; Kraus, Dennis H

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential impact of advanced endoscopic techniques on the current practice patterns in skull base surgery. A 20-item written survey approved by the American Rhinologic Society (ARS) and North American Skull Base Society (NASBS) was conducted at the 22nd Annual NASBS meeting in Las Vegas, NV, from February 17 to 19, 2012. The target group included 212 practicing skull base surgeons. Seventy-nine physicians (37.3%) completed the survey. The subspecialty composition was 42 (53%) otolaryngologists and 35 (44%) neurosurgeons. The respondents represented all regions of the country, with most common being the North Central (24%) and Mid-Atlantic (23%) states. Open and endoscopic skull base techniques were used by 91% and 80%, respectively. During a typical year, the number of endoscopic skull base cases ranged between 20 and 50 in 32%, 50 to 100 in 13%, and >100 in 8%. Endoscopic pituitary surgery was performed by 95%, while transcribriform, transplanum, and transclival approaches were performed by 70.5%, 66%, and 66%, respectively. Wide variation in coding philosophy was noted, including use of unlisted neurosurgical (28%), open skull base (28%), unlisted endoscopic (24%), and sinus surgery (20%) codes. Only 30% of physicians reported adequate reimbursement in ≥50% of the performed cases. Overall, 87% were supportive of the creation of dedicated endoscopic skull base codes. The present survey attests to the widespread adaptation of endoscopic techniques in the management schema of skull base surgery. The wide variation in coding techniques and inadequate reimbursement suggests that future dialogue should also focus on developing consensus with respect to the coding and billing process. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  3. Rapid intraoperative zygoma fracture imaging.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, Marcin; Parker, Wendy L; Beckman, Lorne; Williams, H Bruce

    2009-09-01

    A fractured zygoma frequently results in an aesthetically displeasing facial asymmetry. Open reduction and internal fixation may accurately realign the facial skeleton but often with undesirable sequelae. The authors' objective was to develop a precise technique of intraoperative zygoma fracture imaging using a C-arm to permit anatomical fracture realignment while reducing the extent of skeletal exposure required. The simplicity and accessibility of this method should allow its widespread clinical application. First, using a model skull, the relative positions of the C-arm required to adequately depict zygoma projection, width, arch contour, and zygoma rotation were defined. Second, diverse zygoma fracture types were created in six cadaver heads with a Mini Bionix machine and were repaired using C-arm guidance; accuracy was confirmed with postoperative computed tomography. Third, after defining optimal operating room setup, the accuracy in a clinical case was assessed. Two C-arm views were defined. The zygoma projection view (C-arm at 70 to 90 degrees to the skull's coronal plane) allows visualization of projection, width, and contour. The rotation view (C-arm at 70 to 90 degrees to the skull's sagittal plane) allows visualization of zygoma rotation. Postoperative computed tomographic imaging confirmed anatomical repair in all cases. Average operating room duration was less than 30 minutes, with operating room times decreasing progressively. The authors have developed an accurate technique of intraoperative zygoma fracture imaging and reduction guidance. This technique may decrease the risks of open access by potentially limiting direct skeletal exposure to buttresses where skeletal stabilization is required. In addition, this method is simple, can be learned and used rapidly, and is readily accessible.

  4. [Cloverleaf skull and bilateral facial clefts].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Manassero-Morales, Gioconda

    2015-01-01

    Cloverleaf skull syndrome, or Kleeblattschädel syndrome, is a rare malformation in which the skull has a cloverleaf appearance. It is caused by the premature closure of several sutures, being evident before birth. To present our experience in a case of cloverleaf skull syndrome, and update the information from the literature. A female infant of 5 months of age, diagnosed at birth with cleft lip and palate and hydrocephaly. A peritoneal ventricle valve was implanted at 30 days of life, and an ocular enucleation was performed due to an infectious process. The patient was followed-up in Genetics, where it confirmed a macrocephaly and craniosynostosis type cloverleaf skull. The 46XX cytogenetic study and echocardiography were normal. The brain CT scan showed multiple anomalies associated with hydrocephaly and non-specific malformations. Cloverleaf skull may be present in isolated form or associated with other congenital abnormalities, leading to various craniosynostosis syndromes, such as Crouzon, Pfeiffer or Carpenter. It may also be a component of the amniotic rupture sequence or to different dysplasias, such as campomelic dysplasia, thanatophoric dysplasia type 2, or the asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy of Jeune. The case presented does not fulfil all the characteristics needed to be included within a specific syndrome, and on not having a family history that suggests a hereditary pattern or chromosome abnormalities, it is concluded that it is a case of a congenital anomaly of sporadic presentation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. An assessment of the usefulness of a coconut as a model of the human skull for forensic identification of a homicide weapon.

    PubMed

    Pękala, P; Kiełbasa, G; Bogucka, K; Cempa, A; Olszewska, M; Konopka, T

    2014-01-01

    The authors made an attempt to verify if a coconut can be used as a model of human skull to determine the homicide weapon. During our experiment 27 strike attempts were performed with the use of 9 different tools. Among them there were authentic murder weapons and instruments which had been used in similar experiments conducted on human skulls in 1955. Depending on the size of an area in contact with a coconut, weapons caused dents corresponding to the shape of a weapon, irregular fractures or long linear cracks. Our results have shown that coconut can be used as an inexpensive screening model of human skull, but only to determine fractures made by tools with small striking surface.

  6. Crystal growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    One objective is to demonstrate the way crystals grow and how they affect the behavior of material. Another objective is to compare the growth of crystals in metals and nonmetals. The procedures, which involve a supersaturated solution of a salt that will separate into crystals on cooling and the pouring off of an eutectic solution to expose the crystals formed by a solid solution when an alloy of two metals forms a solid and eutectic solution on cooling, are described.

  7. The fluctuating asymmetry of medieval and modern human skulls.

    PubMed

    Gawlikowska, A; Szczurowski, J; Czerwiński, F; Miklaszewska, D; Adamiec, E; Dzieciołowska, E

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of fluctuating asymmetry (FA) allows for estimating the influence of stress factors on human development and allows to evaluate resistance to stress. FA is often used as a marker of prenatal stress. The aim of this work is to estimate the symmetry of skulls from selected historic human populations and to analyse changes in their morphology which have taken place over centuries. The studied material consisted of two skull samples - a modern sample containing 82 skulls and a medieval sample of 77 skulls from Gródek on the Bug River. Radiographs were taken in postero-anterior (P-A) and base projections. Images were scanned and calibrated by means of MicroStation 95 Academic Edition software. Measurements of the skull images were used to estimate FA. All data were analysed statistically. The skulls in both samples showed asymmetry. The levels of FA varied in different skull regions. A high level of FA in the calvaria and a low asymmetry for the facial part of skull is characteristic of modern skulls. In medieval skulls these relations are inverted. The higher value of FA in modern skulls is an evidence of a higher level of developmental stress in the modern population as well as of its lesser abilities to resist stress.

  8. Statistical analysis of biomechanical properties of the adult skull and age-related structural changes by sex in a Japanese forensic sample.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Nishida, Yoshifumi; Takano, Tachio; Koizumi, Yoshinori; Makino, Yohsuke; Yajima, Daisuke; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Otsuka, Katsura; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Odo, Yuriko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the biomechanical properties of the adult human skull and the structural changes that occur with age in both sexes. The heads of 94 Japanese cadavers (54 male cadavers, 40 female cadavers) autopsied in our department were used in this research. A total of 376 cranial samples, four from each skull, were collected. Sample fracture load was measured by a bending test. A statistically significant negative correlation between the sample fracture load and cadaver age was found. This indicates that the stiffness of cranial bones in Japanese individuals decreases with age, and the risk of skull fracture thus probably increases with age. Prior to the bending test, the sample mass, the sample thickness, the ratio of the sample thickness to cadaver stature (ST/CS), and the sample density were measured and calculated. Significant negative correlations between cadaver age and sample thickness, ST/CS, and the sample density were observed only among the female samples. Computerized tomographic (CT) images of 358 cranial samples were available. The computed tomography value (CT value) of cancellous bone which refers to a quantitative scale for describing radiodensity, cancellous bone thickness and cortical bone thickness were measured and calculated. Significant negative correlation between cadaver age and the CT value or cortical bone thickness was observed only among the female samples. These findings suggest that the skull is substantially affected by decreased bone metabolism resulting from osteoporosis. Therefore, osteoporosis prevention and treatment may increase cranial stiffness and reinforce the skull structure, leading to a decrease in the risk of skull fractures.

  9. Skull defect reconstruction based on a new hybrid level set.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziqun; Zhang, Ran; Song, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    Skull defect reconstruction is an important aspect of surgical repair. Historically, a skull defect prosthesis was created by the mirroring technique, surface fitting, or formed templates. These methods are not based on the anatomy of the individual patient's skull, and therefore, the prosthesis cannot precisely correct the defect. This study presented a new hybrid level set model, taking into account both the global optimization region information and the local accuracy edge information, while avoiding re-initialization during the evolution of the level set function. Based on the new method, a skull defect was reconstructed, and the skull prosthesis was produced by rapid prototyping technology. This resulted in a skull defect prosthesis that well matched the skull defect with excellent individual adaptation.

  10. Modeling skull's acoustic attenuation and dispersion on photoacoustic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, L.; Behnam, H.; Nasiriavanaki, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    Despite the great promising results of a recent new transcranial photoacoustic brain imaging technology, it has been shown that the presence of the skull severely affects the performance of this imaging modality. In this paper, we investigate the effect of skull on generated photoacoustic signals with a mathematical model. The developed model takes into account the frequency dependence attenuation and acoustic dispersion effects occur with the wave reflection and refraction at the skull surface. Numerical simulations based on the developed model are performed for calculating the propagation of photoacoustic waves through the skull. From the simulation results, it was found that the skull-induced distortion becomes very important and the reconstructed image would be strongly distorted without correcting these effects. In this regard, it is anticipated that an accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in transcranial photoacoustic brain imaging.

  11. Imaging of the central skull base.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alexandra

    2009-08-01

    The central skull base (CSB) constitutes a frontier between the extracranial head and neck and the middle cranial fossa. The anatomy of this region is complex, containing most of the bony foramina and canals of the skull base traversed by several neurovascular structures that can act as routes of spread for pathologic processes. Lesions affecting the CSB can be intrinsic to its bony-cartilaginous components; can arise from above, within the intracranial compartment; or can arise from below, within the extracranial head and neck. Crosssectional imaging is indispensable in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up of patients with CSB lesions. This review focuses on a systematic approach to this region based on an anatomic division that takes into account the major tissue constituents of the CSB.

  12. Imaging of the central skull base.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alexandra

    2009-11-01

    The central skull base (CSB) constitutes a frontier between the extracranial head and neck and the middle cranial fossa. The anatomy of this region is complex, containing most of the bony foramina and canals of the skull base traversed by several neurovascular structures that can act as routes of spread for pathologic processes. Lesions affecting the CSB can be intrinsic to its bony-cartilaginous components; can arise from above, within the intracranial compartment; or can arise from below, within the extracranial head and neck. Crosssectional imaging is indispensable in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up of patients with CSB lesions. This review focuses on a systematic approach to this region based on an anatomic division that takes into account the major tissue constituents of the CSB.

  13. Augmented reality-assisted skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Cabrilo, I; Sarrafzadeh, A; Bijlenga, P; Landis, B N; Schaller, K

    2014-12-01

    Neuronavigation is widely considered as a valuable tool during skull base surgery. Advances in neuronavigation technology, with the integration of augmented reality, present advantages over traditional point-based neuronavigation. However, this development has not yet made its way into routine surgical practice, possibly due to a lack of acquaintance with these systems. In this report, we illustrate the usefulness and easy application of augmented reality-based neuronavigation through a case example of a patient with a clivus chordoma. We also demonstrate how augmented reality can help throughout all phases of a skull base procedure, from the verification of neuronavigation accuracy to intraoperative image-guidance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and skull base

    SciTech Connect

    Komisar, A.; Silver, C.; Kalnicki, S.

    1985-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and base of skull are rare phenomena, usually seen after combined therapy for malignancies of the maxillary sinus. While the mandible is most commonly affected by osteoradionecrosis, the maxilla and skull base may also be affected when preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy is combined with surgery. Contributing factors may be: high radiation dosage delivered to the treatment volume (greater than 6000 rads), loss of tissue protective effects due to surgery, decreased vascularity caused by surgery and radiation, and proximity of a contaminated field. Onset of symptoms may vary. One patient presented 25 years after postoperative radiotherapy. Major symptoms were pain, trismus, and purulent discharge. The best diagnostic modality remains the history and physical exam, as the area is readily accessible. CT scans may be helpful in diagnosis and treatment planning. Therapy should follow time honored principles of local wound care. Home irrigations and hyperbaric therapy have been helpful in encouraging early sequestration and rapid healing.

  15. LINAC radiosurgery in skull base meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Deinsberger, R; Tidstrand, J; Sabitzer, H; Lanner, G

    2004-12-01

    LINAC radiosurgery has provided increasing access and changed treatment strategies in patients with benign skull base meningiomas in recent years. From January 1996 to January 2003, 37 patients with skull base meningiomas were treated with LINAC radiosurgery. A combination of the University of Florida system and the X Knife System, developed by Radionics, was used in all patients. Eight patients were treated by microsurgical resection before radiosurgery, in two patients tumor recurrence was treated and in 29 patients LINAC radiosurgery was the initial treatment procedure. The median treatment volume was 5.9 mL (0.7 to 22 mL) and the median given dose was 14.6 Gy (12.8 to 18 Gy) prescribed to the 80 percent isodose line. The follow-up period is between 12 and 96 months, median 66 months. 12 patients (32.4 %) showed a significant reduction in tumor size, in 11 patients (29.7 %) there was significantly less contrast enhancement and in 13 patients (35.1 %) the skull base meningioma was without any change. In one patient (2.8 %) there was tumor growth 48 months after radiosurgery, so the tumor control rate was 97.2 %. Two patients (5.6 %) showed neurological worsening after radiosurgery, whereas the symptoms were transient in one patient. LINAC radiosurgery offers us an effective treatment modality and changes treatment strategies in skull base meningiomas towards a less aggressive surgical approach. By combining microsurgery and radiosurgery we can achieve high tumor control rates with an acceptable low morbidity and a high level of quality of life.

  16. [Orbitozygomatic approaches to the skull base].

    PubMed

    Cherekaev, V A; Gol'bin, D A; Belov, A I; Radchenkov, N S; Lasunin, N V; Vinokurov, A G

    2015-01-01

    The paper is written in the lecture format and dedicated to one of the main basal approaches, the orbitozygomatic approach, that has been widely used by neurosurgeons for several decades. The authors describe the historical background of the approach development and the surgical technique features and also analyze the published data about application of the orbitozygomatic approach in surgery for skull base tumors and cerebral aneurysms.

  17. Myoepithelioma of the skull: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fritchie, Karen J; Bauman, Mitchel D; Durward, Quentin J

    2012-10-01

    Myoepithelioma of bone is a rare osseous tumor thought to be related to myoepithelial lesions found at other anatomic sites such as the salivary gland and skin. These tumors are composed of varying proportions of epithelial and myoepithelial cells and exhibit a spectrum of biologic behavior ranging from benign to malignant. We present the first reported case of myoepithelioma of the skull. A 20-year-old white woman presented with a persistent right parieto-occipital skull nodule, relating its presence to a fall on the site 2 years previously. The nodule had become painful in the past 2 months. Her past medical history and workup were otherwise unremarkable. The initial biopsy was inconclusive for diagnosis. The lytic bone lesion was subsequently resected, and histopathological examination showed a proliferation of epithelioid cells in a myxochondroid background. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies revealed a rearrangement of the EWSR1 locus. The morphologic and molecular findings were consistent with the diagnosis of myoepithelioma of bone. Six months after surgery, the patient is doing well with no evidence of recurrence. This case illustrates the clinical presentation, histopathology, and molecular findings of a myoepithelioma of the skull with successful surgical treatment. Because myoepitheliomas with benign morphological appearance may rarely act aggressively, long-term clinical follow-up is warranted.

  18. Osteolytic Skull Lesions–Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sandeep, B. V.; Banga, Manpreet Singh; Saha, Suniti Kumar; Roy, Kaushik

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To present an overview of varied clinical presentations, investigations and treatment options for Osteolytic skull lesions. Study Design: It is a prospective study. Materials and Methods: We conducted this study from January 2013 to December 2015 in the Department of Neurosurgery, Nil Ratan Sircar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata. During this period, 14 patients presented with osteolytic skull lesions through the outpatient department. All patients were thoroughly investigated with appropriate hematological and radiological investigations and treated following admission, and surgery was performed in the Neurosurgery Department. All were followed regularly in OPD. Results: Total 14 patients were included in the study. Amongst these 7 were male and 7 female. Age group of patients ranged from 5 to 72 years. Of 14 cases, three cases had dermoid cyst, four cases had metastasis, and one each case had epidermoid cyst, intradiploic meningioma, benign cystic lesion, tuberculosis, histiocytosis X, hemangioma, and osteomyelitis. All underwent diagnostic/therapeutic procedures and referred for Radio or chemotherapy where indicated. Conclusion: All scalp/skull lesions need careful clinical correlation, appropriate radiological investigations to establish diagnosis and subject them to suitable treatment. PMID:28694627

  19. Skull shape evolution in durophagous carnivorans.

    PubMed

    Figueirido, Borja; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Martín-Serra, Alberto

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we investigate convergent evolution toward durophagy in carnivoran skull shape using geometric morphometrics in a sample of living and extinct species. Principal components analysis indicate that, in spite of the different dietary resources consumed by durophages-that is, bone-crackers and bamboo-feeders-both groups of carnivorans share portions of skull phenotypic spaces. We identify by discriminant analyses a shared set of adaptations toward durophagy in the skull of carnivores. However, ancestral states indicate that although durophages reached similar phenotypes, the evolutionary pathways that they followed are different depending upon the family to which they belong. Furthermore, while the carnivoran cranium more closely reflects the nature of the resources consumed-that is, soft or hard and tough items-the mandible shows particular feeding adaptations-that is, bamboo or bone. This finding supports the interpretation that the mandible has more evolutionary plasticity than the cranium, which is more limited to evolve toward a particular feeding adaptation. However, we find that the shapes of the cranium and the mandible are highly integrated for the whole order Carnivora. Published studies of teratological cats and dogs indicate that the role of internal constraints in shaping this pattern of integration is absent or weak and malleable by selection. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Sports-related fractures in South East Scotland: an analysis of 990 fractures.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Stuart A; Watson, Bruce S; Wood, Alexander M; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2014-12-01

    To describe the characteristics of all sports related fractures in patients aged ≥ 15 years in South East Scotland in one year. Medical records of 990 consecutive patients aged ≥ 15 years who presented to the Orthopaedic Trauma Unit of the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh with sports-related fractures between 1 July 2007 and 30 June 2008 were reviewed. Acute fractures of the upper limbs, lower limbs, pelvis, and cervical spine were included, but those of the skull, facial bones, and thorax were excluded, as were stress and chronic fractures. The incidence of sports-related fractures was 1.8/1000/year (82% involving men). The median age of patients was 25 (interquartile range, 19-35) years. Sports-related fractures accounted for 24.6% and 5.1% of all fractures in men and women, respectively. Men aged 15 to 19 years were 9 times more likely to have sports-related fractures than women of the same age. The sports-related fractures involved the upper limbs (52.4%), lower limbs (45.4%), and axial skeleton (2.2%). 12 of 49 sports (football, rugby, skiing, snowboarding, 3 cycling disciplines, horse riding, motocross, basketball, martial arts, and ice skating) accounted for 82.8% of all sports-related fractures. Upper limb fractures outnumbered lower limb fractures in all sports, except for horse riding and motocross that the proportions were similar. In South East Scotland, most sports related fractures involved the upper limbs.

  1. Influence of head mass on temporo-parietal skull impact using finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2015-09-01

    The effect of head mass on its biomechanical response during lateral impact to the head is investigated in this computational study. The mass of the head of a state-of-the-art validated finite element head model is altered by ± 10 % from the base value of 4.7 kg. Numerical simulations of lateral head impacts for 30 cases (representing 15 human cadaver experiments × 2 mass configurations) are performed using the LS-DYNA solver at different velocities ranging from 2.4 to 6.5 m/s and three impacting conditions representing different stiffness and shapes of the contact/impact surfaces. Results are compared with the original model using the baseline head mass, thus resulting in a total of 45 simulations. Present findings show that the head mass has greater influence for peak interaction forces and the force has a greater dependency on stiffness of contact surface than the shape. Mass variations have also influence on skull strain energy. Regardless of increase/decrease in skull strain energy influenced by head mass variations used in the computational study, the 50 % fracture tolerance limit was unaltered, which was 544 mJ. The present study gives a better understanding of the mechanism of temporo-parietal skull impact.

  2. Skull Subsidence due to Periosteum Defect following Craniotomy in a Child.

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Akazawa, Ayumi; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a 7-year-old child with a cranial deformity secondary to a craniotomy for an intracranial hematoma. He suffered from an acute epidural hematoma with a lineal fracture of the right temporal bone following a severe head injury. A large question mark-shaped skin flap with the periosteum and temporal muscle was created for a decompressive craniectomy; however, neither the acute epidural hematoma nor brain swelling was severe, and we performed a small craniotomy compared with the skin flap without a decompressive craniectomy. Eighteen months after the operation, he complained of skull deformity with a mild depression of the forehead. Axial and 3-dimensional computed tomography showed thinness and subsidence of the frontoparietal bone around the replaced bone flap, corresponding to the skin flap with the periosteum defect. We suggest that the periosteum defect following creation of the skin flap during surgery prevented normal growth of the skull, which caused the thinness and subsidence of the frontoparietal bone. Preservation and cooptation of the periosteum should be performed during neurological surgeries in babies and children to prevent skull deformity.

  3. 'Do not touch' lesions of the skull base.

    PubMed

    Dobre, Mircea C; Fischbein, Nancy

    2014-08-01

    Imaging of the skull base presents many challenges due to its anatomical complexity, numerous normal variants and lack of familiarity to many radiologists. As the skull base is a region which is not amenable to physical examination and as lesions of the skull base are generally difficult to biopsy and even more difficult to operate on, the radiologist plays a major role in directing patient management via accurate image interpretation. Knowledge of the skull base should not be limited to neuroradiologists and head and neck radiologists, however, as the central skull base is routinely included in the field of view when imaging the brain, cervical spine, or head and neck with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and hence, its nuances should be familiar to general radiologists as well. We herein review the imaging findings of a subcategory of lesions of the central skull base, the 'do not touch' lesions.

  4. Reverse engineering--rapid prototyping of the skull in forensic trauma analysis.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Mattias; Schmidt, Peter; Potente, Stefan; Ramsthaler, Frank; Schrodt, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) comprises a variety of automated manufacturing techniques such as selective laser sintering (SLS), stereolithography, and three-dimensional printing (3DP), which use virtual 3D data sets to fabricate solid forms in a layer-by-layer technique. Despite a growing demand for (virtual) reconstruction models in daily forensic casework, maceration of the skull is frequently assigned to ensure haptic evidence presentation in the courtroom. Owing to the progress in the field of forensic radiology, 3D data sets of relevant cases are usually available to the forensic expert. Here, we present a first application of RP in forensic medicine using computed tomography scans for the fabrication of an SLS skull model in a case of fatal hammer impacts to the head. The report is intended to show that this method fully respects the dignity of the deceased and is consistent with medical ethics but nevertheless provides an excellent 3D impression of anatomical structures and injuries.

  5. Osteoid Osteoma Presenting as a Painful Solitary Skull Lesion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mohammad Saeed; Ahmadi, Mohammad; Dehghan, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Osteomas are asymptomatic and rare slow growing bony tumors in temporal bone, and should be taken into account in differential diagnosis of the osteolytic solitary skull lesions. Sometimes is associated with pain and functional loss. Only a few cases have been reported. Case Report: We describe a case of an osteoid osteoma of the temporal bone (mastoid) in a 31-year-old woman presenting as painful solitary tumor of calvarium and its management. The resection of whole bony tumor was performed using the retroauricular approach. Pathologic evaluation revealed the osteoid osteoma. Conclusion: Although osteoid osteoma of the temporal bone is rare, it should be taken into account in differential diagnosis of the osteolytic skull lesions. Treatment is indicated for symptomatic osteomas or cosmetic reasons. PMID:24745001

  6. Imaging of the skull base: anatomy and pathology.

    PubMed

    Policeni, Bruno A; Smoker, Wendy R K

    2015-01-01

    The skull base is a critical landmark, separating intracranial from extracranial structures. This intricate anatomic structure has several foramina and crossing structures, which can be a challenge for novices. Comprehensive anatomic knowledge is critical for narrowing the differential diagnosis of lesions that may affect the skull base. These lesions can be divided into major categories to help in a systematic approach for skull base pathology evaluation.

  7. Frameless and Maskless Stereotactic Navigation with a Skull-Mounted Tracker:A Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Andrew A; White, Timothy G; Hirsch, Matthew B; Chakraborty, Shamik; Costantino, Peter D; Langer, David J; Boockvar, John A

    2017-03-11

    Intraoperative image-guided navigation has revolutionized neurosurgery. It undoubtedly increases the surgeon's confidence and the perception of safety. While fiducials and facial masks are currently the most widely used tools for intraoperative navigation, their use is associated with certain complications. For instance, such tools require rigid fixation of the head, which increases the risk of skull fractures and epidural hematomas, and decreases both surgical flexibility and surgeon's comfort. In addition, the use of a facial mask is at times undesirable, as it may represent an obstacle during surgeries involving the face and forehead. Furthermore, the use of these devices requires additional preoperative magnetic resonance imaging in the period immediately prior to the surgery, which is not cost-effective. In this case series, we present three cases that illustrate the usage of a skull-mounted tracker for image-guided navigation for anterior skull base surgery and ventricular catheter placement procedures. This system obviates the need for fiducials or face masks during the surgical procedure itself, and allows for the performance of facial incisions using the Weber-Ferguson approach. Moreover, our technique permits free movement of the head during surgery, which in turn facilitates the exposure of head-and-neck lesions and expedites the approach to ventricular catheter placement. Our case series demonstrates the precision and ease of our technique, which is less time-consuming and less cumbersome than the traditional frame-based stereotaxy. In addition, the skull-mounted tracker system allows improved anatomical localization and shorter operating time, while avoiding the complications associated with the use of rigid fixating head frames.

  8. A case of elongated styloid process in a modern-age skull from Puerto Cabello, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, P; Gronkiewicz, S; Soliński, D; Pers, A; Lachowski, K; Domagała, Z

    2015-01-01

    The styloid process (SP) arises from cartilage of the second branchial arch and tends to calcify during later life. If the length of the SP is more than 30 mm, it can be considered abnormally elongated. Clinical symptoms associated with elongation of this type are defined as Eagle's syndrome. The paper presents a case of an elongated SP in a modern skull from Puerto Cabello, Venezuela, obtained from a series of skulls of African slaves kept at the Department of Anthropology, Polish Academy of Sciences in Wroclaw. The skull belonged to a male individual, aged ca. 55 years at death (maturus). In terms of basic anthropometric features it had slightly greater facial width parameters in comparison to the cerebral part, and a shorter length of neurocranium when compared to average values of morphological features in African skulls from Uganda. Further macroscopic analysis revealed the presence of an elongated SP (ca. 70.1 mm) with secondary lesions remaining after a healed fracture. Imaging of the bone structure of the elongated SP was carried out using a computed to-mography scan, with multilevel image analysis without contrast. The elongation and calcification of the left ligament in anterior orientation could have caused irritation to the structure of cranial nerves, running within the parapharyngeal space, and to sympathetic fibres running in the wall of cervical arteries. Analyses of craniological materials recovered during excavations or as part of old osteological collections are rare due to the fragility of this bone structure, and for that reason they may be a valuable source of information on the health status of historic human populations.

  9. Tolerance of the skull to blunt ballistic temporo-parietal impact.

    PubMed

    Raymond, David; Van Ee, Chris; Crawford, Gregory; Bir, Cynthia

    2009-11-13

    Less-lethal ballistic projectiles are used by police personnel to temporarily incapacitate suspects. While the frequency of these impacts to the head is low, they account for more serious injuries than impacts to any other body region. As a result, there is an urgent need to assess the tolerance of the head to such impacts. The focus of this study was to investigate the tolerance of the temporo-parietal skull to blunt ballistic impact and establish injury criteria for risk assessment. Seven unembalmed isolated cadaver heads were subjected to fourteen impacts. Specimens were instrumented with a nine-accelerometer array as well as strain gages surrounding the impact site. Impacts were performed with a 38 mm instrumented projectile at velocities ranging from 18 to 37 m/s. CT images and autopsies were performed to document resulting fractures. Peak fracture force for the seven resulting fractures was 5633+/-2095 N. Peak deformation for fracture-producing impacts was 7.8+/-3.2 mm. The blunt criterion (BC), peak force and principal strain were determined to be the best predictors of depressed comminuted fractures. Temporo-parietal tolerance levels were consistent with previous studies. An initial force tolerance level of 2346 N is established for the temporo-parietal region for blunt ballistic impact with a 38 mm diameter impactor.

  10. Device and method for skull-melting depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Heestand, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A method of skull-melting comprises the steps of: a. providing a vessel adapted for a skull-melting process, the vessel having an interior, an underside, and an orifice in connecting the interior and the underside; b. disposing a waveguide in the orifice so that the waveguide protrudes sufficiently into the interior to interact with the skull-melting process; c. providing a signal energy transducer in signal communication with the waveguide; d. introducing into the vessel a molten working material; e. carrying out the skull-melting process so that a solidified skull of the working material is formed, the skull and the vessel having an interface therebetween, the skull becoming fused to the waveguide so the signal energy can be transmitted through the waveguide and the skull without interference from the interface; f. activating the signal energy transducer so that a signal is propagated through the waveguide; and, g. controlling at least one variable of the skull-melting process utilizing feedback information derived from the propagated signal energy.

  11. Outer contour extraction of skull from CT scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulinuha, M. A.; Yuniarno, E. M.; Nugroho, S. M. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Extraction of the outer contour of the skull is an important step in craniofacial reconstruction. The outer contour is required for surface reconstruction of the skull. In this paper, we propose a method to extract the outer contour of the skull. The extraction process consists of four stages: defining the region of interest, segmentation of the bone, noise removal and extraction of the outer contour based on scanning from the four sides of the image. The proposed method successfully extracts the outermost contour of the skull and avoids redundant data.

  12. Device and method for skull-melting depth measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; Heestand, R.L.

    1993-02-09

    A method of skull-melting comprises the steps of: (a) providing a vessel adapted for a skull-melting process, the vessel having an interior, an underside, and an orifice connecting the interior and the underside; (b) disposing a waveguide in the orifice so that the waveguide protrudes sufficiently into the interior to interact with the skull-melting process; (c) providing a signal energy transducer in signal communication with the waveguide; (d) introducing into the vessel a molten working material; (e) carrying out the skull-melting process so that a solidified skull of the working material is formed, the skull and the vessel having an interface therebetween, the skull becoming fused to the waveguide so the signal energy can be transmitted through the waveguide and the skull without interference from the interface; (f) activating the signal energy transducer so that a signal is propagated through the waveguide; and, (g) controlling at least one variable of the skull-melting process utilizing feedback information derived from the propagated signal energy.

  13. [A rare case of lacunar skull deformity associated with craniosynostosis].

    PubMed

    Vaesen, F; Thimmesch, M; Born, J; Misson, J-P

    2016-03-01

    The lacunar skull is a radiologic description characterised by the presence of lacunae in the cranial vault. Its physiopathology remains up to now poorly understood; it is mostly associated with neural tube defects. The association of a lacunar skull with a craniosynostosis has rarely been described in the literature. The case of a 9-month-old patient presenting a multisutural craniosynostosis with a lacunar skull is reported in this article. The surgical treatment allowed to remodel the skull and to hope for a spontaneous regression of the lacunae.

  14. Paleopathological findings in radiographs of ancient and modern Greek skulls.

    PubMed

    Papagrigorakis, Manolis J; Karamesinis, Kostas G; Daliouris, Kostas P; Kousoulis, Antonis A; Synodinos, Philippos N; Hatziantoniou, Michail D

    2012-12-01

    The skull, when portrayed radiologically, can be a useful tool in detecting signs of systemic diseases and results of pathological growth mechanisms. The aim of this study was therefore to examine, compare, and classify findings in cranial configuration of pathological origin, in modern and ancient skulls. The material consists of 240 modern and 141 ancient dry skulls. Three radiographs for each skull (lateral, anteroposterior, basilar) provide enough evidence for differential diagnoses. Cases of osteoporosis are among the interesting pathological findings. A prevalence of female modern skulls in those determined as osteoporotic skulls is noted. Special interest is placed on the area of the sella turcica and many variations, regarding the shape and texture, are recognized both in ancient and modern skulls. Malignancies and important causes of cranial destruction are identified in both skull collections. Diploid thickening and osteolytic areas appear commonly among ancient remains. Moreover, from the ancient skull collection, one case possibly recognizable as fibrous dysplasia is noted while another case with an unusual exostosis gives rise to many questions. Interpreted with caution, the results of the present study, which can serve as an approach of paleopathology and paleoradiology, indicate similarity trends in cranial configuration of pathologic origin in modern and ancient people. Radiography and cephalometry were the main diagnostic tools used to gather evidence and are evaluated as a quite appropriate method to examine anthropological material and assess the internal structure of skeletal remains since they are non-destructive techniques.

  15. Correlations between selected parameters of the human skull and orbit.

    PubMed

    Nitek, Stanisław; Wysocki, Jarosław; Reymond, Jerzy; Piasecki, Karol

    2009-12-01

    Correlations between selected metric parameters of the human skull and the orbit should be useful for anticipating probable dimensions of the orbit in living subjects. One hundred human skulls derived from medieval cemeteries in Poland and 20 additional contemporary skulls were investigated. Measurements were made with anthropometric caliper, vernier caliper and lead. For orbit depth, orbital coefficient was negatively correlated with the width and length coefficient of the skull, but skull length was positively correlated. The minimal distance between the anterior lacrimal crest and the optic canal had a positive correlation with the skull length and a negative correlation with the orbital coefficient. The distance between the fronto-zygomatic suture and the optic canal had a positive correlation with skull height and with orbit width. The distance between the infraorbital foramen and the optic canal had a negative correlation with the orbital coefficient. Empirical formulas were derived on the basis of the calculated means. These formulas allow prediction of the distances between important orbital structures and topographical points at the orbital entrance, based on skull dimensions which are easily measurable intravitally. We conclude that the actual distances inside the orbit can be determined on the basis of gender, length and height of the skull, the width of the orbit, and the orbital coefficient.

  16. Skull outer contour extraction image using compass scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, Pauladie; Mulyanto Yuniarno, Eko; Hery Purnomo, Mauridhi

    2017-03-01

    Skull outer contour extraction is an important step for craniofacial reconstruction. It useful for performing surface reconstruction. Skull outer contour obtained by three stages: thresholding, defining region of interest, and skull outer contour extraction. Compass scanning is used to this extraction. Scanning is performed using eight compass directions, four scanning are done from the four edges of ROI area, and the other four from corner of ROI area. This proposed method successfully extracts skull outer contour for four sample slices: upper temple, eye, nose, and mouth. Scanning from four corners of ROI area gives better result than four edges of ROI area, but using all eight scannings will give the best extraction performance.

  17. Development of the cetacean nasal skull.

    PubMed

    Klima, M

    1999-01-01

    The adaptation of cetaceans to aquatic life habits is reflected, in their nasal region, in three marked changes from the original relations found in land mammals. These changes include (1) the loss of the sense of smell, (2) translocation of the nostrils from the tip of the rostrum to the vertex of the head, and (3) elongation of the anterior head to form a rostrum protruding far towards anterior. The morphogenetic processes taking place during embryogenesis of the nasal skull play a decisive part in the development of all these changes. The lateral parts of the embryonic nasal capsule, encompassing the nasal passages, change their position from horizontal to vertical. At the same time, the structures of the original nasal floor (the solum nasi) are shifted in front of the nasal passages towards the rostrum. The structures of the original nasal roof (the tectum nasi) and of the nasal side wall (the paries nasi) are translocated behind the nasal passages towards the neurocranium. The medial nasal septum (the septum nasi) mostly loses its connection to the nasal passages and is produced into a point protruding far towards anterior. The transformed embryonic nasal skull of the Cetacea can be divided into three sections: 1. The median structures. These include the cartilaginous structures, viz., the rostrum nasi, the septum interorbitale and the spina mesethmoidalis, which are accompanied by the dermal bones, the vomer and the praemaxillare. In adult cetaceans the rostrum nasi is mostly preserved as a robust cartilage of the skull, which may possibly serve as a sound transmitting structure of the sonar system, or it may be responsible for the sensing of water streams and vibrations. 2. The posterior side wall structures. These include the following cartilaginous structures that are mostly heavily reduced or mutually fused: the cupula nasi anterior, the tectum nasi, the lamina cribrosa, the paries nasi, the commissura orbitonasalis, the cupula nasi posterior, the

  18. Carbon ion radiotherapy of skull base chondrosarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela . E-mail: Daniela.Ertner@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Hof, Holger; Didinger, Bernd; Combs, Stephanie E.; Jaekel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P.; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of carbon ion radiotherapy in chondrosarcomas of the skull base. Patients and Methods: Between November 1998 and September 2005, 54 patients with low-grade and intermediate-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base have been treated with carbon ion radiation therapy (RT) using the raster scan technique at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. All patients had gross residual tumors after surgery. Median total dose was 60 CGE (weekly fractionation 7 x 3.0 CGE). All patients were followed prospectively in regular intervals after treatment. Local control and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE v.3.0) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) score. Results: Median follow-up was 33 months (range, 3-84 months). Only 2 patients developed local recurrences. The actuarial local control rates were 96.2% and 89.8% at 3 and 4 years; overall survival was 98.2%at 5 years. Only 1 patient developed a mucositis CTCAE Grade 3; the remaining patients did not develop any acute toxicities >CTCAE Grade 2. Five patients developed minor late toxicities (RTOG/EORTC Grades 1-2), including bilateral cataract (n = 1), sensory hearing loss (n = 1), a reduction of growth hormone (n = 1), and asymptomatic radiation-induced white matter changes of the adjacent temporal lobe (n = 2). Grade 3 late toxicity occurred in 1 patient (1.9%) only. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT is an effective treatment for low- and intermediate-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base offering high local control rates with low toxicity.

  19. Evolutionary origin of the turtle skull.

    PubMed

    Bever, G S; Lyson, Tyler R; Field, Daniel J; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S

    2015-09-10

    Transitional fossils informing the origin of turtles are among the most sought-after discoveries in palaeontology. Despite strong genomic evidence indicating that turtles evolved from within the diapsid radiation (which includes all other living reptiles), evidence of the inferred transformation between an ancestral turtle with an open, diapsid skull to the closed, anapsid condition of modern turtles remains elusive. Here we use high-resolution computed tomography and a novel character/taxon matrix to study the skull of Eunotosaurus africanus, a 260-million-year-old fossil reptile from the Karoo Basin of South Africa, whose distinctive postcranial skeleton shares many unique features with the shelled body plan of turtles. Scepticism regarding the status of Eunotosaurus as the earliest stem turtle arises from the possibility that these shell-related features are the products of evolutionary convergence. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate strong cranial support for Eunotosaurus as a critical transitional form in turtle evolution, thus fortifying a 40-million-year extension to the turtle stem and moving the ecological context of its origin back onto land. Furthermore, we find unexpected evidence that Eunotosaurus is a diapsid reptile in the process of becoming secondarily anapsid. This is important because categorizing the skull based on the number of openings in the complex of dermal bone covering the adductor chamber has long held sway in amniote systematics, and still represents a common organizational scheme for teaching the evolutionary history of the group. These discoveries allow us to articulate a detailed and testable hypothesis of fenestral closure along the turtle stem. Our results suggest that Eunotosaurus represents a crucially important link in a chain that will eventually lead to consilience in reptile systematics, paving the way for synthetic studies of amniote evolution and development.

  20. Skull base reconstruction: an updated approach.

    PubMed

    Hanasono, Matthew M; Silva, Amanda; Skoracki, Roman J; Gidley, Paul W; DeMonte, Franco; Hanna, Ehab Y; Chang, David W; Yu, Peirong

    2011-09-01

    The authors' goal was to develop an updated and comprehensive algorithm for skull base reconstruction based on data from the 10-year period following their initial report. Reconstructive outcomes were analyzed from 250 patients undergoing skull base reconstruction from 2000 to 2009. Thirty-nine local or regional pedicled flap reconstructions and 211 free flap reconstructions were performed. Free flaps were usually selected over pedicled flaps for patients with a history of prior surgery, irradiation, or chemotherapy (p = 0.003, p < 0.001, and p = 0.04, respectively). Reconstructions were performed for 36 region I defects, 39 region II defects, 124 region III defects, and 51 defects involving more than one region. Complications occurred in 29.6 percent of patients. There were no significant differences in the overall complication rates between pedicled and free flap reconstructions (p = 0.70). The recipient-site complication rate decreased from 31 percent in the authors' prior report to 18.4 percent. A facial nerve repair was performed in 30 patients. By 12 months, 75 percent of patients had signs of reinnervation. Recovery was not significantly less likely in patients with preoperative weakness, postoperative irradiation, or age 60 years or older (p = 1.00, p = 1.00, and p = 0.11, respectively). Based on the largest series of skull base reconstructions to date, the authors recommend pedicled flaps for limited defects because of minimal donor-site morbidity and shorter operative times and hospital stays. For extensive defects and cases involving prior surgery, irradiation, or chemotherapy, free flaps are preferred. Facial nerve repair should be attempted whenever feasible, even in the setting of preoperative weakness, anticipated postoperative irradiation, or advanced age. Therapeutic, III.

  1. Evolutionary morphology of the rabbit skull

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, Emma

    2016-01-01

    The skull of leporids (rabbits and hares) is highly transformed, typified by pronounced arching of the dorsal skull and ventral flexion of the facial region (i.e., facial tilt). Previous studies show that locomotor behavior influences aspects of cranial shape in leporids, and here we use an extensive 3D geometric morphometrics dataset to further explore what influences leporid cranial diversity. Facial tilt angle, a trait that strongly correlates with locomotor mode, significantly predicts the cranial shape variation captured by the primary axis of cranial shape space, and describes a small proportion (13.2%) of overall cranial shape variation in the clade. However, locomotor mode does not correlate with overall cranial shape variation in the clade, because there are two district morphologies of generalist species, and saltators and cursorial species have similar morphologies. Cranial shape changes due to phyletic size change (evolutionary allometry) also describes a small proportion (12.5%) of cranial shape variation in the clade, but this is largely driven by the smallest living leporid, the pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis). By integrating phylogenetic history with our geometric morphometric data, we show that the leporid cranium exhibits weak phylogenetic signal and substantial homoplasy. Though these results make it difficult to reconstruct what the ‘ancestral’ leporid skull looked like, the fossil records suggest that dorsal arching and facial tilt could have occurred before the origin of the crown group. Lastly, our study highlights the diversity of cranial variation in crown leporids, and highlights a need for additional phylogenetic work that includes stem (fossil) leporids and includes morphological data that captures the transformed morphology of rabbits and hares. PMID:27688967

  2. Robotics in Sinus and Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Sanjeet; Hachem, Ralph Abi; Ozer, Enver; Beer-Furlan, Andre; Prevedello, Daniel; Carrau, Ricardo L

    2017-06-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has been proven to be safe and to yield acceptable oncological and functional outcomes for surgery of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, supraglottis, and glottis. TORS has been successful at reducing morbidity, improving quality of life, and providing access to areas that previously required mandibulotomy or other more radical approaches in the past. This has changed the paradigm of management of tumors in these anatomic locations. In this article, the authors review the recent literature discussing the role of robotic surgery in managing sinonasal and skull base pathology and discuss its current advantages and limitations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Facial nerve rerouting in skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Parhizkar, Nooshin; Hiltzik, David H; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2005-08-01

    Facial nerve rerouting techniques were developed to facilitate re-section of extensive tumors occupying the skull base. Facial nerve rerouting has its own limitations and risks, requiring microsurgical expertise, additional surgical time, and often some degree of facial nerve paresis. This article presents different degrees of anterior and posterior facial nerve rerouting, techniques of facial nerve rerouting, and a comprehensive review of outcomes. It then reviews anatomic and functional preservation of the facial nerve in acoustic neuroma resection, technical aspects of facial nerve dissection, intracranial facial nerve repair options, and outcomes for successful acoustic neuroma surgery.

  4. Stress Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Stress fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by ... up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of a ...

  5. Greenstick Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Greenstick fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A greenstick fracture occurs when a bone bends and cracks, instead of breaking completely into separate pieces. The fracture looks similar to what happens when you try ...

  6. Screening for osteoporosis after trauma: a new approach using quantitative computed tomography of the skull.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Amber; Waxman, Kenneth; Izfar, Seema; Grotts, Jonathan; Yim, Samantha

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis of osteoporosis is important in the care of elderly patients at risk of trauma. While pelvis computed tomography (CT) is accurate in the measurement of bone mineral density, axial skull CT has not previously been evaluated for this purpose. This study investigated whether data from axial skull CT scans can screen for osteoporosis. Bone density measurements were derived from digital analysis of routine scans of the head and pelvis using quantitative CT. The study took place from October 2010 to November 2011 at a medium-sized community hospital. The first study phase included patients older than 18 years who had both a head and a pelvis CT scan within 30 days. The known diagnostic value for osteoporosis on pelvis CT scans was used to derive a diagnostic value for head CT. The second study phase included adult trauma patients who underwent noncontrast head CT during an initial trauma evaluation. A subgroup analysis was performed during Phase II on patients older than 65 years to identify the incidence of fracture as it is affected by age and bone mineral density. Our data demonstrated that head CT was able to identify osteoporosis with a sensitivity of 0.70, a specificity of 0.81, and an accuracy of 0.76 compared with pelvic CT. Of 261 trauma patients, 54% had bone disease based on axial skull CT criteria. Patients older than 65 years with a positive screen result for osteoporosis on head CT were twice as likely to have a fracture. Analysis of data from head CT scans has the potential to provide a useful screen for osteoporosis. Adding this analysis to CT scans performed for elderly trauma patients could result in improved diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Diagnostic study, level II.

  7. Development of a skull/brain model for military wound ballistics studies.

    PubMed

    Carr, Debra; Lindstrom, Anne-Christine; Jareborg, Andreas; Champion, Stephen; Waddell, Neil; Miller, David; Teagle, Michael; Horsfall, Ian; Kieser, Jules

    2015-05-01

    Reports on penetrating ballistic head injuries in the literature are dominated by case studies of suicides; the penetrating ammunition usually being .22 rimfire or shotgun. The dominating cause of injuries in modern warfare is fragmentation and hence, this is the primary threat that military helmets protect the brain from. When helmets are perforated, this is usually by bullets. In combat, 20% of penetrating injuries occur to the head and its wounding accounts for 50% of combat deaths. A number of head simulants are described in the academic literature, in ballistic test methods for helmets (including measurement of behind helmet blunt trauma, BHBT) and in the 'open' and 'closed' government literature of several nations. The majority of these models are not anatomically correct and are not assessed with high-velocity rifle ammunition. In this article, an anatomically correct 'skull' (manufactured from polyurethane) and 'brain' (manufactured from 10%, by mass, gelatine) model for use in military wound ballistic studies is described. Filling the cranium completely with gelatine resulted in a similar 'skull' fracture pattern as an anatomically correct 'brain' combined with a representation of cerebrospinal fluid. In particular, posterior cranial fossa and occipital fractures and brain ejection were observed. This pattern of injury compared favourably to reported case studies of actual incidents in the literature.

  8. Modeling of the human skull in EEG source analysis.

    PubMed

    Dannhauer, Moritz; Lanfer, Benjamin; Wolters, Carsten H; Knösche, Thomas R

    2011-09-01

    We used computer simulations to investigate finite element models of the layered structure of the human skull in EEG source analysis. Local models, where each skull location was modeled differently, and global models, where the skull was assumed to be homogeneous, were compared to a reference model, in which spongy and compact bone were explicitly accounted for. In both cases, isotropic and anisotropic conductivity assumptions were taken into account. We considered sources in the entire brain and determined errors both in the forward calculation and the reconstructed dipole position. Our results show that accounting for the local variations over the skull surface is important, whereas assuming isotropic or anisotropic skull conductivity has little influence. Moreover, we showed that, if using an isotropic and homogeneous skull model, the ratio between skin/brain and skull conductivities should be considerably lower than the commonly used 80:1. For skull modeling, we recommend (1) Local models: if compact and spongy bone can be identified with sufficient accuracy (e.g., from MRI) and their conductivities can be assumed to be known (e.g., from measurements), one should model these explicitly by assigning each voxel to one of the two conductivities, (2) Global models: if the conditions of (1) are not met, one should model the skull as either homogeneous and isotropic, but with considerably higher skull conductivity than the usual 0.0042 S/m, or as homogeneous and anisotropic, but with higher radial skull conductivity than the usual 0.0042 S/m and a considerably lower radial:tangential conductivity anisotropy than the usual 1:10.

  9. [Clinical Study of Skull Base Osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Ueki, Yushi; Matsuyama, Hiroshi; Morita, Yuka; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Takahashi, Sugata

    2015-01-01

    Typical osteomyelitis is reportedly caused by Pseudomonous aeruginosa in elderly diabetic patients after malignant external otitis. Recently, complications have arisen due to the emergence of atypical osteomyelitis. We have experiensed 5 cases of skull base osteomyelitis at our hospital. All patients were male with a mean age of 75.2 years. Four patients had diabetes. Regarding the clinical and radiographic findings, patients 1, 2, and 3 had typical osteomyelitis after malignant external otitis, whereas patients 4 and 5 had atypical osteomyelitis without temporal bone findings. Sample culturing revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 4 cases and Aspergillus in one. Intravenous antibiotics were administered to all patients. Two patients responded positively and survived, while 3 died. Typical osteomyelitis is reportedly caused by P. aeruginosa in elderly diabetic patients after malignant external otitis. Recently, complications have arisen due to the emergence of atypical osteomyelitis. The prognosis of skull base osteomyelitis is still poor in Japan. Early diagnosis and long-term antibiotic administration is required to improve outcome.

  10. Skull Base Inverted Papilloma: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Shafik N.; Batra, Pete S.; Barnett, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Skull base inverted papilloma (IP) is an unusual entity for many neurosurgeons. IP is renowned for its high rate of recurrence, its ability to cause local destruction, and its association with malignancy. This paper is a comprehensive review of the reports, studies, and reviews published in the current biomedical literature from 1947 to September 2010 and synthesize this information to focus on its potential invasion to the base of the skull and possible intradural extension. The objective is to familiarize the clinician with the different aspects of this unusual disease. The role of modern diagnostic tools in medical imaging in order to assess clearly the limits of the tumors and to enhance the efficiency and the safety in the choice of a surgical approach is pointed out. The treatment guidelines for IP have undergone a complex evolution that continues today. Radical excision of the tumour is technically difficult and often incomplete. Successful management of IP requires resection of the affected mucosa which could be achieved with open surgery, endoscopic, or combined approach. Radio and chemotherapy were used for certain indications. More optimally research would be a multicenter randomized trials with large size cohorts. PMID:23346418

  11. Biomechanical assessment of evolutionary changes in the lepidosaurian skull

    PubMed Central

    Moazen, Mehran; Curtis, Neil; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E.; Fagan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The lepidosaurian skull has long been of interest to functional morphologists and evolutionary biologists. Patterns of bone loss and gain, particularly in relation to bars and fenestrae, have led to a variety of hypotheses concerning skull use and kinesis. Of these, one of the most enduring relates to the absence of the lower temporal bar in squamates and the acquisition of streptostyly. We performed a series of computer modeling studies on the skull of Uromastyx hardwickii, an akinetic herbivorous lizard. Multibody dynamic analysis (MDA) was conducted to predict the forces acting on the skull, and the results were transferred to a finite element analysis (FEA) to estimate the pattern of stress distribution. In the FEA, we applied the MDA result to a series of models based on the Uromastyx skull to represent different skull configurations within past and present members of the Lepidosauria. In this comparative study, we found that streptostyly can reduce the joint forces acting on the skull, but loss of the bony attachment between the quadrate and pterygoid decreases skull robusticity. Development of a lower temporal bar apparently provided additional support for an immobile quadrate that could become highly stressed during forceful biting. PMID:19416822

  12. The Development of Skull Prosthesis Through Active Contour Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Cheng, Chen-Yang; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2017-09-09

    Skull defects result in brain infection and inadequate brain protection and pose a general danger to patient health. To avoid these situations and prevent re-injury, a prosthesis must be constructed and grafted onto the deficient region. With the development of rapid customization through additive manufacturing and 3D printing technology, skull prostheses can be fabricated accurately and efficiently prior to cranioplasty. However, an unfitted skull prosthesis made with a metal implant can cause repeated infection, potentially necessitating secondary surgery. This paper presents a method of creating suitably geometric graphics of skull defects to be applied in skull repair through active contour models. These models can be adjusted in each computed tomography slice according to the graphic features, and the curves representing the skull defect can be modeled. The generated graphics can adequately mimic the natural curvature of the complete skull. This method will enable clinical surgeons to rapidly implant customized prostheses, which is of particular importance in emergency surgery. The findings of this research can help surgeons provide patients with skull defects with treatment of the highest quality.

  13. Paleoneurosurgical aspects of Proto-Bulgarian artificial skull deformations.

    PubMed

    Enchev, Yavor; Nedelkov, Grigoriy; Atanassova-Timeva, Nadezhda; Jordanov, Jordan

    2010-12-01

    Paleoneurosurgery represents a comparatively new developing direction of neurosurgery dealing with archaeological skull and spine finds and studying their neurosurgical aspects. Artificial skull deformation, as a bone artifact, naturally has been one of the main paleoneurosurgical research topics. Traditionally, the relevant neurosurgical literature has analyzed in detail the intentional skull deformations in South America's tribes. However, little is known about the artificial skull deformations of the Proto-Bulgarians, and what information exists is mostly due to anthropological studies. The Proto-Bulgarians originated from Central Asia, and distributed their skull deformation ritual on the Balkan Peninsula by their migration and domination. Proto-Bulgarian artificial skull deformation was an erect or oblique form of the anular type, and was achieved by 1 or 2 pressure bandages that were tightened around a newborn's head for a sufficiently long period. The intentional skull deformation in Proto-Bulgarians was not associated with neurological deficits and/or mental retardation. No indirect signs of chronic elevated intracranial pressure were found on the 3D CT reconstruction of the artificially deformed skulls.

  14. Glottic and skull indices in canine brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Forty dogs presented for brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome with laryngeal collapse not over 1st degree (saccule eversion) underwent glottis endoscopic and radiographic skull measurements before surgery. Fifteen Pugs, fifteen French and ten English Bulldogs were included. The goals were prospectively to compare three common brachycephalic breeds for anatomical differences regarding glottis and skull measurements, and to assess if any correlation between glottis and skull measurements was present. Linear measurements were used to obtain glottis and skull indices. Correlations between glottis and skull indices and glottic measurements were evaluated. Finally, glottis indices were compared among the three breeds. Results No correlation was found for glottis and skull indices. The glottic index differed among the three breeds (smaller in Pugs and higher in English Bulldogs), ultimately representing a morphologic indicator of the different larynx shape in the three breeds (more rounded in English Bulldogs, more elliptical in Pugs and in-between in French Bulldogs). Conclusions The lack of correlation between skull/glottic indices does not support skull morphology as predictor of glottic morphology. As Pugs had the lowest glottic index, it may be speculated that Pugs’ original narrow glottic width may predispose to further progressive respiratory deterioration more easily than in the other two breeds. PMID:24410902

  15. Biomechanical assessment of evolutionary changes in the lepidosaurian skull.

    PubMed

    Moazen, Mehran; Curtis, Neil; O'Higgins, Paul; Evans, Susan E; Fagan, Michael J

    2009-05-19

    The lepidosaurian skull has long been of interest to functional morphologists and evolutionary biologists. Patterns of bone loss and gain, particularly in relation to bars and fenestrae, have led to a variety of hypotheses concerning skull use and kinesis. Of these, one of the most enduring relates to the absence of the lower temporal bar in squamates and the acquisition of streptostyly. We performed a series of computer modeling studies on the skull of Uromastyx hardwickii, an akinetic herbivorous lizard. Multibody dynamic analysis (MDA) was conducted to predict the forces acting on the skull, and the results were transferred to a finite element analysis (FEA) to estimate the pattern of stress distribution. In the FEA, we applied the MDA result to a series of models based on the Uromastyx skull to represent different skull configurations within past and present members of the Lepidosauria. In this comparative study, we found that streptostyly can reduce the joint forces acting on the skull, but loss of the bony attachment between the quadrate and pterygoid decreases skull robusticity. Development of a lower temporal bar apparently provided additional support for an immobile quadrate that could become highly stressed during forceful biting.

  16. Glottic and skull indices in canine brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caccamo, Roberta; Buracco, Paolo; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Cantatore, Matteo; Romussi, Stefano

    2014-01-11

    Forty dogs presented for brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome with laryngeal collapse not over 1st degree (saccule eversion) underwent glottis endoscopic and radiographic skull measurements before surgery. Fifteen Pugs, fifteen French and ten English Bulldogs were included. The goals were prospectively to compare three common brachycephalic breeds for anatomical differences regarding glottis and skull measurements, and to assess if any correlation between glottis and skull measurements was present. Linear measurements were used to obtain glottis and skull indices. Correlations between glottis and skull indices and glottic measurements were evaluated. Finally, glottis indices were compared among the three breeds. No correlation was found for glottis and skull indices. The glottic index differed among the three breeds (smaller in Pugs and higher in English Bulldogs), ultimately representing a morphologic indicator of the different larynx shape in the three breeds (more rounded in English Bulldogs, more elliptical in Pugs and in-between in French Bulldogs). The lack of correlation between skull/glottic indices does not support skull morphology as predictor of glottic morphology. As Pugs had the lowest glottic index, it may be speculated that Pugs' original narrow glottic width may predispose to further progressive respiratory deterioration more easily than in the other two breeds.

  17. Brain-skull boundary conditions in a computational deformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Liu, Fenghong; Roberts, David; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith

    2007-03-01

    Brain shift poses a significant challenge to accurate image-guided neurosurgery. To this end, finite element (FE) brain models have been developed to estimate brain motion during these procedures. The significance of the brain-skull boundary conditions (BCs) for accurate predictions in these models has been explored in dynamic impact and inertial rotation injury computational simulations where the results have shown that the brain mechanical response is sensitive to the type of BCs applied. We extend the study of brain-skull BCs to quasi-static brain motion simulations which prevail in neurosurgery. Specifically, a frictionless brain-skull BC using a contact penalty method master-slave paradigm is incorporated into our existing deformation forward model (forced displacement method). The initial brain-skull gap (CSF thickness) is assumed to be 2mm for demonstration purposes. The brain surface nodes are assigned as either fixed (at bottom along the gravity direction), free (at brainstem), with prescribed displacement (at craniotomy) or as slave nodes potentially in contact with the skull (all the remaining). Each slave node is assigned a penalty parameter (β=5) such that when the node penetrates the rigid body skull inner-surface (master surface), a contact force is introduced proportionally to the penetration. Effectively, brain surface nodes are allowed to move towards or away from the cranium wall, but are ultimately restricted from penetrating the skull. We show that this scheme improves the model's ability to represent the brain-skull interface.

  18. Applied anatomy of the anterior cranial fossa: what can fracture patterns tell us?

    PubMed

    Stephens, J R; Holmes, S; Evans, B T

    2016-03-01

    The skull base is uniquely placed to absorb anteriorly directed forces imparted either via the midfacial skeleton or cranial vault. A variety of skull base fracture classifications exist. Less well understood, however, is fracture extension beyond the anterior cranial fossa (ACF) into the middle and posterior cranial fossae. The cases of 81 patients from two UK major trauma centres were studied to examine the distribution of fractures across the skull base and any relationship between the vector of force and extent of skull base injury. It was found that predominantly lateral force to the craniofacial skeleton produced a fracture that propagated beyond the ACF into the middle cranial fossa in 77.4% of cases, significantly more (P<0.001) than for predominantly anterior force (12.0%). Fractures were significantly more likely to propagate into the posterior fossa with a lateral vector of impact compared to an anterior vector (P=0.049). This difference in energy transfer across the skull base may, in part, be explained by the local anatomy. The more delicate central ACF acts as a 'crumple zone' in order to absorb force. Conversely, no collapsible interface exists in the lateral aspect of the ACF, thus the lateral ACF behaves like a 'buttress', resulting in increased energy transfer. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of Bone Graft in Reconstruction of Skull Base Defect

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuhei; Minakawa, Hidehiko; Yoshida, Tetsunori; Igawa, Hiroharu; Sugihara, Tsuneki; Ohura, Takehiko; Nohira, Kunihiko

    1993-01-01

    Ten patients underwent reconstruction of skull base defects between 1989 and 1992. In this series, the maximum size of the skull base defect was 6 × 5 cm. Three patients underwent bone grafts to reinforce the skull base. The postoperative course of seven patients without bone grafts was uneventful. There was no cerebrospinal fluid leakage, meningitis, extradural abscess, on brain herniation. On the other hand, two of the three patients with bone grafts developed extradural abseesses requiring the bone grafts to be removed. Although the number of patients in this series is not large, this study demonstrates that the use of bone grafts in reconstruction of skull base detects could be one of the factors in increasing the chances of infectious complications. We think that a bone graft is not necessary to reconstruct moderate-sized skull base defects. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 2Figure 3Figure 3Figure 4p228-aFigure 4Figure 4 PMID:17170915

  20. [Bone Fractures in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

    PubMed

    Machado, Angela; Rocha, Gustavo; Silva, Ana Isabel; Alegrete, Nuno; Guimarães, Hercília

    2015-01-01

    Fractures during the neonatal period are rare. Some fractures, especially long bones, may occur during birth. Moreover, neonates hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit have an increased risk of fractures for several reasons. To evaluate the incidence and characterize fractures in newborns admitted in a tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A retrospective analysis of the newborns admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with a diagnosis at discharge of one or more bone fractures from January 1996 to June 2013. Eighty neonates had one or more fractures. In 76 (95%) infants the fractures were attributed to birth injury. The most common fracture was the clavicle fracture in 60 (79%) neonates, followed by skull fracture in 6 (8%). In two (2.5%) neonates, extremely low birth weight infants, fractures were interpreted as resulting from osteopenia of prematurity. Both had multiple fractures, and one of them with several ribs. A change in obstetric practices allied to improvement premature neonateâÄôs care contributed to the decreased incidence of fractures in neonatal period. But in premature infants the diagnosis may be underestimated, given the high risk of fracture that these infants present.

  1. Skulls and Human Evolution: The Use of Casts of Anthropoid Skulls in Teaching Concepts of Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipps, John

    1991-01-01

    Proposes the use of a series of 11 casts of fossil skulls as a method of teaching about the theory of human evolution. Students explore the questions of which skulls are "human" and which came first in Homo Sapien development, large brain or upright stance. (MDH)

  2. Skulls and Human Evolution: The Use of Casts of Anthropoid Skulls in Teaching Concepts of Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipps, John

    1991-01-01

    Proposes the use of a series of 11 casts of fossil skulls as a method of teaching about the theory of human evolution. Students explore the questions of which skulls are "human" and which came first in Homo Sapien development, large brain or upright stance. (MDH)

  3. Skull base chordomas: a management challenge.

    PubMed

    al-Mefty, O; Borba, L A

    1997-02-01

    Because of their critical location, invasive nature, and aggressive recurrence, skull base chordomas are challenging and, at times, frustrating tumors to treat. Both radical surgical removal and high-dose radiation therapy, particularly proton beam therapy, reportedly are effective in tumor control and improve survival rates. The authors posit that these tumors are best treated with radical surgery and proton-photon beam therapy. During the last 5 years, they treated 25 patients (15 females and 10 males) who harbored pathologically diagnosed skull base chordomas. The mean age of the patients was 38.4 years (range 8-61 years). Previous surgery or radiation therapy was performed at other institutions in seven and two patients, respectively. The authors performed 33 surgical procedures on 23 patients. Radical removal (defined as absence of residual tumor on operative inspection and postoperative imaging) was achieved in 10 patients; subtotal resection (defined as resection of > 90% of the tumor) was achieved in 11 patients; and partial resection (defined as resection of < 90% of the tumor) was achieved in two patients. Radical surgical removal included not only the excision of soft-tumor tissue, but also extensive drilling of the adjacent bone. Adjuvant therapy consisted of postoperative combined proton-photon beam therapy (given to 17 patients and planned for one patient) and conventional radiation therapy (two patients); three patients received no adjunct therapy. To date, four patients have died. One patient who had undergone previous surgery and sacrifice of the internal carotid artery died postoperatively from a massive stroke; one patient died from adenocarcinoma of the pancreas without evidence of recurrence; and two patients died at 25 and 39 months of recurrent tumor. Permanent neurological complications included third cranial nerve palsy (one patient) and hemianopsia (one patient); radiation necrosis occurred in three patients. Of the 21 patients followed

  4. Pediatric temporal bone fractures: A case series.

    PubMed

    Waissbluth, S; Ywakim, R; Al Qassabi, B; Torabi, B; Carpineta, L; Manoukian, J; Nguyen, L H P

    2016-05-01

    Temporal bone fractures are relatively common findings in patients with head trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of temporal bone fractures in the pediatric population. Retrospective case series. Tertiary care pediatric academic medical center. The medical records of patients aged 18 years or less diagnosed with a temporal bone fracture at the Montreal Children's Hospital from January 2000 to August 2014 were reviewed. Patient demographics, clinical presentation, mechanism of injury and complications were analyzed. Imaging studies and audiograms were also evaluated. Out of 323 patients presenting to the emergency department with a skull fracture, 61 presented with a temporal bone fracture. Of these, 5 presented with bilateral fractures. 47 patients had associated fractures, and 3 patients deceased. We observed a male to female ratio of 2.8:1, and the average age was 9.5 years. Motor vehicle accidents were the primary mechanism of injury (53%), followed by falls (21%) and bicycle or skateboard accidents (10%). The most common presenting signs included hemotympanum, decreased or loss of consciousness, facial swelling and nausea and vomiting. 8 patients had otic involvement on computed tomography scans, and 30 patients had documented hearing loss near the time of accident with a majority being conductive hearing loss. 17 patients underwent surgical management of intracranial pressure. In children, fractures of the temporal bone were most often caused by motor vehicle accidents and falls. It is common for these patients to have associated fractures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characteristics of bone fractures and usefulness of micro-computed tomography for fracture detection in rabbits: 210 cases (2007-2013).

    PubMed

    Sasai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Daisuke; Tagami, Yukari; Seto, Eiko; Denda, Yuki; Hamakita, Hideaki; Ichihashi, Tomonori; Okamura, Kensaku; Furuya, Masaru; Tani, Hiroyuki; Sasai, Kazumi; Yamate, Jyoji

    2015-06-15

    To characterize bone fractures and the usefulness of micro-CT for imaging fractures in pet rabbits. Retrospective case series. 210 client-owned rabbits with bone fractures. Medical records of rabbits evaluated for bone fractures from 2007 through 2013 were examined. Information was collected on signalment and nature of fractures, and radiographic and micro-CT images of fractures were reviewed. Almost half (n = 95 [47.7%]) of fractures were in rabbits < 3 years old. Accidental fall was the most common cause. Vertebral fracture was the most common type of fracture with a nonneoplastic cause (n = 46 [23.2%]) and was most common in the L4-L7 region. The tibia was the most common site for limb fracture among all fractures with a nonneoplastic cause (45 [22.7%]). Twelve (5.7%) fractures had a neoplastic cause, and 7 of these were associated with metastatic uterine adenocarcinoma. Females were significantly more likely to have a fracture caused by neoplasia than were males. Compared with radiography, micro-CT provided more detailed fracture information, particularly for complicated fractures or structures (eg, skull, pelvic, vertebral, and comminuted limb fractures). Findings were useful for understanding the nature of fractures in pet rabbits and supported the use of micro-CT versus radiography for fracture detection and evaluation.

  6. The spectrum of facial fractures in motor vehicle accidents: an MDCT study of 374 patients.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Elina M; Koivikko, Mika P; Koskinen, Seppo K

    2014-04-01

    Road traffic accidents are a major health problem worldwide resulting frequently in maxillofacial injuries. The purpose of the study was to assess the incidence and spectrum of facial fractures in patients involved in a motor vehicle accident (MVA). Using picture archiving and communication system, all requests for suspected facial trauma were retrieved during a 62-month period; 374 met the inclusion criteria. Two researchers interpreted the multidetector computed tomography images by consensus. The motor vehicles involved were divided into two groups: those involving a passenger car or a larger vehicle and those involving a motorized two-wheeler. Furthermore, the motor vehicle accidents were divided into collisions and run-off-road accidents. Of the 374 patients (aged 15-80, mean 34), 271 (72 %) were male and 103 (28 %) female. Of all patients, 262 (70 %) had a facial or skull base fracture; of these, multiple separate fractures were present in 56 %. Nasal fractures were the most common fractures followed by orbital, skull base, and maxillary fractures. Frontal bone, LeFort, and zygomatic arch fractures were always accompanied by other fractures. Fractures were more frequent in the group of collisions compared with run-off-road accidents. In the two-wheeled group, only 15 % did not have facial or skull base fractures. Fractures often occur in multitudes as 39 % of all patients have multiple facial or skull bone fractures, and thus, emergency radiologists should be familiar with the complexity of the injuries. Negative clear sinus sign and low-energy sentinel injuries should be trusted as indications of undetected injuries in MVA victims.

  7. Microvascular free flaps in skull base reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Herr, Marc W; Lin, Derrick T

    2013-01-01

    The anatomical challenges of skull base surgery are well known. Furthermore, ablative and traumatic defects in this region produce complex reconstructive problems with a high risk of significant postoperative morbidity and mortality. Over the past two decades, microvascular free tissue reconstruction following open resection has been shown to improve outcomes and reduce complication rates when compared to the traditional use of pedicled flaps. The increasing use of free tissue transfer has been further strengthened by improved technical expertise and high flap success rates. Since the size and type of free tissue to be utilized must be individualized to each defect, the accomplished reconstructive surgeon should be extremely versatile and, by extension, facile with a several types of free flaps. Thus, four of the most commonly used flaps--the rectus abdominis, radial forearm, latissimus dorsi and anterolateral thigh flaps--are discussed.

  8. Modern induced skull deformity in adults.

    PubMed

    Gump, William

    2010-12-01

    The practice of induced skull deformity has long existed in numerous disparate cultures, but for the first time in history it can be applied to adults. While extremely limited in application, some ideas have persisted in the far fringes of modern Western culture with remarkable tenacity. Practitioners of extreme body modification undergo procedures, outside the sphere of traditional medical practice, to make striking, permanent, nontraditional esthetic tissue distortions with the goal of transgressing societal norms. The International Trepanation Advocacy Group represents another example of a fringe cultural movement, whose goal, rather than being purely aesthetic in nature, is to promote elective trepanation as a method for achieving a heightened level of consciousness. Both movements have relatively short and well-defined histories. Despite their tiny numbers of adherents, neurosurgeons may be called on to address relevant patient concerns preprocedurally, or complications postprocedurally, and would benefit from awareness of these peculiar subcultures.

  9. Osteomyelitis of the base of the skull

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, J.R.; Grobman, L.; Quencer, R.; Serafini, A.

    1986-03-01

    Infection in the marrow of the temporal, occipital, and sphenoid bones is an uncommon, but increasing occurrence. It is usually secondary to infections beginning in the external auditory canal and is caused almost uniformly by the gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. Technetium and gallium scintigraphy help in the early detection of such infections while CT scans demonstrate dissolution of bone in well-developed cases. Headache is the predominant symptom. Dysphagia, hoarseness, and aspiration herald the inevitable march of cranial nerves. We have diagnosed and treated 17 cases of osteomyelitis of the skull base. Although the total mortality rate is 53%, it is now a curable disease. Six of our last 8 patients remain alive, although 1 is still under treatment. Treatment is medical and requires the long-term concomitant intravenous administration of an aminoglycoside and a broad spectrum semisynthetic penicillin effective against the causative organism.

  10. Examination of life-threatening injuries in 431 pediatric facial fractures at a level 1 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Ian C; Kordahi, Anthony M; Paik, Angie M; Lee, Edward S; Granick, Mark S

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric facial fractures represent a challenge in management due to the unique nature of the growing facial skeleton. Oftentimes, more conservative measures are favored to avoid rigid internal fixation and disruption of blood supply to the bone and soft tissues. In addition, the great force required to fracture bones of the facial skeleton often produces concomitant injuries that present a management priority. The purpose of this study was to examine a level 1 trauma center's experience with pediatric facial trauma resulting in fractures of the underlying skeleton with regards to epidemiology and concomitant injuries. A retrospective review of all facial fractures at a level 1 trauma center in an urban environment was performed for the years 2000 to 2012. Patients aged 18 years or younger were included. Patient demographics were collected, as well as location of fractures, concomitant injuries, and surgical management strategies. A significance value of 5% was used. During this period, there were 3147 facial fractures treated at our institution, 353 of which were pediatric patients. Upon further review, 68 patients were excluded because of insufficient data for analysis, leaving 285 patients for review. The mean age of patients was 14.2 years with a male predominance (77.9%). The mechanism of injury was assault in 108 (37.9%), motor vehicle accident in 68 (23.9%), pedestrian struck in 41 (14.4%), fall in 26 (9.1%), sporting accident in 20 (7.0%), and gunshot injury in 16 (5.6%). The mean Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on arrival to the emergency department was 13.7. The most common fractures were those of the mandible (29.0%), orbit (26.5%), nasal bone (14.4%), zygoma (7.7%), and frontal bone/frontal sinus (7.5%). Intracranial hemorrhage was present in 70 patients (24.6%). A skull fracture was present in 50 patients (17.5%). A long bone fracture was present in 36 patients (12.6%). A pelvic or thoracic fracture was present in 30 patients (10.5%). A cervical spine

  11. [Children with minor head injury in the emergency department: Is skull radiography necessary for children under 2 years?].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Santanach, David; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; González Forster, Elisa; Luaces Cubells, Carles

    2014-01-01

    Current guidelines on the management of mild head trauma (traumatic brain injury/TBI) do not include the presence of a skull fracture in determining the risk of intracranial injury. However, in our setting cranial radiography is still performed frequently to rule out the presence of skull fracture. To estimate the prevalence of clinically-important traumatic brain injuries (ciTBI) in children younger than two years of age with mild TBI. Descriptive observational study. All children attended in emergency department with mild TBI (Glasgow ≥14 points) for a year were included. We defined ciTBI as intracranial injuries that caused death or required neurosurgery, intubation for more than 24 hours, inotropic drugs or mechanical ventilation. The study included 854 children, of which 457 (53.5%) were male. The median patient age was 11.0 months (P25-75: 7.5-17.0 months). In 741 cases (86.8%) the mechanism of TBI was a fall. In 438 cases (51.3%) skull radiography was performed. Eleven children (1.3%) had intracranial injury, but none met the criteria for ciTBI (estimated prevalence of ciTBI was 0%; CI 95%: 0%-0.4%). Children younger than two years of age with mild TBI have low prevalence of ciTBI. Consequently, it is possible to monitor children younger than two years with a TBI without performing skull radiography. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Histopathology of idiopathic lateral skull base defects.

    PubMed

    Remenschneider, Aaron K; Kozin, Elliott D; Curtin, Hugh; Santos, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to utilize techniques of otopathology to gain insight into the pathogenesis, sites of origin, and associated findings in idiopathic lateral skull base defects. Histopathologic analysis of temporal bones from an otopathology repository. Specimens from a human temporal bone repository were investigated for clinical or otopathologic evidence of occult bony dehiscence indicating communication between the subarachnoid space and air cells of the temporal bone. Specimens were examined by light microscopy, organized by fistula site, and histopathologically described. Premortem patient demographics and clinical history was reviewed. Specimens from 52 individuals met inclusion criteria. Three distinct fistula pathways were determined: transdural, labyrinthine, and perilabyrinthine. Transdural fistulae occur most commonly as the result of arachnoid granulations along the middle or posterior fossa dura (n = 30) and are frequently incidental findings in specimens of older individuals (median age at death: 81 years). Labyrinthine fistulae (n = 10) were noted with cochlear malformations when modiolar atresia permits cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow into a common intracochlear scala and oval window perilymphatic fistula results. Perilabyrinthine fistulae (n = 7) were observed through three congenitally unfused tracts: the tympanomeningeal fissure, the petromastoid canal, or an extension of the subarachnoid space into the fallopian canal. Idiopathic lateral skull base defects occur in three distinct anatomic locations with consistent histopathologic findings. In the absence of clear radiographic localization, patient age and associated cochlear defects may assist in the determination of the site of CSF leak. These data have implications for surgical approaches of CSF fistula repair. NA © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. History of endonasal skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Amy J; Zaidi, Hasan A; Laws, Edward D

    2016-12-01

    While the endonasal approach to the skull base continues to advance, this paper invokes its long history. The centuries of medieval neuroanatomy and early neurosurgery enabled the conception of the first transfacial approaches in the late 1800s; Henry Schloffer performed the first transsphenoidal surgery in 1907. Although the procedure was initially met with much interest, Harvey Cushing eventually led the field of neurosurgery to abandon the transsphenoidal approach in the 1920s. The following three generations of neurosurgeons contained several key figures including Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy who were steadfast in preserving the technique as well as in addressing its shortcomings. The endoscopic approach developed simultaneously, and advances in magnifying and fiberoptics further resolved limitations previously inherent to the transsphenoidal approach. At last, in the 1960s, the transsphenoidal approach entered its renaissance. Today, the momentum of its development persists in the endoscopic endonasal approach, which has recently expanded the indications for transsphenoidal surgery across the skull base, far beyond its original jurisdiction of the sella. Continued progress must not take for granted the rich history of the transsphenoidal approach, which was developed over centuries by surgeons around the world. The authors present the evolution of modern endonasal surgery as a dynamic interplay between technology, medicine, and surgery over the past 100 years. Progress can be attributed to courageous surgeons who affirmed their contemporary practices despite gaps in technology or medicine, and to visionary individuals who produced and incorporated new elements into transsphenoidal surgery. And so while the new endoscopic technique brings forth new challenges, its development reaffirms the principles laid down by the pioneers of transsphenoidal surgery.

  14. Frontal Sinus Fractures: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Strong, E. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Frontal sinus injuries may range from isolated anterior table fractures resulting in a simple aesthetic deformity to complex fractures involving the frontal recess, orbits, skull base, and intracranial contents. The risk of long-term morbidity can be significant. Optimal treatment strategies for the management of frontal sinus fractures remain controversial. However, it is critical to have a thorough understanding of frontal sinus anatomy as well as the current treatment strategies used to manage these injuries. A thorough physical exam and thin-cut, multiplanar (axial, coronal, and sagittal) computed tomography scan should be performed in all patients suspected of having a frontal sinus fracture. The most appropriate treatment strategy can be determined by assessing five anatomic parameters including the: frontal recess, anterior table integrity, posterior table integrity, dural integrity, and presence of a cerebrospinal fluid leak. A well thought out management strategy and meticulous surgical techniques are critical to success. The primary surgical goal is to provide a safe sinus while minimizing patient morbidity. This article offers an anatomically based treatment algorithm for the management of frontal sinus fractures and highlights the key steps to surgical repair. PMID:22110810

  15. The transnasal approach to the skull base. From sinus surgery to skull base surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wagenmann, Martin; Schipper, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The indications for endonasal endoscopic approaches to diseases of the skull base and its adjacent structures have expanded considerably during the last decades. This is not only due to improved technical possibilities such as intraoperative navigation, the development of specialized instruments, and the compilation of anatomical studies from the endoscopic perspective but also related to the accumulating experience with endoscopic procedures of the skull base by multidisciplinary centers. Endoscopic endonasal operations permit new approaches to deeply seated lesions and are characterized by a reduced manipulation of neurovascular structures and brain parenchyma while at the same time providing improved visualization. They reduce the trauma caused by the approach, avoid skin incisions and minimize the surgical morbidity. Transnasal endoscopic procedures for the closure of small and large skull base defects have proven to be reliable and more successful than operations with craniotomies. The development of new local and regional vascularized flaps like the Hadad-flap have contributed to this. These reconstructive techniques are furthermore effectively utilized in tumor surgery in this region. This review delineates the classification of expanded endonasal approaches in detail. They provide access to lesions of the anterior, middle and partly also to the posterior cranial fossa. Successful management of these complex procedures requires a close interdisciplinary collaboration as well as continuous education and training of all team members. PMID:22558058

  16. Prevalence of dehiscences and fenestrations in modern American skulls.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, R D; Horning, G M; Nicoll, B K; Cohen, M E

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence, distribution, and features of alveolar dehiscences and fenestrations in modern American skulls and correlate their presence with occlusal attrition, root prominence, and alveolar bone thickness. A representative sample of 146 dentate modern American skulls from a collection at the National Museum of Natural History were examined. The skulls were from subjects ranging in age from 17 to 87 years old (mean 49.1 years). The mean number of teeth per skull was 22.7 and the mean number of either dehiscence or fenestration defects per skull was 3.0. Of the 3,315 individual teeth examined, 4.1% (135) had dehiscences and 9.0% (298) had fenestrations. A dehiscence was present in 40.4% of the skulls, and a fenestration was present in 61.6% of skulls. Mandibular canines were most often affected by dehiscences (12.9%), while maxillary first molars were most often affected by fenestrations (37.0%). Sixty-seven percent of dehiscences were found in the mandible, and 58% of fenestrations were found in the maxilla. The presence of dehiscences and fenestrations were positively correlated with thin alveolar bone and negatively correlated with occlusal attrition. African-American males and Caucasian females were significantly more likely to have dehiscences, while African-American females were significantly more likely to have fenestrations.

  17. Geologic map of the Skull Creek Quadrangle, Moffat County Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Loenen, R. E.; Selner, Gary; Bryant, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Skull Creek quadrangle is in northwestern Colorado a few miles north of Rangely. The prominent structural feature of the Skull Creek quadrangle is the Skull Creek monocline. Pennsylvanian rocks are exposed along the axis of the monocline while hogbacks along its southern flank expose rocks that are from Permian to Upper Cretaceous in age. The Wolf Creek monocline and the Wolf Creek thrust fault, which dissects the monocline, are salient structural features in the northern part of the quadrangle. Little or no mineral potential exists within the quadrangle. A geologic map of the Lazy Y Point quadrangle, which is adjacent to the Skull Creek quadrangle on the west, is also available (Geologic Investigations Series I-2646). This companian map shows similar geologic features, including the western half of the Skull Creek monocline. The geology of this quadrangle was mapped because of its proximity to Dinosaur National Monument. It is adjacent to quadrangles previously mapped to display the geology of this very scenic and popular National Monument. The Skull Creek quadrangle includes parts of the Skull Creek Wilderness Study Area, which was assessed for its mineral resource potential.

  18. Skull invaders: when surgical pathology and neuropathology worlds collide.

    PubMed

    Serracino, Hilary S; Kleinschmidt-Demasters, B K

    2013-07-01

    Skull and dura serve as effective barriers to penetration by most tumors, often preventing masses originating intracranially from extending into the contiguous bone and soft tissues, or those arising in head and neck regions from extending into the dura and brain tissue. We review our 15-year experience with extracranial tumors that had sufficiently invaded adjacent skull, dura, or brain from the "outside-in" to require a neurosurgeon to participate in the surgical resection and discuss our 40 cases in context with the literature. Sinonasal-origin tumors (n = 17) and cutaneous tumors (n = 10) were the most frequent skull-invaders. Most of the cutaneous tumor types were squamous cellcarcinomas (n = 9); diverse sinonasal-origin types included 4 squamous cell carcinomas, 4 adenoid cystic carcinomas, 2 sinonasal undifferentiated carcinomas, 2 sinonasal adenocarcinomas, and single examples each of sinonasal-origin hemangiopericytoma, solitary fibrous tumor, melanoma, mucocele, and teratocarcinoma. There were 9olfactory neuroblastomas, and middle ear-origin basal cell carcinoma,recurrent glomus jugulare, and orbital malignant hidradenoma were also seen. Unique tumors included a cutaneous cylindroma invasive of skull convexity occurring in familial cylindromatosis and a ganglioneuroma of the middle ear with massive bilateral skull base extension. Convexity dural spread, a seldom-reported pattern of dissemination, was seen in 1 olfactory neuroblastoma and 1 adenoid cystic carcinoma. The ability to show skull/dural invasion did not correlate with specific histopathologic features; even benign tumor types can show skull/dural penetration.

  19. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Claudia F.E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Over the past 20 years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has advanced due to new techniques involving increased magnetic field strength and developments in coils and pulse sequences. These advances allow increased opportunity to delineate the complex skull base anatomy and may guide the diagnosis and treatment of the myriad of pathologies that can affect the skull base. Objectives The objective of this article is to provide a brief background of the development of MRI and illustrate advances in skull base imaging, including techniques that allow improved conspicuity, characterization, and correlative physiologic assessment of skull base pathologies. Data Synthesis Specific radiographic illustrations of increased skull base conspicuity including the lower cranial nerves, vessels, foramina, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, and effacement of endolymph are provided. In addition, MRIs demonstrating characterization of skull base lesions, such as recurrent cholesteatoma versus granulation tissue or abscess versus tumor, are also provided as well as correlative clinical findings in CSF flow studies in a patient pre- and post-suboccipital decompression for a Chiari I malformation. Conclusions This article illustrates MRI radiographic advances over the past 20 years, which have improved clinicians' ability to diagnose, define, and hopefully improve the treatment and outcomes of patients with underlying skull base pathologies. PMID:25992137

  20. Transnasal endoscopic repair of posterior table fractures.

    PubMed

    Chaaban, Mohamad R; Conger, Bryant; Riley, Kristen O; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2012-12-01

    Conventional treatment of frontal sinus posterior table fractures has included osteoplastic flap or cranialization procedures despite considerable advances in endoscopic technique and experience. The objective of the current study was to evaluate outcomes of frontal sinus fractures involving the posterior table managed using endoscopic approaches. Prospective cohort. Tertiary care, academic university hospital. Prospective evaluation of patients with posterior table fractures was performed. Data were collected regarding demographics, etiology, technique, operative site, length involving the posterior table, size of the skull base defect, complications, and clinical follow-up. Thirteen patients (average age 37 years) with posterior table fractures were treated using endoscopic techniques from 2008 to 2012. Mean follow-up time was 68 weeks (range, 2-206 weeks). Patients were primarily managed using Draf IIb frontal sinusotomies with 1 individual requiring a concomitant trephine. A Draf III procedure was performed in 1 patient. Average fracture defect (length vs width) was 13 × 4.5 mm, and average length involving the posterior table was 9.7 mm (1-30 mm). Skull base defects were covered with a septal flap and/or free tissue grafts. Although 1 individual required a revision frontal sinusotomy and follow-up was short in several patients, all sinuses remained patent on last clinical examination. Management of frontal sinus posterior table fractures using minimally invasive endoscopic techniques provides excellent outcomes in selected cases. Fractures of up to 30 mm in length were adequately managed in this series and indicate this approach can be a viable alternative in the treatment of these fractures.

  1. Development of a neonatal skull phantom for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolian, Pantea; Todd, Rhiannon; Kosik, Ivan; Chamson-Reig, Astrid; Vasefi, Fartash; St. Lawrence, Keith; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for the diagnosis and monitoring of disorders in the neonatal brain. However, PAI of the brain through the intact skull is challenging due to reflection and attenuation of photoacoustic pressure waves by the skull bone. The objective of this work was to develop a phantom for testing the potential limits the skull bone places on PAI of the neonatal brain. Our approach was to make acoustic measurements on materials designed to mimic the neonatal skull bone and construct a semi-realistic phantom. A water tank and two ultrasound transducers were utilized to measure the ultrasound insertion loss (100 kHz to 5MHz) of several materials. Cured mixtures of epoxy and titanium dioxide powder provided the closest acoustic match to neonatal skull bone. Specifically, a 1.4-mm thick sample composed of 50% (by mass) titanium dioxide powder and 50% epoxy was closest to neonatal skull bone in terms of acoustic insertion loss. A hemispherical skull phantom (1.4 mm skull thickness) was made by curing the epoxy/titanium dioxide powder mixture inside a mold. The mold was constructed using 3D prototyping techniques and was based on the hairless head of a realistic infant doll. The head was scanned to generate a 3D model, which in turn was used to build a 3D CAD version of the mold. The mold was CNC machined from two solid blocks of Teflon®. The neonatal skull phantom will enable the study of the propagation of photoacoustic pressure waves under a variety of experimental conditions.

  2. Influence of skull modeling approaches on EEG source localization.

    PubMed

    Montes-Restrepo, Victoria; van Mierlo, Pieter; Strobbe, Gregor; Staelens, Steven; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Hallez, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalographic source localization (ESL) relies on an accurate model representing the human head for the computation of the forward solution. In this head model, the skull is of utmost importance due to its complex geometry and low conductivity compared to the other tissues inside the head. We investigated the influence of using different skull modeling approaches on ESL. These approaches, consisting in skull conductivity and geometry modeling simplifications, make use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images to generate seven different head models. A head model with an accurately segmented skull from CT images, including spongy and compact bone compartments as well as some air-filled cavities, was used as the reference model. EEG simulations were performed for a configuration of 32 and 128 electrodes, and for both noiseless and noisy data. The results show that skull geometry simplifications have a larger effect on ESL than those of the conductivity modeling. This suggests that accurate skull modeling is important in order to achieve reliable results for ESL that are useful in a clinical environment. We recommend the following guidelines to be taken into account for skull modeling in the generation of subject-specific head models: (i) If CT images are available, i.e., if the geometry of the skull and its different tissue types can be accurately segmented, the conductivity should be modeled as isotropic heterogeneous. The spongy bone might be segmented as an erosion of the compact bone; (ii) when only MR images are available, the skull base should be represented as accurately as possible and the conductivity can be modeled as isotropic heterogeneous, segmenting the spongy bone directly from the MR image; (iii) a large number of EEG electrodes should be used to obtain high spatial sampling, which reduces the localization errors at realistic noise levels.

  3. Hand in glove: brain and skull in development and dysmorphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Richtsmeier, Joan T; Flaherty, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    The brain originates relatively early in development from differentiated ectoderm that forms a hollow tube and takes on an exceedingly complex shape with development. The skull is made up of individual bony elements that form from neural crest- and mesoderm-derived mesenchyme that unite to provide support and protection for soft tissues and spaces of the head. The meninges provide a protective and permeable membrane between brain and skull. Across evolutionary and developmental time, dynamic changes in brain and skull shape track one another so that their integration is evidenced in two structures that fit soundly regardless of changes in biomechanical and physiologic functions. Evidence for this tight correspondence is also seen in diseases of the craniofacial complex that are often classified as diseases of the skull (e.g., craniosynostosis) or diseases of the brain (e.g., holoprosencephaly) even when both tissues are affected. Our review suggests a model that links brain and skull morphogenesis through coordinated integration of signaling pathways (e.g., FGF, TGFβ, Wnt) via processes that are not currently understood, perhaps involving the meninges. Differences in the earliest signaling of biological structure establish divergent designs that will be enhanced during morphogenesis. Signaling systems that pattern the developing brain are also active in patterning required for growth and assembly of the skull and some members of these signaling families have been indicated as causal for craniofacial diseases. Because cells of early brain and skull are sensitive to similar signaling families, variation in the strength or timing of signals or shifts in patterning boundaries that affect one system (neural or skull) could also affect the other system and appropriate co-adjustments in development would be made. Interactions of these signaling systems and of the tissues that they pattern are fundamental to the consistent but labile functional and structural association

  4. New Insights into the Skull of Istiodactylus latidens (Ornithocheiroidea, Pterodactyloidea)

    PubMed Central

    Witton, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    The skull of the Cretaceous pterosaur Istiodactylus latidens, a historically important species best known for its broad muzzle of interlocking, lancet-shaped teeth, is almost completely known from the broken remains of several individuals, but the length of its jaws remains elusive. Estimates of I. latidens jaw length have been exclusively based on the incomplete skull of NHMUK R3877 and, perhaps erroneously, reconstructed by assuming continuation of its broken skull pieces as preserved in situ. Here, an overlooked jaw fragment of NHMUK R3877 is redescribed and used to revise the skull reconstruction of I. latidens. The new reconstruction suggests a much shorter skull than previously supposed, along with a relatively tall orbital region and proportionally slender maxilla, a feature documented in the early 20th century but ignored by all skull reconstructions of this species. These features indicate that the skull of I. latidens is particularly distinctive amongst istiodactylids and suggests greater disparity between I. latidens and I. sinensis than previously appreciated. A cladistic analysis of istiodactylid pterosaurs incorporating new predicted I. latidens skull metrics suggests Istiodactylidae is constrained to five species (Liaoxipterus brachyognathus, Lonchengpterus zhoai, Nurhachius ignaciobritoi, Istiodactylus latidens and Istiodactylus sinensis) defined by their distinctive dentition, but excludes the putative istiodactylids Haopterus gracilis and Hongshanopterus lacustris. Istiodactylus latidens, I. sinensis and Li. brachyognathus form an unresolved clade of derived istiodactylids, and the similarity of comparable remains of I. sinensis and Li. brachyognathus suggest further work into their taxonomy and classification is required. The new skull model of I. latidens agrees with the scavenging habits proposed for these pterosaurs, with much of their cranial anatomy converging on that of habitually scavenging birds. PMID:22470442

  5. New insights into the skull of Istiodactylus latidens (Ornithocheiroidea, Pterodactyloidea).

    PubMed

    Witton, Mark P

    2012-01-01

    The skull of the Cretaceous pterosaur Istiodactylus latidens, a historically important species best known for its broad muzzle of interlocking, lancet-shaped teeth, is almost completely known from the broken remains of several individuals, but the length of its jaws remains elusive. Estimates of I. latidens jaw length have been exclusively based on the incomplete skull of NHMUK R3877 and, perhaps erroneously, reconstructed by assuming continuation of its broken skull pieces as preserved in situ. Here, an overlooked jaw fragment of NHMUK R3877 is redescribed and used to revise the skull reconstruction of I. latidens. The new reconstruction suggests a much shorter skull than previously supposed, along with a relatively tall orbital region and proportionally slender maxilla, a feature documented in the early 20(th) century but ignored by all skull reconstructions of this species. These features indicate that the skull of I. latidens is particularly distinctive amongst istiodactylids and suggests greater disparity between I. latidens and I. sinensis than previously appreciated. A cladistic analysis of istiodactylid pterosaurs incorporating new predicted I. latidens skull metrics suggests Istiodactylidae is constrained to five species (Liaoxipterus brachyognathus, Lonchengpterus zhoai, Nurhachius ignaciobritoi, Istiodactylus latidens and Istiodactylus sinensis) defined by their distinctive dentition, but excludes the putative istiodactylids Haopterus gracilis and Hongshanopterus lacustris. Istiodactylus latidens, I. sinensis and Li. brachyognathus form an unresolved clade of derived istiodactylids, and the similarity of comparable remains of I. sinensis and Li. brachyognathus suggest further work into their taxonomy and classification is required. The new skull model of I. latidens agrees with the scavenging habits proposed for these pterosaurs, with much of their cranial anatomy converging on that of habitually scavenging birds.

  6. Hand in glove: brain and skull in development and dysmorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The brain originates relatively early in development from differentiated ectoderm that forms a hollow tube and takes on an exceedingly complex shape with development. The skull is made up of individual bony elements that form from neural crest- and mesoderm-derived mesenchyme that unite to provide support and protection for soft tissues and spaces of the head. The meninges provide a protective and permeable membrane between brain and skull. Across evolutionary and developmental time, dynamic changes in brain and skull shape track one another so that their integration is evidenced in two structures that fit soundly regardless of changes in biomechanical and physiologic functions. Evidence for this tight correspondence is also seen in diseases of the craniofacial complex that are often classified as diseases of the skull (e.g., craniosynostosis) or diseases of the brain (e.g., holoprosencephaly) even when both tissues are affected. Our review suggests a model that links brain and skull morphogenesis through coordinated integration of signaling pathways (e.g., FGF, TGFβ, Wnt) via processes that are not currently understood, perhaps involving the meninges. Differences in the earliest signaling of biological structure establish divergent designs that will be enhanced during morphogenesis. Signaling systems that pattern the developing brain are also active in patterning required for growth and assembly of the skull and some members of these signaling families have been indicated as causal for craniofacial diseases. Because cells of early brain and skull are sensitive to similar signaling families, variation in the strength or timing of signals or shifts in patterning boundaries that affect one system (neural or skull) could also affect the other system and appropriate co-adjustments in development would be made. Interactions of these signaling systems and of the tissues that they pattern are fundamental to the consistent but labile functional and structural association

  7. Chordoma of skull base presenting as nasopharyngeal mass

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Sant Prakash; Batra, Ashima; Singh, Gajender; Kumar, Sanjay; Sen, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    While the nasopharynx is most commonly regarded by the otolaryngologist as a primary site of neoplastic involvement, it is also an avenue of spread of base-of-the-skull tumors presenting as bulging nasopharyngeal masses. Chordoma is a relatively rare tumor of the skull base and sacrum thought to originate from embryonic remnants of the notochord. Chordomas arising from the skull base/clivus are typically locally aggressive with lytic bone destruction. The optimal treatment may be photon/proton radiotherapy alone or combined with a gross total resection, when feasible. We report a case of intracranial chordoma presenting as nasopharyngeal mass. PMID:24174811

  8. Image fusion for skull base neuronavigation. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Sure, Ulrich; Benes, Ludwig; Riegel, Thomas; Schulte, Dirk Michael; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2002-10-01

    An automatic image fusion module (BrainLab, Munich, Germany) is used for the fusion of the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) data sets. The procedure of image fusion takes 5 minutes prior to surgery. The image fusion of CT and MR imaging data visualizes the skull base and tumor margins clearly. Color display of the different data sets allows the tumor and the skull base to be distinguished easily. The fused CT data in bone window mode provides useful additional information on the osseous skull base.

  9. A case of bilateral lower cranial nerve palsies after base of skull trauma with complex management issues: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Alexander Christoph; Lettieri, Jennie; Grimley, Rohan

    2012-05-01

    Fractures of the skull base can cause lower cranial nerve palsies because of involvement of the nerves as they traverse the skull. A variety of syndromes have been described, often involving multiple nerves. These are most commonly unilateral, and only a handful of cases of bilateral cranial nerve involvement have been reported. We describe a 64-year-old man with occipital condylar fracture complicated by bilateral palsies of IX and X nerves associated with dramatic physiological derangement causing severe management challenges. Apart from debilitating postural hypotension, he developed dysphagia, severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, issues with airway protection as well as airway obstruction, increased oropharyngeal secretions and variable respiratory control. This is the first report of a patient with traumatic bilateral cranial nerve IX and X nerve palsies. This detailed report and the summary of all 6 previous case reports of traumatic bilateral lower cranial nerve palsies illustrate clinical features, treatment strategies, and outcomes of these rare events.

  10. Observation of skull-guided acoustic waves in a water-immersed murine skull using optoacoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The skull bone, a curved solid multilayered plate protecting the brain, constitutes a big challenge for the use of ultrasound-mediated techniques in neuroscience. Ultrasound waves incident from water or soft biological tissue are mostly reflected when impinging on the skull. To this end, skull properties have been characterized for both high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) operating in the narrowband far-field regime and optoacoustic imaging applications. Yet, no study has been conducted to characterize the near-field of water immersed skulls. We used the thermoelastic effect with a 532 nm pulsed laser to trigger a wide range of broad-band ultrasound modes in a mouse skull. In order to capture the waves propagating in the near-field, a thin hydrophone was scanned in close proximity to the skull's surface. While Leaky pseudo-Lamb waves and grazing-angle bulk water waves are clearly visible in the spatio-temporal data, we were only able to identify skull-guided acoustic waves after dispersion analysis in the wavenumber-frequency space. The experimental data was found to be in a reasonable agreement with a flat multilayered plate model.

  11. [Atlas fractures].

    PubMed

    Schären, S; Jeanneret, B

    1999-05-01

    Fractures of the atlas account for 1-2% of all vertebral fractures. We divide atlas fractures into 5 groups: isolated fractures of the anterior arch of the atlas, isolated fractures of the posterior arch, combined fractures of the anterior and posterior arch (so-called Jefferson fractures), isolated fractures of the lateral mass and fractures of the transverse process. Isolated fractures of the anterior or posterior arch are benign and are treated conservatively with a soft collar until the neck pain has disappeared. Jefferson fractures are divided into stable and unstable fracture depending on the integrity of the transverse ligament. Stable Jefferson fractures are treated conservatively with good outcome while unstable Jefferson fractures are probably best treated operatively with a posterior atlanto-axial or occipito-axial stabilization and fusion. The authors preferred treatment modality is the immediate open reduction of the dislocated lateral masses combined with a stabilization in the reduced position using a transarticular screw fixation C1/C2 according to Magerl. This has the advantage of saving the atlanto-occipital joints and offering an immediate stability which makes immobilization in an halo or Minerva cast superfluous. In late instabilities C1/2 with incongruency of the lateral masses occurring after primary conservative treatment, an occipito-cervical fusion is indicated. Isolated fractures of the lateral masses are very rare and may, if the lateral mass is totally destroyed, be a reason for an occipito-cervical fusion. Fractures of the transverse processes may be the cause for a thrombosis of the vertebral artery. No treatment is necessary for the fracture itself.

  12. Solitary skull metastasis as initial manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yu Shik; Ahn, Jung Yong; Cho, Jun Hyung; Lee, Kyu Sung

    2008-06-21

    A solitary skull metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) prior to diagnosis of the primary tumor without liver dysfunction is a very rare event. A 71-year-old male, without known liver disease, presented to our institution with a palpable occipital scalp mass. On brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a highly enhanced and osteolytic skull tumor was observed. The histological diagnosis obtained from the percutaneous needle biopsy was a cranial metastasis from HCC. The metastatic tumor was removed via occipital craniectomy, and the two primary liver mass lesions were subsequently treated by transarterial chemoembolization. An isolated skull metastasis may be the sole initial presentation of HCC. Early diagnosis is essential in order to treat the primary disease. A skull metastasis from HCC should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with subcutaneous scalp mass and osteolytic defects on X-ray.

  13. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments.

  14. Treatment of dysphagia and dysphonia following skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Peterson, K Linnea; Fenn, Joanne

    2005-08-01

    This article provides an overview of considerations in the evaluation and treatment of lower cranial nerve deficits, specifically in cranial nerves IX, X, and XII, in the context of skull base tumors and their treatment.

  15. Eosinophilic granuloma - x-ray of the skull (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... x-ray of the skull shows an eosinophilic granuloma (a lesion made-up of a type of ... This condition can range from a single eosinophilic granuloma to massive infiltration of skin, bone, and body ...

  16. Paul Broca's search for Basque skulls: The full story.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Roldán, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Paul Broca surmised that the short and broad-brachycephalic-skulls of the earliest European settlers had become longer and narrower-dolichocephalic-in modern populations due to the blending of different races. Swedish anatomist Anders Retzius had two brachycephalic skulls said to be from contemporary Basque individuals, a claim suited to test Broca's hypothesis. Broca worked with fellow anatomist and surgeon Pedro González Velasco, the founding father of Spanish anthropology, to gather a large number of Basque skulls. In its time, this was the most fascinating collection owned by the Anthropological Society of Paris. This article explains how Broca and Velasco were able to gather such a sizeable array of specimens, which they had collected at a location known at first by the code name of "Z." Although Broca finally concluded that the origin of the Retzius skulls could not be determined, his research was to spark anthropologists' interest in the language and origins of the Basque people.

  17. A dynamic skull model for simulation of cerebral cortex folding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanbo; Guo, Lei; Nie, Jingxin; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Liu, Tianming

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of human cerebral cortex folding and their interactions during brain development are largely unknown, partly due to the difficulties in biological experiments and data acquisition for the developing fetus brain. Computational modeling and simulation provide a novel approach to the understanding of cortex folding processes in normal or aberrant neurodevelopment. Based on our recently developed computational model of the cerebral cortex folding using neuronal growth model and mechanical skull constraint, this paper presents a computational dynamic model of the brain skull that regulates the cortical folding simulation. Our simulation results show that the dynamic skull model is more biologically realistic and significantly improves our cortical folding simulation results. This work provides further computational support to the hypothesis that skull is an important regulator of cortical folding.

  18. Minimally invasive surgery of the anterior skull base: transorbital approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, Holger G.; Schwan, Franziska; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive approaches are becoming increasingly popular to access the anterior skull base. With interdisciplinary cooperation, in particular endonasal endoscopic approaches have seen an impressive expansion of indications over the past decades. The more recently described transorbital approaches represent minimally invasive alternatives with a differing spectrum of access corridors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss transorbital approaches to the anterior skull base in the light of the current literature. The transorbital approaches allow excellent exposure of areas that are difficult to reach like the anterior and posterior wall of the frontal sinus; working angles may be more favorable and the paranasal sinus system can be preserved while exposing the skull base. Because of their minimal morbidity and the cosmetically excellent results, the transorbital approaches represent an important addition to established endonasal endoscopic and open approaches to the anterior skull base. Their execution requires an interdisciplinary team approach. PMID:27453759

  19. The mechanism of fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    In this book eighty-five papers look at fractures. Topics covered are fracture mechanics, fracture mechanisms, evaluating fracture resistance, fracture toughness, predicting crack growth, surface cracking, crack initiation and propagation, weld fractures, engineering applications of fracture mechanics, fracture and failure in nonmetallic materials, dynamic fractures, test techniques, radiation embrittlement, applications of fracture mechanics, design concepts, and creep.

  20. Pediatric Orbital Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Monson, Laura A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    It is wise to recall the dictum “children are not small adults” when managing pediatric orbital fractures. In a child, the craniofacial skeleton undergoes significant changes in size, shape, and proportion as it grows into maturity. Accordingly, the craniomaxillofacial surgeon must select an appropriate treatment strategy that considers both the nature of the injury and the child's stage of growth. The following review will discuss the management of pediatric orbital fractures, with an emphasis on clinically oriented anatomy and development. PMID:24436730

  1. [Osteological case study to narrow the timing of postmortem trauma to a skull].

    PubMed

    Verhoff, Marcel A; Durschnabel, Melanie; Kreutz, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    In the course of an exhumation performed 5.5 years after death, several bone fragments were uncovered during the excavation of the clay-rich soil. Amongst others, there was a large piece of the frontal neurocranium. In addition, a so-called coffin stain was discernible. The exhumed coffin was intact. The forensic autopsy revealed a complete corpse with distinct adipocere formation. Consultation with the cemetery administration allowed the conclusion that the additional bone fragments were from the first use of the grave approximately 100 years ago. The heavily soil-encrusted skull fragment bore clear signs of a half sharp force, that could immediately be classified as postmortem. The pattern of injury pointed to an excavator as the cause. However, the question arose whether the postmortem trauma occurred 5.5 years ago during the excavation of the grave or during the current exhumation. First the skull fragment was dried. However, it was then impossible to remove the clay-rich soil without damaging the bone. The fragment was therefore carefully washed and dried again. The cut and fracture areas then showed distinctly lighter surfaces than the rest of the bone, which pointed to the exhumation as the time of origin. For comparison, fresh injuries were inflicted with a hatchet. These distinctly showed even lighter surfaces, so that the time of origin could be assumed to have been during the excavation of the grave 5.5 years ago.

  2. Historical evidence of the 1936 Mojokerto skull discovery, East Java.

    PubMed

    Huffman, O Frank; Shipman, Pat; Hertler, Christine; de Vos, John; Aziz, Fachroel

    2005-04-01

    To resolve ambiguities in the literature, we detail the discovery history of the Mojokerto child's skull (Perning 1), employing letters, maps, photographs, reports, and newspaper accounts not previously used for this purpose. Andoyo, an experienced vertebrate-fossil collector with the Geological Survey of the Netherlands Indies, found the skull on February 13, 1936, while collecting for Johan Duyfjes, who had mapped the field area geologically. On February 18-19 Andoyo sent the fossil and a 1:25,000-topographic map showing the discovery point to Survey headquarters. The locality lies between Perning and Sumbertengu villages, approximately 10km northeast of Mojokerto city, East Java. G.H. Ralph von Koenigswald, Survey paleontologist, identified the specimen as Pithecanthropus and then named it Homo modjokertensis (it is now accepted as Homo erectus). Unfortunately he confused the discovery record in a March 28 newspaper article by characterizing the skull as a "surface find" [Dutch: oppervlaktevondst] while also attributing it to ancient beds. von Koenigswald probably had insufficient basis for either assertion, having not yet talked to Andoyo or Duyfjes. Eugene Dubois challenged von Koenigswald on the "surface-find" issue, Andoyo was consulted, and Duyfjes went to the site. Duyfjes and von Koenigswald then published scientific papers stating that the skull was unearthed 1m deep from a hill-slope outcrop of conglomeratic sandstone in Duyfjes' Pucangan formation. A cross section by Andoyo, which may show the Mojokerto site, also indicates a skull at 1m depth in conglomeratic sandstone. Photographs taken in 1936-1938 show a shallow pit at a single field location that fits Duyfjes' site description and is identified as the Mojokerto-skull site in 1940-1943 publications. By WWII the scientific community accepted the skull as an early hominid. Although von Koenigswald's "surface-find" comment remains a source of doubt in the record, we consider in situ discovery for the

  3. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  4. Stress Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  5. Pervasive genetic integration directs the evolution of human skull shape.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Esparza, Mireia; Sjøvold, Torstein; González-José, Rolando; Santos, Mauro; Hernández, Miquel; Klingenberg, Christian Peter

    2012-04-01

    It has long been unclear whether the different derived cranial traits of modern humans evolved independently in response to separate selection pressures or whether they resulted from the inherent morphological integration throughout the skull. In a novel approach to this issue, we combine evolutionary quantitative genetics and geometric morphometrics to analyze genetic and phenotypic integration in human skull shape. We measured human skulls in the ossuary of Hallstatt (Austria), which offer a unique opportunity because they are associated with genealogical data. Our results indicate pronounced covariation of traits throughout the skull. Separate simulations of selection for localized shape changes corresponding to some of the principal derived characters of modern human skulls produced outcomes that were similar to each other and involved a joint response in all of these traits. The data for both genetic and phenotypic shape variation were not consistent with the hypothesis that the face, cranial base, and cranial vault are completely independent modules but relatively strongly integrated structures. These results indicate pervasive integration in the human skull and suggest a reinterpretation of the selective scenario for human evolution where the origin of any one of the derived characters may have facilitated the evolution of the others. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. "Bochdalek's" skull: morphology report and reconstruction of face.

    PubMed

    Klepáček, Ivo; Malá, Pavla Zedníková

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to create a real model of a face using the well preserved "Bochdalek's skull" (from an eighteenth Century female aged 18 years) kept in the museum of anatomy (Institute of Anatomy, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague). The skull had previously been appraised as a deformed skull with an adhesion present on both sides of the jaw, most likely of post-traumatic origin (bilateral syngnathia). In an attempt to find the best description for it, and to identify the spatial relationships between the surface of the facial bones which had changed in shape, as well as the formation of soft tissue on the face, we decided to perform a 3D reconstruction of the face. Due to the necessity of preserving the unique original undamaged skull, we created an exact digital "casting" of the facial bone structure on a computer first, which we then converted into a three-dimensional model using a 3D RepRap printer. We needed to take into consideration the fact that we had no portrait of the girl, just the skull. For this reason, we opted for a selected combination of anthropologic steps (the modified Manchester technique), which in our view, allows for optimum creation of the topography of the face in keeping with the deformed skull. The resulting reconstructed face was old in appearance with an overhanging lower lip and flattened surfaces in the areas of the temporalis and masseter muscles.

  7. Photogrammetric 3D skull/photo superimposition: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Valeria; Lubelli, Sergio; De Donno, Antonio; Inchingolo, Alessio; Lavecchia, Fulvio; Introna, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    The identification of bodies through the examination of skeletal remains holds a prominent place in the field of forensic investigations. Technological advancements in 3D facial acquisition techniques have led to the proposal of a new body identification technique that involves a combination of craniofacial superimposition and photogrammetry. The aim of this study was to test the method by superimposing various computerized 3D images of skulls onto various photographs of missing people taken while they were still alive in cases when there was a suspicion that the skulls in question belonged to them. The technique is divided into four phases: preparatory phase, 3d acquisition phase, superimposition phase, and metric image analysis 3d. The actual superimposition of the images was carried out in the fourth step. and was done so by comparing the skull images with the selected photos. Using a specific software, the two images (i.e. the 3D avatar and the photo of the missing person) were superimposed. Cross-comparisons of 5 skulls discovered in a mass grave, and of 2 skulls retrieved in the crawlspace of a house were performed. The morphologyc phase reveals a full overlap between skulls and photos of disappeared persons. Metric phase reveals that correlation coefficients of this values, higher than 0.998-0,997 allow to confirm identification hypothesis.

  8. [Diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the frontal skull base].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K J; Maier, H; Mauer, U M

    2011-08-01

    The role of ENT surgery in the management of anterior skull base defects has become increasingly important in recent years. Transnasal endoscopic surgical techniques and intraoperative navigation enable a minimally invasive approach in a large proportion of patients, thus helping to avoid morbidity typically associated with neurosurgical subfrontal approaches. Whereas traffic accidents and sport injuries are the main causes of anterior skull base trauma in the civilian setting, penetrating injuries caused by gunshots and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) play an increasing role in the military arena and terroristic attacks. Minor injuries to the anterior skull base are usually managed by ENT surgeons. Major injuries, involving the midface or neurocranium, require an interdisciplinary approach including maxillofacial surgeons and neurosurgeons. A centre for head and neck medicine and surgery is an ideal setting for such interdisciplinary teams to provide appropriate care for patients with complex skull base trauma in cooperation with ophthalmologists and interventional neuoradiologists. The present article describes concepts for the treatment of anterior skull base trauma established at the head, neck and skull base center at the Ulm military hospital in Germany.

  9. A novel ciliopathic skull defect arising from excess neural crest.

    PubMed

    Tabler, Jacqueline M; Rice, Christopher P; Liu, Karen J; Wallingford, John B

    2016-09-01

    The skull is essential for protecting the brain from damage, and birth defects involving disorganization of skull bones are common. However, the developmental trajectories and molecular etiologies by which many craniofacial phenotypes arise remain poorly understood. Here, we report a novel skull defect in ciliopathic Fuz mutant mice in which only a single bone pair encases the forebrain, instead of the usual paired frontal and parietal bones. Through genetic lineage analysis, we show that this defect stems from a massive expansion of the neural crest-derived frontal bone. This expansion occurs at the expense of the mesodermally-derived parietal bones, which are either severely reduced or absent. A similar, though less severe, phenotype was observed in Gli3 mutant mice, consistent with a role for Gli3 in cilia-mediated signaling. Excess crest has also been shown to drive defective palate morphogenesis in ciliopathic mice, and that defect is ameliorated by reduction of Fgf8 gene dosage. Strikingly, skull defects in Fuz mutant mice are also rescued by loss of one allele of fgf8, suggesting a potential route to therapy. In sum, this work is significant for revealing a novel skull defect with a previously un-described developmental etiology and for suggesting a common developmental origin for skull and palate defects in ciliopathies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumour of the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Maire, Jean-Philippe; Eimer, Sandrine; San Galli, François; Franco-Vidal, Valérie; Galland-Girodet, Sigolène; Huchet, Aymeri; Darrouzet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs) are rare benign clinical and pathological entities. IMTs have been described in the lungs, abdomen, retroperitoneum, and extremities but rarely in the head and neck region. A 38-year-old man presented with headache, right exophthalmia, and right 6th nerve palsy. A CT scan revealed enlargement of the right cavernous sinus and osteolytic lesions of the right sphenoid and clivus. MR imaging showed a large tumor of the skull base which was invading the sella turcica, right cavernous sinus, and sphenoidal sinus. A biopsy was performed and revealed an IMT. Corticosteroids were given for 3 months but were inefficient. In the framework of our pluridisciplinary consultation, fractionated conformal radiotherapy (FRT) was indicated at a low dose; 20 Gy in 10 fractions of 2 Gy over 12 days were delivered. Clinical response was complete 3 months after FRT. Radiological response was subtotal 6 months after FRT. Two years later, the patient is well. PMID:23573442

  11. Peramorphic traits in the tokay gecko skull.

    PubMed

    Daza, Juan D; Mapps, Aurelia A; Lewis, Patrick J; Thies, Monte L; Bauer, Aaron M

    2015-08-01

    Traditionally, geckos have been conceived to exhibit paedomorphic features relative to other lizards (e.g., large eyes, less extensively ossified skulls, and amphicoelous and notochordal vertebrae). In contrast, peramorphosis has not been considered an important process in shaping their morphology. Here, we studied different sized specimens of Gekko gecko to document ontogenetic changes in cranial anatomy, especially near maturity. Comparison of this species with available descriptions of other geckos resulted in the identification of 14 cranial characteristics that are expressed more strongly with size increase. These characteristics become move evident in later stages of post-hatching development, especially near maturation, and are, therefore, attributed to peramorphosis (hyperossification). ACCTRAN and DELTRAN character optimizations were applied to these characters using a tree of 11 genera derived from a gekkotan molecular phylogeny. This analysis revealed that G. gecko expresses the majority of these putative peramorphic features near maturity, and that some of these features are also expressed in species closely related to G. gecko. The characters studied have the potential to be applied in future phylogenetic and taxonomic studies of this group of lizards.

  12. [Human skull development and voice disorders].

    PubMed

    Piron, A; Roch, J B

    2006-01-01

    The hominisation of the skull comes with the bipedic posture, due to a network of muscular and aponevrotic forces applied to the cranio-facial skeleton. A brief sight of the morphogenetic origine and issues of these forces help to understand more clearly the postural statement of the larynx, his functions, and his many extrinsic biomechanical bounds; then further his most frequently dysfunctions. The larynx is surrounded by several effective systems of protection: active, activo-passive, passive. The architectural features of the components of the laryngeal system allows us to consider the laryngeal function as an auto-balanced system. All the forces engaged are auto-balanced in a continuum of tension. This lead us to the concept of tensegrity system, neologism coming from tensional integrity described by Buckminster Fuller. The laryngeal employement by extrinsic system is pathological in case of chronicity. Any osteopathic treatment, which aims to restore the losses of laryngeal mobility, has to release first the peripherical structures involved in the laryngeal defense, before normalising the larynx itself Finally, the larynx recovers his functions in a tensegrity system.

  13. Growing and Growing: Promoting Functional Thinking with Geometric Growing Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    Design research methodology is used in this study to develop an empirically-substantiated instruction theory about students' development of functional thinking in the context of geometric growing patterns. The two research questions are: (1) How does students' functional thinking develop in the context of geometric growing patterns? (2) What are…

  14. Variation in the use of skull radiographs by emergency physicians in young children with minor head trauma.

    PubMed

    Carrière, Benoit; Clément, Karine; Gravel, Jocelyn

    2014-07-01

    Minor head trauma in young children is a major cause of emergency department visits. Conflicting guidelines exist regarding radiologic evaluation in such cases. To determine the practice pattern among Canadian emergency physicians for ordering skull radiographs in young children suffering from minor head trauma. Physicians were also surveyed on their willingness to use a clinical decision rule in such cases. A self-administered email questionnaire was sent to all members of the Pediatric Emergency Research Canada (PERC) group. It consisted of clinical vignettes followed by multiple-option answers on the management plan. The study was conducted using the principles of the Dillman Tailored Design method and included multiple emailings to maximize the response rate. The research protocol received Institutional Review Board approval. A total of 158 of 295 (54%) PERC members responded. Most participants were trained in pediatric emergency medicine and assessed more than 500 children per year. Imaging management for the vignettes was highly variable: 6 of the 11 case scenarios had a proportion of radiograph ordering between 20 and 80%. Ninety-five percent of respondents stated that they would apply a validated clinical decision rule for the detection of skull fracture in young children with minor head trauma. The minimum sensitivity deemed acceptable for such a rule was 98%. Canadian emergency physicians have a wide variation in skull radiography ordering in young children with minor head trauma. This variation, along with the need expressed by physicians, suggests that further research to develop a clinical decision rule is warranted.

  15. Three-layered osteodural plasty for severe anterior skull base and facial injuries. Report of eleven cases.

    PubMed

    Wanyura, Hubert; Kamiński, Artur; Stopa, Zygmunt

    2014-01-01

    The upper cranial trauma of high force and wide area of application leads to fractures of calvaria, the skull base, and the viscerocranium. The aim of the study was to present eleven patients treated for severe anterior skull base and facial defects by means of three-layered osteodural plasty. The operative tactics consisted of bicoronal incision, bifrontal craniotomy, closure of the dura mater damage with a pericranium, reconstruction of bone defects with autologous bone grafts and plasty with anteriorly pedicled pericranial flap on the supratrochlear and supraorbital vessels. During follow-up, which lasted 2-7 years, none of the patients developed any early or late postoperative complications. The three-layer osteodural plasty of severe anterior skull base injuries with the use of autologous bone grafts for the reconstruction of craniofacial skeleton resulted in a good final functional, morphological and aesthetic outcome in all patients. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. [Computed tomography in cats with craniofacial trauma with regard to maxillary and orbital fractures].

    PubMed

    Wunderlin, N; Amort, K; Wigger, A; Klumpp, S; Biel, M; Eichner, G; Kramer, M

    2012-10-17

    Computed tomographic examination of the skull of cats with craniofacial trauma. Analysis of diagnostic findings with regard to the occurrence of isolated and combined maxillary and orbital fractures. Prospective study (August 2006 - June 2010): Computed tomography (CT) of the skull of cats with craniofacial trauma. Thirty-eight cats met the inclusion criteria. Breeds were 36 Domestic Shorthair cats, one Maine Coon and one Somali cat. Age at admission ranged from 11 to 187 months. The ratio of the numbers of males to females was 22:16 (1.4). Computed tomographic examination revealed a maxillary fracture in 27 (71%) animals. Sixteen (42%) cats had multiple maxillary fractures (≥2). Twenty-eight animals (74%) displayed orbital fractures. Combined maxillary and orbital fractures occurred in 26 (68%) patients. The odds ratio of this combined occurrence was 87 (p<0.001). Sixteen (57%) of 28 cats with orbital fractures showed multiple orbital fractures (≥2). The incidence of bilateral orbital fractures was 67% (25 patients). The medial orbital wall was the most commonly fractured orbital wall (66%), and the orbital floor the second most common (61%). Computed tomographic examination of the skull of cats with craniofacial trauma showed that maxillary and orbital fractures are more common than previously described. Combined maxillary and orbital fractures occurred in more than half of the patients. In cats, orbital fractures mainly affect the medial orbital wall and the orbital floor. Cats with craniofacial trauma often have maxillary and orbital fractures. The additional information taken from the computed tomographic examination could lead to an optimised therapeutical concept.

  17. Leonardo da Vinci's "A skull sectioned": skull and dental formula revisited.

    PubMed

    Gerrits, Peter O; Veening, Jan G

    2013-05-01

    What can be learned from historical anatomical drawings and how to incorporate these drawings into anatomical teaching? The drawing "A skull sectioned" (RL 19058v) by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), hides more detailed information than reported earlier. A well-chosen section cut explores sectioned paranasal sinuses and ductus nasolacrimalis. A dissected lateral wall of the maxilla is also present. Furthermore, at the level of the foramen mentale, the drawing displays compact and spongious bony components, together with a cross-section through the foramen mentale and its connection with the canalis mandibulae. Leonardo was the first to describe a correct dental formula (6424) and made efforts to place this formula above the related dental elements. However, taking into account, the morphological features of the individual elements of the maxilla, it can be suggested that Leonardo sketched a "peculiar dental element" on the position of the right maxillary premolar in the dental sketch. The fact that the author did not make any comment on that special element is remarkable. Leonardo could have had sufficient knowledge of the precise morphology of maxillary and mandibular premolars, since the author depicted these elements in the dissected skull. The fact that the author also had access to premolars in situ corroborates our suggestion that "something went wrong" in this part of the drawing. The present study shows that historical anatomical drawings are very useful for interactive learning of detailed anatomy for students in medicine and dentistry.

  18. Design and development of a virtual anatomic atlas of the human skull for automatic segmentation in computer-assisted surgery, preoperative planning, and navigation.

    PubMed

    Metzger, M C; Bittermann, G; Dannenberg, L; Schmelzeisen, R; Gellrich, N-C; Hohlweg-Majert, B; Scheifele, C

    2013-09-01

    Manual segmentation of CT datasets for preoperative planning and intraoperative navigation is a time-consuming procedure. The purpose of this study was to develop an automated segmentation procedure for the facial skeleton based on a virtual anatomic atlas of the skull, to test its practicability, and to evaluate the accuracy of the segmented objects. The atlas skull was created by manually segmenting an unaffected skull CT dataset. For automated segmentation of cases via IPlan cranial (BrainLAB, Germany), the atlas skull underwent projection, controlled deformation, and a facultative threshold segmentation within the individual datasets, of which 16 routine CT (13 pathologies, 3 without) were processed. The variations of the no-threshold versus threshold segmentation results compared to the original were determined. The clinical usability of the results was assessed in a multicentre evaluation. Compared to the original dataset, the mean accuracy was [Formula: see text] mm for the threshold segmentation and 0.6-1.4 mm for the no-threshold segmentation. Comparing both methods together, the deviation was [Formula: see text] mm. An isolated no-threshold segmentation of the orbital cavity alone resulted in a mean accuracy of [Formula: see text] mm. With regard to clinical usability, the no-threshold method was clearly preferred, reaching modal scores of "good" to "moderate" in most areas. Limitations were seen in segmenting the TMJ, mandibular fractures, and thin bone in general. The feasibility of automated skull segmentation was demonstrated. The virtual anatomic atlas can improve the preprocessing of skull CT scans for computer assisted craniomaxillofacial surgery planning.

  19. Morphological evolution of the lizard skull: a geometric morphometrics survey.

    PubMed

    Stayton, C Tristan

    2005-01-01

    Patterns of diversity among lizard skulls were studied from a morphological, phylogenetic, and functional perspective. A sample of 1,030 lizard skulls from 441 species in 17 families was used to create a lizard skull morphospace. This morphospace was combined with a phylogeny of lizard families to summarize general trends in the evolution of the lizard skull. A basal morphological split between the Iguania and Scleroglossa was observed. Iguanians are characterized by a short, high skull, with large areas of attachment for the external adductor musculature, relative to their sister group. The families of the Iguania appear to possess more intrafamilial morphological diversity than families of the Scleroglossa, but rarefaction of the data reveals this to be an artifact caused by the greater number of species represented in Iguanian families. Iguanian families also appear more dissimilar to one another than families of the Scleroglossa. Permutation tests indicate that this pattern is real and not due to the smaller number of families in the Iguanidae. Parallel and convergent evolution is observed among lizards with similar diets: ant and termite specialists, carnivores, and herbivores. However, these patterns are superimposed over the more general phylogenetic pattern of lizard skull diversity. This study has three central conclusions. Different clades of lizards show different patterns of disparity and divergence in patterns of morphospace occupation. Phylogeny imposes a primary signal upon which a secondary ecological signal is imprinted. Evolutionary patterns in skull metrics, taken with functional landmarks, allow testing of trends and the development of new hypotheses concerning both shape and biomechanics.

  20. Earliest Directly-Dated Human Skull-Cups

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Silvia M.; Parfitt, Simon A.; Stringer, Chris B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of human braincases as drinking cups and containers has extensive historic and ethnographic documentation, but archaeological examples are extremely rare. In the Upper Palaeolithic of western Europe, cut-marked and broken human bones are widespread in the Magdalenian (∼15 to 12,000 years BP) and skull-cup preparation is an element of this tradition. Principal Findings Here we describe the post-mortem processing of human heads at the Upper Palaeolithic site of Gough's Cave (Somerset, England) and identify a range of modifications associated with the production of skull-cups. New analyses of human remains from Gough's Cave demonstrate the skilled post-mortem manipulation of human bodies. Results of the research suggest the processing of cadavers for the consumption of body tissues (bone marrow), accompanied by meticulous shaping of cranial vaults. The distribution of cut-marks and percussion features indicates that the skulls were scrupulously 'cleaned' of any soft tissues, and subsequently modified by controlled removal of the facial region and breakage of the cranial base along a sub-horizontal plane. The vaults were also ‘retouched’, possibly to make the broken edges more regular. This manipulation suggests the shaping of skulls to produce skull-cups. Conclusions Three skull-cups have been identified amongst the human bones from Gough's Cave. New ultrafiltered radiocarbon determinations provide direct dates of about 14,700 cal BP, making these the oldest directly dated skull-cups and the only examples known from the British Isles. PMID:21359211

  1. Autogenous Bone Reconstruction of Large Secondary Skull Defects.

    PubMed

    Fearon, Jeffrey A; Griner, Devan; Ditthakasem, Kanlaya; Herbert, Morley

    2017-02-01

    The authors sought to ascertain the upper limits of secondary skull defect size amenable to autogenous reconstructions and to examine outcomes of a surgical series. Published data for autogenous and alloplastic skull reconstructions were also examined to explore associations that might guide treatment. A retrospective review of autogenously reconstructed secondary skull defects was undertaken. A structured literature review was also performed to assess potential differences in reported outcomes between autogenous bone and synthetic alloplastic skull reconstructions. Weighted risks were calculated for statistical testing. Ninety-six patients underwent autogenous skull reconstruction for an average defect size of 93 cm (range, 4 to 506 cm) at a mean age of 12.9 years. The mean operative time was 3.4 hours, 2 percent required allogeneic blood transfusions, and the average length of stay was less than 3 days. The mean length of follow-up was 28 months. There were no postoperative infections requiring surgery, but one patient underwent secondary grafting for partial bone resorption. An analysis of 34 studies revealed that complications, infections, and reoperations were more commonly reported with alloplastic than with autogenous reconstructions (relative risk, 1.57, 4.8, and 1.48, respectively). Autogenous reconstructions are feasible, with minimal associated morbidity, for patients with skull defect sizes as large as 500 cm. A structured literature review suggests that autogenous bone reconstructions are associated with lower reported infection, complication, and reoperation rates compared with synthetic alloplasts. Based on these findings, surgeons might consider using autogenous reconstructions even for larger skull defects. Therapeutic, IV.

  2. Application of superimposition-based personal identification using skull computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masuko; Yayama, Kazuhiro; Motani, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Yasjima, Daisuke; Hayakawa, Mutumi; Yamamoto, Seiji; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2011-07-01

    Superimposition has been applied to skulls of unidentified skeletonized corpses as a personal identification method. The current method involves layering of a skull and a facial image of a suspected person and thus requires a real skeletonized skull. In this study, we scanned skulls of skeletonized corpses by computed tomography (CT), reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) images of skulls from the CT images, and superimposed the 3D images with facial images of the corresponding persons taken in their lives. Superimposition using 3D-reconstructed skull images demonstrated, as did superimposition using real skulls, an adequate degree of morphological consistency between the 3D-reconstructed skulls and persons in the facial images. Three-dimensional skull images reconstructed from CT images can be saved as data files and the use of these images in superimposition is effective for personal identification of unidentified bodies.

  3. Correlation between structure and resistivity variations of the live human skull.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chi; You, Fusheng; Cheng, Guang; Gao, Dakuan; Fu, Feng; Yang, Guosheng; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2008-09-01

    A study on correlation between structure and resistivity variations was performed for live adult human skull. The resistivities of 388 skull samples, excised from 48 skull flaps of patients undergoing surgery, were measured at body temperature (36.5 degrees C) using the well-known four-electrode method in the frequency range of 1-4 MHz. According to different structures of the skull samples, all the 388 samples were classified into six categories and measured their resistivities: standard trilayer skull (7943 +/- 1752 ohm x cm, 58 samples), quasi-trilayer skull (14,471 +/- 3061 ohm x cm, 110 samples), standard compact skull (26,546 +/- 5374 ohm x cm, 62 samples), quasi-compact skull (19,824 +/- 3232 ohm x cm, 53 samples), dentate suture skull (5782 +/- 1778 ohm x cm, 41 samples), and squamous suture skull (12747 +/- 4120 ohm x cm, 64 samples). The results showed that the skull resistivities were not homogenous and were significantly influenced by local structural variations. The presence of sutures appeared to decrease the overall resistivity of particular regions largely and dentate suture decreased the resistivity more than squamous suture. The absence of diploe appeared to increase skull resistivity. The percentage on thickness of diploe would be the primary factor in determining the resistivity of the skull sample without suture. From resistivity spectra results, an inverse relationship between skull resistivity and signal frequency was found.

  4. Neisseria lactamica meningitis following skull trauma.

    PubMed

    Denning, D W; Gill, S S

    1991-01-01

    A woman developed meningitis due to Neisseria lactamica in association with a cribriform plate fracture. Cerebrospinal fluid antigen tests for Neisseria meningitidis were negative. The patient recovered with intravenous penicillin therapy. N. lactamica can be rapidly distinguished from N. meningitidis by the hydrolysis of ONPG (o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside). In contrast to N. meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. lactamica lacks virulence properties. As 100% of N. lactamica strains are susceptible to penicillin and all three previously described patients with N. lactamica meningitis have recovered with penicillin treatment, the reason for distinguishing the organisms in this context is primarily to prevent unnecessary anxiety and prophylaxis among contacts.

  5. [Intraoperative navigation, with focus on the skull base].

    PubMed

    Wirtz, C R

    2016-09-01

    Intraoperative navigation systems are widely used in ENT, oral and maxillofacial, and neurosurgery. The benefits of such systems have been demonstrated in various applications, including intracranial and skull base surgery. Intraoperative shift, "brain shift" and changes in anatomy caused by the surgical procedure itself impair the accuracy of navigation and represent factors limiting its application, particularly in glioma and metastatic brain surgery. For this reason, intraoperative imaging was incorporated into neurosurgery. A specific application of navigation is thus skull base surgery, where shifts are often negligible due to the bony structures in which pathologies are embedded. Development of new systems with seamless integration into the operative workflow propagated routine use of navigation in neuro- and ENT surgery. Navigation proved especially helpful in interdisciplinary surgery with pathologies located in anatomic regions where competences of different surgical disciplines overlap, as in the skull base. While this increased radicality in tumour resection, there was a high risk of morbidity. The integration of electrophysiological function monitoring served to preserve function and reduce morbidity, and has led to less invasive and radical strategies in skull base surgery. New radiosurgical methods to adjuvantly treat possible tumour remnants have also supported this development. Systems allowing resection borders to be marked in the navigational coordinates would enable direct linking of these data to radiotherapy planning and better interpretation of follow-up imaging. Navigation is thus a valuable tool supporting interdisciplinary cooperation in skull base surgery for the benefit of patients.

  6. Robotic Anterior and Midline Skull Base Surgery: Preclinical Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, Bert W. Weinstein, Gregory S.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a minimally invasive surgical technique to access the midline and anterior skull base using the optical and technical advantages of robotic surgical instrumentation. Methods and Materials: Ten experimental procedures focusing on approaches to the nasopharynx, clivus, sphenoid, pituitary sella, and suprasellar regions were performed on one cadaver and one live mongrel dog. Both the cadaver and canine procedures were performed in an approved training facility using the da Vinci Surgical Robot. For the canine experiments, a transoral robotic surgery (TORS) approach was used, and for the cadaver a newly developed combined cervical-transoral robotic surgery (C-TORS) approach was investigated and compared with standard TORS. The ability to access and dissect tissues within the various areas of the midline and anterior skull base were evaluated, and techniques to enhance visualization and instrumentation were developed. Results: Standard TORS approaches did not provide adequate access to the midline and anterior skull base; however, the newly developed C-TORS approach was successful in providing the surgical access to these regions of the skull base. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is an exciting minimally invasive approach to the skull base that warrants continued preclinical investigation and development.

  7. Geographical variation of the skull of the lesser mouse deer.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hideki; Fukuta, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Junpei; Sasaki, Motoki; Stafford, Brian J

    2004-10-01

    We examined the geographical variation of the skull size and shape of the lesser mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus) from Laos, Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, Java, Borneo, Langkawi and some Islands of Tenasserim in Myanmar. Although the influence of the climatic condition on skull size was not confirmed in the mainland populations, the skull became rostro-caudally longer in the populations of Tenasserim and Sumatra because of island isolation effect. The skull size was classified into the following three clusters of localities from the matrix of Q-mode correlation coefficients: 1) Langkawi and Tenasserim, 2) Laos and Thailand, 3) Sumatra and Borneo. The skulls in the population of Java belong to the cluster of Langkawi and Tenasserim in male, however were morphologically similar to those in the cluster of Borneo and Sumatra. The canonical discriminant analysis pointed out that the Laos and Tenasserim populations were separated from the other ones and that the populations of Sumatra, Java and Borneo were intermingled each other.

  8. [Three-dimensional endoscopic endonasal study of skull base anatomy].

    PubMed

    Abarca-Olivas, Javier; Monjas-Cánovas, Irene; López-Álvarez, Beatriz; Lloret-García, Jaime; Sanchez-del Campo, Jose; Gras-Albert, Juan Ramon; Moreno-López, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Training in dissection of the paranasal sinuses and the skull base is essential for anatomical understanding and correct surgical techniques. Three-dimensional (3D) visualisation of endoscopic skull base anatomy increases spatial orientation and allows depth perception. To show endoscopic skull base anatomy based on the 3D technique. We performed endoscopic dissection in cadaveric specimens fixed with formalin and with the Thiel technique, both prepared using intravascular injection of coloured material. Endonasal approaches were performed with conventional 2D endoscopes. Then we applied the 3D anaglyph technique to illustrate the pictures in 3D. The most important anatomical structures and landmarks of the sellar region under endonasal endoscopic vision are illustrated in 3D images. The skull base consists of complex bony and neurovascular structures. Experience with cadaver dissection is essential to understand complex anatomy and develop surgical skills. A 3D view constitutes a useful tool for understanding skull base anatomy. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Craniometric measurements of artificial cranial deformations in Eastern European skulls.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Wolfgang H; Fedorischeva, Victoria A; Naumova, Ella A; Yabluchansky, Nikolay I

    2008-06-01

    Standardized lateral cephalograms of eleven skulls with artificial cranial deformations from Eastern Europe and twenty normal skulls from the same population were made, digitized and imported into the AutoCAD 2005 computer program. The x- and y-coordinates of defined measuring points were determined and angle measurements were made. The form difference of the skulls was tested with the Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (EDMA) and the difference of the angle measurements were compared statistically using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. All deformed skulls belonged to the tabular fronto-occipital type of deformation. The results of the EDMA and the angle measurements indicated significant differences for the neurocranium and the facial cranium in height between the normal and the deformed skulls, but not in the cranial length. It can be concluded that in Eastern Europe one method of cranial molding was used. The deformation of the neurocranium also affected the development of the facial cranium regarding facial height. This may indicate a dependency of the developmental fields of the neurocranium and facial cranium.

  10. Quality of Life Following Endoscopic Resection of Skull Base Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cavel, Oren; Abergel, Avraham; Margalit, Nevo; Fliss, Dan M.; Gil, Ziv

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate patients' quality of life (QOL) after endoscopic resection of skull base tumors. We estimated the QOL of 41 patients who underwent surgery for removal of skull base tumors via the expanded endonasal approach (EEA). The Anterior Skull Base Surgery Questionnaire (ASBS-Q), a multidimensional, disease-specific instrument containing 36 items was used. The rate of meningitis and cerebrospinal fluid leak was 1.4 and 0%, respectively. There was one case of uniocular visual impairment. The internal consistency of the instrument had a correlation coefficient (α-Cronbach score) of 0.8 to 0.92. Of 41 patients, 30 (75%) reported improvement or no change in overall QOL. Improved scores were reported in the physical function domain and worse scores in the specific symptoms domain. The most significant predictor of poor QOL was female gender, which led to a significant decrease in scores of all domains. Site of surgery, histology, age and comorbidity were not significant predictors of outcome. This paper further validates the use of the ASBS-Q for patients undergoing endoscopic skull base resection. The overall QOL of patients following endoscopic extirpation of skull base tumors is good. Female patients experience a significant decline in QOL compared with males. PMID:23542557

  11. The need for skull radiography in patients presenting for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Tress, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    One thousand patients had both CT of the head and a conventional skull series of radiographs. Radiographic findings were abnormal in 250 patients (25%), but only 64 patients (6.4%) had diagnostically significant abnormalities at radiography that were not detected by CT. If the 163 patients who presented after acute trauma were excluded from the series, only 39 (4.7%) of the remaining patients had radiographically significant abnormal findings that were not seen at CT, and only two (0.2%) of these abnormalities could not be diagnosed by a lateral skull radiograph alone. In only five patients (0.5%) was the management actively changed because an abnormaltiy that was detected at skull radiography was not detected at CT. Thus, in nontrauma patients who have stroke, epilepsy, dementia, or non-specific symptoms without focal signs, or have recently undergone craniotomy, and who have been referred for CT, skull radiographs are not justified. In the patient with a history and findings that are strongly suggestive of a pathological disorder anywhere other than in the sella turcica, cerebello-pontine angle, and paranasal sinuses, only the lateral skull radiograph should be obtained after CT, and only if CT is equivocal.

  12. Hamate fractures.

    PubMed

    Sarabia Condés, J M; Ibañez Martínez, L; Sánchez Carrasco, M A; Carrillo Julia, F J; Salmerón Martínez, E L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present our experience in the treatment of the fractures of the hamate and to make a review of the literature on this topic. We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients treated in our clinic between 2005-2012 suffering from fractures of the hamate. Six cases were fractures of the body and four were fractures of the hamate. Five cases were of associated injuries. Diagnostic delay ranged from 30 days to 2 years. Patient follow-up ranged from 1 to 10 years. Patient satisfaction was evaluated using the DASH questionnaire. Five patients with a fracture of the body underwent surgery, and one was treated conservatively. Two patients with fracture of the hook of the hamate were treated with immobilization, and two more patients had the fragment removed. The grip strength and the digital clip were reduced in 2 cases. Flexion and extension of the wrist was limited in 3 cases. The mobility of the fingers was normal in all the cases, except in one. The results obtained from the DASH questionnaire were normal in all the cases, except in one case of fracture of the hamate, and in two cases of fracture of the body. The surgical treatment should reduce the dislocation and stabilize the injuries with osteosynthesis. The fractures of the hamate are usually diagnosed late, and the most recommended treatment is removal of the fragment, although it cannot be deduced from this study. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Growing media [Chapter 5

    Treesearch

    Douglass F. Jacobs; Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2009-01-01

    Selecting the proper growing medium is one of the most important considerations in nursery plant production. A growing medium can be defined as a substance through which roots grow and extract water and nutrients. In native plant nurseries, a growing medium can consist of native soil but is more commonly an "artificial soil" composed of materials such as peat...

  14. Properties and architecture of the sperm whale skull amphitheatre.

    PubMed

    Alam, Parvez; Amini, Shahrouz; Tadayon, Maryam; Miserez, Ali; Chinsamy, Anusuya

    2016-02-01

    The sperm whale skull amphitheatre cradles an enormous two-tonne spermaceti organ. The amphitheatre separates this organ from the cranium and the cervical vertebrae that lie in close proximity to the base of the skull. Here, we elucidate that this skull amphitheatre is an elastic, flexible, triple-layered structure with mechanical properties that are conjointly guided by bone histology and the characteristics of pore space. We contend that the amphitheatre will flex elastically to equilibrate forces transmitted via the spermaceti organ that arise through diving. We find that collisions from sperm whale aggression do not cause the amphitheatre to bend, but rather localise stress to the base of the amphitheatre on its anterior face. We consider, therefore, that the uniquely thin and extended construction of the amphitheatre, has relevance as an energy absorptive structure in diving.

  15. Polymicrobial skull osteomyelitis: a rare complication of subdural hematoma evacuation.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Scott W; Graves, Richard M; Baum, Sue E; Teff, Richard J

    2007-08-01

    Osteomyelitis of the skull (SO) is a rare condition. The infection may complicate community-acquired sinusitis, otitis, or mastoiditis, in which case, the skull base is affected most commonly. The flora typically seen in these conditions, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, tends also to be responsible for the SO. Osteomyelitis also may follow neurosurgical procedures that breach the skull, in which case, the pathogens frequently are typical cutaneous flora such as Staphylococcus aureus or coagulase-negative staphylococci. A case report of post-neurosurgical SO and a review of the relevant English-language literature. We report a delayed presentation of SO after craniotomy for the evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. Cranial tissue cultures grew Staphylococcus aureus, Corynebacterium spp., and Escherichia coli. The isolation of Escherichia coli as an infecting organism in SO has been reported rarely and may reflect a unique pathogenesis.

  16. Sex estimation in forensic anthropology: skull versus postcranial elements.

    PubMed

    Spradley, M Katherine; Jantz, Richard L

    2011-03-01

    When the pelvis is unavailable, the skull is widely considered the second best indicator of sex. The goals of this research are to provide an objective hierarchy of sexing effectiveness of cranial and postcranial elements and to test the widespread notion that the skull is superior to postcranial bones. We constructed both univariate and multivariate discriminant models using data from the Forensic Anthropology Data Bank. Discriminating effectiveness was assessed by cross-validated classification, and in the case of multivariate models, Mahalanobis D(2). The results clearly indicate that most postcranial elements outperform the skull in estimating sex. It is possible to correctly sex 88-90% of individuals with joint size, up to 94% with multivariate models of the postcranial bones. The best models for the cranium do not exceed 90%. We conclude that postcranial elements are to be preferred to the cranium for estimating sex when the pelvis is unavailable. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Morphological analysis of the skull shape in craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Tejszerska, Dagmara; Wolański, Wojciech; Larysz, Dawid; Gzik, Marek; Sacha, Edyta

    2011-01-01

    Craniosynostosis represents premature suture fusion of the fetal and neonatal skull. Pathogenesis of craniosynostosis is complex and probably multifactorial. Growth of skull bones is strictly connected with the expanding growth of the brain and cranial malformations or prematurely fused sutures cause abnormal head shape. In order to diagnose the craniosynostosis, physical examination, plain radiography, and computed tomography with 3D reconstructions are indispensable. Engineering software such as Mimics v.13.1 and 3-matic v.5.0 enables a 3-dimensional model of head to be generated, based on the pictures obtained from CT. It is also possible to indicate the distances between the characteristic anatomical points. These measures are helpful during planning the neurosurgical correction of the skull, because the possibility of strictly specifing incisions before surgery, which is very important to provide the maximal safety of a child.

  18. Genomic and transcriptomic characterization of skull base chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jason K.; Lee, In-Hee; Hong, Sang Duk; Kong, Doo-Sik; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Skull base chordoma is a primary rare malignant bone-origin tumor showing relatively slow growth pattern and locally destructive lesions, which can only be characterized by histologic components. There is no available prognostic or therapeutic biomarker to predict clinical outcome or treatment response and the molecular mechanisms underlying chordoma development still remain unexplored. Therefore, we sought out to identify novel somatic variations that are associated with chordoma progression and potentially employed as therapeutic targets. Thirteen skull base chordomas were subjected for whole-exome and/or whole-transcriptome sequencing. In process, we have identified chromosomal aberration in 1p, 7, 10, 13 and 17q, high frequency of functional germline SNP of the T gene, rs2305089 (P = 0.0038) and several recurrent alterations including MUC4, NBPF1, NPIPB15 mutations and novel gene fusion of SAMD5-SASH1 for the first time in skull base chordoma. PMID:27901492

  19. Skull roentgenography in the evaluation of head injury

    SciTech Connect

    North, S.; Pollak, E.W.

    1983-04-01

    The role of skull roentgenograms in determining choice of therapy, hospital admission, and length of hospitalization was evaluated in 106 consecutive patients with head injury. Thirty patients were discharged from the emergency room after initial evaluation and had uneventful recovery. Seventy-six were admitted and discharged without operative treatment one to ten days later. Only five had pathologic skull findings roentgenographicaly. Of these, one was discharged from the emergency department; the remaining four were admitted because of abnormal neurologic findings. All five recovered uneventfully. Another patient who had a normal roentgenographic evaluation required subsequent admission for craniotomy. Skull roentgenograms were an unimportant factor in the management of head injury patients and did not eliminate the need for complete and serial neurologic evaluation.

  20. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B.; Cook, Mark J.; Wolters, Carsten H.; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery. PMID:27092044

  1. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals.

    PubMed

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B; Cook, Mark J; Wolters, Carsten H; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery.

  2. Primary intraosseous malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the skull: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Mee; Lee, Ghi Jai; Koh, Young-Cho; Kwon, O-Ki; Park, Yong-Koo

    2003-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a rare primary neoplasm that constitutes less than 1% of the malignant tumors of bone, and involvement of the skull is very rare. We present a case of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the skull, presenting an intraosseous lesion in a 43-yr-old woman. She had a rapidly growing, tender mass in the right parietal region. A plain radiograph showed an osteolytic lesion of the right parietal bone. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the lesion showed heterogeneous low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and slightly high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. No evidence of an extraosseous extension to the adjacent dura and soft tissue was found, and a wide excision of the parietal bone was performed. Histologically, the tumor was a typical MFH displaying pleomorphic spindle cells in a storiform pattern. The results of immunohistochemical stainings revealed that the tumor cells were positive for vimentin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and p53, and negative for smooth muscle actin, S100 protein, desmin, and MyoD1. Three months later, a mainly cystic, recurrent mass was developed at the previously operated site. Before the resection, we first performed the percutaneous aspiration cytology, revealing diagnostic multinucleated pleomorphic cells. Thereafter, she had to receive repetitive resections of recurrent or residual lesions, and she died of postoperative meningoencephalitis two years after the first operation. PMID:12923345

  3. Parents' decision for helmet therapy in infants with skull deformation.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Renske M; van Til, Janine A; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina G M; L'Hoir, Monique P; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; IJzerman, Maarten J

    2014-07-01

    Helmet therapy is regularly prescribed in infants with positional skull deformation. Evidence on the effectiveness is lacking, which complicates decision making. This study aims to assess the relation between parents' decision for treatment of skull deformation in their infant and their level of anxiety, decisional conflict, expectations of treatment effect, perceived severity of deformation and perceived side effects. Parents of 5-month-old infants with skull deformation were invited to participate in a survey. Data collection included background characteristics, anthropometric assessment, parent-reported outcomes, decision for treatment (helmet therapy or awaiting natural course), decisional conflict scale and questions about perceived (side) effects of helmet therapy. Factors significantly correlated with treatment decision (p < 0.1) were tested in a multiple logistic regression analysis. The results of 186 respondents were included in the analysis. Parental satisfaction with their infant's head shape (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.2; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.1 to 0.4), expected effect of helmet therapy compared to natural course (aOR 13.4; 95 % CI 5.0 to 36.1) and decision uncertainty (aOR 1.0; 95 % CI 0.9 to 1.0; p = .03) were related to the decision for helmet therapy in infants with skull deformation. With the outcomes of this study, we can better understand parental decision-making for elective 'normalizing' treatments in children, such as helmet therapy in infants with skull deformation. Health care professionals should address the parents' perception of the severity of skull deformation and their expectations of helmet therapy. Furthermore, they can support parents in decision-making by balancing medical information with parents' expectations, values and beliefs.

  4. Predicting zygoma fractures from baseball impact.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Joseph M; Stitzel, Joel D; Hurst, William J; Porta, David J; Jones, Jeryl; Duma, Stefan M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop injury risk functions that predict zygoma fracture based on baseball type and impact velocity. Zygoma fracture strength data from published experiments were mapped with the force exerted by a baseball on the orbit as a function of ball velocity. Using a normal distribution, zygoma fracture risk functions were developed. Experimental evaluation of these risk functions was performed using six human cadaver tests and two baseballs of different stiffness values. High speed video measured the baseball impact velocity. Post test analysis of the cadaver skulls was performed using CT imaging including three-dimensional reconstruction as well as autopsy. The developed injury risk functions accurately identify the risk of zygoma fracture as a result of baseball impact. The experimental results validated the zygoma risk functions at the lower and upper levels. The injuries observed in the post test analysis included fractures of the zygomatic arch, frontal process and the maxilla, zygoma suture, with combinations of these creating comminuted, tripod fractures of the zygoma. Tests with a softer baseball did result in injury but these had fewer resulting zygoma bone fragments and occurred at velocities 50% higher than the major league ball.

  5. Craniomaxillofacial fractures during recreational baseball and softball.

    PubMed

    Bak, Matthew J; Doerr, Timothy D

    2004-10-01

    Baseball and softball are leading causes of sports-related facial trauma in the United States. We review our institutional experience (Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, NY) with these injuries and discuss measures to reduce their incidence. We review our institutions experience with facial fractures sustained during the course of a softball or baseball game over a 12-year period. A total of 38 patients were identified and medical records analyzed for patient demographics, type of impact, and fracture location. The male-to-female ratio was 3.2:1; mean age was 24.2 years, with 17 (45%) of the injuries occurring in the pediatric population. The majority of the injuries were caused by direct impact with the ball (68%), while player-player collisions (18%) and impact from a swung bat (13%) were responsible for the remaining injuries. There were a total of 39 fractures; 18 fractures (46%) involved the midface (level 2), skull (level 1) fractures accounted for 12 (31%), while 9 (23%) were mandibular (level 3) fractures. With 68% of the injuries resulting from a ball impact, we endorse the recommendations of the Consumer Product Safety Commission for the use of low-impact National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment-approved baseballs and softballs for youth and recreational leagues.

  6. Blunt forehead trauma and optic canal involvement: finite element analysis of anterior skull base and orbit on causes of vision impairment.

    PubMed

    Huempfner-Hierl, Heike; Bohne, Alexander; Wollny, Gert; Sterker, Ina; Hierl, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Clinical studies report on vision impairment after blunt frontal head trauma. A possible cause is damage to the optic nerve bundle within the optic canal due to microfractures of the anterior skull base leading to indirect traumatic optic neuropathy. A finite element study simulating impact forces on the paramedian forehead in different grades was initiated. The set-up consisted of a high-resolution skull model with about 740 000 elements, a blunt impactor and was solved in a transient time-dependent simulation. Individual bone material parameters were calculated for each volume element to increase realism. Results showed stress propagation from the frontal impact towards the optic foramen and the chiasm even at low-force fist-like impacts. Higher impacts produced stress patterns corresponding to typical fracture patterns of the anterior skull base including the optic canal. Transient simulation discerned two stress peaks equalling oscillation. It can be concluded that even comparatively low stresses and oscillation in the optic foramen may cause micro damage undiscerned by CT or MRI explaining consecutive vision loss. Higher impacts lead to typical comminuted fractures, which may affect the integrity of the optic canal. Finite element simulation can be effectively used in studying head trauma and its clinical consequences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Proton therapy for tumors of the base of the skull.

    PubMed

    Noel, Georges; Gondi, Vinai

    2016-08-01

    Relative to conventional photon irradiation, proton therapy has distinct advantages in its ability to more precisely target tumor while shielding adjacent normal tissues. In the setting of skull base tumors, proton therapy plays a critical role in the dose-escalation required for optimal tumor control of chordomas, chondrosarcomas, and malignancies of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. For benign tumors such as craniopharyngiomas, pituitary adenomas and meningiomas, proton therapy can limit long-term adverse effects, such as secondary malignancies. This review summarizes published literature to date regarding the role of proton therapy in skull base tumors and introduces emerging proton therapy approaches such as pencil-beam scanning (PBS).

  8. Recurrent mandibular ameloblastoma with anterior skull base invasion: Case report.

    PubMed

    Santini, L; Varoquaux, A; Giovanni, A; Dessi, P; Michel, J

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent ameloblastoma with skull base invasion is a rare clinical entity with poor prognosis. We report a case of a mandibular ameloblastoma recurrence involving the anterior skull base. The diagnostic and therapeutic processes are presented with emphasis on the radiologic features of ameloblastoma. Another aim of this case report is to underline the importance of close and long-term follow-up after resection. Ameloblastoma recurrences are frequent and mainly occur after incomplete surgical resection. These recurrences may be diagnosed late because of lack of symptoms in the mandibular area.

  9. [Primary lymphoma of the skull: Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Issara, K; Yossi, S; Caraivan, I

    2016-12-01

    Primitive lymphomas of the bone are exceptional tumors, representing 4% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The location at the skull remains the rarest. We report the case of a 56 year old patient with lytic lesions in the skull of a small cell lymphoma B, treated with primary chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in arctherapy with a dose of 30Gy in 15 fractions. With a follow-up time of 18 months after the end of treatment, the patient has no sign of disease evolution.

  10. Skull base osteomyelitis presenting with an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kasfiki, Eirini Vasileiou; Kelly, Ciaran; Smith, John; Nicolaides, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This is the first case of skull base osteomyelitis presenting with isolated bilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy reported in the literature. A 75-year-old man presented with tongue paralysis without any other cranial nerve palsy. He was otherwise well apart from recently having a high prostate-specific antigen level recorded. Investigations for malignancy or cerebrovascular insult were negative with the diagnosis of skull base osteomyelitis confirmed using CT. Following treatment with intravenous antibiotics for 6 weeks, symptoms resolved. PMID:23853016

  11. Endoscopic Skull Base Reconstruction: An Evolution of Materials and Methods.

    PubMed

    Sigler, Aaron C; D'Anza, Brian; Lobo, Brian C; Woodard, Troy; Recinos, Pablo F; Sindwani, Raj

    2017-03-31

    Endoscopic skull base surgery has developed rapidly over the last decade, in large part because of the expanding armamentarium of endoscopic repair techniques. This article reviews the available technologies and techniques, including vascularized and nonvascularized flaps, synthetic grafts, sealants and glues, and multilayer reconstruction. Understanding which of these repair methods is appropriate and under what circumstances is paramount to achieving success in this challenging but rewarding field. A graduated approach to skull base reconstruction is presented to provide a systematic framework to guide selection of repair technique to ensure a successful outcome while minimizing morbidity for the patient.

  12. Temporal bone fracture following blunt trauma caused by a flying fish.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D; Karam, M; Danino, J; Flax-Goldenberg, R; Joachims, H Z

    1998-10-01

    Blunt trauma to the temporal region can cause fracture of the skull base, loss of hearing, vestibular symptoms and otorrhoea. The most common causes of blunt trauma to the ear and surrounding area are motor vehicle accidents, violent encounters, and sports-related accidents. We present an obscure case of a man who was struck in the ear by a flying fish while wading in the sea with resulting temporal bone fracture, sudden deafness, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea, and pneumocephalus.

  13. Long-term outcome of extensive skull reconstruction using demineralized perforated bone in Siamese twins joined at the skull vertex.

    PubMed

    Salyer, K E; Gendler, E; Squier, C A

    1997-05-01

    The successful use of cortical demineralized perforated bone in the treatment of extensive skeletal defects in children is exemplified by this case involving Siamese twins joined at the skull vertex. Four years following extensive skull reconstruction using demineralized perforated bone, an examination revealed successful calvarial reconstruction in one twin. The other twin required additional implants of demineralized perforated bone to fill in defects. However, a histologic examination taken following this additional procedure revealed that these implants neither caused tissue reaction over a 4-year period, nor showed signs of resorption. Bony remodeling and new bone formation were in progress. Compared with other bone substitutes, demineralized perforated bone has proven to be effective in the treatment of large skull defects in children.

  14. Segmentation, surface rendering, and surface simplification of 3-D skull images for the repair of a large skull defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weibing; Shi, Pengfei; Li, Shuguang

    2009-10-01

    Given the potential demonstrated by research into bone-tissue engineering, the use of medical image data for the rapid prototyping (RP) of scaffolds is a subject worthy of research. Computer-aided design and manufacture and medical imaging have created new possibilities for RP. Accurate and efficient design and fabrication of anatomic models is critical to these applications. We explore the application of RP computational methods to the repair of a pediatric skull defect. The focus of this study is the segmentation of the defect region seen in computerized tomography (CT) slice images of this patient's skull and the three-dimensional (3-D) surface rendering of the patient's CT-scan data. We see if our segmentation and surface rendering software can improve the generation of an implant model to fill a skull defect.

  15. Forecasting the burden of future postmenopausal hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Omsland, T K; Magnus, J H

    2014-10-01

    A growing elderly population is expected worldwide, and the rate of hip fractures is decisive for the future fracture burden. Significant declines in hip fracture rates in Norway, the USA, France, Germany, and the UK are required to counteract the impact of the ageing effects. This study aims to evaluate the consequences of the expected growth of the elderly population worldwide on the hip fracture burden using Norway as an example. Furthermore, we wanted to estimate the decline in hip fracture rates required to counteract the anticipated increase in the burden of hip fracture for Norway, the USA, France, Germany, and the UK. The burden of future postmenopausal hip fractures in Norway were estimated given (1) constant age-specific rates, (2) continued decline, and (3) different cohort scenarios. Based on population projection estimates and population age-specific hip fracture rates in women 65 years and older, we calculated the required declines in hip fracture rates needed to counteract the growing elderly populations in Norway, the USA, France, Germany, and the UK. The level of age-specific hip fracture rates had a huge impact on the future hip fracture burden in Norway. Even if the hip fracture rates decline at the same speed, a 22 % increase in the burden of hip fractures can be expected by 2040. An annual decline in hip fracture rates of 1.1-2.2 % until 2040 is required to counteract the effects of the growing elderly population on the future burden of hip fractures in Norway, the USA, France, Germany, and the UK. Hip fracture rates have a great impact on the burden of hip fractures. The rates will have to decline significantly to counteract the impact of a growing elderly population. A change in preventive strategies and further studies are warranted to identify the complex causes associated to hip fractures.

  16. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Malleolar fracture; Tri-malleolar; Bi-malleolar; Distal tibia fracture; Distal fibula fracture; Malleolus fracture ... Some ankle fractures may require surgery when: The ends of the bone are out of line with each other (displaced). The ...

  17. If the skull fits: magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for combined analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Brian J; Blank, Marissa C; Roman, Brian B; Henkelman, R Mark; Millen, Kathleen J

    2012-10-17

    The mammalian brain and skull develop concurrently in a coordinated manner, consistently producing a brain and skull that fit tightly together. It is common that abnormalities in one are associated with related abnormalities in the other. However, this is not always the case. A complete characterization of the relationship between brain and skull phenotypes is necessary to understand the mechanisms that cause them to be coordinated or divergent and to provide perspective on the potential diagnostic or prognostic significance of brain and skull phenotypes. We demonstrate the combined use of magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse. Co-registration of brain and skull images allows comparison of the relationship between phenotypes in the brain and those in the skull. We observe a close fit between the brain and skull of two genetic mouse models that both show abnormal brain and skull phenotypes. Application of these three-dimensional image analyses in a broader range of mouse mutants will provide a map of the relationships between brain and skull phenotypes generally and allow characterization of patterns of similarities and differences.

  18. If the skull fits: magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for combined analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Marissa C.; Roman, Brian B.; Henkelman, R. Mark; Millen, Kathleen J.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian brain and skull develop concurrently in a coordinated manner, consistently producing a brain and skull that fit tightly together. It is common that abnormalities in one are associated with related abnormalities in the other. However, this is not always the case. A complete characterization of the relationship between brain and skull phenotypes is necessary to understand the mechanisms that cause them to be coordinated or divergent and to provide perspective on the potential diagnostic or prognostic significance of brain and skull phenotypes. We demonstrate the combined use of magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse. Co-registration of brain and skull images allows comparison of the relationship between phenotypes in the brain and those in the skull. We observe a close fit between the brain and skull of two genetic mouse models that both show abnormal brain and skull phenotypes. Application of these three-dimensional image analyses in a broader range of mouse mutants will provide a map of the relationships between brain and skull phenotypes generally and allow characterization of patterns of similarities and differences. PMID:22947655

  19. [Craniofacial fractures].

    PubMed

    Benech, A; Gerbino, G

    1990-12-01

    Results of early combined maxillo-facial and neurosurgical treatment of 53 craniofacial fractures are referred. The fracture location was in 31 cases central midfrontal, 10 lateral supraorbital and 12 combined central and lateral fractures. 35 fractures interested the floor and the posterior wall of frontal sinus, lacerating the underlying dura and cortical tissue. In 19 fractures orbital displacement was present. The key points in the management of these patients are: 1) Early (within 1 to 5 days) and one stage neurosurgical-maxillofacial procedure. Immediate intervention is indicated only in case of evolutive neurological lesions; 2) wide exposition of all the injuries through bicoronal incision and bone flap; 3) assessment of fractures pattern and amount of bone loss; 4) reconstruction of craniofacial frame with osteosynthesis and autologous bone grafts (35 cases iliac crest, 7 split calvarial graft); 5) interosseous wiring is used in sutured mosaic, small bone fragments and intraoperative temporary fixation; miniplates are used for rigid fixation of craniofacial pillars; 6) for optimal cosmetic result reconstruction of supraorbital ridge, nasoglabellar region and zygomatic arch is essential; 7) fractures involving the sinus floor, posterior wall and the nasofrontal duct result in direct communication between the nose and intracranial cavity with high risk of infection and mucocele formation. Cranialization of the sinus removing the posterior wall and all the mucosa is mandatory. The nasofrontal duct, the floor and sinus dead space are obliterated with autologous bone chips. Osteoneogenesis occurred in all the cases.

  20. Fracture line distribution of olecranon fractures.

    PubMed

    Lubberts, Bart; Mellema, Jos J; Janssen, Stein J; Ring, David

    2017-01-01

    The association between specific olecranon fracture characteristics (e.g., displacement, fragmentation, subluxation) and fracture line distribution might help surgeons predict intra-articular fracture location based on fracture characteristics that can be determined on radiographs. We hypothesized that fracture mapping techniques would reveal different fracture patterns for minimally displaced fractures, displaced fractures, and fracture-dislocations of the olecranon. A consecutive series of 78 patients with olecranon fractures were evaluated using initial radiographs and computed tomography scans and characterized according to the Mayo classification. Fracture lines were identified based on reduced three-dimensional computed tomography reconstructions and graphically superimposed onto a standard template to create two-dimensional fracture maps. The fracture maps were then converted into fracture heat maps. Based on fracture and heat maps, fracture line location and patterns were determined. Six (7.7%) patients had a non- or minimally displaced fracture, 22 (28%) a displaced fracture, and 50 (64%) a fracture-dislocation of the olecranon. There were 27 (54%) anterior and 23 (46%) posterior olecranon fracture-dislocations. Fracture lines of non- or minimally displaced fractures and posterior fracture-dislocations enter and exit the trochlear notch at the base of the coronoid, while fracture lines of displaced fractures and anterior fracture-dislocations were spread more broadly over the depths of the trochlear notch. Based on fracture characteristics depicted on radiographs, one can anticipate the amount of the olecranon involved (how close is the fracture line to the coronoid) and the orientation of the fracture line. Computer tomography could be reserved for when more specific knowledge of the fracture line might affect treatment. III.

  1. Impact of facial fractures and intracranial injuries on hospitalization outcomes following firearm injuries.

    PubMed

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Nalliah, Romesh; Lee, Min Kyeong; Rampa, Sankeerth; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-04-01

    Firearm injuries (FAIs) play a major role in unintentional injuries, suicides, and homicides. It is important that policy makers, public health authorities, physicians, and the public are kept abreast of current trends in FAIs so that preventive programs can be tailored to the needs of cohorts that are at highest risk for such injuries. To provide nationally representative longitudinal estimates of outcomes associated with hospitalizations attributed to FAIs in all age groups in the United States during the years 2003 to 2010; to obtain prevalence estimates of skull and/or facial fractures and intracranial injuries among those hospitalized owing to firearm injuries; and to examine the association between the occurrence of skull and/or facial fractures and/or intracranial injuries and in-hospital mortality. In this retrospective analysis of the largest all-payer hospitalization data set in the United States, we evaluate a Nationwide Inpatient Sample of patients hospitalized for FAIs during the years 2003 to 2010. Face and/or skull fracture and/or intracranial injuries due to firearm injuries. The main outcome of interest was in-hospital mortality. The primary independent variables included occurrence of face and/or skull fracture and/or intracranial injuries. RESULTS During the study period, 252,181 visits were attributed to FAIs. Adolescents and young adults accounted for nearly 80% of all hospitalizations, with more than half of these in the 18- to 29-year-old, high-risk group. Male patients consistently accounted for 89% of the hospitalizations. The uninsured population accounted for nearly a third of hospitalizations. A total of 214,221 FAI hospitalizations did not involve facial and/or skull fractures or intracranial injuries; 13,090 involved a facial and/or skull fracture without a concomitant intracranial injury; 20,453 involved an intracranial injury without a concomitant facial and/or skull fracture; and 4417 involved both a facial and/or skull fracture and

  2. Surgical technique for repair of complex anterior skull base defects.

    PubMed

    Reinard, Kevin; Basheer, Azam; Jones, Lamont; Standring, Robert; Lee, Ian; Rock, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Modern microsurgical techniques enable en bloc resection of complex skull base tumors. Anterior cranial base surgery, particularly, has been associated with a high rate of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and pneumocephalus. We introduce simple modifications to already existing surgical strategies designed to minimize the incidence of postoperative CSF leak and associated morbidity and mortality. Medical records from 1995 to 2013 were reviewed in accordance with the Institutional Review Board. We identified 21 patients who underwent operations for repair of large anterior skull base defects following removal of sinonasal or intracranial pathology using standard craniofacial procedures. Patient charts were screened for CSF leak, meningitis, or intracranial abscess formation. A total of 15 male and 6 female patients with an age range of 26-89 years were included. All patients were managed with the same operative technique for reconstruction of the frontal dura and skull base defect. Spinal drainage was used intraoperatively in all cases but the lumbar drain was removed at the end of each case in all patients. Only one patient required re-operation for repair of persistent CSF leak. None of the patients developed meningitis or intracranial abscess. There were no perioperative mortalities. Median follow-up was 10 months. The layered reconstruction of large anterior cranial fossa defects resulted in postoperative CSF leak in only 5% of the patients and represents a simple and effective closure option for skull base surgeons.

  3. Emergency Decompressive Craniotomy with Banked Skull Flap in Subcutaneous Pocket

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    following differential diagnosis: liquified hematoma , seroma, abscess, or proteinaceous fluid collection. Since the cultures were negative for bacteria...liquified hematoma was the working diagnosis. After surgical removal of skull cap from abdomen, it was decided to use prosthetic cranioplasty...most frequent principle diagnosis in patients receiving such surgeries is subdural hemorrhage.4 Recent studies demonstrate efficacy of banked bone

  4. Human Temporal Bone Removal: The Skull Base Block Method.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Christine; Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Moon, Seo; Angeli, Simon; Eshraghi, Adrien; Telischi, Fred F

    2015-08-01

    Objectives To describe a technique for harvesting larger temporal bone specimens from human cadavers for the training of otolaryngology residents and fellows on the various approaches to the lateral and posterolateral skull base. Design Human cadaveric anatomical study. The calvarium was excised 6 cm above the superior aspect of the ear canal. The brain and cerebellum were carefully removed, and the cranial nerves were cut sharply. Two bony cuts were performed, one in the midsagittal plane and the other in the coronal plane at the level of the optic foramen. Setting Medical school anatomy laboratory. Participants Human cadavers. Main Outcome Measures Anatomical contents of specimens and technical effort required. Results Larger temporal bone specimens containing portions of the parietal, occipital, and sphenoidal bones were consistently obtained using this technique of two bone cuts. All specimens were inspected and contained pertinent surface and skull base landmarks. Conclusions The skull base block method allows for larger temporal bone specimens using a two bone cut technique that is efficient and reproducible. These specimens have the necessary anatomical bony landmarks for studying the complexity, utility, and limitations of lateral and posterolateral approaches to the skull base, important for the education of otolaryngology residents and fellows.

  5. Evolution of Skull and Mandible Shape in Cats (Carnivora: Felidae)

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Per

    2008-01-01

    The felid family consists of two major subgroups, the sabretoothed and the feline cats, to which all extant species belong, and are the most anatomically derived of all carnivores for predation on large prey with a precision killing bite. There has been much controversy and uncertainty about why the skulls and mandibles of sabretoothed and feline cats evolved to become so anatomically divergent, but previous models have focused on single characters and no unifying hypothesis of evolutionary shape changes has been formulated. Here I show that the shape of the skull and mandible in derived sabrecats occupy entirely different positions within overall morphospace from feline cats, and that the evolution of skull and mandible shape has followed very different paths in the two subgroups. When normalised for body-size differences, evolution of bite forces differ markedly in the two groups, and are much lower in derived sabrecats, and they show a significant relationship with size and cranial shape, whereas no such relationship is present in feline cats. Evolution of skull and mandible shape in modern cats has been governed by the need for uniform powerful biting irrespective of body size, whereas in sabrecats, shape evolution was governed by selective pressures for efficient predation with hypertrophied upper canines at high gape angles, and bite forces were secondary and became progressively weaker during sabrecat evolution. The current study emphasises combinations of new techniques for morphological shape analysis and biomechanical studies to formulate evolutionary hypotheses for difficult groups. PMID:18665225

  6. Skull Size and Intelligence, and King Robert Bruce's IQ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Barrow, Geoffrey W. S.; Reid, Louise M.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M. J.

    2007-01-01

    An estimate of someone's IQ is a potentially informative personal datum. This study examines the association between external skull measurements and IQ scores, and uses the resulting regression equation to provide an estimate of the IQ of King Robert I of Scotland (Robert Bruce, 1274-1329). Participants were 48 relatively healthy Caucasian men…

  7. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect.

  8. A Quantitative Analysis of Published Skull Base Endoscopy Literature.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Douglas A; Ponce, Francisco A; Little, Andrew S; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Objectives Skull base endoscopy allows for minimal access approaches to the sinonasal contents and cranial base. Advances in endoscopic technique and applications have been published rapidly in recent decades. Setting We utilized an Internet-based scholarly database (Web of Science, Thomson Reuters) to query broad-based phrases regarding skull base endoscopy literature. Participants All skull base endoscopy publications. Main Outcome Measures Standard bibliometrics outcomes. Results We identified 4,082 relevant skull base endoscopy English-language articles published between 1973 and 2014. The 50 top-cited publications (n = 51, due to articles with equal citation counts) ranged in citation count from 397 to 88. Most of the articles were clinical case series or technique descriptions. Most (96% [49/51])were published in journals specific to either neurosurgery or otolaryngology. Conclusions A relatively small number of institutions and individuals have published a large amount of the literature. Most of the publications consisted of case series and technical advances, with a lack of randomized trials.

  9. A Quantitative Analysis of Published Skull Base Endoscopy Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hardesty, Douglas A.; Ponce, Francisco A.; Little, Andrew S.; Nakaji, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Skull base endoscopy allows for minimal access approaches to the sinonasal contents and cranial base. Advances in endoscopic technique and applications have been published rapidly in recent decades. Setting We utilized an Internet-based scholarly database (Web of Science, Thomson Reuters) to query broad-based phrases regarding skull base endoscopy literature. Participants All skull base endoscopy publications. Main Outcome Measures Standard bibliometrics outcomes. Results We identified 4,082 relevant skull base endoscopy English-language articles published between 1973 and 2014. The 50 top-cited publications (n = 51, due to articles with equal citation counts) ranged in citation count from 397 to 88. Most of the articles were clinical case series or technique descriptions. Most (96% [49/51])were published in journals specific to either neurosurgery or otolaryngology. Conclusions A relatively small number of institutions and individuals have published a large amount of the literature. Most of the publications consisted of case series and technical advances, with a lack of randomized trials. PMID:26949585

  10. Skull base metastases causing acute bilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Rotta, F T; Romano, J G

    1997-05-01

    Acute bilateral tongue palsy is a rare clinical presentation. We report one such case caused by skull base metastases from prostate cancer. There were no other cranial nerves involved or associated neurological deficit. Mild improvement was seen following radiation therapy. We review the anatomy of the nerve and differential diagnosis of its disfunction.

  11. Surgical technique for repair of complex anterior skull base defects

    PubMed Central

    Reinard, Kevin; Basheer, Azam; Jones, Lamont; Standring, Robert; Lee, Ian; Rock, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modern microsurgical techniques enable en bloc resection of complex skull base tumors. Anterior cranial base surgery, particularly, has been associated with a high rate of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and pneumocephalus. We introduce simple modifications to already existing surgical strategies designed to minimize the incidence of postoperative CSF leak and associated morbidity and mortality. Methods: Medical records from 1995 to 2013 were reviewed in accordance with the Institutional Review Board. We identified 21 patients who underwent operations for repair of large anterior skull base defects following removal of sinonasal or intracranial pathology using standard craniofacial procedures. Patient charts were screened for CSF leak, meningitis, or intracranial abscess formation. Results: A total of 15 male and 6 female patients with an age range of 26–89 years were included. All patients were managed with the same operative technique for reconstruction of the frontal dura and skull base defect. Spinal drainage was used intraoperatively in all cases but the lumbar drain was removed at the end of each case in all patients. Only one patient required re-operation for repair of persistent CSF leak. None of the patients developed meningitis or intracranial abscess. There were no perioperative mortalities. Median follow-up was 10 months. Conclusion: The layered reconstruction of large anterior cranial fossa defects resulted in postoperative CSF leak in only 5% of the patients and represents a simple and effective closure option for skull base surgeons. PMID:25722926

  12. Postmortem 3-D reconstruction of skull gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Peschel, O; Szeimies, U; Vollmar, C; Kirchhoff, S

    2013-12-10

    In cases of severe decomposition or skeletonization of a corpse after cerebral gun shot injury it is difficult to exactly reconstruct the bullet path in the brain. However, in case of murder or homicide this might become necessary to answer forensic questions such as the ability to move or other actions of the victim. Therefore a method in terms of three dimensional reconstruction technique was developed by fusing computed tomography scans (CT) of the original skull and magnetic resonance images (MRI) of a normal brain of adequate size. Hereby five cases were investigated. In three cases an excellent concordance between the reconstructed bullet trajectory and the autopsy reports was achieved. In one case the original brain was not available for CT-scanning due to previous autopsy. However, the findings were in line with the pathology report. In one case there was a difference of about 1-2 cm between the original autopsy description and the reconstructed bullet path. This was due to only a part of the skull being available for image reconstruction. The findings suggest that this method can successfully be applied to adequately reconstruct bullet paths in cases of completely skeletonized skulls, but should carefully be used in cases of incomplete skulls. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Skull Size and Intelligence, and King Robert Bruce's IQ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Barrow, Geoffrey W. S.; Reid, Louise M.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M. J.

    2007-01-01

    An estimate of someone's IQ is a potentially informative personal datum. This study examines the association between external skull measurements and IQ scores, and uses the resulting regression equation to provide an estimate of the IQ of King Robert I of Scotland (Robert Bruce, 1274-1329). Participants were 48 relatively healthy Caucasian men…

  14. Solitary Intramedullary Plasmacytoma of the Skull Base Mimicking Aggressive Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Joel R.; Roychowdhury, Sudipta; Cybulski, George; Russell, Eric J.

    1997-01-01

    The authors present an unusual case of solitary intramedullary plasmacytoma. Awareness of this entity can facilitate appropriate surgical planning, which may include a limited biopsy prior to considering more extensive skull base surgery. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17170997

  15. Evolution of skull and mandible shape in cats (Carnivora: Felidae).

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Per

    2008-07-30

    The felid family consists of two major subgroups, the sabretoothed and the feline cats, to which all extant species belong, and are the most anatomically derived of all carnivores for predation on large prey with a precision killing bite. There has been much controversy and uncertainty about why the skulls and mandibles of sabretoothed and feline cats evolved to become so anatomically divergent, but previous models have focused on single characters and no unifying hypothesis of evolutionary shape changes has been formulated. Here I show that the shape of the skull and mandible in derived sabrecats occupy entirely different positions within overall morphospace from feline cats, and that the evolution of skull and mandible shape has followed very different paths in the two subgroups. When normalised for body-size differences, evolution of bite forces differ markedly in the two groups, and are much lower in derived sabrecats, and they show a significant relationship with size and cranial shape, whereas no such relationship is present in feline cats. Evolution of skull and mandible shape in modern cats has been governed by the need for uniform powerful biting irrespective of body size, whereas in sabrecats, shape evolution was governed by selective pressures for efficient predation with hypertrophied upper canines at high gape angles, and bite forces were secondary and became progressively weaker during sabrecat evolution. The current study emphasises combinations of new techniques for morphological shape analysis and biomechanical studies to formulate evolutionary hypotheses for difficult groups.

  16. Reliability of Craniofacial Superimposition Using Three-Dimension Skull Model.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Daniel; Olivieri, Lara; De Angelis, Danilo; Poppa, Pasquale; Galassi, Andrea; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial superimposition is a technique potentially useful for the identification of unidentified human remains if a photo of the missing person is available. We have tested the reliability of the 2D-3D computer-aided nonautomatic superimposition techniques. Three-dimension laser scans of five skulls and ten photographs were overlaid with an imaging software. The resulting superimpositions were evaluated using three methods: craniofacial landmarks, morphological features, and a combination of the two. A 3D model of each skull without its mandible was tested for superimposition; we also evaluated whether separating skulls by sex would increase correct identifications. Results show that the landmark method employing the entire skull is the more reliable one (5/5 correct identifications, 40% false positives [FP]), regardless of sex. However, the persistence of a high percentage of FP in all the methods evaluated indicates that these methods are unreliable for positive identification although the landmark-only method could be useful for exclusion. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Gravity-Driven Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Garagash, D.; Murdoch, L. C.; Robinowitz, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study is motived by a new method for disposing of nuclear waste by injecting it as a dense slurry into a hydraulic fracture that grows downward to great enough depth to permanently isolate the waste. Disposing of nuclear waste using gravity-driven hydraulic fractures is mechanically similar to the upward growth of dikes filled with low density magma. A fundamental question in both applications is how the injected fluid controls the propagation dynamics and fracture geometry (depth and breadth) in three dimensions. Analog experiments in gelatin [e.g., Heimpel and Olson, 1994; Taisne and Tait, 2009] show that fracture breadth (the short horizontal dimension) remains nearly stationary when the process in the fracture "head" (where breadth is controlled) is dominated by solid toughness, whereas viscous fluid dissipation is dominant in the fracture tail. We model propagation of the resulting gravity-driven (buoyant or sinking), finger-like fracture of stationary breadth with slowly varying opening along the crack length. The elastic response to fluid loading in a horizontal cross-section is local and can be treated similar to the classical Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) model of hydraulic fracturing. The propagation condition for a finger-like crack is based on balancing the global energy release rate due to a unit crack extension with the rock fracture toughness. It allows us to relate the net fluid pressure at the tip to the fracture breadth and rock toughness. Unlike the PKN fracture, where breadth is known a priori, the final breadth of a finger-like fracture is a result of processes in the fracture head. Because the head is much more open than the tail, viscous pressure drop in the head can be neglected leading to a 3D analog of Weertman's hydrostatic pulse. This requires relaxing the local elasticity assumption of the PKN model in the fracture head. As a result, we resolve the breadth, and then match the viscosity-dominated tail with the 3-D, toughness

  18. Skull base osteomyelitis: the effect of comorbid disease on hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Rothholtz, Vanessa S; Lee, Alice D; Shamloo, Bahman; Bazargan, Mohsen; Pan, Deya; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2008-11-01

    Skull base osteomyelitis is a rare disease that has a high morbidity and mortality rate if diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Our objective was to perform a more detailed analysis of skull base osteomyelitis in the inpatient population. We also provide a more comprehensive evaluation of comorbid disease and severity of illness in this population and describe their effects on the duration and cost of hospital stay. Review of the California Hospital Discharge Database between the years 1990 and 2000. Information evaluated included age, race, insurance, charges and length of hospital stay, comorbid disease, severity of illness, and disposition. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and linear regression analysis. The overall incidence of skull base osteomyelitis ranged from 57 to 95 cases annually (median 75.5). Whites (69.3%) were more likely to present with the disease than Native Americans (13.2%), African Americans (6.5%), or Asians (2.9%). The majority of patients diagnosed with skull base osteomyelitis had Medicare or public assistance (62%) compared with those with Preferred Provider Organization or Health Maintenance Organization insurance (27%). Increased length of hospital stay and increased charges incurred during hospitalization were significantly associated (P < .05) with aplastic anemia, renal disease, arteriosclerosis, facial nerve dysfunction, and diabetes. Severity of illness and the presence of one or more comorbid conditions also significantly affected the duration and charges incurred during hospital stay (P < .05). The presence of concurrent illness with skull base osteomyelitis significantly affects the duration of hospital stay and the charges incurred during hospitalization.

  19. Micrometeorite Impacts in Beringian Mammoth Tusks and a Bison Skull

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrum, Jonathon T.; Firestone, Richard B; West, Allen; Stefanka, Zsolt; Revay, Zsolt

    2010-02-03

    We have discovered what appear to be micrometeorites imbedded in seven late Pleistocene Alaskan mammoth tusks and a Siberian bison skull. The micrometeorites apparently shattered on impact leaving 2 to 5 mm hemispherical debris patterns surrounded by carbonized rings. Multiple impacts are observed on only one side of the tusks and skull consistent with the micrometeorites having come from a single direction. The impact sites are strongly magnetic indicating significant iron content. We analyzed several imbedded micrometeorite fragments from both tusks and skull with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These analyses confirm the high iron content and indicate compositions highly enriched in nickel and depleted in titanium, unlike any natural terrestrial sources. In addition, electron microprobe (EMP) analyses of a Fe-Ni sulfide grain (tusk 2) show it contains between 3 and 20 weight percent Ni. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) of a particle extracted from the bison skull indicates ~;;0.4 mg of iron, in agreement with a micrometeorite ~;;1 mm in diameter. In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and XRF analyses of the skull show possible entry channels containing Fe-rich material. The majority of tusks (5/7) have a calibrated weighted mean 14C age of 32.9 +- 1.8 ka BP, which coincides with the onset of significant declines<36 ka ago in Beringian bison, horse, brown bear, and mammoth populations, as well as in mammoth genetic diversity. It appears likely that the impacts and population declines are related events, although their precise nature remains to be determined.

  20. [Clinical features and comprehensive treatment of skull base osteosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke; Wan, Jinghai; Ni, Song; Li, Xueji; Liu, Shaoyan; Meng, Xiaoli; Qian, Haipeng

    2015-05-01

    To analyze the clinical features and treatment of skull base osteosarcoma. The clinical data of 18 patients with skull base osteosarcoma, who were admitted to the CAMS Cancer Hospital from January 2005 to November 2013, were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were followed up by telephone, outpatient review and other means. Fifteen patients were followed up, 4 cases received surgery only, and 11 cases received surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis was used to analyze the clinical data and Log rank method was used for verification. Nine patients died among the 15 patients who were followed up for 3-103 months (mean 25.0 months): seven patients died of local recurrence, and two patients died of distant metastasis, and six patients were still alive. Four patients received surgery only, with a median survival time of 25.0 months, and 11 patients received comprehensive treatment, with a median survival time of 47.0 months (P = 0.02). Five patients received sub-total resection, with a mean survival time of 47.0 months, and 10 patients received total resection, with a mean survival time of 45.0 months (P = 0.37). The 1- and 2-year recurrence rates were 46.6% and 68.9%, respectively. The overall 1-, 2-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 82.4%, 61.8%, 36.0% and 36.0%, respectively, with a median survival time of 30.0 months. To compare the long bone and head and neck osteosarcoma with skull base osteosarcoma, the skull base osteosarcoma has a lower total resection rate, a higher recurrence rate, and a poorer prognosis. Radical surgery and comprehensive treatment are appropriate for skull base osteosarcoma.

  1. Longitudinal and shear mode ultrasound propagation in human skull bone

    PubMed Central

    White, P.J.; Clement, G.T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have attempted to dispel the idea of the longitudinal mode being the only significant mode of ultrasound energy transport through the skull bone. The inclusion of shear waves in propagation models has been largely ignored because of an assumption that shear mode conversions from the skull interfaces to the surrounding media rendered the resulting acoustic field insignificant in amplitude and overly distorted. Experimental investigations with isotropic phantom materials and ex vivo human skulls demonstrated that, in certain cases, a shear mode propagation scenario not only can be less distorted, but at times allowed for a substantial (as much as 36% of the longitudinal pressure amplitude) transmission of energy. The phase speed of 1.0-MHz shear mode propagation through ex vivo human skull specimens has been measured to be nearly half of that of the longitudinal mode (shear sound speed = 1500±140 m/s, longitudinal sound speed = 2820±40 m/s), demonstrating that a closer match in impedance can be achieved between the skull and surrounding soft tissues with shear mode transmission. By comparing propagation model results with measurements of transcranial ultrasound transmission obtained by a radiation force method, the attenuation coefficient for the longitudinal mode of propagation was determined to between 14 Np/m and 70 Np/m for the frequency range studied while the same for shear waves was found to be between 94 Np/m and 213 Np/m. This study was performed within the frequency range of 0.2–0.9 MHz. (E-mail: white@bwh.harvard.edu) PMID:16829322

  2. Typical external skull beveling wound unlinked with a gunshot.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Y; Colard, T; Becart, A; Tournel, G; Gosset, D; Hedouin, V

    2013-03-10

    Lesions of the cranial vault resulting from firearms are traditionally described in forensic medical literature with many reports illustrating atypical bone lesions carried out to the skull by gunshot wounds. The authors present this report which illustrates an external beveled skull wound, associated with internal beveling damage, caused by a stabbing injury. A partially buried human skeleton was found in a forest. The examining of the skull revealed a hole resembling the exit wound caused by a bullet and two other smaller stab wounds. No typical entering bullet wound and no other bone lesions were found. During the course of the investigation, one of the perpetrators admitted to hitting the victim, using a sickle, and to hiding the body. For this purpose, he dragged the corpse with the sickle still implanted in the skull, using it as a hook. Upon retrieving the sickle, a piece of cranial vault was removed, thus creating an external beveled wound. In order to identify the mechanism which brought about this kind of lesion, experimental work was carried out on a human skull. In this particular case, the tip of the sickle penetrated into the bone, creating a lesion that would typically be produced with a stabbing instrument when applied with vertical force. When the body was dragged, using the sickle as a hook, this was a hand-produced vertical force, which was applied in the opposite direction. It caused the tearing of a piece of bone and the creation of an outer bevel. This atypical lesion should be made known to medical examiners and pathologists in order to help investigating and understanding of the circumstances of injuries.

  3. A Giant Pliosaurid Skull from the Late Jurassic of England

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Roger B. J.; Evans, Mark; Smith, Adam S.; Sassoon, Judyth; Moore-Faye, Scott; Ketchum, Hilary F.; Forrest, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Pliosaurids were a long-lived and cosmopolitan group of marine predators that spanned 110 million years and occupied the upper tiers of marine ecosystems from the Middle Jurassic until the early Late Cretaceous. A well-preserved giant pliosaurid skull from the Late Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation of Dorset, United Kingdom, represents a new species, Pliosaurus kevani. This specimen is described in detail, and the taxonomy and systematics of Late Jurassic pliosaurids is revised. We name two additional new species, Pliosaurus carpenteri and Pliosaurus westburyensis, based on previously described relatively complete, well-preserved remains. Most or all Late Jurassic pliosaurids represent a globally distributed monophyletic group (the genus Pliosaurus, excluding ‘Pliosaurus’ andrewsi). Despite its high species diversity, and geographically widespread, temporally extensive occurrence, Pliosaurus shows relatively less morphological and ecological variation than is seen in earlier, multi-genus pliosaurid assemblages such as that of the Middle Jurassic Oxford Clay Formation. It also shows less ecological variation than the pliosaurid-like Cretaceous clade Polycotylidae. Species of Pliosaurus had robust skulls, large body sizes (with skull lengths of 1.7–2.1 metres), and trihedral or subtrihedral teeth suggesting macropredaceous habits. Our data support a trend of decreasing length of the mandibular symphysis through Late Jurassic time, as previously suggested. This may be correlated with increasing adaptation to feeding on large prey. Maximum body size of pliosaurids increased from their first appearance in the Early Jurassic until the Early Cretaceous (skull lengths up to 2360 mm). However, some reduction occurred before their final extinction in the early Late Cretaceous (skull lengths up to 1750 mm). PMID:23741520

  4. Can we abolish skull x rays for head injury?

    PubMed Central

    Reed, M; Browning, J; Wilkinson, A; Beattie, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of a change in skull x ray policy on the rate of admission, use of computed tomography (CT), radiation dose per head injury, and detection of intracranial injuries; and to compare the characteristics of patients with normal and abnormal head CT. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: UK paediatric teaching hospital emergency department. Patients: 1535 patients aged between 1 and 14 years with a head injury presenting to the emergency department between 1 August 1998 and 31 July 1999 (control period), and 1867 presenting between 1 August 2002 and 31 July 2003 (first year of new skull x ray policy). Intervention: Hospital notes and computer systems were analysed and data were collected on all patients presenting with a head injury. Results: The abolition of skull x rays in children aged over 1 year prevented about 400 normal skull x rays being undertaken in period 2. The percentage of children undergoing CT rose from 1.0% to 2.1% with no change in the positive CT pick up rate (25.6% v 25.0%). There was no significant change in admission rate (10.9% v 10.1%), and a slight decrease in the radiation dose per head injury (0.042 mSv compared to 0.045 mSv). Conclusions: Skull x rays can be abandoned in children aged 1 to 14 without a significant increase in admission rate, radiation dose per head injury, or missed intracranial injury. The mechanism and history of the injury and a reduced Glasgow coma scale are probably the most important indicators of significant head injury in children. PMID:15851418

  5. Use of Pedicled Trapezius Myocutaneous Flap for Posterior Skull Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mansher; Rios Diaz, Arturo J; Cauley, Ryan; Smith, Timothy R; Caterson, E J

    2015-09-01

    Soft-tissue defects in posterior skull can be challenging for reconstruction. If related to tumor resection, these wound beds are generally irradiated and can be difficult from a recipient-vessel perspective for a free tissue transfer. Locoregional flaps might prove to be important reconstructive option in such patients. There is a very limited data on the usage of pedicled trapezius myocutaneous flaps for such defects. The authors reviewed existing study for usage of trapezius flap for posterior skull repair and used pedicled trapezius myocutaneous flaps based on the descending branch of superficial cervical artery (SCA) for reconstruction of posterior skull soft-tissue defect in an irradiated and infected wound. Two patients were operated for trapezius myocutaneous flap for posterior skull defects complicated by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and epidural abscess. There was no recipient or donor-site complication at a mean follow-up of 12.5 months. Neither of the 2 patients had any functional deficits for the entire duration of the follow-up. Although this flap was able to help in controlling the CSF leakage in the first patient, it successfully healed the cavity generated from epidural abscess drainage in the second patient. The large angle of rotation coupled with the ability to complete the procedure without repositioning the patients makes trapezius myocutaneous flap an attractive option for posterior skull reconstruction. In our limited experience, the pedicled trapezius flaps are a reliable alternative as they are well vascularized and able to obliterate the soft-tissue defect completely. The recipient site healed completely in infected as well as irradiated wound beds. In addition, the donor site can be primarily closed with minimal donor-associated complication.

  6. Inflammatory Pseudotumors of the Skull Base: Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Alyono, Jennifer C; Shi, Yangyang; Berry, Gerald J; Recht, Lawrence D; Harsh, Griffith R; Jackler, Robert K; Corrales, C Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    To describe the presentation, treatment, and outcome of inflammatory pseudotumors (IPs) of the skull base. English-language articles in PubMed, Web of Science, and EMBASE from earliest available through April 2014. Articles were identified using a keyword search for "inflammatory pseudotumor," "inflammatory myofibroblastoma," or "plasma cell granuloma," including a keyword localizing to the skull base. One hundred papers with 157 cases met inclusion criteria. History, tumor site, initial and subsequent treatment, outcomes, and complications were extracted. Student t test, z test, and analysis of variance were used to analyze demographics, symptoms, sites involved, and outcomes. Odds ratios for site versus initial treatment were calculated. At diagnosis, average patient age was 41 years. Approximately 70% of lesions primarily involved the anterior skull base, 29% the lateral skull base, and 1.2% the occiput. The most common initial treatments were steroids (44%), surgery (28%), and surgery with steroids (16%). Anterior lesions were 55.8 times more likely than lateral lesions to be treated initially with steroids (CI, 14.7-212). Seventy-six percent of patients had stable or resolved symptoms after a single course of treatment. Diagnosis of skull base IP requires ruling out other aggressive pathologies, such as malignancy and infection, and maintaining a high index of suspicion. Surgery is favored for lesions that can be removed in toto with minimal morbidity, as well as steroids for those sites where anatomy limits complete resection, such as within the orbit, cavernous sinus, or brain. An option for larger lesions involving vital anatomy is debulking, followed by postoperative steroids.

  7. A giant pliosaurid skull from the late Jurassic of England.

    PubMed

    Benson, Roger B J; Evans, Mark; Smith, Adam S; Sassoon, Judyth; Moore-Faye, Scott; Ketchum, Hilary F; Forrest, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Pliosaurids were a long-lived and cosmopolitan group of marine predators that spanned 110 million years and occupied the upper tiers of marine ecosystems from the Middle Jurassic until the early Late Cretaceous. A well-preserved giant pliosaurid skull from the Late Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation of Dorset, United Kingdom, represents a new species, Pliosaurus kevani. This specimen is described in detail, and the taxonomy and systematics of Late Jurassic pliosaurids is revised. We name two additional new species, Pliosaurus carpenteri and Pliosaurus westburyensis, based on previously described relatively complete, well-preserved remains. Most or all Late Jurassic pliosaurids represent a globally distributed monophyletic group (the genus Pliosaurus, excluding 'Pliosaurus' andrewsi). Despite its high species diversity, and geographically widespread, temporally extensive occurrence, Pliosaurus shows relatively less morphological and ecological variation than is seen in earlier, multi-genus pliosaurid assemblages such as that of the Middle Jurassic Oxford Clay Formation. It also shows less ecological variation than the pliosaurid-like Cretaceous clade Polycotylidae. Species of Pliosaurus had robust skulls, large body sizes (with skull lengths of 1.7-2.1 metres), and trihedral or subtrihedral teeth suggesting macropredaceous habits. Our data support a trend of decreasing length of the mandibular symphysis through Late Jurassic time, as previously suggested. This may be correlated with increasing adaptation to feeding on large prey. Maximum body size of pliosaurids increased from their first appearance in the Early Jurassic until the Early Cretaceous (skull lengths up to 2360 mm). However, some reduction occurred before their final extinction in the early Late Cretaceous (skull lengths up to 1750 mm).

  8. Fracture toughness of polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J. A.; Mings, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    Two aromatic polyimides and an aromatic polyamide-imide were tested in single edge notched tension. Fracture toughnesses, normalized to 25 micron film thickness ranged from 1.65 to 5.4 MPa m sup 1/2. LARC-TPI, a thermoplastic polyimide, showed evidence of crazing ahead of a growing crack whereas the other materials formed a shear yielded zone.

  9. Hip Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... make older people more likely to trip and fall — one of the most common causes of hip ... Taking steps to maintain bone density and avoid falls can help prevent hip fracture. Signs and symptoms ...

  10. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...

  11. Lisfranc fractures.

    PubMed

    Wright, Amanda; Gerhart, Ann E

    2009-01-01

    Injuries of the tarsometatarsal, or Lisfranc, joint are rarely seen. Lisfranc fractures and fracture dislocations are among the most frequently misdiagnosed foot injuries in the emergency department. A misdiagnosed injury may have severe consequences including chronic pain and loss of foot biomechanics. Evaluation of a foot injury should include a high level of suspicion of a Lisfranc injury, and a thorough work-up is needed for correct diagnosis.

  12. Colles' fracture.

    PubMed

    Altizer, Linda L

    2008-01-01

    Many people "slip and fall", especially in the icy areas of the winter season. To prevent an injury to the head, most people put their hand out to hit the ground first, so the wrist usually gets injured. The most frequent injury from this type of "intervention" is a fracture to the distal radius and/or ulna, which is frequently called a "Colles' fracture."

  13. Boxer's fracture.

    PubMed

    Altizer, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Boxer's fracture is a common name for a fracture of the distal fifth metacarpal and received its name from one of its most common causes, punching an object with a closed fist. It can occur from a fistfight or from punching a hard object. The injury of a "Boxer's Fracture" earned the name from the way in which the injury occurred, punching an immovable object with a closed fist and no boxing mitt (Figure 1). Naturally, a "Boxer" usually punches his fist into his opponent's face or body. An angry person may perform the same action into a person, or into the wall. The third person may be performing a task and strike something with his fist with forceful action accidentally. In any event, if the closed fist "punches" into an immovable or firm object with force, the most frequent injury sustained would be a fracture of the fifth metacarpal neck. Some caregivers would also call a fourth metacarpal neck fracture a boxer's fracture.

  14. Superimposition-based personal identification using skull computed tomographic images: application to skull with mouth fixed open by residual soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masuko; Saitoh, Hisako; Yasjima, Daisuke; Yohsuk, Makino; Sakuma, Ayaka; Yayama, Kazuhiro; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2013-09-01

    We previously reported that superimposition of 3-dimensional (3D) images reconstructed from computed tomographic images of skeletonized skulls on photographs of the actual skulls afforded a match of skull contours, thereby demonstrating that superimposition of 3D-reconstructed images provides results identical to those obtained with actual skulls. The current superimposition procedure requires a skeletonized skull with mouth closed and thus is not applicable to personal identification using a skull with residual soft tissue or the mouth fixed open, such as those found in mummified or burned bodies. In this study, we scanned using computed tomography the skulls of mummified and immersed body with mandibles fixed open by residual soft tissue, created 3D-reconstructed skull images, which were digitally processed by computer software to close the mandible, and superimposed the images on antemortem facial photographs. The results demonstrated morphological consistency between the 3D-reconstructed skull images and facial photographs, indicating the applicability of the method to personal identification.

  15. Predicting and Preventing Skull Overheating in Non Invasive Brain HIFU Treatment Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Pernot, Mathieu; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2005-03-28

    Ultrasound brain therapy is currently limited by the strong phase and amplitude aberrations induced by the heterogeneities of the skull. However the development of aberration correction techniques has made it possible to correct the beam distortion induced by the skull and to produce a sharp focus in the brain. Moreover, using the density of the skull bone that can be obtained with high-resolution CT scans, the corrections needed to produce this sharp focus can be calculated using ultrasound propagation models. We propose here a model for computing the temperature elevation in the skull during High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) transcranial therapy. Based on CT scans, the wave propagation through the skull is computed with 3D finite differences wave propagation software. The acoustic simulation is combined with a 3D thermal diffusion code and the temperature elevation inside the skull is computed. Finally, the simulation is validated experimentally by measuring the temperature elevation in several locations of the skull.

  16. Allometry and performance: the evolution of skull form and function in felids.

    PubMed

    Slater, G J; VAN Valkenburgh, B

    2009-11-01

    Allometric patterns of skull-shape variation can have significant impacts on cranial mechanics and feeding performance, but have received little attention in previous studies. Here, we examine the impacts of allometric skull-shape variation on feeding capabilities in the cat family (Felidae) with linear morphometrics and finite element analysis. Our results reveal that relative bite force diminishes slightly with increasing skull size, and that the skulls of the smallest species undergo the least strain during biting. However, larger felids are able to produce greater gapes for a given angle of jaw opening, and they have overall stronger skulls. The two large felids in this study achieved increased cranial strength by increasing skull bone volume relative to surface area. Allometry of skull geometry in large felids reflects a trade-off between the need to increase gape to access larger prey while maintaining the ability to resist unpredictable loading when taking large, struggling prey.

  17. Cranio-facial morphanalysis: a new method for enhancing reliability while identifying skulls by photo superimposition.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, P T; Srinivasan, G J; Amravaneswaran, M G

    2001-03-01

    Skull-photograph superimposition continues to be the most prevalent method employed for identifying a skull recovered in a criminal case as that belonging to a putative victim whose face photograph is available. The reliability of identification achieved has been shown to be 91%, indicating the possibility of a skull mismatching with a face photograph belonging to a person other than the actual deceased. This lack of reliability dampens the confidence of the expert and in turn confounds the mind of the judge. It has been shown that the variations in the shape of the facial organs are influenced by the corresponding variations in the skeletal elements of the facial skull. "Cranio-facial morphanalysis", a new anthroposcopic method proposed here for evaluating the shape correlations between a skull and a face photograph, when applied conjointly with skull-photograph superimposition is shown to increase the reliability in forensic skull identification.

  18. High Resolution Three-Dimensional MR Imaging of the Skull Base: Compartments, Boundaries, and Critical Structures.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Ari Meir; Aygun, Nafi; Herzka, Daniel A; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution 3D MRI of the skull base allows for a more detailed and accurate assessment of normal anatomic structures as well as the location and extent of skull base pathologies than has previously been possible. This article describes the techniques employed for high-resolution skull base MRI including pre- and post-contrast constructive interference in the steady state (CISS) imaging and their utility for evaluation of the many small structures of the skull base, focusing on those regions and concepts most pertinent to localization of cranial nerve palsies and in providing pre-operative guidance and post-operative assessment. The concept of skull base compartments as a means of conceptualizing the various layers of the skull base and their importance in assessment of masses of the skull base is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Skull base, orbits, temporal bone, and cranial nerves: anatomy on MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Morani, Ajaykumar C; Ramani, Nisha S; Wesolowski, Jeffrey R

    2011-08-01

    Accurate delineation, diagnosis, and treatment planning of skull base lesions require knowledge of the complex anatomy of the skull base. Because the skull base cannot be directly evaluated, imaging is critical for the diagnosis and management of skull base diseases. Although computed tomography (CT) is excellent for outlining the bony detail, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides better soft tissue detail and is helpful for evaluating the adjacent meninges, brain parenchyma, and bone marrow of the skull base. Thus, CT and MR imaging are often used together for evaluating skull base lesions. This article focuses on the radiologic anatomy of the skull base pertinent to MR imaging evaluation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fatal skull trauma in caged layer chickens associated with a moving feed hopper: diagnosis based on autopsy examination, forensic computed tomography and farm visit.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Chris J; Noormohammadi, Amir H; O'Donnell, Chris J

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of unexpected mortality in caged layer chickens led to the discovery of a consistent traumatic injury to the heads of affected hens. Initial post-mortem examination found linear skin lacerations and associated fractures in the dorsal cranium of all birds examined, and 5 to 10 mm deep trauma in the underlying brain tissue. Post-mortem multidetector computed tomography (CT) scanning of two affected birds demonstrated similar obliquely orientated, linear, depressed fractures of the skulls consistent with a single, severe impact force to the head. Both skull fractures had a pattern of rounded, rostral expansion measuring approximately 3 mm in width. On inspection of the cages during a farm visit, this CT pattern corresponded with the size and shape of sheet metal lugs holding feed troughs onto the cages (on which blood stains were subsequently observed). Based on this analysis and hypothesizing that hunger was a triggering factor, a recommendation was made to reverse the shed "lights on" and feed hopper operation times with instant reduction in mortality. This case highlights the value of post-mortem CT imaging in bird death investigation where trauma is a postulated cause.

  1. Clinical characteristics and molecular pathology of skull ectopic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Longxing; Wang, Zhongyong; Ma, Jiawei; Chen, Jinsheng; Zhu, Haojiang; Zhou, Xiaohua; Zhu, Qing; Dong, Jun; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    Thyroid cancer is very common, but skull ectopic thyroid cancer has not been reported in 50 years of literatures in foreign countries. There are only four cases of the skull ectopic thyroid cancer reported in more than 30 years of domestic literature including the cases in this report. This paper aims to investigate the clinical characteristics and possible molecular mechanisms of this rare disease. Five keywords of "thyroid gland", "ectopic thyroid", "thyroid cancer", "ectopic thyroid cancer" and "metastatic thyroid cancer" were included and 50 years of literatures in the PubMed-MEDLINE and Wanfang database were reviewed. By combining the test data of 2 cases of surgical patient tissue microarray specimens-molecular immunology pathology, the possible molecular mechanisms were analyzed and molecular regulation network diagram was drawn. The skull ectopic thyroid cancer has not been reported in 50 years of literatures in foreign countries and there are only four cases of the skull ectopic thyroid cancer reported in more than 30 years of domestic literature including the cases in this report. The molecular expressions of skull ectopic thyroid cancer, orthotopic thyroid cancer, and metastatic thyroid cancer were not the same: (I) AKT (P=0.012, 0.002) and mTOR (P=0.002, 0.004) were highly expressed in the skull ectopic thyroid cancer; (II) BRAF (P=0.029, 0.014) and ERK (P=0.002, 0.001) were highly expressed in orthotopic thyroid cancer; (III) MMP-9 (P=0.023, 0.016) was highly expressed in metastatic thyroid cancer. According to the molecular information base, the PI3K is predicted to be a key crossing gene of the above three signaling pathways, which showed no significant differences in these three thyroid cancers (P=0.692, 0.388, 0.227), but PI3K has regulation roles in the three signaling pathways of Akt/mTOR, MAPK, and NF-κB. PI3K gene is an important starting gene of thyroid cancers. After the canceration starts, due to the fact that the local microenvironments of

  2. A novel skull registration based on global and local deformations for craniofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingqiong; Zhou, Mingquan; Shui, Wuyang; Wu, Zhongke; Ji, Yuan; Bai, Ruyi

    2011-05-20

    Craniofacial reconstruction is important in forensic identification. It aims to estimate a facial appearance for human skeletal remains using the relationship between the soft tissue and the underlying bone structure. Various computerized methods have been developed in recent decades. An effective way is to deform a reference skull to the discovered skull, and then apply the same deformation to the skin associated with the reference skull to provide an approximate face for the discovered skull. For this method, the better the two skulls match each other, the more face-like the reconstructed skin surface will be. In this paper, we present a novel skull registration method that can match the two skulls closely, so as to improve the accuracy of the reconstruction. It combines both global and local deformations. A generic thin-plate spline (TPS)-based deformation, which is global, is applied first to roughly align the two skulls based on two groups of manually defined landmarks. Afterwards, the two skulls are largely matched, except some regions, on which some new landmarks are automatically marked. A compact support radial basis functions (CSRBF)-based deformation, which is local, will then be performed on these regions to adjust the initial alignment of the two skulls. Such adjustment can be repeatedly implemented until the two skulls have optimal alignment. In addition, all the skulls and face involved in the registration are represented by their single outer surfaces to facilitate the reconstruction procedure. The experiments demonstrate that our method can create a plausible face even when the reference skull is very different from the discovered skull. As a result, we can make full use of our database to provide multiple estimates for a principle components analysis (PCA) for the final reconstruction.

  3. Definition of topographic organization of skull profile in normal population and its implications on the role of sutures in skull morphology.

    PubMed

    Pirouzmand, Farhad; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2008-01-01

    The geometric configuration of the skull is complex and unique to each individual. This study provides a new technique to define the outline of skull profile and attempt to find the common factors defining the ultimate skull configuration in adult population. Ninety-three lateral skull x-ray from the computed tomographic scan films were selected and digitized. The lateral skull surface was divided into 3 regions based on the presumed location of the coronal and lambdoid sutures. Three main curvatures (frontal, parietal, occipital) were consistently identified to overlap the skull periphery. The radius, cord length, and inclination of each curvature were measured. The average values for 3 defined curvatures of the skull profile were recorded. Factor analysis of the measured values produced 3 factors explaining the skull profile. The first factor explained 32% of total variance and was related to the overall size of the head as represented by total length and the radius of the curvature in the vertex and back of the head. The second factor covered 26% of the variance representing the inverse correlation between the angle of the frontal and parietal curves. The third factor revealed the direct correlation of the occipital and parietal angle. In all of these factors, the frontal zone variation was independent or opposite of the parieto-occipital zone. A strong association between the total length of the skull, occipital curve radius, and length with the sex was shown. In conclusion, the skull profile topography has large variation and can be defined mathematically by 2 distinct territories: frontal and parieto-occipital zones. These territories hinge on the coronal suture. Therefore, the coronal suture may play a dominant role in final skull configuration.

  4. Flow Characterization in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alajmi, A.; Gharbi, R.

    2008-12-01

    Most hydrocarbon reservoirs are fractured in nature with various degrees of fracture intensities. With the current oil prices and growing demand for oil, a great interest is built in the petroleum industry to characterize partially fractured reservoirs and to develop an increased understanding of the physics of fluid flow in these types of reservoirs. This is due to the fact that fractured reservoirs have different performance behavior and high potential for oil recovery than conventional reservoirs. Therefore, prediction and understanding of fluid displacement in these reservoirs is very much critical in the decision on the applicability of oil recovery methods. Using a finite difference numerical simulator, this study investigated the effect of reservoir fracture intensities on the displacement behavior. Several heterogeneous permeable media, each with different probability of fracture intensity, were generated stochastically. The fracture intensity covers reservoirs with no fracture (zero fracture intensity) to fully fractured reservoirs (fracture intensity of 1). In order to better describe and model fractured reservoirs, a dual porosity-dual permeability model was built. Extensive simulations of water displacing oil were then performed in each of the generated fractured models for different well configurations. The objective was to determine the functional relationships between the displacement performance, fracture intensities, and well configurations. The study has resulted in significant new insights into the flow characterization in naturally fractured reservoirs. Results show that the reservoir fracture intensity has considerable effects on the efficiency of fluid displacement in naturally fractured reservoirs. A critical value of reservoir fracture intensity appears to sort favorable from unfavorable displacement, causing the displacement to be either fracture-dominated or matrix-dominated. The conditions under which fluid displacement may yield better

  5. A methodology for pseudo-genetic stochastic modeling of discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneau, François; Henrion, Vincent; Caumon, Guillaume; Renard, Philippe; Sausse, Judith

    2013-07-01

    Stochastic simulation of fracture systems is an interesting approach to build a set of dense and complex networks. However, discrete fracture models made of planar fractures generally fail to reproduce the complexity of natural networks, both in terms of geometry and connectivity. In this study a pseudo-genetic method is developed to generate stochastic fracture models that are consistent with patterns observed on outcrops and fracture growth principles. The main idea is to simulate evolving fracture networks through geometric proxies by iteratively growing 3D fractures. The algorithm defines heuristic rules in order to mimic the mechanics of fracture initiation, propagation, interaction and termination. The growth process enhances the production of linking structure and impacts the connectivity of fracture networks. A sensitivity study is performed on synthetic examples. The method produces unbiased fracture dip and strike statistics and qualitatively reproduces the fracture density map. The fracture length distribution law is underestimated because of the early stop in fracture growth after intersection.

  6. Reconstruction of skull defects in the middle ages and renaissance.

    PubMed

    Missori, Paolo; Currà, Antonio; Paris, Harry S; Peschillo, Simone; Fattapposta, Francesco; Paolini, Sergio; Domenicucci, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    In Egyptian, Greco-Roman, and Arabic medicine, the closure of a skull defect was not provided at the end of a therapeutic trepanation or in cases of bone removal. The literature from the Middle Ages and Renaissance disclosed some striking and forgotten practices. Gilbertus Anglicus (c. 1180 to c. 1250) cites the use of a piece of a cup made from wooden bowl (ciphum or mazer) or a gold sheet to cover the gap and protect the brain in these patients; this citation probably reflected a widely known folk practice. Pietro d'Argellata introduced the use of a fixed piece of dried gourd for brain protection to reconstruct a skull defect. In the late Renaissance, the negative folklore describing this outlandish practice likely led to the use of silver and lead sheets. Nevertheless, for centuries, large numbers of surgeons preferred to leave the dura mater uncovered after bone removal, and failed to apply any brain protection.

  7. Rhesus monkey brain imaging through intact skull with thermoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Wang, Lihong V

    2006-03-01

    Two-dimensional microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is applied to imaging the Rhesus monkey brain through the intact skull. To reduce the wavefront distortion caused by the skull, only the low-frequency components of the thermoacoustic signals (< 1 MHz) are used to reconstruct the TAT images. The methods of signal processing and image reconstruction are validated by imaging a lamb kidney. The resolution of the system is found to be 4 mm when we image a 1-month-old monkey head containing inserted needles. We also image the coronal and axial sections of a 7-month-old monkey head. Brain features that are 3 cm deep in the head are imaged clearly. Our results demonstrate that TAT has potential for use in portable, cost-effective imagers for pediatric brains.

  8. The Ardipithecus ramidus skull and its implications for hominid origins.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Gen; Asfaw, Berhane; Kono, Reiko T; Kubo, Daisuke; Lovejoy, C Owen; White, Tim D

    2009-10-02

    The highly fragmented and distorted skull of the adult skeleton ARA-VP-6/500 includes most of the dentition and preserves substantial parts of the face, vault, and base. Anatomical comparisons and micro-computed tomography-based analysis of this and other remains reveal pre-Australopithecus hominid craniofacial morphology and structure. The Ardipithecus ramidus skull exhibits a small endocranial capacity (300 to 350 cubic centimeters), small cranial size relative to body size, considerable midfacial projection, and a lack of modern African ape-like extreme lower facial prognathism. Its short posterior cranial base differs from that of both Pan troglodytes and P. paniscus. Ar. ramidus lacks the broad, anteriorly situated zygomaxillary facial skeleton developed in later Australopithecus. This combination of features is apparently shared by Sahelanthropus, showing that the Mio-Pliocene hominid cranium differed substantially from those of both extant apes and Australopithecus.

  9. Skull anatomy of the miniaturized gecko Sphaerodactylus roosevelti (Squamata: Gekkota).

    PubMed

    Daza, Juan D; Abdala, Virginia; Thomas, Richard; Bauer, Aaron M

    2008-11-01

    A detailed description of the skull and jaw of the gecko Sphaerodactylus roosevelti is presented. The bones are described articulated and isolated with special consideration given to the type of suture among joining elements. S. roosevelti was compared with 109 gekkotan species to evaluate the osteological variation and to find characters for cladistic analysis. Changes in the skull associated with the miniaturization process are discussed within the sphaerodactylid geckos. A noticeable increase of overlapping sutures was observed in the snout of the smallest sphaerodactylids compared to other gekkotans. This pattern is convergent with that in miniaturized pygopodids and may be attributed to adaptations for decreasing mechanical resistance of the cranium during feeding or burrowing. New cranial characters support Sphaerodactylinae as a monophyletic group and should be useful for resolving questions such as their relationship with other gekkotans.

  10. Novel hantavirus in the flat-skulled shrew (Sorex roboratus).

    PubMed

    Kang, Hae Ji; Arai, Satoru; Hope, Andrew G; Cook, Joseph A; Yanagihara, Richard

    2010-08-01

    Genetically distinct hantaviruses have been identified recently in multiple species of shrews (Order Soricomorpha, Family Soricidae) in Eurasia and North America. To corroborate decades-old reports of hantaviral antigens in shrews from Russia, archival liver and lung tissues from 4 Siberian large-toothed shrews (Sorex daphaenodon), 5 Eurasian least shrews (Sorex minutissimus), 12 flat-skulled shrews (Sorex roboratus), and 18 tundra shrews (Sorex tundrensis), captured in the Sakha Republic in northeastern Siberia during July and August 2006, were analyzed for hantavirus RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A novel hantavirus, named Kenkeme virus, was detected in a flat-skulled shrew. Sequence analysis of the full-length S and partial M and L segments indicated that Kenkeme virus was genetically and phylogenetically distinct from Seewis virus harbored by the Eurasian common shrew (Sorex araneus), as well as all other rodent-, soricid-, and talpid-borne hantaviruses.

  11. A Trephined Late Bronze Age Skull From Peloponnesus, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountrakis, C.; Georgaki, S.; Manolis, S. K.

    Cranial trepanation is one of the most ancient surgical operations. This kind of "operation" has been reported in prehistoric Greece with several specific case studies. In this paper, a significant case of trepanation, on a male skull, dated to the Late Bronze Age, is presented. Our interest was pointed firstly to the verification of the technique, secondly the description of the trepanation's shape and finally to the surgical procedure. A series of imaging techniques were implemented including X-ray diffraction and CT scan imaging. The observations of the skull support our statement as to the nature of the trepanation. This specimen represents one of the earlier confirmed cases of trepanation in Greece. We also discuss when and how this technique came to Greece.

  12. Endoscopic Excision of Symptomatic Simple Bone Cyst at Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Gunawat, Prashant; Karmarkar, Vikram; Deopujari, Chandrashekhar; Shah, Nishit

    2016-01-01

    Seizure is a classical feature of intra axial brain parenchymal lesion. Simple bone cyst is an unusual bony pathology at skull base presenting with unexpected symptoms of complex partial seizures. Skull base neuro-endoscopy has managed such lesions more effectively with reduced post-operative morbidity as compared to transcranial approach. This case report discusses a 20-year-old male who presented with 3 episodes of seizure over a time period of 10 months. MRI brain revealed T1 hypo and T2 hyper intense cystic lesion in middle cranial fossa with no enhancement on contrast administration. CT scan showed cystic lesion involving greater wing and pterygoid plate of sphenoid on left side. CT cisternographic evaluation showed CSF outpouching in the sphenoid air sinus. Excision of the cystic lesion was carried out through endoscopic transmaxillary transpterygoid approach. Histopathological examination showed the lesion to be a simple bone cyst. PMID:27891396

  13. A new skull of early Homo from Dmanisi, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Vekua, Abesalom; Lordkipanidze, David; Rightmire, G Philip; Agusti, Jordi; Ferring, Reid; Maisuradze, Givi; Mouskhelishvili, Alexander; Nioradze, Medea; De Leon, Marcia Ponce; Tappen, Martha; Tvalchrelidze, Merab; Zollikofer, Christoph

    2002-07-05

    Another hominid skull has been recovered at Dmanisi (Republic of Georgia) from the same strata in which hominid remains have been reported previously. The Dmanisi site dated to approximately 1.75 million years ago has now produced craniofacial portions of several hominid individuals, along with many well-preserved animal fossils and quantities of stone artifacts. Although there are certain anatomical differences among the Dmanisi specimens, the hominids do not clearly represent more than one taxon. We assign the new skull provisionally to Homo erectus (=ergaster). The Dmanisi specimens are the most primitive and small-brained fossils to be grouped with this species or any taxon linked unequivocally with genus Homo and also the ones most similar to the presumed habilis-like stem. We suggest that the ancestors of the Dmanisi population dispersed from Africa before the emergence of humans identified broadly with the H. erectus grade.

  14. The "polymorphous" history of a polymorphous skull bone: the sphenoid.

    PubMed

    Costea, Claudia; Turliuc, Serban; Cucu, Andrei; Dumitrescu, Gabriela; Carauleanu, Alexandru; Buzduga, Catalin; Sava, Anca; Costache, Irina; Turliuc, Dana

    2017-03-27

    For a long time, because of its location at the skull base level, the sphenoid bone was rather mysterious as it was too difficult for anatomists to reach and to elucidate its true configuration. The configuration of the sphenoid bone led to confusion regarding its sutures with the other skull bones, its shape, its detailed anatomy, and the vascular and nervous structures that cross it. This article takes the reader on a journey through time and space, charting the evolution of anatomists' comprehension of sphenoid bone morphology from antiquity to its conception as a bone structure in the eighteenth century, and ranging from ancient Greece to modern Italy and France. The journey illustrates that many anatomists have attempted to name and to best describe the structural elements of this polymorphous bone.

  15. Blast Scaling Parameters: Transitioning from Lung to Skull Base Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric Flint; Rosen, Charles L; Qaiser, Rabia

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrauma from blast exposure is one of the single most characteristic injuries of modern warfare. Understanding blast traumatic brain injury is critical for developing new treatment options for warfighters and civilians exposed to improvised explosive devices. Unfortunately, the pre-clinical models that are widely utilized to investigate blast exposure are based on archaic lung based parameters developed in the early 20th century. Improvised explosive devices produce a different type of injury paradigm than the typical mortar explosion. Protective equipment for the chest cavity has also improved over the past 100 years. In order to improve treatments, it is imperative to develop models that are based more on skull-based parameters. In this mini-review, we discuss the important anatomical and biochemical features necessary to develop a skull-based model. PMID:28386605

  16. Growing Pains (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Growing ... > For Parents > Growing Pains Print A A A What's in ...

  17. Functional Outcomes of the Retromaxillary-Infratemporal Fossa Dissection for Advanced Head and Neck/Skull Base Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Terry Y.; Doerr, Timothy D.; Mathog, Robert H.; Burgio, Don L.; Meleca, Robert J.; Yoo, George H.; Guthikonda, Murali

    2000-01-01

    The retromaxillary-infratemporal fossa (RM-ITF) dissection, using a preauricular incision, was initially popularized for the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders, facial fractures, and orbital tumors. This approach has been expanded for the treatment of advanced head and neck and skull base tumors extending into the infratemporal fossa. We studied prospectively eight consecutive patients requiring a RM-ITF dissection. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes measured were mastication, speech, swallowing, cranial nerve function, pain, and cosmesis. A significant reduction in pain was noted postoperatively in all patients studied. Limited changes were identified in mastication, speech, swallowing, vision, hearing, or cosmesis postoperatively. The RM-ITF dissection should be considered when resecting advanced head and neck/skull base lesions that extend into this region. We have found minimal morbidity associated with this dissection. This procedure may have a useful place in palliation of patients with incurable pain caused by tumor invasion into the infratemporal fossa. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171134

  18. Pediatric Thighbone (Femur) Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures in infants under 1 year old is child abuse. Child abuse is also a leading cause of thighbone fracture ... contact sports • Being in a motor vehicle accident • Child abuse Types of Femur Fractures (Classification) Femur fractures vary ...

  19. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  20. Fracture types (1) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... fracture which goes at an angle to the axis Comminuted - a fracture of many relatively small fragments Spiral - a fracture which runs around the axis of the bone Compound - a fracture (also called ...

  1. Galeazzi fracture.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc I; Jupiter, Jesse B; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2011-10-01

    Galeazzi fracture is a fracture of the radial diaphysis with disruption at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Typically, the mechanism of injury is forceful axial loading and torsion of the forearm. Diagnosis is established on radiographic evaluation. Underdiagnosis is common because disruption of the ligamentous restraints of the DRUJ may be overlooked. Nonsurgical management with anatomic reduction and immobilization in a long-arm cast has been successful in children. In adults, nonsurgical treatment typically fails because of deforming forces acting on the distal radius and DRUJ. Open reduction and internal fixation is the preferred surgical option. Anatomic reduction and rigid fixation should be followed by intraoperative assessment of the DRUJ. Further intraoperative interventions are based on the reducibility and postreduction stability of the DRUJ. Misdiagnosis or inadequate management of Galeazzi fracture may result in disabling complications, such as DRUJ instability, malunion, limited forearm range of motion, chronic wrist pain, and osteoarthritis.

  2. Skull shapes of the Lissodelphininae: radiation, adaptation and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Galatius, Anders; Goodall, R Natalie P

    2016-06-01

    Within Delphinidae, the sub-family Lissodelphininae consists of 8 Southern Ocean species and 2 North Pacific species. Lissodelphininae is a result of recent phylogenetic revisions based on molecular methods. Thus, morphological radiation within the taxon has not been investigated previously. The sub-family consists of ecologically diverse groups such as (1) the Cephalorhynchus genus of 4 small species inhabiting coastal and shelf waters, (2) the robust species in the Lagenorhynchus genus with the coastal La. australis, the offshore La. cruciger, the pelagic species La. obscurus and La. obliquidens, and (3) the morphologically aberrant genus Lissodelphis. Here, the shapes of 164 skulls from adults of all 10 species were compared using 3-dimensional geometric morphometrics. The Lissodelphininae skulls were supplemented by samples of Lagenorhynchus albirostris and Delphinus delphis to obtain a context for the variation found within the subfamily. Principal components analysis was used to map the most important components of shape variation on phylogeny. The first component of shape variation described an elongation of the rostrum, lateral and dorsoventral compression of the neurocranium and smaller temporal fossa. The two Lissodelphis species were on the high extreme of this spectrum, while Lagenorhynchus australis, La. cruciger and Cephalorhynchus heavisidii were at the low extreme. Along the second component, La. cruciger was isolated from the other species by its expanded neurocranium and concave facial profile. Shape variation supports the gross phylogenetic relationships proposed by recent molecular studies. However, despite the great diversity of ecology and external morphology within the subfamily, shape variation of the feeding apparatus was modest, indicating a similar mode of feeding across the subfamily. All 10 species were similar in their pattern of skull asymmetry, but interestingly, two species using narrowband high frequency clicks (La. cruciger and C

  3. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Sydney S.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3–4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14–17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4–6 hr; printing = 9–11 hr, post-processing = <30 min). Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1–5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes. PMID:26295459

  4. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    PubMed

    Naftulin, Jason S; Kimchi, Eyal Y; Cash, Sydney S

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = <30 min). Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes.

  5. Hydrologic reconnaissance of Skull Valley, Tooele County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, James W.; Waddell, K.M.

    1968-01-01

    This report is the second in a series by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, which describes the water resources of the western basins of Utah. Its purpose is to present available hydrologic data on Skull Valley, to provide an evaluation of the potential water-resource development of the valley, and to identify needed studies that would help provide an understandingof the valley's water supply.

  6. Vascular anatomy: the head, neck, and skull base.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michele H; Thorisson, Hjalti M; Diluna, Michael L

    2009-07-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the vasculature of the head and neck from the thorax to the skull base is critical to the approach to diagnosis and treatment of cerebrovascular disease. Awareness of the anatomic variations that may be encountered, common and uncommon, is necessary to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to avert therapeutic disasters. Careful anatomic analysis and understanding of collateral pathways and dangerous anastomoses facilitates cross-sectional and angiographic diagnosis and the development of surgical and endovascular treatment strategies.

  7. Skull anatomy of the bizarre crocodylian Mourasuchus nativus (Alligatoridae, Caimaninae).

    PubMed

    Bona, Paula; Degrange, Federico J; Fernández, Marta S

    2013-02-01

    Mourasuchus is a Miocene alligatorid endemic to South America, and is represented by four species. Together with the closely related Purussaurus, it is a peculiar crocodylian taxon of neogene Caimaninae and one of the most bizarre forms among eusuchian crocodiles. The phylogenetic relationships between Mourasuchus species have not been explored, and detailed skull descriptions are scarce. The goal of this study is to provide new data on skull morphology and cranial recesses in Mourasuchus nativus, including a new tomography analysis (3D modeling). We observed that several diagnostic characters of Purussaurus, such as lack of contact between the nasal and lacrimal, separation of the nasal and frontal by the prefrontals, and the posterior dorsal margin of the skull table, are shared with Mourasuchus. M. nativus is characterized by the presence of solid transverse squamosal eminences, large posttemporal fenestrae, and a quadrate laterocaudal bridge separating V(2) -V(3) trigeminal openings. Compared with other crocodylians, the endocast of M. nativus is similar in shape but quite sigmoid in lateral view, the canal of the supraorbital ramus of V(2) is more vertically oriented, the thick tympanic branch canal opens in a large foramen aligned with trigeminal foramen, and the canal of the vagal (X) tympanic ramus is also very wide. Contrary to extant alligatorids, the median pharyngeal recess remains paired throughout its course and only connects its opposite fellow near the external ventral opening. The knowledge of the internal skull anatomy of Mourasuchus contributes to the understanding of the general morphology of alligatorids, Caimaninae, and their variation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Spring-assisted posterior skull expansion without osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Eric; Marchac, Alexandre; Jeblaoui, Yassine; Renier, Dominique; Di Rocco, Federico

    2012-09-01

    A posterior flatness of the skull vault can be observed in infants with brachycephaly. Such posterior deformation favours the development of turricephaly which is difficult to correct. To reduce the risk of such deformation, an early posterior skull remodelling has been suggested. Translambdoid springs can be used to allow for a distraction through the patent lambdoid sutures and obtain a progressive increase of the posterior skull volume. The procedure consists in a posterior scalp elevation, the patient being on a prone position. Springs made of stainless steel wire (1.5 mm in diameter) are bent in a U-type fashion, and strategically positioned across both lambdoid sutures. No drilling is usually necessary, as the lambdoid suture can be gently forced with a subperiosteal elevator in its middle and an indentation can be created with a bony rongeur on each side of the open suture to allow for a self-retention of bayonet-shaped extremity of the spring. Careful attention is addressed to the favoured prone position during the post-operative period. After a delay of 3-6 months, the springs can be removed during a second uneventful procedure, with limited incisions, usually as a preliminary step of the subsequent frontal remodelling. The concept of spring-assisted expansion across patent sutures under 6 months of age was confirmed in our experience (19 cases). Insertion of the springs allowed for immediate distraction across the suture. A posterior remodelling of the skull could be achieved with minimal morbidity allowing to delay safely a radical anterior surgery.

  9. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy in skull base meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Navarria, Pierina; Pessina, Federico; Cozzi, Luca; Clerici, Elena; Villa, Elisa; Ascolese, Anna Maria; De Rose, Fiorenza; Comito, Tiziana; Franzese, Ciro; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Lobefalo, Francesca; Fogliata, Antonella; Reggiori, Giacomo; Fornari, Maurizio; Tomatis, Stefano; Bello, Lorenzo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the role of hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiation treatment (HSRT) in the management of skull base meningioma. Twenty-six patients were included in the study and treated with a dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions with volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc). Eighteen patients were symptomatic before treatment. Endpoints were local toxicity and relief from symptoms. Tumors were located in anterior skull base in 4/27 cases, in middle skull base in 12/27 and in posterior skull base in 11/27. HSRT was performed as first treatment in 17 (65 %) patients, in 9 (35 %) patients it followed a previous partial resection. Median follow up was 24.5 months (range 5-57 months). clinical remission of symptoms, complete or partial, was obtained in the vast majority of patients after treatment. Out of the 18 symptomatic patients, partial remission occurred in 9 (50 %) patients and complete remission in 9 (50 %). All asymptomatic patients retained their status after treatment. No severe neurologic toxicity grade III-IV was recorded. No increase of meningioma in the same site of treatment occurred; 16 (62 %) patients had stable disease and 9 (38 %) patients had tumor reduction. The mean tumor volume after treatment was 10.8 ± 17.8 cm(3) compared with 13.0 ± 19.1 cm(3) before treatment (p = 0.02). The mean actuarial OS was 54.4 ± 2.8 months. The 1- and 2-years OS was 92.9 ± 0.7 %. HSRT proved to be feasible for these patients not eligible to full surgery or to ablative radiation therapy. Local control and durability of results suggest for a routine application of this approach in properly selected cases.

  10. Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Skull Combined with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign but locally invasive and frequently recur. Giant cell tumors of the skull are extremely rare. A patient underwent a surgery to remove a tumor, but the tumor recurred. Additionally, the patient developed multiple aneurysms. The patient underwent total tumor resection and trapping for the aneurysms, followed by radiotherapy. We report this rare case and suggest some possibilities for treating tumor growth combined with aneurysm development. PMID:27195256

  11. Endoscopic skull base surgery: evaluation of current clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J P; De Albuquerque, L A; Dal Fabbro, M; Sampaio, M; Medina, R; Chacon, M; Gondim, J

    2015-11-23

    Endoscopic skull base surgery is one of the most recent fields of neurosurgery. Successive innovations were developed throughout history so that the current concepts that rule this surgical field could be reached. The current paper presents the evolution of endoscopic surgery and its current results on the treatment of skull base tumor, based on a review of meta-analysis and clinical series. A PubMed search for articles published between January 1990 and January 2014 about "endoscopic skull base surgery", "endoscopic transsphenoidal approach", "endoscopic treatment of parasellar tumors" and "suprasellar lesions" was performed. According to the current data, endoscopic surgery seems to be superior to open and transsphenoidal microscopic removal of giant pituitary adenomas. Endoscopy is at least as successful as transsphenoidal microsurgery for the removal of pituitary adenomas and craniopharyngiomas. Transcranial open approaches, in the context of anterior midline skull base meningiomas, present higher rates of gross total resection, fewer complications and better clinical results than endoscopy approaches. The rate of postoperative CSF leakage has been significantly reduced with the introduction of new techniques such as the Hadad- Bassagasteguy flap but still represent one of the most important complications of this technique. Currently, selected tumors located at the anterior, middle and posterior fossa can be adequately assessed using the endoscope with low rates of postoperative CSF leaks. Endoscopic surgery has substantially evolved in the last decades through the collaboration of different teams around the world. The endoscope is now an essential tool in the neurosurgery armamentarium with great potential for new applications in the nearby future.

  12. Thermal effects of diagnostic ultrasound in an anthropomorphic skull model.

    PubMed

    Vyskocil, E; Pfaffenberger, S; Kollmann, C; Gleiss, A; Nawratil, G; Kastl, S; Unger, E; Aumayr, K; Schuhfried, O; Huber, K; Wojta, J; Gottsauner-Wolf, M

    2012-12-01

    Exposure to diagnostic ultrasound (US) can significantly heat biological tissue although conventional routine examinations are regarded as safe. The risk of unwanted thermal effects increases with a high absorption coefficient and extended insonation time. Certain applications of transcranial diagnostic US (TC-US) require prolonged exposure. An anthropomorphic skull model (ASM) was developed to evaluate thermal effects induced by TC-US of different modalities. The objective was to determine whether prolonged continuous TC-US application results in potentially harmful temperature increases. The ASM consists of a human skull with tissue mimicking material and exhibits acoustic and anatomical characteristics of the human skull and brain. Experiments are performed with a diagnostic US device testing four different US modalities: Duplex PW (pulsed wave) Doppler, PW Doppler, color flow Doppler and B-mode. Temperature changes are recorded during 180 minutes of insonation. All measurements revealed significant temperature increases during insonation independent of the US modality. The maximum temperature elevation of + 5.25° C (p < 0.001) was observed on the surface of the skull exposed to duplex PW Doppler. At the bone-brain border a maximum temperature increae of + 2.01 °C (p < 0.001) was noted. Temperature increases within the brain were < 1.23 °C (p = 0.001). The highest values were registered using the duplex PW Doppler modality. TC-US induces significant local heating effects in an ASM. An application duration that extends routine clinical periods causes potentially harmful heating especially in tissue close to bone. TC-US elevates the temperature in the brain mimicking tissue but is not capable of producing harmful temperature increases during routine examinations. However, the risk of thermal injury in brain tissue increases significantly after an exposure time of > 2 hours. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Leakage losses from a hydraulic fracture and fracture propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert E.; Gustafson, Craig W.

    1988-11-01

    The fluid mechanics of viscous fluid injection into a fracture embedded in a permeable rock formation is studied. Coupling between flow in the fracture and flow in the rock is retained. The analysis is based on a perturbation scheme that assumes the depth of penetration of the fluid into the rock is small compared to the characteristic length w30/k, where w0 is the characteristic crack width and k is the permeability. This restriction, however, is shown to be minor. The spatial dependence of the leakage rate per unit length from the fracture is found to be linear, decreasing from the well bore to the fracture tip where it vanishes. The magnitude of the leakage rate per unit length is found to decay in time as t-1/3 if the injection rate at the well bore is constant, and as t-1/2 if the well bore pressure is held constant. The results cast considerable doubt on the validity of Carter's well-known leakage formula (Drilling Prod. Prac. API 1957, 261) derived from a one-dimensional theory. Using the simple fracture propagation model made popular by Carter, the present work also predicts that the fracture grows at a rate proportional to t1/3 for a fixed well bore injection rate and a rate proportional to t1/4 for a fixed well bore pressure.

  14. Shape similarities and differences in the skulls of scavenging raptors.

    PubMed

    Guangdi, S I; Dong, Yiyi; Ma, Yujun; Zhang, Zihui

    2015-04-01

    Feeding adaptations are a conspicuous feature of avian evolution. Bill and cranial shape as well as the jaw muscles are closely related to diet choice and feeding behaviors. Diurnal raptors of Falconiformes exhibit a wide range of foraging behaviors and prey preferences, and are assigned to seven dietary groups in this study. Skulls of 156 species are compared from the dorsal, lateral and ventral views, by using geometric morphometric techniques with those landmarks capturing as much information as possible on the overall shape of cranium, bill, orbits, nostrils and attachment area for different jaw muscles. The morphometric data showed that the skull shape of scavengers differ significantly from other raptors, primarily because of different feeding adaptations. As a result of convergent evolution, different scavengers share generalized common morphology, possessing relatively slender and lower skulls, longer bills, smaller and more sideward orbits, and more caudally positioned quadrates. Significant phylogenetic signals suggested that phylogeny also played important role in shape variation within scavengers. New World vultures can be distinguished by their large nostrils, narrow crania and small orbits; Caracaras typically show large palatines, crania and orbits, as well as short, deep and sharp bill.

  15. Morphometric analysis of infraorbital foramen in Indian dry skulls

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the variability in position, shape, size and incidence of the infraorbital foramen in Indian dry skulls as little literature is available on this foramen in Indians to prevent clinical complications during maxillofacial surgery and regional block anesthesia. Fifty-five Indian skulls from the Department of Anatomy CSM Medical University were examined. The 110 sides (left and right) of the skulls were analyzed by measuring the infraorbital foramina distances from infraorbital margin and the piriform aperture on both sides. The vertical and horizontal dimensions were also measured. All measurements were taken with a compass transferred to calipers and analyzed statistically. The mean distances between the infraorbital foramen and the infraorbital margin on the right and left side were 6.12 mm and 6.19 mm, respectively. The mean distances between the infraorbital foramen and the piriform aperture were 15.31 mm and 15.80 mm on the right and left sides, respectively. The mean vertical dimensions on the right and left side were 3.39 mm and 3.75 mm, respectively. The mean horizontal dimensions on the two sides were 3.19 mm and 3.52 mm. These results provide detailed knowledge of the anatomical characteristics and clinical importance of the infraorbital foramina which are of paramount importance for surgeons when performing maxillofacial surgery and regional block anesthesia. PMID:21519552

  16. Does nasal echolocation influence the modularity of the mammal skull?

    PubMed

    Santana, S E; Lofgren, S E

    2013-11-01

    In vertebrates, changes in cranial modularity can evolve rapidly in response to selection. However, mammals have apparently maintained their pattern of cranial integration throughout their evolutionary history and across tremendous morphological and ecological diversity. Here, we use phylogenetic, geometric morphometric and comparative analyses to test the hypothesis that the modularity of the mammalian skull has been remodelled in rhinolophid bats due to the novel and critical function of the nasal cavity in echolocation. We predicted that nasal echolocation has resulted in the evolution of a third cranial module, the 'nasal dome', in addition to the braincase and rostrum modules, which are conserved across mammals. We also test for similarities in the evolution of skull shape in relation to habitat across rhinolophids. We find that, despite broad variation in the shape of the nasal dome, the integration of the rhinolophid skull is highly consistent with conserved patterns of modularity found in other mammals. Across their broad geographical distribution, cranial shape in rhinolophids follows two major divisions that could reflect adaptations to dietary and environmental differences in African versus South Asian distributions. Our results highlight the potential of a relatively simple modular template to generate broad morphological and functional variation in mammals.

  17. Closure of the sigmoid sinus in lateral skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Zanoletti, E; Cazzador, D; Faccioli, C; Martini, A; Mazzoni, A

    2014-06-01

    Closure of the sigmoid-jugular complex is generally planned during various surgical procedures on the skull base, either to repair a jugular foramen lesion or as the oncological boundary of the resection. A series of 218 cases of skull base tumour surgeries was analysed in which closure of the sigmoid-jugular complex was systematically planned (bilaterally in one case) in patients treated for jugular foramen paragangliomas, squamous cell carcinomas and other temporal bone tumours. Surgery was performed via a petro-occipital trans-sigmoid approach in 61 cases, an infratemporal A in 128, en bloc subtotal temporal bone resections in 10 and other approaches in 20. In our experience, planned unilateral (and, in one case, bilateral) closure of the sigmoid-jugular complex had no clinical consequences. The vicarious drainage of the skull base was always assessed preoperatively, revealing no contraindications to intraoperative sinus closure. Given the scarcity of literature on this subject, the present report shows that the procedure is associated with low morbidity and helps to improve our understanding of cerebral venous discharge.

  18. The use of free flaps in skull base reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Macía, G; Picón, M; Nuñez, J; Almeida, F; Alvarez, I; Acero, J

    2016-02-01

    Skull base tumours are rare, comprising less than 1% of all tumours of the head and neck. Surgical treatment of these tumours involves the approach, the resection, and the reconstruction of the defect, which present a challenge due to the technical difficulty and anatomical complexity. A retrospective study of 17 patients with tumours involving the skull base, treated by resection and immediate reconstruction using microsurgical free flaps, is presented; 11 were men and six were women. The following types of flap were used: osteocutaneous fibula flaps, fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flaps, and myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flaps. The most common histology of the tumours was squamous cell carcinoma. The most frequent point of origin was the paranasal sinuses (58.8%). All of the free flaps used for reconstruction were viable. A cerebrospinal fluid fistula occurred in two patients, and in one of these cases, meningoencephalitis led to death. In conclusion, the reconstruction of large defects of the skull base after ablation requires a viable tissue that in many cases can be obtained only through the use of microvascular free flaps. The type of flap to be selected depends on the anatomical structures and size of the defect to be restored.

  19. Ground truth data generation for skull-face overlay.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, O; Cavalli, F; Campomanes-Álvarez, B R; Campomanes-Álvarez, C; Valsecchi, A; Huete, M I

    2015-05-01

    Objective and unbiased validation studies over a significant number of cases are required to get a more solid picture on craniofacial superimposition reliability. It will not be possible to compare the performance of existing and upcoming methods for craniofacial superimposition without a common forensic database available for the research community. Skull-face overlay is a key task within craniofacial superimposition that has a direct influence on the subsequent task devoted to evaluate the skull-face relationships. In this work, we present the procedure to create for the first time such a dataset. We have also created a database with 19 skull-face overlay cases for which we are trying to overcome legal issues that allow us to make it public. The quantitative analysis made in the segmentation and registration stages, together with the visual assessment of the 19 face-to-face overlays, allows us to conclude that the results can be considered as a gold standard. With such a ground truth dataset, a new horizon is opened for the development of new automatic methods whose performance could be now objectively measured and compared against previous and future proposals. Additionally, other uses are expected to be explored to better understand the visual evaluation process of craniofacial relationships in craniofacial identification. It could be very useful also as a starting point for further studies on the prediction of the resulting facial morphology after corrective or reconstructive interventionism in maxillofacial surgery.

  20. Shape and volume of craniofacial cavities in intentional skull deformations.

    PubMed

    Khonsari, R H; Friess, M; Nysjö, J; Odri, G; Malmberg, F; Nyström, I; Messo, E; Hirsch, J M; Cabanis, E A M; Kunzelmann, K H; Salagnac, J M; Corre, P; Ohazama, A; Sharpe, P T; Charlier, P; Olszewski, R

    2013-05-01

    Intentional cranial deformations (ICD) have been observed worldwide but are especially prevalent in preColombian cultures. The purpose of this study was to assess the consequences of ICD on three cranial cavities (intracranial cavity, orbits, and maxillary sinuses) and on cranial vault thickness, in order to screen for morphological changes due to the external constraints exerted by the deformation device. We acquired CT-scans for 39 deformed and 19 control skulls. We studied the thickness of the skull vault using qualitative and quantitative methods. We computed the volumes of the orbits, of the maxillary sinuses, and of the intracranial cavity using haptic-aided semi-automatic segmentation. We finally defined 3D distances and angles within orbits and maxillary sinuses based on 27 anatomical landmarks and measured these features on the 58 skulls. Our results show specific bone thickness patterns in some types of ICD, with localized thinning in regions subjected to increased pressure and thickening in other regions. Our findings confirm that volumes of the cranial cavities are not affected by ICDs but that the shapes of the orbits and of the maxillary sinuses are modified in circumferential deformations. We conclude that ICDs can modify the shape of the cranial cavities and the thickness of their walls but conserve their volumes. These results provide new insights into the morphological effects associated with ICDs and call for similar investigations in subjects with deformational plagiocephalies and craniosynostoses.

  1. The first skull of the earliest giant panda

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Changzhu; Ciochon, Russell L.; Dong, Wei; Hunt, Robert M.; Liu, Jinyi; Jaeger, Marc; Zhu, Qizhi

    2007-01-01

    Fossils of the giant panda Ailuropoda (Order Carnivora, Family Ursidae) are largely isolated teeth, mandibles, and a few rare skulls, known from the late Pliocene to late Pleistocene in China and Southeast Asia. Much of this material represents a Pleistocene chronospecies, Ailuropoda baconi, an animal larger than the living giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. The earliest certain record of Ailuropoda is the late Pliocene chronospecies, Ailuropoda microta, smaller than either A. baconi or A. melanoleuca, and previously known only from teeth and a few mandibles from karst caves in south China. Here, we report the discovery of the first skull of A. microta, establishing its cranial anatomy and demonstrating that the specialized cranial and dental adaptations of Ailuropoda for durophagous feeding behavior centered on bamboo were already evident in this late Pliocene species. The skull from Jinyin cave (Guangxi) and dental remains from other karst localities in southeastern China show that Ailuropoda microta occupied south China from ≈2 to 2.4 Myr ago after a marked global climatic deterioration. Dental and basicranial anatomy indicate a less specialized morphology early in the history of the lineage and support derivation of the giant panda from the Miocene Asian ursid Ailurarctos PMID:17578912

  2. Immediate and Delayed Complications Following Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Naunheim, Matthew R.; Sedaghat, Ahmad R.; Lin, Derrick T.; Bleier, Benjamin S.; Holbrook, Eric H.; Curry, William T.; Gray, Stacey T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the temporal distribution and resolution rate of postoperative complications from endoscopic skull base surgery. Design Retrospective review of patients undergoing endoscopic resection of paranasal sinus or skull base neoplasm from 2007 to 2013. Setting Massachusetts General Hospital/Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Cranial Base Center. Participants Fifty-eight consecutive patients. Main Outcome Measures Postoperative complications were categorized as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, pituitary, orbital, intracranial, or sinonasal. Complications were temporally categorized as “perioperative” (within 1 week), “early” (after 1 week and within 6 months), or “delayed” (after 6 months). Results The most common perioperative complications were diabetes insipidus (19.0%), CSF leak (5.2%), and meningitis (5.2%), with resolution rates of 75%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Overall, CSF leak occurred in 13.8% of patients and resolved in all cases. A total of 53.8% of all complications were evident within 1 week of surgery. Chronic rhinosinusitis was the most common delayed complication (3.4%). Hypopituitarism and delayed complications were less likely to resolve (p = 0.014 and p = 0.080, respectively). Conclusions Monitoring of complications after endoscopic skull base surgery should focus on neurologic complications and CSF leak in the early postoperative period and development of chronic rhinosinusitis in the long term. Late-onset complications and hypopituitarism are less likely to resolve. PMID:26401482

  3. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  4. Modified midfacial translocation for access to ventral skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A; Shakeel, M; Vallamkondu, V; Kamel, M

    2014-09-01

    To describe our technical modifications of midfacial translocation for access to the nasopharynx, and anterior, central and lateral skull base. Retrospective chart review of a prospective case series. Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Scotland, UK. Along with demographics, other parameters studied were adequacy of exposure, completeness of resection, aesthetic outcome and complications. Our main outcome measures included adequacy of exposure, partial or total resection of tumour, aesthetic outcome, and complications related to surgical technique. A total of 48 patients underwent modified midfacial translocation at our institution for nasopharyngeal, parapharyngeal, and anterior, central and lateral skull base tumours. In all cases, the exposure was deemed to be adequate. Two patients developed wound dehiscence in previously irradiated fields. Other incisions healed very well and the aesthetic outcome was regarded as satisfactory. Modified midfacial translocation is based on the principle of temporary craniofacial disassembly for access to the skull base. Our modifications offer adequate access and a better aesthetic outcome. All incisions are placed through the aesthetic sub units of the nose with preservation of the lip. Preservation of the bony piriform aperture prevents airway compromise.

  5. Integrated Anterior, Central, and Posterior Skull Base Unit – A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Yves; Waran, Vicknes; Zulkiflee, Abu Bakar; Lim, Elizabeth; Prepageran, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    The skull base is one of the most complex anatomical regions and forms the floor of the cranial cavity. Skull base surgery involves open, microscopic, and endoscopic approaches to the anterior, middle, or posterior cranial fossa. A multispecialty team approach is essential in treating patients with skull base lesions. Traditionally, rhinologists are involved in providing access to anterior skull base lesions while otologists are involved in the treatment of lesions of the posterior skull base. This is the case in most skull base centers today. In this article, we share a new perspective of an integrated skull base unit where a team of otolaryngologists and neurosurgeons treat anterior, middle, and posterior skull base pathologies. The rationale for this approach is that most technical skills required in skull base surgery are interchangeable and apply whether an endoscopic or microscopic approach is used. We show how the different skills apply to the different approaches and share our experience with an integrated skull base unit. PMID:26258128

  6. Analysis of the sexual dimorphism in the basioccipital portion of the dog's skull.

    PubMed

    Trouth, C O; Winter, S; Gupta, K C; Millis, R M; Holloway, J A

    1977-01-01

    Sexual differences in the basioccipital portion of the skull of dogs have been described and an index is presented which reliably predicts the sex of the skull. 92 dolichocephalic skull (44 male, 48 female) from mongrel dogs were used. In the basioccipital region of the male skulls, a triangular area, which extends from the basion to a line joining the medialmost points of the two jugular foramina, appears narrow and elevated. The pharyngeal tubercle is also prominent. In female skulls the rostral angle of this triangle is wider and the triangular area seems smoother and flat. The anterior half of the female basioccipital portion is wider and smoother than in the male skull. In order to quantify the observed differences, four indices were calculated. All of the indices were statistically significant. However, only index IV could be reliably used in predicting the sex of an unknown skull: (formula: see text) was derived from breadth IV (distance between the two temporo-occipital fissures at their lateralmost points) and length II (distance between the basion and a line drawn between the two medialmost points of the jugular foramina in the midline). Values of less than 123 for male and greater than 136 for female placed the skulls in their proper sex group. Skulls that had intermediate values could be placed in correct sex grouping only in conjunction with strong observational criteria. It is suggested that in absence of such strong observational criteria these skulls may belong to immature or castrate animals.

  7. Is solid always best? Cranial performance in solid and fenestrated caecilian skulls.

    PubMed

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Maddin, Hillary C; Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix; Summers, Adam P

    2012-03-01

    Caecilians (Lissamphibia: Gymnophiona) are characterized by a fossorial lifestyle that appears to play a role in the many anatomical specializations in the group. The skull, in particular, has been the focus of previous studies because it is driven into the substrate for burrowing. There are two different types of skulls in caecilians: (1) stegokrotaphic, where the squamosal completely covers the temporal region and the jaw closing muscles, and (2) zygokrotaphic, with incomplete coverage of the temporal region by the squamosal. We used 3-D imaging and modeling techniques to explore the functional consequences of these skull types in an evolutionary context. We digitally converted stegokrotaphic skulls into zygokrotaphic skulls and vice versa. We also generated a third, akinetic skull type that was presumably present in extinct caecilian ancestors. We explored the benefits and costs of the different skull types under frontal loading at different head angles with finite element analysis (FEA). Surprisingly, the differences in stress distributions and bending between the three tested skull types were minimal and not significant. This suggests that the open temporal region in zygokrotaphic skulls does not lead to poorer performance during burrowing. However, the results of the FEA suggest a strong relationship between the head angle and skull performance, implying there is an optimal head angle during burrowing.

  8. Immediate, but Not Delayed, Microsurgical Skull Reconstruction Exacerbates Brain Damage in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tsz; Kaneko, Yuji; van Loveren, Harry; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2012-01-01

    Moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in malformations to the skull. Aesthetic surgical maneuvers may offer normalized skull structure, but inconsistent surgical closure of the skull area accompanies TBI. We examined whether wound closure by replacement of skull flap and bone wax would allow aesthetic reconstruction of the TBI-induced skull damage without causing any detrimental effects to the cortical tissue. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to TBI using the controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury model. Immediately after the TBI surgery, animals were randomly assigned to skull flap replacement with or without bone wax or no bone reconstruction, then were euthanized at five days post-TBI for pathological analyses. The skull reconstruction provided normalized gross bone architecture, but 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride and hematoxylin and eosin staining results revealed larger cortical damage in these animals compared to those that underwent no surgical maneuver at all. Brain swelling accompanied TBI, especially the severe model, that could have relieved the intracranial pressure in those animals with no skull reconstruction. In contrast, the immediate skull reconstruction produced an upregulation of the edema marker aquaporin-4 staining, which likely prevented the therapeutic benefits of brain swelling and resulted in larger cortical infarcts. Interestingly, TBI animals introduced to a delay in skull reconstruction (i.e., 2 days post-TBI) showed significantly reduced edema and infarcts compared to those exposed to immediate skull reconstruction. That immediate, but not delayed, skull reconstruction may exacerbate TBI-induced cortical tissue damage warrants a careful consideration of aesthetic repair of the skull in TBI. PMID:22438975

  9. Divergent Skull Morphology Supports Two Trophic Specializations in Otters (Lutrinae)

    PubMed Central

    Timm-Davis, Lori L.; DeWitt, Thomas J.; Marshall, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Variation in terrestrial mammalian skull morphology is known to constrain feeding performance, which in turn influences dietary habits and ultimately fitness. Among mustelids, otters have evolved two feeding specializations: underwater raptorial capture of prey (mouth-oriented) and capture of prey by hand (hand-oriented), both of which have likely associations with morphology and bite performance. However, feeding biomechanics and performance data for otters are sparse. The first goal of this study was to investigate the relationships between feeding morphology and bite performance among two mouth-oriented piscivores (Pteronura brasiliensis and Lontra canadensis) and two hand-oriented invertebrate specialists (Enhydra lutris and Aonyx cinerea). Since other vertebrate taxa that are mouth-oriented piscivores tend to possess longer skulls and mandibles, with jaws designed for increased velocity at the expense of biting capability, we hypothesized that mouth-oriented otters would also possess long, narrow skulls indicative of high velocity jaws. Conversely, hand-oriented otters were expected to possess short, blunt skulls with adaptations to increase bite force and crushing capability. Concomitant with these skull shapes we hypothesized that sea otters would possess a greater mandibular bluntness index, providing for a greater mechanical advantage compared to other otter species investigated. A second goal was to examine morphological variation at a finer scale by assessing variation in cranial morphology among three sea otter subspecies. Since diet varies among these subspecies, and their populations are isolated, we hypothesized that the magnitude of mandibular bluntness and concomitant mechanical advantage, as well as occlusal surface area would also vary within species according to their primary food source (fish versus hard invertebrates). Functional expectations were met for comparisons among and within species. Among species the phylogeny suggests a deeply

  10. Micrometeorite Impacts in Beringian Mammoth Tusks and a Bison Skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; West, A.; Stefanka, Z.; Revay, Z.; Hagstrum, J. T.

    2007-12-01

    We have discovered what appear to be micrometeorites imbedded in seven Alaskan Mammoth tusks and a Siberian bison skull. The micrometeorites apparently shattered on impact leaving 2-5 mm hemispherical debris patterns surrounded by carbonized rings. Multiple impacts are observed on only one side of the tusks and skull consistent with the micrometeorites having come from a single direction. The impact sites are strongly magnetic indicating significant iron content. We analyzed several imbedded micrometeorite fragments from both tusks and skull with Laser Ablation Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). These analyses confirmed the high iron content and a uniform composition highly enriched in nickel and depleted in titanium. The Fe/Ni and Fe/Ti ratios are comparable to urelite meteorites and are unlike any terrestrial sources. Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) of a micrometeorite extracted from the bison skull indicated it contained ~0.4 mg of iron, in agreement with a micrometeorite ~1 mm in diameter. Several tusks have an average radiocarbon age of ~33 ka. This age coincides with sudden increases in global radiocarbon ~35 ka agoa and 10Be ~32 ka agob, the Mono Lake geomagnetic excursion ~34 ka agoc, and significant declines in Beringian bison, horse, brown bear, and mammoth populations and genetic diversity <36 ka agod. The bison skull shows evidence of new bone growth over the micrometeorite impact sites indicating the animal survived the bombardment and is dated at ~26 ka which is younger than the tusks. This age is consistent with exposure of the bison to an enriched source of radiocarbon following the impact. It appears likely that the impacts, cosmogenic isotope increases, magnetic excursion, and population declines are related events (Occam's razor), although their precise nature remains to be determined. aK. Hughen, et al., Science 303, 202-207 (2004). bL.R. McHargue, P.E. Damon, & D.J. Donahue

  11. Three-dimensional adult male head and skull contours.

    PubMed

    Lee, Calvin; Loyd, Andre M; Nightingale, Roger; Myers, Barry S; Damon, Andrew; Bass, Cameron R

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health issue, affecting millions of people annually. Anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) and finite element models (FEMs) provide a means of understanding factors leading to TBI, potentially reducing the occurrence. Thus, there is a need to ensure that these tools accurately model humans. For example, the Hybrid III was not based on 3-dimensional human head shape data. The objective of this study is to produce average head and skull contours for an average U.S. male that can be used for ATDs and FEMs. Computed tomography (CT) scans of adult male heads were obtained from a database provided by the University of Virginia Center for Applied Biomechanics. An orthographic viewer was used to extract head and skull contours from the CT scans. Landmarks were measured graphically using HyperMesh (Altair, HyperWorks). To determine the head occipital condyle (OC) centroid, surface meshes of the OCs were made and the centroid of the surfaces was calculated. The Hybrid III contour was obtained using a MicroScribe Digitizer (Solution Technologies, Inc., Oella, MD). Comparisons of the average male and ATD contours were performed using 2 methods: (1) the midsagittal and midcoronal ATD contours relative to the OC centroid were compared to the corresponding 1 SD range of the average male contours; (2) the ATD sagittal contour was translated relative to the average male sagittal contour to minimize the area between the 2 contours. Average male head and skull contours were created. Landmark measurements were made for the dorsum sellae, nasion skin, nasion bone, infraorbital foramen, and external auditory meatus, all relative to the OC centroid. The Hybrid III midsagittal contour was outside the 1 SD range for 15.2 percent of the average male head contour but only by a maximum distance of 1.5 mm, whereas the Hybrid III midcoronal head contour was outside the 1 SD range for 12.2 percent of the average male head contour by a maximum distance

  12. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Patients with Skull Defects and Skull Plates: High-Resolution Computational FEM Study of Factors Altering Cortical Current Flow

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom; Fregni, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary positive results of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in enhancing the effects of cognitive and motor training indicate this technique might also be beneficial in traumatic brain injury or patients who had decompressive craniectomy for trauma and cerebrovascular disease. One perceived hurdle is the presence of skull defects or skull plates in these patients that would hypothetically alter the intensity and location of current flow through the brain. We aimed to model tDCS using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived finite element head model with several conceptualized skull injuries. Cortical electric field (current density) peak intensities and distributions were compared with the healthy (skull intact) case. The factors of electrode position (C3-supraorbital or O1-supraorbital), skull defect size, skull defect state (acute and chronic) or skull plate (titanium and acrylic) were analyzed. If and how electric current through the brain was modulated by defects was found to depend on a specific combination of factors. For example, the condition that led to largest increase in peak cortical electric field was when one electrode was placed directly over a moderate sized skull defect. In contrast, small defects midway between electrodes did not significantly change cortical currents. As the conductivity of large skull defects/plates was increased (chronic to acute to titanium), current was shunted away from directly underlying cortex and concentrated in cortex underlying the defect perimeter. The predictions of this study are the first step to assess safety of transcranial electrical therapy in subjects with skull injuries. PMID:20435146

  13. Condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Raja; Brown, Ryan; Ducic, Yadranko

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic indications for different treatments of condylar and subcondylar fractures. It also reviews the steps of different surgical approaches to access the surgical area and explains the pros and cons of each procedure.

  14. Rib Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Damage in Boxers (News) Which High School Sport Has the Most Concussions? Additional Content Medical News Rib Fractures By Thomas ... often... More News News HealthDay Which High School Sport Has the Most Concussions? WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Female soccer ...

  15. Mature osteoblasts dedifferentiate in response to traumatic bone injury in the zebrafish fin and skull.

    PubMed

    Geurtzen, Karina; Knopf, Franziska; Wehner, Daniel; Huitema, Leonie F A; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Weidinger, Gilbert

    2014-06-01

    Zebrafish have an unlimited capacity to regenerate bone after fin amputation. In this process, mature osteoblasts dedifferentiate to osteogenic precursor cells and thus represent an important source of newly forming bone. By contrast, differentiated osteoblasts do not appear to contribute to repair of bone injuries in mammals; rather, osteoblasts form anew from mesenchymal stem cells. This raises the question whether osteoblast dedifferentiation is specific to appendage regeneration, a special feature of the lepidotrichia bone of the fish fin, or a process found more generally in fish bone. Here, we show that dedifferentiation of mature osteoblasts is not restricted to fin regeneration after amputation, but also occurs during repair of zebrafish fin fractures and skull injuries. In both models, mature osteoblasts surrounding the injury downregulate the expression of differentiation markers, upregulate markers of the pre-osteoblast state and become proliferative. Making use of photoconvertible Kaede protein as well as Cre-driven genetic fate mapping, we show that osteoblasts migrate to the site of injury to replace damaged tissue. Our findings suggest a fundamental role for osteoblast dedifferentiation in reparative bone formation in fish and indicate that adult fish osteoblasts display elevated cellular plasticity compared with mammalian bone-forming cells.

  16. Lightning injury as a blast injury of skull, brain, and visceral lesions: clinical and experimental evidences.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, M; Hosoda, Y; Fujishiro, Y; Tuyuki, A; Kikuchi, K; Obara, H; Kitagawa, N; Ishikawa, T

    2001-12-01

    The present study attempts to better understand the mechanism of injuries associated with direct lightning strikes. We reviewed the records of 256 individuals struck by lightning between 1965 and 1999, including 56 people who were killed. Basal skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage, pulmonary haemorrhage, or solid organ rupture was suspected in three men who died. Generally these lesions have been attributed to current flow or falling after being struck. However, examination of surface injuries sustained suggested that the true cause was concussion secondary to blast injury resulting from vaporization of water on the body surface by a surface flashover spark. To investigate this hypothesis, an experimental model of a lightning strike was created in the rat. Saline-soaked blotting paper was used to simulate wet clothing or skin, and an artificial lightning impulse was applied. The resultant lesions were consistent with our hypothesis that the blast was reinforced by the concussive effect of water vaporization. The concordance between the clinical and experimental evidence argues strongly for blast injury as an important source of morbidity and mortality in lightning strikes.

  17. The Growing Human Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  18. Apparatus for growing crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J. (Inventor); Witt, August F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for growing crystals from a melt employing a heat pipe, consisting of one or more sections, each section serving to control temperature and thermal gradients in the crystal as it forms inside the pipe.

  19. How Your Baby Grows

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Pregnancy week by week Pregnancy week by week Week by week Videos Swipe to advance Learn ... grows each week during pregnancy. Pick your week. Weeks 1-2 Conception (also called fertilization) usually happens ...

  20. Crop growing practices

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter reviews the literature on two specific aspects of cotton growing practices; tillage management and nutrient management. Conservation tillage systems were developed to reduce soil erosion from agricultural fields. Besides this function, conservation tillage systems can improve the water ...

  1. The Growing Human Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  2. Fluid-driven multiple fracture growth from a permeable bedding plane intersected by an ascending hydraulic fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Jeffrey, Robert G.

    2012-12-01

    In bedded sedimentary rocks, the energy for spontaneous growth of multiple vertical fractures from a bedding plane may be provided by an overpressurized sublayer fracture that connects a fluid source to the bedding plane. In this paper, using our coupled deformation and flow model, we study the processes and mechanisms involved in the formation and interaction of closely space fractures from preexisting flaws or starter fractures located along the bedding plane. Fracture growth from multiple flaws can be convergent, parallel or divergent, depending on the factors like contrasts in moduli and far-field stresses, flaw sizes and locations, and initial bed conductivity, fluid viscosity, and injection rate, as well as time. The results presented here have been obtained for conditions where fluid viscous dissipation is dominant, in contrast to other results available in literature based on uniform pressure assumption equivalent to use of an inviscid fluid. It is demonstrated that the earlier a hydraulic fracture starts to extend, the more likely it is to become the primary fracture in a system of closely spaced fractures. The fracture closest to the fluid source typically grows faster as a result of a higher pressure level because viscous dissipation results in a decrease in pressure with distance from the fluid source. But its development does not completely inhibit the growth of other hydraulic fractures. Simultaneous growth of closely spaced fractures is supported by the local stress and energetic analyses, and the fracture distance can be very small. Their length to spacing ratio is accordingly much larger than that predicted previously. Under certain circumstances, a longer and more permeable fracture may grow to a greater extent than a shorter fracture closer to the fluid source, which may grow toward and merge with the longer fracture to create fracture clusters adjacent to a bedding plane.

  3. Growing America's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts produced from a range of abundant, renewable biomass resources. Bioenergy can help ensure a secure, sustainable, and economically sound future by reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil, developing domestic clean energy sources, and generating domestic green jobs. Bioenergy can also help address growing concerns about climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to create a healthier environment for current and future generations.

  4. Application of thinned-skull cranial window to mouse cerebral blood flow imaging using optical microangiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuandong; Baran, Utku; Wang, Ruikang K

    2014-01-01

    In vivo imaging of mouse brain vasculature typically requires applying skull window opening techniques: open-skull cranial window or thinned-skull cranial window. We report non-invasive 3D in vivo cerebral blood flow imaging of C57/BL mouse by the use of ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) and Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) techniques to evaluate two cranial window types based on their procedures and ability to visualize surface pial vessel dynamics. Application of the thinned-skull technique is found to be effective in achieving high quality images for pial vessels for short-term imaging, and has advantages over the open-skull technique in available imaging area, surgical efficiency, and cerebral environment preservation. In summary, thinned-skull cranial window serves as a promising tool in studying hemodynamics in pial microvasculature using OMAG or other OCT blood flow imaging modalities.

  5. Application of Thinned-Skull Cranial Window to Mouse Cerebral Blood Flow Imaging Using Optical Microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo imaging of mouse brain vasculature typically requires applying skull window opening techniques: open-skull cranial window or thinned-skull cranial window. We report non-invasive 3D in vivo cerebral blood flow imaging of C57/BL mouse by the use of ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) and Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) techniques to evaluate two cranial window types based on their procedures and ability to visualize surface pial vessel dynamics. Application of the thinned-skull technique is found to be effective in achieving high quality images for pial vessels for short-term imaging, and has advantages over the open-skull technique in available imaging area, surgical efficiency, and cerebral environment preservation. In summary, thinned-skull cranial window serves as a promising tool in studying hemodynamics in pial microvasculature using OMAG or other OCT blood flow imaging modalities. PMID:25426632

  6. Demonstration of skull bones mobility using optical methods: practical importance in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander V.; Okushko, Vladimir R.; Vturin, Sergey A.; Moseychuk, Vladimir V.; Petrov, Aleksey A.; Suetenkov, Dmitry E.

    2014-01-01

    Unprompted skull bones mobility not related to breathing, heart beating and other physiological reactions, using installation of original construction with control of physiological parameters by biofeedback hardware-software complex BOS-lab and BOS-pulse appliance (COMSIB, Novosibirsk, Russia) has been confirmed. Teeth eruption occurs through odontiasis canals, emerging from the funiculus. The main driving force for promoting a tooth into odontiasis canal during eruption is the unprompted skull bones mobility. A simple optical installation was made for the visualization of skull bones mobility during the investigation of the median palatine and incisors sutures. Early detection of failures of unprompted skull bones mobility and its normalization can lead to prevention of impact teeth, malocclusion, extrudocclusion and other anomalies and deformations of teeth, teeth rows, TMJ and skull. The skull bones mobility should be considered during the early preventive treatment and therapy of the consequences of injuries and malfunction of the maxillofacial area.

  7. [A case of a traumatic anterior cerebral artery aneurysm following the penetration of the skull base by an iron rod].

    PubMed

    Nakai, H; Kawata, Y; Tamura, Y; Tanaka, T; Hodozuka, A; Hashizume, K; Tosho, T; Matsui, R; Iwakiri, H

    1999-06-01

    A 61-year-old male fell from a position 1 m high when building a house. An iron rod, which protruded upward from a solid base in cement, penetrated this patient's neck 15 cm to the head and was successfully extracted by himself. On admission, he complained of headache and vomiting. General examination disclosed nasal bleeding, intraoral bleeding, and L figured skin laceration in the left side of his neck at the level of the thyroid cartilage. Mild disorientation (JCS2) was noted. Otolaryngological examination disclosed hyperemia on the left side of the vocal cord as well as at the dome of the superior pharynx. Plain skull film disclosed pneumocephalus and that a piece of bone fragment of the planum sphenoidale had penetrated the brain. CT demonstrated air in the subarachnoid space, ventricular hemorrhage, intracerebral hematoma in the right frontal lobe, and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the anterior interhemispheric fissure. CAG detected neither cerebral vascular abnormalities nor cerebral aneurysm. While staying in our department, he developed mild fever and CSF rhinorrhea. The diagnosis of bacterial meningitis was made from the CSF finding and was well controlled with conservative therapy. CSF rhinorrhea stopped spontaneously with conservative treatment. Sagittal MRI continuously demonstrated contusional hematoma in the base of the right frontal lobe just above the fractured planum sphenoidale and genu of the corpus callosum following the course of the intracranially invading iron rod. The right CAG on Day 10 demonstrated vasospasm on the A1 and a 1 cm sized saccular cerebral aneurysm at the proximal right fronto-polar artery. CAG on Day 17 again showed the persistent presence of the aneurysm. For the purpose of preventing delayed rupture of the aneurysm, radical surgical treatment was planned. Microsurgical dissection disclosed that the aneurysm was located just behind the elevated fracture of the planum sphenoidale. Severe arachnoid adhesion was noted around the

  8. Divergent effects of obesity on fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carla; Alessi, Chiara; Nuti, Ranuccio; Gonnelli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Obesity was commonly thought to be advantageous for maintaining healthy bones due to the higher bone mineral density observed in overweight individuals. However, several recent studies have challenged the widespread belief that obesity is protective against fracture and have suggested that obesity is a risk factor for certain fractures. The effect of obesity on fracture risk is site-dependent, the risk being increased for some fractures (humerus, ankle, upper arm) and decreased for others (hip, pelvis, wrist). Moreover, the relationship between obesity and fracture may also vary by sex, age, and ethnicity. Risk factors for fracture in obese individuals appear to be similar to those in nonobese populations, although patterns of falling are particularly important in the obese. Research is needed to determine if and how visceral fat and metabolic complications of obesity (type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, chronic inflammation, etc) are causally associated with bone status and fragility fracture risk. Vitamin D deficiency and hypogonadism may also influence fracture risk in obese individuals. Fracture algorithms such as FRAX(®) might be expected to underestimate fracture probability. Studies specifically designed to evaluate the antifracture efficacy of different drugs in obese patients are not available; however, literature data may suggest that in obese patients higher doses of the bisphosphonates might be required in order to maintain efficacy against nonvertebral fractures. Therefore, the search for better methods for the identification of fragility fracture risk in the growing population of adult and elderly subjects with obesity might be considered a clinical priority which could improve the prevention of fracture in obese individuals.

  9. Shape and mechanics in thalattosuchian (Crocodylomorpha) skulls: implications for feeding behaviour and niche partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, S E; Angielczyk, K D; Rayfield, E J

    2009-01-01

    Variation in modern crocodilian and extinct thalattosuchian crocodylomorph skull morphology is only weakly correlated with phylogeny, implying that factors other than evolutionary proximity play important roles in determining crocodile skull shape. To further explore factors potentially influencing morphological differentiation within the Thalattosuchia, we examine teleosaurid and metriorhynchid skull shape variation within a mechanical and dietary context using a combination of finite element modelling and multivariate statistics. Patterns of stress distribution through the skull were found to be very similar in teleosaurid and metriorhynchid species, with stress peaking at the posterior constriction of the snout and around the enlarged supratemporal fenestrae. However, the magnitudes of stresses differ, with metriorhynchids having generally stronger skulls. As with modern crocodilians, a strong linear relationship between skull length and skull strength exists, with short-snouted morphotypes experiencing less stress through the skull than long-snouted morphotypes under equivalent loads. Selection on snout shape related to dietary preference was found to work in orthogonal directions in the two families: diet is associated with snout length in teleosaurids and with snout width in metriorhynchids, suggesting that teleosaurid skulls were adapted for speed of attack and metriorhynchid skulls for force production. Evidence also indicates that morphological and functional differentiation of the skull occurred as a result of dietary preference, allowing closely related sympatric species to exploit a limited environment. Comparisons of the mechanical performance of the thalattosuchian skull with extant crocodilians show that teleosaurids and long-snouted metriorhynchids exhibit stress magnitudes similar to or greater than those of long-snouted modern forms, whereas short-snouted metriorhynchids display stress magnitudes converging on those found in short-snouted modern

  10. Lateral Skull Base Attenuation in Patients with Anterior Cranial Fossa Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Brendan P; Stevens, Shawn M; Xiao, Christopher C; Meyer, Ted A; Schlosser, Rodney J

    2016-06-01

    (1) Determine if patients with anterior fossa spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (SCSF) leaks demonstrate lateral skull base bone attenuation. (2) Examine the relation between body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)) and skull base thickness. Retrospective cohort study. Tertiary care hospital. Retrospective review from 2004 to 2013 identified 96 patients with anterior cranial fossa SCSF leaks. A control group was identified from a consecutive series of clinic patients. Controls had no history of chronic sinonasal or temporal bone pathology and were divided according to BMI into nonobese (<30 kg/m(2)) and obese (≥30 kg/m(2)) groups. Composite skull base thickness was calculated for lateral and anterior subsites through predefined points according to previously published protocols. Thirty-two patients were included in each group. Composite lateral skull base thickness was less in patients with SCSF leaks(0.7 ± 0.1 mm) when compared with nonobese controls (0.8 ± 0.1 mm, P = .004); no differences were apparent when SCSF leaks were compared with obese controls (0.7 ± 0.1 mm, P = .99). A direct relation was observed between anterior skull base and lateral skull base thickness (r = 0.48, P < .0001). An inverse correlation was noted between BMI and lateral skull base (r =-0.40, P < .0001). Patients with anterior fossa SCSF leaks demonstrate attenuation of the lateral skull base. A significant correlation between anterior skull base thickness and lateral skull base thickness was observed. BMI was inversely related to lateral skull base thickness. Taken together, SCSF leaks are associated with obesity, which appears to be partly responsible for diffuse skull base erosion observed in patients with this condition. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  11. Imaging cerebral blood flow through the intact rat skull with temporal laser speckle imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengcheng; Ni, Songlin; Zhang, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2006-06-15

    We discovered that laser speckle temporal contrast analysis (LSTCA) is able to access the two-dimensional (2D) cerebral blood flow velocity and vessel structure through the intact rat skull. It is demonstrated that LSTCA can significantly suppress the influence of the laser speckle from the stationary structure, such as the skull, and thus reveal the blood flow and morphology of blood vessels through the laser speckle images recorded from the intact rat skull.

  12. Trepanation and enlarged parietal foramen on skulls from the Loyalty Islands (Melanesia).

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, Sergey V; Sviridov, Alexey A

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this study is a comprehensive examination of openings discovered on two skulls in the collection of skeletal remains from the Loyalty Islands (Melanesia). The skull No. 1524 displayed an evidence of successful trepanation, and the skull No. 7985 revealed openings that were reminiscent of a trepanation, however, we are inclined to believe that in the latter case we are dealing with a rare genetic anomaly - enlarged parietal foramen.

  13. Imaging cerebral blood flow through the intact rat skull with temporal laser speckle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Ni, Songlin; Zhang, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2006-06-01

    We discovered that laser speckle temporal contrast analysis (LSTCA) is able to access the two-dimensional (2D) cerebral blood flow velocity and vessel structure through the intact rat skull. It is demonstrated that LSTCA can significantly suppress the influence of the laser speckle from the stationary structure, such as the skull, and thus reveal the blood flow and morphology of blood vessels through the laser speckle images recorded from the intact rat skull.

  14. Systematic review of the effectiveness of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics for skull base surgeries.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sheri A B; Getz, Anne E; Kingdom, Todd; Youssef, A Samy; Ramakrishnan, Vijay R

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative antibiotics are commonly used in endoscopic skull base surgeries as prophylaxis for infectious complications, e.g., meningitis. The role of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in endoscopic sinus surgery is unclear, and the routine use of prophylactic antibiotics in endoscopic skull base surgery is also highly debated. Currently, there is no formal recommendation for perioperative antibiotic use in skull base surgery, and regimens vary greatly from one institution to the next. To assess perioperative antibiotics as prophylaxis against infectious complications in patients who underwent endoscopic skull base surgery. PubMed, Ovid EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. A systematic review that examined perioperative antibiotic use in endoscopic skull base and craniofacial surgeries was conducted. Inclusion criteria were prospective or retrospective study design and clinical trials related to the use of antibiotics within 30 days of skull base surgery. End points included infectious complications such as (1) meningitis and (2) sinusitis. A total of 2543 articles were identified by the initial search, and 5 articles met inclusion criteria. The five eligible trials were all observational and involved different types of skull base surgical procedures and antibiotic regimens. Despite institutional variability in antibiotic regimens, meningitis rarely occurs after skull base procedures and seems to be encountered most frequently in open craniofacial surgeries. A systematic review revealed a limited number of published studies, all observational in study design, which precluded a formal meta-analysis. A novel large-scale randomized-controlled clinical trial is needed to evaluate antibiotic selection and need in endoscopic skull base surgery.

  15. A rapid and reversible skull optical clearing method for monitoring cortical blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Yanjie; Shi, Rui; Zhu, Dan

    2016-03-01

    In vivo cortex optical imaging is of great important for revealing both structural and functional architecture of brain with high temporal-spatial resolution. To reduce the limitation of turbid skull, researchers had to establish various skull windows or directly expose cortex through craniotomy. Here we developed a skull optical clearing method to make skull transparent. Laser speckle contrast imaging technique was used to monitor the cortical blood flow after topical treatment with the optical clearing agents. The results indicated that the image contrast increased gradually, and then maintained at a high level after 15 min for adult mice, which made the image quality and resolution of micro-vessels nearly approximate to those of exposed cortex. Both the cortical blood flow velocity almost kept constant after skull became transparent. Besides, the treatment of physiological saline on the skull could make skull return to the initial state again and the skull could become transparent again when SOCS retreated it. Thus, we could conclude that the skull optical clearing method was rapid, valid, reversible and safe, which provided us available approach for performing the cortical structural and functional imaging at high temporal-spatial resolution.

  16. Contributions to the functional morphology of caudate skulls: kinetic and akinetic forms

    PubMed Central

    Handschuh, Stephan; Lukanov, Simeon; Naumov, Borislav

    2016-01-01

    A strongly ossified and rigid skull roof, which prevents parietal kinesis, has been reported for the adults of all amphibian clades. Our μ-CT investigations revealed that the Buresch’s newt (Triturus ivanbureschi) possess a peculiar cranial construction. In addition to the typical amphibian pleurokinetic articulation between skull roof and palatoquadrate associated structures, we found flexible connections between nasals and frontals (prokinesis), vomer and parasphenoid (palatokinesis), and between frontals and parietals (mesokinesis). This is the first description of mesokinesis in urodelans. The construction of the skull in the Buresch’s newts also indicates the presence of an articulation between parietals and the exocipitals, discussed as a possible kind of metakinesis. The specific combination of pleuro-, pro-, meso-, palato-, and metakinetic skull articulations indicate to a new kind of kinetic systems unknown for urodelans to this date. We discuss the possible neotenic origin of the skull kinesis and pose the hypothesis that the kinesis in T. ivanbureschi increases the efficiency of fast jaw closure. For that, we compared the construction of the skull in T. ivanbureschi to the akinetic skull of the Common fire salamander Salamandra salamandra. We hypothesize that the design of the skull in the purely terrestrial living salamander shows a similar degree of intracranial mobility. However, this mobility is permitted by elasticity of some bones and not by true articulation between them. We comment on the possible relation between the skull construction and the form of prey shaking mechanism that the species apply to immobilize their victims. PMID:27688958

  17. Deficiency of zebrafish fgf20a results in aberrant skull remodeling that mimics both human cranial disease and evolutionarily important fish skull morphologies.

    PubMed

    Cooper, W James; Wirgau, Rachel M; Sweet, Elly M; Albertson, R Craig

    2013-01-01

    The processes that direct skull remodeling are of interest to both human-oriented studies of cranial dysplasia and evolutionary studies of skull divergence. There is increasing awareness that these two fields can be mutually informative when natural variation mimics pathology. Here we describe a zebrafish mutant line, devoid of blastema (dob), which does not have a functional fgf20a protein, and which also presents cranial defects similar to both adaptive and clinical variation. We used geometric morphometric methods to provide quantitative descriptions of the effects of the dob mutation on skull morphogenesis. In combination with "whole-mount in situ hybridization" labeling of normal fgf20a expression and assays for osteoblast and osteoclast activity, the results of these analyses indicate that cranial dysmorphologies in dob zebrafish are generated by aberrations in post-embryonic skull remodeling via decreased osteoblasotgenesis and increased osteoclastogenesis. Mutational effects include altered skull vault geometries and midfacial hypoplasia that are consistent with key diagnostic signs for multiple human craniofacial syndromes. These phenotypic shifts also mimic changes in the functional morphology of fish skulls that have arisen repeatedly in several highly successful radiations (e.g., damselfishes and East-African rift-lake cichlids). Our results offer the dob/fgf20a mutant as an experimentally tractable model with which to examine post-embryonic skull development as it relates to human disease and vertebrate evolution.

  18. Deficiency of zebrafish fgf20a results in aberrant skull remodeling that mimics both human cranial disease and evolutionarily important fish skull morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, W. James; Wirgau, Rachel M.; Sweet, Elly M.; Albertson, R. Craig

    2013-01-01

    The processes that direct skull remodeling are of interest to both human-oriented studies of cranial dysplasia and evolutionary studies of skull divergence. There is increasing awareness that these two fields can be mutually informative when natural variation mimics pathology. Here we describe a zebrafish mutant line, devoid of blastema(dob), which does not have a functional fgf20a protein, and which also presents cranial defects similar to both adaptive and clinical variation. We used geometric morphometric methods to provide quantitative descriptions of the effects of the dob mutation on skull morphogenesis. In combination with whole-mount in situ hybridization labeling of normal fgf20a expression and assays for osteoblast and osteoclast activity, the results of these analyses indicate that cranial dysmorphologies in dob zebrafish are generated by aberrations in post-embryonic skull remodeling via decreased osteoblasotgenesis and increased osteoclastogenesis. Mutational effects include altered skull vault geometries and midfacial hypoplasia that are consistent with key diagnostic signs for multiple human craniofacial syndromes. These phenotypic shifts also mimic changes in the functional morphology of fish skulls that have arisen repeatedly in several highly successful radiations (e.g., damselfishes and East-African rift-lake cichlids). Our results offer the dob/fgf20a mutant as an experimentally tractable model with which to examine post-embryonic skull development as it relates to human disease and evolution. PMID:24261444

  19. Facial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    White, Lawrence M.; Marotta, Thomas R.; McLennan, Michael K.; Kassel, Edward E.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate clinical radiographic investigation, together with an understanding of the normal radiographic anatomy of the facial skeleton, allows for precise delineation of facial fracutres and associated soft tissue injuries encountered in clinical practice. A combination of multiple plain radiographic views and coronal and axial computed tomographic images allow for optimal delineation of fracture patterns. This information is beneficial in the clinical and surgical management patients with facial injuries

  20. Creating Physical 3D Stereolithograph Models of Brain and Skull

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Daniel J.; Farhoud, Mohammed; Meyerand, M. Elizabeth; Nelson, David L.; Ramirez, Lincoln F.; Dempsey, Robert J.; Wolf, Alan J.; Alexander, Andrew L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    The human brain and skull are three dimensional (3D) anatomical structures with complex surfaces. However, medical images are often two dimensional (2D) and provide incomplete visualization of structural morphology. To overcome this loss in dimension, we developed and validated a freely available, semi-automated pathway to build 3D virtual reality (VR) and hand-held, stereolithograph models. To evaluate whether surface visualization in 3D was more informative than in 2D, undergraduate students (n = 50) used the Gillespie scale to rate 3D VR and physical models of both a living patient-volunteer's brain and the skull of Phineas Gage, a historically famous railroad worker whose misfortune with a projectile tamping iron provided the first evidence of a structure-function relationship in brain. Using our processing pathway, we successfully fabricated human brain and skull replicas and validated that the stereolithograph model preserved the scale of the VR model. Based on the Gillespie ratings, students indicated that the biological utility and quality of visual information at the surface of VR and stereolithograph models were greater than the 2D images from which they were derived. The method we developed is useful to create VR and stereolithograph 3D models from medical images and can be used to model hard or soft tissue in living or preserved specimens. Compared to 2D images, VR and stereolithograph models provide an extra dimension that enhances both the quality of visual information and utility of surface visualization in neuroscience and medicine. PMID:17971879

  1. Anatomical landmarks for transnasal endoscopic skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Sandu, Kishore; Monnier, Philippe; Pasche, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Resection of midline skull base lesions involve approaches needing extensive neurovascular manipulation. Transnasal endoscopic approach (TEA) is minimally invasive and ideal for certain selected lesions of the anterior skull base. A thorough knowledge of endonasal endoscopic anatomy is essential to be well versed with its surgical applications and this is possible only by dedicated cadaveric dissections. The goal in this study was to understand endoscopic anatomy of the orbital apex, petrous apex and the pterygopalatine fossa. Six cadaveric heads (3 injected and 3 non injected) and 12 sides, were dissected using a TEA outlining systematically, the steps of surgical dissection and the landmarks encountered. Dissection done by the "2 nostril, 4 hands" technique, allows better transnasal instrumentation with two surgeons working in unison with each other. The main surgical landmarks for the orbital apex are the carotid artery protuberance in the lateral sphenoid wall, optic nerve canal, lateral optico-carotid recess, optic strut and the V2 nerve. Orbital apex includes structures passing through the superior and inferior orbital fissure and the optic nerve canal. Vidian nerve canal and the V2 are important landmarks for the petrous apex. Identification of the sphenopalatine artery, V2 and foramen rotundum are important during dissection of the pterygopalatine fossa. In conclusion, the major potential advantage of TEA to the skull base is that it provides a direct anatomical route to the lesion without traversing any major neurovascular structures, as against the open transcranial approaches which involve more neurovascular manipulation and brain retraction. Obviously, these approaches require close cooperation and collaboration between otorhinolaryngologists and neurosurgeons.

  2. Fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for large benign skull base meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose to assess the safety and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for large skull base meningiomas. Methods and Materials Fifty-two patients with large skull base meningiomas aged 34-74 years (median age 56 years) were treated with FSRT between June 2004 and August 2009. All patients received FSRT for residual or progressive meningiomas more than 4 centimeters in greatest dimension. The median GTV was 35.4 cm3 (range 24.1-94.9 cm3), and the median PTV was 47.6 cm3 (range 33.5-142.7 cm3). Treatment volumes were achieved with 5-8 noncoplanar beams shaped using a micromultileaf collimator (MLC). Treatment was delivered in 30 daily fractions over 6 weeks to a total dose of 50 Gy using 6 MV photons. Outcome was assessed prospectively. Results At a median follow-up of 42 months (range 9-72 months) the 3-year and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 96% and 93%, respectively, and survival was 100%. Three patients required further debulking surgery for progressive disease. Hypopituitarism was the most commonly reported late complication, with a new hormone pituitary deficit occurring in 10 (19%) of patients. Clinically significant late neurological toxicity was observed in 3 (5.5%) patients consisting of worsening of pre-existing cranial deficits. Conclusion FSRT as a high-precision technique of localized RT is suitable for the treatment of large skull base meningiomas. The local control is comparable to that reported following conventional external beam RT. Longer follow-up is required to assess long term efficacy and toxicity, particularly in terms of potential reduction of treatment-related late toxicity. PMID:21486436

  3. Position and course of the mandibular canal in skulls.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Ayla; Potluri, Anitha; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and describe the topography of the mandibular canal (MC) in both vertical and occlusal dimensions. Fifty-two adult skulls deposited in the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine skull collection were evaluated in this study. Cone-beam computerized tomographic scans of each skull were obtained. The vertical course of MC was classified into 3 types: straight projection (12.2%), catenary-like configuration (51.1%), and progressive descent from posterior to anterior (36.7%). The evaluation of the buccolingual dimension showed that the mandibular canal was located either in contact with or close to the lingual cortical plate (≤ 2 mm) in the molar region of the majority of the cases. As it proceeds anteriorly it moves toward the buccal aspect of the mandible, where it finally emerges through the mental foramen. Three emerging patterns of mandibular canal were observed: sharp turn (53.2%), soft curved exit (28.8%), and straight path (17.4%). The examination of the vertical dimension showed that the canal was located almost 1 cm above the inferior border of the mandible and then ascended to reach the mental foramen, which is located ~16 mm (range 13.4-20.3 mm) above the inferior border of the mandible. We found a strong correlation between height of the mandible and location of the mental foramen (r = 0.64; P < .0001). The course of mandibular canal described in vertical and axial dimensions and variation in its path have been classified. In addition to variation in location of MC, it has different anatomic configurations which clinicians should be familiar with in any surgical procedures involving the posterior mandible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A checklist for endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Laws, Edward R; Wong, Judith M; Smith, Timothy R; de Los Reyes, Kenneth; Aglio, Linda S; Thorne, Alison J; Cote, David J; Esposito, Felice; Cappabianca, Paolo; Gawande, Atul

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Approximately 250 million surgical procedures are performed annually worldwide, and data suggest that major complications occur in 3%-17% of them. Many of these complications can be classified as avoidable, and previous studies have demonstrated that preoperative checklists improve operating room teamwork and decrease complication rates. Although the authors' institution has instituted a general preoperative "time-out" designed to streamline communication, flatten vertical authority gradients, and decrease procedural errors, there is no specific checklist for transnasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery, with or without endoscopy. Such minimally invasive cranial surgery uses a completely different conceptual approach, set-up, instrumentation, and operative procedure. Therefore, it can be associated with different types of complications as compared with open cranial surgery. The authors hypothesized that a detailed, procedure-specific, preoperative checklist would be useful to reduce errors, improve outcomes, decrease delays, and maximize both teambuilding and operational efficiency. Thus, the object of this study was to develop such a checklist for endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery. METHODS An expert panel was convened that consisted of all members of the typical surgical team for transsphenoidal endoscopic cases: neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, circulating nurses, scrub technicians, surgical operations managers, and technical assistants. Beginning with a general checklist, procedure-specific items were added and categorized into 4 pauses: Anesthesia Pause, Surgical Pause, Equipment Pause, and Closure Pause. RESULTS The final endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery checklist is composed of the following 4 pauses. The Anesthesia Pause consists of patient identification, diagnosis, pertinent laboratory studies, medications, surgical preparation, patient positioning, intravenous/arterial access, fluid management

  5. Pediatric skull base surgery. 1. Embryology and developmental anatomy.

    PubMed

    Gruber, David P; Brockmeyer, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the pediatric cranial base is uncommon, but in affected children, traditional operative techniques and management philosophies predominate. While the creation of multidisciplinary skull base teams synergistically pools the talents of individual specialties, a better understanding of the developmental anatomy of the cranial base becomes essential in order for such teams to safely implement these approaches in children. The extant neurosurgical literature lacks a comprehensive review of this anatomy. This report discusses the developmental anatomy and embryology of the cranial base within the context of specific surgical approaches. Detailed development of the calvaria, midface skeleton and orbit is excluded. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. An arrow penetrating at base of the skull successfully removed.

    PubMed

    Misra, Saibal; Anwar, Tarique; Basak, Bijan; Ghosh, Debasish

    2010-03-01

    A 30-year-old male presented with accidental injury with an arrow which referred to us from a peripheral village hospital. It was found that the arrow was penetrating through the nasal bones. An xray skull lateral view showed the tip of the arrow penetrating into the posterior wall of the sphenoid sinus. As the patient had no clinical evidence of neurological or vascular injury, he was immediately operated upon and the arrow was removed. Patient was discharged in good condition and a 3-month follow-up was normal.

  7. The complete skull and skeleton of an early dinosaur.

    PubMed

    Sereno, P C; Novas, F E

    1992-11-13

    The unearthing of a complete skull and skeleton of the early dinosaur Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis sheds light on the early evolution of dinosaurs. Discovered in the Upper Triassic Ischigualasto Formation of Argentina, the fossils show that Herrerasaurus, a primitive theropod, was an agile, bipedal predator with a short forelimb specialized for grasping and raking. The fossils clarify anatomical features of the common ancestor of all dinosaurs. Herrerasaurus and younger dinosaurs from Upper Triassic beds in Argentina suggest that the dinosaurian radiation was well under way before dinosaurs dominated terrestrial vertebrate communities in taxonomic diversity and abundance.

  8. Corrugation of the skull in Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, N. K.; Das, S. K.; Kataria, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone has been known for about 100 years and the usual deformities of bone, e.g. bowed tibia, large head, are well described in medical text books. However, there does not appear to have been a description of corrugation of the skull as a recognized deformity in Paget's disease. Three cases are now described to illustrate this deformity as an unusual but valuable sign in this disease. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Figs. 7 and 8 PMID:876912

  9. [Injuries of the central base of the skull].

    PubMed

    Fendel, K

    1976-09-01

    In different types of lesions, especially in frontobasal and laterobasal ones, the central base of the skull is injured, too (in about 20% of severe frontabasal lesions). Surgical treatment is necessary. Examination of intra- and infrabasal structures and localized intracranial operations may be performed by transthemoidal-transphenoidal or transpyramidal approaches. Main problems are the treatment of dura lesions, the control of hemorrhages, the examination of the optic nerve, and the compensation of disturbances of central regulation. The above experiences we gathered from patients in the ORL Clinic of Jena University.

  10. Expanded Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to Skull Base Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, J. Drew; Vender, John R.; Alleyne, Cargill H.; Solares, C. Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cranial base meningiomas have traditionally been addressed via frontal or frontolateral approaches. However, with the advances in endoscopic endonasal treatment of pituitary lesions, the transphenoidal approach is being expanded to address lesions of the petrous ridge, anterior clinoid, clivus, sella, parasellar region, tuberculum, planum, olfactory groove, and crista galli regions. The expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEEA) has the advantage of limiting brain retraction and resultant brain edema, as well as minimizing manipulation of neural structures. Herein, we describe the techniques of transclival, transphenoidal, transplanum, and transcribiform resections of anterior skull base meningiomas. Selected cases are presented. PMID:23730542

  11. Grow your own fuelwood

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, G.

    1984-11-01

    The 14th article in a ''how-to'' series describes how to grow and harvest fuelwood. Several species of fast-growing trees, notably hybrid poplars, are available, although there is a wide range in heat values among species. The author explains how to assess available resources, how to start a fuelwood plantation, how to harvest cuttings and sprouts, how to maintain yard trees, and how to cut and stack a wood pile. He also cautions against thoughtless practices that can damage a woodlot. 5 figures, 1 table.

  12. Surfactant-driven fracture of gels: Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Schillaci, Mark; Bostwick, Joshua

    2012-11-01

    A droplet of surfactant spreading on a gel substrate can produce fractures on the gel surface, which originate at the contact-line and propagate outwards in a star-burst pattern. Fractures have previously been observed to initiate through a thermal process, with the number of fractures controlled by the ratio of surface tension differential to gel shear modulus. After the onset of fracture, experiments show the arm length grows with universal power law L =t 3 / 4 that does not scale with any material parameters (Daniels et al. 2007, PRL), including super-spreading surfactants (Spandangos et al. 2012, Langmuir). We develop a model for crack growth controlled by the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip. While treating the gel as a linear material correctly predicts power-law growth, we find that only by considering a Neo-Hookean (incompressible) material do we obtain agreement with the experiments.

  13. Relevance of Whitnall's tubercle and auditory meatus in diagnosing exclusions during skull-photo superimposition.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, Paul T; Hashim, Natassha; Yusop, Ridzuan Abd Aziz Mohd

    2015-08-01

    Video vision mixer based skull-photo superimposition is a popular method for identifying skulls retrieved from unidentified human remains. A report on the reliability of the superimposition method suggested increased failure rates of 17.3 to 32% to exclude and 15 to 20% to include skulls while using related and unrelated face photographs. Such raise in failures prompted an analysis of the methods employed for the research. The protocols adopted for assessing the reliability are seen to vary from those suggested by the practitioners in the field. The former include overlaying the skull- and face-images on the basis of morphology by relying on anthropometric landmarks on the front plane of the face-images and evaluating the goodness of match depending on mix-mode images; the latter consist of orienting the skull considering landmarks on both the eye and ear planes of the face- and skull-images and evaluating the match utilizing images seen in wipe-mode in addition to those in mix-mode. Superimposition of a skull with face-images of five living individuals in two sets of experiments, one following the procedure described for the research on reliability and the other applying the methods suggested by the practitioners has shown that overlaying the images on the basis of morphology depending on the landmarks on the front plane alone and assessing the match in mix-mode fails to exclude the skull. However, orienting the skull relying on the relationship between the anatomical landmarks on the skull- and face-images such as Whitnall's tubercle and exocanthus in the front (eye) plane and the porion and tragus in the rear (ear) plane as well as assessing the match using wipe-mode images enables excluding that skull while superimposing with the same set of face-images.

  14. Does skull morphology constrain bone ornamentation? A morphometric analysis in the Crocodylia.

    PubMed

    Clarac, F; Souter, T; Cubo, J; de Buffrénil, V; Brochu, C; Cornette, R

    2016-08-01

    Previous quantitative assessments of the crocodylians' dermal bone ornamentation (this ornamentation consists of pits and ridges) has shown that bone sculpture results in a gain in area that differs between anatomical regions: it tends to be higher on the skull table than on the snout. Therefore, a comparative phylogenetic analysis within 17 adult crocodylian specimens representative of the morphological diversity of the 24 extant species has been performed, in order to test if the gain in area due to ornamentation depends on the skull morphology, i.e. shape and size. Quantitative assessment of skull size and shape through geometric morphometrics, and of skull ornamentation through surface analyses, produced a dataset that was analyzed using phylogenetic least-squares regression. The analyses reveal that none of the variables that quantify ornamentation, be they on the snout or the skull table, is correlated with the size of the specimens. Conversely, there is more disparity in the relationships between skull conformations (longirostrine vs. brevirostrine) and ornamentation. Indeed, both parameters GApit (i.e. pit depth and shape) and OArelat (i.e. relative area of the pit set) are negatively correlated with snout elongation, whereas none of the values quantifying ornamentation on the skull table is correlated with skull conformation. It can be concluded that bone sculpture on the snout is influenced by different developmental constrains than on the skull table and is sensible to differences in the local growth 'context' (allometric processes) prevailing in distinct skull parts. Whatever the functional role of bone ornamentation on the skull, if any, it seems to be restricted to some anatomical regions at least for the longirostrine forms that tend to lose ornamentation on the snout. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  15. A Three-Dimensional Statistical Average Skull: Application of Biometric Morphing in Generating Missing Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Tara Lynn; Patel, Vaibhav; Mainprize, James G; Edwards, Glenn; Antonyshyn, Oleh M

    2015-07-01

    The utilization of three-dimensional modeling technology in craniomaxillofacial surgery has grown exponentially during the last decade. Future development, however, is hindered by the lack of a normative three-dimensional anatomic dataset and a statistical mean three-dimensional virtual model. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a protocol to generate a statistical three-dimensional virtual model based on a normative dataset of adult skulls. Two hundred adult skull CT images were reviewed. The average three-dimensional skull was computed by processing each CT image in the series using thin-plate spline geometric morphometric protocol. Our statistical average three-dimensional skull was validated by reconstructing patient-specific topography in cranial defects. The experiment was repeated 4 times. In each case, computer-generated cranioplasties were compared directly to the original intact skull. The errors describing the difference between the prediction and the original were calculated. A normative database of 33 adult human skulls was collected. Using 21 anthropometric landmark points, a protocol for three-dimensional skull landmarking and data reduction was developed and a statistical average three-dimensional skull was generated. Our results show the root mean square error (RMSE) for restoration of a known defect using the native best match skull, our statistical average skull, and worst match skull was 0.58, 0.74, and 4.4  mm, respectively. The ability to statistically average craniofacial surface topography will be a valuable instrument for deriving missing anatomy in complex craniofacial defects and deficiencies as well as in evaluating morphologic results of surgery.

  16. Growing Up with "1984."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franza, August

    1983-01-01

    Relates changing student reaction to George Orwell's "1984" over 20 years of teaching. Finds present high school students' acceptance of Orwell's bleak world vision both a sign of student honesty and a frightening indication of the growing reality of the book. (MM)

  17. Growing Plants in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    Background information on the methods and varieties used to demonstrate the cultivation of plants without the use of chemical pesticides is provided. Discussed are species and variety selection, growing plants from seed and from seedlings, soil preparation, using cuttings, useful crops, and pest control. (CW)

  18. GROWING SEEDS, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elementary Science Study, Newton, MA.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE IS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH AN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT, "GROWING SEEDS," IN WHICH SUCH BASIC SCIENCE SKILLS AND PROCESSES AS MEASUREMENT, OBSERVATION, AND HYPOTHESIS FORMATION ARE INTRODUCED THROUGH STUDENT ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SEEDS, GERMINATION, AND SEEDLING GROWTH. THE MATERIALS WERE DEVELOPED FOR USE IN…

  19. Growing Backyard Textiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Eleanor Hall

    1975-01-01

    For those involved in creative work with textiles, the degree of control possible in texture, finish, and color of fiber by growing and processing one's own (perhaps with students' help) can make the experience rewarding. The author describes the processes for flax and nettles and gives tips on necessary equipment. (Author/AJ)

  20. Growing into Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvy, Harvey; Robbins, Pam

    2005-01-01

    New school principals have the necessity to lead at the very time they are learning the ropes of their new jobs. Some essential themes are identified that can guide new principals into growing in their new leadership roles, which are presented and discussed.