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Sample records for grown bulk ingaas

  1. High-performance metamorphic InGaAs resonant cavity enhanced photodetector grown on GaAs substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S. Q.; Han, Q.; Zhu, B.; Yang, X. H.; Wang, X.; Wang, J.; Wang, X. P.; Ni, H. Q.; He, J. F.; Li, M. F.; Zhu, Y.; Niu, Z. C.

    2011-05-16

    In this letter, we demonstrated a top illuminated 1.55 {mu}m metamorphic InGaAs resonant-cavity-enhanced p-i-n photodetector grown on GaAs substrate. The photodetectors were grown by a solid-source molecular beam epitaxy system. The high quality linearly graded In{sub x}Al{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 1-x-0.4}As metamorphic buffer layer enabled photodiodes to achieve ultralow dark current densities of 2.3x10{sup -6} A/cm{sup 2} at 0 V and 4.2x10{sup -5} A/cm{sup 2} at a reverse bias of 5 V. A high quantum efficiency of 84.4% at resonant wavelength of 1542 nm, a full width at half maximum about 14 nm, and a -3 dB bandwidth up to 13 GHz were also obtained.

  2. Long-wavelength emission InAs quantum dots grown on InGaAs metamorphic buffers.

    PubMed

    Wu, B P; Wu, D H; Xiong, Y H; Huang, S S; Ni, H Q; Xu, Y Q; Niu, Z C

    2009-02-01

    In this work, InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on a linear graded InGaAs metamorphic buffer layer by molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated. The growth of the metamorphic buffer layers was carefully optimized, yielding a smooth surface with a minimum root mean square of roughness of less than 0.98 nm as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). InAs QDs were then grown on the buffer layers, and their emission wavelength at room-temperature is 1.49 microm as measured by photoluminescence (PL). The effects of post-growth rapid thermal annealing (RTA) on the optical properties of the InAs QDs were investigated. After the RTA, the PL peak of the QDs was blue-shifted and the full width at half maximum decreased.

  3. Spatially correlated structural and optical characterization of a single InGaAs quantum well fin selectively grown on Si by microscopy and cathodoluminescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S.; Roque, J.; Rochat, N.; Bernier, N.; Piot, L.; Alcotte, R.; Cerba, T.; Martin, M.; Moeyaert, J.; Bogumilowizc, Y.; Arnaud, S.; Bertin, F.; Bassani, F.; Baron, T.

    2016-05-01

    Structural and optical properties of InGaAs quantum well fins (QWFs) selectively grown on Si using the aspect ratio trapping (ART) method in 200 nm deep SiO2 trenches are studied. A new method combining cathodoluminescence, transmission electron microscopy, and precession electron diffraction techniques is developed to spatially correlate the presence of defects and/or strain with the light emission properties of a single InGaAs QWF. Luminescence losses and energy shifts observed at the nanoscale along InGaAs QWF are correlated with structural defects. We show that strain distortions measured around threading dislocations delimit both high and low luminescent areas. We also show that trapped dislocations on SiO2 sidewalls can also result in additional distortions. Both behaviors affect optical properties of QWF at the nanoscale. Our study highlights the need to improve the ART growth method to allow integration of new efficient III-V optoelectronic components on Si.

  4. Generation of continuous wave terahertz frequency radiation from metal-organic chemical vapour deposition grown Fe-doped InGaAs and InGaAsP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohandas, Reshma A.; Freeman, Joshua R.; Rosamond, Mark C.; Hatem, Osama; Chowdhury, Siddhant; Ponnampalam, Lalitha; Fice, Martyn; Seeds, Alwyn J.; Cannard, Paul J.; Robertson, Michael J.; Moodie, David G.; Cunningham, John E.; Davies, A. Giles; Linfield, Edmund H.; Dean, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the generation of continuous wave terahertz (THz) frequency radiation from photomixers fabricated on both Fe-doped InGaAs and Fe-doped InGaAsP, grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The photomixers were excited using a pair of distributed Bragg reflector lasers with emission around 1550 nm, and THz radiation was emitted over a bandwidth of greater than 2.4 THz. Two InGaAs and four InGaAsP wafers with different Fe doping concentrations were investigated, with the InGaAs material found to outperform the InGaAsP in terms of emitted THz power. The dependencies of the emitted power on the photomixer applied bias, incident laser power, and material doping level were also studied.

  5. Periodic Two-Dimensional GaAs and InGaAs Quantum Rings Grown on GaAs (001) by Droplet Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Tung, Kar Hoo Patrick; Huang, Jian; Danner, Aaron

    2016-06-01

    Growth of ordered GaAs and InGaAs quantum rings (QRs) in a patterned SiO2 nanohole template by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using droplet epitaxy (DE) process is demonstrated. DE is an MBE growth technique used to fabricate quantum nanostructures of high crystal quality by supplying group III and group V elements in separate phases. In this work, ordered QRs grown on an ordered nanohole template are compared to self-assembled QRs grown with the same DE technique without the nanohole template. This study allows us to understand and compare the surface kinetics of Ga and InGa droplets when a template is present. It is found that template-grown GaAs QRs form clustered rings which can be attributed to low mobility of Ga droplets resulting in multiple nucleation sites for QR formation when As is supplied. However, the case of template-grown InGaAs QRs only one ring is formed per nanohole; no clustering is observed. The outer QR diameter is a close match to the nanohole template diameter. This can be attributed to more mobile InGa droplets, which coalesce from an Ostwald ripening to form a single large droplet before As is supplied. Thus, well-patterned InGaAs QRs are demonstrated and the kinetics of their growth are better understood which could potentially lead to improvements in the future devices that require the unique properties of patterned QRs. PMID:27427737

  6. Periodic Two-Dimensional GaAs and InGaAs Quantum Rings Grown on GaAs (001) by Droplet Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Tung, Kar Hoo Patrick; Huang, Jian; Danner, Aaron

    2016-06-01

    Growth of ordered GaAs and InGaAs quantum rings (QRs) in a patterned SiO2 nanohole template by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using droplet epitaxy (DE) process is demonstrated. DE is an MBE growth technique used to fabricate quantum nanostructures of high crystal quality by supplying group III and group V elements in separate phases. In this work, ordered QRs grown on an ordered nanohole template are compared to self-assembled QRs grown with the same DE technique without the nanohole template. This study allows us to understand and compare the surface kinetics of Ga and InGa droplets when a template is present. It is found that template-grown GaAs QRs form clustered rings which can be attributed to low mobility of Ga droplets resulting in multiple nucleation sites for QR formation when As is supplied. However, the case of template-grown InGaAs QRs only one ring is formed per nanohole; no clustering is observed. The outer QR diameter is a close match to the nanohole template diameter. This can be attributed to more mobile InGa droplets, which coalesce from an Ostwald ripening to form a single large droplet before As is supplied. Thus, well-patterned InGaAs QRs are demonstrated and the kinetics of their growth are better understood which could potentially lead to improvements in the future devices that require the unique properties of patterned QRs.

  7. Terahertz-frequency photoconductive detectors fabricated from metal-organic chemical vapor deposition-grown Fe-doped InGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatem, O.; Cunningham, J.; Linfield, E. H.; Wood, C. D.; Davies, A. G.; Cannard, P. J.; Robertson, M. J.; Moodie, D. G.

    2011-03-01

    We report the detection of terahertz frequency radiation using photoconductive antennas fabricated from Fe-doped InGaAs, grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Coherent photoconductive detection is demonstrated using femtosecond laser pulses centered at either an 800 or a 1550 nm wavelength. The InGaAs resistivity and the sensitivity of photoconductive detection are both found to depend on the Fe-doping level. We investigate a wide range of probe laser powers, finding a peak in detected signal for ˜5 mW probe power, followed by a reduction at larger powers, attributed to screening of the detected THz field by photo-generated carriers in the material. The measured signal from Fe:InGaAs photoconductive detectors excited at 800 nm is four times greater than that from a low-temperature-grown GaAs photodetector with identical antenna design, despite the use of a ten times smaller probe power.

  8. Widely tunable alloy composition and crystal structure in catalyst-free InGaAs nanowire arrays grown by selective area molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treu, J.; Speckbacher, M.; Saller, K.; Morkötter, S.; Döblinger, M.; Xu, X.; Riedl, H.; Abstreiter, G.; Finley, J. J.; Koblmüller, G.

    2016-02-01

    We delineate the optimized growth parameter space for high-uniformity catalyst-free InGaAs nanowire (NW) arrays on Si over nearly the entire alloy compositional range using selective area molecular beam epitaxy. Under the required high group-V fluxes and V/III ratios, the respective growth windows shift to higher growth temperatures as the Ga-content x(Ga) is tuned from In-rich to Ga-rich InGaAs NWs. Using correlated x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, we identify structural defects to govern luminescence linewidths in In-rich (x(Ga) < 0.4) and Ga-rich (x(Ga) > 0.6) NWs, whereas limitations at intermediate Ga-content (0.4 < x(Ga) < 0.6) are mainly due to compositional inhomogeneities. Most remarkably, the catalyst-free InGaAs NWs exhibit a characteristic transition in crystal structure from wurtzite to zincblende (ZB) dominated phase near x(Ga) ˜ 0.4 that is further reflected in a cross-over from blue-shifted to red-shifted photoluminescence emission relative to the band edge emission of the bulk ZB InGaAs phase.

  9. Low-temperature-grown InGaAs quantum wells for optical device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juodawlkis, Paul William

    1999-11-01

    The large optical absorption and carrier-induced nonlinearities of semiconductor materials are useful for optical signal processing applications. For absorptive devices operating at ultrafast data rates (>100 Gb/s) or high optical intensities, it is necessary to reduce the intrinsic photo-excited carrier removal time. One method of achieving this reduction is to increase the nonradiative recombination rate through the controlled introduction of defects. In this thesis, we explore the use of low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) to introduce nonradiative recombination centers into InGaAs-based quantum-wells (QWs). The objectives of the thesis are: (i)to improve the understanding of the optoelectronic properties of low-temperature-grown (LTG) InGaAs/InAlAs QWs, and (ii)to assess the feasibility of using these materials for optical device applications in the 1.5-μm wavelength region. Time-resolved differential transmission measurements reveal that the nonlinear absorption recovery time in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs can be reduced from >100 ps to 0.6 ps through the combination of low-temperature growth (~250°C) and beryllium (Be) doping. The bandedge absorption slope and the nonlinear absorption cross- section are only diminished by factors of 2 to 3 relative to QWs grown at standard temperature (~500°C). The Be doping dependence of the recovery time and the residual electron density in the LTG-QWs can be mainly attributed to impurity-related compensation. Be doping also maintains the ultrafast recovery following thermal anneal. The recovery response results from fast electron- trapping followed by slow (>100 ps) trapped- electron/free-hole recombination. Detailed simulations of the nonlinear absorption saturation and recovery processes agree quantitatively with measured data and substantiate the importance of the photo-excitation wavelength on the observed recovery response. The absorption saturation model includes the competition between band-filling and band

  10. Effect of InGaAs interlayer on the properties of GaAs grown on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Lei; Gao, Fangliang; Li, Jingling; Guan, Yunfang; Wang, Wenliang; Zhou, Shizhong; Lin, Zhiting; Zhang, Xiaona; Zhang, Shuguang E-mail: mssgzhang@scut.edu.cn; Li, Guoqiang E-mail: mssgzhang@scut.edu.cn

    2014-11-21

    High-quality GaAs films have been epitaxially grown on Si (111) substrates by inserting an In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As interlayer with proper In composition by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The effect of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As (0 < x < 0.2) interlayers on the properties of GaAs films grown on Si (111) substrates by MBE has been studied in detailed. Due to the high compressive strain between InGaAs and Si, InGaAs undergoes partial strain relaxation. Unstrained InGaAs has a larger lattice constant than GaAs. Therefore, a thin InGaAs layer with proper In composition may adopt a close lattice constant with that of GaAs, which is beneficial to the growth of high-quality GaAs epilayer on top. It is found that the proper In composition in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As interlayer of 10% is beneficial to obtaining high-quality GaAs films, which, on the one hand, greatly compensates the misfit stress between GaAs film and Si substrate, and on the other hand, suppresses the formation of multiple twin during the heteroepitaxial growth of GaAs film. However, when the In composition does not reach the proper value (∼10%), the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As adopts a lower strain relaxation and undergoes a lattice constant smaller than unstrained GaAs, and therefore introduces compressive stress to GaAs grown on top. When In composition exceeds the proper value, the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As will adopt a higher strain relaxation and undergoes a lattice constant larger than unstrained GaAs, and therefore introduces tensile stress to GaAs grown on top. As a result, In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As interlayers with improper In composition introduces enlarged misfit stress to GaAs epilayers grown on top, and deteriorates the quality of GaAs epilayers. This work demonstrates a simple but effective method to grow high-quality GaAs epilayers and brings up a broad prospect for the application of GaAs-based optoelectronic devices on Si substrates.

  11. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Menchhofer, Paul A.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Baker, Frederick S.

    2011-11-08

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  12. Epitaxially grown layered MFI-bulk MFI hybrid zeolitic materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wun-gwi; Zhang, Xueyi; Lee, Jong Suk; Tsapatsis, Michael; Nair, Sankar

    2012-11-27

    The synthesis of hybrid zeolitic materials with complex micropore-mesopore structures and morphologies is an expanding area of recent interest for a number of applications. Here we report a new type of hybrid zeolite material, composed of a layered zeolite material grown epitaxially on the surface of a bulk zeolite material. Specifically, layered (2-D) MFI sheets were grown on the surface of bulk MFI crystals of different sizes (300 nm and 10 μm), thereby resulting in a hybrid material containing a unique morphology of interconnected micropores (∼0.55 nm) and mesopores (∼3 nm). The structure and morphology of this material, referred to as a "bulk MFI-layered MFI" (BMLM) material, was elucidated by a combination of XRD, TEM, HRTEM, SEM, TGA, and N(2) physisorption techniques. It is conclusively shown that epitaxial growth of the 2-D layered MFI sheets occurs in at least two principal crystallographic directions of the bulk MFI crystal and possibly in the third direction as well. The BMLM material combines the properties of bulk MFI (micropore network and mechanical support) and 2-D layered MFI (large surface roughness, external surface area, and mesoporosity). As an example of the uses of the BMLM material, it was incorporated into a polyimide and fabricated into a composite membrane with enhanced permeability for CO(2) and good CO(2)/CH(4) selectivity for gas separations. SEM-EDX imaging and composition analysis showed that the polyimide and the BMLM interpenetrate into each other, thereby forming a well-adhered polymer/particle microstructure, in contrast with the defective interfacial microstructure obtained using bare MFI particles. Analysis of the gas permeation data with the modified Maxwell model also allows the estimation of the effective volume of the BMLM particles, as well as the CO(2) and CH(4) gas permeabilities of the interpenetrated layer at the BMLM/polyimide interface.

  13. Terahertz radiation using log-spiral-based low-temperature-grown InGaAs photoconductive antenna pumped by mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Kong, Moon Sik; Kim, Ji Su; Han, Sang Pil; Kim, Namje; Moon, Kiwon; Park, Kyung Hyun; Jeon, Min Yong

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a terahertz (THz) radiation using log-spiral-based low-temperature-grown (LTG) InGaAs photoconductive antenna (PCA) modules and a passively mode-locked 1030 nm Yb-doped fiber laser. The passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser is easily implemented with nonlinear polarization rotation in the normal dispersion using a 10-nm spectral filter. The laser generates over 250 mW of the average output power with positively chirped 1.58 ps pulses, which are dechirped to 127 fs pulses using a pulse compressor outside the laser cavity. In order to obtain THz radiation, a home-made emitter and receiver constructed from log-spiral-based LTG InGaAs PCA modules were used to generate and detect THz signals, respectively. We successfully achieved absorption lines over 1.5 THz for water vapor in free space. Therefore, we confirm that a mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser has the potential to be used as an optical source to generate THZ waves.

  14. Low defect InGaAs quantum well selectively grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on Si(100) 300 mm wafers for next generation non planar devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cipro, R.; Gorbenko, V.; Baron, T. Martin, M.; Moeyaert, J.; David, S.; Bassani, F.; Bogumilowicz, Y.; Barnes, J. P.; Rochat, N.; Loup, V.; Vizioz, C.; Allouti, N.; Chauvin, N.; Bao, X. Y.; Ye, Z.; Pin, J. B.; Sanchez, E.

    2014-06-30

    Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of GaAs, InGaAs, and AlGaAs on nominal 300 mm Si(100) at temperatures below 550 °C was studied using the selective aspect ratio trapping method. We clearly show that growing directly GaAs on a flat Si surface in a SiO{sub 2} cavity with an aspect ratio as low as 1.3 is efficient to completely annihilate the anti-phase boundary domains. InGaAs quantum wells were grown on a GaAs buffer and exhibit room temperature micro-photoluminescence. Cathodoluminescence reveals the presence of dark spots which could be associated with the presence of emerging dislocation in a direction parallel to the cavity. The InGaAs layers obtained with no antiphase boundaries are perfect candidates for being integrated as channels in n-type metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET), while the low temperatures used allow the co-integration of p-type MOSFET.

  15. Defect studies in 4H- Silicon Carbide PVT grown bulk crystals, CVD grown epilayers and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrappa, Shayan M.

    Silicon Carbide [SiC] which exists as more than 200 different polytypes is known for superior high temperature and high power applications in comparison to conventional semiconductor materials like Silicon and Germanium. The material finds plethora of applications in a diverse fields due to its unique properties like large energy bandgap, high thermal conductivity and high electric breakdown field. Though inundated with superior properties the potential of this material has not been utilized fully due to impeding factors such as defects especially the crystalline ones which limit their performance greatly. Lots of research has been going on for decades to reduce these defects and there has been subsequent improvement in the quality as the diameter of SiC commercial wafers has reached 150mm from 25mm since its inception. The main focus of this thesis has been to study yield limiting defect structures in conjunction with several leading companies and national labs using advanced characterization tools especially the Synchrotron source. The in depth analysis of SiC has led to development of strategies to reduce or eliminate the density of defects by studying how the defects nucleate, replicate and interact in the material. The strategies discussed to reduce defects were proposed after careful deliberation and analysis of PVT grown bulk crystals and CVD grown epilayers. Following are some of the results of the study: [1] Macrostep overgrowth mechanism in SiC was used to study the deflection of threading defects onto the basal plane resulting in stacking faults. Four types of stacking faults associated with deflection of c/c+a threading defects have been observed to be present in 76mm, 100mm and 150mm diameter wafers. The PVT grown bulk crystals and CVD grown epilayers in study were subjected to contrast studies using synchrotron white beam X-ray topography [SWBXT]. The SWBXT image contrast studies of these stacking faults with comparison of calculated phase shifts for

  16. Surface studies of gallium nitride quantum dots grown using droplet epitaxy on bulk, native substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christina; Jeon, Sunyeol; Goldman, Rachel; Yacoby, Yizhak; Clarke, Roy

    Gallium nitride (GaN) and its applications in light-emitting diodes play an integral part in efficient, solid-state lighting, as evidenced by its recognition in the 2014 Nobel prize in physics. In order to push this technology towards higher efficiency and reliability and lower cost, we must understand device growth on bulk GaN substrates, which have lower defect densities and strain than template GaN substrates grown on sapphire. In this work, we present our findings on the surface properties of GaN quantum dots (QDs) grown on commercial bulk GaN. QDs are grown using the droplet epitaxy method and analyzed using a surface X-ray diffraction technique called Coherent Bragg Rod Analysis (COBRA), which uses phase retrieval to reconstruct atomic positions near the substrate surface. While several QD growth conditions in our study produce dense QDs, COBRA reveals that only low nitridation temperatures result in GaN QDs that are coherent with the bulk GaN substrate. Results are supported with atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Electrical and structural characterization of as-grown and annealed hydrothermal bulk ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Kassier, G. H.; Hayes, M.; Auret, F. D.; Mamor, M.; Bouziane, K.

    2007-07-01

    Hall effect measurements in the range 20-370 K on as-grown and annealed hydrothermal bulk ZnO have been performed. The bulk conductivity in the highly resistive as-grown sample was found to decrease and then increase after annealing at 550 deg. C and 930 deg. C, respectively. The conduction in the as-grown material is attributed to a deep donor which is replaced by a much shallower donor after annealing at 930 deg. C. Annealing at both temperatures also produced strong surface conduction effects. Nondegenerate low-mobility surface conduction dominated the electrical properties of the sample annealed at 550 deg. C, while a degenerate surface channel was formed after annealing at 930 deg. C. In addition, Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectrometry (RBS/C) was used to assess the effect of annealing on the crystalline quality of the samples. RBS/C measurements reveal that annealing at 930 deg. C leads to significant improvement of the crystalline quality of the material, while annealing at 550 deg. C results in the segregation of a nonchanneling impurity at the surface.

  18. X-ray characterization of bulk AIN single crystals grown by the sublimation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Rojo, J. C.; Morgan, K.; Schowalter, L. J.

    2003-03-01

    Bulk AlN single crystal boules have been grown using the sublimation technique and several substrates have been prepared from them. Microstructural characterization of these substrates has been performed using synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXT) and high-resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction. Our study has revealed that AlN single crystal boules grown by the sublimation technique can possess a high structural quality with dislocation densities of 800-1000/cm 2 and rocking curves with a full-width at half-maximum of less than 10 arcsec. The distribution of dislocations is inhomogeneous with large areas of the wafer free from dislocations. Inclusions are also observed (density of the order of 10 5/cm 3) and their distribution is also inhomogeneous.

  19. Characterization of bulk grown GaN and AlN single crystal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghothamachar, Balaji; Bai, Jie; Dudley, Michael; Dalmau, Rafael; Zhuang, Dejin; Herro, Ziad; Schlesser, Raoul; Sitar, Zlatko; Wang, Buguo; Callahan, Michael; Rakes, Kelly; Konkapaka, Phanikumar; Spencer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Sublimation method, spontaneously nucleated as well as seeded on SiC substrates, has been employed for growing AlN bulk crystals. For GaN growth, in addition to the sublimation method using sapphire substrates, ammonothermal growth (analogous to the hydrothermal method) on HVPE GaN seeds is also being used. Thick plates/films of AlN and GaN grown by these methods have been characterized by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXT) and high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). Results from a recent set of growth experiments are discussed.

  20. Characterization of Bulk Grown GaN and AlN Single Crystal Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Raghothamachar,B.; Bai, J.; Dudley, M.; Dalmau, R.; Zhuang, D.; Herro, Z.; Schlesser, R.; Sitar, Z.; Wang, B.; Callahan, M.

    2006-01-01

    Sublimation method, spontaneously nucleated as well as seeded on SiC substrates, has been employed for growing AlN bulk crystals. For GaN growth, in addition to the sublimation method using sapphire substrates, ammonothermal growth (analogous to the hydrothermal method) on HVPE GaN seeds is also being used. Thick plates/films of AlN and GaN grown by these methods have been characterized by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXT) and high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). Results from a recent set of growth experiments are discussed.

  1. Bottom-up and top-down fabrication of nanowire-based electronic devices: In situ doping of vapor liquid solid grown silicon nanowires and etch-dependent leakage current in InGaAs tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Meng-Wei

    Semiconductor nanowires are important components in future nanoelectronic and optoelectronic device applications. These nanowires can be fabricated using either bottom-up or top-down methods. While bottom-up techniques can achieve higher aspect ratio at reduced dimension without having surface and sub-surface damage, uniform doping distributions with abrupt junction profiles are less challenging for top-down methods. In this dissertation, nanowires fabricated by both methods were systematically investigated to understand: (1) the in situ incorporation of boron (B) dopants in Si nanowires grown by the bottom-up vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) technique, and (2) the impact of plasma-induced etch damage on InGaAs p +-i-n+ nanowire junctions for tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) applications. In Chapter 2 and 3, the in situ incorporation of B in Si nanowires grown using silane (SiH4) or silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) as the Si precursor and trimethylboron (TMB) as the p-type dopant source is investigated by I-V measurements of individual nanowires. The results from measurements using a global-back-gated test structure reveal nonuniform B doping profiles on nanowires grown from SiH4, which is due to simultaneous incorporation of B from nanowire surface and the catalyst during VLS growth. In contrast, a uniform B doping profile in both the axial and radial directions is achieved for TMBdoped Si nanowires grown using SiCl4 at high substrate temperatures. In Chapter 4, the I-V characteristics of wet- and dry-etched InGaAs p+-i-n+ junctions with different mesa geometries, orientations, and perimeter-to-area ratios are compared to evaluate the impact of the dry etch process on the junction leakage current properties. Different post-dry etch treatments, including wet etching and thermal annealing, are performed and the effectiveness of each is assessed by temperaturedependent I-V measurements. As compared to wet-etched control devices, dry-etched junctions have a significantly

  2. Structural investigation of InGaAsN films grown on pseudo-lattice-matched InGaAs substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongjaeng, Pornsiri; Sanorpim, Sakuntam; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Ono, Wataru; Nakajima, Fumio; Katayama, Ryuji; Onabe, Kentaro

    2007-01-01

    The use of the nearly lattice-matched In xGa 1-xAs pseudo-substrate has been explored for the growth of In xGa 1-xAs 1-yN y with higher In ( x) contents by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). As compared with the quality of high In-containing In 0.3Ga 0.7As 0.98N 0.02 films grown directly on GaAs substrates, the growth on In 0.2Ga 0.8As pseudo-lattice-matched substrates yielded good structural quality films. The number of misfit dislocations investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy was found to be reduced in the InGaAsN grown layer. Furthermore, higher optical quality In 0.3Ga 0.7As 0.98N 0.02 films with the bandgap of 1.01 eV were grown on the In 0.2Ga 0.8As pseudo-lattice-matched substrate. This study shows that the use of the In xGa 1-xAs pseudo-lattice-matched substrate is an effective method to fabricate a thick lattice-matched InGaAsN layers with higher optical and structural qualities necessary for the development of the multijunction (MJ) solar cells.

  3. Lattice constant and hardness of InSb:Bi bulk crystals grown by vertical directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maske, Dilip; Deshpande, Manisha; Choudhary, Rashmi; Gadkari, Dattatray

    2016-05-01

    Ingots of the Bi doped InSb (InSb1-xBix) bulk semiconductor crystals were grown by specially designed Vertical Directional Solidification (VDS) technique. Substrates of seven crystals grown with various composition values of x (0 ≤ x < 0.1) were used to analyze the effect of Bi incorporation on the crystal lattice, bonding energy and physical strength of the material. Lattice constant of each substrate was calculated using 2ɵ angles of the peak positions in the powder XRD. FTIR was used in its transmission mode to find the band edge and calculate the energy band gap. Reduction in the energy band was found up to 0.105 eV. The substrates were tested for their toughness using Vickers micro-hardness test. Comparison of these measurements with the corresponding values of undoped InSb indicate that, due to Bi incorporation in InSb lattice there is increase in the lattice constant (°A) and decrease in the energy band gap (eV) in the ratio 2:1, and decrease in the micro-hardness up to ˜20% for the Bi composition x > 0.05.

  4. Two-dimensional ordering of (In,Ga)As quantum dots in vertical multilayers grown on GaAs(100) and (n11)

    SciTech Connect

    Lytvyn, P. M.; Strelchuk, V. V.; Kolomys, O. F.; Prokopenko, I. V.; Valakh, M. Ya.; Mazur, Yu. I.; Wang, Zh. M.; Salamo, G. J.; Hanke, M.

    2007-10-22

    We have investigated lateral self-assembling in In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) multilayers, which were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(100) and (n11)B substrates with n=9,8,7,5,4,3. The lateral self-assembling and the QD size distribution have been studied by atomic force microscopy depending on substrate orientation and the number of periods within the multilayers. The observed two-dimensional ordering can be described by a centered rectangular surface unit cell. Derived autocorrelation functions exhibit the most pronounced lateral QD assembling along the elastically soft directions [1n0]. This can be attributed to elastic interaction, the particular elastic anisotropy of the high index substrates, and the minimization of the strain energy.

  5. Initial stages of chain formation in a single layer of (In,Ga)As quantum dots grown on GaAs (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidbauer, M.; Wang, Zh. M.; Mazur, Yu. I.; Lytvyn, P. M.; Salamo, G. J.; Grigoriev, D.; Schaefer, P.; Koehler, R.; Hanke, M.

    2007-08-27

    The self-organized formation of In{sub 0.40}Ga{sub 0.60}As quantum dot chains was investigated using x-ray scattering. Two samples were compared grown on GaAs(100) by molecular beam epitaxy. The first sample with a single layer of In{sub 0.40}Ga{sub 0.60}As dots shows weak quantum dot alignment and a corresponding elongated shape along [011], while the top layer of a multilayered In{sub 0.40}Ga{sub 0.60}As/GaAs sample exhibits extended and highly regular quantum dot chains oriented along [011]. Numerical calculations of the three-dimensional strain fields are used to explain the initial stages of chain formation by anisotropic strain relaxation induced by the elongated dot shape.

  6. Tilted bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells grown by oblique angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate small molecule bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells using oblique angle vacuum deposition. Obliquely deposited donor chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (ClAlPc) films on indium tin oxide have surface feature sizes of ˜30 nm, resulting in ClAlPc/C60 donor-acceptor heterojunctions (HJs) with approximately twice the interface area of HJs grown at normal incidence. This results in nearly twice the external quantum efficiency in the ClAlPc absorption band compared with analogous, planar HJs. The efficiency increase is attributed to the increased surface area presented by the donor-acceptor junction to the incident illumination by ClAlPc protrusions lying obliquely to the substrate plane formed during deposition. The power conversion efficiency improves from (2.0±0.1)% to (2.8±0.1)% under 1 sun, AM 1.5G simulated solar illumination. Similarly, the power efficiency of copper phthalocyanine/C60 organic photovoltaic cells is increased from (1.3±0.1)% to (1.7±0.1)%.

  7. Optical and mechanical studies on unidirectional grown tri-nitrophenol methyl p-hydroxybenzoate bulk single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthrakumar, R.; Vesta, C.; Robert, R.; Mangalam, G.; Jerome Das, S.

    2010-10-01

    The bulk single crystal of tri-nitrophenol methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (TNMPHB) of length 90 mm and diameter 12 mm was obtained by employing unidirectional growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and powder XRD analysis have been carried out to confirm the identity of the crystal. The optical band gap of the grown crystal was calculated to be 4.91 eV from UV transmission spectrum. The mechanical strength of the grown crystal has been studied using Vicker's microhardness tester. Low dielectric loss shows that the grown crystal contains lesser defects authenticating the suitability of the crystal towards device applications. The surface morphology studies have been carried out on the grown crystal.

  8. Radiation-induced defects in GaN bulk grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Duc, Tran Thien; Pozina, Galia; Son, Nguyen Tien; Janzén, Erik; Hemmingsson, Carl; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2014-09-08

    Defects induced by electron irradiation in thick free-standing GaN layers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy were studied by deep level transient spectroscopy. In as-grown materials, six electron traps, labeled D2 (E{sub C}–0.24 eV), D3 (E{sub C}–0.60 eV), D4 (E{sub C}–0.69 eV), D5 (E{sub C}–0.96 eV), D7 (E{sub C}–1.19 eV), and D8, were observed. After 2 MeV electron irradiation at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2}, three deep electron traps, labeled D1 (E{sub C}–0.12 eV), D5I (E{sub C}–0.89 eV), and D6 (E{sub C}–1.14 eV), were detected. The trap D1 has previously been reported and considered as being related to the nitrogen vacancy. From the annealing behavior and a high introduction rate, the D5I and D6 centers are suggested to be related to primary intrinsic defects.

  9. Characterization of bulk hexagonal boron nitride single crystals grown by the metal flux technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, J. H.; Hoffman, T. B.; Clubine, B.; Currie, M.; Du, X. Z.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-10-01

    The optical and physical properties of hexagonal boron nitride single crystals grown from a molten metal solution are reported. The hBN crystals were grown by precipitation from a nickel-chromium flux with a boron nitride source, by slowly cooling from 1500 °C at 2-4 °C/h under a nitrogen flow at atmospheric pressure. The hBN crystals formed on the surface of the flux with an apparent crystal size up to 1-2 mm in diameter. Individual grains were as large as 100-200 μm across. Typically, the flakes removed from the metal were 6-20 μm thick. Optical absorption measurements suggest a bandgap of 5.8 eV by neglecting the binding energy of excitons in hBN. The highest energy photoluminescence peak was at 5.75 eV at room temperature. The hBN crystals typically had a pit density of 5×106 cm-2 after etching in a molten eutectic mixture of potassium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide. The quality of these crystals suggests they are suitable as substrates for two dimensional materials such as graphene and gallium nitride based devices.

  10. Intrinsically tunable bulk acoustic wave resonators based on sol-gel grown PMN-PT films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, A.; Spreitzer, M.; Veber, A.; Suvorov, D.; Gevorgian, S.

    2014-08-01

    Intrinsically tunable bulk acoustic wave resonators, based on sol-gel 0.70Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.30PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) thin films, with high effective electromechanical coupling coefficient of 13% and tunability of the series resonance frequency up to 4.0% are fabricated and characterized. The enhanced electroacoustic properties of the PMN-PT resonators are attributed to the mechanism of polarization rotation occurring in the region of the morphotropic phase boundary. Electroacoustic performance of the PMN-PT resonators is analyzed using the theory of dc field-induced piezoelectric effect in ferroelectrics. Extrinsic acoustic loss in the PMN-PT resonators is analyzed using the model of the wave scattering at reflections from rough interfaces. Mechanical Q-factor of the resonators is up to 70 at 4.1 GHz and limited mainly by losses in the PMN-PT film.

  11. Dielectric function of InGaAs in the visible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Sieg, R. E.; Yao, H. D.; Snyder, P. G.; Woollam, J. A.; Pamulapati, J.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Sekula-Moise, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are reported of the dielectric function of thermodynamically stable In(x)Ga(1-x)As in the composition range 0.3 equal to or less than X = to or less than 0.7. The optically thick samples of InGaAs were made by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in the range 0.4 = to or less than X = to or less than 0.7 and by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) for X = 0.3. The MBE made samples, usually 1 micron thick, were grown on semi-insulating InP and included a strain release structure. The MOCVD sample was grown on GaAs and was 2 microns thick. The dielectric functions were measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry in the range 1.55 to 4.4 eV. The data was analyzed assuming an optically thick InGaAs material with an oxide layer on top. The thickness of this layer was estimated by comparing the results for the InP lattice matched material, i.e., X = 0.53, with results published in the literature. The top oxide layer mathematically for X = 0.3 and X = 0.53 was removed to get the dielectric function of the bare InGaAs. In addition, the dielectric function of GaAs in vacuum, after a protective arsenic layer was removed. The dielectric functions for X = 0, 0.3, and 0.53 together with the X = 1 result from the literature to evaluate an algorithm for calculating the dielectric function of InGaAs for an arbitrary value of X(0 = to or less than X = to or less than 1) were used. Results of the dielectric function calculated using the algorithm were compared with experimental data.

  12. Dielectric function of InGaAs in the visible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Yao, H. D.; Snyder, P. G.; Woolam, J. A.; Pamulapati, J.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Sekula-Moise, P. A.; Sieg, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are reported of the dielectric function of thermodynamically stable In(x)Ga(1-x)As in the composition range 0.3 equal to or less than X = to or less than 0.7. The optically thick samples of InGaAs were made by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) in the range 0.4 = to or less than X = to or less than 0.7 and by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) for X = 0.3. The MBE made samples, usually 1 micron thick, were grown on semi-insulating InP and included a strain release structure. The MOCVD sample was grown on GaAs and was 2 microns thick. The dielectric functions were measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry in the range 1.55 to 4.4 eV. The data was analyzed assuming an optically thick InGaAs material with an oxide layer on top. The thickness of this layer was estimated by comparing the results for the InP lattice matched material, i.e., X = 0.53, with results published in the literature. The top oxide layer mathematically for X = 0.3 and X = 0.53 was removed to get the dielectric function of the bare InGaAs. In addition, the dielectric function of GaAs in vacuum, after a protective arsenic layer was removed. The dielectric functions for X = 0, 0.3, and 0.53 together with the X = 1 result from the literature to evaluate an algorithm for calculating the dielectric function of InGaAs for an arbitrary value of X (0 = to or less than X = to or less than 1) were used. Results of the dielectric function calculated using the algorithm were compared with experimental data.

  13. Surface and bulk properties of deposits grown with a bidisperse ballistic deposition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, F. A.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2007-06-01

    We study roughness scaling of the outer surface and the internal porous structure of deposits generated with the three-dimensional bidisperse ballistic deposition (BBD), in which particles of two sizes are randomly deposited. Systematic extrapolation of roughness and dynamical exponents and the comparison of roughness distributions indicate that the top surface has Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) scaling for any ratio F of the flux between large and small particles. A scaling theory predicts the characteristic time of the crossover from random to correlated growth in BBD and provides relations between the amplitudes of roughness scaling and F in the KPZ regime. The porosity of the deposits monotonically increases with F and scales as F1/2 for small F , which is also explained by the scaling approach and illustrates the possibility of connecting surface growth rules and bulk properties. The suppression of relaxation mechanisms in BBD enhances the connectivity of the deposits when compared to other ballisticlike models, so that they percolate down to F≈0.05 . The fractal dimension of the internal surface of the percolating deposits is DF≈2.9 , which is very close to the values in other ballistic-like models and suggests universality among these systems.

  14. Comparison of different grading schemes in InGaAs metamorphic buffers on GaAs substrate: Tilt dependence on cross-hatch irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Bag, Ankush; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Das, Subhashis; Biswas, Dhrubes

    2015-12-01

    InGaAs graded metamorphic buffers (MBs) with different grading strategies have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs (0 0 1) substrate. A detailed comparative analysis of surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and bulk properties using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and room temperature photoluminescence (RTPL) of grown MBs have been presented to comprehend the effectiveness of different grading scheme on InGaAs MBs. Conventional, statistical and fractal analysis on measured AFM data has been performed for in-depth investigation of these surfaces. The grading scheme has been found to have little impact on residual strain while it affects the epitaxial tilt significantly. Moreover, the tilt has been found to depend on growth front irregularities. Tilt magnitude in a graded MB has been found to vary with composition while tilt azimuth has been found to be almost same in the graded layers. PL Intensity and a shift in the PL peaks have been used to study the quality of the MB and residual strain comparatively.

  15. Impact of thermal annealing on bulk InGaAsSbN materials grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. W.; Mawst, L. J.; Kim, K.; Lee, J. J.; Kuech, T. F.; Wells, N. P.; LaLumondiere, S. D.; Sin, Y.; Lotshaw, W. T.; Moss, S. C.

    2014-02-03

    Two different thermal annealing techniques (rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and in-situ post-growth annealing in the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) chamber) were employed to investigate their impact on the optical characteristics of double-heterostructures (DH) of InGaAsSbN/GaAs and on the performance of single-junction solar cell structures, all grown by MOVPE. We find that an optimized RTA procedure leads to a similar improvement in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity compared with material employing a multi-step optimized anneal within the MOVPE reactor. Time-resolved photoluminescence techniques at low temperature (LT) and room temperature (RT) were performed to characterize the carrier dynamics in bulk InGaAsSbN layers. Room temperature carrier lifetimes were found to be similar for both annealing methods, although the LT-PL (16 K) measurements of the MOVPE-annealed sample found longer lifetimes than the RTA-annealed sample (680 ps vs. 260 ps) for the PL measurement energy of 1.24 eV. InGaAsSbN-based single junction solar cells processed with the optimized RTA procedure exhibited an enhancement of the electrical performance, such as improvements in open circuit voltage, short circuit current, fill factor, and efficiency over solar cells subjected to the in-situ MOVPE annealing technique.

  16. Optical properties of C-doped bulk GaN wafers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Khromov, S.; Hemmingsson, C.; Monemar, B.; Hultman, L.; Pozina, G.

    2014-12-14

    Freestanding bulk C-doped GaN wafers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy are studied by optical spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Significant changes of the near band gap (NBG) emission as well as an enhancement of yellow luminescence have been found with increasing C doping from 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. Cathodoluminescence mapping reveals hexagonal domain structures (pits) with high oxygen concentrations formed during the growth. NBG emission within the pits even at high C concentration is dominated by a rather broad line at ∼3.47 eV typical for n-type GaN. In the area without pits, quenching of the donor bound exciton (DBE) spectrum at moderate C doping levels of 1–2 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} is observed along with the appearance of two acceptor bound exciton lines typical for Mg-doped GaN. The DBE ionization due to local electric fields in compensated GaN may explain the transformation of the NBG emission.

  17. Annealing and surface conduction on Hydrogen peroxide treated bulk melt-grown, single crystal ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtangi, W.; Nel, J. M.; Auret, F. D.; Chawanda, A.; Diale, M.; Nyamhere, C.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the studies carried out on hydrogen peroxide treated melt-grown, bulk single crystal ZnO samples. Results show the existence of two shallow donors in the as-received ZnO samples with energy levels (37.8±0.3) meV that has been suggested as Zni related and possibly H-complex related and (54.5±0.9) meV, which has been assigned to an Al-related donor. Annealing studies performed on the hydrogen peroxide treated samples reveal the existence of a conductive channel in the samples in which new energy levels have been observed, Zn vacancies, related to the Group I elements, XZn. The surface donor volume concentration of the conductive channel was calculated from a theory developed by Look (2007) [1]. Results indicate an increase in the surface volume concentration with increasing annealing temperature from 60×1017 cm-3 at 200 °C to 4.37×1018 cm-3 at 800 °C.

  18. Deep green emission at 570nm from InGaN/GaN MQW active region grown on bulk AlN substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Grandusky, J. R.; Jamil, M.; Jindal, V.; Schujman, S. B.; Schowalter, L. J.; Liu, R.; Ponce, F. A.; Cheung, M.; Cartwright, A.

    2005-09-01

    Relatively intense deep-green/yellow photoluminescence emission at ~600 nm is observed for InGaN/GaN multi quantum well (MQW) structures grown on bulk AlN substrates, demonstrating the potential to extend commercial III-Nitride LED technology to longer wavelengths. Optical spectroscopy has been performed on InGaN MQWs with an estimated In concentration of greater than 50% grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy at 750oC. Temperature- and power-dependence, time-resolved photoluminescence as well as spatially resolved cathodoluminescence measurements and transmission electron microscopy have been applied to understand and elucidate the nature of the mechanism responsible for radiative recombination at 600nm as well as higher energy emission band observed in the samples. A comparison between samples grown on bulk AlN and sapphire substrates indicate a lower degree of compositional and/or thickness fluctuation in the latter case. Our results indicate the presence of alloy compositional fluctuation in the active region despite the lower strain expected in the structure contrary to that of low In composition active regions deposited on bulk GaN substrates. Transient photoluminescence measurements signify a stretched exponential followed by a power decay to best fit the luminescence decay indicative of carrier hopping in the active region. Our results point to the fact that at such high In composition (>30%) InGaN compositional fluctuation is still a dominant effect despite lower strain at the substrate-epi interface.

  19. Multijunction InGaAs thermophotovoltaic power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven

    1996-01-01

    The experimental performance of a multijunction monolithic lattice-matched 0.74 eV InGaAs thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power converter under 980 C blackbody irradiation is reported. Eight InGaAs PN junctions grown epitaxially on a semi-insulating wafer were monolithically integrated in series to boost the approximately 0.4 V photovoltage per typical InGaAs junction to over 3 volts for the 1 cm(exp 2) chip. This chip was originally designed and characterized for free-space 1.3 micron laser power beaming. The power efficiency of this TPV device is 16% for that part of the blackbody spectrum above the material bandgap. The device is shown to deliver about 1 watt of output power when driven with enough light. This is the first report of such a multijunction TPV device. This is not a traditional tandem cell in which the junctions are stacked vertically. Eight 1 mm long by 1 cm wide junctions are laterally connected across the device area. This multijunction design has the potential for lower I(exp 2)R power loss since the smaller PN junction area limits the current to one eighth that of the equivalent surface area. In essence, the current is traded for voltage to avoid the I(exp 2)R loss, analogous to the way power utilities avoid I(exp 2)R loss in high-tension power lines, by transforming the high current, low voltage generated at a power plant into a high voltage at a low current before transmitting the power over great distances.

  20. A combined kick-out and dissociative diffusion mechanism of grown-in Be in InGaAs and InGaAsP. A new finite difference-Bairstow method for solution of the diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koumetz, Serge D. Martin, Patrick; Murray, Hugues

    2014-09-14

    Experimental results on the diffusion of grown-in beryllium (Be) in indium gallium arsenide (In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As) and indium gallium arsenide phosphide (In{sub 0.73}Ga{sub 0.27}As{sub 0.58}P{sub 0.42}) gas source molecular beam epitaxy alloys lattice-matched to indium phosphide (InP) can be successfully explained in terms of a combined kick-out and dissociative diffusion mechanism, involving neutral Be interstitials (Be{sub i}{sup 0}), singly positively charged gallium (Ga), indium (In) self-interstitials (I{sub III}{sup +}) and singly positively charged Ga, In vacancies (V{sub III}{sup +}). A new numerical method of solution to the system of diffusion equations, based on the finite difference approximations and Bairstow's method, is proposed.

  1. Multijunction InGaAs thermophotovoltaic power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Parodos, Themis

    1995-01-01

    The experimental performance of a multijunction monolithic In(0.53)Ga(0. 47)As power converter under blackbody irradiation is reported. Eight InGaAs PN junctions grown epitaxially on a semi-insulating wafer were monolithically integrated in series to boost the approximately 0.4 V photovoltage per typical InGaAs junction to over 3 volts for the 1 sq cm chip. This chip was originally designed and characterized for free-space 1.3 micron laser power beaming. This is the first report of such a multijunction TPV. This is not a traditional tandem cell in which the junctions are stacked vertically. The junctions are each about 1mm long by 1 cm wide and are laterally connected across the 1 sq cm device area. This multijunction design has the potential for lower I(sup 2)R power loss since the smaller PN junction area limits the current to one-eighth that of the equivalent surface area. In essence, the current is traded for voltage to avoid the I(sup 2)R loss, analogous to the way power utilities avoid I(sup 2)P loss in high-tension power lines, by transforming the high current, low voltage generated at a power plant into a high voltage at a low current before transmitting the power over great distances.

  2. Multijunction InGaAs thermophotovoltaic power converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Parodos, Themis

    1995-10-01

    The experimental performance of a multijunction monolithic In(0.53)Ga(0. 47)As power converter under blackbody irradiation is reported. Eight InGaAs PN junctions grown epitaxially on a semi-insulating wafer were monolithically integrated in series to boost the approximately 0.4 V photovoltage per typical InGaAs junction to over 3 volts for the 1 sq cm chip. This chip was originally designed and characterized for free-space 1.3 micron laser power beaming. This is the first report of such a multijunction TPV. This is not a traditional tandem cell in which the junctions are stacked vertically. The junctions are each about 1mm long by 1 cm wide and are laterally connected across the 1 sq cm device area. This multijunction design has the potential for lower I(sup 2)R power loss since the smaller PN junction area limits the current to one-eighth that of the equivalent surface area. In essence, the current is traded for voltage to avoid the I(sup 2)R loss, analogous to the way power utilities avoid I(sup 2)P loss in high-tension power lines, by transforming the high current, low voltage generated at a power plant into a high voltage at a low current before transmitting the power over great distances.

  3. High Resolution X-ray Diffraction Studies of MBE-Grown HgCdTe Layers on Bulk-Grown CdZnTe Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasinghe, Priyanthi M.; Qadri, Syed B.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.

    2015-08-01

    The structural properties of molecular beam epitaxially (MBE)-grown Hg1- x Cd x Te epilayers on CdZnTe (211) substrate have been investigated using high-resolution x-ray topography and rocking curves. High-resolution x-ray diffraction 2 θ- θ scans of (422) reflections were utilized in calculating the out-of-plane lattice parameters of the HgCdTe layer and the CdZnTe substrate. The lattice strain of the HgCdTe layer was evaluated using the in-plane measurements of the (311) reflection. Etching seemed to improve the surface of the substrate by removing any damage caused by polishing or any post-processing. In spite of some localized line dislocations, a remarkable quality of the MBE-grown HgCdTe layer was observed. The full width at half maximum values of the HgCdTe layer and the CdZnTe substrate were determined as 43 arc-s and 16.2 arc-s, respectively.

  4. Three-dimensional whispering gallery modes in InGaAs nanoneedle lasers on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.-T. D.; Chen, R.; Ng, K. W.; Ko, W. S.; Lu, F.; Chang-Hasnain, C. J.

    2014-09-15

    As-grown InGaAs nanoneedle lasers, synthesized at complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor compatible temperatures on polycrystalline and crystalline silicon substrates, were studied in photoluminescence experiments. Radiation patterns of three-dimensional whispering gallery modes were observed upon optically pumping the needles above the lasing threshold. Using the radiation patterns as well as finite-difference-time-domain simulations and polarization measurements, all modal numbers of the three-dimensional whispering gallery modes could be identified.

  5. Determination of CdTe bulk carrier lifetime and interface recombination velocity of CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin-Hao; DiNezza, Michael J.; Liu, Shi; Campbell, Calli M.; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Hang

    2014-12-01

    The bulk Shockley-Read-Hall carrier lifetime of CdTe and interface recombination velocity at the CdTe/Mg0.24Cd0.76Te heterointerface are estimated to be around 0.5 μs and (4.7 ± 0.4) × 102 cm/s, respectively, using time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Four CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures (DHs) with varying CdTe layer thicknesses were grown on nearly lattice-matched InSb (001) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. The longest lifetime of 179 ns is observed in the DH with a 2 μm thick CdTe layer. It is also shown that the photon recycling effect has a strong influence on the bulk radiative lifetime, and the reabsorption process affects the measured PL spectrum shape and intensity.

  6. Stimulated emission and optical gain in AlGaN heterostructures grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei Bryan, Zachary; Kirste, Ronny; Bryan, Isaac; Hussey, Lindsay; Bobea, Milena; Haidet, Brian; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji; Gerhold, Michael

    2014-03-14

    Optical gain spectra for ∼250 nm stimulated emission were compared in three different AlGaN-based structures grown on single crystalline AlN substrates: a single AlGaN film, a double heterostructure (DH), and a Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) structure; respective threshold pumping power densities of 700, 250, and 150 kW/cm{sup 2} were observed. Above threshold, the emission was transverse-electric polarized and as narrow as 1.8 nm without a cavity. The DH and MQW structures showed gain values of 50–60 cm{sup −1} when pumped at 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. The results demonstrated the excellent optical quality of the AlGaN-based heterostructures grown on AlN substrates and their potential for realizing electrically pumped sub-280 nm laser diodes.

  7. Border trap reduction in Al2O3/InGaAs gate stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kechao; Winter, Roy; Zhang, Liangliang; Droopad, Ravi; Eizenberg, Moshe; McIntyre, Paul C.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of Al2O3 atomic layer deposition (ALD) temperature on the border trap density (Nbt) of Al2O3/InGaAs gate stacks is investigated quantitatively, and we demonstrate that lowering the trimethylaluminum (TMA)/water vapor ALD temperature from 270 °C to 120 °C significantly reduces Nbt. The reduction of Nbt coincides with increased hydrogen incorporation in low temperature ALD-grown Al2O3 films during post-gate metal forming gas annealing. It is also found that large-dose (˜6000 L) exposure of the In0.53Ga0.47As (100) surface to TMA immediately after thermal desorption of a protective As2 capping layer is an important step to guarantee the uniformity and reproducibility of high quality Al2O3/InGaAs samples made at low ALD temperatures.

  8. OMVPE growth and characterization of InGaAs for TPV cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ehsani, H.; Bhat, I.; Marcy, D. ); Nichols, G. ); Borrego, J. ); Parrington, J. ); Gutmann, R. )

    1995-01-05

    We describe the growth of InGaAs on InP substrates for the fabrication of thermo-photovoltaic cells. The growth by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) is accomplished by a two-step process in which a thin buffer layer is grown first at low temperature followed by a thicker layer at 650 [degree]C. This method eliminates the need to maintain a phosphorous pressure over InP substrate before InGaAs growth is started. Specular films of In[sub 0.53]Ga[sub 0.47]As with hole life times in the range 100--200 nS have been obtained on InP substrates using the above two-step growth method.

  9. Crystal growth of compound semiconductors in a low-gravity environment (InGaAs crystals) (M-22)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatsumi, Masami

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor crystals, such as gallium arsenide and indium phosphide crystals, have many interesting properties that silicon crystals lack, and they are expected to be used as materials for optic and/or electro-optic integrated devices. Generally speaking, alloy semiconductors, which consist of more than three elements, demonstrate new functions. For example, values of important parameters, such as lattice constant and emission wavelength, can be chosen independently. However, as it is easy for macroscopic and/or microscopic fluctuations of composition to occur in alloy semiconductor crystals, it is difficult to obtain crystals having homogeneous properties. Macroscopic change of composition in a crystal is caused by the segregation phenomenon. This phenomenon is due to a continuous change in the concentration of constituent elements at the solid-liquid interfacing during solidification. On Earth, attempts were made to obtain a crystal with homogeneous composition by maintaining a constant melt composition near the solid-liquid interface, through suppression of the convection flow of the melt by applying a magnetic field. However, the attempt was not completely successful. Convective flow does not occur in microgravity because the gravity in space is from four to six orders of magnitude less than that on Earth. In such a case, mass transfer in the melt is dominated by the diffusion phenomenon. So, if crystal growth is carried out at a rate that is higher than the rate of mass transfer due to this phenomenon, it is expected that crystals having a homogeneous composition will be obtained. In addition, it is also possible that microscopic composition fluctuations (striation) may disappear because microscopic fluctuations diminish in the absence of convection. We are going to grow a bulk-indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) crystal using the gradient heating furnace (GHF) in the first material processing test (FMPT). The structure of the sample is shown where InGaAs

  10. Water absorption in thermally grown oxides on SiC and Si: Bulk oxide and interface properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gang; Xu, Can; Feldman, Leonard C.; Yakshinskiy, Boris; Wielunski, Leszek; Gustafsson, Torgny; Bloch, Joseph; Dhar, Sarit

    2014-11-10

    We combine nuclear reaction analysis and electrical measurements to study the effect of water exposure (D{sub 2}O) on the n-type 4H-SiC carbon face (0001{sup ¯}) MOS system and to compare to standard silicon based structures. We find that: (1) The bulk of the oxides on Si and SiC behave essentially the same with respect to deuterium accumulation; (2) there is a significant difference in accumulation of deuterium at the semiconductor/dielectric interface, the SiC C-face structure absorbs an order of magnitude more D than pure Si; (3) standard interface passivation schemes such as NO annealing greatly reduce the interfacial D accumulation; and (4) the effective interfacial charge after D{sub 2}O exposure is proportional to the total D amount at the interface.

  11. Interface Shape and Growth Rate Analysis of Se/GaAs Bulk Crystals Grown in the NASA Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bly, J. M.; Kaforey, M. L.; Matthiesen, D. H.; Chait, A.

    1997-01-01

    Selenium-doped gallium arsenide, Se/GaAs, bulk crystals have been grown on earth using NASA's crystal growth furnace (CGF) in preparation for microgravity experimentation on the USML-2 spacelab mission. Peltier cooling pulses of 50 ms duration, 2040 A magnitude, and 0.0033 Hz frequency were used to successfully demark the melt-solid interface at known times during the crystal growth process. Post-growth characterization included interface shape measurement, growth rate calculation, and growth rate transient determinations. It was found that the interface shapes were always slightly concave into the solid. The curvature of the seeding interfaces was typically 1.5 mm for the 15 mm diameter samples. This was in agreement with the predicted interface shapes and positions relative to the furnace determined using a numerical model of the sample/ampoule/cartridge assembly (SACA).

  12. High internal quantum efficiency in AlGaN multiple quantum wells grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Zachary Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Collazo, Ramón; Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji

    2015-04-06

    The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of Al{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N/AlN and Al{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N/Al{sub 0.85}Ga{sub 0.15}N UVC MQW structures was analyzed. The use of bulk AlN substrates enabled us to undoubtedly distinguish the effect of growth conditions, such as V/III ratio, on the optical quality of AlGaN based MQWs from the influence of dislocations. At a high V/III ratio, a record high IQE of ∼80% at a carrier density of 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} was achieved at ∼258 nm. The high IQE was correlated with the decrease of the non-radiative coefficient A and a reduction of midgap defect luminescence, all suggesting that, in addition to dislocations, point defects are another major factor that strongly influences optical quality of AlGaN MQW structures.

  13. Determination of CdTe bulk carrier lifetime and interface recombination velocity of CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin-Hao; Campbell, Calli M.; DiNezza, Michael J.; Liu, Shi; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Hang

    2014-12-22

    The bulk Shockley-Read-Hall carrier lifetime of CdTe and interface recombination velocity at the CdTe/Mg{sub 0.24}Cd{sub 0.76}Te heterointerface are estimated to be around 0.5 μs and (4.7 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 2 }cm/s, respectively, using time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Four CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures (DHs) with varying CdTe layer thicknesses were grown on nearly lattice-matched InSb (001) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. The longest lifetime of 179 ns is observed in the DH with a 2 μm thick CdTe layer. It is also shown that the photon recycling effect has a strong influence on the bulk radiative lifetime, and the reabsorption process affects the measured PL spectrum shape and intensity.

  14. Photoluminescence characteristics of ZnTe bulk crystal and ZnTe epilayer grown on GaAs substrate by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Hai-Yan; Mu, Qi; Zhang, Lei; Lü, Yuan-Jie; Ji, Zi-Wu; Feng, Zhi-Hong; Xu, Xian-Gang; Guo, Qi-Xin

    2015-12-01

    Excitation power and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the ZnTe epilayer grown on (100) GaAs substrate and ZnTe bulk crystal are investigated. The measurement results show that both the structures are of good structural quality due to their sharp bound excitonic emissions and absence of the deep level structural defect-related emissions. Furthermore, in contrast to the ZnTe bulk crystal, although excitonic emissions for the ZnTe epilayer are somewhat weak, perhaps due to As atoms diffusing from the GaAs substrate into the ZnTe epilayer and/or because of the strain-induced degradation of the crystalline quality of the ZnTe epilayer, neither the donor-acceptor pair (DAP) nor conduction band-acceptor (e-A) emissions are observed in the ZnTe epilayer. This indicates that by further optimizing the growth process it is possible to obtain a high-crystalline quality ZnTe heteroepitaxial layer that is comparable to the ZnTe bulk crystal. Project supported by the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120131110006), the Key Science and Technology Program of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. 2013GGX10221), the Key Laboratory of Functional Crystal Materials and Device (Shandong University, Ministry of Education), China (Grant No. JG1401), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61306113), the Major Research Plan of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91433112), and the Partnership Project for Fundamental Technology Researches of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan.

  15. Cz-Silicon Produced from Solar Grade and Recycled Materials. Part I: Bulk Properties and Formation of As-Grown Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Øvrelid, Eivind Johannes; Juel, Mari; Tranell, Gabriella

    2015-03-01

    The current paper is the first of two, investigating the properties of Czochralski-silicon (Cz-silicon) materials and solar cells produced with recycled and compensated silicon materials. In this work, impurity levels in two experimental Cz-silicon ingots were characterized by glow discharge mass spectroscopy and FTIR. The combined effects of these impurities on recombination properties were investigated by photoluminescence imaging and compared to bulk properties of a reference ingot. Ring pattern distribution of as-grown micro-defects in the ingots, related to elevated carbon and oxygen levels, were delineated based on the results of two steps of dry oxidation. Moreover, the mechanism of defect formation in the experimental Cz-Si during solidification and oxidation is elaborated in light of thermodynamic theories. Meanwhile, the positive effect of phosphorus in compensated feedstock is discussed in relation to the minority carrier lifetime based on the quasi-steady-state photoconductance results, as well as on the restricted formation of oxygen-related defects during solidification by analyzing samples after oxidation and copper decoration.

  16. Microstructural dependency of optical properties of m-plane InGaN multiple quantum wells grown on 2° misoriented bulk GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Fengzai; Barnard, Jonathan S.; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Kappers, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2015-08-24

    A non-polar m-plane structure consisting of five InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) was grown on ammonothermal bulk GaN by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. Surface step bunches propagating through the QW stack were found to accommodate the 2° substrate miscut towards the -c direction. Both large steps with heights of a few tens of nanometres and small steps between one and a few atomic layers in height are observed, the former of which exhibit cathodoluminescence at longer wavelengths than the adjacent m-plane terraces. This is attributed to the formation of semi-polar facets at the steps on which the QWs are shown to be thicker and have higher Indium contents than those in the adjacent m-plane regions. Discrete basal-plane stacking faults (BSFs) were occasionally initiated from the QWs on the main m-plane terraces, but groups of BSFs were frequently observed to initiate from those on the large steps, probably related to the increased strain associated with the locally higher indium content and thickness.

  17. Effect of Cr/In-doping on the crystalline quality of bulk ZnTe crystals grown from Te solution by temperature gradient solution growth (TGSG) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Yang; Wanqi, Jie; Xiaoyan, Sun; Min, Yang

    2015-09-01

    The properties of undoped, Cr-doped, and In-doped bulk ZnTe crystals grown by the TGSG method were compared. Cr/In-doping leads to a slight red-shift of the absorption edge. Cr-doping also creates two characteristic absorption bands, centered at about 1750 nm and beneath the fundamental absorption edge. However, the fundamental reflectance spectra are not sensitive to the dopants. The resistivity of undoped, Cr-doped, and In-doped ZnTe is about 102 Ω·cm, 103 Ω·cm, and 108 Ω·cm, respectively. Only In-doped ZnTe has an IR transmittance higher than 60% in the range of 500 to 4000 cm-1. However, the IR transmittance of Cr-doped ZnTe is very low and decreases greatly as the wavenumber increases, which is mainly attributed to the scattering effects caused by some defects generated by Cr-doping. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2011CB610406), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51372205), the 111 Project of China (No. B08040), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20116102120014), and the NWPU Foundation for Fundamental Research and the Research Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing (NWPU).

  18. Energetics of neutral Si dopants in InGaAs: An ab initio and semiempirical Tersoff model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheng-Wei; Lukose, Binit; Thompson, Michael O.; Clancy, Paulette

    2015-03-01

    A roadblock in utilizing III-V semiconductors for scaled-down electronic devices is their poor dopant activation. As a first step to unravel the dopant behavior in InGaAs, we studied the tendency for dopant formation computationally using two approaches: ab initio and semiempirical methods. We studied a number of structural possibilities, such as the impact of local sites and local and global environments. We will show that the dopant we considered here, Si, has discrete preferences for certain sites and the nature of its surroundings. Substitutional defects are clearly preferred over interstitial locations. We shall show that cation ordering has an impact on dopant energetics. Critically, for large-scale simulations of dopant diffusion in InGaAs alloys, we also present a parameterization of the Abell-Tersoff semiempirical potential for pairwise interactions between silicon atoms and each of the elements constituting InGaAs. In the absence of experimental data, reference parameters for estimating the Tersoff values were obtained using ab initio pseudopotential calculations (density functional theory and generalized gradient approximations). These sets of Tersoff parameters were optimized to describe the bulk structural properties of the mostly theoretical alloys Si-As, Si-Ga, and Si-In. We demonstrate the transferability of these parameters by predicting formation energies of extrinsic point "defects" of Si on a variety of sites in ternary InGaAs alloys with different local compositional configurations, both random and ordered. Tersoff model predictions of the extrinsic "substitution energy" of a Si dopant on a cationic lattice site were found to be independent of the composition of the dopant's second nearest neighbors, but were affected by the strain induced by a local arrangement of In and Ga cationic atoms. This finding is important since common deposition processes used to create InGaAs may lead to specifically ordered patterns within the cation sublattice.

  19. The effect of nucleation layer thickness on the structural evolution and crystal quality of bulk GaN grown by a two-step process on cone-patterned sapphire substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Lin; Zhai, Guangmei; Mei, Fuhong; Jia, Wei; Yu, Chunyan; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2016-05-01

    The role of nucleation layer thickness on the GaN crystal quality grown on cone-patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) was explored. The morphologies of epitaxial GaN at different growth stages were investigated by a series of growth interruption in detail. After 10- and 15-min three-dimensional growth, the nucleation sites are very important for the bulk GaN crystal quality. They have a close relationship with the nucleation layer thickness, as confirmed through the scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Nucleation sites formed mainly on patterns are bad for bulk GaN crystal quality and nucleation sites formed mainly in the trenches of PSS mounds are good for bulk GaN crystal quality, as proved by X-ray diffraction analysis. Nucleation layer thickness can effectively control the nucleation sites and thus determine the crystal quality of bulk GaN.

  20. Characteristics of Monolithically Integrated InGaAs Active Pixel Image Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Cunningham, T. J.; Pain, B.; Lange, M. J.; Olsen, G. H.

    1999-01-01

    Switching and amplifying characteristics of a newly developed monolithic InGaAs Active Pixel Imager Array are presented. The sensor array is fabricated from InGaAs material epitaxially deposited on an InP substrate.

  1. Atomic imaging of atomic layer deposition oxide nucleation with trimethylaluminum on As-rich InGaAs(001) 2 × 4 vs Ga/In-rich InGaAs(001) 4 × 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melitz, Wilhelm; Kent, Tyler; Kummel, Andrew C.; Droopad, Ravi; Holland, Martin; Thayne, Iain

    2012-04-01

    Formation of a contaminant free, flat, electrically passive interface to a gate oxide such as a-Al2O3 is the critical step in fabricating III-V metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors; while the bulk oxide is amorphous, the interface may need to be ordered to prevent electrical defect formation. A two temperature in situ cleaning process is shown to produce a clean, flat group III or group V rich InGaAs surface. The dependence of initial surface reconstruction and dosing temperature of the seeding of aluminum with trimethylaluminum dosing is observed to produce an ordered unpinned passivation layer on InGaAs(001)-(4 × 2) surface at sample temperatures below 190 °C. Conversely, the InGaAs(001)-(2 × 4) surface is shown to generate an unpinned passivation layer with a seeding temperature up to 280 °C. For both reconstructions, the chemical drive force is consistent with formation of As-Al-As bonds. The optimal seed layer protects the surface from background contamination.

  2. SWIR InGaAs focal plane arrays in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvié, A.; Huet, O.; Hamard, S.; Truffer, J. P.; Pozzi, M.; Decobert, J.; Costard, E.; Zécri, M.; Maillart, P.; Reibel, Y.; Pécheur, A.

    2013-06-01

    SWIR detection band benefits from natural (sun, night glow, thermal radiation) or artificial (eye safe lasers) photons sources combined to low atmospheric absorption and specific contrast compared to visible wavelengths. It gives the opportunity to address a large spectrum of applications such as defense and security (night vision, active imaging), space (earth observation), transport (automotive safety) or industry (non destructive process control). InGaAs material appears as a good candidate to satisfy SWIR detection needs. The lattice matching with InP constitutes a double advantage to this material: attractive production capacity and uncooled operation thanks to low dark current level induced by high quality material. The study of InGaAs FPA has begun few years ago with III-VLab, gathering expertise in InGaAs material growth and imaging technology respectively from Alcatel-Lucent and Thales, its two mother companies. This work has led to put quickly on the market a 320x256 InGaAs module. The recent transfer of imagery activities from III-VLab to Sofradir allows developing new high performances products, satisfying customers' new requirements. Especially, a 640x512 InGaAs module with a pitch of 15µm is actually under development to fill the needs of low light level imaging.

  3. Highly c-axis oriented growth of GaN film on sapphire (0001) by laser molecular beam epitaxy using HVPE grown GaN bulk target

    SciTech Connect

    Kushvaha, S. S.; Kumar, M. Senthil; Maurya, K. K.; Dalai, M. K.; Sharma, Nita D.

    2013-09-15

    Growth temperature dependant surface morphology and crystalline properties of the epitaxial GaN layers grown on pre-nitridated sapphire (0001) substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) were investigated in the range of 500–750 °C. The grown GaN films were characterized using high resolution x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The x-ray rocking curve full width at a half maximum (FWHM) value for (0002) reflection dramatically decreased from 1582 arc sec to 153 arc sec when the growth temperature was increased from 500 °C to 600 °C and the value further decreased with increase of growth temperature up to 720 °C. A highly c-axis oriented GaN epitaxial film was obtained at 720 °C with a (0002) plane rocking curve FWHM value as low as 102 arc sec. From AFM studies, it is observed that the GaN grain size also increased with increasing growth temperature and flat, large lateral grains of size 200-300 nm was obtained for the film grown at 720 °C. The micro-Raman spectroscopy studies also exhibited the high-quality wurtzite nature of GaN film grown on sapphire at 720 °C. The SIMS measurements revealed a non-traceable amount of background oxygen impurity in the grown GaN films. The results show that the growth temperature strongly influences the surface morphology and crystalline quality of the epitaxial GaN films on sapphire grown by LMBE.

  4. Wurtzite ZnO (001) films grown on cubic MgO (001) with bulk-like opto-electronic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hua; Wang Huiqiong; Chen Xiaohang; Zhan Huahan; Kang Junyong; Wu Lijun; Zhu Yimei; Zhang Lihua; Kisslinger, Kim

    2011-10-03

    We report the growth of ZnO (001) wurtzite thin films with bulk-like opto-electronic properties on MgO (001) cubic substrates using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns and ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy images indicate that the structure transition from the cubic MgO substrates to the hexagonal films involves 6 ZnO variants that have the same structure but different orientations. This work demonstrates the possibility of integrating wurtzite ZnO films and functional cubic substrates while maintaining their bulk-like properties.

  5. InGaAs focal plane array developments and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvié, A.; Coussement, J.; Huet, O.; Truffer, J. P.; Pozzi, M.; Oubensaid, E. H.; Hamard, S.; Chaffraix, V.; Costard, E.

    2015-05-01

    SWIR spectral band is an attractive domain thanks to its intrinsic properties. Close to visible wavelengths, SWIR images interpretation is made easier for field actors. Besides complementary information can be extracted from SWIR band and bring significant added value in several fields of applications such as defense and security (night vision, active imaging), space (earth observation), transport (automotive safety) or industry (non destructive process control). Among the various new technologies able to detect SWIR wavelengths, InGaAs appears as a key technology. Initially developed for optical telecommunications, this material guaranties performances, stability and reliability and is compatible with attractive production capacity. Thanks to high quality material, very low dark current levels can be achieved at ambient temperature. Then uncooled operation can be set up, allowing compact and low power systems. Since the recent transfer of InGaAs imaging activities from III-Vlab, Sofradir provides a framework for the production activity with the manufacturing of high performances products: CACTUS320 SW. The developments towards VGA format with 15μm pixel pitch, lead today to the industrialization of a new product: SNAKE. On one side, the InGaAs detection array presents high performances in terms of dark current and quantum efficiency. On the other side, the low noise ROIC has different additional functionalities. Then this 640x512 @ 15μm sensor appears as well suited to answer the needs of a wide range of applications. In this paper, we will present the Sofradir InGaAs technology, the performances of our last product SNAKE and the perspectives of InGaAs new developments.

  6. Monolithically Integrated InGaAs Nanowires on 3D Structured Silicon-on-Insulator as a New Platform for Full Optical Links.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunseok; Farrell, Alan C; Senanayake, Pradeep; Lee, Wook-Jae; Huffaker, Diana L

    2016-03-01

    Monolithically integrated III-V semiconductors on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform can be used as a building block for energy-efficient on-chip optical links. Epitaxial growth of III-V semiconductors on silicon, however, has been challenged by the large mismatches in lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficients between epitaxial layers and silicon substrates. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the monolithic integration of InGaAs nanowires on the SOI platform and its feasibility for photonics and optoelectronic applications. InGaAs nanowires are grown not only on a planar SOI layer but also on a 3D structured SOI layer by catalyst-free metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The precise positioning of nanowires on 3D structures, including waveguides and gratings, reveals the versatility and practicality of the proposed platform. Photoluminescence measurements exhibit that the composition of ternary InGaAs nanowires grown on the SOI layer has wide tunability covering all telecommunication wavelengths from 1.2 to 1.8 μm. We also show that the emission from an optically pumped single nanowire is effectively coupled and transmitted through an SOI waveguide, explicitly showing that this work lays the foundation for a new platform toward energy-efficient optical links.

  7. Monolithically Integrated InGaAs Nanowires on 3D Structured Silicon-on-Insulator as a New Platform for Full Optical Links.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunseok; Farrell, Alan C; Senanayake, Pradeep; Lee, Wook-Jae; Huffaker, Diana L

    2016-03-01

    Monolithically integrated III-V semiconductors on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform can be used as a building block for energy-efficient on-chip optical links. Epitaxial growth of III-V semiconductors on silicon, however, has been challenged by the large mismatches in lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficients between epitaxial layers and silicon substrates. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the monolithic integration of InGaAs nanowires on the SOI platform and its feasibility for photonics and optoelectronic applications. InGaAs nanowires are grown not only on a planar SOI layer but also on a 3D structured SOI layer by catalyst-free metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The precise positioning of nanowires on 3D structures, including waveguides and gratings, reveals the versatility and practicality of the proposed platform. Photoluminescence measurements exhibit that the composition of ternary InGaAs nanowires grown on the SOI layer has wide tunability covering all telecommunication wavelengths from 1.2 to 1.8 μm. We also show that the emission from an optically pumped single nanowire is effectively coupled and transmitted through an SOI waveguide, explicitly showing that this work lays the foundation for a new platform toward energy-efficient optical links. PMID:26901448

  8. Influence of crystallization front direction on the Mg-related impurity centers incorporation in bulk GaN:Mg grown by HNPS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovyi, B.; Amilusik, M.; Litwin-Staszewska, E.; Bockowski, M.; Grzegory, I.; Porowski, S.; Fijalkowski, M.; Rudyk, V.; Tsybulskyi, V.; Panasyuk, M.; Karbovnyk, I.; Kapustianyk, V.

    2016-08-01

    We studied the incorporation of Mg-related impurity centers in GaN crystals depending on the direction of the crystallization front. Two series of GaN crystals - (i) undoped and (ii) Mg-doped - were grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution (HNPS) method under otherwise identical conditions. Each series contained four samples with (10 1 bar 0) , (11 2 bar 0) , (20 2 bar 1 bar) and (20 2 bar 1) orientations. The low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was used for characterization of the obtained crystals. The observed differences in the PL spectra of GaN:Mg crystals suggested that Mg incorporation in GaN grown by HNPS method depends considerably on the orientation of crystallization front. The concentration of Mg impurity incorporated into the GaN crystals subsequently increases for the following sequence of planes: (10 1 bar 0) , (11 2 bar 0) , (20 2 bar 1 bar) and (20 2 bar 1) . For (10 1 bar 0) , (11 2 bar 0) and (20 2 bar 1 bar) planes the blue band is related only to ON - MgGa donor-acceptor pair (DAP) transitions, while for (20 2 bar 1) plane the incorporation of Mg-H complexes occurs additionally to the formation ON - MgGa DAP.

  9. Surface roughness in InGaAs channels of high electron mobility transistors depending on the growth temperature: Strain induced or due to alloy decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiró, F.; Cornet, A.; Morante, J. R.; Beck, M.; Py, M. A.

    1998-06-01

    InAlAs/InGaAs/InP based high electron mobility transistor devices have been structurally and electrically characterized, using transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy and measuring Hall mobilities. The InGaAs lattice matched channels, with an In molar fraction of 53%, grown at temperatures lower than 530 °C exhibit alloy decomposition driving an anisotropic InGaAs surface roughness oriented along [11¯0]. Conversely, lattice mismatched channels with an In molar fraction of 75% do not present this lateral decomposition but a strain induced roughness, with higher strength as the channel growth temperature increases beyond 490 °C. In both cases the presence of the roughness implies low and anisotropic Hall mobilities of the two dimensional electron gas.

  10. Effect of bulk growth temperature on antiphase domain boundary annihilation rate in MOCVD-grown GaAs on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, C. S. C.; Martin, T. P.; Bao, X.-Y.; Kennon, E. L.; Gutierrez, L.; Martin, P.; Sanchez, E.; Jones, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    GaAs is a material of interest as a potential buffer layer in future III-V semiconductor-based transistor technologies integrated on Si wafers. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of growth temperature on the propagation and annihilation of antiphase domain boundaries (APBs) in GaAs films grown on Si(001) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). No intentional wafer off-cuts or high temperature pre-growth anneals (>1000 °C) were employed as both of these practices complicate integration with other devices. To evaluate the role of growth temperature on the APB evolution, a 200 nm thick layer of GaAs was grown on the Si at a fixed temperature of 530 °C so that all samples started with the same approximate APB density. Subsequently, 600 nm of GaAs was grown at temperatures varying between 530 °C and 650 °C. Chemical etching combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to profile the density of the APBs in each sample as a function of depth. The APB annihilation rate, i.e. the exponential decay rate of APB density with respect to film thickness, increases from 2.6 μm-1 to 10.7 μm-1 as the growth temperature increases from 530 °C to 610 °C and then saturates. The increase in annihilation rate with increasing temperatures suggests that the higher temperatures remove kinetic barriers to the reduction of the overall APB interfacial area. An activation energy of 1.1 eV was extracted using an Arrhenius relationship and likely corresponds to the energy needed for APBs to kink from {110} to higher-index planes, e.g. {112}. Dark field transmission electron microscopy showed that at higher growth temperatures the APBs can shift from vertical {110} habit planes to {112} planes leading to self-annihilation with sufficient thickness.

  11. Preparation of Ag Schottky contacts on n-type GaN bulk crystals grown in nitrogen rich atmosphere by the hydride vapor phase epitaxy technique

    SciTech Connect

    Stübner, R. Kolkovsky, Vl.; Weber, J.; Leibiger, Gunnar; Habel, Frank

    2014-10-14

    Electrical properties of Schottky contacts on n-type GaN grown in nitrogen rich atmosphere with different N/Ga ratios by hydride vapor phase epitaxy were investigated. We show that tunneling of electrons from the conduction band of GaN to the metal is dominant in our samples. The quality of Schottky contacts does not only depend on surface preparation but also on the growth conditions of the crystals. Schottky contacts on these crystals show an increasing deterioration when higher N/Ga growth ratios are used. We correlate our results with the presence of negatively charged gallium vacancies in the samples. These charges compensate the positively charged donors and lead to a significant increase in series resistance.

  12. Study on 512×128 pixels InGaAs near infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Tang, Hengjing; Huang, Songlei; Shao, Xiumei; Li, Tao; Huang, Zhangcheng; Gong, Haimei

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that In0.53Ga0.47As epitaxial material is lattice-matched to InP substrate corresponding to the wavelength from 0.9μm to 1.7μm, which results to high quality material and good device characteristics at room temperature. In order to develop the near infrared multi-spectral imaging, 512×128 pixels InGaAs Near Infrared Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) were studied. The n-InP/i-InGaAs/n-InP double hereto-structure epitaxial material was grown by MBE. The 512×128 back-illuminated planar InGaAs detector arrays were fabricated, including the improvement of passivation film, by grooving the diffusion masking layer, the P type electrode layer, In bump condition and so on. The photo-sensitive region has the diffusion area of 23×23μm2 and pixel pitch of 30×30μm2 . The 512×128 detector arrays were individually hybridized on readout integrated circuit(ROIC) by Indium bump based on flip-chip process to make focal plane arrays (FPAs). The ROIC is based on a capacitive trans-impedance amplifier with correlated double sampling and integrated while readout (IWR) mode with high readout velocity of every pixel resulting in low readout noise and high frame frequency. The average peak detectivity and the response non-uniformity of the FPAs are 1.63×1012 cmHz1/2/W and 5.9%, respectively. The power dissipation and frame frequency of the FPAs are about 180mW and 400Hz, respectively.

  13. Influence of interface traps inside the conduction band on the capacitance–voltage characteristics of InGaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taoka, Noriyuki; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kim, Sang Hyeon; Suzuki, Rena; Iida, Ryo; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the influences of the AC response with interface/bulk-oxide traps near the conduction band (CB) and a low effective density of states (DOS) on the accumulation capacitance C acc of an n-type InGaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) capacitor. We found that the capacitance associated with the interface traps inside the CB significantly increases C acc compared to the C acc value constrained by a low DOS. These results indicate that accurate characterization inside the CB and considering the capacitance due to the interface traps inside the CB in the MOS capacitance–voltage curves are indispensable for accurate characterization of InGaAs MOS interface properties.

  14. Research and experiment of InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ling; Min, Chaobo; Sun, Jianning; Gu, Yan; Yang, Feng; Zhu, Bo; Pan, Jingsheng; Guo, Yiliang

    2015-04-01

    The design and imaging characteristic experiment of InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system are introduced. Through the adoption of InGaAs focal plane array, the real time image process structure of InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system is researched. The hardware circuit and image process software of the imaging system based on FPGA are researched. The InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system is composed of shortwave infrared lens, InGaAs focal plane array, temperature controller module, power supply module, analog-to-digital converter module, digital-to-analog converter module, FPGA image processing module and optical-mechanical structure. The main lock frequency of InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system is 30MHz. The output mode of the InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system is PAL analog signal. The power dissipation of the imaging system is 2.6W. The real time signal process in InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system includes non-uniformly correction algorithm, bad pixel replacement algorithm, and histogram equalization algorithm. Based on the InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system, the imaging characteristic test of shortwave infrared is carried out for different targets in different conditions. In the foggy weather, the haze and fog penetration are tested. The InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system could be used for observing humans, boats, architecture, and mountains in the haze and foggy weather. The configuration and performance of InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system are respectively logical and steady. The research on the InGaAs shortwave infrared imaging system is worthwhile for improving the development of night vision technology.

  15. Crosstalk study of near infrared InGaAs detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Tao; Fan, Cui; Shao, Xiumei; Li, Jianwei; Wei, Jun; Gong, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Crosstalk characteristics of high density FPA detectors attract widespread attention in the application of electro-optical systems. Crosstalk characteristics of near-infrared (NIR) InGaAs photodiodes and focal plane arrays (FPAs) were studied in this paper. The mesa type detector was investigated by using laser beam induced current technique (LBIC) to measure the absorption outside the designed photosensitive area, and the results show that the excess absorption enlarges the crosstalk of the adjacent pixels. The structure optimization using the effective absorption layer between the pixels can effectively reduce the crosstalk to 2.5%. The major crosstalk components of the optimization photodiode come from the electronic signal caused by carrier lateral diffusion. For the planar type detectors, test structures were used to compare the crosstalk of different structures, and the guard ring structure shows good suppression of the crosstalk. Then the back-illuminated 32x32 InGaAs photodiodes with 30μm pitch were designed, and LBIC was used to measure its lateral diffusion of the effective carriers and fill factor of photosensitive area. The results indicate that the fill factor of detectors can reach up to 98% when the diffusion region is optimized, and the minimum response exists between two neighborhood pixels. Based on these crosstalk measurement results and optimizing structure designs, the linear InGaAs photodiodes were designed and thus the InGaAs FPA assembly was fabricated. The assembly shows higher electro-optical performance and good improvement on crosstalk. The assembly was applied in infrared imaging system and modulation transfer function (MTF) of FPA assembly was calculated to be above 0.50. The clear image based on FPA assembly was obtained.

  16. Metastable growth of pure wurtzite InGaAs microstructures.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kar Wei; Ko, Wai Son; Lu, Fanglu; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2014-08-13

    III-V compound semiconductors can exist in two major crystal phases, namely, zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ). While ZB is thermodynamically favorable in conventional III-V epitaxy, the pure WZ phase can be stable in nanowires with diameters smaller than certain critical values. However, thin nanowires are more vulnerable to surface recombination, and this can ultimately limit their performances as practical devices. In this work, we study a metastable growth mechanism that can yield purely WZ-phased InGaAs microstructures on silicon. InGaAs nucleates as sharp nanoneedles and expand along both axial and radial directions simultaneously in a core-shell fashion. While the base can scale from tens of nanometers to over a micron, the tip can remain sharp over the entire growth. The sharpness maintains a high local surface-to-volume ratio, favoring hexagonal lattice to grow axially. These unique features lead to the formation of microsized pure WZ InGaAs structures on silicon. To verify that the WZ microstructures are truly metastable, we demonstrate, for the first time, the in situ transformation from WZ to the energy-favorable ZB phase inside a transmission electron microscope. This unconventional core-shell growth mechanism can potentially be applied to other III-V materials systems, enabling the effective utilization of the extraordinary properties of the metastable wurtzite crystals.

  17. New developments on InGaAs focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussement, J.; Rouvié, A.; Oubensaid, E. H.; Huet, O.; Hamard, S.; Truffer, J.-P.; Pozzi, M.; Maillart, P.; Reibel, Y.; Costard, E.; Billon-Lanfrey, D.

    2014-06-01

    SWIR detection band benefits from natural (sun, night glow, thermal radiation) or artificial (eye safe lasers) photons sources combined to low atmospheric absorption and specific contrast compared to visible wavelengths. It gives the opportunity to address a large spectrum of applications such as defense and security (night vision, active imaging), space (earth observation), transport (automotive safety) or industry (non destructive process control). InGaAs material appears as a good candidate to satisfy SWIR detection needs. The lattice matching with InP constitutes a double advantage to this material: attractive production capacity and uncooled operation thanks to low dark current level induced by high quality material. The recent transfer of imagery activities from III-VLab to Sofradir provides a framework for the production activity with the manufacturing of high performances products: CACTUS320 SW and CACTUS640 SW. The developments, begun at III-Vlab towards VGA format with 15μm pixel pitch, lead today to the industrialization of a new product: SNAKE SW. On one side, the InGaAs detection array presents high performances in terms of dark current and quantum efficiency. On the other side, the low noise ROIC has different additional functionalities. Then this 640×512 @ 15μm module appears as well suited to answer the needs of a wide range of applications. In this paper, we will present the Sofradir InGaAs technology, some performances optimization and the last developments leading to SNAKE SW.

  18. InGaAs quantum wells on wafer-bonded InP/GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, S.; Sandhu, R.; Wojtowicz, M.; Chen, G.; Hicks, R.; Goorsky, M.S.

    2005-11-01

    Wafer bonding and hydrogen implantation exfoliation techniques have been used to fabricate a thin InP template layer on GaAs with intermediate silicon nitride bonding layers. This template layer was used to directly compare subsequent metal organic vapor phase epitaxial growth of InGaAs/InAlAs quantum-well structures on these wafer-bonded templates to growth on a standard InP substrate. Chemical mechanical polishing of the bonded structure and companion InP substrates was assessed. No effects from the coefficient of thermal mismatch are detected up to the growth temperature, and compositionally equivalent structures are grown on the wafer-bonded InP template and the bare InP substrate. However, after growth dislocation, loops can be identified in the InP template layer due to the ion implantation step. These defects incur a slight mosaic tilt but do not yield any crystalline defects in the epitaxial structure. Low-temperature photoluminescence measurements of the InGaAs grown on the template structure and the InP substrate exhibit near-band-edge luminescence on the same order; this indicates that ion implantation and exfoliation is a viable technique for the integration of III-V materials.

  19. Border trap reduction in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kechao; McIntyre, Paul C.; Winter, Roy; Eizenberg, Moshe; Zhang, Liangliang; Droopad, Ravi

    2015-11-16

    The effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition (ALD) temperature on the border trap density (N{sub bt}) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stacks is investigated quantitatively, and we demonstrate that lowering the trimethylaluminum (TMA)/water vapor ALD temperature from 270 °C to 120 °C significantly reduces N{sub bt}. The reduction of N{sub bt} coincides with increased hydrogen incorporation in low temperature ALD-grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films during post-gate metal forming gas annealing. It is also found that large-dose (∼6000 L) exposure of the In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (100) surface to TMA immediately after thermal desorption of a protective As{sub 2} capping layer is an important step to guarantee the uniformity and reproducibility of high quality Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs samples made at low ALD temperatures.

  20. Numerical study of the intrinsic recombination carriers lifetime in extended short-wavelength infrared detector materials: A comparison between InGaAs and HgCdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic carrier lifetime due to radiative and Auger recombination in HgCdTe and strained InGaAs has been computed in the extended short-wavelength infrared (ESWIR) spectrum from 1.7 μm to 2.7 μm. Using the Green's function theory, both direct and phonon-assisted indirect Auger recombination rates as well as the radiative recombination rates are calculated for different cutoff wavelengths at 300 K with full band structures of the materials. In order to properly model the full band structures of strained InGaAs, an empirical pseudo-potential model for the alloy is fitted using the virtual crystal approximation with spin-orbit coupling included. The results showed that for InxGa1-xAs grown on InP substrate, the compressive strain, which presents in the film when the cutoff wavelength is longer than 1.7 μm, leads to decrease of Auger recombination rate and increase of radiative recombination rate. Since the dominant intrinsic recombination mechanism in this spectral range is radiative recombination, the overall intrinsic carrier lifetime in the strained InGaAs alloys is shorter than that in the relaxed material. When compared to the relaxed HgCdTe, both relaxed and compressively strained InGaAs alloys show shorter intrinsic carrier lifetime at the same cutoff wavelength in room temperature which confirms the potential advantage of HgCdTe as wide-band infrared detector material. While HgCdTe offers superior performance, ultimately the material of choice for ESWIR application will also depend on material quality and cost.

  1. Lattice-engineered MBE growth of high-indium mole fraction InGaAs for low cost MMICs and (1.3--1.55 {micro}m) OEICs

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, T.T.; Sokolov, V.; Sullivan, C.T.

    1997-11-01

    Using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and lattice engineering techniques, the feasibility of combining photonic devices applicable to the 1.3 to 1.55 {micro}m wavelength range and monolithic microwave (or mm-wave) integrated circuits (MMICs) on GaAs is demonstrated. A key factor in the MBE growth is incorporation of an InGaAs active layer having an indium arsenide mole fraction of 0.35 or greater and its lattice compatibility with the underlying semi-insulating GaAs substrate. The InGaAs layer used for the photonic devices, can also serve as the active channel for the high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) for application in MMICs. Several examples of active and passive photonic devices grown by MBE are presented including an optical ridge waveguide, and a photodetector for detection of light in the 1.3 {micro}m range. The material structure includes a 3-layer AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs optical waveguide and a thin InGaAs absorbing layer situated directly above the optical waveguide. Metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors are formed on the top surface of the InGaAs layer for collection of the photo-induced carriers. The optical ridge waveguide is designed for lateral incidence of the light to enhance the MSM photodetector responsivity. Initial measurements on the optical waveguide and photodetector are presented.

  2. 1.58 {mu}m InGaAs quantum well laser on GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Taangring, I.; Ni, H. Q.; Wu, B. P.; Wu, D. H.; Xiong, Y. H.; Huang, S. S.; Niu, Z. C.; Wang, S. M.; Lai, Z. H.; Larsson, A.

    2007-11-26

    We demonstrate the 1.58 {mu}m emission at room temperature from a metamorphic In{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4}As quantum well laser grown on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. The large lattice mismatch was accommodated through growth of a linearly graded buffer layer to create a high quality virtual In{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}As substrate. Careful growth optimization ensured good optical and structural qualities. For a 1250x50 {mu}m{sup 2} broad area laser, a minimum threshold current density of 490 A/cm{sup 2} was achieved under pulsed operation. This result indicates that metamorphic InGaAs quantum wells can be an alternative approach for 1.55 {mu}m GaAs-based lasers.

  3. Narrow optical line width from site-controlled InGaAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lily; Yakes, Michael; Sweeney, Timothy; Carter, Samuel; Kim, Chulsoo; Kim, Mijin; Bracker, Allan; Gammon, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The incorporation of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) in systematically scalable quantum devices requires a method of nucleating dots with nanometer-scale spatial accuracy while preserving their narrow optical line width. We have developed a technique combining e-beam lithography, wet etching, and molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth to deterministically position InGaAs QDs with spectrometer limited photoluminescence line widths. Our technique takes advantage of the anisotropy in GaAs growth to evolve an etched pattern of holes and lines into faceted structures in which dots nucleate. Using this technique, we were able to grow a buffer layer of pure GaAs up to 90 nm in thickness between the processed surface and the dot nucleation surface, effectively separating the QDs from unavoidable residual defects and impurities on the patterned surface that broaden their optical line widths. Additionally, we demonstrate control over the number of dots nucleating per site, from single to a chain of several, by varying the dimensions of the original pattern. Our dots are grown in a Schottky diode structure. Their PL spectrum shows discrete charging transitions, with narrow linewidths near the spectrometer's resolution limit of 20 micro eV.

  4. Dimensionality of InGaAs nonlinear optical response

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, S.R. |

    1995-07-01

    In this thesis the ultrafast optical properties of a series of InGaAs samples ranging from the two to the three dimensional limit are discussed. An optical system producing 150 fs continuum centered at 1.5 microns was built. Using this system, ultrafast pump-probe and four wave mixing experiments were performed. Carrier thermalization measurements reveal that screening of the Coulomb interaction is relatively unaffected by confinement, while Pauli blocking nonlinearities at the band edge are approximately twice as strong in two dimensions as in three. Carrier cooling via phonon emission is influenced by confinement due both to the change in electron distribution function and the reduction in electron phonon coupling. Purely coherent band edge effects, as measured by the AC Stark effect and four wave mixing, are found to be dominated by the changes in excitonic structure which take place with confinement.

  5. InGaAs Detectors for Miniature Infrared Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabach, T. N.; Staller, C.; Dejewski, S.; Cunningham, T.; Herring, M.; Fossum, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    In the past year, there has been substantial impetus for NASA to consider missions that are of relatively low cost as a trade off for a higher new mission launch rate. To maintain low mission cost, these missions will be of short duration and will use smaller launch vehicles (e.g. Pegasus). Consequently, very low volume, very low mass instrument (a.k.a. miniature instrument) payloads will be required. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the number of instruments flown on a particular mission will also be highly constrained; consequently increased instrument capability will also be desired. In the case of infrared instruments, focal planes typically require cooling to ensure high performance of the detectors, especially in the case of spectrometers where high D* is necessary. In this paper, we discuss the InGaAs detector technology and its potential.

  6. Characterization of NIR InGaAs imager arrays for the JDEM SNAPmission concept

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; Cole, M.D.; Hancock, B.; Ringold, P.; Wrigley, C.; Bonati, M.; Brown, M.G.; Schubnell, M.; Rahmer, G.; Guzman, D.; Figer,D.; Tarle, G.; Smith, R.M.; Bebek, C.

    2006-05-23

    We present the results of a study of the performance of InGaAs detectors conducted for the SuperNova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) dark energy mission concept. Low temperature data from a nominal 1.7um cut-off wavelength 1kx1k InGaAs photodiode array, hybridized to a Rockwell H1RG multiplexer suggest that InGaAs detector performance is comparable to those of existing 1.7um cut-off HgCdTe arrays. Advances in 1.7um HgCdTe dark current and noise initiated by the SNAP detector research and development program makes it the baseline detector technology for SNAP. However, the results presented herein suggest that existing InGaAs technology is a suitable alternative for other future astronomy applications.

  7. Modeling direct interband tunneling. I. Bulk semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    Interband tunneling is frequently studied using the semiclassical Kane model, despite uncertainty about its validity. Revisiting the physical basis of this formula, we find that it neglects coupling to other bands and underestimates transverse tunneling. As a result, significant errors can arise at low and high fields for small and large gap materials, respectively. We derive a simple multiband tunneling model to correct these defects analytically without arbitrary parameters. Through extensive comparison with band structure and quantum transport calculations for bulk InGaAs, InAs, and InSb, we probe the accuracy of the Kane and multiband formulas and establish the superiority of the latter. We also show that the nonlocal average electric field should be used when applying either of these models to nonuniform potentials. Our findings are important for efficient analysis and simulation of bulk semiconductor devices involving tunneling.

  8. Growing InGaAs quasi-quantum wires inside semi-rhombic shaped planar InP nanowires on exact (001) silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu; Li, Qiang; Chang, Shih-Pang; Hsu, Wen-Da; Lau, Kei May

    2016-06-01

    We report InGaAs quasi-quantum wires embedded in planar InP nanowires grown on (001) silicon emitting in the 1550 nm communication band. An array of highly ordered InP nanowire with semi-rhombic cross-section was obtained in pre-defined silicon V-grooves through selective-area hetero-epitaxy. The 8% lattice mismatch between InP and Si was accommodated by an ultra-thin stacking disordered InP/GaAs nucleation layer. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope characterizations suggest excellent crystalline quality of the nanowires. By exploiting the morphological evolution of the InP and a self-limiting growth process in the V-grooves, we grew embedded InGaAs quantum-wells and quasi-quantum-wires with tunable shape and position. Room temperature analysis reveals substantially improved photoluminescence in the quasi-quantum wires as compared to the quantum-well reference, due to the reduced intrusion defects and enhanced quantum confinement. These results show great promise for integration of III-V based long wavelength nanowire lasers on the well-established (001) Si platform.

  9. Comparison of Ge, InGaAs p-n junction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korun, M.; Navruz, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the effect of material parameters on the efficiency of Ge and InGaAs p-n junction solar cells which are most commonly used as the sub-cell of multi-junction solar cells are investigated and the results due to these two cells are compared. The efficiency of Ge (EG =0.67 eV) solar cell which is easy to manufacture and inexpensive in cost, is compared with the efficiency of InGaAs (EG =0.74 eV) solar cell which is coming with drawback of high production difficulties and cost. The theoretical efficiency limit of Ge and InGaAs solar cells with optimum thickness were determined by using detailed balance model under one sun AM1.5 illumination. Since the band gap values of two cells are close to each other, approximate detailed balance efficiency limits of 16% for InGaAs and 14% for Ge are obtained. When drift-diffusion model is used and the thicknesses and doping concentrations are optimized, the maximum efficiency values are calculated as 13% for InGaAs and 9% for Ge solar cell. For each solar cell external quantum efficiency curves due to wavelength are also sketched and compared.

  10. The influence of sunlight irradiation on the characteristics of InGaAs detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiumei; Zhu, Yaoming; Li, Xue; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Tao; Gong, Haimei

    2014-10-01

    InGaAs ternary compound is suitable for detector applications in the shortwave infrared (SWIR) band. Due to the advantages of good stability, low cooling requirements and high detectivity, InGaAs detectors have been applied widely in the space remote sensing area. However, InGaAs detectors would be affected by strong sunlight direct irradiation in space application. In this paper, a mesa-type InGaAs detector with large sensitive area of diameter 5mm was designed based on InP/In0.53Ga0.47As/InP epitaxial material, which is lattice-matched to InP substrate. The InGaAs detectors were fabricated by ICP etching, and packaged in a Kovar shell. The relative spectral response is in the range of 0.9μm to 1.7μm. The mechanism of the sunlight direct irradiation on InGaAs detector performance was studied. The sunlight were focalized by lens and irradiated directly on the detector. A piece of epitaxial material was investigated at the same time which was cleaved from a 2 inch wafer, same to the detector material. The real time testing was taken out to observe the output signal of the detector. After the irradiation experiment, the I-V curves and the relative response were tested immediately. The dark current of the detector increased temporarily, but come back to the original level after 24 hours. The response spectrum was nearly not affected. The XRD testing of the epitaxial material sample was carried out before and after sunlight direct irradiation. The sunlight irradiation causes thermal stress degradation. The thermal electrons were produced by the absorption of a great deal of visible light, leading to local enhancement of temperature and the lattice degeneration of the material.

  11. Characterization of extrinsic resistances in temperature behaviour modelling of InGaAs MODFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, B.; Hernández, A.; García, J.; del Pino, F. J.; Sendra, J. R.; Nunez, A.

    2004-05-01

    This work analyses the dc response of InGaAs channel modulation-doped field-effect transistors, when varying temperature from 300 to 400 K. An analytical model for the intrinsic drain current is derived from previous work, carried out for a similar AlGaAs channel device, in order to show explicitly the temperature dependence. The extrinsic resistances are numerically evaluated and added in a straightforward form to the model. Experimental output characteristics at different temperatures of an InGaAs MODFET, in static operation, are compared with those offered by the resulting extrinsic model and numerical simulations. Computed relative errors are around 10%.

  12. Location of Trapped Electron Centers in the Bulk of Epitaxial MgO(001) Films Grown on Mo(001) Using in situ W-band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Damien; Rocker, Jan; Gonchar, Anastasia; Risse, Thomas; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-07-01

    We present the first in situ W-band (94-GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of a trapped electron center in thin MgO(001) films. The improved resolution of the high-field EPR experiments proves that the signal originate from a well-defined species present in the bulk of the films, whose projection of the principal g-tensor components onto the (001) plane are oriented along the [110] direction of the MgO lattice. Based on a comparison between the structural properties of the films, knowledge of the ability of bulk defects to trap electrons, and the properties of the EPR signal, it is possible to propose that the paramagnetic species are located at the origin of a screw dislocation in the bulk of the film.

  13. Evaluation of the performance correlated defects of metamorphic InGaAs photodetector structures through plane-view EBIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-gang; Liu, Ke-hui; Gu, Yi; Zhou, Li; Li, Hsby; Chen, Xing-you; Cao, Yuan-ying; Xi, Su-ping

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the performance correlated imperfection or defect features of metamorphic InGaAs photodetector structures, a scanning electron microscopy scheme including both plane-view electron beam induced current (EBIC) and secondary electron (SE) images have been used. The abilities, merits and limitations as well as some case-dependent properties of EBIC have been discussed in detail. The devices of similar structures grown on InP or GaAs substrates with quite different lattice mismatch show discriminated defect distribution patterns, prompting their distinct origins, which have been confirmed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy observation. Using self-developed image processing software the EBIC features of the samples are statistically analyzed, which validated the qualitative correlation between the EBIC data and device dark current. Fusing of EBIC and SE images has also been attempted to enhance the defect visibility. Results indicate that EBIC is feasible to investigate the effects of defects on the device performance not only in research work, but also for product quality monitor purposes.

  14. Bulk undercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattamis, T. Z.

    1984-01-01

    Bulk undercooling methods and procedures will first be reviewed. Measurement of various parameters which are necessary to understand the solidification mechanism during and after recalescence will be discussed. During recalescence of levitated, glass-encased large droplets (5 to 8 mm diam) high speed temperature sensing devices coupled with a rapid response oscilloscope are now being used at MIT to measure local thermal behavior in hypoeutectic and eutectic binary Ni-Sn alloys. Dendrite tip velocities were measured by various investigators using thermal sensors or high speed cinematography. The confirmation of the validity of solidification models of bulk-undercooled melts is made difficult by the fineness of the final microstructure, the ultra-rapid evolution of the solidifying system which makes measurements very awkward, and the continuous modification of the microstructure which formed during recalescence because of precipitation, remelting and rapid coarsening.

  15. Characteristics of Monolithically Integrated InGaAs Active Pixel Imager Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Cunningham, T. J.; Pain, B.; Lange, M. J.; Olsen, G. H.

    2000-01-01

    Switching and amplifying characteristics of a newly developed monolithic InGaAs Active Pixel Imager Array are presented. The sensor array is fabricated from InGaAs material epitaxially deposited on an InP substrate. It consists of an InGaAs photodiode connected to InP depletion-mode junction field effect transistors (JFETs) for low leakage, low power, and fast control of circuit signal amplifying, buffering, selection, and reset. This monolithically integrated active pixel sensor configuration eliminates the need for hybridization with silicon multiplexer. In addition, the configuration allows the sensor to be front illuminated, making it sensitive to visible as well as near infrared signal radiation. Adapting the existing 1.55 micrometer fiber optical communication technology, this integration will be an ideal system of optoelectronic integration for dual band (Visible/IR) applications near room temperature, for use in atmospheric gas sensing in space, and for target identification on earth. In this paper, two different types of small 4 x 1 test arrays will be described. The effectiveness of switching and amplifying circuits will be discussed in terms of circuit effectiveness (leakage, operating frequency, and temperature) in preparation for the second phase demonstration of integrated, two-dimensional monolithic InGaAs active pixel sensor arrays for applications in transportable shipboard surveillance, night vision, and emission spectroscopy.

  16. Development of a Quantum Dot, 0.6 eV InGaAs Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, David; Sinharoy, Samar; Raffalle, Ryne; Weizer, Victor; Homann, Natalie; Valko, Thomas; Bartos,Nichole; Scheiman, David; Bailey, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion has to date demonstrated conversion efficiencies exceeding 20% when coupled to a heat source. Current III-V semiconductor TPV technology makes use of planar devices with bandgaps tailored to the heat source. The efficiency can be improved further by increasing the collection efficiency through the incorporation of InAs quantum dots. The use of these dots can provide sub-gap absorption and thus improve the cell short circuit current without the normal increase in dark current associated with lowering the bandgap. We have developed self-assembled InAs quantum dots using the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode on 0.74 eV In0.53GaAs lattice-matched to InP and also on lattice-mismatched 0.6 eV In0.69GaAs grown on InP through the use of a compositionally graded InPAsx buffer structure, by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements showed that the most reproducible dot pattern was obtained with 5 monolayers of InAs grown at 450 C. The lattice mismatch between InAs and In0.69GaAs is only 2.1%, compared to 3.2% between InAs and In0.53GaAs. The smaller mismatch results in lower strain, making dot formation somewhat more complicated, resulting in quantum dashes, rather than well defined quantum dots in the lattice-mismatched case. We have fabricated 0.6 eV InGaAs planer TPV cells with and without the quantum dashes

  17. Nanophotonic integrated circuits from nanoresonators grown on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Roger; Ng, Kar Wei; Ko, Wai Son; Parekh, Devang; Lu, Fanglu; Tran, Thai-Truong D.; Li, Kun; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2014-07-01

    Harnessing light with photonic circuits promises to catalyse powerful new technologies much like electronic circuits have in the past. Analogous to Moore’s law, complexity and functionality of photonic integrated circuits depend on device size and performance scale. Semiconductor nanostructures offer an attractive approach to miniaturize photonics. However, shrinking photonics has come at great cost to performance, and assembling such devices into functional photonic circuits has remained an unfulfilled feat. Here we demonstrate an on-chip optical link constructed from InGaAs nanoresonators grown directly on a silicon substrate. Using nanoresonators, we show a complete toolkit of circuit elements including light emitters, photodetectors and a photovoltaic power supply. Devices operate with gigahertz bandwidths while consuming subpicojoule energy per bit, vastly eclipsing performance of prior nanostructure-based optoelectronics. Additionally, electrically driven stimulated emission from an as-grown nanostructure is presented for the first time. These results reveal a roadmap towards future ultradense nanophotonic integrated circuits.

  18. Nanophotonic integrated circuits from nanoresonators grown on silicon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Roger; Ng, Kar Wei; Ko, Wai Son; Parekh, Devang; Lu, Fanglu; Tran, Thai-Truong D; Li, Kun; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing light with photonic circuits promises to catalyse powerful new technologies much like electronic circuits have in the past. Analogous to Moore's law, complexity and functionality of photonic integrated circuits depend on device size and performance scale. Semiconductor nanostructures offer an attractive approach to miniaturize photonics. However, shrinking photonics has come at great cost to performance, and assembling such devices into functional photonic circuits has remained an unfulfilled feat. Here we demonstrate an on-chip optical link constructed from InGaAs nanoresonators grown directly on a silicon substrate. Using nanoresonators, we show a complete toolkit of circuit elements including light emitters, photodetectors and a photovoltaic power supply. Devices operate with gigahertz bandwidths while consuming subpicojoule energy per bit, vastly eclipsing performance of prior nanostructure-based optoelectronics. Additionally, electrically driven stimulated emission from an as-grown nanostructure is presented for the first time. These results reveal a roadmap towards future ultradense nanophotonic integrated circuits.

  19. Uniform InGaAs quantum dot arrays fabricated using nanosphere lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, X.; Li, J.; Wasserman, D.; Goodhue, W. D.

    2008-12-08

    We demonstrate the fabrication of optically active uniform InGaAs quantum dot arrays by combining nanosphere lithography and bromine ion-beam-assisted etching on a single InGaAs/GaAs quantum well. A wide range of lateral dot sizes was achieved from an oxygen plasma nanosphere resizing process. The increased lateral confinement of carriers in the dots results in low temperature photoluminescence blueshifts from 0.5 to 11 meV. Additional quantization was achieved using a selective wet-etch process. Our model suggests the presence of a 70 nm dead layer in the outer InGaAs radial edge, which we believe to be a result of defects and dislocations introduced during the dry-etch process.

  20. Electrical and Optical Performance Characteristics of p/n InGaAs Monolithic Interconnected Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Weizer, Victor G.; Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Murray, Christopher S.; Riley, David R.

    1997-01-01

    There has been a traditional trade-off in ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) energy conversion development between system efficiency and power density. This trade-off originates from the use of front surface spectral controls such as selective emitters and various types of filters. A Monolithic Interconnected Module (MIM) structure has been developed which allows for both high power densities and high system efficiencies. The MIM device consists of many individual Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) devices series-connected on a single semi-insulating Indium Phosphide (InP) substrate. The MIMs are exposed to the entire emitter output, thereby maximizing output power density. An InfraRed (IR) reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns the unused portion of the emitter output spectrum back to the emitter for recycling, thereby providing for high system efficiencies. Initial MIM development has focused on a 1 sq cm device consisting of eight (8) series interconnected cells. MIM devices, produced from 0.74eV InGaAs, have demonstrated V(sub infinity) = 3.2 volts, J(sub sc) = 70 mA/sq cm and a fill factor of 66% under flashlamp testing. IR reflectance measurements (greater than 2 microns) of these devices indicate a reflectivity of greater than 82%. MIM devices produced from 0.55 eV InGaAs have also been demonstrated. In addition, conventional p/n InGaAs devices with record efficiencies (11.7% AM0) have been demonstrated.

  1. InGaAs focal plane array developments at III-V Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvié, Anne; Reverchon, Jean-Luc; Huet, Odile; Djedidi, Anis; Robo, Jean-Alexandre; Truffer, Jean-Patrick; Bria, Toufiq; Pires, Mauricio; Decobert, Jean; Costard, Eric

    2012-06-01

    SWIR detection band benefits from natural (sun, night glow, thermal radiation) or artificial (eye safe lasers) photons sources combined to low atmospheric absorption and specific contrast compared to visible wavelengths. It gives the opportunity to address a large spectrum of applications such as defense and security (night vision, active imaging), space (earth observation), transport (automotive safety) or industry (non destructive process control). InGaAs material appears as a good candidate to satisfy SWIR detection needs. The lattice matching with InP constitutes a double advantage to this material: attractive production capacity and uncooled operation thanks to low dark current level induced by high quality material. For few years, III-VLab has been studying InGaAs imagery, gathering expertise in InGaAs material growth and imaging technology respectively from Alcatel-Lucent and Thales, its two mother companies. This work has lead to put quickly on the market a 320x256 InGaAs module, exhibiting high performances in terms of dark current, uniformity and quantum efficiency. In this paper, we present the last developments achieved in our laboratory, mainly focused on increasing the pixels number to VGA format associated to pixel pitch decrease (15μm) and broadening detection spectrum toward visible wavelengths. Depending on targeted applications, different Read Out Integrated Circuits (ROIC) have been used. Low noise ROIC have been developed by CEA LETI to fit the requirements of low light level imaging whereas logarithmic ROIC designed by NIT allows high dynamic imaging adapted for automotive safety.

  2. n/p/n Tunnel Junction InGaAs Monolithic Interconnected Module (MIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Murray, Christopher S.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor

    2005-01-01

    The Monolithic Interconnected Module (MIM), originally introduced at the First NREL thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conference, consists of low-bandgap indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) photovoltaic devices, series interconnected on a common semi-insulating indium phosphide (inP) substrate. An infrared reflector is deposited on the back surface of the substrate to reflect photons, which were not absorbed in the first pass through the structure. The single largest optical loss in the current device occurs int he heavily doped p-type emitter. A new MIM design (pat.pend.) has been developed which flips the polarity of the conventional MIM cell (i.e., n/p rather than p/n), eliminating the need for the high conductivity p-type emitter. The p-type base of the cell is connected to the n-type lateral conduction layer through a thin InGaAs tunnel junction. 0.58 eV and 0.74 eV InGaAs devices have demonstrated reflectances above 90% for wavelengths beyond the bandgap (greater than 95% for unprocessed structures). Electrical measurements indicate minimal voltage drops across the tunnel junction (less than mV/junction under 1200K-blackbody illumnination) and fill factors that are above 70% at current densities (J(sub sc)) above 8 Angstroms per square centimeters for the 0.74eV devices.

  3. Phase separation and ordering in InGaAs and InGaAs materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-23

    This report highlights the advances in the understanding of phase separation and atomic ordering in mixed III-V layers. Specifically, the following issues were addressed in the grant period (August 1987 to February 1992): (1) bulk vs surface phase separation; (2) influence of growth technique on phase separation; (3) origin of coarse contrast modulations; (4) influence of dopant diffusion on phase separated microstructures; (5) influence of annealing on carrier mobility in InGaAsP layers; (6) co-existence of CuPt-type ordering and phase separation; (7) influence of growth conditions on ordering; (8) influence of surface reconstruction on atomic ordering.

  4. Characteristics and device applications of erbium doped III-V semiconductors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, S.; Bhattacharya, P. K.

    1996-03-01

    We have studied the properties of molecular beam epitaxially (MBE)-grown Erdoped III-V semiconductors for optoelectronic applications. Optically excited Er3+ in insulating materials exhibits optical emission chiefly around 1.54 μm, in the range of minimum loss in silica fiber. It was thought, therefore, that an electrically pumped Er-doped semiconductor laser would find great applicability in fiber-optic communication systems. Exhaustive photoluminescence (PL) characterization was conducted on several of As-based III-V semiconductors doped with Er, on bulk as well as quantum-well structures. We did not observe any Errelated PL emission at 1.54 μm for any of the materials/structures studied, a phenomenon which renders impractical the realization of an Er-doped III-V semiconductor laser. Deep level transient spectroscopy studies were performed on GaAs and AlGaAs co-doped with Er and Si to investigate the presence of any Er-related deep levels. The lack of band-edge luminescence in the GaAs:Er films led us to perform carrier-lifetime measurements by electro-optic sampling of photoconductive transients generated in these films. We discovered lifetimes in the picosecond regime, tunable by varying the Er concentration in the films. We also found the films to be highly resistive, the resistivity increasing with increasing Er-concentration. Intensive structural characterization (double-crys-tal x-ray and transmission electron microscopy) performed by us on GaAs:Er epilayers indicates the presence of high-density nanometer-sized ErAs precipitates in MBE-grown GaAs:Er. These metallic nanoprecipitates probably form internal Schottky barriers within the GaAs matrix, which give rise to Shockley-Read-Hall recombination centers, thus accounting for both the high resistivities and the ultrashort carrier lifetimes. Optoelectronic devices fabricated included novel tunable (in terms of speed and responsivity) high-speed metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodiodes made with Ga

  5. InGaAs quantum dot molecules around self-assembled GaAs nanomound templates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Wang, Zh. M.; Strom, N. W.; Mazur, Yu. I.; Salamo, G. J.

    2006-11-13

    Several distinctive self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot molecules (QDMs) are studied. The QDMs self-assemble around nanoscale-sized GaAs moundlike templates fabricated by droplet homoepitaxy. Depending on the specific InAs monolayer coverage, the number of QDs per GaAs mound ranges from two to six (bi-QDMs to hexa-QDMs). The Ga contribution from the mounds is analyzed in determining the morphologies of the QDMs, with respect to the InAs coverages ranging between 0.8 and 2.4 ML. Optical characterization shows that the resulting nanostructures are high-quality nanocrystals.

  6. Initiation of a passivated interface between hafnium oxide and In(Ga)As(0 0 1)-(4x2).

    PubMed

    Clemens, Jonathon B; Bishop, Sarah R; Lee, Joon Sung; Kummel, Andrew C; Droopad, Ravi

    2010-06-28

    Hafnium oxide interfaces were studied on two related group III rich semiconductor surfaces, InAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) and In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As(0 0 1)-(4x2), via two different methods: reactive oxidation of deposited Hf metal and electron beam deposition of HfO(2). The interfaces were investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STS). Single Hf atom chemisorption sites were identified that are resistant to oxidation by O(2), but Hf islands are reactive to O(2). After e(-) beam deposition of <1 ML of HfO(2), single chemisorption sites were identified. At low coverage (<1 ML), the n-type and p-type HfO(2)/InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) interfaces show p-type character in STS, which is typical of clean InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2). After annealing below 200 degrees C, full coverage HfO(2)/InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) (1-3 ML) has the surface Fermi level shifted toward the conduction band minimum for n-type InGaAs, but near the valence band maximum for p-type InGaAs. This is consistent with the HfO(2)/InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) interface being at least partially unpinned, i.e., a low density of states in the band gap. The partially unpinned interface results from the modest strength of the bonding between HfO(2) and InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) that prevents substrate atom disruption. The fortuitous structure of HfO(2) on InAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) and InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) allows for the elimination of the partially filled dangling bonds on the surface, which are usually responsible for Fermi level pinning.

  7. Initiation of a passivated interface between hafnium oxide and In(Ga)As(0 0 1)-(4x2)

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Jonathon B.; Bishop, Sarah R.; Kummel, Andrew C.; Lee, Joon Sung

    2010-06-28

    Hafnium oxide interfaces were studied on two related group III rich semiconductor surfaces, InAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) and In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As(0 0 1)-(4x2), via two different methods: reactive oxidation of deposited Hf metal and electron beam deposition of HfO{sub 2}. The interfaces were investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STS). Single Hf atom chemisorption sites were identified that are resistant to oxidation by O{sub 2}, but Hf islands are reactive to O{sub 2}. After e{sup -} beam deposition of <<1 ML of HfO{sub 2}, single chemisorption sites were identified. At low coverage (<1 ML), the n-type and p-type HfO{sub 2}/InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) interfaces show p-type character in STS, which is typical of clean InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2). After annealing below 200 deg. C, full coverage HfO{sub 2}/InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) (1-3 ML) has the surface Fermi level shifted toward the conduction band minimum for n-type InGaAs, but near the valence band maximum for p-type InGaAs. This is consistent with the HfO{sub 2}/InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) interface being at least partially unpinned, i.e., a low density of states in the band gap. The partially unpinned interface results from the modest strength of the bonding between HfO{sub 2} and InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) that prevents substrate atom disruption. The fortuitous structure of HfO{sub 2} on InAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) and InGaAs(0 0 1)-(4x2) allows for the elimination of the partially filled dangling bonds on the surface, which are usually responsible for Fermi level pinning.

  8. Extremely low nonalloyed and alloyed contact resistance using an InAs cap layer on InGaAs by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Chen, J.; Chyi, J.; Morkoc, H.

    1988-01-01

    Extremely low alloyed and nonalloyed ohmic contact resistances have been formed on n-type InAs/In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As/In(0.52)Al(0.48)As structures grown on InP(Fe) by molecular-beam epitaxy. To insure the accuracy of the small contact resistances measured, an extended transmission line model was used to extrapolate contact resistances from test patterns with multiple gap spacings varying from 1 to 20 microns. For a 150-A-thick InAs layer doped to 2 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm and a 0.1-micron-thick InGaAs layer doped to 1 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm, a specific contact resistance of 2.6 x 10 to the -8th ohm-asterisk sq cm was measured for the nonalloyed contact, while a resistance less than 1.7 x 10 to the -8th ohm-asterisk sq cm is reported for the alloyed contact. Conventional Au-Ge/Ni/Au was used for the ohmic metal contact and alloying was performed at 500 C for 50 s in flowing H2. Using a thermionic field emission model, the barrier height at the InAs/InGaAs interface was calculated to be 20 meV.

  9. Synthesis and characterizations of ternary InGaAs nanowires by a two-step growth method for high-performance electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jared J; Han, Ning; Wang, Fengyun; Xiu, Fei; Yip, Senpo; Hui, Alvin T; Hung, TakFu; Ho, Johnny C

    2012-04-24

    InAs nanowires have been extensively studied for high-speed and high-frequency electronics due to the low effective electron mass and corresponding high carrier mobility. However, further applications still suffer from the significant leakage current in InAs nanowire devices arising from the small electronic band gap. Here, we demonstrate the successful synthesis of ternary InGaAs nanowires in order to tackle this leakage issue utilizing the larger band gap material but at the same time not sacrificing the high electron mobility. In this work, we adapt a two-step growth method on amorphous SiO(2)/Si substrates which significantly reduces the kinked morphology and surface coating along the nanowires. The grown nanowires exhibit excellent crystallinity and uniform stoichiometric composition along the entire length of the nanowires. More importantly, the electrical properties of those nanowires are found to be remarkably impressive with I(ON)/I(OFF) ratio >10(5), field-effect mobility of ∼2700 cm(2)/(V·s), and ON current density of ∼0.9 mA/μm. These nanowires are then employed in the contact printing and achieve large-scale assembly of nanowire parallel arrays which further illustrate the potential for utilizing these high-performance nanowires on substrates for the fabrication of future integrated circuits.

  10. Buffer Layer Effects on Tandem InGaAs TPV Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Maurer, William F.

    2004-01-01

    Single junction indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) based TPV devices have demonstrated efficiencies in excess of 20% at radiator temperatures of 1058 C. Modeling suggests that efficiency improvements in single bandgap devices should continue although they will eventually plateau. One approach for extending efficiencies beyond the single bandgap limit is to follow the technique taken in the solar cell field, namely tandem TPV cells. Tandem photovoltaic devices are traditionally composed of cells of decreasing bandgap, connected electrically and optically in series. The incident light impinges upon the highest bandgap first. This device acts as a sieve, absorbing the high-energy photons, while allowing the remainder to pass through to the underlying cell(s), and so on. Tandem devices reduce the energy lost to overexcitation as well as reducing the current density (Jsc). Reduced Jsc results in lower resistive losses and enables the use of thinner and lower doped lateral current conducting layers as well as a higher pitch grid design. Fabricating TPV tandem devices utilizing InGaAs for all of the component cells in a two cell tandem necessitates the inclusion of a buffer layer in-between the high bandgap device (In0.53 Ga0.47As - 0.74eV) and the low bandgap device (In0.66Ga0.34As - 0.63eV) to accommodate the approximately 1% lattice strain generated due to the change in InGaAs composition. To incorporate only a single buffer layer structure, we have investigated the use of the indium phosphide (InP) substrate as a superstrate. Thus the high-bandgap, lattice- matched device is deposited first, followed by the buffer structure and the low-bandgap cell. The near perfect transparency of the high bandgap (1.35eV) iron-doped InP permits the device to be oriented such that the light enters through the substrate. In this paper we examine the impact of the buffer layer on the underlying lattice-matched InGaAs device. 0.74eV InGaAs devices were produced in a variety of

  11. A low noise high readout speed 512×128 ROIC for shortwave InGaAs FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, SongLei; Huang, Zhangcheng; Chen, Yu; Tang, Hengjing; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2015-03-01

    A low noise high readout speed 512×128 readout Integrated circuit (ROIC) based on capacitance trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA) is designed in this paper. The ROIC is flip-chip bonded with Indium bumps to InGaAs detectors which cutoff wavelength is 1.7μm, as a hybrid structure (InGaAs FPA). The ROIC with 30μm pixel pitch and 50fF integrated capacitance, is fabricated in 0.5μm DPTM CMOS process. The results show that output noise is about 3.0E-4V which equivalent readout noise is 95e-, output voltage swing is better than 2.5V; the dynamic range of InGaAs FPA reaches 69.7dB@2ms, and the power dissipation is about 175mw. The peak detectivity of InGaAs FPA reaches 2E12cmHz1/2w-1 at 300K without TEC cooling.

  12. Short wave infrared InGaAs focal plane arrays detector: the performance optimization of photosensitive element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-jiang; Tang, Zun-lie; Zhang, Xiu-chuan; Chen, Yang; Jiang, Li-qun; Cheng, Hong-bing

    2009-07-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in technology of the InGaAs focal plane arrays (FPA) detector operating in short wave infrared (SWIR) last two decades. The no cryogenic cooling, low manufacturing cost, low power, high sensitivity and maneuverability features inherent of InGaAs FPA make it as a mainstream SWIR FPA in a variety of critical military, national security, aerospace, telecommunications and industrial applications. These various types of passive image sensing or active illumination image detecting systems included range-gated imaging, 3-Dimensional Ladar, covert surveillance, pulsed laser beam profiling, machine vision, semiconductor inspection, free space optical communications beam tracker, hyperspectroscopy imaging and many others. In this paper the status and perspectives of hybrid InGaAs FPA which is composed of detector array (PDA) and CMOS readout integrate circuit (ROIC) are reviewed briefly. For various low light levels applications such as starlight or night sky illumination, we have made use of the interface circuit of capacitive feedback transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) in which the integration capacitor was adjustable, therefore implements of the physical and electrical characteristics matches between detector arrays and readout intergrate circuit was achieved excellently. Taking into account the influences of InGaAs detector arrays' optoelectronic characteristics on performance of the FPA, we discussed the key parameters of the photodiode in detailed, and the tradeoff between the responsivity, dark current, impedance at zero bias and junction capacitance of photosensitive element has been made to root out the impact factors. As a result of the educed approach of the photodiode's characteristics optimizing which involve with InGaAs PDA design and process, a high performance InGaAs FPA of 30um pixel pitch and 320×256 format has been developed of which the response spectrum range over 0.9um to 1.7um, the mean peak detectivity (λ=1.55

  13. ROTARY BULK SOLIDS DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer JR., Richard P.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  14. Rotary bulk solids divider

    DOEpatents

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  15. Bulk Fuel Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by bulk fuel workers. Addressed in the four individual units of the course are the following topics: bulk fuel equipment, bulk fuel systems, procedures for handling fuels, and…

  16. Polariton condensation in a strain-compensated planar microcavity with InGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Cilibrizzi, Pasquale; Askitopoulos, Alexis Silva, Matteo; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G.; Bastiman, Faebian; Clarke, Edmund; Zajac, Joanna M.; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2014-11-10

    The investigation of intrinsic interactions in polariton condensates is currently limited by the photonic disorder of semiconductor microcavity structures. Here, we use a strain compensated planar GaAs/AlAs{sub 0.98}P{sub 0.02} microcavity with embedded InGaAs quantum wells having a reduced cross-hatch disorder to overcome this issue. Using real and reciprocal space spectroscopic imaging under non-resonant optical excitation, we observe polariton condensation and a second threshold marking the onset of photon lasing, i.e., the transition from the strong to the weak-coupling regime. Condensation in a structure with suppressed photonic disorder is a necessary step towards the implementation of periodic lattices of interacting condensates, providing a platform for on chip quantum simulations.

  17. Spin injection from Co2MnGa into an InGaAs quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, M. C.; Damsgaard, C. D.; Holmes, S. N.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Jacobsen, C. S.; Hansen, J. B.; Pepper, M.

    2008-06-01

    We have demonstrated spin injection from a full Heusler alloy Co2MnGa thin film into a (100) InGaAs quantum well in a semiconductor light-emitting diode structure at a temperature of 5K. The detection is performed in the oblique Hanle geometry, allowing quantification of the effective spin lifetime and spin detection efficiency (22±4%). This work builds on existing studies on off-stoichiometric Heusler injectors into similar light-emitting-diode structures. The role of injector stoichiometry can therefore be quantitatively assessed with the result that the spin injection efficiency increases by a factor of approximately 2 as compared with an off-stoichiometric Co2.4Mn1.6Ga injector.

  18. Characterization of InGaAs linear array for applications to remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Farnsworth, Glenn R.; Abedin, M. N.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2005-05-01

    An Indium Gallium Arsenide linear photodiode array in the 1.1-2.5 μm spectral range was characterized. The array has 1024X1 pixels with a 25 μm pitch and was manufactured by Sensors Unlimited, Inc. Characterization and analysis of the electrical and optical properties of a camera system were carried out at room temperature to obtain detector performance parameters. The signal and noise were measured while the array was uniformly illuminated at varying exposure levels. A photon transfer curve was generated by plotting noise as a function of average signal to obtain the camera gain constant. The spectral responsivity was also measured, and the quantum efficiency, read noise and full-well capacity were determined. This paper describes the characterization procedure, analyzes the experimental results, and discusses the applications of the InGaAs linear array to future earth and planetary remote sensing mission.

  19. Defect-Induced Photoluminescence Blinking of Single Epitaxial InGaAs Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fengrui; Cao, Zengle; Zhang, Chunfeng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2015-03-01

    Here we report two types of defect-induced photoluminescence (PL) blinking behaviors observed in single epitaxial InGaAs quantum dots (QDs). In the first type of PL blinking, the ``off'' period is caused by the trapping of hot electrons from the higher-lying excited state (absorption state) to the defect site so that its PL rise lifetime is shorter than that of the ``on'' period. For the ``off'' period in the second type of PL blinking, the electrons relax from the first excited state (emission state) into the defect site, leading to a shortened PL decay lifetime compared to that of the ``on'' period. This defect-induced exciton quenching in epitaxial QDs, previously demonstrated also in colloidal nanocrystals, confirms that these two important semiconductor nanostructures could share the same PL blinking mechanism.

  20. InGaAs PV Device Development for TPV Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Scheiman, David; Lowe, Roland; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) photovoltaic devices have been fabricated with bandgaps ranging from 0.75 eV to 0.60 eV on Indium Phosphide (InP) substrates. Reported efficiencies have been as high as 11.2 percent (AMO) for the lattice matched 0.75 eV devices. The 0.75 eV cell demonstrated 14.8 percent efficiency under a 1500 K blackbody with a projected efficiency of 29.3 percent. The lattice mismatched devices (0.66 and 0.60 eV) demonstrated measured efficiencies of 8 percent and 6 percent respectively under similar conditions. Low long wavelength response and high dark currents are responsible for the poor performance of the mismatched devices. Temperature coefficients have been measured and are presented for all of the bandgaps tested.

  1. Characterization of InGaAs Linear Array for Applications to Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Farnsworth, Glenn R.; Abedin, M. N.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2005-01-01

    An Indium Gallium Arsenide linear photodiode array in the 1.1-2.5 micron spectral range was characterized. The array has 1024x1 pixels with a 25 micron pitch and was manufactured by Sensors Unlimited, Inc. Characterization and analysis of the electrical and optical properties of a camera system were carried out at room temperature to obtain detector performance parameters. The signal and noise were measured while the array was uniformly illuminated at varying exposure levels. A photon transfer curve was generated by plotting noise as a function of average signal to obtain the camera gain constant. The spectral responsivity was also measured, and the quantum efficiency, read noise and full-well capacity were determined. This paper describes the characterization procedure, analyzes the experimental results, and discusses the applications of the InGaAs linear array to future earth and planetary remote sensing mission.

  2. Carbon reduction and antimony incorporation in InGaAsSb films grown by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy using tris-dimethylaminoantimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuhara, Manabu; Sato, Tomonari; Yamamoto, Norio; Fukano, Hideki; Kondo, Yasuhiro

    2009-07-01

    InGaAsSb layers nearly lattice-matched to InP were grown by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy using tris-dimethylaminoantimony (TDMASb). Secondary-ion mass spectroscopy measurements revealed that TDMASb is useful not only as an Sb source but also as an additive that reduces the incorporation of C into the film from group-III metalorganic sources. In the room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum, the incorporation of Sb into InGaAs shifted the peak wavelength from 1.66 to 1.75 μm and, simultaneously, the peak intensity of InGaAsSb became more than twice that of InGaAs.

  3. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from...

  4. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from...

  5. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from...

  6. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from...

  7. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from...

  8. Subwavelength Gold Grating as Polarizers Integrated with InP-Based InGaAs Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Li, Tao; Shao, Xiumei; Li, Xue; Huang, Xiaqi; Shao, Jinhai; Chen, Yifang; Gong, Haimei

    2015-07-01

    There are currently growing needs for polarimetric imaging in infrared wavelengths for broad applications in bioscience, communications and agriculture, etc. Subwavelength metallic gratings are capable of separating transverse magnetic (TM) mode from transverse electric (TE) mode to form polarized light, offering a reliable approach for the detection in polarization way. This work aims to design and fabricate subwavelength gold gratings as polarizers for InP-based InGaAs sensors in 1.0-1.6 μm. The polarization capability of gold gratings on InP substrate with pitches in the range of 200-1200 nm (fixed duty cycle of 0.5) has been systematically studied by both theoretical modeling with a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulator and spectral measurements. Gratings with 200 nm lines/space in 100-nm-thick gold have been fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL). It was found that subwavelength gold gratings directly integrated on InP cannot be applied as good polarizers, because of the existence of SPP modes in the detection wavelengths. An effective solution has been found by sandwiching the Au/InP bilayer using a 200 nm SiO2 layer, leading to significant improvement in both TM transmission and extinction ratio. At 1.35 μm, the improvement factors are 8 and 10, respectively. Therefore, it is concluded that the Au/SiO2/InP trilayer should be a promising candidate of near-infrared polarizers for the InP-based InGaAs sensors.

  9. Numerical modeling of extended short wave infrared InGaAs focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasmann, Andreu; Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    Indium gallium arsenide (In1-xGaxAs) is an ideal material choice for short wave infrared (SWIR) imaging due to its low dark current and excellent collection efficiency. By increasing the indium composition from 53% to 83%, it is possible to decrease the energy gap from 0.74 eV to 0.47 eV and consequently increase the cutoff wavelength from 1.7 μm to 2.63 μm for extended short wavelength (ESWIR) sensing. In this work, we apply our well-established numerical modeling methodology to the ESWIR InGaAs system to determine the intrinsic performance of pixel detectors. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of different buffer/cap materials. To accomplish this, we have developed composition-dependent models for In1-xGaxAs, In1-xAlxAs, and InAs1-y Py. Using a Green's function formalism, we calculate the intrinsic recombination coefficients (Auger, radiative) to model the diffusion-limited behavior of the absorbing layer under ideal conditions. Our simulations indicate that, for a given total thickness of the buffer and absorbing layer, structures utilizing a linearly graded small-gap InGaAs buffer will produce two orders of magnitude more dark current than those with a wide gap, such as InAlAs or InAsP. Furthermore, when compared with experimental results for ESWIR photodiodes and arrays, we estimate that there is still a 1.5x magnitude of reduction in dark current before reaching diffusion-limited behavior.

  10. Vacuum packaging of InGaAs focal plane array with four-stage thermoelectric cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, De-feng; Liu, Da-fu; Yang, Li-yi; Xu, Qin-fei; Li, Xue

    2013-09-01

    The InGaAs focal plane array (FPA) detectors, covering the near-infrared 1~2.4 μm wavelength range, have been developed for application in space-based spectroscopy of the Earth atmosphere. This paper shows an all-metal vacuum package design for area array InGaAs detector of 1024×64 pixels, and its architecture will be given. Four-stage thermoelectric cooler (TEC) is used to cool down the FPA chip. To acquire high heat dissipation for TEC's Joule-heat, tungsten copper (CuW80) and kovar (4J29) is used as motherboard and cavity material respectively which joined by brazing. The heat loss including conduction, convection and radiation is analyzed. Finite element model is established to analyze the temperature uniformity of the chip substrate which is made of aluminum nitride (AlN). The performance of The TEC with and without heat load in vacuum condition is tested. The results show that the heat load has little influence to current-voltage relationship of TEC. The temperature difference (ΔT) increases as the input current increases. A linear relationship exists between heat load and ΔT of the TEC. Theoretical analysis and calculation show that the heat loss of radiation and conduction is about 187 mW and 82 mW respectively. Considering the Joule-heat of readout circuit and the heat loss of radiation and conduction, the FPA for a 220 K operation at room temperature can be achieved. As the thickness of AlN chip substrate is thicker than 1 millimeter, the temperature difference can be less than 0.3 K.

  11. Development of high performance SWIR InGaAs focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagi, Richie; Bregman, Jeremy; Mizuno, Genki; Oduor, Patrick; Olah, Robert; Dutta, Achyut K.; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2015-05-01

    Banpil Photonics has developed a novel InGaAs based photodetector array for Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR) imaging, for the most demanding security, defense, and machine vision applications. These applications require low noise from both the detector and the readout integrated circuit arrays. In order to achieve high sensitivity, it is crucial to minimize the dark current generated by the photodiode array. This enables the sensor to function in extremely low light situations, which enables it to successfully exploit the benefits of the SWIR band. In addition to minimal dark current generation, it is essential to develop photodiode arrays with higher operating temperatures. This is critical for reducing the power consumption of the device, as less energy is spent in cooling down the focal plane array (in order to reduce the dark current). We at Banpil Photonics are designing, simulating, fabricating and testing SWIR InGaAs arrays, and have achieved low dark current density at room temperature. This paper describes Banpil's development of the photodetector array. We also highlight the fabrication technique used to reduce the amount of dark current generated by the photodiode array, in particular the surface leakage current. This technique involves the deposition of strongly negatively doped semiconductor material in the area between the pixels. This process reduces the number of dangling bonds present on the edges of each pixel, which prevents electrons from being swept across the surface of the pixels. This in turn drastically reduces the amount of surface leakage current at each pixel, which is a major contributor towards the total dark current. We present the optical and electrical characterization data, as well as the analysis that illustrates the dark current mechanisms. Also highlighted are the challenges and potential opportunities for further reduction of dark current, while maintaining other parameters of the photodiode array, such as size, weight, temperature

  12. Impact of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfacial layers on InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor interface properties in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stacks deposited by atomic-layer-deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.-Y. Takenaka, M.; Takagi, S.; Ichikawa, O.; Osada, T.; Hata, M.; Yamada, H.

    2015-08-28

    We examine the electrical properties of atomic layer deposition (ALD) La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. It is found that the thick ALD La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs interface provides low interface state density (D{sub it}) with the minimum value of ∼3 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}, which is attributable to the excellent La{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation effect for InGaAs surfaces. It is observed, on the other hand, that there are a large amount of slow traps and border traps in La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In order to simultaneously satisfy low D{sub it} and small hysteresis, the effectiveness of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stacks with ultrathin La{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfacial layers is in addition evaluated. The reduction of the La{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness to 0.4 nm in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stacks leads to the decrease in hysteresis. On the other hand, D{sub it} of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs interfaces becomes higher than that of the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs ones, attributable to the diffusion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} through La{sub 2}O{sub 3} into InGaAs and resulting modification of the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs interface structure. As a result of the effective passivation effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} on InGaAs, however, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/10 cycle (0.4 nm) La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stacks can realize still lower D{sub it} with maintaining small hysteresis and low leakage current than the conventional Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs MOS interfaces.

  13. Reduction in interface state density of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor interfaces by InGaAs surface nitridation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshii, Takuya; Lee, Sunghoon; Suzuki, Rena; Taoka, Noriyuki; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Yamada, Hishashi; Hata, Masahiko; Yasuda, Tetsuji

    2012-10-01

    We report the decrease in interface trap density (D{sub it}) in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors by using electron cyclotron resonance plasma nitridation of the InGaAs surfaces. The impact of the nitridation process on the MOS interface properties is quantitatively examined. The plasma nitridation process is observed to form a nitrided layer at the InGaAs surface. The nitridation using microwave power (P{sub microwave}) of 250 W and nitridation time (t{sub nitridation}) of 420 s can form Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs MOS interfaces with a minimum D{sub it} value of 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}. On the other hand, the nitridation process parameters such as P{sub microwave} and t{sub nitridation} are found to strongly alter D{sub it} (both decrease and increase are observed) and capacitance equivalent thickness (CET). It is found that the nitridation with higher P{sub microwave} and shorter t{sub nitridation} can reduce D{sub it} with less CET increase. Also, it is observed that as t{sub nitridation} increases, D{sub it} decreases first and increases later. It is revealed from XPS analyses that minimum D{sub it} can be determined by the balance between the saturation of nitridation and the progress of oxidation. As a result, it is found that the superior MOS interface formed by the nitridation is attributable to the existence of oxide-less InGaN/InGaAs interfaces.

  14. Na-doped optical Germanium bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, G. S.; Singaevsky, A. F.

    2012-09-01

    In an effort to develop a material for infrared (IR) optics with improved parameters, bulk crystals of optical germanium doped with Na have been first grown and studied. Single-crystalline and coarse-crystalline Ge:Na boules of different shapes and dimensions, up to 10 kg by weight, have been grown. Sodium was incorporated into the Ge crystal during the crystal growing from the melt. Despite the fact that Na contamination in the source material was not strictly controlled, the density of Na in the grown crystals determined by the neutron activation analysis as well as by the glow discharge mass spectrometry did not exceed 1015 cm-3. Just this value may be supposed to be close to the solubility limit of Na incorporated in Ge in the course of bulk crystal growth. A first demonstration of donor behavior of Na in bulk Ge crystals is made by means of a thermoelectric type of testing. An interstitial location of Na impurity has been verified by experiments on donor drift in the dc electric field. The crystals are grown with free electron density in the range from 5ṡ1013 to 4ṡ1014 cm-3 which is optimal for using Ge crystals as an optical material for fabricating passive elements of the IR technique. A comparison between the properties of Ge:Na crystals and Ge crystals doped with Sb, a conventional impurity in optical germanium, grown under the same technological conditions and from the same intrinsic Ge as a source material, revealed a number of advantages of Ge:Na crystals; among them, the higher transparency in the IR region, smaller radiation scattering and higher regular optical transmission, lower dislocation density, more uniform distribution of electrical and optical characteristics over the crystal volume, the identity of optical parameters in the single-crystalline, and coarse-crystalline boules. No degradation of optical elements fabricated from Ge:Na crystals was detected in the course of their commercial application, starting from 1998.

  15. Degradation processes in high power multi-mode InGaAs strained quantum well lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; Presser, Nathan; Foran, Brendan; Moss, Steven C.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, broad-area InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers have attracted much attention because of their unparalleled high optical output power characteristics that narrow stripe lasers or tapered lasers can not achieve. However, broad-area lasers suffer from poor beam quality and their high reliability operation has not been proven for communications applications. This paper concerns reliability and degradation aspects of broad-area lasers. Good facet passivation techniques along with optimized structural designs have led to successful demonstration of reliable 980nm single-mode lasers, and the dominant failure mode of both single-mode and broadarea lasers is catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), which limits maximum output powers and also determines operating output powers. Although broad-area lasers have shown characteristics unseen from singlemode lasers including filamentation, their effects on long-term reliability and degradation processes have not been fully investigated. Filamentation can lead to instantaneous increase in optical power density and thus temperature rise at localized areas through spatial-hole burning and thermal lensing which significantly reduces filament sizes under high power operation, enhancing the COMD process. We investigated degradation processes in commercial MOCVD-grown broad-area InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers at ~975nm with and without passivation layers by performing accelerated lifetests of these devices followed by failure mode analyses with various micro-analytical techniques. Since instantaneous fluctuations of filaments can lead to faster wear-out of passivation layer thus leading to facet degradation, both passivated and unpassivated broad-area lasers were studied that yielded catastrophic failures at the front facet and also in the bulk. Electron beam induced current technique was employed to study dark line defects (DLDs) generated in degraded lasers stressed under different test conditions and focused

  16. InGaP/GaAs and InGaAs mechanically-stacked triple-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takamoto, T.; Ikeda, E.; Agui, T.

    1997-12-31

    Triple-junction cells with AM1.5 efficiencies of over 33% have been demonstrated. A planar type InGaP/GaAs monolithic dual-junction cell was fabricated on a semi-insulating FaAs substrate, which has high infra-red transparency. Then a dual-junction cell, with efficiency of 27--28%, was mechanically stacked on an InGaAs cell fabricated on an InP substrate. The bottom InGaAs cell showed an efficiency of 6.2% under the InGaP/GaAs cell, and a total efficiency of 33--34% was achieved for the four-terminal triple-junction cell.

  17. Cavity-enhanced single photon emission from site-controlled In(Ga)As quantum dots fabricated using nanoimprint lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Tommila, J.; Hakkarainen, T. V.; Schramm, A. Guina, M.; Belykh, V. V.; Sibeldin, N. N.; Heinonen, E.

    2014-05-26

    We report on the emission dynamics of single In(Ga)As quantum dots formed in etched GaAs pits and integrated into micropillar cavities. The site-controlled quantum dots were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy on nanoimprint lithography patterned GaAs(001) surfaces. Triggered single photon emission confirmed by photon autocorrelation measurements is demonstrated. Time-resolved photoluminescence experiments clearly show an effect of the cavity on the spontaneous emission rate of the quantum dot.

  18. Study of strain boundary conditions and GaAs buffer sizes in InGaAs quantum dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyafuso, F.; Klimeck, G.; Boykin, T. B.; Bowen, R. C.; Allmen, P. von

    2003-01-01

    NEMO 3-D has been developed for the simulation of electronic structure in self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots on GaAs substrates. Typical self-assembled quantum dots in that material system contain about 0.5 to 1 million atoms. Effects of strain by the surrounding GaAs buffer modify the electronic structure inside the quantum dot significantly and a large GaAs buffer must be included in the strain and electronic structure.

  19. Electrical and Optical Gain Lever Effects in InGaAs Double Quantum Well Diode Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M D; Goddard, L L; Bond, T C; Nikolic, R J; Vernon, S P; Kallman, J S; Behymer, E M

    2007-01-03

    In multisection laser diodes, the amplitude or frequency modulation (AM or FM) efficiency can be improved using the gain lever effect. To study gain lever, InGaAs double quantum well (DQW) edge emitting lasers have been fabricated with integrated passive waveguides and dual sections providing a range of split ratios from 1:1 to 9:1. Both the electrical and the optical gain lever have been examined. An electrical gain lever with greater than 7 dB enhancement of AM efficiency was achieved within the range of appropriate DC biasing currents, but this gain dropped rapidly outside this range. We observed a 4 dB gain in the optical AM efficiency under non-ideal biasing conditions. This value agreed with the measured gain for the electrical AM efficiency under similar conditions. We also examined the gain lever effect under large signal modulation for digital logic switching applications. To get a useful gain lever for optical gain quenched logic, a long control section is needed to preserve the gain lever strength and a long interaction length between the input optical signal and the lasing field of the diode must be provided. The gain lever parameter space has been fully characterized and validated against numerical simulations of a semi-3D hybrid beam propagation method (BPM) model for the coupled electron-photon rate equation. We find that the optical gain lever can be treated using the electrical injection model, once the absorption in the sample is known.

  20. High dynamic solutions for short-wavelength infrared imaging based on InGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverchon, Jean-Luc; Decobert, Jean; Djedidi, Anis; Gentner, Jean-Louis; Huet, Odile; Lagay, Nadine; Rouvié, Anne; Robo, Jean-Alexandre; Truffer, Jean-Patrick; Costard, Eric; Ni, Yang; Arion, Bogdan; Zhu, Yiming; Potet, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Short-wavelength infrared image sensors based on p-i-n photodiode arrays present a tremendous interest in applications such as passive and active imagery for laser detection/warning, hot spot or detection for lasers sensors, enhanced vision systems or low light level sensors. The capability to work at room temperature with dark current equivalent to silicon-based devices is another motivation for the fast development of this technology. This paper presents several modules and camera based on InGaAs photodiode arrays from the III-VLab. First, we describe the electro-optics performance in terms of dark signal, sensitivity, and particularly the visible extension capability. We also present a nucless logarithmic sensor based on a 1/2 video graphics array (VGA) format at a pitch of 25 μm initially designed for visible CMOS camera chip. We will also present the next generation of focal plane arrays based on a VGA format of 640×512 pixels with a pitch of 15 μm. This array will be associated to a CTIA readout circuit and also to an innovative CMOS logarithmic wide dynamic range ROIC, developed by New Imaging Technologies. This VGA logarithmic device developed for automotive safety will involve visible extension capability in a European project named 2Wide_sense.

  1. Polarized and spatially resolved Raman scattering from composition-graded wurtzite InGaAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Rho, H.; Lee, E. H.; Song, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    We report Raman scattering from wurtzite single-crystalline InGaAs nanowires (NWs) to probe optical phonon behaviors associated with spatial grading in alloy composition along the NW length. Polarized Raman spectra revealed several optical phonons and their scattering symmetries: (i) InAs-like A 1(LO) and A 1(TO) phonons and (ii) GaAs-like A 1(LO), A 1(TO), and E 2(high) phonons. In addition, strong anisotropic behavior was observed in the Raman tensor elements of the A 1(TO) phonon mode. Interestingly, a spatial mapping of the GaAs-like A 1(TO) phonon along the NW length direction showed a systematic increase in energy from the NW top (~255 cm‑1) to the midpoint (~263 cm‑1), indicating an increase in the Ga mole fraction from about 0.5 to about 0.8. Further toward the NW bottom, the GaAs-like A 1(TO) phonon energy saturated to the peak value at about 264 cm‑1. In the upper half of the NW, the phonon linewidths broadened significantly due to the spatial grading in In/Ga composition along the NW length. When the composition grading was negligible in the bottom half of the NW, the spectral widths were considerably narrowed. The GaAs-like E 2(high) phonon showed similar variations in both energy and spectral width along the NW length.

  2. Stray light characterization of an InGaAs anamorphic hyperspectral imager.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mike; Swanson, Rand; Moon, Thomas; Smith, Casey; Kehoe, Michael; Brown, Steven W; Lykke, Keith R

    2010-08-01

    Compact hyperspectral sensors potentially have a wide range of applications, including machine vision, quality control, and surveillance from small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). With the development of Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) focal plane arrays, much of the Short Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) spectral regime can be accessed with a small hyperspectral imaging system, thereby substantially expanding hyperspectral sensing capabilities. To fully realize this potential, system performance must be well-understood. Here, stray light characterization of a recently-developed push-broom hyperspectral sensor sensitive in the 1 microm -1.7 microm spectral regime is described. The sensor utilizes anamorphic fore-optics that partially decouple image formation along the spatial and spectral axes of the instrument. This design benefits from a reduction in complexity over standard high-performance spectrometer optical designs while maintaining excellent aberration control and spatial and spectral distortion characteristics. The stray light performance characteristics of the anamorphic imaging spectrometer were measured using the spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCUS) facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A description of the measurements and results are presented. Additionally, a stray-light matrix was assembled for the instrument to improve the instrument's spectral accuracy. Transmittance of a silicon wafer was measured to validate this approach.

  3. Stern-Gerlach effect and spin separation in InGaAs nanstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohda, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    The demonstration of quantized spin splitting by Stern and Gerlach in 1922 is one of the most important experiments in modern physics. We utilized an effective non-uniform magnetic field which originates from Rashba spin orbit interaction (SOI) and demonstrated an experimental manifestation of electronic Stern-Gerlach spin separation in InGaAs based quantum point contacts (QPCs). Lateral potential confinement in a trench-type QPC creates a spatial modulation of Rashba SOI inducing a spin dependent force Clear conductance plateaus are observed in steps of 2e2/ hwhen the strength of Rashba SOI becomes small. However, when the Rashba SOI is enhanced by applying the top gate, a half-integer plateau additionally appears at 0.5(2e2 / h) , indicating the spin polarized current. We found that the spin polarization of the conduction electrons in this plateau is as high as 70%. Our new approach for generating spin polarization in semiconductor nanostructures provides a way to seamlessly integrate electrical spin generation, manipulation, and detection in a single semiconductor device without the need for either external magnetic fields or magnetic materials. This work was supported in part by the PRESTO of the Japan Science and Technology Agency and by Grant-in-Aids from Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

  4. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  5. Metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy-grown ultra-low density InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots exhibiting cascaded single-photon emission at 1.3 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Matthias Kettler, Jan; Zeuner, Katharina; Clausen, Caterina; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter

    2015-03-23

    By metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy, we have fabricated InGaAs quantum dots on GaAs substrate with an ultra-low lateral density (<10{sup 7} cm{sup −2}). The photoluminescence emission from the quantum dots is shifted to the telecom O-band at 1.31 μm by an InGaAs strain reducing layer. In time-resolved measurements, we find fast decay times for exciton (∼600 ps) and biexciton (∼300 ps). We demonstrate triggered single-photon emission (g{sup (2)}(0)=0.08) as well as cascaded emission from the biexciton decay. Our results suggest that these quantum dots can compete with their counterparts grown by state-of-the-art molecular beam epitaxy.

  6. Electron mobility in ultra-thin InGaAs channels: Impact of surface orientation and different gate oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivec, Sabina; Poljak, Mirko; Suligoj, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Electron mobility is investigated in sub-20 nm-thick InGaAs channels, sandwiched between different gate oxides (SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2) and InP as substrate, using physics-based numerical modeling. Effects of body thickness downscaling to 2 nm, different gate oxides, and surface orientation [(1 0 0) and (1 1 1)] are examined by including all electron valleys and all relevant scattering mechanisms. We report that ultra-thin (1 1 1) Al2O3-InGaAs-InP devices offer greater electron mobility than (1 0 0) devices even in the extremely-thin channels. Furthermore, ultra-thin (1 0 0) InGaAs devices outperform SOI in terms of electron mobility for body thicknesses above ∼4 nm, while (1 1 1) InGaAs channels are superior to SOI for all body thickness values above ∼3 nm. The study of different gate oxides indicates that HfO2 is the optimum gate dielectric regardless of device orientation, offering a mobility improvement of up to 124% for (1 1 1) and 149% for (1 0 0) surface orientation, when compared to the initial Al2O3-InGaAs-InP structure. The (1 1 1) orientation offers improvement over (1 0 0) device irrespective of the body thickness and gate oxide material, with the highest difference reported for SiO2, followed by Al2O3 and HfO2.

  7. COUGAR: a liquid nitrogen cooled InGaAs camera for astronomy and electro-luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Bogget, Urbain; Vervenne, Vincent; Vinella, Rosa Maria; van der Zanden, Koen; Merken, Patrick; Vermeiren, Jan

    2014-06-01

    A SWIR FPA was designed and manufactured with 640*512 pixels, 20 μm pitch and InGaAs detectors for electroluminescence characterization and astronomical applications in the [0.9 - 1.55 μm] range. The FPA is mounted in a liquid nitrogen dewar and is operated by a low noise frontend electronics. One of the biggest problem in designing sensors and cameras for electro-luminescence measurements is the autoillumination of the detectors by the readout circuit. Besides of proper shielding of the detectors, the ROIC shall be optimized for minimal electrical activity during the integration time of the very-weak signals coming from the circuit under test. For this reason a SFD (or Source Follower per Detector) architecture (like in the Hawaii sensor) was selected, resulting in a background limited performance of the detector. The pixel has a (somewhat arbitrary) full well capacity of 400 000 e- and a sensitivity of 2.17 μV/e-. The dark signal is app. 1 e-/pixel/sec and with the appropriate Fowler sampling the dark noise lowers below 5 e-rms. The power consumption of the circuit is limited 2 mW, allowing more than 24 hours of operation on less than 1 l of liquid nitrogen. The FPA is equipped with 4 outputs (optional readout on one single channel) and is capable of achieving 3 frames per second. Due to the non-destructive readout it is possible to determine in a dynamic way the optimal integration time for each observation. The Cougar camera is equipped with ultra-low noise power supply and bias lines; the electronics contain also a 24 bit AD converter to fully exploit the sensitivity of the FPA and the camera.

  8. Imaging Early Demineralization on Tooth Occlusal Surfaces with a High Definition InGaAs Camera

    PubMed Central

    Fried, William A.; Fried, Daniel; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that high contrast images of tooth demineralization can be acquired in the near-IR due to the high transparency of dental enamel. The purpose of this study is to compare the lesion contrast in reflectance at near-IR wavelengths coincident with high water absorption with those in the visible, the near-IR at 1300-nm and with fluorescence measurements for early lesions in occlusal surfaces. Twenty-four human molars were used in this in vitro study. Teeth were painted with an acid-resistant varnish, leaving a 4×4 mm window in the occlusal surface of each tooth exposed for demineralization. Artificial lesions were produced in the exposed windows after 1 & 2-day exposure to a demineralizing solution at pH 4.5. Lesions were imaged using NIR reflectance at 3 wavelengths, 1310, 1460 and 1600-nm using a high definition InGaAs camera. Visible light reflectance, and fluorescence with 405-nm excitation and detection at wavelengths greater than 500-nm were also used to acquire images for comparison. Crossed polarizers were used for reflectance measurements to reduce interference from specular reflectance. The contrast of both the 24 hr and 48 hr lesions were significantly higher (P<0.05) for NIR reflectance imaging at 1460-nm and 1600-nm than it was for NIR reflectance imaging at 1300-nm, visible reflectance imaging, and fluorescence. The results of this study suggest that NIR reflectance measurements at longer near-IR wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption are better suited for imaging early caries lesions. PMID:24357911

  9. Imaging early demineralization on tooth occlusional surfaces with a high definition InGaAs camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, William A.; Fried, Daniel; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.

    In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that high contrast images of tooth demineralization can be acquired in the near-IR due to the high transparency of dental enamel. The purpose of this study is to compare the lesion contrast in reflectance at near-IR wavelengths coincident with high water absorption with those in the visible, the near-IR at 1300-nm and with fluorescence measurements for early lesions in occlusal surfaces. Twenty-four human molars were used in this in vitro study. Teeth were painted with an acidresistant varnish, leaving a 4×4 mm window in the occlusal surface of each tooth exposed for demineralization. Artificial lesions were produced in the exposed windows after 1 and 2-day exposure to a demineralizing solution at pH 4.5. Lesions were imaged using NIR reflectance at 3 wavelengths, 1310, 1460 and 1600-nm using a high definition InGaAs camera. Visible light reflectance, and fluorescence with 405-nm excitation and detection at wavelengths greater than 500-nm were also used to acquire images for comparison. Crossed polarizers were used for reflectance measurements to reduce interference from specular reflectance. The contrast of both the 24 hr and 48 hr lesions were significantly higher (P<0.05) for NIR reflectance imaging at 1460-nm and 1600-nm than it was for NIR reflectance imaging at 1300-nm, visible reflectance imaging, and fluorescence. The results of this study suggest that NIR reflectance measurements at longer near-IR wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption are better suited for imaging early caries lesions.

  10. Imaging surface plasmon polaritons using proximal self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Bracher, Gregor; Schraml, Konrad; Blauth, Mäx; Wierzbowski, Jakob; López, Nicolás Coca; Bichler, Max; Müller, Kai; Finley, Jonathan J.; Kaniber, Michael

    2014-07-21

    We present optical investigations of hybrid plasmonic nanosystems consisting of lithographically defined plasmonic Au-waveguides or beamsplitters on GaAs substrates coupled to proximal self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots. We designed a sample structure that enabled us to precisely tune the distance between quantum dots and the sample surface during nano-fabrication and demonstrated that non-radiative processes do not play a major role for separations down to ∼10 nm. A polarized laser beam focused on one end of the plasmonic nanostructure generates propagating surface plasmon polaritons that, in turn, create electron-hole pairs in the GaAs substrate during propagation. These free carriers are subsequently captured by the quantum dots ∼25 nm below the surface, giving rise to luminescence. The intensity of the spectrally integrated quantum dot luminescence is used to image the propagating plasmon modes. As the waveguide width reduces from 5 μm to 1 μm, we clearly observe different plasmonic modes at the remote waveguide end, enabling their direct imaging in real space. This imaging technique is applied to a plasmonic beamsplitter facilitating the determination of the splitting ratio between the two beamsplitter output ports as the interaction length L{sub i} is varied. A splitting ratio of 50:50 is observed for L{sub i}∼9±1 μm and 1 μm wide waveguides for excitation energies close to the GaAs band edge. Our experimental findings are in good agreement with mode profile and finite difference time domain simulations for both waveguides and beamsplitters.

  11. Radiation performance of AlGaAs and InGaAs concentrator cells and expected performance of cascade structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, H. B.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Aluminum gallium arsenide, GaAs, silicon and InGaAs cells have been irradiated with 1-MeV electrons and 37-MeV protons. These cells are candidates for individual cells in a cascade structure. Data are presented for both electron and proton irradiation studies for one sun and a concentration level of 100X AM0. Results of calculations on the radiation resistance of cascade cell structures based on the individual cell data are also presented. Both series-connected and separately connected structures are investigated.

  12. Detection of terahertz radiation by tightly concatenated InGaAs field-effect transistors integrated on a single chip

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, V. V.; Yermolaev, D. M.; Shapoval, S. Yu.; Maremyanin, K. V.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Zemlyakov, V. E.; Bespalov, V. A.; Yegorkin, V. I.; Maleev, N. A.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2014-04-21

    A tightly concatenated chain of InGaAs field-effect transistors with an asymmetric T-gate in each transistor demonstrates strong terahertz photovoltaic response without using supplementary antenna elements. We obtain the responsivity above 1000 V/W and up to 2000 V/W for unbiased and drain-biased transistors in the chain, respectively, with the noise equivalent power below 10{sup −11} W/Hz{sup 0.5} in the unbiased mode of the detector operation.

  13. InGaAs triangular barrier photodiodes for high-responsivity detection of near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimura, Kazuya; Ohmori, Masato; Noda, Takeshi; Kojima, Tomoya; Kado, Sakunari; Vitushinskiy, Pavel; Iwata, Naotaka; Sakaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    InGaAs triangular barrier (TB) structures of various barrier thicknesses have been formed on InP substrates. With them, we have fabricated TB photodiodes that yield a very high responsivity of 2.3 × 104 A/W at 100 K for the 1312 nm light of 320 fW power. By passivating the diode surface with polyimide, the dark current has been markedly reduced. Diodes with thicker barriers show higher sensitivity and responsivity, reflecting the enhancement of the barrier lowering effect by photogenerated holes.

  14. Recent Progress in HTS Bulk Technology and Performance at NSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshima, Hidekazu; Morita, Mitsuru

    This paper describes the current status of large single-grained RE-Ba-Cu-O (where RE: Y or rare earth elements) bulk superconductors with excellent superconducting properties in Nippon Steel Corporation. Intensive research on RE-Ba-Cu-O revealed that the optimal RE element is different for application requirements. While Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductors are greatly attractive for almost all bulk applications, Eu-Ba-Cu-O is suitable for compact NMR/MRI and Dy-Ba-Cu-O for current leads. In addition, single-domain bulk superconductors have been grown up to 150 mm in diameter by incorporating the RE compositional gradient method. Furthermore, progress of machining technology enables to obtain various complicated shapes of bulk superconductors.

  15. Surface analysis of InP and InGaAs after low temperature diffusion of Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Goff, Florian; Mathiot, Daniel; Decobert, Jean; Le Goec, Jean-Pierre; Parillaud, Olivier; Reverchon, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-01

    In order to develop III–V based devices integrated directly above post-processed silicon wafers, low temperature diffusion of zinc in n-type InP and InGaAs is studied at compatible temperatures, below 425 oC. We particularly focus on the resulting surface degradation. Efficient Zn diffusion is obtained for InGaAs samples, where the surface remains mirror-like after thermal treatment. Conversely, no significant diffusion occurs in InP where the surface is deeply deteriorated. The stability study for InP under thermal annealing in various ambients allows us to rule out thermal dephosphorization as the main cause of the surface degradation. On the basis of experimental observations and thermodynamic considerations, it is suggested that InP degradation is linked to the direct interaction of Zn and P, inducing the formation of parasitic Zn x P2 alloys, which also hinders the efficient diffusion of Zn into the InP substrate.

  16. Analysis of high frame rate readout circuit for near-infrared InGaAs focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhangcheng; Chen, Yu; Huang, Songlei; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2013-09-01

    High frame rate imaging for applications such as meteorological forecast, motion target tracking require high-speed Read-Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC). In order to achieve 10 KHz of frame rate, this paper analyzes the bandwidth of Capacitive-feedback Trans-Impedance Amplifier (CTIA) in ROIC which is the dominant bandwidth-limiting node when interfaced with large InGaAs detector pixel capacitance of about 10pF. A small-signal model is presented to study the relationship between integration capacitance, detector capacitance, transconductance and CTIA bandwidth. Calculation and simulation results show explicitly how the series resistance at the interface restricts the frame rate of Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). In order to achieve low-noise performance at a high frame rate, this paper describes an optimal solution in ROIC design. A prototype ROIC chip (DL7) has been fabricated with 0.5-μm mixed signal CMOS process and interfaced with InGaAs detector arrays. Test results show that frame rate is above 10 KHz and ROIC noise is around 270 e-, near identical to the design value.

  17. Surfactant-assisted growth and properties of rare-earth arsenide InGaAs nanocomposites for terahertz generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, R.; Guchhait, S.; McNicholas, K. M.; Sifferman, S. D.; Dasika, V. D.; Jung, D.; Krivoy, E. M.; Lee, M. L.; Bank, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the effects of surfactant-mediated epitaxy on the structural, electrical, and optical properties of fast metal-semiconductor superlattice photoconductors. Specifically, application of a bismuth flux during growth was found to significantly improve the properties of superlattices of LuAs nanoparticles embedded in In0.53Ga0.47As. These improvements are attributed to the enhanced structural quality of the overgrown InGaAs over the LuAs nanoparticles. The use of bismuth enabled a 30% increase in the number of monolayers of LuAs that could be deposited before the InGaAs overgrowth degraded. Dark resistivity increased by up to ˜15× while carrier mobility remained over 2300 cm2/V-s and carrier lifetimes were reduced by >2× at comparable levels of LuAs deposition. These findings demonstrate that surfactant-mediated epitaxy is a promising approach to enhance the properties of ultrafast photoconductors for terahert generation.

  18. Surface analysis of InP and InGaAs after low temperature diffusion of Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Goff, Florian; Mathiot, Daniel; Decobert, Jean; Le Goec, Jean-Pierre; Parillaud, Olivier; Reverchon, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-01

    In order to develop III-V based devices integrated directly above post-processed silicon wafers, low temperature diffusion of zinc in n-type InP and InGaAs is studied at compatible temperatures, below 425 oC. We particularly focus on the resulting surface degradation. Efficient Zn diffusion is obtained for InGaAs samples, where the surface remains mirror-like after thermal treatment. Conversely, no significant diffusion occurs in InP where the surface is deeply deteriorated. The stability study for InP under thermal annealing in various ambients allows us to rule out thermal dephosphorization as the main cause of the surface degradation. On the basis of experimental observations and thermodynamic considerations, it is suggested that InP degradation is linked to the direct interaction of Zn and P, inducing the formation of parasitic Zn x P2 alloys, which also hinders the efficient diffusion of Zn into the InP substrate.

  19. Analysis and design of a low-noise ROIC for hybrid InGaAs infrared FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, SongLei; Huang, ZhangCheng; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2011-08-01

    The noises of CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for hybrid focal plane array (FPA) may occupy a great part of total noise in conditions that a low resistance or large capacitor detector interfacing with CTIA input stage. A novel low noise low power preamplifier with shared current-mirrors bias is designed. It has a gain of more than 90dB, which makes enough inject efficiency and low detector bias offset. Besides, it has strong detector bias control, because the shared current-mirror copies the DC current of the amplifier and generates the bias control voltage. A pixel level Correlated Double Sample circuits is designed in order to suppress the reset KTC noise and 1/f noise from preamplifier. An experimental chip of 30μm pitch 32×32 array was fabricated in standard 0.5μm CMOS mixed signal process. A few experimental structures are designed to study the allocating of layout area for low noise designing. The ROIC is bonded to an existing back-illuminated 30μm pitch InGaAs photodiode array with indium bump fabrication. The test of both the ROIC chips and InGaAs focal plane array is shown in this paper, and the contrast of different structure is shown and analyzed.

  20. An uncooled 1280 x 1024 InGaAs focal plane array for small platform, shortwave infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, J.; Blessinger, M.; Enriquez, M.; Ettenberg, M.; Evans, M.; Flynn, K.; Lin, M.; Passe, J.; Stern, M.; Sudol, T.

    2009-05-01

    The increasing demand for short wave infrared (SWIR) imaging technology for soldier-based and unmanned platforms requires camera systems where size, weight and power consumption are minimized without loss of performance. Goodrich, Sensors Unlimited Inc. reports on the development of a novel focal plane (FPA) array for DARPA's MISI (Micro-Sensors for Imaging) Program. This large format (1280 x 1024) array is optimized for day/night imaging in the wavelength region from 0.4 μm to 1.7 μm and consists of an InGaAs detector bump bonded to a capacitance transimpedance amplifier (CTIA)-based readout integrated circuit (ROIC) on a compact 15 μm pixel pitch. Two selectable integration capacitors provide for high dynamic range with low (< 50 electrons) noise, and expanded onchip ROIC functionality includes analog-to-digital conversion and temperature sensing. The combination of high quality, low dark current InGaAs with temperature-parameterized non-uniformity correction allows operation at ambient temperatures while eliminating the need for thermoelectric cooling. The resulting lightweight, low power implementation is suitable for man-portable and UAV-mounted applications.

  1. Analysis of Carrier Recombination Processes in 0.6 eV InGaAs Epitaxial Materials for Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    D Donetsky; F Newman; M Dashiell

    2006-10-30

    Minority carrier lifetime was measured by time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) method in sets of p-type and n-type InGaAs double heterostructures (DH) moderately doped with Zn and Te, respectively. Contributions of the radiative and non-radiative recombination terms were separated by fitting experimental data to temperature dependences of the radiative term. The latter was modeled with measured fundamental absorption spectrum and the temperature dependence of the photon recycling effect was taken into account. Different temperature dependences of radiative terms for electron and hole materials were obtained. It was concluded that in 0.6 eV Te-doped InGaAs structures the radiative recombination controls the hole lifetime at liquid nitrogen temperatures, while Auger recombination dominates at room and above room temperatures. In similar 0.6 eV InGaAs with Zn-doped active regions Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination was found dominant in a wide temperature range from liquid nitrogen to above-room temperatures. Rapid decrease of electron lifetime with decrease of excess carrier concentration was observed and attributed to recombination through partially-ionized deep donor centers. The obtained data allows for more adequate modeling of the performance and design optimization of narrow-gap photonic devices based on InGaAs Indium-rich compounds.

  2. Fracture Toughness Properties of Gd123 Superconducting Bulks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Murakami, A.

    Fracture toughness properties of melt growth GdBa2Cu3Ox (Gd123) large single domain superconducting bulks with Ag2O of 10 wt% and Pt of 0.5 wt%; 45 mm in diameter and 25 mm in thickness with low void density were evaluated at 77 K through flexural tests of specimens cut from the bulks, and compared to those of a conventional Gd123 with voids. The densified Gd123 bulks were prepared with a seeding and temperature gradient method; first melt processed in oxygen, then crystal growth in air; two-step regulated atmosphere heat treatment. The plane strain fracture toughness, KIC was obtained by the three point flexure test of the specimens with through precrack, referring to the single edge pre-cracked beam (SEPB) method, according to the JIS-R-1607, Testing Methods for Fracture Toughness of High Performance Ceramics. The results show that the fracture toughness of the densified Gd123 bulk with low void density was higher than that of the standard Gd123 bulk with voids, as well as the flexural strength previously reported. We also compared the fracture toughness of as-grown bulks with that of annealed bulks. The relation between the microstructure and the fracture toughness of the Gd123 bulk was clearly shown.

  3. Light-trapping for room temperature Bose-Einstein condensation in InGaAs quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Vasudev, Pranai; Jiang, Jian-Hua; John, Sajeev

    2016-06-27

    We demonstrate the possibility of room-temperature, thermal equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of exciton-polaritons in a multiple quantum well (QW) system composed of InGaAs quantum wells surrounded by InP barriers, allowing for the emission of light near telecommunication wavelengths. The QWs are embedded in a cavity consisting of double slanted pore (SP2) photonic crystals composed of InP. We consider exciton-polaritons that result from the strong coupling between the multiple quantum well excitons and photons in the lowest planar guided mode within the photonic band gap (PBG) of the photonic crystal cavity. The collective coupling of three QWs results in a vacuum Rabi splitting of 3% of the bare exciton recombination energy. Due to the full three-dimensional PBG exhibited by the SP2 photonic crystal (16% gap to mid-gap frequency ratio), the radiative decay of polaritons is eliminated in all directions. Due to the short exciton-phonon scattering time in InGaAs quantum wells of 0.5 ps and the exciton non-radiative decay time of 200 ps at room temperature, polaritons can achieve thermal equilibrium with the host lattice to form an equilibrium BEC. Using a SP2 photonic crystal with a lattice constant of a = 516 nm, a unit cell height of 2a=730nm and a pore radius of 0.305a = 157 nm, light in the lowest planar guided mode is strongly localized in the central slab layer. The central slab layer consists of 3 nm InGaAs quantum wells with 7 nm InP barriers, in which excitons have a recombination energy of 0.944 eV, a binding energy of 7 meV and a Bohr radius of aB = 10 nm. We take the exciton recombination energy to be detuned 35 meV above the lowest guided photonic mode so that an exciton-polariton has a photonic fraction of approximately 97% per QW. This increases the energy range of small-effective-mass photonlike states and increases the critical temperature for the onset of a Bose-Einstein condensate. With three quantum wells in the central slab layer

  4. Light-trapping for room temperature Bose-Einstein condensation in InGaAs quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Vasudev, Pranai; Jiang, Jian-Hua; John, Sajeev

    2016-06-27

    We demonstrate the possibility of room-temperature, thermal equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of exciton-polaritons in a multiple quantum well (QW) system composed of InGaAs quantum wells surrounded by InP barriers, allowing for the emission of light near telecommunication wavelengths. The QWs are embedded in a cavity consisting of double slanted pore (SP2) photonic crystals composed of InP. We consider exciton-polaritons that result from the strong coupling between the multiple quantum well excitons and photons in the lowest planar guided mode within the photonic band gap (PBG) of the photonic crystal cavity. The collective coupling of three QWs results in a vacuum Rabi splitting of 3% of the bare exciton recombination energy. Due to the full three-dimensional PBG exhibited by the SP2 photonic crystal (16% gap to mid-gap frequency ratio), the radiative decay of polaritons is eliminated in all directions. Due to the short exciton-phonon scattering time in InGaAs quantum wells of 0.5 ps and the exciton non-radiative decay time of 200 ps at room temperature, polaritons can achieve thermal equilibrium with the host lattice to form an equilibrium BEC. Using a SP2 photonic crystal with a lattice constant of a = 516 nm, a unit cell height of 2a=730nm and a pore radius of 0.305a = 157 nm, light in the lowest planar guided mode is strongly localized in the central slab layer. The central slab layer consists of 3 nm InGaAs quantum wells with 7 nm InP barriers, in which excitons have a recombination energy of 0.944 eV, a binding energy of 7 meV and a Bohr radius of aB = 10 nm. We take the exciton recombination energy to be detuned 35 meV above the lowest guided photonic mode so that an exciton-polariton has a photonic fraction of approximately 97% per QW. This increases the energy range of small-effective-mass photonlike states and increases the critical temperature for the onset of a Bose-Einstein condensate. With three quantum wells in the central slab layer

  5. Sensitivity and noise of micro-Hall magnetic sensors based on InGaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenaud, B.; Segovia-Mera, A.; Delgard, A.; Feltin, N.; Hoffmann, A.; Pascal, F.; Zawadzki, W.; Mailly, D.; Chaubet, C.

    2016-01-01

    We study the room-temperature performance of micro-Hall magnetic sensors based on pseudomorphic InGaAs quantum wells. Active areas of our sensors range from 1 to 80 μm. We focus on the smallest detectable magnetic fields in small sensors and perform a systematic study of noise at room temperature in the frequency range between 1 Hz and 100 kHz. Our data are interpreted by the mobility fluctuation model. The Hooge parameter is determined for the applied technology. We show that, independently of the experimental frequency, the ratio of sensitivity to noise is proportional to characteristic length of the sensor. The resolution of 1 mG/√{Hz } is achievable in a 3 μm sensor at room temperature.

  6. An InGaAs detector based radiation thermometer and fixed-point blackbodies for temperature scale realization at NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, X.; Yuan, Z.; Wang, J.; Lu, X.

    2013-09-11

    In this paper, we describe an InGaAs detector based radiation thermometer (IRT) and new design of fixed-point blackbodies, including Sn, Zn, Al and Cu, for the establishment of a temperature scale from 200 °C to 1085 °C at the National Institute of Metrology of China. The construction and calibration of the IRT with the four fixed-point blackbodies are described. Characteristics of the IRT, such as the size-of-source effect, the amplifier performance and its stability are determined. The design of the four fixed-points, with 10 mm diameter of aperture and 0.9999 emissivity, is described. The uncertainty of the scale realization is elaborated.

  7. An InGaAs detector based radiation thermometer and fixed-point blackbodies for temperature scale realization at NIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, X.; Yuan, Z.; Wang, J.; Lu, X.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we describe an InGaAs detector based radiation thermometer (IRT) and new design of fixed-point blackbodies, including Sn, Zn, Al and Cu, for the establishment of a temperature scale from 200 °C to 1085 °C at the National Institute of Metrology of China. The construction and calibration of the IRT with the four fixed-point blackbodies are described. Characteristics of the IRT, such as the size-of-source effect, the amplifier performance and its stability are determined. The design of the four fixed-points, with 10 mm diameter of aperture and 0.9999 emissivity, is described. The uncertainty of the scale realization is elaborated.

  8. Identification and thermal stability of the native oxides on InGaAs using synchrotron radiation based photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, B.; Hughes, G.

    2010-09-01

    A high resolution synchrotron radiation core level photoemission study of the native oxides on In0.53Ga0.47As was carried out in order to determine the various oxidation states present on the surface. The thermal stability of the oxidation states was also investigated by annealing the samples in vacuum at temperatures ranging from 150 to 450 °C. As well as the widely reported oxidation states, various arsenic, gallium, and indium oxides, along with mixed phase gallium arsenic and indium gallium oxides are identified. Elemental binary oxides have been identified as residing at the oxide substrate interface and could play an important role in understanding the growth of metal oxide dielectric layers on the InGaAs surface, due to their apparent chemical stability.

  9. Experimental demonstration of hot-carrier photo-current in an InGaAs quantum well solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, L. C.; Walters, R. J.; Führer, M. F.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.

    2014-06-09

    An unambiguous observation of hot-carrier photocurrent from an InGaAs single quantum well solar cell is reported. Simultaneous photo-current and photoluminescence measurements were performed for incident power density 0.04–3 kW cm{sup −2}, lattice temperature 10 K, and forward bias 1.2 V. An order of magnitude photocurrent increase was observed for non-equilibrium hot-carrier temperatures >35 K. This photocurrent activation temperature is consistent with that of equilibrium carriers in a lattice at elevated temperature. The observed hot-carrier photo-current is extracted from the well over an energy selective GaAs barrier, thus integrating two essential components of a hot-carrier solar cell: a hot-carrier absorber and an energy selective contact.

  10. Indium and gallium diffusion through zirconia in the TiN/ZrO{sub 2}/InGaAs stack

    SciTech Connect

    Ceballos-Sanchez, O.; Martinez, E.; Guedj, C.; Veillerot, M.; Herrera-Gomez, A.

    2015-06-01

    Angle-resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS) was applied to the TiN/ZrO{sub 2}/InGaAs stack to assess its thermal stability. Through a robust ARXPS analysis, it was possible to observe subtle effects such as the thermally induced diffusion of substrate atomic species (In and Ga) through the dielectric layer. The detailed characterization of the film structure allowed for assessing the depth profiles of the diffused atomic species by means of the scenarios-method. Since the quantification for the amount of diffused material was done at different temperatures, it was possible to obtain an approximate value of the activation energy for the diffusion of indium through zirconia. The result is very similar to the previously reported values for indium diffusion through alumina and through hafnia.

  11. Gain-switched pulses from InGaAs ridge-quantum-well lasers limited by intrinsic dynamical gain suppression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Yoshita, Masahiro; Ito, Takashi; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-25

    Gain-switched pulses of InGaAs double-quantum-well lasers fabricated from identical epitaxial laser wafers were measured under both current injection and optical pumping conditions. The shortest output pulse widths were nearly identical (about 40 ps) both for current injection and optical pumping; this result attributed the dominant pulse-width limitation factor to the intrinsic gain properties of the lasers. We quantitatively compared the experimental results with theoretical calculations based on rate equations incorporating gain nonlinearities. Close consistency between the experimental data and the calculations was obtained only when we assumed a dynamically suppressed gain value deviated from the steady-state gain value supported by standard microscopic theories.

  12. New design of InGaAs guided-mode resonance photodiode for SWIR low dark current imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdun, Michaël.; Portier, Benjamin; Jaworowicz, Katarzyna; Jaeck, Julien; Dupuis, Christophe; Haidar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice; Pelouard, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a full-dielectric guided mode resonant photodiode. It has been designed to enhance the absorption by excitation of several resonances in the SWIR domain. The device consists of an InP/InGaAs/InP P-i-N heterojunction containing an active layer as thin as 90 nm on top of a subwavelength lamellar grating and a gold mirror. We successfully compared the electro-optical characterizations of individual pixels with electro-magnetic simulations. In particular, we observe near perfect collection of the photo-carriers and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of up to 71% around 1.55 μm. Moreover, compared with InGaAs resonator state-of-the-art detector, we show a broader spectral response in the 1.2-1.7 μm range, thus paving the way for SWIR low dark current imaging.

  13. Compact fiber-pigtailed InGaAs photoconductive antenna module for terahertz-wave generation and detection.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Pil; Kim, Namje; Ko, Hyunsung; Ryu, Han-Cheol; Park, Jeong-Woo; Yoon, Young-Jong; Shin, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Dong Hun; Park, Sang-Ho; Moon, Seok-Hwan; Choi, Sung-Wook; Chun, Hyang Sook; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2012-07-30

    We propose a compact fiber-pigtailed InGaAs photoconductive antenna (FPP) module having an effective heat-dissipation solution as well as a module volume of less than 0.7 cc. The heat-dissipation of the FPP modules when using a heat-conductive printed circuit board (PCB) and an aluminium nitride (AlN) submount, without any cooling systems, improve by 40% and 85%, respectively, when compared with a photoconductive antenna chip on a conventional PCB. The AlN submount is superior to those previously reported as a heat-dissipation solution. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) using the FPP module perfectly detects the absorption lines of water vapor in free space and an α-lactose sample. PMID:23038394

  14. Graphic Grown Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ann

    2009-01-01

    It's no secret that children and YAs are clued in to graphic novels (GNs) and that comics-loving adults are positively giddy that this format is getting the recognition it deserves. Still, there is a whole swath of library card-carrying grown-up readers out there with no idea where to start. Splashy movies such as "300" and "Spider-Man" and their…

  15. Direct Measurements of Fermi Level Pinning at the Surface of Intrinsically n-Type InGaAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Speckbacher, Maximilian; Treu, Julian; Whittles, Thomas J; Linhart, Wojciech M; Xu, Xiaomo; Saller, Kai; Dhanak, Vinod R; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J; Veal, Tim D; Koblmüller, Gregor

    2016-08-10

    Surface effects strongly dominate the intrinsic properties of semiconductor nanowires (NWs), an observation that is commonly attributed to the presence of surface states and their modification of the electronic band structure. Although the effects of the exposed, bare NW surface have been widely studied with respect to charge carrier transport and optical properties, the underlying electronic band structure, Fermi level pinning, and surface band bending profiles are not well explored. Here, we directly and quantitatively assess the Fermi level pinning at the surfaces of composition-tunable, intrinsically n-type InGaAs NWs, as one of the prominent, technologically most relevant NW systems, by using correlated photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). From the PL spectral response, we reveal two dominant radiative recombination pathways, that is, direct near-band edge transitions and red-shifted, spatially indirect transitions induced by surface band bending. The separation of their relative transition energies changes with alloy composition by up to more than ∼40 meV and represent a direct measure for the amount of surface band bending. We further extract quantitatively the Fermi level to surface valence band maximum separation using XPS, and directly verify a composition-dependent transition from downward to upward band bending (surface electron accumulation to depletion) with increasing Ga-content x(Ga) at a crossover near x(Ga) ∼ 0.2. Core level spectra further demonstrate the nature of extrinsic surface states being caused by In-rich suboxides arising from the native oxide layer at the InGaAs NW surface. PMID:27458736

  16. Spectral imaging of chemical compounds using multivariate optically enhanced filters integrated with InGaAs VGA cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priore, Ryan J.; Jacksen, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Infrared hyperspectral imagers (HSI) have been fielded for the detection of hazardous chemical and biological compounds, tag detection (friend versus foe detection) and other defense critical sensing missions over the last two decades. Low Size/Weight/Power/Cost (SWaPc) methods of identification of chemical compounds spectroscopy has been a long term goal for hand held applications. We describe a new HSI concept for low cost / high performance InGaAs SWIR camera chemical identification for military, security, industrial and commercial end user applications. Multivariate Optical Elements (MOEs) are thin-film devices that encode a broadband, spectroscopic pattern allowing a simple broadband detector to generate a highly sensitive and specific detection for a target analyte. MOEs can be matched 1:1 to a discrete analyte or class prediction. Additionally, MOE filter sets are capable of sensing an orthogonal projection of the original sparse spectroscopic space enabling a small set of MOEs to discriminate a multitude of target analytes. This paper identifies algorithms and broadband optical filter designs that have been demonstrated to identify chemical compounds using high performance InGaAs VGA detectors. It shows how some of the initial models have been reduced to simple spectral designs and tested to produce positive identification of such chemicals. We also are developing pixilated MOE compressed detection sensors for the detection of a multitude of chemical targets in challenging backgrounds/environments for both commercial and defense/security applications. This MOE based, real-time HSI sensor will exhibit superior sensitivity and specificity as compared to currently fielded HSI systems.

  17. Direct Measurements of Fermi Level Pinning at the Surface of Intrinsically n-Type InGaAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Speckbacher, Maximilian; Treu, Julian; Whittles, Thomas J; Linhart, Wojciech M; Xu, Xiaomo; Saller, Kai; Dhanak, Vinod R; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J; Veal, Tim D; Koblmüller, Gregor

    2016-08-10

    Surface effects strongly dominate the intrinsic properties of semiconductor nanowires (NWs), an observation that is commonly attributed to the presence of surface states and their modification of the electronic band structure. Although the effects of the exposed, bare NW surface have been widely studied with respect to charge carrier transport and optical properties, the underlying electronic band structure, Fermi level pinning, and surface band bending profiles are not well explored. Here, we directly and quantitatively assess the Fermi level pinning at the surfaces of composition-tunable, intrinsically n-type InGaAs NWs, as one of the prominent, technologically most relevant NW systems, by using correlated photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). From the PL spectral response, we reveal two dominant radiative recombination pathways, that is, direct near-band edge transitions and red-shifted, spatially indirect transitions induced by surface band bending. The separation of their relative transition energies changes with alloy composition by up to more than ∼40 meV and represent a direct measure for the amount of surface band bending. We further extract quantitatively the Fermi level to surface valence band maximum separation using XPS, and directly verify a composition-dependent transition from downward to upward band bending (surface electron accumulation to depletion) with increasing Ga-content x(Ga) at a crossover near x(Ga) ∼ 0.2. Core level spectra further demonstrate the nature of extrinsic surface states being caused by In-rich suboxides arising from the native oxide layer at the InGaAs NW surface.

  18. Bulk material handling system

    DOEpatents

    Kleysteuber, William K.; Mayercheck, William D.

    1979-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a bulk material handling system particularly adapted for underground mining and includes a monorail supported overhead and carrying a plurality of conveyors each having input and output end portions with the output end portion of a first of the conveyors positioned above an input end portion of a second of the conveyors, a device for imparting motion to the conveyors to move the material from the input end portions toward the output end portions thereof, a device for supporting at least one of the input and output end portions of the first and second conveyors from the monorail, and the supporting device including a plurality of trolleys rollingly supported by the monorail whereby the conveyors can be readily moved therealong.

  19. Bulk Topological Proximity Effect.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Timothy H; Ishizuka, Hiroaki; Balents, Leon; Hughes, Taylor L

    2016-02-26

    Existing proximity effects stem from systems with a local order parameter, such as a local magnetic moment or a local superconducting pairing amplitude. Here, we demonstrate that despite lacking a local order parameter, topological phases also may give rise to a proximity effect of a distinctively inverted nature. We focus on a general construction in which a topological phase is extensively coupled to a second system, and we argue that, in many cases, the inverse topological order will be induced on the second system. To support our arguments, we rigorously establish this "bulk topological proximity effect" for all gapped free-fermion topological phases and representative integrable models of interacting topological phases. We present a terrace construction which illustrates the phenomenological consequences of this proximity effect. Finally, we discuss generalizations beyond our framework, including how intrinsic topological order may also exhibit this effect.

  20. Bulk muscles, loose cables

    PubMed Central

    Liyanage, Chamari R D G; Kodali, Venkata

    2014-01-01

    The accessibility and usage of body building supplements is on the rise with stronger internet marketing strategies by the industry. The dangers posed by the ingredients in them are underestimated. A healthy young man came to the emergency room with palpitations and feeling unwell. Initial history and clinical examination were non-contributory to find the cause. ECG showed atrial fibrillation. A detailed history for any over the counter or herbal medicine use confirmed that he was taking supplements to bulk muscle. One of the components in these supplements is yohimbine; the onset of symptoms coincided with the ingestion of this product and the patient is symptom free after stopping it. This report highlights the dangers to the public of consuming over the counter products with unknown ingredients and the consequential detrimental impact on health. PMID:25326558

  1. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony; Saldana, Christopher J.; Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John; Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  2. Bulk amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Archuleta, J.I.; Sickafus, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work was to develop the competency for the synthesis of novel bulk amorphous alloys. The authors researched their synthesis methods and alloy properties, including thermal stability, mechanical, and transport properties. The project also addressed the development of vanadium-spinel alloys for structural applications in hostile environments, the measurement of elastic constants and thermal expansion in single-crystal TiAl from 300 to 750 K, the measurement of elastic constants in gallium nitride, and a study of the shock-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi alloys.

  3. Explosive bulk charge

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  4. 1.59 {mu}m room temperature emission from metamorphic InAs/InGaAs quantum dots grown on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Seravalli, L.; Frigeri, P.; Trevisi, G.; Franchi, S.

    2008-05-26

    We present design, preparation by molecular beam epitaxy, and characterization by photoluminescence of long-wavelength emitting, strain-engineered quantum dot nanostructures grown on GaAs, with InGaAs confining layers and additional InAlAs barriers embedding InAs dots. Quantum dot strain induced by metamorphic lower confining layers is instrumental to redshift the emission, while a-few-nanometer thick InAlAs barriers allow to significantly increase the activation energy of carriers' thermal escape. This approach results in room temperature emission at 1.59 {mu}m and, therefore, is a viable method to achieve efficient emission in the 1.55 {mu}m window and beyond from quantum dots grown on GaAs substrates.

  5. Indium out-diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs stacks during anneal at different ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, Igor; Winter, Roy; Ritter, Dan; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2014-06-16

    Indium out-diffusion during anneal enhances leakage currents in metal/dielectric/InGaAs gate stacks. In this work, we study the influence of ambient conditions during anneal on indium out-diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs structures, prior to the gate metal deposition. Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ions mass spectrometry, we observed much lower indium concentrations in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer following vacuum and O{sub 2} anneals compared to forming gas or nitrogen anneals. The electrical characteristics of the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stack following these pre-metallization anneals as well as after subsequent post metallization anneals are presented. Possible explanations for the role of the annealing ambient conditions on indium out-diffusion are presented.

  6. Detailed Study of the Influence of InGaAs Matrix on the Strain Reduction in the InAs Dot-In-Well Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Cao, Chunfang; Wang, Shumin; Gong, Qian

    2016-12-01

    InAs/InGaAs dot-in-well (DWELL) structures have been investigated with the systematically varied InGaAs thickness. Both the strained buffer layer (SBL) below the dot layer and the strain-reducing layer (SRL) above the dot layer were found to be responsible for the redshift in photoluminescence (PL) emission of the InAs/InGaAs DWELL structure. A linear followed by a saturation behavior of the emission redshift was observed as a function of the SBL and SRL thickness, respectively. The PL intensity is greatly enhanced by applying both of the SRL and SBL. Finite element analysis simulation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurement were carried out to analyze the strain distribution in the InAs QD and the InGaAs SBL. The results clearly indicate the strain reduction in the QD induced by the SBL, which are likely the main cause for the emission redshift. PMID:26932758

  7. Detailed Study of the Influence of InGaAs Matrix on the Strain Reduction in the InAs Dot-In-Well Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Cao, Chunfang; Wang, Shumin; Gong, Qian

    2016-12-01

    InAs/InGaAs dot-in-well (DWELL) structures have been investigated with the systematically varied InGaAs thickness. Both the strained buffer layer (SBL) below the dot layer and the strain-reducing layer (SRL) above the dot layer were found to be responsible for the redshift in photoluminescence (PL) emission of the InAs/InGaAs DWELL structure. A linear followed by a saturation behavior of the emission redshift was observed as a function of the SBL and SRL thickness, respectively. The PL intensity is greatly enhanced by applying both of the SRL and SBL. Finite element analysis simulation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurement were carried out to analyze the strain distribution in the InAs QD and the InGaAs SBL. The results clearly indicate the strain reduction in the QD induced by the SBL, which are likely the main cause for the emission redshift.

  8. Low interface defect density of atomic layer deposition BeO with self-cleaning reaction for InGaAs metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H. S.; Yum, J. H.; Johnson, D. W.; Harris, H. R.; Hudnall, Todd W.; Oh, J.; Kirsch, P.; Wang, W.-E.; Bielawski, C. W.; Banerjee, S. K.; Lee, J. C.; Lee, H. D.

    2013-11-25

    In this paper, we discuss atomic configuration of atomic layer deposition (ALD) beryllium oxide (BeO) using the quantum chemistry to understand the theoretical origin. BeO has shorter bond length, higher reaction enthalpy, and larger bandgap energy compared with those of ALD aluminum oxide. It is shown that the excellent material properties of ALD BeO can reduce interface defect density due to the self-cleaning reaction and this contributes to the improvement of device performance of InGaAs MOSFETs. The low interface defect density and low leakage current of InGaAs MOSFET were demonstrated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the corresponding electrical results.

  9. An efficient heat-spreader design: First demonstration on InGaP/graded InGaAs base/GaAs collector-up HBTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsien-Cheng; Chu, Wen-Jen

    2013-01-01

    An efficient heat-spreader design, demonstrated on n-p-n InGaP/graded InGaAs base/GaAs collector-up heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) for the first time, is proposed to achieve high speed and thermal dissipation performances. The collector-up HBT, with a graded InGaAs base, has been successfully fabricated using a three-stage selective-area-regrowth technique. A unity-gain cutoff frequency fT = 55 GHz and a maximum frequency of oscillation fmax = 74 GHz were obtained from prototype devices with a large collector area of 3.5 × 40 μm2. Moreover, through proper thinning process, the maximum junction temperature and thermal coupling within the transistors were effectively decreased. It is shown that the thermal management for power amplifiers, based on the developed HBT, used in next-generation cellular phones can be enhanced.

  10. In-situ atomic layer deposition of tri-methylaluminum and water on pristine single-crystal (In)GaAs surfaces: electronic and electric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, T. W.; Lin, Y. H.; Fanchiang, Y. T.; Chiang, T. H.; Wei, C. H.; Lin, Y. C.; Wertheim, G. K.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    2015-04-01

    The electronic structure of single-crystal (In)GaAs deposited with tri-methylaluminum (TMA) and water via atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented with high-resolution synchrotron radiation core-level photoemission and capacitance-voltage (CV) characteristics. The interaction of the precursor atoms with (In)GaAs is confined at the topmost surface layer. The Ga-vacant site on the GaAs(111)A-2 × 2 surface is filled with Al, thereby effectively passivating the As dangling bonds. The As-As dimers on the GaAs(001)-2 × 4 surface are entirely passivated by one cycle of TMA and water. The presumed layerwise deposition fails to happen in GaAs(001)-4 × 6. In In0.20Ga0.80As(001)-2 × 4, the edge row As atoms are partially bonded with the Al, and one released methyl then bonds with the In. It is suggested that the unpassivated surface and subsurface atoms cause large frequency dispersions in CV characteristics under the gate bias. We also found that the (In)GaAs surface is immune to water in ALD. However, the momentary exposure of it to air (less than one minute) introduces significant signals of native oxides. This indicates the necessity of in situ works of high κ/(In)GaAs-related experiments in order to know the precise interfacial atomic bonding and thus know the electronic characteristics. The electric CV measurements of the ALD-Al2O3 on these (In)GaAs surfaces are correlated with their electronic properties.

  11. Passively Q-switched Yb3+:YCa4O(BO3)3 laser with InGaAs quantum wells as saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H. C.; Huang, J. Y.; Su, K. W.; Lai, H. C.; Chen, Y. F.; Huang, K. F.; Zhang, H. J.; Wang, J. Y.; Jiang, M. H.

    2007-04-01

    A diode-pumped Yb:YCOB laser at 1086 nm is passively Q switched by using InGaAs quantum wells as saturable absorbers and utilizing the Bragg mirror structure as an output coupler. With an absorbed pump power of 9.2 W the laser produces pulses of 100 ms duration with average pulse energy of as much as 165 μJ at a pulse repetition rate of 7 kHz.

  12. Passively Q-switched Yb3+:YCa4O(BO3)3 laser with InGaAs quantum wells as saturable absorbers.

    PubMed

    Liang, H C; Huang, J Y; Su, K W; Lai, H C; Chen, Y F; Huang, K F; Zhang, H J; Wang, J Y; Jiang, M H

    2007-04-20

    A diode-pumped Yb:YCOB laser at 1086 nm is passively Q switched by using InGaAs quantum wells as saturable absorbers and utilizing the Bragg mirror structure as an output coupler. With an absorbed pump power of 9.2 W the laser produces pulses of 100 ms duration with average pulse energy of as much as 165 microJ at a pulse repetition rate of 7 kHz.

  13. Electrical and optical performance characteristics of 0.74eV p/n InGaAs monolithic interconnected modules

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, D.M.; Weizer, V.G.; Fatemi, N.S.; Jenkins, P.P.; Hoffman, R.W. Jr.; Jain, R.K.; Murray, C.S.; Riley, D.R.

    1997-06-01

    There has been a traditional trade-off in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion development between system efficiency and power density. This trade-off originates from the use of front surface spectral controls such as selective emitters and various types of filters. A monolithic interconnected module (MIM) structure has been developed which allows for both high power densities and high system efficiencies. The MIM device consists of many individual indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) cells series-connected on a single semi-insulating indium phosphide (InP) substrate. The MIM is exposed to the entire emitter output, thereby maximizing output power density. An infrared (IR) reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns the unused portion of the emitter output spectrum back to the emitter for recycling, thereby providing for high system efficiencies. Initial MIM development has focused on a 1 cm{sup 2} device consisting of eight series interconnected cells. MIM devices, produced from 0.74 eV InGaAs, have demonstrated V{sub oc} = 3.2 volts, J{sub sc} = 70 mA/cm{sup 2} and a fill factor of 66% under flashlamp testing. Infrared (IR) reflectance measurements (> 2 {micro}m) of these devices indicate a reflectivity of > 82%. MIM devices produced from 0.55 eV InGaAs have also been demonstrated. In addition, conventional p/n InGaAs devices with record efficiencies (11.7% AM0) have been demonstrated.

  14. Toward a single-chip TECless/NUCless InGaAs SWIR camera with 120-dB intrinsic operation dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y.; Arion, B.; Zhu, Y. M.; Potet, P.; Huet, Odile; Reverchon, Jean Luc; Truffer, Jean Patrick; Robo, Jean Alexandre; Costard, Eric

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a single-chip InGaAs SWIR camera with more than 120dB instant operational dynamic range with an innovative CMOS ROIC technology, so called MAGIC, invented and patented by New Imaging Technologies. A 320x256- pixel InGaAs 25μm pitch photodiode array, designed and fabricated by III-Vlab/Thales Research & Technology(TRT), has been hybridized on this new generation CMOS ROIC. With NIT's MAGIC technology, the sensor's output follows a precise logarithmic law in function of incoming photon flux and gives instant operational dynamic range (DR) better than 120 dB. The ROIC incorporates the entire video signal processing function including a CCIR TV encoder, so a complete SWIR InGaAs camera with standard video output has been realized on a single 30x30 mm2 PCB board with ¼ W power consumption. Neither TEC nor NUC is needed from room temperature operation. The camera can be switched on and off instantly, ideal for all the portable battery operated SWIR band observation applications. The measured RMS noise and FPN noise on the prototype sensor in dark conditions are 0.4 mV and 0.27 mV respectively. The signal excursion from pixel is about 300mV over the 120 dB dynamic range. The FPN remains almost constant over the whole operation dynamic range. The NEI has been measured to be 3,71E+09 ph/s/cm2 with 92 equivalent noise photons at 25Hz frame rate, better than the same architecture of InGaAs photodiode array hybridized on an Indigo ROIC ISC9809 with a pitch of 30 μm for which a readout noise of 120 electrons is observed.

  15. Electrical and Optical Performance Characteristics of 0.74-eV p/n InGaAs Monolithic Interconnected Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Weizer, Victor G.; Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Jain, Raj K.; Murray, Christopher S.; Riley, David R.

    1997-01-01

    There has been a traditional trade-off in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion development between system efficiency and power density. This trade-off originates from the use of front surface spectral controls such as selective emitters and various types of filters. A monolithic interconnected module (MIM) structure has been developed which allows for both high power densities and high system efficiencies. The MIM device consists of many individual indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) cells series-connected on a single semi-insulating indium phosphide (InP) substrate. The MIM is exposed to the entire emitter output, thereby maximizing output power density. An infrared (IR) reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns the unused portion of the emitter output spectrum back to the emitter for recycling, thereby providing for high system efficiencies. Initial MIM development has focused on a 1 sq cm device consisting of eight (8) series interconnected cells. MIM devices, produced from 0.74-eV InGaAs, have demonstrated V(sub oc) = 3.2 volts, J(sub sc) = 70 mA/sq cm, and a fill factor of 66% under flashlamp testing. Infrared (IR) reflectance measurements (greater than 2 micron) of these devices indicate a reflectivity of greater than 82%. MIM devices produced from 0.55-eV InGaAs have also been demonstrated. In addition, conventional p/n InGaAs devices with record efficiencies (11.7% AM0) have been demonstrated.

  16. In-situ atomic layer deposition of tri-methylaluminum and water on pristine single-crystal (In)GaAs surfaces: electronic and electric structures.

    PubMed

    Pi, T W; Lin, Y H; Fanchiang, Y T; Chiang, T H; Wei, C H; Lin, Y C; Wertheim, G K; Kwo, J; Hong, M

    2015-04-24

    The electronic structure of single-crystal (In)GaAs deposited with tri-methylaluminum (TMA) and water via atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented with high-resolution synchrotron radiation core-level photoemission and capacitance-voltage (CV) characteristics. The interaction of the precursor atoms with (In)GaAs is confined at the topmost surface layer. The Ga-vacant site on the GaAs(111)A-2 × 2 surface is filled with Al, thereby effectively passivating the As dangling bonds. The As-As dimers on the GaAs(001)-2 × 4 surface are entirely passivated by one cycle of TMA and water. The presumed layerwise deposition fails to happen in GaAs(001)-4 × 6. In In0.20Ga0.80As(001)-2 × 4, the edge row As atoms are partially bonded with the Al, and one released methyl then bonds with the In. It is suggested that the unpassivated surface and subsurface atoms cause large frequency dispersions in CV characteristics under the gate bias. We also found that the (In)GaAs surface is immune to water in ALD. However, the momentary exposure of it to air (less than one minute) introduces significant signals of native oxides. This indicates the necessity of in situ works of high κ/(In)GaAs-related experiments in order to know the precise interfacial atomic bonding and thus know the electronic characteristics. The electric CV measurements of the ALD-Al2O3 on these (In)GaAs surfaces are correlated with their electronic properties.

  17. Bulk Data Mover

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-03

    Bulk Data Mover (BDM) is a high-level data transfer management tool. BDM handles the issue of large variance in file sizes and a big portion of small files by managing the file transfers with optimized transfer queue and concurrency management algorithms. For example, climate simulation data sets are characterized by large volume of files with extreme variance in file sizes. The BDN achieves high performance using a variety of techniques, including multi-thraded concurrent transfer connections, data channel caching, load balancing over multiple transfer servers, and storage i/o pre-fetching. Logging information from the BDM is collected and analyzed to study the effectiveness of the transfer management algorithms. The BDM can accept a request composed of multiple files or an entire directory. The request also contains the target site and directory where the replicated files will reside. If a directory is provided at the source, then the BDM will replicate the structure of the source directory at the target site. The BDM is capable of transferring multiple files concurrently as well as using parallel TCP streams. The optimal level of concurrency or parallel streams depends on the bandwidth capacity of the storage systems at both ends of the transfer as well as achievable bandwidth of the wide-area network. Hardware req.-PC, MAC, Multi-platform & Workstation; Software req.: Compile/version-Java 1.50_x or ablove; Type of files: source code, executable modules, installation instructions other, user guide; URL: http://sdm.lbl.gov/bdm/

  18. High-speed InGaAs thin film MSM photodetector characterization using a fiber-based electro-optic sampling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Sang-Woo; Cho, Sang-Yeon; Huang, Sa; Brown, April; Jokerst, Nan M.

    2004-06-01

    As optoelectronic devices increase in speed, the measurement system used to characterize these devices must have sufficient bandwidth and minimum parasitic loading during test to accurately determine the intrinsic performance of the device under test. Conventional electrical measurement systems have an intrinsic bandwidth due to the available components for test and have parasitic loading due to direct electrical contact to the device under the test. Electro-optic sampling is an excellent measurement technique for characterizing ultra-fast devices because it has high bandwidth, is non-contact, is non-destructive, and relatively non-invasive. In this paper, an optical fiber-based electro-optic sampling system is designed and used for characterizing high speed InGaAs thin film MSM photodetectors. A fiber laser which is operating at 1556 nm wavelength was used for the sampling and excitation beam. Optical fibers were used to connect each component in the system for flexibility. InGaAs thin film MSM photodetectors were fabricated and characterized. InGaAs thin film MSM photodetectors were bonded onto a coplanar strip line deposited on a benzocyclobutene (BCB)-coated glass substrate for characterization. These thin film photodetectors show high speed operation combined with high responsivity and large detection area compared to P-I-N photodetectors operating at similar speeds

  19. Phobos: Observed bulk properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pätzold, Martin; Andert, Tom; Jacobson, Robert; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Dehant, Véronique

    2014-11-01

    This work is a review of the mass determinations of the Mars moon Phobos by spacecraft close flybys, by solving for the Martian gravity field and by the analysis of secular orbit perturbations. The absolute value and accuracy is sensitive on the knowledge and accuracy of the Phobos ephemeris, of the spacecraft orbit, other perturbing forces acting on the spacecraft and the resolution of the Martian gravity field besides the measurement accuracy of the radio tracking data. The mass value and its error improved from spacecraft mission to mission or from the modern analysis of “old” tracking data but these solutions depend on the accuracy of the ephemeris at the time of observation. The mass value seems to settle within the range of GMPh=(7.11±0.09)×10-4 km3 s-2 which covers almost all mass values from close flybys and “distant” encounters within its 3-σ error (1.5%). Using the volume value determined from MEX HRSC imaging, the bulk density is (1873±31) kg m-3 (3-σ error or 1.7%), a low value which suggests that Phobos is either highly porous, is composed partially of light material or both. The determination of the gravity coefficients C20 and C22 from the Mars Express 2010 close flyby does not allow to draw conclusion on the internal structure. The large errors do not distinguish whether Phobos is homogeneous or not. In view of theories of the Phobos' origin, one possibility is that Phobos is not a captured asteroid but accreted from a debris disk in Mars orbit as a second generation solar system object.

  20. Bulk Data Mover

    2011-01-03

    Bulk Data Mover (BDM) is a high-level data transfer management tool. BDM handles the issue of large variance in file sizes and a big portion of small files by managing the file transfers with optimized transfer queue and concurrency management algorithms. For example, climate simulation data sets are characterized by large volume of files with extreme variance in file sizes. The BDN achieves high performance using a variety of techniques, including multi-thraded concurrent transfer connections,more » data channel caching, load balancing over multiple transfer servers, and storage i/o pre-fetching. Logging information from the BDM is collected and analyzed to study the effectiveness of the transfer management algorithms. The BDM can accept a request composed of multiple files or an entire directory. The request also contains the target site and directory where the replicated files will reside. If a directory is provided at the source, then the BDM will replicate the structure of the source directory at the target site. The BDM is capable of transferring multiple files concurrently as well as using parallel TCP streams. The optimal level of concurrency or parallel streams depends on the bandwidth capacity of the storage systems at both ends of the transfer as well as achievable bandwidth of the wide-area network. Hardware req.-PC, MAC, Multi-platform & Workstation; Software req.: Compile/version-Java 1.50_x or ablove; Type of files: source code, executable modules, installation instructions other, user guide; URL: http://sdm.lbl.gov/bdm/« less

  1. Plasmonic field confinement for separate absorption-multiplication in InGaAs nanopillar avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Alan C.; Senanayake, Pradeep; Hung, Chung-Hong; El-Howayek, Georges; Rajagopal, Abhejit; Currie, Marc; Hayat, Majeed M.; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-12-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are essential components in quantum key distribution systems and active imaging systems requiring both ultrafast response time to measure photon time of flight and high gain to detect low photon flux. The internal gain of an APD can improve system signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Excess noise is typically kept low through the selection of material with intrinsically low excess noise, using separate-absorption-multiplication (SAM) heterostructures, or taking advantage of the dead-space effect using thin multiplication regions. In this work we demonstrate the first measurement of excess noise and gain-bandwidth product in III-V nanopillars exhibiting substantially lower excess noise factors compared to bulk and gain-bandwidth products greater than 200 GHz. The nanopillar optical antenna avalanche detector (NOAAD) architecture is utilized for spatially separating the absorption region from the avalanche region via the NOA resulting in single carrier injection without the use of a traditional SAM heterostructure.

  2. A low noise low power 512×256 ROIC for extended wavelength InGaAs FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Songlei; Huang, Zhangcheng; Chen, Yu; Li, Tao; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2015-05-01

    A low noise low power 512×256 readout integrated circuit (ROIC) based on Capacitance Trans-impedance Amplifier (CTIA) was designed in this paper. The ROIC with 30μm pixel-pitch and 70 fF integrated capacitance as normal structure and test structure capacitance from 5 to 60 fF, was fabricated in 0.5μm DPTM CMOS process. The results showed that output voltage was larger than 2.0V and power consumption was about 150mW, output ROIC noise was about 3.6E-4V which equivalent noise was 160e-, and the test structure noise was from 20e- to 140 e-. Compared the readout noises in Integration Then Readout (ITR) mode and Integration While Readout (IWR) mode, it indicated that in IWR mode, readout noise comes mainly from both integration capacitance and sampling capacitance, while in ITR mode, readout noise comes mostly from sampling capacitance. Finally the ROIC was flip-chip bonded with Indium bumps to extended wavelength InGaAs detectors with cutoff wavelength 2.5μm at 200K. The peak detectivity exceeded 5E11cmHz1/2/w with 70nA/cm2 dark current density at 200K.

  3. Non-destructive mapping of doping and structural composition of MOVPE-grown high current density resonant tunnelling diodes through photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K. J. P.; Stevens, B. J.; Mukai, T.; Ohnishi, D.; Hogg, R. A.

    2015-05-01

    We report on photoluminescence (PL) characterisation of metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) grown high current density (~700 kA/cm2) InGaAs/AlAs/InP based resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs) for terahertz emission. The PL mapping we describe allows important information about doping level and uniformity, ternary alloy composition and uniformity, and uniformity of quantum well thickness to be deduced. PL as a function of doping concentration is studied for InGaAs test layers at low temperatures and correlated to secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and electrochemical capacitance-voltage (eCV) profiling to provide non-destructive mapping of doping over the wafer. For the RTD structures, we utilise eCV as a selective etch tool to identify the origin of low temperature PL emission from the quantum well (QW) and the highly doped contact layers. PL mapping of the RTD wafer at low temperatures is shown to allow the assessment of variations in InGaAs alloy composition and QW thickness. Details of the growth process are discussed and confirmed using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) crystallography. The rapid non-destructive characterisation and wafer mapping of these structures promises a route to future growth optimisation of such structures.

  4. Plasmonic field confinement for separate absorption-multiplication in InGaAs nanopillar avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Alan C; Senanayake, Pradeep; Hung, Chung-Hong; El-Howayek, Georges; Rajagopal, Abhejit; Currie, Marc; Hayat, Majeed M; Huffaker, Diana L

    2015-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are essential components in quantum key distribution systems and active imaging systems requiring both ultrafast response time to measure photon time of flight and high gain to detect low photon flux. The internal gain of an APD can improve system signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Excess noise is typically kept low through the selection of material with intrinsically low excess noise, using separate-absorption-multiplication (SAM) heterostructures, or taking advantage of the dead-space effect using thin multiplication regions. In this work we demonstrate the first measurement of excess noise and gain-bandwidth product in III-V nanopillars exhibiting substantially lower excess noise factors compared to bulk and gain-bandwidth products greater than 200 GHz. The nanopillar optical antenna avalanche detector (NOAAD) architecture is utilized for spatially separating the absorption region from the avalanche region via the NOA resulting in single carrier injection without the use of a traditional SAM heterostructure. PMID:26627932

  5. Photoexcited-induced sensitivity of InGaAs surface QDs to environment.

    PubMed

    Milla, M J; Ulloa, J M; Guzmán, A

    2014-11-01

    A detailed analysis of the impact of illumination on the electrical response of In0.5Ga0.5As surface nanostructures is carried out as a function of different relative humidity conditions. The importance of the surface-to-volume ratio for sensing applications is once more highlighted. From dark-to-photo conditions, the sheet resistance (SR) of a three-dimensional In0.5Ga0.5As nanostructure decays two orders of magnitude compared with that of a two-dimensional nanostructure. The electrical response is found to be vulnerable to the energy of the incident light and the external conditions. Illuminating with high energy light translates into an SR reduction of one order of magnitude under humid atmospheres, whereas it remains nearly unchanged under dry environments. Conversely, lighting with energy below the bulk energy bandgap, shows a negligible effect on the electrical properties regardless the local moisture. Both illumination and humidity are therefore needed for sensing. Photoexcited carriers can only contribute to conductivity if surface states are inactive due to water physisorption. The strong dependence of the electrical response on the environment makes these nanostructures very suitable for the development of highly sensitive and efficient sensing devices. PMID:25325146

  6. Plasmonic field confinement for separate absorption-multiplication in InGaAs nanopillar avalanche photodiodes

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Alan C.; Senanayake, Pradeep; Hung, Chung-Hong; El-Howayek, Georges; Rajagopal, Abhejit; Currie, Marc; Hayat, Majeed M.; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are essential components in quantum key distribution systems and active imaging systems requiring both ultrafast response time to measure photon time of flight and high gain to detect low photon flux. The internal gain of an APD can improve system signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Excess noise is typically kept low through the selection of material with intrinsically low excess noise, using separate-absorption-multiplication (SAM) heterostructures, or taking advantage of the dead-space effect using thin multiplication regions. In this work we demonstrate the first measurement of excess noise and gain-bandwidth product in III–V nanopillars exhibiting substantially lower excess noise factors compared to bulk and gain-bandwidth products greater than 200 GHz. The nanopillar optical antenna avalanche detector (NOAAD) architecture is utilized for spatially separating the absorption region from the avalanche region via the NOA resulting in single carrier injection without the use of a traditional SAM heterostructure. PMID:26627932

  7. Silicon Bulk Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, T. K.; Gutierrez, R. C.; Wilcox, J. Z.; Stell, C.; Vorperian, V.; Calvet, R.; Li, W. J.; Charkaborty, I.; Bartman, R.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on design, modeling, fabrication, and characterization of a novel silicon bulk micromachined vibratory rate gyroscope designed for microspacecraft applications. The new microgyroscope consists of a silicon four leaf cloverstructure with a post attached to the center.

  8. Bulk pesticide storage - state perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Buzicky, G.

    1994-12-31

    State bulk pesticide storage regulations continue to evolve differentially due, in large part, to the absence of federal regulations. This is about to change because of the pending promulgation of 40 CFR Part 165, as amended in 1988 by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules regarding storage, handling and disposal. Until final adoption of the rules by EPA, states continue to address bulk pesticide storage and handling according to individual state statute, rules and guidelines.

  9. Modelling of bulk superconductor magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a topical review of the current state of the art in modelling the magnetization of bulk superconductors, including both (RE)BCO (where RE = rare earth or Y) and MgB2 materials. Such modelling is a powerful tool to understand the physical mechanisms of their magnetization, to assist in interpretation of experimental results, and to predict the performance of practical bulk superconductor-based devices, which is particularly important as many superconducting applications head towards the commercialization stage of their development in the coming years. In addition to the analytical and numerical techniques currently used by researchers for modelling such materials, the commonly used practical techniques to magnetize bulk superconductors are summarized with a particular focus on pulsed field magnetization (PFM), which is promising as a compact, mobile and relatively inexpensive magnetizing technique. A number of numerical models developed to analyse the issues related to PFM and optimise the technique are described in detail, including understanding the dynamics of the magnetic flux penetration and the influence of material inhomogeneities, thermal properties, pulse duration, magnitude and shape, and the shape of the magnetization coil(s). The effect of externally applied magnetic fields in different configurations on the attenuation of the trapped field is also discussed. A number of novel and hybrid bulk superconductor structures are described, including improved thermal conductivity structures and ferromagnet-superconductor structures, which have been designed to overcome some of the issues related to bulk superconductors and their magnetization and enhance the intrinsic properties of bulk superconductors acting as trapped field magnets. Finally, the use of hollow bulk cylinders/tubes for shielding is analysed.

  10. Low-noise, fast frame-rate InGaAs 320 x 256 FPA for hyperspectral applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeiren, Jan; Van Bogget, Urbain; Van Horebeek, Guido; Bentell, Jonas; Verbeke, Peet; Colin, Thierry

    2009-05-01

    InGaAs is the material of preference for uncooled imaging in the [0.9-1.7 μm] SWIR range, as it can be manufactured on low cost InP substrates in a mainstream technology for optical telecommunications. By removing the substrate the spectral range can be extended to the [0.6 - 1.7 μm] range. In this way low cost, room temperature operated FPAs cameras for imaging and hyperspectral applications can be developed. The FPA is built around a low power CTIA stage with 3 S&H capacitors in the 20*20 um2 unit cell. This approach results in a synchronous shutter operation, which will support both ITR and IWR operation. In IWR mode the integration dead time is limited to max. 10 μsec. The CDS operation yields in a high sensitivity combined with a low noise: This presentation will focus on the development of a 20 μm pitch 320*256 device, with the following main characteristics: 20 μV/e-sensitivity and < 60 e-noise. The 4 low-power, differential outputs are enabling to drive an output load of > 30 pF at 40 Msamples/sec each, resulting in a > 1700 Hz frame rate, while at the same time the overall nominal power dissipation is < 200 mW. The ROIC is realized in a 0.35 um technology and the outputs are designed to drive directly a 3.3 V, 1.5 V VCM differential AD convertor. The circuit also supports a NDR operating mode to further reduce the noise of the FPA. A small from factor camera with Cameralink output is built around this FPA.

  11. Compact multichannel receiver using InGaAs APDs for single-pulse eye-safe laser radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Hoyt N.; Yun, Steven T.; Dinndorf, Kenneth M.; Hayden, David R.

    1997-08-01

    Active imaging laser radars form 3D images which can be processed to provide target identification and precision aimpoint definition in real time. Earlier raster-scanned and pushbroom-scanned 3D imaging laser radar receivers required multiple laser pulses to assemble a complete 3D image frame. Platform/target motion and atmospheric effects caused tearing and jitter in the assembled 3D images, which complicated the subsequent image processing and necessitated the use of stabilized scanning systems. This paper describes the current status of the parallel/multichannel imaging laser radar receiver (PMR) which is being developed under an SBIR Phaser II program by the USAF Wright Laboratories Armament Directorate. The PMR uses an array of multichannel laser radar receivers to form single-pulse, 3D laser radar images, thus eliminating the complex and costly scanning system, and enabling much higher frame rates than were ever before possible. The heart of the PMR is the multichannel optical receiver photonic hybrid (MORPH), a high performance 16-channel laser radar receiver module which uses an array of InGaAs avalanche photodiodes for eyesafe operation. The MORPH provides high downrange resolution, multihit range data for each detector on a compact circuit card. Optical flux is transferred from the receiver focal plane to each MORPH via a fiber optic ribbon cable. An array of MORPHs are plugged into a compact passive backplane, along with a single digital control card (DCC). The DCC, which is the same form factor as the MORPH, synchronizes the MORPHs and transfers the digital range information to the host processor over a standard parallel data interface cable. The system described here illustrates one approach to integrating and packaging high-density photonic arrays and their associated signal processing electronics to yield a compact, low power, scannerless, high performance imaging laser radar receiver, using existing technology.

  12. High-Performance Wrap-Gated InGaAs Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors with Sputtered Dielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Fan; Yip, SenPo; Yang, Zai-xing; Fang, Ming; Hung, TakFu; Pun, Edwin Y.B.; Ho, Johnny C.

    2015-01-01

    Although wrap-gated nanowire field-effect-transistors (NWFETs) have been explored as an ideal electronic device geometry for low-power and high-frequency applications, further performance enhancement and practical implementation are still suffering from electron scattering on nanowire surface/interface traps between the nanowire channel and gate dielectric as well as the complicated device fabrication scheme. Here, we report the development of high-performance wrap-gated InGaAs NWFETs using conventional sputtered Al2O3 layers as gate dielectrics, instead of the typically employed atomic layer deposited counterparts. Importantly, the surface chemical passivation of NW channels performed right before the dielectric deposition is found to significantly alleviate plasma induced defect traps on the NW channel. Utilizing this passivation, the wrap-gated device exhibits superior electrical performances: a high ION/IOFF ratio of ~2 × 106, an extremely low sub-threshold slope of 80 mV/decade and a peak field-effect electron mobility of ~1600 cm2/(Vs) at VDS = 0.1 V at room temperature, in which these values are even better than the ones of state-of-the-art NWFETs reported so far. By combining sputtering and pre-deposition chemical passivation to achieve high-quality gate dielectrics for wrap-gated NWFETs, the superior gate coupling and electrical performances have been achieved, confirming the effectiveness of our hybrid approach for future advanced electronic devices. PMID:26607169

  13. Controlling Planar and Vertical Ordering in Three-Dimensional (In,Ga)As Quantum Dot Lattices by GaAs Surface Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidbauer, M.; Seydmohamadi, Sh.; Wang, Zh.M.; Mazur, Yu.I.; Salamo, G.J.; Grigoriev, D.; Schaefer, P.; Koehler, R.; Hanke, M.

    2006-02-17

    Anisotropic surface diffusion and strain are used to explain the formation of three-dimensional (In,Ga)As quantum dot lattices. The diffusion characteristics of the surface, coupled with the elastic anisotropy of the matrix, provides an excellent opportunity to influence the dot positions. In particular, quantum dots that are laterally organized into long chains or chessboard two-dimensional arrays vertically organized with strict vertical ordering or vertical ordering that is inclined to the sample surface normal are accurately predicted and observed.

  14. Gallium Arsenide Layers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy on Single Crystalline Germanium Islands on Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Mikio; Tanigawa, Takaho; Minamisono, Tadanori; Gamo, Kenji; Namba, Susumu

    1984-05-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) layers have successfully been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on single crystalline germanium (Ge) islands, recrystallized by zone melting with SiO2 capping layers, on thermally-oxidized Si-wafers. The GaAs layers, grown on the single crystalline Ge islands, show smooth surfaces without any grain-boundaries, while those, grown on the Ge islands with grain-boundaries and on the SiO2, have grain-boundaries. The GaAs layers on the single crystalline Ge islands emit photoluminescence, the intensity of which is almost comparable to that of GaAs layers on bulk Ge crystals.

  15. Diffused P+-N solar cells in bulk GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrego, J. M.; Ghandhi, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    Recently melt grown GaAs, made by liquid encapsulation techniques, has become available. This material is of sufficiently good quality to allow the fabrication of solar cells by direct diffusion. Results obtained with p(+)/n junction solar cells made by zinc diffusion are described. The quality of bulk GaAs for this application is evaluated.

  16. Electronic structure of Mg: From monolayers to bulk

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, F.; Laubschat, C.; Heber, M.; Servedio, V.D.P.

    2004-09-15

    The structure of thin Mg films epitaxially grown onto a W(110) crystal was analyzed by low energy electron and Auger electron diffraction verifying a growth of bulk Mg. Normal-emission angle-resolved photoemission spectra of the growing films reveal quantum well states on both sides of a surface state. These states result from electron confinement in the Mg layer and are used to derive the electronic structure perpendicular to the surface. Off-normal, the electronic structure is dominated by the parabolic dispersion of surface states forming circles around the {gamma}-points and ellipses around the M-points in the Fermi surface cuts.

  17. Recent developments of film bulk acoustic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junning; Liu, Guorong; Li, Jie; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-06-01

    Film bulk acoustic wave resonator (FBAR) experienced skyrocketing development in the past 15 years, owing to the explosive development of mobile communication. It stands out in acoustic filters mainly because of high quality factor, which enables low insertion loss and sharp roll off. Except for the massive application in wireless communication, FBARs are also promising sensors because of the high sensitivity and readily integration ability to miniaturize circuits. On the ground of summarizing FBAR’s application in wireless communication as filters and in sensors including electronic nose, bio field, and pressure sensing, this paper review the main challenges of each application faced. The number of filters installed in the mobile phone has being grown explosively, which leads to overcrowded bands and put harsh requirements on component size and power consumption control for each unit. Data flow and rate are becoming increasingly demanding as well. This paper discusses three promising technical strategies addressing these issues. Among which coupled resonator filter is given intense attention because it is able to vigorously reduce the filter size by stacking two or more resonators together, and it is a great technique to increase data flow and rate. Temperature compensation methods are discussed considering their vital influence on frequency stability. Finally, materials improvement and novel materials exploration for band width modulation, tunable band acquisition, and quality factor improvement are discussed. The authors appeal attention of the academic society to bring AlN epitaxial thin film into the FBAR fabrication and have proposed a configuration to implement this idea.

  18. High-optical-power handling InGaAs photodiodes and balanced receivers for high-spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) analog photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Abhay M.; Wang, Xinde; Mohr, Dan; Becker, Donald; Patil, Ravikiran

    2004-08-01

    We have developed 20 mA or higher photocurrent handling InGaAs photodiodes with 20 GHz bandwidth, and 10 mA or higher photocurrent handling InGaAs photodiodes with >40 GHz bandwidth. These photodiodes have been thoroughly tested for reliability including Bellcore GR 468 standard and are built to ISO 9001:2000 Quality Management System. These Dual-depletion InGaAs/InP photodiodes are surface illuminated and yet handle such large photocurrent due to advanced band-gap engineering. They have broad wavelength coverage from 800 nm to 1700 nm, and thus can be used at several wavelengths such as 850 nm, 1064 nm, 1310 nm, 1550 nm, and 1620 nm. Furthermore, they exhibit very low Polarization Dependence Loss of 0.05dB typical to 0.1dB maximum. Using above high current handling photodiodes, we have developed classical Push-Pull pair balanced photoreceivers for the 2 to 18 GHz EW system. These balanced photoreceivers boost the Spurious Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) by almost 3 dB by eliminating the laser RIN noise. Future research calls for designing an Avalanche Photodiode Balanced Pair to boost the SFDR even further by additional 3 dB. These devices are a key enabling technology in meeting the SFDR requirements for several DoD systems.

  19. Magnetic properties of manganese ferrite films grown at atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Xu; Yang, Aria; Yoon, Soack-Dae; Christodoulides, Joe A.; Harris, Vincent G.; Vittoria, Carmine

    2005-05-15

    Manganese ferrite is a partial inverse spinel which, when prepared by conventional growth techniques, has {approx}20% of the Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice. Here we describe a layer-by-layer growth scheme at atomic scale by which the percentage of Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice can be artificially controlled. Manganese ferrite films grown by this technique exhibits different degrees of cation inversion when grown on {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace} MgO substrates. It was observed that saturation magnetization varied in a wide range of values depending on chemical composition and oxygen pressure. Although bulk manganese ferrite was low anisotropy magnetic material, uniaxial anisotropy was observed at room temperature in the films deposited on {l_brace}100{r_brace} MgO substrates, and its magnitude and direction sensitively depended on chemical composition and oxygen pressure during deposition.

  20. Magnetic Properties of Manganese Ferrite Films Grown at Atomic Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo,X.; Yang, A.; Yoon, S.; Christodoulides, I.; Harris, V.; Vittoria, C.

    2005-01-01

    Manganese ferrite is a partial inverse spinel which, when prepared by conventional growth techniques, has {approx}20% of the Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice. Here we describe a layer-by-layer growth scheme at atomic scale by which the percentage of Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice can be artificially controlled. Manganese ferrite films grown by this technique exhibits different degrees of cation inversion when grown on {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace} MgO substrates. It was observed that saturation magnetization varied in a wide range of values depending on chemical composition and oxygen pressure. Although bulk manganese ferrite was low anisotropy magnetic material, uniaxial anisotropy was observed at room temperature in the films deposited on {l_brace}100{r_brace} MgO substrates, and its magnitude and direction sensitively depended on chemical composition and oxygen pressure during deposition.

  1. Off state breakdown behavior of AlGaAs / InGaAs field plate pHEMTs

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, John; Mil'shtein, Samson

    2014-05-15

    Off-state breakdown voltage, V{sub br}, is an important parameter determining the maximum power output of microwave Field Effect Transistors (FETs). In recent years, the use of field plates has been widely adopted to significantly increase V{sub br}. This important technological development has extended FET technologies into new areas requiring these higher voltages and power levels. Keeping with this goal, field plates were added to an existing AlGaAs / InGaAs pseudomorphic High Electron Mobility Transistor (pHEMT) process with the aim of determining the off-state breakdown mechanism and the dependency of V{sub br} on the field plate design. To find the mechanism responsible for breakdown, temperature dependent off-state breakdown measurements were conducted. It was found that at low current levels, the temperature dependence indicates thermionic field emission at the Schottky gate and at higher current levels, impact ionization is indicated. The combined results imply that impact ionization is ultimately the mechanism that is responsible for the breakdown in the tested transistors, but that it is preceded by thermionic field emission from the gate. To test the dependence of V{sub br} upon the field plate design, the field plate length and the etch depth through the highly-doped cap layer under the field plate were varied. Also, non-field plate devices were tested along side field plate transistors. It was found that the length of the etched region under the field plate is the dominant factor in determining the off-state breakdown of the more deeply etched devices. For less deeply etched devices, the length of the field plate is more influential. The influence of surface states between the highly doped cap layer and the passivation layer along the recess are believed to have a significant influence in the case of the more deeply etched examples. It is believed that these traps spread the electric field, thus raising the breakdown voltage. Three terminal breakdown

  2. Protein Crystals Grown in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A collage of protein and virus crystals, many of which were grown on the U.S. Space Shuttle or Russian Space Station, Mir. The crystals include the proteins canavalin; mouse monoclonal antibody; a sweet protein, thaumatin; and a fungal protease. Viruses are represented here by crystals of turnip yellow mosaic virus and satellite tobacco mosaic virus. The crystals are photographed under polarized light (thus causing the colors) and range in size from a few hundred microns in edge length up to more than a millimeter. All the crystals are grown from aqueous solutions and are useful for X-ray diffraction analysis. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  3. AC and DC transport currents in melt-grown YBCO

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Z.; Ashworth, S.; Becluz, C.; Scurlock, R.G. )

    1991-03-01

    It has been suggested that the transport J{sub c} in multi-grain samples of bulk YBCO are limited by the intergrain links. This paper reports on preliminary measurements of intergrain currents. The intergrain critical currents in melt grown YBCO do not appear to be as sensitive to the precise crystallographic alignment of adjacent grains a has been reported for thin films. The measured critical current of similar grain boundaries varies widely, between 15000 A/cm{sup 2} and 200A/Cm{sub 2} for adjacent boundaries in the same sample.

  4. Growth and Characteristics of Bulk Single Crystals Grown from Solution on Earth and in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of crystals has been of interest to physicists and engineers for a long time because of their unique properties. Single crystals are utilized in such diverse applications as pharmaceuticals, computers, infrared detectors, frequency measurements, piezoelectric devices, a variety of high technology devices and sensors. Solution crystal growth is one of the important techniques to grow a variety of crystals when the material decomposes at the melting point and a suitable solvent is available to make a saturated solution at a desired temperature. In this chapter an attempt is made to give some fundamentals of growing crystals from solution including improved designs of various crystallizers. Since the same solution crystal growth technique could not be used in microgravity, authors had proposed a new cooled sting technique to grow crystals in space. Authors? experiences of conducting two space shuttle experiments relating to solution crystal growth are also detailed in this work. The complexity of these solution growth experiments to grow crystals in space are discussed. These happen to be some of the early experiments performed in space, and various lessons learned are described. A brief discussion of protein crystal growth that also shares basic principles of solution growth technique is given along with some flight hardware information for its growth in microgravity.

  5. Diffusion length measurement in bulk and epitaxially grown III-V semiconductors using charge collection microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Diffusion lengths and surface recombination velocities were measured in GaAs diodes and InP finished solar cells. The basic technique used was charge collection microscopy, also known as electron beam induced current (EBIC). The normalized currents and distances from the pn junction were read directly from the calibrated curves obtained while using the line-scan mode in an SEM. These values were then equated to integral and infinite series expressions resulting from the solution of the diffusion equation with both extended-generation and point-generation functions. This expands previous work by examining both thin and thick samples. The surface recombination velocity was either treated as an unknown in a system of two equations or measured directly using low e(-) beam accelerating voltages. These techniques give accurate results by accounting for the effects of surface recombination and the finite size of the generation volume.

  6. Diffusion length measurements in bulk and epitaxially grown 3-5 semiconductors using charge collection microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Diffusion lengths and surface recombination velocities were measured in GaAs diodes and InP finished solar cells. The basic techniques used was charge collection microscopy also known as electron beam induced current (EBIC). The normalized currents and distances from the pn junction were read directly from the calibrated curves obtained while using the line scan mode in an SEM. These values were then equated to integral and infinite series expressions resulting from the solution of the diffusion equation with both extended generation and point generation functions. This expands previous work by examining both thin and thick samples. The surface recombination velocity was either treated as an unknown in a system of two equations, or measured directly using low e(-) beam accelerating voltages. These techniques give accurate results by accounting for the effects of surface recombination and the finite size of the generation volume.

  7. A direct comparison of CVD-grown and exfoliated MoS2 using optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechinger, G.; Mann, J.; Preciado, E.; Barroso, D.; Nguyen, A.; Eroms, J.; Schüller, C.; Bartels, L.; Korn, T.

    2014-06-01

    MoS2 is a highly interesting material, which exhibits a crossover from an indirect band gap in the bulk crystal to a direct gap for single layers. Here, we perform a direct comparison between large-area MoS2 films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and MoS2 flakes prepared by mechanical exfoliation from mineral bulk crystal. Raman spectroscopy measurements show differences between the in-plane and out-of-plane phonon mode positions in CVD-grown and exfoliated MoS2. Photoluminescence (PL) mapping reveals large regions in the CVD-grown films that emit strong PL at room-temperature, and low-temperature PL scans demonstrate a large spectral shift of the A exciton emission as a function of position. Polarization-resolved PL measurements under near-resonant excitation conditions show a strong circular polarization of the PL, corresponding to a valley polarization.

  8. Fracture in Bulk Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J.A.; Wright, J.L.

    1998-11-30

    The fracture behavior of a Zr-based bulk amorphous alloy, Zr-10 AI-5 Ti-17.9 Cu-14.6 Ni, was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction for any evidence of crystallization preceding crack propagation. No evidence for crystallization was found in shear bands in compression specimens or at the fracture surface in tensile specimens. In- situ TEM deformation experiments were performed to more closely examine actual crack tip regions. During the in-situ deformation experiment controlled crack growth occurred to the point where the specimen was approximately 20 {micro}m thick at which point uncontrolled crack growth occurred. No evidence of any crystallization was found at the crack tips or the crack flanks. Subsequent scanning microscope examination showed that the uncontrolled crack growth region exhibited ridges and veins that appeared to have resulted from melting. Performing the deformations, both bulk and in-situ TEM, at liquid nitrogen temperatures (LN{sub 2}) resulted in an increase in the amount of controlled crack growth. The surface roughness of the bulk regions fractured at LN{sub 2} temperatures corresponded with the roughness of the crack propagation observed during the in-situ TEM experiment, suggesting that the smooth-appearing room temperature fracture sur-faces may also be a result of localized melting.

  9. Bulk Superconductors in Mobile Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, F. N.; Delor, U. Floegel-; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.; Schirrmeister, P.

    We investigate and review concepts of multi - seeded REBCO bulk superconductors in mobile application. ATZ's compact HTS bulk magnets can trap routinely 1 T@77 K. Except of magnetization, flux creep and hysteresis, industrial - like properties as compactness, power density, and robustness are of major device interest if mobility and light-weight construction is in focus. For mobile application in levitated trains or demonstrator magnets we examine the performance of on-board cryogenics either by LN2 or cryo-cooler application. The mechanical, electric and thermodynamical requirements of compact vacuum cryostats for Maglev train operation were studied systematically. More than 30 units are manufactured and tested. The attractive load to weight ratio is more than 10 and favours group module device constructions up to 5 t load on permanent magnet (PM) track. A transportable and compact YBCO bulk magnet cooled with in-situ 4 Watt Stirling cryo-cooler for 50 - 80 K operation is investigated. Low cooling power and effective HTS cold mass drives the system construction to a minimum - thermal loss and light-weight design.

  10. Bulk Crystal Growth of Nonlinear Optical Organic Materials Using Inverted Vertical Gradient Freeze Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, J.; Cruz, Magda; Metzl, R.; Wang, W. S.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    1998-01-01

    A new process for producing large bulk single crystals of benzil (C6H5COCOC6H5) is reported in this paper. Good quality crystals have been successfully grown using this approach to crystal growth. This method seems to be very promising for other thermally stable NLO organic materials also. The entire contents vycor crucible 1.5 inch in diameter and 2 inch deep was converted to single crystal. Purity of the starting growth material is also an important factor in the final quality of the grown crystals. The entire crystal can be very easily taken out of the crucible by simple maneuvering. Initial characterization of the grown crystals indicated that the crystals are as good as other crystals grown by conventional Bridgman Stockbarger technique.

  11. Integration of bulk-quality thin film magneto-optical cerium-doped yttrium iron garnet on silicon nitride photonic substrates.

    PubMed

    Onbasli, Mehmet C; Goto, Taichi; Sun, Xueyin; Huynh, Nathalie; Ross, C A

    2014-10-20

    Cerium substituted yttrium iron garnet (Ce:YIG) films were grown on yttrium iron garnet (YIG) seed layers on silicon nitride films using pulsed laser deposition. Optimal process conditions for forming garnet films on silicon nitride are presented. Bulk or near-bulk magnetic and magneto-optical properties were observed for 160 nm thick Ce:YIG films grown at 640 °C on rapid thermal annealed 40 nm thick YIG grown at 640 °C and 2 Hz pulse rate. The effect of growth temperature and deposition rate on structural, magnetic and magneto-optical properties has been investigated.

  12. Stable and high-speed SiC bulk growth without dendrites by the HTCVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Yuichiro; Makino, Emi; Sugiyama, Naohiro; Kamata, Isaho; Hoshino, Norihiro; Kojima, Jun; Hara, Kazukuni; Tsuchida, Hidekazu

    2016-08-01

    We investigate growth conditions to obtain high-quality SiC bulk crystals by the High-Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (HTCVD) method. Formation of dendrite crystals, which sometimes occurs on the growth front and degrades the material quality, is raised as an issue. We find that a bulk crystal growth under a high vertical temperature gradient, where the temperature of the back side of the bulk crystal is much lower than that of the crystal surface, suppresses the formation of dendrite crystals. Under growth conditions with a high temperature gradient, a very high-speed growth of 2.4 mm/h is achieved without the formation of dendrite crystals. Growth of a thick 4H-SiC bulk crystal without the dendrites is demonstrated and the quality of a grown crystal is evaluated.

  13. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  14. Interface trap density and mobility extraction in InGaAs buried quantum well metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors by gated Hall method

    SciTech Connect

    Chidambaram, Thenappan; Madisetti, Shailesh; Greene, Andrew; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Oktyabrsky, Serge; Veksler, Dmitry; Hill, Richard

    2014-03-31

    In this work, we are using a gated Hall method for measurement of free carrier density and electron mobility in buried InGaAs quantum well metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor channels. At room temperature, mobility over 8000 cm{sup 2}/Vs is observed at ∼1.4 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. Temperature dependence of the electron mobility gives the evidence that remote Coulomb scattering dominates at electron density <2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}. Spectrum of the interface/border traps is quantified from comparison of Hall data with capacitance-voltage measurements or electrostatic modeling. Above the threshold voltage, gate control is strongly limited by fast traps that cannot be distinguished from free channel carriers just by capacitance-based methods and can be the reason for significant overestimation of channel density and underestimation of carrier mobility from transistor measurements.

  15. Characteristics of the dynamics of breakdown filaments in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, F.; Shekhter, P.; Eizenberg, M.; Cohen Weinfeld, K.

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs interface was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after a breakdown (BD) event at positive bias applied to the gate contact. The dynamics of the BD event were studied by comparable XPS measurements with different current compliance levels during the BD event. The overall results show that indium atoms from the substrate move towards the oxide by an electro-migration process and oxidize upon arrival following a power law dependence on the current compliance of the BD event. Such a result reveals the physical feature of the breakdown characteristics of III-V based metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  16. Polarization fine structure and enhanced single-photon emission of self-assembled lateral InGaAs quantum dot molecules embedded in a planar microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermannstädter, C.; Witzany, M.; Beirne, G. J.; Schulz, W.-M.; Eichfelder, M.; Rossbach, R.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P.; Wang, L.; Rastelli, A.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2009-06-01

    Single lateral InGaAs quantum dot molecules have been embedded in a planar microcavity in order to increase the luminescence extraction efficiency. Using a combination of metal-organic vapor phase and molecular beam epitaxy samples could be produced that exhibit a 30 times enhanced single-photon emission rate. We also show that the single-photon emission is fully switchable between two different molecular excitonic recombination energies by applying a lateral electric field. Furthermore, the presence of a polarization fine structure splitting of the molecular neutral excitonic states is reported which leads to two polarization split classically correlated biexciton-exciton cascades. The fine structure splitting is found to be on the order of 10 μeV.

  17. Compositional bowing of band energies and their deformation potentials in strained InGaAs ternary alloys: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Khomyakov, Petr A.; Luisier, Mathieu; Schenk, Andreas

    2015-08-10

    Using first-principles calculations, we show that the conduction and valence band energies and their deformation potentials exhibit a non-negligible compositional bowing in strained ternary semiconductor alloys such as InGaAs. The electronic structure of these compounds has been calculated within the framework of local density approximation and hybrid functional approach for large cubic supercells and special quasi-random structures, which represent two kinds of model structures for random alloys. We find that the predicted bowing effect for the band energy deformation potentials is rather insensitive to the choice of the functional and alloy structural model. The direction of bowing is determined by In cations that give a stronger contribution to the formation of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As valence band states with x ≳ 0.5, compared to Ga cations.

  18. Fermi level pinning in metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stack after post metallization annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, R.; Krylov, I.; Cytermann, C.; Eizenberg, M.; Tang, K.; Ahn, J.; McIntyre, P. C.

    2015-08-07

    The effect of post metal deposition annealing on the effective work function in metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stacks was investigated. The effective work functions of different metal gates (Al, Au, and Pt) were measured. Flat band voltage shifts for these and other metals studied suggest that their Fermi levels become pinned after the post-metallization vacuum annealing. Moreover, there is a difference between the measured effective work functions of Al and Pt, and the reported vacuum work function of these metals after annealing. We propose that this phenomenon is caused by charging of indium and gallium induced traps at the annealed metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface.

  19. High net modal gain (>100 cm(-1)) in 19-stacked InGaAs quantum dot laser diodes at 1000 nm wavelength band.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Fumihiko; Sugawara, Hiroharu; Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu

    2013-07-01

    An InGaAs quantum dot (QD) laser diode with 19-stacked QDs separated by 20 nm-thick GaAs spacers was fabricated using an ultrahigh-rate molecular beam epitaxial growth technique, and the laser characteristics were evaluated. A 19-stacked simple broad area QD laser diode was lased at the 1000 nm waveband. A net modal gain of 103 cm(-1) was obtained at 2.25 kA/cm(2), and the saturated modal gain was 145.6 cm(-1); these are the highest values obtained to our knowledge. These results indicate that using this technique to highly stack QDs is effective for improving the net modal gain of QD lasers.

  20. Heat Capacity Study of Solution Grown Crystals of Isotactic Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,H.; Cebe, P.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the specific heat capacity on isotactic polystyrene (iPS) crystals grown from dilute solution. Solution grown crystal (SGC) samples had larger crystal fractions and greatly reduced rigid amorphous fractions compared to their bulk cold-crystallized counterparts. Heat capacity studies were performed from below the glass transition temperature to above the melting temperature by using quasi-isothermal temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and standard DSC. Two or three endotherms are observed, which represent the melting of crystals. The small rigid amorphous fraction relaxes in a wide temperature range from just above the glass transition temperature to just below the first crystal melting endotherm. As in bulk iPS, 1 multiple reversing melting was found in iPS SGCs, supporting the view that double melting in iPS may be due to dual thermal stability distribution existing along one single lamella.2 The impact of reorganization and annealing on the melt endotherms was also investigated. Annealing occurs as a result of the very slow effective heating rate of the quasi-isothermal measurements compared to standard DSC. The improvement of crystal perfection through annealing causes the reversing melting endotherms to occur at a temperature higher than the endotherms seen in the standard DSC scan.

  1. Comparison of the degradation characteristics of AlON/InGaAs and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, F. Krylov, I.; Eizenberg, M.

    2015-03-14

    In this paper, the degradation characteristics of MOS (Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor) stacks with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlON or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} only as dielectric layers on InGaAs were studied. The dielectric nitrides are proposed as possible passivation layers to prevent InGaAs oxidation. At negative bias, it has been found out that the main contribution to the overall degradation of the gate oxide is dominated by the generation of positive charge in the gate oxide. This effect is pronounced in MOS stacks with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlON as dielectric, where we think the positive charge is mainly generated in the AlON interlayer. At positive bias, the degradation is dominated by buildup of negative charge due to electron trapping in pre-existing or stress-induced traps. For stress biases where the leakage currents are low, the changes in the electrical characteristics are dominated by electron-trapping into traps located in energy levels in the upper part of the semiconductor gap. For stress biases with higher leakage current levels, the electron trapping occurs in stress-induced traps increasing the shift of V{sub FB} towards positive bias. The overall results clearly show that the improvement of the high-k dielectric/InGaAs interface by introducing N into the Al-oxide does not necessarily mean an increase in the reliability of the MOS stack.

  2. Flexoelectricity as a bulk property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta, Raffaele

    2010-03-01

    Piezoelectric composites can be created using nonpiezoelectric materials, by exploiting flexoelectricity. This is by definition the linear response of polarization to strain gradient, and is symmetry-allowed even in elemental crystals. However, the basic issue whether flexoelectricity is a bulk or a surface material property is open. We mention that the analogous issue about piezoelectricity is nontrivial either.^1 In this first attempt towards a full theory of flexoelectricity we prove that, for a simple class of strain and strain gradients, flexoelectricity is indeed a bulk effect. The key ingredients of the present theory are the long-range perturbations linearly induced by a unit displacement of a single nucleus in an otherwise perfect crystal: to leading order these are dipolar, quadrupolar, and octupolar. The corresponding tensors have rank 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Whereas dipoles and quadrupoles provide the piezoelectric response,^1 we show that dipoles and octupoles provide the flexoelectric response in nonpiezoelectric crystals. We conjecture that the full dipole and octupole tensors provide the flexoelectric response to the most general form of strain gradient. Our problem has a close relationship to the one of the ``absolute'' deformation potentials, which is based on a similar kind of dipolar and octupolar tensors.^2 ^1 R. M. Martin, Phys. Rev. B 5, 1607 (1972). ^2 R. Resta, L. Colombo and S. Baroni, Phys. Rev. B 41, 12538 (1990).

  3. Growth of high quality bulk size single crystals of inverted solubility lithium sulphate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, A.; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2015-06-01

    The paper summarizes the processes of growing large lithium sulfate monohydrate (LSMH) single crystals. We have established a procedure to grow high quality bulk size single crystals of inverted solubility LSMH by a newly developed unidirectional crystallization technique called the Sankeranarayenan - Ramasamy (SR) method. The convective flow of crystal growth processes from solution and the conditions of growing crystals of various aspects were discussed. Good quality LSMH single crystal is grown of the size 20 mmX80 mm without cracks, localized-defects and inclusions. The as-grown crystals are suitable for piezoelectric and nonlinear optical applications.

  4. Growth of bulk single crystal of N-acetyl DL-methionine and its spectral characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moovendaran, K.; Natarajan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Bulk size single crystal of N-acetyl DL-methionine (C7H13NO3S) (1) was grown using a home-made crystal growth setup (MKN setup). The identity of the grown crystal was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The modes of vibrations of the functional groups present were assigned using the infrared (IR) spectrum. UV-vis-NIR spectra showed that the crystals have excellent transparency in the visible and infrared regions. The thermal stability and decomposition of the sample was studied by using thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). Photoluminescence excitation studies showed that the emission occurred at 350 nm for the compound.

  5. Growth of high quality bulk size single crystals of inverted solubility lithium sulphate monohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Silambarasan, A.; Rajesh, P. Ramasamy, P.

    2015-06-24

    The paper summarizes the processes of growing large lithium sulfate monohydrate (LSMH) single crystals. We have established a procedure to grow high quality bulk size single crystals of inverted solubility LSMH by a newly developed unidirectional crystallization technique called the Sankeranarayenan - Ramasamy (SR) method. The convective flow of crystal growth processes from solution and the conditions of growing crystals of various aspects were discussed. Good quality LSMH single crystal is grown of the size 20 mmX80 mm without cracks, localized-defects and inclusions. The as-grown crystals are suitable for piezoelectric and nonlinear optical applications.

  6. Technique for Calculating the Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshnyakov, V. A.; Belenkov, E. A.

    2014-10-01

    A comparative analysis of different techniques for calculating the bulk modulus of solid bodies has been performed. A new technique for calculating the bulk modulus is proposed which is especially adapted for theoretical calculations of the elastic properties of crystals. The new technique makes it possible to calculate the values of bulk moduli at high pressures with greater accuracy.

  7. 49 CFR 172.514 - Bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bulk packagings. 172.514 Section 172.514... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.514 Bulk packagings. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, each person who offers for transportation a bulk packaging which contains a hazardous...

  8. Investigations on growth morphology, bulk growth and crystalline perfection of L-threonine, an organic nonlinear optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linet, J. Mary; Das, S. Jerome

    2010-09-01

    L-threonine single crystal was successfully grown from aqueous solution. The morphology of the grown crystal was compared with the predicted morphology using Bravais-Friedel-Donnay-Harker law and was found to be in good agreement with the predicted morphology. Good optical quality bulk single crystal of enhanced size has been grown using unidirectional crystal growth method. High-resolution X-ray analysis study resulted in a rocking curve with a full width half maximum of 20 arc sec exhibiting the good crystalline quality of the grown crystal. The optical transmission study shows 90% of transmission in the entire visible region that exhibits the good optical quality of the grown crystal. The mechanical properties were analyzed by Vicker’s microhardness method.

  9. Prediction of the Viscoelastic Bulk Modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiaxi; Simon, Sindee

    2010-03-01

    The bulk and shear viscoelastic responses for several materials appear to arise from the same molecular mechanisms at short times, i.e., Andrade creep where the KWW beta parameter is approximately 0.3. If this is indeed the case, prediction and placement of the bulk viscoelastic response can be made simply by knowing the limiting elastic and rubbery bulk moduli and the viscoelastic shear response. The proposed methodology, which uses only easily measured functions, is considerably less time- and labor-intensive than direct measurement of the viscoelastic bulk modulus. Here we investigate this hypothesis and compare the calculated viscoelastic bulk responses for several materials to existing data in the literature.

  10. Microwave disinfestation of bulk timber.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Pedro Jose; Zona, Angela Tatiana; Sanchís, Raul; Balbastre, Juan Vicente; Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz, Eva Maria; Gordillo, Javier; de los Reyes, Elías

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a complete microwave system for bulk timber disinfestation is developed and tested. A commercial FEM simulator has been used to design the applicator, looking for structures providing uniform field distributions, which is a factor of capital relevance for a successful treatment. Special attention has also been given to the reduction of electromagnetic energy leakage. A dual polarized cylindrical applicator with a corrugated flange has been designed. The applicator has also been numerically tested emulating some real-life operating conditions. A prototype has been built using two low-cost magnetrons of 900 W and high power coaxial cables and it has been tested inside a shielded semianechoic chamber. The tests have been carried out in three stages: validation of the applicator design, determination of the lethal dosage as a function of the insect position and the maximum wood temperature allowed and statement of safe operation procedures. PMID:18351001

  11. New fermions in the bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brito, K. P. S.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2016-10-01

    The spinor fields on 5-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds are classified according to the geometric Fierz identities, which involve their bilinear covariants. Based upon this classification, which generalises the celebrated 4-dimensional Lounesto classification of spinor fields, new non-trivial classes of 5-dimensional spinor fields are hence found, with important potential applications regarding bulk fermions and their subsequent localisation on brane-worlds. In addition, quaternionic bilinear covariants are used to derive the quaternionic spin density through the truncated exterior bundle. In order to accomplish the realisation of these new spinors, a Killing vector field is constructed on the horizon of a 5-dimensional Kerr black hole. This Killing vector field is shown to reach the time-like Killing vector field at spatial infinity through a current 1-form density, constructed with the new derived spinor fields. The current density is, moreover, expressed as the fünfbein component, assuming a condensed form.

  12. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-08-01

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644K, a glass transition temperature of 401K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is ˜350Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractive for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry.

  13. Isotopic signatures by bulk analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.

    1997-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a series of measurement techniques for identification of nuclear signatures by analyzing bulk samples. Two specific applications for isotopic fingerprinting to identify the origin of anthropogenic radioactivity in bulk samples are presented. The first example is the analyses of environmental samples collected in the US Arctic to determine the impact of dumping of radionuclides in this polar region. Analyses of sediment and biota samples indicate that for the areas sampled the anthropogenic radionuclide content of sediments was predominantly the result of the deposition of global fallout. The anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in fish, birds and mammals were very low. It can be surmised that marine food chains are presently not significantly affected. The second example is isotopic fingerprinting of water and sediment samples from the Rocky Flats Facility (RFP). The largest source of anthropogenic radioactivity presently affecting surface-waters at RFP is the sediments that are currently residing in the holding ponds. One gram of sediment from a holding pond contains approximately 50 times more plutonium than 1 liter of water from the pond. Essentially 100% of the uranium in Ponds A-1 and A-2 originated as depleted uranium. The largest source of radioactivity in the terminal Ponds A-4, B-5 and C-2 was naturally occurring uranium and its decay product radium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.05% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public. All of the radioactivity observed in soil, sediment and water samples collected at RFP was naturally occurring, the result of processes at RFP or the result of global fallout. No extraneous anthropogenic alpha, beta or gamma activities were detected. The plutonium concentrations in Pond C-2 appear to vary seasonally.

  14. Diamond films grown from fullerene precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Zuiker, C.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1995-07-01

    Fullerene precursors have been shown to result in the growth of diamond films from argon microwave plasmas. In contradistinction to most diamond films grown using conventional methane-hydrogen mixtures, the fullerene-generated films are nanocrystalline and smooth on the nanometer scale. They have recently been shown to have friction coefficients approaching the values of natural diamond. It is clearly important to understand the development of surface morphology during film growth from fullerene precursors and to elucidate the factors leading to surface roughness when hydrogen is present in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) gas mixtures. To achieve these goals, we are measuring surface reflectivity of diamond films growing on silicon substrates over a wide range of plasma processing conditions. A model for the interpretation of the laser interferometric data has been developed, which allows one to determine film growth rate, rms surface roughness, and bulk losses due to scattering and absorption. The rms roughness values determined by reflectivity are in good agreement with atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. A number of techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and near-edge x-ray absorption find structure (NEXAFS) measurements, have been used to characterize the films. A mechanism for diamond-film growth involving the C{sub 2} molecule as a growth species will be presented. The mechanism is based on (1) the observation that the optical emission spectra of the fullerene- containing plasmas are dominated by the Swan bands of C{sub 2} and (2) the ability of C{sub 2} to insert directly into C-H and C-C bonds with low activation barriers, as shown by recent theoretical calculations of reactions of C{sub 2} with carbon clusters.

  15. Spontaneous atomic ordering in MOVPE grown gallium arsenide antimonide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weiyang

    Spontaneous atomic ordering of semiconductor alloys is of great practical and fundamental interest. Atomic ordering of III-V alloys such as InGaP has been extensively studied experimentally and theoretically. In this thesis, we investigate a little-studied, atomic-ordering phenomenon, the so-called CuAu structure in the III-V material GaAsSb, grown by the technique of metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Despite being first observed in 1986 in this material, there is as yet no detailed microscopic model for its formation mechanism. A key part of the thesis involves the study of surfactant effects on the ordering process in GaAsSb. Surfactants are elements which modify the growth surface without incorporation in the bulk. Nevertheless, they influence the incorporation of the bulk elements. We first explored the surfactant behavior of Bi on GaAs in order to understand how Bi incorporates at the surface and in the bulk in a related III-V material. For GaAs (001), Bi surface layers are stable at temperatures below 500°C but rapidly desorb at temperatures of 550°C and higher. Bi coverages of over 1 ML induce the formation of Bi islands, whose sizes increase with increasing Bi exposure. Bulk incorporation of Bi remains essentially zero at typical MOVPE growth temperatures. In the case of GaAsSb alloys, Bi surfactant was found to induce CuAu ordering, with no measurable Bi incorporation in the bulk. High resolution TEM was used to study the detailed microstructural features for ordered and disordered samples. The domain sizes of the ordered regions are from 5 nm to 20 nm under all growth conditions. In contrast to orderings in other alloys such as InGaP, CuAu ordering had no observable effect on the bandgap. CuAu ordering in GaAsSb was studied in a function of growth conditions, including Bi surfactant concentration, growth temperature, growth rate, and substrate miscut. All of these experiments confirm that bulk CuAu ordering is a surface driven, rather than bulk

  16. InAlAs/InGaAs/InP sub-micron HEMTs grown by CBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munns, G. O.; Sherwin, M. E.; Brock, T.; Haddad, G. I.; Kwon, Y.; Ng, G. I.; Pavlidis, D.

    1992-05-01

    The paper describes the growth of InGaAs/InAlAs and InP/InAlAs high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs), using InAlAs grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) with trimethyl amine alane (TMAA). The InAlAs bulk layers showed background carrier concentrations of 2 x 10 exp 14/cu cm, with 15 K photoluminescence FWHM of only 18.5 meV. Planar doped InAlAs/InGaAS HEMTs grown by CBE showed f(t) values of 150 GHz and f(max) values of 160 GHz.

  17. A comparison between HfO2/Al2O3 nano-laminates and ternary HfxAlyO compound as the dielectric material in InGaAs based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Igor; Pokroy, Boaz; Eizenberg, Moshe; Ritter, Dan

    2016-09-01

    We compare the electrical properties of HfO2/Al2O3 nano-laminates with those of the ternary HfxAlyO compound in metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. The dielectrics were deposited by atomic layer deposition on InGaAs. Water, ozone, and oxygen plasma were tested as oxygen precursors, and best results were obtained using water. The total dielectric thickness was kept constant in our experiments. It was found that the effective dielectric constant increased and the leakage current decreased with the number of periods. Best results were obtained for the ternary compound. The effect of the sublayer thicknesses on the electrical properties of the interface was carefully investigated, as well as the role of post-metallization annealing. Possible explanations for the observed trends are provided. We conclude that the ternary HfxAlyO compound is more favorable than the nano-laminates approach for InGaAs based MOS transistor applications.

  18. Understanding 'clean-up' of III-V native oxides during atomic layer deposition using bulk first principles models.

    PubMed

    Klejna, Sylwia; Elliott, Simon D

    2011-09-01

    The use of III-V materials as the channel in future transistor devices is dependent on removing the deleterious native oxides from their surface before deposition of a gate dielectric. Trimethylaluminium has been found to achieve in situ 'clean-up' of the oxides of GaAs and InGaAs before atomic layer deposition (ALD) of alumina. Here we propose six reaction mechanisms for 'clean-up,' featuring exchange of ligands between surface atoms, reduction of arsenic oxide by methyl groups and desorption of various products. We use first principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) to determine which mechanistic path is thermodynamically favoured based on models of the bulk oxides and gas-phase products. We therefore predict that 'clean-up' of arsenic oxides mostly produces As4 gas. Most C is predicted to form C2H6 but with some C2H4, CH4 and H2O. An alternative pathway is non-redox ligand exchange, which allows non-reducible oxides to be cleaned-up.

  19. Curvature and bow of bulk GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Romanov, Alexey E.; Young, Erin C.; Roberston, Christian A.; Beltz, Glenn E.; Speck, James S.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the bow of free standing (0001) oriented hydride vapor phase epitaxy grown GaN substrates and demonstrate that their curvature is consistent with a compressive to tensile stress gradient (bottom to top) present in the substrates. The origin of the stress gradient and the curvature is attributed to the correlated inclination of edge threading dislocation (TD) lines away from the [0001] direction. A model is proposed and a relation is derived for bulk GaN substrate curvature dependence on the inclination angle and the density of TDs. The model is used to analyze the curvature for commercially available GaN substrates as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction. The results show a close correlation between the experimentally determined parameters and those predicted from theoretical model.

  20. Natural growth habit of bulk AlN crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epelbaum, B. M.; Seitz, C.; Magerl, A.; Bickermann, M.; Winnacker, A.

    2004-05-01

    Growth conditions for self-nucleation and subsequent growth of bulk AlN crystals by sublimation are presented. With increasing growth temperature, the natural habit of AlN crystals changes from needle-like to prismatic and then turns to thick asymmetric platelet. The best-formed platelet crystals up to 14×7×2 mm 3 in size exhibit a number of atomically smooth surfaces. Growth morphology and crystal quality were found to be strongly influenced by the polar nature of AlN. Al-terminated faces produce mirror-like facets and transparent material of high crystalline quality, whereas development of N-terminated faces leads to opaque and defective sectors in grown crystals. It is suggested that the most successful seeded growth of AlN can be achieved along Al-terminated (0 0 0 1) , ( 1¯ 0 1 2) and non-polar ( 1¯ 0 1 0) faces.

  1. Structure of ferromagnetic CrAs epilayers grown on GaAs(001).

    PubMed

    Etgens, V H; de Camargo, P C; Eddrief, M; Mattana, R; George, J M; Garreau, Y

    2004-04-23

    Magnetic and structural properties of CrAs epilayers grown on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy have been studied. CrAs epilayers are orthorhombic for all thicknesses investigated but show a structural transition from a metastable phase for very thin films, to the usual bulk MnP-type orthorhombic phase at higher thicknesses. At intermediate thicknesses, there is a predominance of the new phase, although a contribution from the usual CrAs bulk phase remains clearly present. These results strongly suggest that the ferromagnetic signal measured at room temperature comes from the new metastable orthorhombic structure with an expanded b-axis induced by the substrate strain.

  2. Structure of Ferromagnetic CrAs Epilayers Grown on GaAs(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etgens, V. H.; de Camargo, P. C.; Eddrief, M.; Mattana, R.; George, J. M.; Garreau, Y.

    2004-04-01

    Magnetic and structural properties of CrAs epilayers grown on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy have been studied. CrAs epilayers are orthorhombic for all thicknesses investigated but show a structural transition from a metastable phase for very thin films, to the usual bulk MnP-type orthorhombic phase at higher thicknesses. At intermediate thicknesses, there is a predominance of the new phase, although a contribution from the usual CrAs bulk phase remains clearly present. These results strongly suggest that the ferromagnetic signal measured at room temperature comes from the new metastable orthorhombic structure with an expanded b-axis induced by the substrate strain.

  3. Seeded growth of AlN bulk single crystals by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesser, R.; Dalmau, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2002-06-01

    AlN bulk single crystals were grown by sublimation of AlN powder at temperatures of 2100-2300°C in an open crucible geometry in a 400 Torr nitrogen atmosphere. Small, single crystalline AlN c-platelets, prepared by vaporization of Al in a nitrogen atmosphere, were used as seeds. Seeded growth occurred preferentially in the crystallographic c-direction, with growth rates exceeding 500 μm/h, while the seed crystals grew only marginally in the c-plane. Transparent, centimeter-sized AlN single crystals were grown within 24 h. Characterization by X-ray diffraction showed that rocking curves around the (0 0 0 2) reflection were very narrow (25 arcsec full-width at half-maximum), thus indicating very high crystalline quality of the material grown on the seeds.

  4. Braneworld gravity in a symmetric space bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Nejat T.

    2010-07-01

    By considering the p-brane motion in a G/K symmetric space bulk we identify the G-invariant bulk metric in the solvable Lie algebra gauge of the brane action. After calculating the Levi-Civita connection of this bulk metric we use it in the Gauss equation to compute the braneworld curvature in terms of the bulk coordinates. Finally, by making use of the Gauss equation in the braneworld Einstein equation we present a geometrical method of implementing the first fundamental form in the gravitating brane dynamics for the specially chosen symmetric space bulk case leading to an Einstein equation expressed solely in terms of the bulk coordinates of the braneworld.

  5. Aspects of silicon bulk lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsberg, P. T.

    1985-01-01

    The best lifetimes attained for bulk crytalline silicon as a function of doping concentrations are analyzed. It is assumed that the dopants which set the Fermi level do not contribute to the recombination traffic which is due to the unknown defect. This defect is assumed to have two charge states: neutral and negative, the neutral defect concentration is frozen-in at some temperature T sub f. The higher doping concentrations should include the band-band Auger effect by using a generalization of the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism. The generalization of the SRH mechanism is discussed. This formulation gives a straightforward procedure for incorporating both band-band and band-trap Auger effects in the SRH procedure. Two related questions arise in this context: (1) it may sometimes be useful to write the steady-state occupation probability of the traps implied by SRH procedure in a form which approximates to the Fermi-Dirac distribution; and (2) the effect on the SRH mechanism of spreading N sub t levels at one energy uniformly over a range of energies is discussed.

  6. Diffusion of oxygen in bulk GaN crystals at high temperature and at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovyi, B.; Nikolenko, A.; Weyher, J. L.; Grzegory, I.; Dziecielewski, I.; Sarzynski, M.; Strelchuk, V.; Tsykaniuk, B.; Belyaev, O.; Petrusha, I.; Turkevich, V.; Kapustianyk, V.; Albrecht, M.; Porowski, S.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies of diffusion of oxygen in bulk wurtzite-type GaN crystals grown by Halide Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) are reported. Oxygen concentration profiles were studied in as-grown GaN crystals and also after annealing of crystals at temperatures up to 3400 K and pressures up to 9 GPa. Investigated crystals contained large conical defects i.e. pinholes of significantly higher oxygen concentration (NO=(2-4)×1019 cm-3) than that in the bulk matrix (NO<1×1017 cm-3). The pinholes were revealed by a photo-etching method in as-grown and annealed GaN samples. Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy was applied to measure the profiles of free electron concentration, which directly corresponds to the concentration of oxygen impurity. Lateral scanning across the interfaces between pinholes and matrix in the as-grown HVPE GaN crystals showed sharp step-like carrier concentration profiles. Annealing at high temperature and high pressure resulted in the diffusion blurring of the profiles. Analysis of obtained data allowed for the first time for estimation of oxygen diffusion coefficients DO(T, P). The obtained values of DO(T, P) are anomalously small similarly to the values obtained by Harafuji et al. by molecular dynamic calculations for self-diffusion of nitrogen. Whereas oxygen and nitrogen are on the same sublattice it could explain the similarity of their diffusion coefficients.

  7. Relative entropy equals bulk relative entropy

    DOE PAGES

    Jafferis, Daniel L.; Lewkowycz, Aitor; Maldacena, Juan; Suh, S. Josephine

    2016-06-01

    We consider the gravity dual of the modular Hamiltonian associated to a general subregion of a boundary theory. We use it to argue that the relative entropy of nearby states is given by the relative entropy in the bulk, to leading order in the bulk gravitational coupling. We also argue that the boundary modular flow is dual to the bulk modular flow in the entanglement wedge, with implications for entanglement wedge reconstruction.

  8. Metamorphic In(0.20)Ga(0.80)As p-i-n photodetectors grown on GaAs substrates for near infrared applications.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, K; Yang, L-M; Grassman, T J; Tabares, G; Guzman, A; Hierro, A; Mills, M J; Ringel, S A

    2011-04-11

    The growth and performance of top-illuminated metamorphic In(0.20)Ga(0.80)As p-i-n photodetectors grown on GaAs substrates using a step-graded In(x)Ga(1-x)As buffer is reported. The p-i-n photodetectors display a low room-temperature reverse bias dark current density of ~1.4×10(-7) A/cm(2) at -2 V. Responsivity and specific detectivity values of 0.72 A/W, 2.3×10(12) cm·Hz(1/2)/W and 0.69 A/W, 2.2×10(12) cm·Hz(1/2)/W are achieved for Yb:YAG (1030 nm) and Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser wavelengths at -2 V, respectively. A high theoretical bandwidth-responsivity product of 0.21 GHz·A/W was estimated at 1064 nm. Device performance metrics for these GaAs substrate-based detectors compare favorably with those based on InP technology due to the close tuning of the detector bandgap to the target wavelengths, despite the presence of a residual threading dislocation density. This work demonstrates the great potential for high performance metamorphic near-infrared InGaAs detectors with optimally tuned bandgaps, which can be grown on GaAs substrates, for a wide variety of applications.

  9. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The...

  10. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The...

  11. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The...

  12. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The...

  13. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The...

  14. Harvesting microalgae grown on wastewater.

    PubMed

    Udom, Innocent; Zaribaf, Behnaz H; Halfhide, Trina; Gillie, Benjamin; Dalrymple, Omatoyo; Zhang, Qiong; Ergas, Sarina J

    2013-07-01

    The costs and life cycle impacts of microalgae harvesting for biofuel production were investigated. Algae were grown in semi-continuous culture in pilot-scale photobioreactors under natural light with anaerobic digester centrate as the feed source. Algae suspensions were collected and the optimal coagulant dosages for metal salts (alum, ferric chloride), cationic polymer (Zetag 8819), anionic polymer (E-38) and natural coagulants (Moringa Oleifera and Opuntia ficus-indica cactus) were determined using jar tests. The relative dewaterability of the algae cake was estimated by centrifugation. Alum, ferric chloride and cationic polymer could all achieve >91% algae recovery at optimal dosages. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis results revealed that cationic polymer had the lowest cost but the highest environmental impacts, while ferric chloride had the highest cost and lowest environmental impacts. Based on the LCA results, belt presses are the recommended algae dewatering technology prior to oil extraction.

  15. Harvesting microalgae grown on wastewater.

    PubMed

    Udom, Innocent; Zaribaf, Behnaz H; Halfhide, Trina; Gillie, Benjamin; Dalrymple, Omatoyo; Zhang, Qiong; Ergas, Sarina J

    2013-07-01

    The costs and life cycle impacts of microalgae harvesting for biofuel production were investigated. Algae were grown in semi-continuous culture in pilot-scale photobioreactors under natural light with anaerobic digester centrate as the feed source. Algae suspensions were collected and the optimal coagulant dosages for metal salts (alum, ferric chloride), cationic polymer (Zetag 8819), anionic polymer (E-38) and natural coagulants (Moringa Oleifera and Opuntia ficus-indica cactus) were determined using jar tests. The relative dewaterability of the algae cake was estimated by centrifugation. Alum, ferric chloride and cationic polymer could all achieve >91% algae recovery at optimal dosages. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis results revealed that cationic polymer had the lowest cost but the highest environmental impacts, while ferric chloride had the highest cost and lowest environmental impacts. Based on the LCA results, belt presses are the recommended algae dewatering technology prior to oil extraction. PMID:23648758

  16. EPITAXIAL GROWTH OF CUBIC MnSb ON GaAs AND InGaAs(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Gavin R.; Burrows, Christopher W.; Hase, Thomas P. A.; Ashwin, Mark J.; McMitchell, Sean R. C.; Sanchez, Ana M.; Aldous, James D.

    2014-10-01

    The cubic polymorph of the binary transition metal pnictide (TMP) MnSb, c-MnSb, has been predicted to be a robust half-metallic ferromagnetic (HMF) material with minority spin gap ≳1 eV. Here, MnSb epilayers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs and In0.5Ga0.5As(111) substrates and analyzed using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction. We find polymorphic growth of MnSb on both substrates, where c-MnSb co-exists with the ordinary niccolite n-MnSb polymorph. The grain size of the c-MnSb is of the order of tens of nanometer on both substrates and its appearance during MBE growth is independent of the very different epitaxial strain from the GaAs (3.1%) and In0.5Ga0.5As (0.31%) substrates.

  17. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of...

  18. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of...

  19. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of...

  20. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of...

  1. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of...

  2. Temporal soil bulk density following tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil is the medium for air, energy, water, and chemical transport between the atmosphere and the solid earth. Soil bulk density is a key variable impacting the rate at which this transport occurs. Typically, soil bulk density is measured by the gravimetric method, where a sample of known volume is t...

  3. Enhanced performance of room-temperature-grown epitaxial thin films of vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Joyeeta; Payzant, E Andrew; More, Karren Leslie; HaglundJr., Richard F

    2011-01-01

    Stoichiometric vanadium dioxide in bulk, thin film and nanostructured forms exhibits an insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) accompanied by a structural phase transformation, induced by temperature, light, electric fields, doping or strain. We have grown epitaxial films of vanadium dioxide on c-plane (0001) of sapphire using two different procedures involving (1) room temperature growth followed by annealing and (2) direct high temperature growth. Strain at the film-substrate interface due to growth at different temperatures leads to interesting differences in morphologies and phase transition characteristics. Comparison of the morphologies and switching characteristics of the two films shows that contrary to conventional wisdom, the room-temperature grown films have smoother, more continuous morphologies and better switching performance, consistent with the behavior of epitaxially grown semiconductors.

  4. Growth Mechanisms and Structural Properties of Lead Chalcogenide Films Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virt, I. S.; Rudyi, I. O.; Lopatynskyi, I. Ye.; Dubov, Yu.; Tur, Y.; Lusakowska, E.; Luka, G.

    2016-09-01

    Three lead chalcogenide films, PbTe, PbSe, and PbS, with a high structural quality were grown by pulsed lased deposition (PLD). The films were grown on single crystal substrates (Si, KCl, Al2O3) and on Si covered with a Si3N4 buffer layer. The Si3N4 layer latter facilitated the lead chalcogenide layer nucleation during the first growth stages and resulted in a more homogeneous surface morphology and a lower surface roughness. The surface geometry (roughness) of the films grown on Si3N4 was studied by means of the power spectral density analysis. Different growth modes, ranging from plasma plume condensation to bulk diffusion, resulting in observed film morphologies were identified. The investigations were complemented by electrical characterization of the chalcogenide films.

  5. Secondary ion mass spectrometry of vapor-liquid-solid grown, Au-catalyzed, Si wires.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Morgan C; Filler, Michael A; Kayes, Brendan M; Kelzenberg, Michael D; Guan, Yunbin; Lewis, Nathan S; Eiler, John M; Atwater, Harry A

    2008-10-01

    Knowledge of the catalyst concentration within vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown semiconductor wires is needed in order to assess potential limits to electrical and optical device performance imposed by the VLS growth mechanism. We report herein the use of secondary ion mass spectrometry to characterize the Au catalyst concentration within individual, VLS-grown, Si wires. For Si wires grown by chemical vapor deposition from SiCl 4 at 1000 degrees C, an upper limit on the bulk Au concentration was observed to be 1.7 x 10(16) atoms/cm(3), similar to the thermodynamic equilibrium concentration at the growth temperature. However, a higher concentration of Au was observed on the sidewalls of the wires. PMID:18767881

  6. Mid-infrared to ultraviolet optical properties of InSb grown on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard Yeo, Yee-Chia; Tan, Kian Hua; Jia, Bo Wen; Yoon, Soon Fatt

    2015-06-14

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to investigate the optical properties of an InSb film grown on a GaAs (100) substrate, and to compare the optical properties of InSb film with those of bulk InSb. The film was grown by molecular beam epitaxy under conditions intended to form 90° misfit dislocations at the InSb-GaAs interface. The complex dielectric function obtained in a wide spectroscopic range from 0.06–4.6 eV shows the critical point transitions E{sub 0}, E{sub 1}, E{sub 1} + Δ{sub 1}, E{sub 0}{sup ′}, and E{sub 2}. The amplitudes, energy transitions, broadenings, and phase angles have been determined using a derivative analysis. Comparing film and bulk critical point results reveal that the epitaxial film is nearly relaxed and has bulk-like optical characteristics.

  7. Understanding the defect structure of solution grown zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, Laura-Lynn; Sankar, Gopinathan; Handoko, Albertus D.; Goh, Gregory K.L.; Kohara, Shinji

    2012-05-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide bandgap semiconducting oxide with many potential applications in various optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and field effect transistors (FETs). Much effort has been made to understand the ZnO structure and its defects. However, one major issue in determining whether it is Zn or O deficiency that provides ZnO its unique properties remains. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an ideal, atom specific characterization technique that is able to probe defect structure in many materials, including ZnO. In this paper, comparative studies of bulk and aqueous solution grown ({<=}90 Degree-Sign C) ZnO powders using XAS and x-ray pair distribution function (XPDF) techniques are described. The XAS Zn-Zn correlation and XPDF results undoubtedly point out that the solution grown ZnO contains Zn deficiency, rather than the O deficiency that were commonly reported. This understanding of ZnO short range order and structure will be invaluable for further development of solid state lighting and other optoelectronic device applications. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO powders have been synthesized through an aqueous solution method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Defect structure studied using XAS and XPDF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn-Zn correlations are less in the ZnO powders synthesized in solution than bulk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn vacancies are present in the powders synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EXAFS and XPDF, when used complementary, are useful characterization techniques.

  8. Short-wavelength infrared imaging using low dark current InGaAs detector arrays and vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser illuminators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdougal, Michael; Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; Follman, David

    2011-06-01

    We describe the factors that go into the component choices for a short wavelength IR (SWIR) imager, which include the SWIR sensor, the lens, and the illuminator. We have shown the factors for reducing dark current, and shown that we can achieve well below 1.5 nA/cm2 for 15 μm devices at 7 °C. In addition, we have mated our InGaAs detector arrays to 640×512 readout integrated integrated circuits to make focal plane arrays (FPAs). The resulting FPAs are capable of imaging photon fluxes with wavelengths between 1 and 1.6 μm at low light levels. The dark current associated with these FPAs is extremely low, exhibiting a mean dark current density of 0.26 nA/cm2 at 0 °C. Noise due to the readout can be reduced from 95 to 57 electrons by using off-chip correlated double sampling. In addition, Aerius has developed laser arrays that provide flat illumination in scenes that are normally light-starved. The illuminators have 40% wall-plug efficiency and provide low-speckle illumination, and provide artifact-free imagery versus conventional laser illuminators.

  9. 75 FR 34682 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 46 CFR Parts 97 and 148 RIN 1625-AB47 Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code; Correction AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... proposed rule published in the Federal Register on June 17, 2010, entitled ``Bulk Solid Hazardous...

  10. 76 FR 8658 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ...), 1974, as amended, that carry bulk solid cargoes other than grain. The final rule (75 FR 64586) allows... SECURITY Coast Guard 46 CFR Part 148 RIN 1625-AB47 Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Rule;...

  11. Effect of solvents on the bulk growth of 4-aminobenzophenone single crystals: A potential material for blue and green lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, V.; Usharani, S.; Arivanandhan, M.; Anandan, P.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Although 4-aminobenzophenone (4-ABP) is the best derivative of benzophenone with 260 times higher second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency than potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), growth of high quality bulk crystal still remains a difficult task. In the present work, the effect of solvents on solubility and growth aspects of 4-ABP was investigated to grow inclusion free 4-ABP crystals. The growth processes were discussed based on solute-solvent interaction in two different growth media of ethyl acetate and ethanol. The growth rate and thereby solvent inclusions are relatively higher in ethyl acetate grown crystal than the crystal grown from ethanol. The structural, thermal and optical properties of 4-ABP crystals were studied. The enthalpy of 4-ABP melting process was estimated from differential thermal analysis. The optical transmission study shows that 4-ABP crystals grown from ethanol has high transparency compared to ethyl acetate grown sample due to solvent inclusion in the later crystal.

  12. Surface state conductivity in epitaxially grown Bi1‑x Sb x (111) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Julian; Kröger, Philipp; Pfnür, Herbert; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Topologically non-trivial surface states were reported first on {{Bi}}1-xSb x bulk crystals. In this study we present transport measurements performed on thin {{Bi}}1-xSb x -films (up to 24 nm thickness) grown epitaxially on Si(111) with various Sb-concentrations (up to x = 0.22). The analysis of the temperature dependency allowed us to distinguish between different transport channels originating from surface and bulk bands as well as impurity states. At temperatures below 30 K the transport is mediated by surface states while at higher temperatures activated transport via bulk channels sets in. The surface state conductivity and bulk band gaps can be tuned by the Sb-concentration and film thickness, respectively. For films as thin as 4 nm the surface state transport is strongly suppressed in contrast to Bi(111) films grown under identical conditions. The impurity channel is of intrinsic origin due to the growth and alloy formation process and turns out to be located at the buried interface.

  13. Surface state conductivity in epitaxially grown Bi1-x Sb x (111) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Julian; Kröger, Philipp; Pfnür, Herbert; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Topologically non-trivial surface states were reported first on {{Bi}}1-xSb x bulk crystals. In this study we present transport measurements performed on thin {{Bi}}1-xSb x -films (up to 24 nm thickness) grown epitaxially on Si(111) with various Sb-concentrations (up to x = 0.22). The analysis of the temperature dependency allowed us to distinguish between different transport channels originating from surface and bulk bands as well as impurity states. At temperatures below 30 K the transport is mediated by surface states while at higher temperatures activated transport via bulk channels sets in. The surface state conductivity and bulk band gaps can be tuned by the Sb-concentration and film thickness, respectively. For films as thin as 4 nm the surface state transport is strongly suppressed in contrast to Bi(111) films grown under identical conditions. The impurity channel is of intrinsic origin due to the growth and alloy formation process and turns out to be located at the buried interface.

  14. Physical vapor transport growth of bulk aluminum nitride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noveski, Vladimir

    The most promising substrates for III-Nitride devices---bulk aluminum nitride (AlN) crystals were grown by seeded and self-seeded methods in sandwich sublimation configuration in nitrogen atmosphere. The growth was performed in an inductively heated reactor, which was designed and assembled during the course of this project. In the theoretical study of mass transfer effects on the crystal growth rate a one-dimensional model was developed assuming diffusion of Al species as rate limiting step. Estimation and validation of model parameters were completed by experiments carried out at temperature 1800--2400°C, pressure 55--105 kPa and temperature gradient in the vapor phase 1--4°C. Crystal growth rates ˜1 mm/h, viable for commercial production and very good uniformity in the plane of growth were achieved. Two typical issues during the seeded growth on SiC were identified: (1) the formation of voids, and (2) the formation of cracks. A viable process window of temperatures, growth times and source-to-seed distances was identified in which these issues could be overcome and single crystalline AIN was deposited on 200--300 mm2 SiC seeds. X-ray diffraction confirmed a single crystalline nature of the grown material, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy revealed the step-flow growth mechanism. Grain expansion in the growth direction during self-seeded studies indicated a possibility of achieving single crystalline AlN of significant size starting from a polycrystalline material. Growth interruption and seed preparation were introduced to preserve the crucible integrity and provide conditions for one-dimensional transport. The use of an inverted temperature gradient during initial stages and sintering of the AlN powder source helped eliminating the secondary nucleation, which had been identified to be an issue during the growth on previously polished AlN seeds. X-ray topography and optical microscopy confirmed the epitaxial re-growth after

  15. Energy Bandgap and Edge States in an Epitaxially Grown Graphene/h-BN Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Beomyong; Hwang, Jeongwoon; Yoon, Jong Keon; Lim, Sungjun; Kim, Sungmin; Lee, Minjun; Kwon, Jeong Hoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Sung, Dongchul; Kim, Gunn; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Stroscio, Joseph A; Kuk, Young

    2016-01-01

    Securing a semiconducting bandgap is essential for applying graphene layers in switching devices. Theoretical studies have suggested a created bulk bandgap in a graphene layer by introducing an asymmetry between the A and B sub-lattice sites. A recent transport measurement demonstrated the presence of a bandgap in a graphene layer where the asymmetry was introduced by placing a graphene layer on a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate. Similar bandgap has been observed in graphene layers on metal substrates by local probe measurements; however, this phenomenon has not been observed in graphene layers on a near-insulating substrate. Here, we present bulk bandgap-like features in a graphene layer epitaxially grown on an h-BN substrate using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We observed edge states at zigzag edges, edge resonances at armchair edges, and bandgap-like features in the bulk. PMID:27503427

  16. Energy Bandgap and Edge States in an Epitaxially Grown Graphene/h-BN Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Beomyong; Hwang, Jeongwoon; Yoon, Jong Keon; Lim, Sungjun; Kim, Sungmin; Lee, Minjun; Kwon, Jeong Hoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Sung, Dongchul; Kim, Gunn; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Stroscio, Joseph A.; Kuk, Young

    2016-08-01

    Securing a semiconducting bandgap is essential for applying graphene layers in switching devices. Theoretical studies have suggested a created bulk bandgap in a graphene layer by introducing an asymmetry between the A and B sub-lattice sites. A recent transport measurement demonstrated the presence of a bandgap in a graphene layer where the asymmetry was introduced by placing a graphene layer on a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate. Similar bandgap has been observed in graphene layers on metal substrates by local probe measurements; however, this phenomenon has not been observed in graphene layers on a near-insulating substrate. Here, we present bulk bandgap-like features in a graphene layer epitaxially grown on an h-BN substrate using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We observed edge states at zigzag edges, edge resonances at armchair edges, and bandgap-like features in the bulk.

  17. Energy Bandgap and Edge States in an Epitaxially Grown Graphene/h-BN Heterostructure

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Beomyong; Hwang, Jeongwoon; Yoon, Jong Keon; Lim, Sungjun; Kim, Sungmin; Lee, Minjun; Kwon, Jeong Hoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Sung, Dongchul; Kim, Gunn; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Stroscio, Joseph A.; Kuk, Young

    2016-01-01

    Securing a semiconducting bandgap is essential for applying graphene layers in switching devices. Theoretical studies have suggested a created bulk bandgap in a graphene layer by introducing an asymmetry between the A and B sub-lattice sites. A recent transport measurement demonstrated the presence of a bandgap in a graphene layer where the asymmetry was introduced by placing a graphene layer on a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate. Similar bandgap has been observed in graphene layers on metal substrates by local probe measurements; however, this phenomenon has not been observed in graphene layers on a near-insulating substrate. Here, we present bulk bandgap-like features in a graphene layer epitaxially grown on an h-BN substrate using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We observed edge states at zigzag edges, edge resonances at armchair edges, and bandgap-like features in the bulk. PMID:27503427

  18. Energy Bandgap and Edge States in an Epitaxially Grown Graphene/h-BN Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Beomyong; Hwang, Jeongwoon; Yoon, Jong Keon; Lim, Sungjun; Kim, Sungmin; Lee, Minjun; Kwon, Jeong Hoon; Baek, Hongwoo; Sung, Dongchul; Kim, Gunn; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Stroscio, Joseph A; Kuk, Young

    2016-08-09

    Securing a semiconducting bandgap is essential for applying graphene layers in switching devices. Theoretical studies have suggested a created bulk bandgap in a graphene layer by introducing an asymmetry between the A and B sub-lattice sites. A recent transport measurement demonstrated the presence of a bandgap in a graphene layer where the asymmetry was introduced by placing a graphene layer on a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate. Similar bandgap has been observed in graphene layers on metal substrates by local probe measurements; however, this phenomenon has not been observed in graphene layers on a near-insulating substrate. Here, we present bulk bandgap-like features in a graphene layer epitaxially grown on an h-BN substrate using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We observed edge states at zigzag edges, edge resonances at armchair edges, and bandgap-like features in the bulk.

  19. Spontaneous lateral composition modulation in InAlAs and InGaAs short-period superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Twesten, R.D.; Millunchick, J.M.; Lee, S.R.; Jones, E.D.; Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Zhang, Y.; Mascarenhas, A.

    1997-07-11

    The microstructure of spontaneous lateral composition modulation along the [110] direction has been studied in (InAs){sub n}/(AlAs){sub m} short-period superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (001) InP. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy show that global strain ({var_epsilon}) in the superlattice reduces the degree of composition modulation, which disappears for the absolute value of {var_epsilon} > 0.7%. For tensile strains of {var_epsilon} {approx} +0.4%, they find that In-rich columns become regularly spaced and correlated with cusps in the growth surface. A similar correlation is seen in (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub m} short-period superlattices between the enriched columns and the peaks and valleys of {l_brace}114{r_brace}{sub A} facets on the surface. The enriched columns in the (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub m} layer (and the facets) extend for much longer distances ({approximately}0.2--0.4 {micro}m) in the [1{bar 1}0] direction than do the columns in the (InAs){sub n}/(AlAs){sub m} layer ({approximately} 56 nm).

  20. Exceptional gettering response of epitaxially grown kerfless silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Powell, D. M.; Markevich, V. P.; Hofstetter, J.; Jensen, M. A.; Morishige, A. E.; Castellanos, S.; Lai, B.; Peaker, A. R.; Buonassisi, T.

    2016-02-08

    The bulk minority-carrier lifetime in p- and n-type kerfless epitaxial (epi) crystalline silicon wafers is shown to increase >500 during phosphorus gettering. We employ kinetic defect simulations and microstructural characterization techniques to elucidate the root cause of this exceptional gettering response. Simulations and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) indicate that a high concentra- tion of point defects (likely Pt) is “locked in” during fast (60 C/min) cooling during epi wafer growth. The fine dispersion of moderately fast-diffusing recombination-active point defects limits as-grown lifetime but can also be removed during gettering, confirmed by DLTS measurements. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy indicates metal agglomeratesmore » at structural defects, yet the structural defect density is sufficiently low to enable high lifetimes. Consequently, after phosphorus diffusion gettering, epi silicon exhibits a higher lifetime than materials with similar bulk impurity contents but higher densities of structural defects, including multicrystalline ingot and ribbon silicon materials. As a result, device simulations suggest a solar-cell efficiency potential of this material >23%.« less

  1. Exceptional gettering response of epitaxially grown kerfless silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, D. M.; Markevich, V. P.; Hofstetter, J.; Jensen, M. A.; Morishige, A. E.; Castellanos, S.; Lai, B.; Peaker, A. R.; Buonassisi, T.

    2016-02-01

    The bulk minority-carrier lifetime in p- and n-type kerfless epitaxial (epi) crystalline silicon wafers is shown to increase >500× during phosphorus gettering. We employ kinetic defect simulations and microstructural characterization techniques to elucidate the root cause of this exceptional gettering response. Simulations and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) indicate that a high concentration of point defects (likely Pt) is "locked in" during fast (60 °C/min) cooling during epi wafer growth. The fine dispersion of moderately fast-diffusing recombination-active point defects limits as-grown lifetime but can also be removed during gettering, confirmed by DLTS measurements. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy indicates metal agglomerates at structural defects, yet the structural defect density is sufficiently low to enable high lifetimes. Consequently, after phosphorus diffusion gettering, epi silicon exhibits a higher lifetime than materials with similar bulk impurity contents but higher densities of structural defects, including multicrystalline ingot and ribbon silicon materials. Device simulations suggest a solar-cell efficiency potential of this material >23%.

  2. OSCEE fan exhaust bulk absorber treatment evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Samanich, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    The acoustic suppression capability of bulk absorber material designed for use in the fan exhaust duct walls of the quiet clean short haul experiment engine (OCSEE UTW) was evaluated. The acoustic suppression to the original design for the engine fan duct which consisted of phased single degree-of-freedom wall treatment was tested with a splitter and also with the splitter removed. Peak suppression was about as predicted with the bulk absorber configuration, however, the broadband characteristics were not attained. Post test inspection revealed surface oil contamination on the bulk material which could have caused the loss in bandwidth suppression.

  3. Bulk viscosity of superfluid hyperon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gusakov, Mikhail E.; Kantor, Elena M.

    2008-10-15

    We calculate the bulk viscosity due to nonequilibrium weak processes in superfluid nucleon-hyperon matter of neutron stars. For that, the dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics, formulated eariler [M. E. Gusakov, Phys. Rev. D 76, 083001 (2007).] for superfluid mixtures, is extended to the case when both nucleons and hyperons are superfluid. It is demonstrated that in the most general case (when neutrons, protons, {lambda}, and {sigma}{sup -} hyperons are superfluid), nonequilibrium weak processes generate 16 bulk viscosity coefficients, with only three of them being independent. In addition, we correct an inaccuracy in a widely used formula for the bulk viscosity of nonsuperfluid nucleon-hyperon matter.

  4. Bulk viscosity of a pion gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Egang; Moore, Guy D.

    2011-04-15

    We compute the bulk viscosity of a gas of pions at temperatures below the QCD crossover temperature, for the physical value of m{sub {pi}}, to lowest order in chiral perturbation theory. Bulk viscosity is controlled by number-changing processes which become exponentially slow at low temperatures when the pions become exponentially dilute, leading to an exponentially large bulk viscosity {zeta}{approx}(F{sub 0}{sup 8}/m{sub {pi}}{sup 5})exp(2m{sub {pi}}/T), where F{sub 0}{approx_equal}93 MeV is the pion decay constant.

  5. Superconducting bulk magnets for magnetic levitation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Kamijo, H.

    2000-06-01

    The major applications of high-temperature superconductors have mostly been confined to products in the form of wires and thin films. However, recent developments show that rare-earth REBa 2Cu 3O 7- x and light rare-earth LREBa 2Cu 3O 7- x superconductors prepared by melt processes have a high critical-current density at 77 K and high magnetic fields. These superconductors will promote the application of bulk high-temperature superconductors in high magnetic fields; the superconducting bulk magnet for the Maglev train is one possible application. We investigated the possibility of using bulk magnets in the Maglev system, and examined flux-trapping characteristics of multi-superconducting bulks arranged in array.

  6. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  7. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  8. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  9. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  10. Effects of bulk viscosity at freezeout

    SciTech Connect

    Monnai, Akihiko; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2009-11-15

    We investigate particle spectra and elliptic flow coefficients in relativistic heavy-ion collisions by taking into account the distortion of phase space distributions by bulk viscosity at freezeout. We first calculate the distortion of phase space distributions in a multicomponent system with Grad's 14-moment method. We find some subtle issues when macroscopic variables are matched with microscopic momentum distributions in a multicomponent system, and we develop a consistent procedure to uniquely determine the corrections to the phase space distributions. Next, we calculate particle spectra by using the Cooper-Frye formula to see the effect of the bulk viscosity. Despite the relative smallness of the bulk viscosity, we find that it is likely to have a visible effect on particle spectra and elliptic flow coefficients. This indicates the importance of taking into account bulk viscosity together with shear viscosity to constrain the transport coefficients with better accuracy from comparison with experimental data.

  11. Zinc Isotope Anomalies in bulk Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, P. S.; Boyet, M.; Moynier, F.

    2014-09-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate that Zn isotope anomalies are present in bulk primitive meteorites, consistent with the injection of material derived from a neutron-rich supernova source into the solar nebula.

  12. The influence of surface preparation on low temperature HfO{sub 2} ALD on InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Tyler; Edmonds, Mary; Kummel, Andrew C.; Tang, Kechao; Negara, Muhammad Adi; McIntyre, Paul; Chobpattana, Varistha; Mitchell, William; Sahu, Bhagawan; Galatage, Rohit; Droopad, Ravi

    2015-10-28

    Current logic devices rely on 3D architectures, such as the tri-gate field effect transistor (finFET), which utilize the (001) and (110) crystal faces simultaneously thus requiring passivation methods for the (110) face in order to ensure a pristine 3D surface prior to further processing. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and correlated electrical measurement on MOSCAPs were utilized to compare the effects of a previously developed in situ pre-atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface clean on the InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces. Ex situ wet cleans are very effective on the (001) surface but not the (110) surface. Capacitance voltage indicated the (001) surface with no buffered oxide etch had a higher C{sub max} hypothesized to be a result of poor nucleation of HfO{sub 2} on the native oxide. An in situ pre-ALD surface clean employing both atomic H and trimethylaluminum (TMA) pre-pulsing, developed by Chobpattana et al. and Carter et al. for the (001) surface, was demonstrated to be effective on the (110) surface for producing low D{sub it} high C{sub ox} MOSCAPs. Including TMA in the pre-ALD surface clean resulted in reduction of the magnitude of the interface state capacitance. The XPS studies show the role of atomic H pre-pulsing is to remove both carbon and oxygen while STM shows the role of TMA pre-pulsing is to eliminate H induced etching. Devices fabricated at 120 °C and 300 °C were compared.

  13. The influence of surface preparation on low temperature HfO2 ALD on InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Tyler; Tang, Kechao; Chobpattana, Varistha; Negara, Muhammad Adi; Edmonds, Mary; Mitchell, William; Sahu, Bhagawan; Galatage, Rohit; Droopad, Ravi; McIntyre, Paul; Kummel, Andrew C.

    2015-10-01

    Current logic devices rely on 3D architectures, such as the tri-gate field effect transistor (finFET), which utilize the (001) and (110) crystal faces simultaneously thus requiring passivation methods for the (110) face in order to ensure a pristine 3D surface prior to further processing. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and correlated electrical measurement on MOSCAPs were utilized to compare the effects of a previously developed in situ pre-atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface clean on the InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces. Ex situ wet cleans are very effective on the (001) surface but not the (110) surface. Capacitance voltage indicated the (001) surface with no buffered oxide etch had a higher Cmax hypothesized to be a result of poor nucleation of HfO2 on the native oxide. An in situ pre-ALD surface clean employing both atomic H and trimethylaluminum (TMA) pre-pulsing, developed by Chobpattana et al. and Carter et al. for the (001) surface, was demonstrated to be effective on the (110) surface for producing low Dit high Cox MOSCAPs. Including TMA in the pre-ALD surface clean resulted in reduction of the magnitude of the interface state capacitance. The XPS studies show the role of atomic H pre-pulsing is to remove both carbon and oxygen while STM shows the role of TMA pre-pulsing is to eliminate H induced etching. Devices fabricated at 120 °C and 300 °C were compared.

  14. The influence of surface preparation on low temperature HfO2 ALD on InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kent, Tyler; Tang, Kechao; Chobpattana, Varistha; Negara, Muhammad Adi; Edmonds, Mary; Mitchell, William; Sahu, Bhagawan; Galatage, Rohit; Droopad, Ravi; McIntyre, Paul; Kummel, Andrew C

    2015-10-28

    Current logic devices rely on 3D architectures, such as the tri-gate field effect transistor (finFET), which utilize the (001) and (110) crystal faces simultaneously thus requiring passivation methods for the (110) face in order to ensure a pristine 3D surface prior to further processing. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and correlated electrical measurement on MOSCAPs were utilized to compare the effects of a previously developed in situ pre-atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface clean on the InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces. Ex situ wet cleans are very effective on the (001) surface but not the (110) surface. Capacitance voltage indicated the (001) surface with no buffered oxide etch had a higher C(max) hypothesized to be a result of poor nucleation of HfO2 on the native oxide. An in situ pre-ALD surface clean employing both atomic H and trimethylaluminum (TMA) pre-pulsing, developed by Chobpattana et al. and Carter et al. for the (001) surface, was demonstrated to be effective on the (110) surface for producing low D(it) high C(ox) MOSCAPs. Including TMA in the pre-ALD surface clean resulted in reduction of the magnitude of the interface state capacitance. The XPS studies show the role of atomic H pre-pulsing is to remove both carbon and oxygen while STM shows the role of TMA pre-pulsing is to eliminate H induced etching. Devices fabricated at 120 °C and 300 °C were compared.

  15. Molecule diagram from space-grown crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Researchers' at Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, in Buffalo, N.Y. have analyzed the molecular structures of insulin crystals grown during Space Shuttle experiments and are unlocking the mystery of how insulin works.

  16. Predicting bulk damage in NIF triple harmonic generators

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, J; Runkel, M; Williams, W

    1998-09-18

    Recently reported experiments have investigated the statistics of laser damage in KDP and KD*P. Automated damage tests have allowed cumulative failure and damage probability distributions to be constructed. Large area tests have investigated the feasibility of on-line laser conditioning and damage evolution for tripler harmonic generation (THG) crystals on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These tests have shown that there is a nonzero probability of damage at NIF redline fluence (14.3 J/cm2, 351 nm, 3 ns) and that the damage pinpoint density evolves exponentially with fluence. In this paper, the results of these tests are used in conjunction with model spatial profiles of the NIP beam to predict the level of damage created in the THG crystal. A probabilistic calculation based on the overlap of the beam fluence and damage probabiity distribution shows that the overall damage probability is less than 3% for well-conditioned, high quality KDP/KD*P crystals of conventional or rapid growth. The number density of generated pinpoints has been calculated by mapping the damage evolution curves onto the NlF model profile. This shows that the number of damage pinpoints generated in high fluence portions of the NIF beam will be low for well-conditioned THG crystals. In contrast, unconditioned triplers of the same material will exhibit an increase in pinpoint density of greater than 20x. To test the validity of these calculations a 37 cm, conventionally grown KD*P tripler from the Beamlet laser was scatter mapped for bulk damage. The tripler had been exposed to NE-like fluences during its operational lifetime on Beamlet and exhibited very low levels of bulk pinpoint damage, essentially supporting the predictions based on tests and modeling.

  17. Bulk and interfacial glass transitions of water.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Payne, Candace N; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2011-06-16

    Fast scanning calorimetry (FSC) was employed to investigate glass softening dynamics in bulk-like and ultrathin glassy water films. Bulk-like water samples were prepared by vapor-deposition on the surface of a tungsten filament near 140 K where vapor-deposition results in low enthalpy glassy water films. The vapor-deposition approach was also used to grow multiple nanoscale (approximately 50 nm thick) water films alternated with benzene and methanoic films of similar dimensions. When heated from cryogenic temperatures, the ultrathin water films underwent a well manifested glass softening transition at temperatures 20 K below the onset of crystallization. However, no such transition was observed in bulk-like samples prior to their crystallization. These results indicate that thin-film water demonstrates glass softening dynamics that are dramatically distinct from those of the bulk phase. We attribute these differences to water's interfacial glass transition, which occurs at temperatures tens of degrees lower than that in the bulk. Implications of these findings for past studies of glass softening dynamics in various glassy water samples are discussed. PMID:21401034

  18. Bulk Growth of 2-6 Crystals in the Microgravity Environment of USML-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Szofran, Frank R.; Larson, David J.; Su, Ching-Hua; Sha, Yi-Gao; Alexander, Helga A.

    1993-01-01

    The first United States Microgravity Laboratory Mission (USML- 1) flew in June 1992 on the Space Shuttle Columbia. An important part of this SpaceLab mission was the debut of the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF). Of the seven samples grown in the furnace, three were bulk grown 2-6 compounds, two of a cadmium zinc telluride alloy, and one of a mercury zinc telluride alloy. Ground based results are presented, together with the results of computer simulated growths of these experimental conditions. Preliminary characterization results for the three USML-1 growth runs are also presented and the flight sample characteristics are compared to the equivalent ground truth samples. Of particular interest are the effect of the containment vessel on surface features, and especially on the nucleation, and the effect of the gravity vector on radial and axial compositional variations and stress and defect levels.

  19. Sn-doped Bi1.1Sb0.9Te2S bulk crystal topological insulator with excellent properties

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, S. K.; Pletikosić, I.; Liang, T.; Gyenis, A.; Lapidus, S. H.; Tian, Yao; Zhao, He; Burch, K. S.; Lin, Jingjing; Wang, Wudi; Ji, Huiwen; Fedorov, A. V.; Yazdani, Ali; Ong, N. P.; Valla, T.; Cava, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing issue in topological insulator research has been to find a bulk single crystal material that provides a high-quality platform for characterizing topological surface states without interference from bulk electronic states. This material would ideally be a bulk insulator, have a surface state Dirac point energy well isolated from the bulk valence and conduction bands, display quantum oscillations from the surface state electrons and be growable as large, high-quality bulk single crystals. Here we show that this material obstacle is overcome by bulk crystals of lightly Sn-doped Bi1.1Sb0.9Te2S grown by the vertical Bridgman method. We characterize Sn-BSTS via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunnelling microscopy, transport studies, X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering. We present this material as a high-quality topological insulator that can be reliably grown as bulk single crystals and thus studied by many researchers interested in topological surface states. PMID:27118032

  20. Sn-doped Bi1.1Sb0.9Te2S bulk crystal topological insulator with excellent properties

    DOE PAGES

    S. K. Kushwaha; Pletikosic, I.; Liang, T.; Gyenis, A.; Lapidus, S. H.; Tian, Y.; Zhao, H.; Burch, K. S.; Lin, Jingjing; Wang, Wudi; et al

    2016-04-27

    A long-standing issue in topological insulator research has been to find a bulk single crystal material that provides a high quality platform for characterizing topological surface states without interference from bulk electronic states. This material would ideally be a bulk insulator, have a surface state Dirac point energy well isolated from the bulk valence and conduction bands, display quantum oscillations from the surface state electrons, and be growable as large, high quality bulk single crystals. Here we show that this materials obstacle is overcome by bulk crystals of lightly Sn-doped Bi1.1Sb0.9Te2S grown by the Vertical Bridgeman method. We characterize Sn-BSTSmore » via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, transport studies, X-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering. We present this material as a high quality topological insulator that can be reliably grown as bulk single crystals and thus studied by many researchers interested in topological surface states.« less

  1. Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Pocha, Michael D.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Deri, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

  2. Bulk-memory processor for data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; McMillan, D.E.; Sunier, J.W.; Meier, M.; Poore, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    To meet the diverse needs and data rate requirements at the Van de Graaff and Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facilities, a bulk memory system has been implemented which includes a fast and flexible processor. This bulk memory processor (BMP) utilizes bit slice and microcode techniques and features a 24 bit wide internal architecture allowing direct addressing of up to 16 megawords of memory and histogramming up to 16 million counts per channel without overflow. The BMP is interfaced to the MOSTEK MK 8000 bulk memory system and to the standard MODCOMP computer I/O bus. Coding for the BMP both at the microcode level and with macro instructions is supported. The generalized data acquisition system has been extended to support the BMP in a manner transparent to the user.

  3. A diphoton resonance from bulk RS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Csaba; Randall, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Recent LHC data hinted at a 750 GeV mass resonance that decays into two photons. A significant feature of this resonance is that its decays to any other Standard Model particles would be too low to be detected so far. Such a state has a compelling explanation in terms of a scalar or a pseudoscalar that is strongly coupled to vector states charged under the Standard Model gauge groups. Such a scenario is readily accommodated in bulk RS with a scalar localized in the bulk away from but close to the Higgs. Turning this around, we argue that a good way to find the elusive bulk RS model might be the search for a resonance with prominent couplings to gauge bosons.

  4. Orchestrating Bulk Data Movement in Grid Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vazhkudai, SS

    2005-01-25

    Data Grids provide a convenient environment for researchers to manage and access massively distributed bulk data by addressing several system and transfer challenges inherent to these environments. This work addresses issues involved in the efficient selection and access of replicated data in Grid environments in the context of the Globus Toolkit{trademark}, building middleware that (1) selects datasets in highly replicated environments, enabling efficient scheduling of data transfer requests; (2) predicts transfer times of bulk wide-area data transfers using extensive statistical analysis; and (3) co-allocates bulk data transfer requests, enabling parallel downloads from mirrored sites. These efforts have demonstrated a decentralized data scheduling architecture, a set of forecasting tools that predict bandwidth availability within 15% error and co-allocation architecture, and heuristics that expedites data downloads by up to 2 times.

  5. A stereoscopic look into the bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Mosk, Benjamin; Sully, James

    2016-07-01

    We present the foundation for a holographic dictionary with depth perception. The dictionary consists of natural CFT operators whose duals are simple, diffeomorphisminvariant bulk operators. The CFT operators of interest are the "OPE blocks," contributions to the OPE from a single conformal family. In holographic theories, we show that the OPE blocks are dual at leading order in 1 /N to integrals of effective bulk fields along geodesics or homogeneous minimal surfaces in anti-de Sitter space. One widely studied example of an OPE block is the modular Hamiltonian, which is dual to the fluctuation in the area of a minimal surface. Thus, our operators pave the way for generalizing the Ryu-Takayanagi relation to other bulk fields.

  6. The structural and optical properties of GaSb/InGaAs type-II quantum dots grown on InP (100) substrate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the structural and optical properties of type-II GaSb/InGaAs quantum dots [QDs] grown on InP (100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Rectangular-shaped GaSb QDs were well developed and no nanodash-like structures which could be easily found in the InAs/InP QD system were formed. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectra show there are two peaks centered at 0.75eV and 0.76ev. The low-energy peak blueshifted with increasing excitation power is identified as the indirect transition from the InGaAs conduction band to the GaSb hole level (type-II), and the high-energy peak is identified as the direct transition (type-I) of GaSb QDs. This material system shows a promising application on quantum-dot infrared detectors and quantum-dot field-effect transistor. PMID:22277096

  7. Compensating defects in Si-doped AlN bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irmscher, K.; Schulz, T.; Albrecht, M.; Hartmann, C.; Wollweber, J.; Fornari, R.

    2007-12-01

    The rather low n-type conductivity observed in Si-doped sublimation-grown AlN bulk crystals is explained by the formation of high concentrations of compensating defects. The model is based on the experimental verification of a shallow impurity band formed by Si donors and the presence of acceptor-like electron traps within 1 eV below the conduction band edge. Further it is suggested that the majority of the Si donors is compensated by deep acceptors in the lower half of the band gap. This compensation model is an alternative to the controversially discussed assumption of Si DX center formation.

  8. The polarization signature of local bulk flows

    SciTech Connect

    Roebber, Elinore; Holder, Gilbert

    2014-02-01

    A large peculiar velocity of the intergalactic medium produces a Doppler shift of the cosmic microwave background with a frequency-dependent quadrupole term. This quadrupole will act as a source for polarization of the cosmic microwave background, creating a large-scale polarization anisotropy if the bulk flow is local and coherent on large scales. In the case where we are near the center of the moving region, the polarization signal is a pure quadrupole. We show that the signal is small, but detectable with future experiments for bulk flows as large as some recent reports.

  9. 'Work-Hardenable' Ductile Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Eckert, Juergen; Tang Meibo; Wang Weihua; Kim, Ki Buem; Baier, Falko; Theissmann, Ralf

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive 'work hardening' and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The 'work-hardening' capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  10. Efficient bulk-loading of gridfiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Scott T.; Nicol, David M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of bulk-loading large data sets for the gridfile multiattribute indexing technique. We propose a rectilinear partitioning algorithm that heuristically seeks to minimize the size of the gridfile needed to ensure no bucket overflows. Empirical studies on both synthetic data sets and on data sets drawn from computational fluid dynamics applications demonstrate that our algorithm is very efficient, and is able to handle large data sets. In addition, we present an algorithm for bulk-loading data sets too large to fit in main memory. Utilizing a sort of the entire data set it creates a gridfile without incurring any overflows.

  11. Unmanned barges carrying certain bulk dangerous cargoes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-03

    The US Coast Guard updates its regulations on the shipment of certain chemicals in bulk to include all dangerous cargoes that are now allowed to be shipped in bulk, and codifies the minimum carriage requirements that have been previously established for these cargoes, thus facilitating their shipment. Tables list the minimum requirements for certain regulated cargoes, including benzene-hydrocarbon mixtures (containing acetylenes), butyraldehydes, dichloromethane, ethylamine (72% or less), methyl tert.-butyl ether, nitric acid (70% or less), nitrobenzene, phthalic anhydride, sulfur dioxide, toluene diisocyanate, and trichloroethylene.

  12. Specific features of seeding and growth of bulk polar crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, E. G.; Tyurikov, V. I.

    2000-07-01

    Formal analysis of seeding and growth of crystals exhibiting spontaneous polarization has been attempted using lithium iodate (α-LiIO 3) and barium metaborate (β-BaB 2O 4) as representative materials grown from aqueous and high-temperature solutions, respectively. We suggest that the specific growth features of nonlinear optical α-LiIO 3 and β-BaB 2O 4 crystals are being determined by formation and evolutionary restructuring of a double electric layer (DEL) at the growth interface. Both composition and structure of the DEL are governed by potential-determining ions of the growth medium as well as by the nature of crystal polarization and its properties. We have found that the composition and structure of the DEL together with the magnitude and direction of spontaneous polarization of the seed (crystal) predetermine the macrotwinning boundaries during seeding and subsequent stages of crystal growth as well as the formation of microtwin structures of various sizes. Similar reasoning is applied to possible crystal asymmetry, cellular growth, extinction of growth, etc. Model concepts of seeding and growth of bulk polar crystals are discussed.

  13. Optical Characterization of Bulk ZnSeTe Solid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, S.; Zhu, Shen; Lehoczky, S. L.; Wang, Ling Jun

    2000-01-01

    Optical characterization was performed on wafers sliced from crystals of ZnSe, ZnTe, and ZnSe(1-x)Te(x)(0 less than x less than 0.4) grown by physical vapor transport. Energy band gaps at room temperature were determined from optical transmission measurements on 11 wafers. A best fit curve to the band gap versus composition x data gives a bowing parameter of 1.45. This number lies between the value of 1.23 determined previously on ZnSeTe bulk crystals and the value of 1.621 reported on ZnSeTe epilayers. Low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra were measured on six samples. The spectra of ZnSe and ZnTe were dominated by near band edge emissions and no deep donor-acceptor pairs were observed. The PL spectrum exhibited a broad emission for each of the ZnSe(1-x)Te(x) samples, 0.09 less than x less than 0.39. For x=0.09, this emission energy is about 0.2 eV lower than the band gap energy measured at low temperature. As x increases the energy discrepancy gradually decreases and reduces to almost zero at x=0.4. The single broad PL emission spectra and the spectra measured as a function of temperature were interpreted as being associated with the exciton bound to Te clusters because of the high Te content in these samples.

  14. Fiber Treatment Effects on Bioreactor Bulk Fluid Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Ronald II

    2013-01-01

    In order to facilitate the exploration of worlds beyond the borders of our planet, it is necessary to maintain sustainable levels of clean water. The remediation of water via Membrane Aerated Bioreactors (MABRs) is one such method, and the focus of this study. MARRs rely on healthy biofilms grown on hollow fiber membranes to clean non-potable water. These biofilms can take weeks to months to establish. Therefore, various fiber treatments and two inoculums were evaluated for their effect on rapid biofilm formation. Fiber treatments are as follows: sanding of the fibers with 1500 and 8000 grit sandpaper, immersion of the fibers in a 1% hydrofluoric acid solution for 12 seconds and 15 minutes, and the immersion of the fibers in a Fluoroetch® solution for 18 seconds and 5 minutes. The two inoculums utilized were sourced from healthy, established MARRs; Texas Tech University (TTU) MABR "TRL5" and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) MABR "R3". Data attained from direct bacterial cell counts of the reactor bulk fluids via fluorescent microscopy, suggests that the fluoroetching treatment combined with the TTU inoculum show the greatest biofilm creation.

  15. Optical properties of Zn-terminated ZnO bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, C. J.; Jeong, T. S.; Han, M. S.; Kim, J. H.

    2004-02-01

    Optical properties of ZnO bulk grown by hydrothermal method were investigated on the Zn-terminated surface by using Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL). The typical Raman peak of E 2high mode was observed at 436.20 cm -1. Also, the peak 576.20 cm -1 was found to correspond to the LO phonon of A 1 mode. This peak was caused by the defects of O-vacancy, Zn-interstitial, or these complexes. The PL peak positions of B- and A-excitons are shifted to the shorter-wavelength side with decreasing temperature. The obtained PL intensity of excitons was exponentially reduced and the linewidth of the B-exciton broadened with increasing temperature. This is thought to be the vibration mode of LO phonon, which may be participated in quenching process. Also, the empirical band gap was found to be Eg( T)= Eg(0)- αT2/( β+ T), where α and β were turned out to be 5.70×10 -4 eV/K and 420 K, respectively.

  16. The effect of nitridation and sulfur passivation for In0.53Ga0.47As surfaces on their Al/Al2O3/InGaAs MOS capacitors properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizeng, Lin; Mingmin, Cao; Shengkai, Wang; Qi, Li; Gongli, Xiao; Xi, Gao; Honggang, Liu; Haiou, Li

    2016-02-01

    The impact of nitridation and sulfur passivation for In0 53Ga0 47As surfaces on the Al/Al2O3/InGaAs MOS capacitors properties was investigated by comparing the characteristics of frequency dispersion and hysteresis, calculating the Dit and ΔNbt values, and analyzing the interface traps and the leakage current. The results showed that both of the methods could form a passivation-layer on the InGaAs surface. The samples treated by N2 plasma could obtain good interface properties with the smallest frequency dispersion in the accumulation region, and the best hysteresis characteristics and good I-V properties were presented. Also the samples with (NH4/2Sx treatment showed the smallest frequency dispersion near the flat-band region and a minimum Dit value of 2.6 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61274077, 61474031, 61464003), the Guangxi Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 2013GXNSFGA019003, 2013GXNSFAA019335), the Project (No. 9140C140101140C14069), the Innovation Project of GUET Graduate Education (No. YJCXS201529), and the National Science & Technology Major Project of China (No. 2011ZX02708-003).

  17. Low-noise behavior of InGaAs quantum-well-structured modulation-doped FET's from 10 to the -2nd to 10 to the 8 Hz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Shih-Ming J.; Das, Mukunda B.; Peng, Chin-Kun; Klem, John; Henderson, Timothy S.

    1986-01-01

    Equivalent gate noise voltage spectra of 1-micron gate-length modulation-doped FET's with pseudomorphic InGaAs quantum-well structure have been measured for the frequency range of 0.01 Hz to 100 MHz and commpared with the noise spectra of conventional AlGaAs/GaAs MODFET's and GaAs MESFET's. The prominent generation-recombination (g-r) noise bulge commonly observed in the vicinity of 10 kHz in conventional MODFET's at 300 K does not appear in the case of the new InGaAs quantum-well MODFET. Instead, its noise spectra indicate the presence of low-intensity multiple g-r noise components superimposed on a reduced 1/f noise. The LF noise intensity in the new device appears to be the lowest among those observed in any MODFET or MESFET. The noise spectra at 82 K in the new device represent nearly true 1/f noise. This unusual low-noise behavior of the new structure suggests the effectiveness of electron confinement in the quantum well that significantaly reduces electron trapping in the n-AlGaAs, and thus eliminates the g-r noise bulge observed in conventional MODFET's.

  18. Crossover between weak antilocalization and weak localization of bulk states in ultrathin Bi₂Se₃ films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huichao; Liu, Haiwen; Chang, Cui-Zu; Zuo, Huakun; Zhao, Yanfei; Sun, Yi; Xia, Zhengcai; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xie, X C; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Jian

    2014-07-24

    We report transport studies on the 5 nm thick Bi₂Se₃ topological insulator films which are grown via molecular beam epitaxy technique. The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data show that the Fermi level of the system lies in the bulk conduction band above the Dirac point, suggesting important contribution of bulk states to the transport results. In particular, the crossover from weak antilocalization to weak localization in the bulk states is observed in the parallel magnetic field measurements up to 50 Tesla. The measured magneto-resistance exhibits interesting anisotropy with respect to the orientation of parallel magnetic field B// and the current I, signifying intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in the Bi₂Se₃ films. Our work directly shows the crossover of quantum interference effect in the bulk states from weak antilocalization to weak localization. It presents an important step toward a better understanding of the existing three-dimensional topological insulators and the potential applications of nano-scale topological insulator devices.

  19. Teaching Advanced SQL Skills: Text Bulk Loading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, David; Hauser, Karina

    2007-01-01

    Studies show that advanced database skills are important for students to be prepared for today's highly competitive job market. A common task for database administrators is to insert a large amount of data into a database. This paper illustrates how an up-to-date, advanced database topic, namely bulk insert, can be incorporated into a database…

  20. 49 CFR 172.514 - Bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND..., shall affix the placards specified for the material in §§ 172.504 and 172.505. (b) Each bulk...

  1. Supramolecular polymer networks: hydrogels and bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Voorhaar, Lenny; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2016-07-21

    Supramolecular polymer networks are materials crosslinked by reversible supramolecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonding or electrostatic interactions. Supramolecular materials show very interesting and useful properties resulting from their dynamic nature, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness and adaptability. Here we will discuss recent progress in polymer-based supramolecular networks for the formation of hydrogels and bulk materials. PMID:27206244

  2. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  3. A stereoscopic look into the bulk

    DOE PAGES

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Mosk, Benjamin; Sully, James

    2016-07-26

    Here, we present the foundation for a holographic dictionary with depth perception. The dictionary consists of natural CFT operators whose duals are simple, diffeomorphisminvariant bulk operators. The CFT operators of interest are the “OPE blocks,” contributions to the OPE from a single conformal family. In holographic theories, we show that the OPE blocks are dual at leading order in 1/N to integrals of effective bulk fields along geodesics or homogeneous minimal surfaces in anti-de Sitter space. One widely studied example of an OPE block is the modular Hamiltonian, which is dual to the fluctuation in the area of a minimalmore » surface. Thus, our operators pave the way for generalizing the Ryu-Takayanagi relation to other bulk fields. Although the OPE blocks are non-local operators in the CFT, they admit a simple geometric description as fields in kinematic space — the space of pairs of CFT points. We develop the tools for constructing local bulk operators in terms of these non-local objects. The OPE blocks also allow for conceptually clean and technically simple derivations of many results known in the literature, including linearized Einstein’s equations and the relation between conformal blocks and geodesic Witten diagrams.« less

  4. MT6425CA: a 640 X 512-25μm CTIA ROIC for SWIR InGaAs detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Mahsereci, Yigit Uygar; Altiner, Caglar; Akin, Tayfun

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a new CTIA ROIC (MT6425CA) suitable for SWIR InGaAs detector arrays. MT6425CA has a format of 640 × 512 with a pixel pitch of 25 μm and has a system-on-chip architecture, where all the critical timing and biasing for this ROIC are generated by programmable blocks on-chip. MT6425CA is a highly configurable and flexible ROIC, where many of its features can be programmed through a 3-wire serial interface allowing on-the-fly configuration of many ROIC features. The ROIC runs on 3.3V supply voltage at nominal clock speed of 10 MHz clock. It performs snapshot operation both using Integrate-Then-Read (ITR) and Integrate-While- Read (IWR) modes. The CTIA type pixel input circuitry has a full-well-capacity (FWC) of about 320,000e-, with an input referred read noise of less than 110e- at 300K. MT6425CA has programmable number of outputs, where 4, 2, or 1 output can be selected along with an analog reference for pseudo-differential operation. The integration time can be programmed up to 1s in steps of 0.1μs. The gain and offset in the ROIC can be programmed to adjust the output offset and voltage swing. ROIC dissipates less than 130mW from a 3.3V supply at full speed and full frame size with 4 outputs, providing both low-power and low-noise operation. MT6425CA is fabricated using a modern mixed-signal CMOS process on 200mm CMOS wafers with a high yield above 75%, yielding more than 50 working parts per wafer. It has been silicon verified, and tested parts are available either in wafer and die levels with a complete documentation including test reports and wafer maps. A USB based camera electronics and camera development platform with software are available to help customers to evaluate the imaging performance of MT6425CA in a fast and efficient way.

  5. Differences and similarities between structural properties of GaN grown by different growth methods

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Jasinski, J.; Washburn, J.

    2002-08-01

    In this paper defects formed in GaN grown by different methods are reviewed. The crystal growth direction and growth rate play important roles. For bulk crystals grown under high pressure the highest growth rates are for planes perpendicular to the c-axis. Only planar defects formed on c-planes are observed in these crystals. There are no threading dislocations or nanotubes in the c-direction. However, polarity of the growth direction plays a role in the surface roughness and the distribution of planar defects. For growth of homo-epitaxial and hetero-epitaxial layers the growth is forced to take place in the much slower c-direction. As a result defects related to the purity of constituents used for growth are formed such as nanotubes and pinholes. In addition threading dislocations and dislocations that accommodate lattice and thermal expansion mismatch are formed.

  6. Photoconductivities in monocrystalline layered V2O5 nanowires grown by physical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Photoconductivities of monocrystalline vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) nanowires (NWs) with layered orthorhombic structure grown by physical vapor deposition (PVD) have been investigated from the points of view of device and material. Optimal responsivity and gain for single-NW photodetector are at 7,900 A W-1 and 30,000, respectively. Intrinsic photoconduction (PC) efficiency (i.e., normalized gain) of the PVD-grown V2O5 NWs is two orders of magnitude higher than that of the V2O5 counterpart prepared by hydrothermal approach. In addition, bulk and surface-controlled PC mechanisms have been observed respectively by above- and below-bandgap excitations. The coexistence of hole trapping and oxygen sensitization effects in this layered V2O5 nanostructure is proposed, which is different from conventional metal oxide systems, such as ZnO, SnO2, TiO2, and WO3. PMID:24160337

  7. Stability of Detached Grown Germanium Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, M.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Vujisic, L.; Szofran, F. R.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Detachment of the melt meniscus from the crucible during semiconductor Bridgman growth experiments has been observed in recent years, especially under microgravity experiments. Under earth conditions, the hydrostatic pressure counteracts the mechanism, whereby it is more difficult to achieve detached Bridgman growth. Attempts to get stable detached growth under terrestrial conditions have been discussed in the literature and have been the subject of recent experiments in our own group. The advantage of crystals grown without wall contact is obvious: In general, they possess a higher crystal quality than conventional Bridgman grown crystals with wall contact. However, due to the interaction of different parameters such as the wetting behavior of the melt with the crucible, and the dependence of the growth angle with the shape of the melt meniscus, the mechanism leading to detachment is very complicated and not completely understood. We have grown several doped and undoped Germanium crystals with the detached Bridgman and the normal Bridgman growth technique. Pyrolytic boron nitride containers were used for all growth experiments. In the detached grown crystals the typical gap thickness between the pBN crucible and the crystal is in the range of 10 to 100 micrometers, which was determined by performing profilometer measurements. Etch pit density measurements were also performed and a comparison between detached and attached grown crystals will be given. An interesting feature was detected on the surface of a detached grown crystal. Strong surface striations with an average axial distance of 0.5 mm were observed around the whole circumference. The maximum fluctuation of the gap thickness is in the range of 5-10 micrometers. These variations of the detached gap along the crystal axis can be explained by a kind of stiction of the melt/crucible interface and thus by a variation of the meniscus shape. This phenomenon leading to the fluctuation of the gap thickness will be

  8. Stability of Detached Grown Germanium Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, M.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Detachment of the melt meniscus from the crucible during semiconductor Bridgman growth experiments has been observed in recent years especially, under microgravity experiments. Under earth conditions, the hydrostatic pressure counteracts the mechanism, whereby it is more difficult to achieve detached Bridgman growth. Attempts to get stable detached growth under terrestrial conditions have been discussed in the literature and have been the subject of recent experiments in our own group. The advantage of crystals grown without wall contact is obvious: In general, they possess a higher crystal quality than conventional Bridgman grown crystals with wall contact. However, due to the interaction of different parameters such as the wetting behavior of the melt with the crucible, and the dependence of the growth angle with the shape of the melt meniscus, the mechanism leading to detachment is very complicated and not completely understood. We have grown several doped and undoped Germanium crystals with the detached Bridgman and the normal Bridgman growth technique. Pyrolytic boron nitride containers were used for all growth experiments. In the detached grown crystals the typical gap thickness between the pBN crucible and the crystal is in the range of 10 to 100 microns, which was determined by performing profilometer measurements. Etch pit density measurements were also performed and a comparison between detached and attached grown crystals will be given. An interesting feature was detected on the surface of a detached grown crystal. Strong surface striations with an average axial distance of 0.5mm were observed around the whole circumference. The maximum fluctuation of the gap thickness is in the range of 5-10 microns. These variations of the detached gap along the crystal axis can be explained by a kind of stiction of the melt/crucible interface and thus by a variation of the meniscus shape. This phenomenon leading to the fluctuation of the gap thickness will be

  9. Bulk sulfur (S) deposition in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiuying; Wang, Shanqian; Zhang, Wuting; Lu, Xuehe

    2016-06-01

    A systematic dataset of an observation network on a national scale has been organized to investigate the spatial distribution of bulk sulfur (S) deposition (Sdep) throughout China during 2000-2013, representing by far the most detailed data set to track the bulk sulfur deposition throughout China since 2000. Such a dataset is needed for ecosystem studies and for developing emission control policies. Bulk Sdep values showed great variations, ranging from 2.17 to 70.55 kg ha-1 y-1, with an average of 22.99 kg ha-1 y-1. The average rate of bulk Sdep located in East Coastal region (35.97 kg ha-1 y-1), Middle Yangtze region (57.90 kg ha-1 y-1), Middle Yellow River region (23.42 kg ha-1 y-1), North Coastal region (42.19 kg ha-1 y-1), Northeast region (34.28 kg ha-1 y-1), South Coastal region (36.97 kg S ha-1 y-1), Southwest region (33.85 kg ha-1 y-1) was 4.50, 7.24, 2.93, 5.28, 4.29, 4.63 and 4.24 times than that in Northwest region (7.99 kg ha-1 y-1). Bulk Sdep over China was mainly from fossil fuel combustion (76.96%), biomass burning (7.64%), crust (6.22%), aged sea salt (5.48%) and agriculture (3.68%). A systematic observation network on a national scale should be established to conduct a long-term monitoring atmospheric Sdep (including wet and dry deposition), based on exiting ecological stations administrated by different departments in China.

  10. Effect of the soil type on the microbiome in the rhizosphere of field-grown lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Schreiter, Susanne; Ding, Guo-Chun; Heuer, Holger; Neumann, Günter; Sandmann, Martin; Grosch, Rita; Kropf, Siegfried; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    The complex and enormous diversity of microorganisms associated with plant roots is important for plant health and growth and is shaped by numerous factors. This study aimed to unravel the effects of the soil type on bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of field-grown lettuce. We used an experimental plot system with three different soil types that were stored at the same site for 10 years under the same agricultural management to reveal differences directly linked to the soil type and not influenced by other factors such as climate or cropping history. Bulk soil and rhizosphere samples were collected 3 and 7 weeks after planting. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing revealed soil type dependent differences in the bacterial community structure of the bulk soils and the corresponding rhizospheres. The rhizosphere effect differed depending on the soil type and the plant growth developmental stage. Despite the soil type dependent differences in the bacterial community composition several genera such as Sphingomonas, Rhizobium, Pseudomonas, and Variovorax were significantly increased in the rhizosphere of lettuce grown in all three soils. The number of rhizosphere responders was highest 3 weeks after planting. Interestingly, in the soil with the highest numbers of responders the highest shoot dry weights were observed. Heatmap analysis revealed that many dominant operational taxonomic units were shared among rhizosphere samples of lettuce grown in diluvial sand, alluvial loam, and loess loam and that only a subset was increased in relative abundance in the rhizosphere compared to the corresponding bulk soil. The findings of the study provide insights into the effect of soil types on the rhizosphere microbiome of lettuce. PMID:24782839

  11. Evidence for graphite-like hexagonal AlN nanosheets epitaxially grown on single crystal Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsipas, P.; Kassavetis, S.; Tsoutsou, D.; Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Golias, E.; Giamini, S. A.; Grazianetti, C.; Chiappe, D.; Molle, A.; Fanciulli, M.; Dimoulas, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ultrathin (sub-monolayer to 12 monolayers) AlN nanosheets are grown epitaxially by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Ag(111) single crystals. Electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy provide evidence that AlN on Ag adopts a graphite-like hexagonal structure with a larger lattice constant compared to bulk-like wurtzite AlN. This claim is further supported by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy indicating a reduced energy bandgap as expected for hexagonal AlN.

  12. One-dimensional edge state of Bi thin film grown on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Naoya; Lin, Chun-Liang; Kawai, Maki; Takagi, Noriaki; Arafune, Ryuichi

    2015-07-20

    The geometric and electronic structures of the Bi thin film grown on Si(111) were investigated by using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. We have found two types of edges, one of which hosts an electronic state localized one-dimensionally. We also revealed the energy dispersion of the localized edge state from the evolution of quasiparticle interference patterns as a function of energy. These spectroscopic findings well reproduce those acquired for the cleaved surface of the bulk Bi crystal [I. K. Drozdov et al., Nat. Phys. 10, 664 (2014)]. The present results indicate that the deposited Bi film provides a tractable stage for further scrutiny of the one-dimensional edge state.

  13. Bulk solitary waves in elastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, A. M.; Dreiden, G. V.; Semenova, I. V.; Shvartz, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    A short and object oriented conspectus of bulk solitary wave theory, numerical simulations and real experiments in condensed matter is given. Upon a brief description of the soliton history and development we focus on bulk solitary waves of strain, also known as waves of density and, sometimes, as elastic and/or acoustic solitons. We consider the problem of nonlinear bulk wave generation and detection in basic structural elements, rods, plates and shells, that are exhaustively studied and widely used in physics and engineering. However, it is mostly valid for linear elasticity, whereas dynamic nonlinear theory of these elements is still far from being completed. In order to show how the nonlinear waves can be used in various applications, we studied the solitary elastic wave propagation along lengthy wave guides, and remarkably small attenuation of elastic solitons was proven in physical experiments. Both theory and generation for strain soliton in a shell, however, remained unsolved problems until recently, and we consider in more details the nonlinear bulk wave propagation in a shell. We studied an axially symmetric deformation of an infinite nonlinearly elastic cylindrical shell without torsion. The problem for bulk longitudinal waves is shown to be reducible to the one equation, if a relation between transversal displacement and the longitudinal strain is found. It is found that both the 1+1D and even the 1+2D problems for long travelling waves in nonlinear solids can be reduced to the Weierstrass equation for elliptic functions, which provide the solitary wave solutions as appropriate limits. We show that the accuracy in the boundary conditions on free lateral surfaces is of crucial importance for solution, derive the only equation for longitudinal nonlinear strain wave and show, that the equation has, amongst others, a bidirectional solitary wave solution, which lead us to successful physical experiments. We observed first the compression solitary wave in the

  14. Grown-ups Ought To Know Better.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightman, Samuel C.

    Among the articles by Sam Brightman collected in this volume from the newsletter, "Adult & Continuing Education Today (ACET)" are the following: "Grown-Ups Ought to Know Better"; "Adult Education: The Only Sure Factor Is Growth"; "Adult Education Important in This Election Year"; "Will Nursery School External Degree Programs Come Next?";…

  15. Molecule diagram from earth-grown crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Like many chemicals in the body, the three-dimensional structure of insulin is extremely complex. When grown on the ground, insulin crystals do not grow as large or as ordered as researchers desire--obscuring the blueprint of the insulin molecules.

  16. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  17. Origin of anomalous piezoresistive effects in VLS grown Si nanowires.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Karl; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Lugstein, Alois

    2015-03-11

    Although the various effects of strain on silicon are subject of intensive research since the 1950s the physical background of anomalous piezoresistive effects in Si nanowires (NWs) is still under debate. Recent investigations concur in that due to the high surface-to-volume ratio extrinsic surface related effects superimpose the intrinsic piezoresistive properties of nanostructures. To clarify this interplay of piezoresistive effects and stress related surface potential modifications, we explored a particular tensile straining device (TSD) with a monolithic embedded vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown Si NW. Integrating the suspended NW in a gate all around (GAA) field effect transistor (FET) configuration with a transparent gate stack enables optical and field modulated electrical characterization under high uniaxial tensile strain applied along the ⟨111⟩ Si NW growth direction. A model based on stress-induced carrier mobility change and surface charge modulation is proposed to interpret the actual piezoresistive behavior of Si NWs. By controlling the nature and density of surface states via passivation the "true" piezoresistance of the NWs is found to be comparable with that of bulk Si. This demonstrates the indispensability of application-specific NW surface conditioning and the modulation capability of Si NWs properties for sensor applications.

  18. Origin of Anomalous Piezoresistive Effects in VLS Grown Si Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although the various effects of strain on silicon are subject of intensive research since the 1950s the physical background of anomalous piezoresistive effects in Si nanowires (NWs) is still under debate. Recent investigations concur in that due to the high surface-to-volume ratio extrinsic surface related effects superimpose the intrinsic piezoresistive properties of nanostructures. To clarify this interplay of piezoresistive effects and stress related surface potential modifications, we explored a particular tensile straining device (TSD) with a monolithic embedded vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) grown Si NW. Integrating the suspended NW in a gate all around (GAA) field effect transistor (FET) configuration with a transparent gate stack enables optical and field modulated electrical characterization under high uniaxial tensile strain applied along the ⟨111⟩ Si NW growth direction. A model based on stress-induced carrier mobility change and surface charge modulation is proposed to interpret the actual piezoresistive behavior of Si NWs. By controlling the nature and density of surface states via passivation the “true” piezoresistance of the NWs is found to be comparable with that of bulk Si. This demonstrates the indispensability of application-specific NW surface conditioning and the modulation capability of Si NWs properties for sensor applications. PMID:25651106

  19. Foamed Bulk Metallic Glass (Foam) Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This soldering iron has an evacuated copper capsule at the tip that contains a pellet of Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Prior to flight, researchers sealed a pellet of bulk metallic glass mixed with microscopic gas-generating particles into the copper ampoule under vacuum. Once heated in space, such as in this photograph, the particles generated gas and the BMG becomes a viscous liquid. The released gas made the sample foam within the capsule where each microscopic particle formed a gas-filled pore within the foam. The inset image shows the oxidation of the sample after several minutes of applying heat. Although hidden within the brass sleeve, the sample retained the foam shape when cooled, because the viscosity increased during cooling until it was solid.

  20. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  1. Bulk dynamics of the expendable bathythermograph (XBT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. W.

    1984-04-01

    Factors affecting the dynamics of expendable bathythernograph probes (SIPPICAN Corporation XBT types T-7 and T-4) are discussed, and a bulk dynamic model for a vertically falling probe is proposed. The model predicts fall speeds and depths as functions of time. The theoretical results agree with recent observations and provide improved probe depth estimates in comparison with the manufacturer's empirical formula. The model quantifies the relationships of probe mass, bulk drag coefficient, wire loss, and initial fall speed; consequently, it is suggested that these parameters should be considered when refined and accurate intercomparisons of XBT probes and conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profilers are made. Accurate determinations of the probe's hydrodynamic drag over its operational range of Reynolds number are needed for future refinements of the model.

  2. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, legal representative, Carol

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  3. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  4. Combinatorial development of bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shiyan; Liu, Yanhui; Li, Yanglin; Liu, Ze; Sohn, Sungwoo; Walker, Fred J; Schroers, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The identification of multicomponent alloys out of a vast compositional space is a daunting task, especially for bulk metallic glasses composed of three or more elements. Despite an increasing theoretical understanding of glass formation, bulk metallic glasses are predominantly developed through a sequential and time-consuming trial-and-error approach. Even for binary systems, accurate quantum mechanical approaches are still many orders of magnitude away from being able to simulate the relatively slow kinetics of glass formation. Here, we present a high-throughput strategy where ∼3,000 alloy compositions are fabricated simultaneously and characterized for thermoplastic formability through parallel blow forming. Using this approach, we identified the composition with the highest thermoplastic formability in the glass-forming system Mg-Cu-Y. The method provides a versatile toolbox for unveiling complex correlations of material properties and glass formation, and should facilitate a drastic increase in the discovery rate of metallic glasses.

  5. Large bulk Micromegas detectors for TPC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvar, S.; Baron, P.; Boyer, M.; Beucher, J.; Calvet, D.; Colas, P.; De La Broise, X.; Delagnes, E.; Delbart, A.; Druillole, F.; Emery, S.; Giganti, C.; Giomataris, I.; Mazzucato, E.; Monmarthe, E.; Nizery, F.; Pierre, F.; Ritou, J.-L.; Sarrat, A.; Zito, M.; Catanesi, M. G.; Radicioni, E.; De Oliveira, R.; Blondel, A.; Di Marco, M.; Ferrere, D.; Perrin, E.; Ravonel, M.; Jover, G.; Lux, T.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Sanchez, F.; Cervera, A.; Hansen, C.; Monfregola, L.

    2009-04-01

    A large volume TPC will be used in the near future in a variety of experiments including T2K. The bulk Micromegas detector for this TPC is built using a novel production technique particularly suited for compact, thin and robust low mass detectors. The capability to pave a large surface with a simple mounting solution and small dead space is of particular interest for these applications. We have built several large bulk Micromegas detectors ( 36×34 cm2) and we have tested one in the former HARP field cage with a magnetic field. Prototypes cards of the T2K front end electronics, based on the AFTER ASIC chip, have been used in this TPC test for the first time. Cosmic ray data have been acquired in a variety of experimental conditions. Good detector performances, space point resolution and energy loss measurement have been achieved.

  6. Bulk micromegas detectors for large TPC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchez, J.; Burke, D. R.; Cavata, Ch.; Colas, P.; De La Broise, X.; Delbart, A.; Giganon, A.; Giomataris, I.; Graffin, P.; Mols, J.-Ph.; Pierre, F.; Ritou, J.-L.; Sarrat, A.; Virique, E.; Zito, M.; Radicioni, E.; De Oliveira, R.; Dumarchez, J.; Abgrall, N.; Bene, P.; Blondel, A.; Cervera, A.; Ferrere, D.; Maschiocchi, F.; Perrin, E.; Richeux, J.-P.; Schroeter, R.; Jover, G.; Lux, T.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Sanchez, F.

    2007-05-01

    A large volume TPC will be used in the near future in a variety of experiments including T2K. The bulk Micromegas detector for this TPC is built using a novel production technique particularly suited for compact and robust low mass detectors. The capability to pave a large surface with a simple mounting solution and small dead space between modules is of particular interest for these applications. We have built several large bulk Micromegas detectors (27×26 cm2) and we have tested them in the former HARP field cage setup with a magnetic field. Cosmic ray data have been acquired in a variety of experimental conditions. Good detector performances and space point resolution have been achieved.

  7. Induction detection of concealed bulk banknotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Christopher; Chen, Antao

    2012-06-01

    The smuggling of bulk cash across borders is a serious issue that has increased in recent years. In an effort to curb the illegal transport of large numbers of paper bills, a detection scheme has been developed, based on the magnetic characteristics of bank notes. The results show that volumes of paper currency can be detected through common concealing materials such as plastics, cardboard, and fabrics making it a possible potential addition to border security methods. The detection scheme holds the potential of also reducing or eliminating false positives caused by metallic materials found in the vicinity, by observing the stark difference in received signals caused by metal and currency. The detection scheme holds the potential to detect for both the presence and number of concealed bulk notes, while maintaining the ability to reduce false positives caused by metal objects.

  8. The Soret effect in bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Liu, Chain T; George, Easo P; Wang, Xianzhen

    2007-01-01

    Compositional inhomogeneity induced by the Soret effect was studied in two Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMG): Zr50Cu50 and Zr50Cu40Al10 (at.%), and one Cu-based BMG: Cu60Zr30Ti10 (at.%), all of which were prepared by rapid solidification. The concentration of Cu increases from the surface to the interior, while the concentrations of Zr, Ti and Al decrease. The magnitude of the Soret effect is found to be highly dependant on sample size and interactions between the diffusing atoms in bulk metallic glasses. For the Zr50Cu50 alloy, a large sample size favors the Soret effect, because of the longer diffusion time it affords compared to a small sample. Further, the additions of Al and Ti in the Zr-Cu BMGs reduce the magnitude of the Soret effect by the formation of short-range order and/or inter-atomic clusters.

  9. Structural rejuvenation in bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yang; Iwashita, T.; Dmowski, Wojciech; Bei, Hongbin; Yokoyama, Y.; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-01-05

    Using high-energy X-ray diffraction we study structural changes in bulk metallic glasses after uniaxial compressive homogeneous deformation at temperatures slightly below the glass transition. We observe that deformation results in structural disordering corresponding to an increase in the fictive, or effective, temperature. However, the structural disordering saturates after yielding. Lastly, examination of the experimental structure and molecular dynamics simulation suggests that local changes in the atomic connectivity network are the main driving force of the structural rejuvenation.

  10. Bulk-titanium for MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Changsong

    RF-MEMS switches offer great potential benefits such as high isolation, low insertion loss, low power consumption, and excellent linearity characteristics. Most MEMS switches are fabricated using surface micromachining techniques by taking advantage of the IC processing techniques. Little work has been done on bulk micromachining for fabricating MEMS switches. This work contributes to two main areas in the MEMS switch field, (1) a Sacrificial-Layer-Free (SLF) method to fabricate switches using bulk titanium MEMS (BT-MEMS) and multilayer lamination techniques, and (2) development of a novel composite contact material and integration into BT-MEMS switches for testing. This approach for fabricating MEMS switches offers advantages from five aspects to attack the fabrication and reliability issues. Four generations of Bulk-Ti MEMS (BT-MEMS) switches were developed. They were improved through developments of high aspect ratio bulk Ti etching, Titanium-On-Insulator structure, multilayer lamination, mechanical design, and a new contact material. The first generation proved the feasibility of the concept of the BT-MEMS switch. The second generation had a good contact resistance. Development of the novel Nano-Structured-Titania (NST) composite material allowed further improvement of the third generation. We used the BT-MEMS switch as a platform for testing this new, novel contact material. Due to the preferred surface properties of the NST-metal composite material such as roughness and hardness, the third generation switched above 15 billion contact cycles without adhesion failure. Contact resistance was further improved in the fourth generation switch by integrating the NST-metal composite material into the top part as bumps. Above 100 million cycles with good contact resistance values were achieved.

  11. Growth of aluminum nitride bulk crystals by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bei

    The commercial potential of III-nitride semiconductors is already being realized by the appearance of high efficiency, high reliability, blue and green LEDS around the world. However, the lack of a native nitride substrate has hindered the full-realization of more demanding III-nitride devices. To date, single aluminum nitride (AlN) crystals are not commercially available. New process investigation is required to scale up the crystal size. New crucibles stable up to very high temperatures (˜2500°C) are needed which do not incorporate impurities into the growing crystals. In this thesis, the recent progresses in bulk AlN crystal growth by sublimation-recondensation were reviewed first. The important physical, optical and electrical properties as well as chemical and thermal stabilities of AlN were discussed. The development of different types of growth procedures including self-seeding, substrate employed and a new "sandwich" technique were covered in detail. Next, the surface morphology and composition at the initial stages of AlN grown on 6H-SiC (0001) were investigated. Discontinuous AlN coverage occurred after 15 minutes of growth. The initial discontinuous nucleation of AlN and different lateral growth of nuclei indicated discontinuous AIN direct growth on on-axis 6H-SiC substrates. At the temperature in excess of 2100°C, the durability of the furnace fixture materials (crucibles, retorts, etc.) remains a critical problem. The thermal and chemical properties and performance of several refractory materials, including tantalum carbide, niobium carbide, tungsten, graphite, and hot-pressed boron nitride (HPBN), in inert gas, as well as under AIN crystal growth conditions were discussed. TaC and NbC are the most stable crucible materials in the crystal growth system. HPBN crucible is more suitable for AlN self-seeding growth, as crystals tend to nucleate in thin colorless platelets with low dislocation density. Finally, clear and colorless thin platelet Al

  12. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J.; Cecchi, Joseph L.

    1990-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  13. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J.; Cecchi, Joseph L.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  14. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOEpatents

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1991-08-20

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

  15. Evidence for Bulk Ripplocations in Layered Solids.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Jacob; Lang, Andrew C; Griggs, Justin; Taheri, Mitra L; Tucker, Garritt J; Barsoum, Michel W

    2016-09-19

    Plastically anisotropic/layered solids are ubiquitous in nature and understanding how they deform is crucial in geology, nuclear engineering, microelectronics, among other fields. Recently, a new defect termed a ripplocation-best described as an atomic scale ripple-was proposed to explain deformation in two-dimensional solids. Herein, we leverage atomistic simulations of graphite to extend the ripplocation idea to bulk layered solids, and confirm that it is essentially a buckling phenomenon. In contrast to dislocations, bulk ripplocations have no Burgers vector and no polarity. In graphite, ripplocations are attracted to other ripplocations, both within the same, and on adjacent layers, the latter resulting in kink boundaries. Furthermore, we present transmission electron microscopy evidence consistent with the existence of bulk ripplocations in Ti3SiC2. Ripplocations are a topological imperative, as they allow atomic layers to glide relative to each other without breaking the in-plane bonds. A more complete understanding of their mechanics and behavior is critically important, and could profoundly influence our current understanding of how graphite, layered silicates, the MAX phases, and many other plastically anisotropic/layered solids, deform and accommodate strain.

  16. Evidence for Bulk Ripplocations in Layered Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Jacob; Lang, Andrew C.; Griggs, Justin; Taheri, Mitra L.; Tucker, Garritt J.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-09-01

    Plastically anisotropic/layered solids are ubiquitous in nature and understanding how they deform is crucial in geology, nuclear engineering, microelectronics, among other fields. Recently, a new defect termed a ripplocation–best described as an atomic scale ripple–was proposed to explain deformation in two-dimensional solids. Herein, we leverage atomistic simulations of graphite to extend the ripplocation idea to bulk layered solids, and confirm that it is essentially a buckling phenomenon. In contrast to dislocations, bulk ripplocations have no Burgers vector and no polarity. In graphite, ripplocations are attracted to other ripplocations, both within the same, and on adjacent layers, the latter resulting in kink boundaries. Furthermore, we present transmission electron microscopy evidence consistent with the existence of bulk ripplocations in Ti3SiC2. Ripplocations are a topological imperative, as they allow atomic layers to glide relative to each other without breaking the in-plane bonds. A more complete understanding of their mechanics and behavior is critically important, and could profoundly influence our current understanding of how graphite, layered silicates, the MAX phases, and many other plastically anisotropic/layered solids, deform and accommodate strain.

  17. Evidence for Bulk Ripplocations in Layered Solids.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Jacob; Lang, Andrew C; Griggs, Justin; Taheri, Mitra L; Tucker, Garritt J; Barsoum, Michel W

    2016-01-01

    Plastically anisotropic/layered solids are ubiquitous in nature and understanding how they deform is crucial in geology, nuclear engineering, microelectronics, among other fields. Recently, a new defect termed a ripplocation-best described as an atomic scale ripple-was proposed to explain deformation in two-dimensional solids. Herein, we leverage atomistic simulations of graphite to extend the ripplocation idea to bulk layered solids, and confirm that it is essentially a buckling phenomenon. In contrast to dislocations, bulk ripplocations have no Burgers vector and no polarity. In graphite, ripplocations are attracted to other ripplocations, both within the same, and on adjacent layers, the latter resulting in kink boundaries. Furthermore, we present transmission electron microscopy evidence consistent with the existence of bulk ripplocations in Ti3SiC2. Ripplocations are a topological imperative, as they allow atomic layers to glide relative to each other without breaking the in-plane bonds. A more complete understanding of their mechanics and behavior is critically important, and could profoundly influence our current understanding of how graphite, layered silicates, the MAX phases, and many other plastically anisotropic/layered solids, deform and accommodate strain. PMID:27640724

  18. DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM (DBVS) EXTERNAL REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    HONEYMAN, J.O.

    2007-02-08

    The Hanford mission to retrieve and immobilize 53 million gallons of radioactive waste from 177 underground storage tanks will be accomplished using a combination of processing by the waste treatment plant currently under construction, and a supplemental treatment that would process low-activity waste. Under consideration for this treatment is bulk vitrification, a versatile joule-heated melter technology which could be deployed in the tank farms. The Department proposes to demonstrate this technology under a Research, Development and Demonstration (RD and D) permit issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology using both non-radioactive simulant and blends of actual tank waste. From the demonstration program, data would be obtained on cost and technical performance to enable a decision on the potential use of bulk vitrification as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford. An independent review by sixteen subject matter experts was conducted to assure that the technical basis of the demonstration facility design would be adequate to meet the objectives of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) program. This review explored all aspects of the program, including flowsheet chemistry, project risk, vitrification, equipment design and nuclear safety, and was carried out at a time when issues can be identified and corrected. This paper describes the mission need, review approach, technical recommendations and follow-on activities for the DBVS program.

  19. Evidence for Bulk Ripplocations in Layered Solids

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Jacob; Lang, Andrew C.; Griggs, Justin; Taheri, Mitra L.; Tucker, Garritt J.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-01-01

    Plastically anisotropic/layered solids are ubiquitous in nature and understanding how they deform is crucial in geology, nuclear engineering, microelectronics, among other fields. Recently, a new defect termed a ripplocation–best described as an atomic scale ripple–was proposed to explain deformation in two-dimensional solids. Herein, we leverage atomistic simulations of graphite to extend the ripplocation idea to bulk layered solids, and confirm that it is essentially a buckling phenomenon. In contrast to dislocations, bulk ripplocations have no Burgers vector and no polarity. In graphite, ripplocations are attracted to other ripplocations, both within the same, and on adjacent layers, the latter resulting in kink boundaries. Furthermore, we present transmission electron microscopy evidence consistent with the existence of bulk ripplocations in Ti3SiC2. Ripplocations are a topological imperative, as they allow atomic layers to glide relative to each other without breaking the in-plane bonds. A more complete understanding of their mechanics and behavior is critically important, and could profoundly influence our current understanding of how graphite, layered silicates, the MAX phases, and many other plastically anisotropic/layered solids, deform and accommodate strain. PMID:27640724

  20. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent `wave' temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, radiation viscous dissipation is suppressed, and the evolution of local photon spectra can be understood in terms of compression and expansion of the strongly coupled photon and gas fluids. We discuss the consequences of these effects for self-consistently resolving and interpreting turbulent Comptonization in spectral calculations in radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of high luminosity accretion flows.

  1. Tailoring Magnetic Properties in Bulk Nanostructured Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jason Rolando

    Important magnetic properties and behaviors such as coercivity, remanence, susceptibility, energy product, and exchange coupling can be tailored by controlling the grain size, composition, and density of bulk magnetic materials. At nanometric length scales the grain size plays an increasingly important role since magnetic domain behavior and grain boundary concentration determine bulk magnetic behavior. This has spurred a significant amount of work devoted to developing magnetic materials with nanometric features (thickness, grain/crystallite size, inclusions or shells) in 0D (powder), 1D (wires), and 2D (thin films) materials. Large 3D nanocrystalline materials are more suitable for many applications such as permanent magnets, magneto-optical Faraday isolators etc. Yet there are relatively few successful demonstrations of 3D magnetic materials with nanoscale influenced properties available in the literature. Making dense 3D bulk materials with magnetic nanocrystalline microstructures is a challenge because many traditional densification techniques (HIP, pressureless sintering, etc.) move the microstructure out of the "nano" regime during densification. This dissertation shows that the Current Activated Pressure Assisted Densification (CAPAD) method, also known as spark plasma sintering, can be used to create dense, bulk, magnetic, nanocrystalline solids with varied compositions suited to fit many applications. The results of my research will first show important implications for the use of CAPAD for the production of exchange-coupled nanocomposite magnets. Decreases in grain size were shown to have a significant role in increasing the magnitude of exchange bias. Second, preferentially ordered bulk magnetic materials were produced with highly anisotropic material properties. The ordered microstructure resulted in changing magnetic property magnitudes (ex. change in coercivity by almost 10x) depending on the relative orientation (0° vs. 90°) of an externally

  2. Dimensionality effect on the charge density wave and superconductivity of molecular beam epitaxy grown monolayer NbSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hyejin; Zhang, Yi; Hussain, Zahid; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Shen, Z.-X.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Onishi, Seita; Chen, Yi; Ruan, Wei; Ojeda-Aristizabal, Claudia; Edmonds, Mark T.; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Riss, Alexander; Lee, Dunghai; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.

    Transition metal dichalcogenides are ideal compounds to investigate dimensionality effect since the weak coupling between layers enables to study single-layer material which removes interlayer interactions and introduces quantum confinement. We investigate dimensionality effect of NbSe2 in which the bulk phase shows charge density wave (CDW) (TCDW = 33 K) and superconductivity (Tc = 7.2 K). We report electronic band structure of MBE grown monolayer NbSe2 measured by Angel-resolved photoemission spectroscopy compared with bulk. We find the number of bands crossing the Fermi energy reduces from three (bulk) to one (monolayer). Based on the significant suppression of superconducting Tc = 0.65 K with robust CDW in monolayer NbSe2, our results imply the band remained at the Fermi level in monolayer NbSe2 may play a crucial role in CDW formation and the disappeared bands are possibly in charge of superconductivity.

  3. Growth of aluminum nitride bulk crystals by sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lianghong

    The research work of this thesis is driven by the fact that the lack of nitride bulk crystals has hindered the full-realization of III-nitride devices. AIN bulk crystals were grown on a resistively heated furnace by sublimation and characterized by optical microscopy, XRD, AFM, SEM, and Raman spectroscopy. First the properties, synthesis, advantages and disadvantages of the seven most commonly/potentially employed substrates (sapphire, 6H-SiC, Si, GaAs, LiGaO2, Al, and GaN) for epitaxy are presented and consequences are discussed, including the crystallographic orientation and polarity, surface morphology, stress, and defects in the GaN films. Subsequently, the transport effect and surface kinetics for the sublimation growth were investigated. Theoretical predictions from a detailed two-dimensional model accounting transport only agree well with the experimental data at pressure above 100 Torr and seed temperature ranging from 1700˜1900°C while the activation energy of the growth rate was estimated as 681KJ/mol. Consequently, a global model accounting for both the surface kinetics and transport in the vapor phase is described to explain the mismatches between transport-only model predictions and experiments below 100 Torr. The model parameters for the sticking coefficient of N2 were identified from the experimental data. The refined model more accurately predicts the growth rate over a wider pressure range. Then, the effects of substrate misorientation and buffer layers (both SiC and AlN) on the morphology and growth mode of AlN deposited on 6H-SiC were explored. The AlN sublimated on the on-axis and off-axis 6H-SiC substrate without any treatment proceeded by island growth, producing a high density of screw dislocations. This produced individual AlN grains and rough surface morphologies. These problems were largely eliminated by first depositing an AlN layer on the 6H-SiC by MOCVD before starting sublimation growth. 2-dimensional growth was achieved on the 6H

  4. Bulk electronic structure of metals resolved with scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J I; Dick, A; Hansmann, M; Rust, H-P; Neugebauer, J; Horn, K

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate that bulk band structure can have a strong influence in scanning tunneling microscopy measurements by resolving electronic interference patterns associated with scattering phenomena of bulk states at a metal surface and reconstructing the bulk band topology. Our data reveal that bulk information can be detected because states at the edge of the surface-projected bulk band have a predominant role on the scattering patterns. With the aid of density functional calculations, we associate this effect with an intrinsic increase in the projected density of states of edge states. This enhancement is characteristic of the three-dimensional bulk band curvature, a phenomenon analog to a van Hove singularity.

  5. Optical Characterization of Bulk ZnSeTe Solid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, S.; Zhu, Shen; Lehoczky, S. L.; Wang, Ling Jun

    2000-01-01

    Optical characterization was performed on wafers sliced from crystals of ZnSe, ZnTe and ZnSe (sub 1-x) Te (sub x) (0 less than x less than 0.4) grown by physical vapor transport technique. The energy band gaps at room temperature were determined from optical transmission measurements on 11 wafers. The best fit to the band gap vs. composition, x, data gives a bowing parameter of 1.336 which is between the value of 1.23 determined previously on ZnSeTe bulk crystals by reflectivity and the value of 1.621 reported on epilayers by photoconductivity. Low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra were measured on 6 samples. The spectra of ZnSe and ZnTe were dominated by near band edge emissions and no deep donor-acceptor pairs were observed. The PL spectrum exhibited a broad emission for each of the ZnSe (sub 1-x) Te (sub x) samples, 0.09 less than x less than 0.39. For x = 0.09, this emission energy is about 0.2eV lower than the band gap energy measured at low temperature. As x increases the energy discrepancy gradually decreases and reduces to almost zero at x = 0.4. The single broad PL emission spectra and the spectra measured as a function of temperature were interpreted to be associated with the exciton bound to Te clusters because of the high Te content in these samples.

  6. Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching of III-V Semiconductors in BCl(3)-Based Chemistries: Part II: InP, InGaAs, InGaAsP, InAs and AllnAs

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Han, J.; Hobson, W.S.; Hong, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Lee, J.W.; Maeda, T.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J

    1998-12-02

    A parametric study of etch rates and surface morphologies of In-containing compound semiconductors (InP, InGaAs, InGaAsP, InAs and AlInAs) obtained by BClj-based Inductively Coupled Plasmas is reported. Etch rates in the range 1,500-3,000 &min. are obtained for all the materials at moderate source powers (500 W), with the rates being a strong function of discharge composition, rf chuck power and pressure. Typical root-mean-square surface roughness of-5 nm were obtained for InP, which is worse than the values obtained for Ga-based materials under the same conditions (-1 run). The near surface of etched samples is typically slightly deficient in the group V element, but the depth of this deficiency is small (a few tens of angstroms).

  7. Anisotropic Transport of Electrons in a Novel FET Channel with Chains of InGaAs Nano-Islands Embedded along Quasi-Periodic Multi-Atomic Steps on Vicinal (111)B GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Y.; Kawazu, T.; Noda, T.; Sakaki, H.

    2010-01-04

    We have studied electron transport in n-AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction FET channels, in which chains of InGaAs nano-islands are embedded along quasi-periodic steps. By using two samples, conductance G{sub para}(V{sub g}) parallel to the steps and G{sub perp}(V{sub g}) perpendicular to them were measured at 80 K as functions of gate voltage V{sub g}. At sufficiently high V{sub g}, G{sub para} at 80 K is several times as high as G{sub perp}, which manifests the anisotropic two-dimensional transport of electrons. When V{sub g} is reduced to -0.7 V, G{sub perp} almost vanishes, while {sub Gpara} stays sizable unless V{sub g} is set below -0.8 V. These results indicate that 'inter-chain' barriers play stronger roles than 'intra-chain' barriers.

  8. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  9. Integration of bulk piezoelectric materials into microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    Bulk piezoelectric ceramics, compared to deposited piezoelectric thin-films, provide greater electromechanical coupling and charge capacity, which are highly desirable in many MEMS applications. In this thesis, a technology platform is developed for wafer-level integration of bulk piezoelectric substrates on silicon, with a final film thickness of 5-100microm. The characterized processes include reliable low-temperature (200°C) AuIn diffusion bonding and parylene bonding of bulk-PZT on silicon, wafer-level lapping of bulk-PZT with high-uniformity (+/-0.5microm), and low-damage micro-machining of PZT films via dicing-saw patterning, laser ablation, and wet-etching. Preservation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties is confirmed with hysteresis and piezo-response measurements. The introduced technology offers higher material quality and unique advantages in fabrication flexibility over existing piezoelectric film deposition methods. In order to confirm the preserved bulk properties in the final film, diaphragm and cantilever beam actuators operating in the transverse-mode are designed, fabricated and tested. The diaphragm structure and electrode shapes/sizes are optimized for maximum deflection through finite-element simulations. During tests of fabricated devices, greater than 12microm PP displacement is obtained by actuation of a 1mm2 diaphragm at 111kHz with <7mW power consumption. The close match between test data and simulation results suggests that the piezoelectric properties of bulk-PZT5A are mostly preserved without any necessity of repolarization. Three generations of resonant vibration energy harvesters are designed, simulated and fabricated to demonstrate the competitive performance of the new fabrication process over traditional piezoelectric deposition systems. An unpackaged PZT/Si unimorph harvester with 27mm3 active device volume produces up to 205microW at 1.5g/154Hz. The prototypes have achieved the highest figure-of-merits (normalized

  10. Structural defects in bulk GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; dos Reis, R.; Mancuso, M.; Song, C. Y.; Grzegory, I.; Porowski, S.; Bockowski, M.

    2014-10-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies of undoped and Mg doped GaN layers grown on the HVPE substrates by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution (HNPS) with the multi-feed-seed (MFS) configuration are shown. The propagation of dislocations from the HVPE substrate to the layer is observed. Due to the interaction between these dislocations in the thick layers much lower density of these defects is observed in the upper part of the HNPS layers. Amorphous Ga precipitates with attached voids pointing toward the growth direction are observed in the undoped layer. This is similar to the presence of Ga precipitates in high-pressure platelets, however the shape of these precipitates is different. The Mg doped layers do not show Ga precipitates, but MgO rectangular precipitates are formed, decorating the dislocations. Results of TEM studies of HVPE layers grown on Ammonothermal substrates are also presented. These layers have superior crystal quality in comparison to the HNPS layers, as far as density of dislocation is concern. Occasionally some small inclusions can be found, but their chemical composition was not yet determined. It is expected that growth of the HNPS layers on these substrate will lead to large layer thickness obtained in a short time and with high crystal perfection needed in devices.

  11. Separation of surface and bulk reflectance by absorption of bulk scattered light.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Niklas; Neuman, Magnus; Andersson, Mattias; Edström, Per

    2013-07-01

    A method is proposed for separating light reflected from turbid media with a rough surface into a bulk and a surface component. Dye is added to the sample, thereby increasing absorption and canceling bulk scattering. The remaining reflected light is surface reflectance, which can be subtracted from the total reflectance of an undyed sample to obtain the bulk component. The method is applied to paper where the addition of dye is accomplished by inkjet printing. The results show that the bulk scattered light is efficiently canceled, and that both the spectrally neutral surface reflectance and the surface topography of the undyed paper is maintained. The proposed method is particularly suitable for characterization of dielectric, highly randomized materials with significant bulk reflectance and rough surfaces, which are difficult to analyze with existing methods. A reliable separation method opens up for new ways of analyzing, e.g., biological tissues and optical coatings, and is also a valuable tool in the development of more comprehensive reflectance models.

  12. Impact of extended defects on recombination in CdTe heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaunbrecher, Katherine N.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Swartz, Craig H.; Dippo, Pat; Edirisooriya, Madhavie; Ogedengbe, Olanrewaju S.; Sohal, Sandeep; Hancock, Bobby L.; LeBlanc, Elizabeth G.; Jayathilaka, Pathiraja A. R. D.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Myers, Thomas H.

    2016-08-01

    Heterostructures with CdTe and CdTe1-xSex (x ˜ 0.01) absorbers between two wider-band-gap Cd1-xMgxTe barriers (x ˜ 0.25-0.3) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy to study carrier generation and recombination in bulk materials with passivated interfaces. Using a combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and low-temperature PL emission spectroscopy, two extended defect types were identified and the impact of these defects on charge-carrier recombination was analyzed. The dominant defects identified by confocal PL were dislocations in samples grown on (211)B CdTe substrates and crystallographic twinning-related defects in samples on (100)-oriented InSb substrates. Low-temperature PL shows that twin-related defects have a zero-phonon energy of 1.460 eV and a Huang-Rhys factor of 1.50, while dislocation-dominated samples have a 1.473-eV zero-phonon energy and a Huang-Rhys factor of 1.22. The charge carrier diffusion length near both types of defects is ˜6 μm, suggesting that recombination is limited by diffusion dynamics. For heterostructures with a low concentration of extended defects, the bulk lifetime was determined to be 2.2 μs with an interface recombination velocity of 160 cm/s and an estimated radiative lifetime of 91 μs.

  13. Ferroelastic domain organization and precursor control of size in solution-grown hafnium dioxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Depner, Sean W; Cultrara, Nicholas D; Farley, Katie E; Qin, Yueling; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-05-27

    We demonstrate that the degree of branching of the alkyl (R) chain in a Hf(OR)4 precursor allows for control over the length of HfO2 nanocrystals grown by homocondensation of the metal alkoxide with a metal halide. An extended nonhydrolytic sol-gel synthesis has been developed that enables the growth of high aspect ratio monoclinic HfO2 nanorods that grow along the [100] direction. The solution-grown elongated HfO2 nanorods show remarkable organization of twin domains separated by (100) coherent twin boundaries along the length of the nanowires in a morphology reminiscent of shape memory alloys. The sequence of finely structured twin domains each spanning only a few lattice planes originates from the Martensitic transformation of the nanorods from a tetragonal to a monoclinic structure upon cooling. Such ferroelastic domain organization is uncharacteristic of metal oxides and has not thus far been observed in bulk HfO2. The morphologies observed here suggest that, upon scaling to nanometer-sized dimensions, HfO2 might exhibit mechanical properties entirely distinctive from the bulk.

  14. Fertilizer use by class: Bag, bulk, fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, N.L.; Berry, J.T.; McKinney, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    US fertilizer consumption (excluding natural organic, secondary, and micronutrient materials) increased slightly from 42.7 million tons in 1987--1988 to 42.8 million tons in 1988--1989-a gain of less than one percent. In 1988--1989, dry bulk materials represented 52.1 percent of total consumption, fluid fertilizers accounted for 38.9 percent, and bagged materials the remaining 9.0 percent. Both dry and fluid fertilizers increased in tonnage over last year but market shares of each remained essentially the same. Bagged fertilizer continued to drop in tonnage as well as in market share. Fluid fertilizer use (including anhydrous ammonia) exceeded 16.6 million tons. Solid materials accounted for 26.2 million tons. TVA estimates that total dry bulk fertilizer distribution was 22.3 million tons, representing 85 percent of all solid materials. Estimated fertilizer sales of bagged products was 3.9 million tons compared to 4.1 million tons in 1987--1988. Multiple-nutrient fertilizer consumption was 17.5 million tons in 1988--1989. Class distribution of these materials was 60.1 percent dry bulk form, 22.4 percent fluid, and 17.5 percent bagged. Fluid multiple-nutrient materials consumption remained about the same as for 1987--1988 but increased in total market share from 9.1 percent to 9.2 percent. This report is compiled annually from individual State fertilizer tonnage reports. Forty States provided complete breakdown by class in 1988-1989. Only numerical data is included.

  15. Mineral composition of organically grown tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, consumer concerns on environmental and health issues related to food products have increased and, as a result, the demand for organically grown production has grown. Results indicate that consumers concerned about healthy diet and environmental degradation are the most likely to buy organic food, and are willing to pay a high premium. Therefore, it is important to ensure the quality of the produce, especially for highly consumed products. The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) is one of the most widely consumed fresh vegetables in the world. It is also widely used by the food industries as a raw material for the production of derived products such as purees or ketchup. Consequently, many investigations have addressed the impact of plant nutrition on the quality of tomato fruit. The concentrations of minerals (P, Na, K, Ca and Mg) and trace elements (Cu, Zn and Mn) were determined in tomatoes grown organically in East Georgia, Marneuli District. The contents of minerals and Mn seem to be in the range as shown in literature. Cu and Zn were found in considerably high amounts in comparison to maximum permissible values established in Georgia. Some correlations were observed between the minerals and trace elements studied. K and Mg were strongly correlated with Cu and Zn. Statistically significant difference have shown also P, K and Mg based between period of sampling.

  16. Nucleolus in clinostat-grown plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shen-Miller, J.; Dannenhoffer, J. ); Hinchman, R. )

    1991-05-01

    The clinostat is an apparatus that is used to mimic zero gravity in studies of plant growth in the absence of gravitropic response. Clinostat-grown tissue cultures of carrot exhibit significant increases both in the number of nuclei containing more than one nucleolus and in nucleolar volume. Oat seedlings germinated and grown on clinostats exhibit a decreased rate of shoot elongation, increased tissue sensitivity to applied auxin, and an increased response to gravitropic stimulation. Clinostat treatment clearly affects plant metabolism. The nucleolus is the region in the nucleus where ribosome synthesis and assembly take place. The 18S, 5.8S, and 25S ribosomal genes, in tandem units, are located in the nucleolus. Ribosomes orchestrate the production of all proteins that are necessary for the maintenance of cell growth, development, and survival. A full study of the effects of nullification of gravitropism, by clinostat rotation, on nucleolar development in barley has been initiated. The authors study developmental changes of nucleolar number and diameter in clinostat-grown root tissues. Preliminary results show that barley roots exhibit changes in nucleolar number and diameter. Growth rates of barley root and shoot also appear to be reduced, in measurements of both length and weight.

  17. Physical characterization of deep bulk levels by the MOS conductance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, M.; Fischetti, M. V.; Gastaldi, R.

    1982-01-01

    The a.c. response of SRH centers in the bulk silicon of an MOS capacitor is reconsidered in the case of traps far from midgap for which the dominant dissipative process is the a.c. delay in capture and emission of majority carriers. Following the Nicollian and Goetzberger's scheme the MOS admittance is calculated in the whole range of biases starting from a model equivalent circuit in which minority carriers are supposed to be disconnected from the bulk. Henceforth the conductance technique can be employed to characterize the deep bulk levels not only in strong inversion, as previously done by others Authors, but also in the depletion-weak inversion mode. This extension is accomplished without the need of extensive numerical computation and makes it possible to obtain from measurements performed at room temperature the physical parameters of the SRH centers, including their energy level and, in principle, their degeneracy factor. Results of measurements performed on <1, 0, 0>-oriented, CZ and FZ grown wafers are presented. Good correlation is obtained between theory and experiment for the trap conductance as a function of frequency at different values of the surface potential. The deduced density of SRH centers and energy level are also confirmed by DLTS and transient current measurements. Finally, evidence is reported for the existence of a two level trap, probably related to oxygen, in commercial CZ wafers.

  18. Improving the bulk data transfer experience

    SciTech Connect

    Guok, Chin; Guok, Chin; Lee, Jason R.; Berket, Karlo

    2008-05-07

    Scientific computations and collaborations increasingly rely on the network to provide high-speed data transfer, dissemination of results, access to instruments, support for computational steering, etc. The Energy Sciences Network is establishing a science data network to provide user driven bandwidth allocation. In a shared network environment, some reservations may not be granted due to the lack of available bandwidth on any single path. In many cases, the available bandwidth across multiple paths would be sufficient to grant the reservation. In this paper we investigate how to utilize the available bandwidth across multiple paths in the case of bulk data transfer.

  19. Ovarian tissue characterization using bulk optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, B.; Xu, Y.; Zhu, Q.

    2013-03-01

    Ovarian cancer, the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers, is not often found in its early stages due to few symptoms and no reliable screening test. Optical imaging has a great potential to improve the ovarian cancer detection and diagnosis. In this study we have characterized the bulk optical properties of 26 ex-vivo human ovaries using a Diffuse Optical Tomography system. The quantitative values indicated that, in the postmenopausal group, malignant ovaries showed significantly lower scattering coefficient than normal ones. The scattering parameter is largely related to the collagen content that has shown a strong correlation with the cancer development.

  20. Towards bulk based preconditioning for quantum dotcomputations

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, Jack; Langou, Julien; Tomov, Stanimire; Channing,Andrew; Marques, Osni; Vomel, Christof; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2006-05-25

    This article describes how to accelerate the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) type eigensolvers for the computation of several states around the band gap of colloidal quantum dots. Our new approach uses the Hamiltonian from the bulk materials constituent for the quantum dot to design an efficient preconditioner for the folded spectrum PCG method. The technique described shows promising results when applied to CdSe quantum dot model problems. We show a decrease in the number of iteration steps by at least a factor of 4 compared to the previously used diagonal preconditioner.

  1. New approach to cosmological bulk viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disconzi, Marcelo M.; Kephart, Thomas W.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2015-02-01

    We examine the cosmological consequences of an alternative to the standard expression for bulk viscosity, one which was proposed to avoid the propagation of superluminal signals without the necessity of extending the space of variables of the theory. The Friedmann equation is derived for this case, along with an expression for the effective pressure. We find solutions for the evolution of the density of a viscous component, which differs markedly from the case of conventional Eckart theory; our model evolves toward late-time phantomlike behavior with a future singularity. Entropy production is addressed, and some similarities and differences to approaches based on the Mueller-Israel-Stewart theory are discussed.

  2. Superfluid light in bulk nonlinear media.

    PubMed

    Carusotto, Iacopo

    2014-09-01

    We review how the paraxial approximation naturally leads to a hydrodynamic description of light propagation in a bulk Kerr nonlinear medium in terms of a wave equation analogous to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the order parameter of a superfluid. The main features of the many-body collective dynamics of the fluid of light in this propagating geometry are discussed: generation and observation of Bogoliubov sound waves in the fluid of light is first described. Experimentally accessible manifestations of superfluidity are then highlighted. Perspectives in view of realizing analogue models of gravity are finally given. PMID:25197252

  3. Planar Bragg grating in bulk polymethylmethacrylate.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, M; Koller, G; Belle, S; Schmauss, B; Hellmann, R

    2012-12-01

    We report on a one-step writing process of a planar waveguide including a Bragg grating structure in bulk Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). A KrF excimer laser and a phase mask covered by an amplitude mask were used to locally increase the refractive index in PMMA and thereby generate simultaneously the planar waveguide and the Bragg grating. Our results show a reflected wavelength of the Bragg grating of about 1558.5 nm in accordance to the phase mask period. The reflectivity of the grating is about 80%. Initial characteristics of the Bragg grating structure towards humidity are investigated.

  4. Thulium-based bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, H. B.; Yu, P.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2008-04-07

    We report the formation and properties of a thulium-based bulk metallic glass (BMG). Compared with other known rare-earth (RE) based BMGs, Tm-based BMGs show features of excellent glass formation ability, considerable higher elastic modulus, smaller Poisson's ratio, high mechanical strength, and intrinsic brittleness. The reasons for the different properties between the Tm-based and other RE-based BMGs are discussed. It is expected that the Tm-based glasses with the unique properties are appropriate candidates for studying some important issues in BMGs.

  5. High-temperature bulk acoustic wave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritze, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric crystals like langasite (La3Ga5SiO14, LGS) and gallium orthophosphate (GaPO4) exhibit piezoelectrically excited bulk acoustic waves at temperatures of up to at least 1450 °C and 900 °C, respectively. Consequently, resonant sensors based on those materials enable new sensing approaches. Thereby, resonant high-temperature microbalances are of particular interest. They correlate very small mass changes during film deposition onto resonators or gas composition-dependent stoichiometry changes of thin films already deposited onto the resonators with the resonance frequency shift of such devices. Consequently, the objective of the work is to review the high-temperature properties, the operation limits and the measurement principles of such resonators. The electromechanical properties of high-temperature bulk acoustic wave resonators such as mechanical stiffness, piezoelectric and dielectric constant, effective viscosity and electrical conductivity are described using a one-dimensional physical model and determined accurately up to temperatures as close as possible to their ultimate limit. Insights from defect chemical models are correlated with the electromechanical properties of the resonators. Thereby, crucial properties for stable operation as a sensor under harsh conditions are identified to be the formation of oxygen vacancies and the bulk conductivity. Operation limits concerning temperature, oxygen partial pressure and water vapor pressure are given. Further, application-relevant aspects such as temperature coefficients, temperature compensation and mass sensitivity are evaluated. In addition, approximations are introduced which make the exact model handy for routine data evaluation. An equivalent electrical circuit for high-temperature resonator devices is derived based on the one-dimensional physical model. Low- and high-temperature approximations are introduced. Thereby, the structure of the equivalent circuit corresponds to the Butterworth

  6. Quantum and classical magnetoresistance in ambipolar topological insulator transistors with gate-tunable bulk and surface conduction.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jifa; Chang, Cuizu; Cao, Helin; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Chen, Yong P

    2014-05-07

    Weak antilocalization (WAL) and linear magnetoresistance (LMR) are two most commonly observed magnetoresistance (MR) phenomena in topological insulators (TIs) and often attributed to the Dirac topological surface states (TSS). However, ambiguities exist because these phenomena could also come from bulk states (often carrying significant conduction in many TIs) and are observable even in non-TI materials. Here, we demonstrate back-gated ambipolar TI field-effect transistors in (Bi0.04Sb0.96)2Te3 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SrTiO3(111), exhibiting a large carrier density tunability (by nearly 2 orders of magnitude) and a metal-insulator transition in the bulk (allowing switching off the bulk conduction). Tuning the Fermi level from bulk band to TSS strongly enhances both the WAL (increasing the number of quantum coherent channels from one to peak around two) and LMR (increasing its slope by up to 10 times). The SS-enhanced LMR is accompanied by a strongly nonlinear Hall effect, suggesting important roles of charge inhomogeneity (and a related classical LMR), although existing models of LMR cannot capture all aspects of our data. Our systematic gate and temperature dependent magnetotransport studies provide deeper insights into the nature of both MR phenomena and reveal differences between bulk and TSS transport in TI related materials.

  7. Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, D.E.

    1992-11-01

    High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V[sub Ga]. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1[mu]m. Gallium vacancies, V[sub Ga], was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As[sub Ga] in the layer. As As[sub Ga] increases, photoquenchable As[sub Ga] decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As[sub Ga] content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga[sub As], as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As[sub Ga]-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V[sub Ga] enhanced diffusion of As[sub Ga] to As precipitates. The supersaturated V[sub GA] and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As[sub Ga]-related defects gives 2.0 [plus minus] 0.3 eV and 1.5 [plus minus] 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As[sub Ga] and V[sub Ga]. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As[sub Ga]-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 [plus minus] 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As[sub Ga]-Be[sub Ga] pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

  8. Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, D.E.

    1992-11-01

    High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V{sub Ga}. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1{mu}m. Gallium vacancies, V{sub Ga}, was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3} Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As{sub Ga} in the layer. As As{sub Ga} increases, photoquenchable As{sub Ga} decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As{sub Ga} content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga{sub As}, as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As{sub Ga}-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V{sub Ga} enhanced diffusion of As{sub Ga} to As precipitates. The supersaturated V{sub GA} and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As{sub Ga}-related defects gives 2.0 {plus_minus} 0.3 eV and 1.5 {plus_minus} 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As{sub Ga} and V{sub Ga}. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As{sub Ga}-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 {plus_minus} 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As{sub Ga}-Be{sub Ga} pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

  9. As-Grown Gallium Nitride Nanowire Electromechanical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montague, Joshua R.

    Technological development in recent years has led to a ubiquity of micro- and nano-scale electromechanical devices. Sensors for monitoring temperature, pressure, mass, etc., are now found in nearly all electronic devices at both the industrial and consumer levels. As has been true for integrated circuit electronics, these electromechanical devices have continued to be scaled down in size. For many nanometer-scale structures with large surface-to-volume ratio, dissipation (energy loss) becomes prohibitively large causing a decreasing sensitivity with decreasing sensor size. In this work, gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires are investigated as singly-clamped (cantilever) mechanical resonators with typical mechanical quality factors, Q (equal to the ratio of resonance frequency to peak full-width-at-half-maximum-power) and resonance frequencies, respectively, at or above 30,000, and near 1 MHz. These Q values---in vacuum at room temperature---indicate very low levels of dissipation; they are essentially the same as those for bulk quartz crystal resonators that form the basis of simple clocks and mass sensors. The GaN nanowires have lengths and diameters, respectively, of approximately 15 micrometers and hundreds of nanometers. As-grown GaN nanowire Q values are larger than other similarly-sized, bottom-up, cantilever resonators and this property makes them very attractive for use as resonant sensors. We demonstrate the capability of detecting sub-monolayer levels of atomic layer deposited (ALD) films, and the robust nature of the GaN nanowires structure that allows for their 'reuse' after removal of such layers. In addition to electron microscope-based measurement techniques, we demonstrate the successful capacitive detection of a single nanowire using microwave homodyne reflectometry. This technique is then extended to allow for simultaneous measurements of large ensembles of GaN nanowires on a single sample, providing statistical information about the distribution of

  10. Negative ion extraction from hydrogen plasma bulk

    SciTech Connect

    Oudini, N.; Taccogna, F.; Minelli, P.

    2013-10-15

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model has been developed and used to study low electronegative magnetized hydrogen plasma. A configuration characterized by four electrodes is used: the left electrode is biased at V{sub l} = −100 V, the right electrode is grounded, while the upper and lower transversal electrodes are biased at an intermediate voltage V{sub ud} between 0 and −100 V. A constant and homogeneous magnetic field is applied parallel to the lateral (left/right) electrodes. It is shown that in the magnetized case, the bulk plasma potential is close to the transversal electrodes bias inducing then a reversed sheath in front of the right electrode. The potential drop within the reversed sheath is controlled by the transversal electrodes bias allowing extraction of negative ions with a significant reduction of co-extracted electron current. Furthermore, introducing plasma electrodes, between the transversal electrodes and the right electrode, biased with a voltage just above the plasma bulk potential, increases the negative ion extracted current and decreases significantly the co-extracted electron current. The physical mechanism on basis of this phenomenon has been discussed.

  11. Dual Enzymatic Detection by Bulk Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    de Poulpiquet, Anne; Diez-Buitrago, Beatriz; Dumont Milutinovic, Milena; Sentic, Milica; Arbault, Stéphane; Bouffier, Laurent; Kuhn, Alexander; Sojic, Neso

    2016-06-21

    The combination of enzymes, as recognition elements for specific analytes, and of electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) as a readout method has proven to be a valuable strategy for sensitive and specific analytical detection. However, ECL is intrinsically a 2D process which could potentially limit the analysis of inhomogeneous samples. Here, we show how a bulk ECL signal, generated by thousands of carbon microbeads remotely addressed via bipolar electrochemistry, are implemented as a powerful tool for the concomitant ECL sensing and imaging of two enzymatic substrates. We selected two enzymes (glucose dehydrogenase and choline oxidase) that react with their respective model substrates and produce in situ chemical species (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and H2O2) acting as coreactants for the ECL emission of different luminophores ([Ru(bpy)3](2+) at λ = 620 nm and luminol at λ = 425 nm, respectively). Both enzymes are spatially separated in the same capillary. We demonstrate thus the simultaneous quantitative determination of both glucose and choline over a wide concentration range. The originality of this remote approach is to provide a global chemical view through one single ECL image of inhomogeneous samples such as a biochemical concentration gradient in a capillary configuration. Finally, we report the first proof-of-concept of dual biosensing based on this bulk ECL method for the simultaneous imaging of both enzymatic analytes at distinct wavelengths. PMID:27213503

  12. Perovskite oxides: Oxygen electrocatalysis and bulk structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbonio, R. E.; Fierro, C.; Tryk, D.; Scherson, D.; Yeager, Ernest

    1987-01-01

    Perovskite type oxides were considered for use as oxygen reduction and generation electrocatalysts in alkaline electrolytes. Perovskite stability and electrocatalytic activity are studied along with possible relationships of the latter with the bulk solid state properties. A series of compounds of the type LaFe(x)Ni1(-x)O3 was used as a model system to gain information on the possible relationships between surface catalytic activity and bulk structure. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate constants were measured for these compounds. Ex situ Mossbauer effect spectroscopy (MES), and magnetic susceptibility measurements were used to study the solid state properties. X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to examine the surface. MES has indicated the presence of a paramagnetic to magnetically ordered phase transition for values of x between 0.4 and 0.5. A correlation was found between the values of the MES isomer shift and the catalytic activity for peroxide decomposition. Thus, the catalytic activity can be correlated to the d-electron density for the transition metal cations.

  13. Substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement via nanolayering

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Fenggong; Young, Steve M.; Zheng, Fan; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2016-01-21

    Spontaneous polarization and inversion symmetry breaking in ferroelectric materials lead to their use as photovoltaic devices. However, further advancement of their applications are hindered by the paucity of ways of reducing bandgaps and enhancing photocurrent. By unravelling the correlation between ferroelectric materials’ responses to solar irradiation and their local structure and electric polarization landscapes, here we show from first principles that substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement can be achieved by nanolayering PbTiO3 with nickel ions and oxygen vacancies ((PbNiO2)x(PbTiO3)1–x). The enhancement of the total photocurrent for different spacings between the Ni-containing layers can be as high as 43 times duemore » to a smaller bandgap and photocurrent direction alignment for all absorption energies. This is due to the electrostatic effect that arises from nanolayering. Lastly, this opens up the possibility for control of the bulk photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric materials by nanoscale engineering of their structure and composition.« less

  14. Substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement via nanolayering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fenggong; Young, Steve M.; Zheng, Fan; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous polarization and inversion symmetry breaking in ferroelectric materials lead to their use as photovoltaic devices. However, further advancement of their applications are hindered by the paucity of ways of reducing bandgaps and enhancing photocurrent. By unravelling the correlation between ferroelectric materials' responses to solar irradiation and their local structure and electric polarization landscapes, here we show from first principles that substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement can be achieved by nanolayering PbTiO3 with nickel ions and oxygen vacancies ((PbNiO2)x(PbTiO3)1-x). The enhancement of the total photocurrent for different spacings between the Ni-containing layers can be as high as 43 times due to a smaller bandgap and photocurrent direction alignment for all absorption energies. This is due to the electrostatic effect that arises from nanolayering. This opens up the possibility for control of the bulk photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric materials by nanoscale engineering of their structure and composition.

  15. Bulk Micromegas detectors for large TPC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrat, A.

    2007-10-01

    A large volume TPC will be used in the near future for a variety of experiments, including T2K and possibly the Linear Collider detector. The bulk Micromegas detector is a novel construction technique suited for building compact and robust low mass detectors. The ability to pave a large surface with a simple mechanical solution and negligible dead space between modules is of particular interest for these applications, offering a simple and low cost alternative to wire chambers. We have built and tested two large bulk detectors (26×27 cm2 with 8×8 mm2 pads) in the former HARP field cage setup at CERN, with cosmic ray data in a magnetic field up to 0.4 T. We present the excellent detector performances, with gains in excess of 104, space point resolution of 700 μm at 1 m drift, and dE/dx resolution of 12%. Improvement on the point resolution with the use of a resistive anode is also discussed.

  16. Enhancing bulk superconductivity by engineering granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayoh, James; García García, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The quest for higher critical temperatures is one of the main driving forces in the field of superconductivity. Recent theoretical and experimental results indicate that quantum size effects in isolated nano-grains can boost superconductivity with respect to the bulk limit. Here we explore the optimal range of parameters that lead to an enhancement of the critical temperature in a large three dimensional array of these superconducting nano-grains by combining mean-field, semiclassical and percolation techniques. We identify a broad range of parameters for which the array critical temperature, TcArray, can be up to a few times greater than the non-granular bulk limit, Tc 0. This prediction, valid only for conventional superconductors, takes into account an experimentally realistic distribution of grain sizes in the array, charging effects, dissipation by quasiparticles and limitations related to the proliferation of thermal fluctuations for sufficiently small grains. For small resistances we find the transition is percolation driven. Whereas at larger resistances the transition occurs above the percolation threshold due to phase fluctuations. JM acknowledes support from an EPSRC Ph.D studentship, AMG acknowledges support from EPSRC, grant No. EP/I004637/1, FCT, grant PTDC/FIS/111348/2009 and a Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant PIRG07-GA-2010-268172.

  17. A Batch Feeder for Inhomogeneous Bulk Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vislov, I. S.; Kladiev, S. N.; Slobodyan, S. M.; Bogdan, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    The work includes the mechanical analysis of mechanical feeders and batchers that find application in various technological processes and industrial fields. Feeders are usually classified according to their design features into two groups: conveyor-type feeders and non-conveyor feeders. Batchers are used to batch solid bulk materials. Less frequently, they are used for liquids. In terms of a batching method, they are divided into volumetric and weighting batchers. Weighting batchers do not provide for sufficient batching accuracy. Automatic weighting batchers include a mass controlling sensor and systems for automatic material feed and automatic mass discharge control. In terms of operating principle, batchers are divided into gravitational batchers and batchers with forced feed of material using conveyors and pumps. Improved consumption of raw materials, decreased loss of materials, ease of use in automatic control systems of industrial facilities allows increasing the quality of technological processes and improve labor conditions. The batch feeder suggested by the authors is a volumetric batcher that has no comparable counterparts among conveyor-type feeders and allows solving the problem of targeted feeding of bulk material batches increasing reliability and hermeticity of the device.

  18. Bulk micromachined vibrating wheel rate gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong; Gao, Zhongyu; Chen, Zhiyong

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents a vibrating wheel rate gyroscope fabricated by bulk machining. The structure pattern is symmetrical and has differential detecting capacitor. It weakens the coupling between the driving and sensing modes, restrains the influence of linear acceleration. A so-called 'cosine beam' is designed to reduce the nonlinearity of large amplitude vibration. The structure is fabricated by a bulk process. It is called dissolve wafer process. This process is very simple and can get high aspect ratio. It is in favor of improving the performance of the sensing element. The circuit of the gyroscope consists of two parts: One is the exciting and control circuit, the other is read out circuit. The exciting and control circuit is implemented with phase lock and amplitude control loops. These are dual close control loops. High stability of vibrating amplitude can be achieved with the loops. It is helpful to improve the stability of scale factor. The read out circuit is implemented with a kind of passive switched demodulator circuit. The demodulated signal can be gained directly, which greatly reduce the circuit. The resolution of this circuit is high. The experimental result is given in this paper. In vacuum situation, the resolution of the gyroscope is about 0.03 degree(s)/s (with bandwidth 10Hz).

  19. Ideal bulk pressure of active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Thomas; Jack, Robert L.

    2016-06-01

    The extent to which active matter might be described by effective equilibrium concepts like temperature and pressure is currently being discussed intensely. Here, we study the simplest model, an ideal gas of noninteracting active Brownian particles. While the mechanical pressure exerted onto confining walls has been linked to correlations between particles' positions and their orientations, we show that these correlations are entirely controlled by boundary effects. We also consider a definition of local pressure, which describes interparticle forces in terms of momentum exchange between different regions of the system. We present three pieces of analytical evidence which indicate that such a local pressure exists, and we show that its bulk value differs from the mechanical pressure exerted on the walls of the system. We attribute this difference to the fact that the local pressure in the bulk does not depend on boundary effects, contrary to the mechanical pressure. We carefully examine these boundary effects using a channel geometry, and we show a virial formula for the pressure correctly predicts the mechanical pressure even in finite channels. However, this result no longer holds in more complex geometries, as exemplified for a channel that includes circular obstacles.

  20. Characterization of bulk superconductors through EBSD methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka, M. R.; Koblischka-Veneva, A.

    2003-10-01

    The application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique to bulk high- Tc superconductors is presented and reviewed. Due to the ceramic nature and the complex crystallographic unit cells of the perovskite-type high- Tc superconductors, the EBSD analysis is not yet as common as it deserves. We have successfully performed EBSD analysis on a variety of high- Tc compounds and samples including polycrystalline YBCO (pure and doped by alkali metals), melt-textured YBCO, thin and thick films of YBCO; the “green phase” Y 2BaCuO 5, thin film and melt-textured NdBa 2Cu 3O x and Bi-2212 single crystals and tapes. It is shown that the surface preparation of the samples is crucial due to the small information depth (up to 100 nm) of the EBSD technique. High quality Kikuchi patterns are the requirement in order to enable the automated EBSD mapping, which yields phase distributions, individual grain orientations and the misorientation angle distribution. The results can be presented in form of mappings, as charts, and as pole figures. These informations are required for a better understanding of the growth mechanism(s) of bulk high- Tc superconductors intended for applications.

  1. Substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement via nanolayering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenggong; Young, Steve M.; Zheng, Fan; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous polarization and inversion symmetry breaking in ferroelectric materials lead to their use as photovoltaic devices. However, further advancement of their applications are hindered by the paucity of ways of reducing bandgaps and enhancing photocurrent. By unravelling the correlation between ferroelectric materials' responses to solar irradiation and their local structure and electric polarization landscapes, here we show from first principles that substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement can be achieved by nanolayering PbTiO3 with nickel ions and oxygen vacancies ((PbNiO2)x(PbTiO3)1−x). The enhancement of the total photocurrent for different spacings between the Ni-containing layers can be as high as 43 times due to a smaller bandgap and photocurrent direction alignment for all absorption energies. This is due to the electrostatic effect that arises from nanolayering. This opens up the possibility for control of the bulk photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric materials by nanoscale engineering of their structure and composition. PMID:26791545

  2. Substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement via nanolayering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenggong; Young, Steve M; Zheng, Fan; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M

    2016-01-21

    Spontaneous polarization and inversion symmetry breaking in ferroelectric materials lead to their use as photovoltaic devices. However, further advancement of their applications are hindered by the paucity of ways of reducing bandgaps and enhancing photocurrent. By unravelling the correlation between ferroelectric materials' responses to solar irradiation and their local structure and electric polarization landscapes, here we show from first principles that substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement can be achieved by nanolayering PbTiO3 with nickel ions and oxygen vacancies ((PbNiO2)x(PbTiO3)(1-x)). The enhancement of the total photocurrent for different spacings between the Ni-containing layers can be as high as 43 times due to a smaller bandgap and photocurrent direction alignment for all absorption energies. This is due to the electrostatic effect that arises from nanolayering. This opens up the possibility for control of the bulk photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric materials by nanoscale engineering of their structure and composition.

  3. [Use of bulking agents in urinary incontinece].

    PubMed

    Angioli, R; Muzii, L; Zullo, M A; Battista, C; Ruggiero, A; Montera, R; Guzzo, F; Montone, E; Musella, A; Di Donato, V; Benedetti Panici, P

    2008-12-01

    Urinary incontinence consist in voluntary urine leakage. Female affected in the world are about 200 thousand. Urinary incontinence affect severely women quality of life. There are different kinds of urinary incontinence that can be treated in different ways. We can use pelvic floor rehabilitation, drug therapy, invasive and non-invasive surgical treatment. Different treatments are used for different incontinence types. Periurethral injection is the most common procedure between non-invasive surgery. The most recent bulking agents occasionally determine severe adverse reaction or complication. Frequently we can have just pain during injection and a temporary urine retention. During the latest years we used a lot of bulking agents: bovine collagen, autologous fat, carbon particles, macroplastique, calcium hydroxylapatite, ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, dextranomer. Urethral injection have success in 40-90%. We can assert that macroplastique is the most efficacy and safe on the basis of literature data and of our experience data. This surgical procedure, in fact, has good percentage of success in accurately selected patients. In our experience Macroplastique can also be used in oncological patients, in elderly women, in patients with important comorbidity and with high surgical risk with good objective and subjective results.

  4. Modeling of Bulk Evaporation and Condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, S.; Ding, Z.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the modeling and mathematical formulation of the bulk evaporation and condensation involved in liquid-vapor phase change processes. An internal energy formulation, for these phase change processes that occur under the constraint of constant volume, was studied. Compared to the enthalpy formulation, the internal energy formulation has a more concise and compact form. The velocity and time scales of the interface movement were obtained through scaling analysis and verified by performing detailed numerical experiments. The convection effect induced by the density change was analyzed and found to be negligible compared to the conduction effect. Two iterative methods for updating the value of the vapor phase fraction, the energy based (E-based) and temperature based (T-based) methods, were investigated. Numerical experiments revealed that for the evaporation and condensation problems the E-based method is superior to the T-based method in terms of computational efficiency. The internal energy formulation and the E-based method were used to compute the bulk evaporation and condensation processes under different conditions. The evolution of the phase change processes was investigated. This work provided a basis for the modeling of thermal performance of multi-phase nuclear fuel elements under variable gravity conditions, in which the buoyancy convection due to gravity effects and internal heating are involved.

  5. Ideal bulk pressure of active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Speck, Thomas; Jack, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    The extent to which active matter might be described by effective equilibrium concepts like temperature and pressure is currently being discussed intensely. Here, we study the simplest model, an ideal gas of noninteracting active Brownian particles. While the mechanical pressure exerted onto confining walls has been linked to correlations between particles' positions and their orientations, we show that these correlations are entirely controlled by boundary effects. We also consider a definition of local pressure, which describes interparticle forces in terms of momentum exchange between different regions of the system. We present three pieces of analytical evidence which indicate that such a local pressure exists, and we show that its bulk value differs from the mechanical pressure exerted on the walls of the system. We attribute this difference to the fact that the local pressure in the bulk does not depend on boundary effects, contrary to the mechanical pressure. We carefully examine these boundary effects using a channel geometry, and we show a virial formula for the pressure correctly predicts the mechanical pressure even in finite channels. However, this result no longer holds in more complex geometries, as exemplified for a channel that includes circular obstacles. PMID:27415318

  6. 30 CFR 56.6802 - Bulk delivery vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bulk delivery vehicles. 56.6802 Section 56.6802... § 56.6802 Bulk delivery vehicles. No welding or cutting shall be performed on a bulk delivery vehicle until the vehicle has been washed down and all explosive material has been removed. Before welding...

  7. 30 CFR 57.6802 - Bulk delivery vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bulk delivery vehicles. 57.6802 Section 57.6802...-Surface and Underground § 57.6802 Bulk delivery vehicles. No welding or cutting shall be performed on a bulk delivery vehicle until the vehicle has been washed down and all explosive material has...

  8. 19 CFR 151.24 - Unlading facilities for bulk sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. 151.24 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.24 Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. When dutiable sugar is to be imported in bulk, a...

  9. 19 CFR 151.24 - Unlading facilities for bulk sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. 151.24 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.24 Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. When dutiable sugar is to be imported in bulk, a...

  10. 19 CFR 151.24 - Unlading facilities for bulk sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. 151.24 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.24 Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. When dutiable sugar is to be imported in bulk, a...

  11. 19 CFR 151.24 - Unlading facilities for bulk sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. 151.24 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.24 Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. When dutiable sugar is to be imported in bulk, a...

  12. 19 CFR 151.24 - Unlading facilities for bulk sugar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. 151.24 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.24 Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. When dutiable sugar is to be imported in bulk, a...

  13. 7 CFR 58.313 - Print and bulk packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Print and bulk packaging rooms. 58.313 Section 58.313....313 Print and bulk packaging rooms. Rooms used for packaging print or bulk butter and related products should, in addition to proper construction and sanitation, provide an atmosphere relatively free...

  14. 7 CFR 58.313 - Print and bulk packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Print and bulk packaging rooms. 58.313 Section 58.313....313 Print and bulk packaging rooms. Rooms used for packaging print or bulk butter and related products should, in addition to proper construction and sanitation, provide an atmosphere relatively free...

  15. 7 CFR 58.313 - Print and bulk packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Print and bulk packaging rooms. 58.313 Section 58.313....313 Print and bulk packaging rooms. Rooms used for packaging print or bulk butter and related products... contamination and maintain a reasonable room temperature in accordance with good commercial practices....

  16. Bulk Fluorine and Chlorine Contents of Chondritic Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. H.; Brearley, A. J.; Lewis, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    Bulk F contents of individual chondrite groups are poorly defined. We reappraise bulk Cl and F contents of OCs, based on modal abundance and compositions of apatite, and propose much lower bulk F abundances for OCs and ECs than commonly used values.

  17. 7 CFR 58.313 - Print and bulk packaging rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Print and bulk packaging rooms. 58.313 Section 58.313 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....313 Print and bulk packaging rooms. Rooms used for packaging print or bulk butter and related...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1356 - Pears grown from late blooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pears grown from late blooms. 51.1356 Section 51.1356... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Pears for Canning Definitions § 51.1356 Pears grown from late blooms. Pears grown from late blooms. Such pears often have excessively long stems (commonly termed “rat...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1356 - Pears grown from late blooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pears grown from late blooms. 51.1356 Section 51.1356... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Pears for Canning Definitions § 51.1356 Pears grown from late blooms. Pears grown from late blooms. Such pears often have excessively long...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1356 - Pears grown from late blooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pears grown from late blooms. 51.1356 Section 51.1356... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Pears for Canning Definitions § 51.1356 Pears grown from late blooms. Pears grown from late blooms. Such pears often have excessively long stems (commonly termed “rat...

  1. 7 CFR 51.1356 - Pears grown from late blooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pears grown from late blooms. 51.1356 Section 51.1356... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Pears for Canning Definitions § 51.1356 Pears grown from late blooms. Pears grown from late blooms. Such pears often have excessively long stems (commonly termed “rat...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1356 - Pears grown from late blooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pears grown from late blooms. 51.1356 Section 51.1356... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Pears for Canning Definitions § 51.1356 Pears grown from late blooms. Pears grown from late blooms. Such pears often have excessively long...

  3. Investigation of the transport properties of Bi2 Se3 films grown on various substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. Y.; Wang, C. Y.; Chen, K. H. M.; Lin, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Yang, B. Y.; Hong, M.; Kwo, J.

    2015-03-01

    Topological insulators, a new state of quantum matter, displayed a variety of physical phenomena. We have obtained high quality TI films of Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3,andSb2Te3 grown on various substrates with streaky RHEED patterns and large domains 1-2um in size. However, the Fermi level of Bi2Se3 tends to locate in the bulk conduction band due to the high density of intrinsic defects in TIs. To fine tune the Fermi level to be within the band gap, Bi2Se3 films were grown on amorphous oxide layers such as SiO2, Y2O3,andAl2O3 ~20 nm thick deposited on GaAs and Si substrates in a back gate structure for the electrical field effect. Compare to Bi2Se3 thin films on crystalline substrates such as sapphire, samples grown on amorphous oxides such as Al2O3 showed lower carrier concentration for the film thickness less than 10 QL, and the resistivity showed an insulating behavior at T below 50K. Other transport properties such as mobility, WAL effects are underway.

  4. HVPE homoepitaxial growth of high quality bulk GaN using acid wet etching method and its mechanism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nanliu; Cheng, Yutian; Wu, Jiejun; Li, Xingbin; Yu, Tongjun; Xiong, Huan; Li, Wenhui; Chen, Jiao; Zhang, Guoyi

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, crack-free 2-inch bulk GaN wafer with the thickness up to 3 mm was obtained by HVPE homoepitaxy. A new method of acid wet etching was used to pre-treat GaN substrate before re-growth. The formation of the mesh-like subsurface crack and interface layer were found to be suppressed between the re-growth layer and as-grown GaN substrate. EDS and time varied contact angle measurement proved that chemical etching would decrease the oxygen related surface adsorption and increase atoms diffusion length during HVPE homoepitaxial growth. Moreover, Morphology, Low temperature photoluminescence measurements indicated a reduction in stress of wet etching treated as-grown GaN substrate due to etching effect on its N face. High quality bulk GaN with the dislocation density of 1×106 cm-2 was achieved by using wet etching and HVPE multiple re-growth. It would offer a simple method to obtain bulk GaN with thicker layer and high quality.

  5. Terrestrial Trophic Transfer of Bulk and Nanoparticle La2O3 Does Not Depend on Particle Size.

    PubMed

    De la Torre Roche, Roberto; Servin, Alia; Hawthorne, Joseph; Xing, Baoshan; Newman, Lee A; Ma, Xingmao; Chen, Guangcai; White, Jason C

    2015-10-01

    The bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of bulk and nanoparticle (NP) La2O3 from soil through a terrestrial food chain was determined. To investigate the impact of growth conditions, lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was grown in 350 or 1200 g of bulk/NP amended soil. Leaf tissues were fed to crickets (Acheta domesticus) or darkling beetles (Tenebrionoidea); select crickets were fed to mantises. In the small pot (350 g), La2O3 exposure reduced plant biomass by 23-30% and La tissue content did not differ with particle size. In the large pot (1200 g), biomass was unaffected by exposure and La content in the tissues were significantly greater with bulk particle treatment. Darkling beetles exposed to bulk and NP La2O3-contaminated lettuce contained La at 0.18 and 0.08 mg/kg; respectively (significantly different, P < 0.05). Crickets fed bulk or NP La2O3-exposed lettuce contained 0.53 and 0.33 mg/kg, respectively (significantly different, P < 0.05) with 48 h of depuration. After 7 d of depuration, La content did not differ with particle size, indicating that 48 h may be insufficient to void the digestive system. Mantises that consumed crickets from bulk and NP-exposed treatments contained La at 0.05-0.060 mg/kg (statistically equivalent). These results demonstrate that although La does trophically transfer, biomagnification does not occur and NP levels are equivalent or less than the bulk metal. PMID:26356537

  6. 17 CFR 5.23 - Notice of bulk transfers and bulk liquidations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Notice and disclosure to retail forex customers of a bulk transfer. (1) A retail foreign exchange... consent of its retail forex customer to the assignment of any position or transfer of any account of the retail forex customer to another retail foreign exchange dealer, futures commission merchant...

  7. 17 CFR 5.23 - Notice of bulk transfers and bulk liquidations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Notice and disclosure to retail forex customers of a bulk transfer. (1) A retail foreign exchange... consent of its retail forex customer to the assignment of any position or transfer of any account of the retail forex customer to another retail foreign exchange dealer, futures commission merchant...

  8. 17 CFR 5.23 - Notice of bulk transfers and bulk liquidations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Notice and disclosure to retail forex customers of a bulk transfer. (1) A retail foreign exchange... consent of its retail forex customer to the assignment of any position or transfer of any account of the retail forex customer to another retail foreign exchange dealer, futures commission merchant...

  9. 17 CFR 5.23 - Notice of bulk transfers and bulk liquidations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Notice and disclosure to retail forex customers of a bulk transfer. (1) A retail foreign exchange... consent of its retail forex customer to the assignment of any position or transfer of any account of the retail forex customer to another retail foreign exchange dealer, futures commission merchant...

  10. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. Final samples from Mir and Earth appeared histologically cartilaginous throughout their entire cross sections (5-8 mm thick), with the exception of fibrous outer capsules. Constructs grown on Earth (A) appeared to have a more organized extracellular matrix with more uniform collagen orientation as compared with constructs grown on Mir (B), but the average collagen fiber diameter was similar in the two groups (22 +- 2 nm) and comparable to that previously reported for developing articular cartilage. Randomly oriented collagen in Mir samples would be consistent with previous reports that microgravity disrupts fibrillogenesis. These are transmission electron micrographs of constructs from Mir (A) and Earth (B) groups at magnifications of x3,500 and x120,000 (Inset). The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  11. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens of cartilage tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. Constructs grown on Mir (A) tended to become more spherical, whereas those grown on Earth (B) maintained their initial disc shape. These findings might be related to differences in cultivation conditions, i.e., videotapes showed that constructs floated freely in microgravity but settled and collided with the rotating vessel wall at 1g (Earth's gravity). In particular, on Mir the constructs were exposed to uniform shear and mass transfer at all surfaces such that the tissue grew equally in all directions, whereas on Earth the settling of discoid constructs tended to align their flat circular areas perpendicular to the direction of motion, increasing shear and mass transfer circumferentially such that the tissue grew preferentially in the radial direction. A and B are full cross sections of constructs from Mir and Earth groups shown at 10-power. C and D are representative areas at the construct surfaces enlarged to 200-power. They are stained red with safranin-O. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Photo credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  12. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  13. Cadmium availability from granulated and bulk-blended phosphate-potassium fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Chien, S H; Carmona, G; Prochnow, L I; Austin, E R

    2003-01-01

    Recent field experiments have shown that high chloride (Cl) in irrigation waters can increase soil cadmium (Cd) uptake by crops because of the formation of soluble ion-pair complexes of Cd with Cl in soil solution. The present study was aimed at testing a hypothesis that KCl in granulated PK fertilizers may enhance Cd uptake by crops from Cd-containing P fertilizers because of close contact between Cd and Cl in the same granules. Less effect would be expected if the same granular PK fertilizers were bulk-blended because of separation of Cd and Cl in different granules. A single superphosphate (SSP) containing 32 mg Cd kg(-1) was granulated by the compaction process with KCl at a P to K ratio = 1:1. Granular KCl was also bulk-blended with granular SSP or Cd-free monocalcium phosphate (MCP) at the same P to K ratio. An acid Ultisol (pH 5.2) was treated with PK fertilizers at 400 mg kg(-1) each for P and K. Upland rice (Oryza sativa L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] were grown to maturity, and signalgrass (Brachiaria decumbens Stapf.) was cut four times during the study. The results showed that the agronomic effectiveness in increasing crop yield was the same with SSP and MCP whether granulated or bulk-blended with KCl. Concentrations of Cd in plant tissue samples of all crops were much lower for MCP than for SSP. In all the plant tissue samples, except grain samples of upland rice, Cd concentrations obtained with granulated (SSP + KCl) were significantly higher than that with bulk-blended (SSP) + (KCl). PMID:14535337

  14. Bulk-Flow Analysis, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara W.

    1993-01-01

    The bulk-flow analysis results for this contract are incorporated in the following publications: 'Fluid-Structure Interaction Forces at Pump-Impeller Shroud Surfaces for Axial Vibration Analysis'; 'Centrifugal Acceleration Modes for Incompressible Fluid in the Leakage Annulus Between a Shrouded Pump Impeller and Its Housing'; 'Influence of Impeller Shroud Forces on Pump Rotordynamics'; 'Pressure Oscillation in the Leakage Annulus Between a Shrouded Impeller and Its Housing Due to Impeller-Discharge-Pressure Disturbances'; and 'Compressibility Effects on Rotor Forces in the Leakage Path Between a Shrouded Pump Impeller and Its Housing'. These publications are summarized and included in this final report. Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD) results developed by Dr. Erian Baskharone are reported separately.

  15. Light bullets formation in a bulk media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoeva, A. B.; Dinev, S. G.; Dreischuh, A. A.; Naidenov, A.

    1991-08-01

    The conditions for the formation of a light bullet pulse, propagating with nearly constant spatial and temporal parameters in a bulk nonlinear medium, are obtained. A pump and probe pulse configuration using an induced phase modulation (IPM) is used. The IPM effect provides a well-controllable spatial and temporal trapping of the probe pulse. The authors derive analytical expressions for the critical parameters of the system, incorporating input power, pulse duration, pump and probe beam radii, medium parameters, etc. The system parameters analyzed are rather general and include varying pump and probe pulse durations and delay. The constant parameters of the light formation are shown to be limited by the walk-off effect. An analytical balance condition is obtained for the spatial and temporal soliton-like formation.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2008-09-14

    A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50

  17. Crack evolution in bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, Simon; Lee, Min Ha; Kim, Do Hyang; Kim, Ki Buem; Sordelet, Daniel J.; Eckert, Juergen

    2009-11-15

    In the present study, the mechanisms underlying plastic deformation of a Ni-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) are explored. Based on the microstructural investigations, a model is proposed how fracture emerges in BMGs. After deformation, the glass is macroscopically more fragile indicating a decrease in the viscosity within the shear bands due to shear softening. These fluctuations of viscosity and therefore Poisson ratio between the deformed and undeformed regions appear to be the initiation sites for nanometer-scale cracks, which are aligned parallel to the applied force. Coalescence of voids is believed to form these small cracks, which eventually interconnect along the interface between the sheared and unsheared regions to form a detrimental defect resulting in fracture.

  18. Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2011-11-08

    A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

  19. Bulk amorphous steels based on Fe alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lu, ZhaoPing; Liu, Chain T.

    2006-05-30

    A bulk amorphous alloy has the approximate composition: Fe.sub.(100-a-b-c-d-e)Y.sub.aMn.sub.bT.sub.cM.sub.dX.sub.e wherein: T includes at least one of the group consisting of: Ni, Cu, Cr and Co; M includes at least one of the group consisting of W, Mo, Nb, Ta, Al and Ti; X includes at least one of the group consisting of Co, Ni and Cr; a is an atomic percentage, and a<5; b is an atomic percentage, and b.ltoreq.25; c is an atomic percentage, and c.ltoreq.25; d is an atomic percentage, and d.ltoreq.25; and e is an atomic percentage, and 5.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.30.

  20. Bulk semiconducting scintillator device for radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2016-08-30

    A bulk semiconducting scintillator device, including: a Li-containing semiconductor compound of general composition Li-III-VI.sub.2, wherein III is a Group III element and VI is a Group VI element; wherein the Li-containing semiconductor compound is used in one or more of a first mode and a second mode, wherein: in the first mode, the Li-containing semiconductor compound is coupled to an electrical circuit under bias operable for measuring electron-hole pairs in the Li-containing semiconductor compound in the presence of neutrons and the Li-containing semiconductor compound is also coupled to current detection electronics operable for detecting a corresponding current in the Li-containing semiconductor compound; and, in the second mode, the Li-containing semiconductor compound is coupled to a photodetector operable for detecting photons generated in the Li-containing semiconductor compound in the presence of the neutrons.

  1. The superplastic forming of bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan

    2005-05-01

    Superplastic forming (SPF) is introduced in this article as a net-shape processing method for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), commercially known as Liquidmetal® alloys. This method decouples fast cooling and forming of the BMG. Forming takes place in the supercooled liquid region, where the BMG exists as a highly viscous liquid and increases its fluidity with increasing temperature. The SPF method is very similar to techniques used for processing thermoplastics. In this work, a simple flow law is used to quantify the forming ability and to estimate both the potential and the limitations of the SPF method. This process is especially well suited to replicate small features and thin sections with high aspect ratios, which makes this process appropriate for microelectromechanical systems, nano- and microtechnology, jewelry, medical and optical applications, and data storage.

  2. Bulk Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaic Devices Using Dendrimers

    SciTech Connect

    Kopidakis, N.; Mitchell, W. J.; Bozell, J. J.; Piris, J.; Ginley, D. S.; Rumbles, G.; Shaheen S. E.

    2005-11-01

    A family of prototype ..pi..-conjugated dendrimers has been synthesized and incorporated into solution-processable organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. Bulk heterojunction devices were fabricated by blending the dendrimers with a solubilized fullerene. The best of these initial devices, which were not optimized for morphology, exhibited external quantum efficiencies of 22% at peak wavelength. It was found that 3-arm dendrimers, when sufficiently soluble, yielded higher photocurrents than their 4-arm counterparts. This was attributed to better planarity and intermolecular alignment of the 3-arm version. Device efficiency was seen to increase with increasing arm length. A reduced-band gap dendrimer was synthesized by attaching electron-withdrawing groups onto the core to yield an optical band gap of 1.82 eV.

  3. DEPLOYMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.

    2013-10-10

    A new Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) was designed by the Savannah River National Laboratory to be a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The BTSP was certified by the National Nuclear Safety Administration in 2011 for shipments of up to 150 grams of Tritium. Thirty packages were procured and are being delivered to various DOE sites for operational use. This paper summarizes the design features of the BTSP, as well as associated engineered material improvements. Fabrication challenges encountered during production are discussed as well as fielding requirements. Current approved tritium content forms (gas and tritium hydrides), are reviewed, as well as, a new content, tritium contaminated water on molecular sieves. Issues associated with gas generation will also be discussed.

  4. Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Yang, Fan

    2011-03-01

    A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

  5. Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Yang, Fan

    2013-04-09

    A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

  6. New Class of Plastic Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. Y.; Jiang, Q. K.; Wang, X. D.; Cao, Q. P.; Zeng, Y. W.; Jiang, J. Z.; Fu, Z. D.; Zhang, S. L.; Zhang, G. Q.; Hao, X. P.; Wang, B. Y.; Franz, H.; Liu, Y. G.; Xie, H. S.

    2008-02-22

    An intrinsic plastic Cu{sub 45}Zr{sub 46}Al{sub 7}Ti{sub 2} bulk metallic glass (BMG) with high strength and superior compressive plastic strain of up to 32.5% was successfully fabricated by copper mold casting. The superior compressive plastic strain was attributed to a large amount of randomly distributed free volume induced by Ti minor alloying, which results in extensive shear band formation, branching, interaction and self-healing of minor cracks. The mechanism of plasticity presented here suggests that the creation of a large amount of free volume in BMGs by minor alloying or other methods might be a promising new way to enhance the plasticity of BMGs.

  7. Electrical properties of bulk-barrier diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, H.

    1982-11-01

    Like Schottky-barrier diodes, bulk-barrier diodes (BBD's) are majority-carrier devices and can, therefore, be used up to very high frequencies. In both types of diodes, charge-carrier transportation is determined by an energy barrier. In Schottky-barrier diodes the barrier is located at the metal/semiconductor boundary, whereas in BBD's it is found inside the semiconductor and is the result of a space-charge zone in a three-layered n-p-n or p-n-p structure with a very thin base region. The height of the barrier is determined by technological parameters such as doping density and layer thickness. As the current in BBD's, just as in Schottky-barrier diodes, is an exponential function of barrier height, the current-voltage characteristic can be adjusted by technological means.

  8. Interface control of bulk ferroelectric polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P; Luo, Weidong; Yi, D.; Zhang, J.-X.; Rossell, M.D.; Yang, C.-H.; You, L.; Singh-Bhalla, G. B.; Yang, S.Y; He, Q; Ramasse, Q. M.; Erni, R.; Martin, L. W.; Chu, Y. H.; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Pennycook, Stephen J; Ramesh, R.

    2012-01-01

    The control of material interfaces at the atomic level has led to no- vel interfacial properties and functionalities. In particular, the study of polar discontinuities at interfaces between complex oxides lies at the frontier of modern condensed matter research. Here we em- ploy a combination of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations to demonstrate the control of a bulk property, namely ferroelectric polarization, of a heteroepitaxial bilayer by precise atomic-scale interface engineering. More specifically, the control is achieved by exploiting the interfacial valence mismatch to influence the electrostatic potential step across the interface, which manifests itself as the biased-voltage in ferroelectric hysteresis loops and determines the ferroelectric state. A broad study of diverse systems comprising different ferroelectrics and conducting perovskite un- derlayers extends the generality of this phenomenon.

  9. Combustion of bulk titanium in oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, A. F.; Moulder, J. C.; Runyan, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    The combustion of bulk titanium in one atmosphere oxygen is studied using laser ignition and several analytical techniques. These were high-speed color cinematography, time and space resolved spectra in the visible region, metallography (including SEM) of specimens quenched in argon gas, X-ray and chemical product analyses, and a new optical technique, the Hilbert transform method. The cinematographic application of this technique for visualizing phase objects in the combustion zone is described. The results indicate an initial vapor phase reaction immediately adjacent to the molten surface but as the oxygen uptake progresses the evaporation approaches the point of congruency and a much reduced evaporation rate. This and the accumulation of the various soluble oxides soon drive the reaction zone below the surface where gas formation causes boiling and ejection of particles. The buildup of rutile cuts off the oxygen supply and the reaction ceases.

  10. Technical issues of a high-Tc superconducting bulk magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    2000-06-01

    Superconducting magnets made of high-Tc superconductors are promising for industrial applications. It is well known that REBa2Cu3O7-x superconductors prepared by melt processes have a high critical current density, Jc, at 77 K and high magnetic fields. The materials are very promising for high magnetic field applications as a superconducting permanent/bulk magnet with liquid-nitrogen refrigeration. Light rare-earth (LRE) BaCuO bulks, compared with REBaCuO bulks, exhibit a larger Jc in high magnetic fields and a much improved irreversibility field, Hirr, at 77 K. In this study, we discuss technical issues of a high-Tc superconducting bulk magnet, namely the aspects of the melt processing for bulk superconductors, their characteristic superconducting properties and mechanical properties, and trapped field properties of a superconducting bulk magnet. One of the possible applications is a superconducting bulk magnet for the magnetically levitated (Maglev) train in the future.

  11. Wet etching studies of aluminum nitride bulk crystals and their sublimation growth by microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Dejin

    The research described in this dissertation was motivated by the need of bulk AlN single crystals to improve the quality of group III nitride based devices. In this dissertation, first the evolution of semiconductors is reviewed. Second, historical reviews and recent advances of AlN crystal growth are presented. Third, the experimental setup and characterization methods are described. Finally, four papers regarding wet etching and sublimation growth of AlN are attached: (1) AlN bulk crystal growth using microwaves as heat source; (2) a review of wet etching of GaN and AlN; (3) anisotropic etching technique for identifying AlN crystal polarities; and (4) defect-selective etching to reveal dislocations in Al-polar crystals. Single crystalline AIN platelets up to 2 x 3 mm2 and needles 3 mm long were successfully grown by directly heating the source materials with microwaves. The grown crystals were characterized by optical microscopy, photoluminescence (PL), Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXT), and defect-selective etching. The grown crystals have good structural quality, with etch pit density as low as 103 cm -2. A peak positioned at 5.5 eV in PL spectra was attributed to magnesium impurities, presumably originating from the source materials. The wet etchings of GaN and AlN by electrochemical etching and defect-selective etching are reviewed. The mechanism of each etching process and etching conditions resulting in highly anisotropic, dopant-type/bandgap selective, defect-selective, and smooth surfaces are discussed. The applications of wet etching techniques in device fabrication and crystal characterization are also reviewed. The anisotropic etching technique for AlN crystals was successfully developed. Aqueous KOH solution did not attack Al-polar surfaces, but produced hexagonal hillocks on N-polar surfaces. The etching results suggested that freely nucleated AlN crystals predominately have the Al polarity facing the source

  12. Assessment of bioburden encapsulated in bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Newlin, Laura; Chung, Shirley Y.; Ellyin, Raymond

    2016-05-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) imposes bioburden limitations on all spacecraft destined for solar system bodies that might harbor evidence of extant or extinct life. The subset of microorganisms trapped within solid materials during manufacture and assembly is referred to as encapsulated bioburden. In the absence of spacecraft-specific data, NASA relies on specification values to estimate total spacecraft encapsulated bioburden, typically 30 endospores/cm3 or 300 viable cells/cm3 in non-electronic materials. Specification values for endospores have been established conservatively, and represent no less than an order of magnitude greater abundance than that derived from empirical assessments of actual spacecraft materials. The goal of this study was to generate data germane to determining whether revised bulk encapsulated material values (lower than those estimated by historical specifications) tailored specifically to the materials designated in modern-day spacecraft design could be used, on a case-by-case basis, to comply with planetary protection requirements. Organic materials having distinctly different chemical properties and configurations were selected. This required more than one experimental and analytical approach. Filtration was employed for liquid electrolytes, lubricants were suspended in an aqueous solution and solids (wire and epoxy sealant) were cryogenically milled. The final data characteristic for all bioburden estimates was microbial colony formation in rich agar growth medium. To assess survival potential, three non-spore-forming bacterial cell lines were systematically encapsulated in an epoxy matrix, liberated via cryogenic grinding, and cultured. Results suggest that bulk solid materials harbor significantly fewer encapsulated microorganisms than are estimated by specification values. Lithium-ion battery electrolyte reagents housed fewer than 1 CFU/cm3. Results also demonstrated that non-spore-forming microorganisms

  13. Optical reading of field-effect transistors by phase-space absorption quenching in a single InGaAs quantum well conducting channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, D. S.; Bar-Joseph, I.; Klingshirn, C.; Miller, D. A. B.; Kuo, J. M.

    1987-03-01

    Absorption switching in a semiconductor quantum well by electrically varying the charge density in the quantum well conducting channel of a selectively doped heterostructure transistor is reported for the first time. The phase-space absorption quenching (PAQ) is observed at room temperature in an InGaAs/InAlAs grown on InP FET, and it shows large absorption coefficient changes with relatively broad spectral bandwidth. This PAQ is large enough to be used for direct optical determination of the logic state of the FET.

  14. Fabrication of optical element from unidirectional grown imidazole-imidazolium picrate monohydrate (IIP) organic crystals for nonlinear optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, P.; Murugakoothan, P.

    2014-12-01

    Nonlinear optical bulk single crystal of Imidazole-imidazolium picrate monohydrate (IIP) has been grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method using acetonitrile as solvent. First time we report the bulk growth of IIP crystal by SR method. The transparent IIP single crystal of maximum diameter 21 mm and length 46 mm was obtained by employing SR method. The grown crystal was subjected to high resolution X-ray diffraction, UV-vis-NIR transmittance, refractive index, hardness, dielectric and laser damage threshold studies. The crystalline perfection of the grown crystal was analyzed using HRXRD. Cut off wavelength and optical transmission window of the crystal was assessed by UV-vis-NIR and the refractive index of the crystal was found. The mechanical property of the crystal was estimated by Vicker's hardness test. The dielectric property of the crystal was measured as a function of frequency. The laser damage threshold value was determined. The particle size dependent second harmonic generation efficiency for IIP was evaluated with standard reference material potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) by Kurtz-Perry powder method using Nd:YAG laser, which established the existence of phase matching. The second harmonic generation (SHG) of IIP crystal was investigated by the SHG Maker fringes technique. The mechanism of growth is revealed by carrying out chemical etching using acetonitrile as etchant.

  15. Imaging extended non-homogeneities in HVPE grown GaN with Kelvin Probe Microscopy and photo-etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, G.; Weyher, J. L.; Khachapuridze, A.; Grzegory, I.

    2012-08-01

    GaN bulk crystals grown by Hydrate Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) contain regions with non-homogenous electrical properties. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) was used for revealing and analysis of these defects in thick GaN layers grown by this method on top of GaN on sapphire templates. Such layers initially grow in the form of separate pyramids, which are later overgrown, creating microscopically flat crystallization front. Cross-sectional KPFM images, made just above the template surface, revealed a series of inverted dome-like features of significantly lower potential, indicating regions of high electron concentration. Inside the thick HVPE-grown layer the changes of surface potential are much smaller and indicate the existence of minor fluctuation in carrier concentration during bulk growth of GaN. Subsequent photo-etching, sensitive to carrier concentration, and measurements of etch depth supported this findings. Both KPFM and photo-etching confirmed the known preferential incorporation of impurities at sides of the overgrown pits (pinholes) during initial phase of HVPE growth. During subsequent HVPE growth the changes of the surface potential and of the etch depth are small and may be related to non-uniform incorporation of impurities due to rotation of the growing sample.

  16. Increase of Si0.5Ge0.5 Bulk Single Crystal Size as Substrates for Strained Ge Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Kyoichi; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Arai, Yasutomo; Taguchi, Keisuke; Tomioka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Ryota; Yoda, Shinichi

    2013-04-01

    Compositionally uniform 2 and 10 mm diameter Si0.5Ge0.5 bulk crystals have been grown by the traveling liquidus-zone (TLZ) method. The TLZ method requires diffusion controlled mass transport in a melt and crystal size was limited for suppressing convection in a melt. For substrate use, however, larger diameter crystals are required. Increase of crystal diameter was challenged in spite of the concern that compositional homogeneity of grown crystals might be degraded due to faster convective flow in a larger diameter melt. As a result, however, increase of crystal diameter was possible up to 30 mm although single crystal length was limited to 5 mm. Si0.55Ge0.45 and Si0.6Ge0.4 bulk crystals with 30 mm diameter showed excellent compositional homogeneity and high crystallinity without mosaicity.

  17. Dislocation reduction in HgCdTe grown on CdTe/Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.

    2016-05-01

    Bulk-grown CdZnTe (Zn = 3%) substrates are the natural choice for HgCdTe epitaxy since it is lattice matched to long wave LW-HgCdTe alloy. However, lack of large area CdZnTe substrates, high production costs, and more importantly, the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between CdZnTe and silicon Read out Integrated Circuits (ROIC) are some of the inherent drawbacks of CdZnTe substrates. Consequently, Hg1-xCdxTe detectors fabricated on silicon substrates are an attractive alternative. Recent developments in the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) buffer layer growth technology on Si substrates has revolutionized the HgCdTe research and offered a new dimension to HgCdTe-based IR technology. Si substrates provide advantages in terms of relatively large area (3 to 6-inch diameter is easily obtained) compared to CZT substrate materials, durability during processing, and reliability to thermal cycling. Innovations in Si-based composite substrates made it possible to fabricate very large-format IR arrays that offer higher resolution, low-cost arrays and more dies per wafer. Between Si substrates and HgCdTe has large lattice mismatch of 19%. This leads to dislocation densities of low-107 cm-2 for optimal growth of HgCdTe on silicon-based substrates as compared to the mid-104 cm-2 dislocation density of HgCdTe grown on CdZnTe. This paper present dislocation reduction by two orders of magnitude using thermal cycle anneal under Hg environment on HgCdTe grown on Si substrates and as well as defect reduction in Cd(Se)Te buffer layers grown on Si Substrates.

  18. AlN bulk single crystal growth on 6H-SiC substrates by sublimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Ichiro; Kato, Tomohisa; Miura, Tomonori; Kamata, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Kunihiro; Sanada, Kazuo; Okumura, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Large and thick AlN bulk single crystals up to 43 mm in diameter and 10 mm in thickness have been successfully grown on 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1) substrates by the sublimation method using a TaC crucible. Raman spectrum indicates that the polytype of the grown AlN single crystals is a Wurtzite-2H type structure, and the crystals do not include any impurity phases. The quality at the top of the crystal improves as crystal thickness increases along the <0 0 0 1> direction during growth: a low etch pit density (7×10 4 cm -2) and a small full width at half maximum for a 0002 X-ray rocking curve (58 arcsec) have been achieved at a thickness of ˜8 mm. The possible mechanism behind the improvement in the AlN crystal quality is also discussed.

  19. Phytochemical phenolics in organically grown vegetables.

    PubMed

    Young, Janice E; Zhao, Xin; Carey, Edward E; Welti, Ruth; Yang, Shie-Shien; Wang, Weiqun

    2005-12-01

    Fruit and vegetable intake is inversely correlated with risks for several chronic diseases in humans. Phytochemicals, and in particular, phenolic compounds, present in plant foods may be partly responsible for these health benefits through a variety of mechanisms. Since environmental factors play a role in a plant's production of secondary metabolites, it was hypothesized that an organic agricultural production system would increase phenolic levels. Cultivars of leaf lettuce, collards, and pac choi were grown either on organically certified plots or on adjacent conventional plots. Nine prominent phenolic agents were quantified by HPLC, including phenolic acids (e. g. caffeic acid and gallic acid) and aglycone or glycoside flavonoids (e. g. apigenin, kaempferol, luteolin, and quercetin). Statistically, we did not find significant higher levels of phenolic agents in lettuce and collard samples grown organically. The total phenolic content of organic pac choi samples as measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay, however, was significantly higher than conventional samples (p < 0.01), and seemed to be associated with a greater attack the plants in organic plots by flea beetles. These results indicated that although organic production method alone did not enhance biosynthesis of phytochemicals in lettuce and collards, the organic system provided an increased opportunity for insect attack, resulting in a higher level of total phenolic agents in pac choi.

  20. Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A. J.; White, S. P.; Adur, R.; Pu, Y.; Hammel, P. C.; Amamou, W.; Kawakami, R. K.

    2014-05-07

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidth—an often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1 nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.

  1. Prostate tumor grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This prostate cancer construct was grown during NASA-sponsored bioreactor studies on Earth. Cells are attached to a biodegradable plastic lattice that gives them a head start in growth. Prostate tumor cells are to be grown in a NASA-sponsored Bioreactor experiment aboard the STS-107 Research-1 mission in 2002. Dr. Leland Chung of the University of Virginia is the principal investigator. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and the University of Virginia.

  2. Performance and applications of quench melt-growth bulk magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariki, S.; Teshima, H.; Morita, M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the progress in quench melt-growth (QMG) bulk magnets, developed by the Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation, which consist of single crystalline RE123 phase and finely dispersed RE211 particles. QMG bulks can trap high magnetic fields. The field-trapping ability of QMG bulks is largely increased with an improvement in its J c and size, promising the realization of various applications such as flywheel energy-storage systems, ship motors, NMR/MRI spectrometers, wind-power generators and so on. Intensive research has revealed that the optimal RE element is different depending on application requirements. Gd-QMG bulk is the most promising material for several high-field engineering applications. The trapped magnetic field of Gd-QMG bulk 60 mm in diameter at 77 K is twice as large as that of Y-QMG bulk with a similar size due to its excellent J c properties. The large Gd-based QMG bulks up to 150 mm in diameter are fabricated by incorporating the RE compositional gradient method. Compact NMR/MRI spectrometers are one of the promising applications of bulk superconductors. Eu-QMG bulks are suitable for NMR magnets. NMR applications require extremely homogeneous magnetic fields. In the Eu-system, the small paramagnetic moment of a Eu ion compared to a Gd ion improves the field homogeneity in the bulk. For the application of current leads, Dy-based QMG is available by utilizing a low thermal conductivity.

  3. Efficient Yb³⁺:CaGdAlO₄ bulk and femtosecond-laser-written waveguide lasers.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Kore; Calmano, Thomas; Deppe, Bastian; Liebald, Christoph; Kränkel, Christian

    2015-08-01

    We report on, to the best of our knowledge, the first fs-laser-written waveguide laser in Yb3+:CaGdAlO4 (Yb:CALGO). With Yb:CALGO crystals grown in our labs, we obtained a slope efficiency of 69% and up to 2.4 W of continuous wave (cw) output power in a waveguide-laser configuration. Moreover, bulk laser experiments with Yb:CALGO were performed, and slope efficiencies up to 73%, optical-to-optical efficiencies of 65%, and maximum cw output powers of 3.3 W were reached. These are the highest efficiencies in the laser configuration with Yb:CALGO.

  4. Growth of wurtzite InN on bulk In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofev, Sergey; Cho, Yong Jin; Brandt, Oliver; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Erwin, Steven C.; Galazka, Zbigniew; Korytov, Maxym; Albrecht, Martin; Uecker, Reinhard; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-10-22

    A single phase InN epitaxial film is grown on a bulk In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) wafer by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The InN/In{sub 2}O{sub 3} orientation relationship is found to be (0001) parallel (111) and [1100] parallel [112]. High quality of the layer is confirmed by the small widths of the x-ray rocking curves, the sharp interfaces revealed by transmission electron microscopy, the narrow spectral width of the Raman E{sub 2}{sup h} vibrational mode, and the position of the photoluminescence band close to the fundamental band gap of InN.

  5. A perfectly stoichiometric and flat CeO2(111) surface on a bulk-like ceria film

    PubMed Central

    Barth, C.; Laffon, C.; Olbrich, R.; Ranguis, A.; Parent, Ph.; Reichling, M.

    2016-01-01

    In surface science and model catalysis, cerium oxide (ceria) is mostly grown as an ultra-thin film on a metal substrate in the ultra-high vacuum to understand fundamental mechanisms involved in diverse surface chemistry processes. However, such ultra-thin films do not have the contribution of a bulk ceria underneath, which is currently discussed to have a high impact on in particular surface redox processes. Here, we present a fully oxidized ceria thick film (180 nm) with a perfectly stoichiometric CeO2(111) surface exhibiting exceptionally large, atomically flat terraces. The film is well-suited for ceria model studies as well as a perfect substitute for CeO2 bulk material. PMID:26879800

  6. Compositional analysis of dilute nitride doped indium antimonide bulk crystal by VDS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Manisha; Maske, Dilip; Choudhari, Rashmi; Arora, Brij Mohan; Gadkari, Dattatray

    2016-05-01

    Dilute nitrides are suitable materials for fabrication of devices in detection of long wavelength infrared region. Dilute nitride doped Indium antimonide bulk crystals were grown using vertical directional solidification technique. The compositional characteristics of the crystals were carried out using EDS. The analysis was simulated and compared with observations using DTSA II software for accuracy. The ingots have uniform composition of Indium and Antimony. The actual nitrogen composition measured using EDS was 0.136% for doped nitrogen composition 0.1% except near conical end where it was 0.1%. The study of bonding between nitrogen, Indium and antimony was carried out using SIMS. The analysis shows strong presence of In-N bonding along with In-Sb bonds which indicates nitrogen has replaced antimony atoms in crystal lattice.

  7. Spectroscopic ellipsometry study of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} bulk crystals

    SciTech Connect

    León, M. Lopez, N.; Merino, J. M.; Caballero, R.; Levcenko, S.; Gurieva, G.; Serna, R.; Bodnar, I. V.; Nateprov, A.; Guc, M.; Arushanov, E.; Schorr, S.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.

    2014-08-11

    Using spectroscopic ellipsometry we investigated and analyzed the pseudo-optical constants of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} bulk crystals, grown by the Bridgman method, over 0.8–4.5 eV photon energy range. The structures found in the spectra of the complex pseudodielectric functions were associated to E{sub 0}, E{sub 1A}, and E{sub 1B} interband transitions and were analyzed in frame of the Adachi's model. The interband transition parameters such as strength, threshold energy, and broadening were evaluated by using the simulated annealing algorithm. In addition, the pseudo-complex refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, and normal-incidence reflectivity were derived over 0.8–4.5 eV photon energy range.

  8. Tunable thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators with improved Q-factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, A.; Gevorgian, S.

    2010-05-01

    The tunable solidly mounted Ba0.25Sr0.75TiO3 (BSTO) thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators (TFBARs) with improved Q-factor are fabricated and characterized. The BSTO films are grown by magnetron sputtering at temperature 600 °C and extremely low sputter gas pressure 2 mTorr using on-axis configuration. The measured TFBARs Q-factor is more than 250 and mechanical Q-factor is more than 350 at 5 GHz resonance frequency. The improvement in the Q-factor is associated with reduction in the BSTO film grain misorientation. The latter is responsible for generation of shear waves leaking through the Bragg reflector and corresponding acoustic loss.

  9. Thermodynamic States and Phase Diagrams for Bulk-Incoherent, Bulk-Coherent, and Epitaxially-Coherent Semiconductor Alloys: Application to Cubic (Ga,In)N

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Z.; Zunger, A.

    2008-01-01

    The morphology and microstructure of A{sub 1-x}B{sub x}C semiconductor alloys depend on the type of thermodynamic states established during growth. We distinguish three main cases: (i) bulk-incoherent structures occur when the alloy grows without being coherent with an underlying substrate and when each of the possible alloy species-phase separated AC and BC constituents, random A{sub 1-x}B{sub x}C alloy, or ordered (AC){sub n}/(BC){sub m} structures-maintain their own lattice structures and lattice constants, giving up mutual coherence. Bulk incoherence is common in thick films with sufficient dislocations. For cubic (Ga,In)N, bulk-incoherent structures are found to have a positive excess enthalpy {Delta}H{sub bulk}{sup incoh} > 0 and, thus, to phase separate. (ii) Bulk-coherent structures occur when the alloy grows without being coherent with a substrate, but each of the possible species internal to the alloy film is forced to be coherent with the film matrix. Thus, the constituents AC-rich and BC-rich solid solution phases share the same lattice structure at their interface, leading to internal strain that destabilizes the AC+BC separated constituents. This can expose the intermediate (AC){sub n}/(BC){sub m} ordered phases as stable structures with respect to the strained constituents, i.e., {Delta}H{sub bulk}{sup coh} < 0. Bulk coherence is applicable to growth when the development of dislocations is inhibited, e.g., small size precipitates in the alloy matrix. For cubic (Ga,In)N alloy, we find that the coherent ground state phases are three ordered superlattice structures: (InN){sub 2}/(GaN){sub 2} (=chacolpyrite), (InN){sub 3}/(GaN){sub 1}, and (InN){sub 4}/(GaN){sub 1}, along (201) [and its cubic symmetry equivalent, i.e., (102), (210), etc.] crystal direction. (iii) Epitaxially coherent structures occur when the alloy is made coherent with an underlying substrate, e.g., in thin film pseudomorphic growth. Depending on the substrate, the formation enthalpy

  10. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique.

  11. Macroscopic and direct light propulsion of bulk graphene material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tengfei; Chang, Huicong; Wu, Yingpeng; Xiao, Peishuang; Yi, Ningbo; Lu, Yanhong; Ma, Yanfeng; Huang, Yi; Zhao, Kai; Yan, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Tian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-07-01

    It has been a great challenge to achieve the direct light manipulation of matter on a bulk scale. In this work the direct light propulsion of matter is observed on a macroscopic scale using a bulk graphene-based material. The unique structure and properties of graphene, and the novel morphology of the bulk three-dimensional linked graphene material make it capable not only of absorbing light at various wavelengths but also of emitting energetic electrons efficiently enough to drive the bulk material, following Newtonian mechanics. Thus, the unique photonic and electronic properties of individual graphene sheets are manifested in the response of the bulk state. These results offer an exciting opportunity to bring about bulk-scale light manipulation with the potential to realize long-sought applications in areas such as the solar sail and space transportation driven directly by sunlight.

  12. Somatic cells count in cow's bulk tank milk.

    PubMed

    Olechnowicz, Jan; Jaśkowski, Jedrzej M

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was therefore to present factors affecting somatic cell counts in bovine bulk milk as a result of intramammary infections as well as non-infectious factors. The paper presents also the impact of on-farm management practices on the level of bulk milk somatic cell counts and presents quality indicators in bulk tank milk. At the farm level bulk milk bacterial infection takes place through three main sources: bacterial contamination from the external surface of the udder and teats, from the surface of the milking equipment, and from mastitis microorganisms within the udder. The threshold of 200,000 cells/ml identifies bacteriological negative quarters of the udder. The counts of mammary pathogens in bulk tank milk are relatively low, on average not exceeding 1,000 cfu/ml. Environmental pathogens predominate in bulk tank milk samples with somatic cells count <300 × 10(3) ml. PMID:22230979

  13. Gravitational potential wells and the cosmic bulk flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuyu; Kumar, Abhinav; Feldman, Hume; Watkins, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The bulk flow is a volume average of the peculiar velocities and a useful probe of the mass distribution on large scales. The gravitational instability model views the bulk flow as a potential flow that obeys a Maxwellian Distribution. We use two N-body simulations, the LasDamas Carmen and the Horizon Run, to calculate the bulk flows of various sized volumes in the simulation boxes. Once we have the bulk flow velocities as a function of scale, we investigate the mass and gravitational potential distribution around the volume. We found that matter densities can be asymmetrical and difficult to detect in real surveys, however, the gravitational potential and its gradient may provide better tools to investigate the underlying matter distribution. This study shows that bulk flows are indeed potential flows and thus provides information on the flow sources. We also show that bulk flow magnitudes follow a Maxwellian distribution on scales > 10h-1 Mpc.

  14. Numerical estimates for the bulk viscosity of ideal gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, M. S.

    2012-06-01

    We estimate the bulk viscosity of a selection of well known ideal gases. A relatively simple formula is combined with published values of rotational and vibrational relaxation times. It is shown that the bulk viscosity can take on a wide variety of numerical values and variations with temperature. Several fluids, including common diatomic gases, are seen to have bulk viscosities which are hundreds or thousands of times larger than their shear viscosities. We have also provided new estimates for the bulk viscosity of water vapor in the range 380-1000 K. We conjecture that the variation of bulk viscosity with temperature will have a local maximum for most fluids. The Lambert-Salter correlation is used to argue that the vibrational contribution to the bulk viscosities of a sequence of fluids having a similar number of hydrogen atoms at a fixed temperature will increase with the characteristic temperature of the lowest vibrational mode.

  15. Bulk metallic glass coating of polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soinila, Erno; Sharma, Parmanand; Heino, Markku; Pischow, Kaj; Inoue, Akihisa; Hänninen, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) alloy with the composition of Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 was deposited by sputtering as thin films on several different engineering polymers and polymer composites. Polycarbonate, polymethyl methacrylate, polyamide 12, polyarylamide (50GF=50 % glass fibers), polyphenylene sulfide (30GF) and polybutylene terephthalate (30GF) were used as substrates. The microstructure of the deposited BMG coatings was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of XRD and SEM studies were consistent with amorphous microstructure. Elemental compositions of the coatings were verified by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Mechanical properties of the coatings were compared to copper mould cast BMG using nano- indentation tests with similar results. According to the cross-cut tape tests good adhesion was achieved between the studied BMG alloy and all other polymer substrates except polycarbonate. Nano-indentation results showed similar mechanical properties for coating and cast BMG. The results of this study look promising as they open new opportunities for BMG- polymer composite applications.

  16. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H Eugene

    2014-11-14

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (T(L) ≃ 225 K). The second, T* ∼ 315 ± 5 K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility K(T)(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient α(P)(T, P) in the P-T plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (T(L)) and the onset of the unfolding process (T*).

  17. Determination of Bulk Dimensional Variation in Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. James F. Cuttino Dr. Edward P. Morse

    2005-04-14

    The purpose of this work is to improve the efficiency of green sand foundries so that they may continue to compete as the most cost-effective method of fabrication while meeting tightening constraints on near-net shape manufacturing. In order to achieve this objective, the study is divided into two major components. The first component concentrated on identifying which processes control surface finish on the castings and which provide potential reductions in variations. The second component identified metrological methods that effectively discern between the geometry of bulk material versus surface finish in order to more accurately determine the quality of a part. The research resulted in the determination of an empirical relationship relating pouring parameters to dimensional variation, with an R2 value of greater than 0.79. A significant difference in variations obtained from vertical vs. horizontal molding machines was also noticed. When analyzed separately, however, the resulting empirical relationships for horizontal and vertical machines had reduced R2 values, probably due to the reduced data sets. Significant parameters when considering vertical and horizontal molding machines together included surface roughness, pattern type, iron type, pouring rate, copper content, amount of Western Bentonite, and permeability.

  18. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-11-14

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (T{sub L} ≃ 225 K). The second, T{sup *} ∼ 315 ± 5 K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility K{sub T}(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient α{sub P}(T, P) in the P–T plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (T{sub L}) and the onset of the unfolding process (T{sup *})

  19. Leachables evaluation for bulk drug substance.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Victor; Somma, Maria S; Zitzner, Linda A

    2009-01-01

    This study describes a comprehensive analytical approach for evaluating potential leachables from product-contacting material surfaces in the manufacture of bulk drug substance (BDS) for use in parenteral products. A qualitative step-by-step evaluation of the process stream for the production, purification, and storage of the BDS was performed. The product-contact equipment surfaces were then grouped based on their materials of construction and prioritized according to the potential risk of contributing leachables to the BDS. Based on this evaluation, 13 potential leachable species were identified and classified either as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), anions, cations, or trace metals. The BDS was first screened for the presence of VOCs, SVOCs, anions, cations, and trace metals using analytical methods that were qualified for their application with the BDS. Thirteen potential leachables were then spiked in the BDS and in the water for injection for spike-recovery studies. The analysis of the BDS for potential leachables showed that the potential impurities were not present in the BDS except for a trace amount of silicon, and that the residual solvent concentrations were lower than the recommended limits established by the International Committee on Harmonisation. The spike-recovery studies confirmed that the analytical methods could effectively determine the leachable compounds in the BDS. Moreover, the 13 contaminants did not form a complex with the protein in the BDS and did not represent a potential risk to the BDS's safety and stability. PMID:19634355

  20. Material Profile Influences in Bulk-Heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Roehling, John D.; Rochester, Christopher W.; Ro, Hyun W.; Wang, Peng; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Batenburg, Kees J.; Arslan, Ilke; Delongchamp, Dean M.; Moule, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    he morphology in mixed bulk-heterojunction films are compared using three different quantitative measurement techniques. We compare the vertical composition changes using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron tomography and neutron and x-ray reflectometry. The three measurement techniques yield qualita-tively comparable vertical concentration measurements. The presence of a metal cathode during thermal annealing is observed to alter the fullerene concentration throughout the thickness of the film for all measurements. However, the abso-lute vertical concentration of fullerene is quantitatively different for the three measurements. The origin of the quantitative measurement differences is discussed. The authors thank Luna Innovations, Inc. for donating the endohedral fullerenes used in this study and Plextronics for the P3HT. They are gratefully thank the National Science Foundation Energy for Sustainability Program, Award No. 0933435. This work benefited from the use of the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Los Alamos National Laboratory under DOE Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. This research was also supported in part by Laboratory Directed Research & Development program at PNNL. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.