Science.gov

Sample records for growth coalition development

  1. Cast Metal Coalition Research and Development Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.

    2000-08-01

    The Cast Metal Coalition, composed of more than 22 research providers and universities and 149 industrial partners, has completed a four-year research and development partnership with the Department of Energy. This report provides brief summaries of the 29 projects performed by the Coalition. These projects generated valuable information in such aspects of the metals industry as process prediction technologies, quality control, improved alloys, product machinability, and casting process improvements.

  2. Development of a Community Readiness Survey for Coalitions to Address Prescription Opioid Misuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudeau, Kimberlee J.

    2015-01-01

    A community readiness survey for coalitions to address the growing epidemic of prescription opioid misuse was developed in this four-part study. A total of 70 coalition members participated. 1) We conducted 30-minute phone interviews with coalition members (n = 30) and a literature review to develop an item list. 2) Coalition members rated these…

  3. Organizational Member Involvement in Physical Activity Coalitions across the United States: Development and Testing of a Novel Survey Instrument for Assessing Coalition Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Daniel B.; Pate, Russell R.; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement…

  4. Organizational Member Involvement in Physical Activity Coalitions across the United States: Development and Testing of a Novel Survey Instrument for Assessing Coalition Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Daniel B.; Pate, Russell R.; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement…

  5. Development of a Community Readiness Survey for Coalitions to Address Prescription Opioid Misuse

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, Kimberlee J.

    2016-01-01

    A community readiness survey for coalitions to address the growing epidemic of prescription opioid misuse was developed in this four-part study. A total of 70 coalition members participated. 1) We conducted 30-minute phone interviews with coalition members (n=30) and a literature review to develop an item list. 2) Coalition members rated these 60 items for three criteria: importance, confidence in own answer, confidence in others’ answer. 3) Highly rated items were included in a revised survey that was tested with coalition members (n=10) using in-person cognitive interviewing to assess how coalition members were interpreting the questions. 4) Lastly, pre-testing and satisfaction testing with additional coalition members (n=30). Most (83%) of the respondents reported positive overall impressions of the survey. PMID:27516644

  6. Developing and maintaining state-wide adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Nezlek, J B; Galano, J

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of state-wide adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions. Key informants in five states throughout the southern United States were given semi-structured interviews regarding the adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions in their states. From these interviews and other documents, conclusions were drawn regarding the nature and importance of the environments within which these coalitions operate, the universe of activities in which coalitions engage, and the stages of development of these coalitions. Katz and Kahn's model of social organizations served as the basis for understanding coalitions in terms of these three considerations. Future research should consider the utility of organizational models that can explain more fully the organization--committee hybrid structure that tends to characterize these coalitions.

  7. Benefits and Challenges in Building a Community Youth Development Coalition. REACH Issue Brief Series. Number One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, David; Erbstein, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    How can the field of youth development move from being an assortment of valuable but often disconnected programs to become a coordinated system or sector with greater policy relevance? One strategy for working toward this goal involves building a community youth development coalition. Successful coalitions can take various forms, but most are…

  8. Organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions across the United States: development and testing of a novel survey instrument for assessing coalition functioning.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Daniel B; Pate, Russell R; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Blair, Steven N

    2015-06-01

    Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. The study was carried out in three phases: (a) developing a draft survey, (b) assessing the content validity of the draft survey, and (c) assessing the underlying factor structure, reliability, and validity of the survey. A cross-sectional design was employed. In Phase 1, a team of experts in survey development produced a draft survey. In Phase 2, the content validity of the draft survey was evaluated by a panel of individuals with expertise in physical activity coalitions. In Phase 3, the survey was administered to 120 individuals on local-, state-, and national-level physical activity coalitions. Responses were subjected to an exploratory factor analysis in order to determine the survey's underlying factor structure, reliability, and validity. Phases 1 and 2yielded a survey instrument with demonstrated content validity. Phase 3 yielded a three-factor model with three subscales: Strategic Alignment, Organizational Alignment, and Providing Input. Each subscale demonstrated high internal consistency reliability and construct validity. The survey instrument developed here demonstrated sound psychometric properties and provides new insight into organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This instrument may be an important tool in developing a more complete picture of coalition functioning in physical activity coalitions specifically and health-based coalitions overall. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  9. Conceptual models to guide best practices in organization and development of State Action Coalitions.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Lazure, Linda; Morris, Kathy J; Valerio, Marilyn; Morris, Rosanna

    2013-01-01

    The RWJF/AARP National Campaign for Action established a goal of establishing Action Coalitions in every state by 2012. Last year, a small Steering Committee formed in Nebraska and used two conceptual models to guide the organization and development of its Action Coalition. The purpose of this article is to present the Internal Coalition Outcome Hierarchy (ICOH) model that guided development of partnership and coalition building. The second model, Determining Program Feasibility, provided a framework for data collection and analysis to identify the opportunities and challenges for strategic program planning to accomplish identified key priorities for Nebraska. A discussion of the models' applications is included and offered as best practices for others seeking to form partnership/coalitions and establish action plans and priorities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of U.S. and Coalition Efforts to Develop Leaders in the Afghan National Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-24

    Efforts to Develop Leaders in the Afghan National Army Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...SUBTITLE Assessment of U.S. and Coalition Efforts to Develop Leaders in the Afghan National Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...TRANSITION COMMAND-AFGHANISTAN SUBJECT: Assessment of U.S. Government and Coalition Efforts to Develop Leaders in the Afghan National Army (Report No

  11. An advocacy coalition framework analysis of the development of offshore wind energy in South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Marines

    Offshore winds blow considerably harder and more uniformly than on land, and can thus produce higher amounts of electricity. Design, installation, and distribution of an offshore wind farm is more difficult and expensive, but is nevertheless a compelling energy source. With its relatively shallow offshore waters South Carolina has the potential to offer one of the first offshore wind farms in the United States, arguably ideal for wind-farm construction and presenting outstanding potential for the state's growth and innovation. This study analyzes the policy process involved in the establishment of an offshore wind industry in South Carolina through the use of Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) concepts. The ACF studies policy process by analyzing policy subsystems, understanding that stakeholders motivated by belief systems influence policy subsystem affairs, and recognizing the assembly of these stakeholders into coalitions as the best way to simplify the analysis. The study interviewed and analyzed responses from stakeholders involved to different but significant degrees with South Carolina offshore wind industry development, allowing for their categorization into coalitions. Responses and discussion analysis through the implementation of ACF concepts revealed, among other observations, direct relationships of opinions to stakeholder's belief systems. Most stakeholders agreed that a potential for positive outputs is real and substantial, but differed in opinion when discussing challenges for offshore wind development in South Carolina. The study importantly considers policy subsystem implications at national and regional levels, underlining the importance of learning from other offshore wind markets and policy arenas worldwide. In this sense, this study's discussions and conclusions are a step towards the right direction.

  12. Stone Soup: A Recipe for Successful Coalitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Joan

    1999-01-01

    Considers the implications of community connections by examining a coalition developed by the Pekin Public Library (Illinois): the Pekin Intergenerational Network (PIN). Highlights include recognizing the need for coalitions; developing a team; and evaluating the coalition's progress. (AEF)

  13. From local development policies to strategic planning-Assessing continuity in institutional coalitions.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo Rinaldi, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    In the last two decades, EU policies have had a fundamental role in orienting regional/local development. The objective of this work is set in this context as it intends to analyze the local development programs activated in Sicily in the last three programming periods. The main aim is to explore whether the EU partnership principle influenced cooperation among local actors, assessing the continuity of local institutional coalition in managing different local development programs within the regional development policy system. We focus, in particular, on Strategic Plans (SP) promoted in Sicily in the transition phase between the 2000-2006 and the 2007-2013 periods.

  14. Ecological Contexts in the Development of Coalitions for Youth Violence Prevention: An Organizational Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Kimberly D.; Speer, Paul W.; Perkins, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions are a recognized strategy for addressing pressing public health problems. Despite the promise of coalitions as an effective prevention strategy, results linking coalition efforts to positive community outcomes are mixed. To date, research has primarily focused on determining organizational attributes related to successful…

  15. Ecological Contexts in the Development of Coalitions for Youth Violence Prevention: An Organizational Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Kimberly D.; Speer, Paul W.; Perkins, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions are a recognized strategy for addressing pressing public health problems. Despite the promise of coalitions as an effective prevention strategy, results linking coalition efforts to positive community outcomes are mixed. To date, research has primarily focused on determining organizational attributes related to successful…

  16. Tarsal Coalitions--Calcaneonavicular Coalitions.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Stephanie J; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    Calcaneonavicular coalitions are an important cause of adolescent foot pain and deformity. The congenital condition is characterized by an aberrant osseous, cartilaginous, or fibrinous union of the calcaneal and navicular bones. Calcaneonavicular coalitions are the most common form of tarsal coalitions identified within epidemiologic studies. A thorough understanding of this clinically significant entity is important for restoring joint motion and preventing long-term disability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Examining the Washington State Breastfeeding-Friendly Policy Development Process Using the Advocacy Coalition Framework.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Lesley E; Bradford, Victoria; Quinn, Emilee; Otten, Jennifer J; McNamara, Jennifer; Fisher, Kari; Johnson, Donna B

    2017-03-01

    Objectives Breastfeeding promotion is increasingly recognized as a key public health strategy. Policies can promote breastfeeding by creating supportive environments and addressing challenges. In 2014, the Washington State legislature considered bills to create a voluntary recognition system for breastfeeding-friendly hospitals, clinics, worksites and childcare settings. These Breastfeeding-Friendly Washington (BFW) bills (SB 6298 and HB 2329) did not pass. Methods The purpose of this case study was to analyze the policy development process for the BFW bills using the Advocacy Coalition Framework. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders in the state policy process, and document review. We used thematic analysis to identify deductive and inductive themes. Results Though all policy actors indicated general support for breastfeeding, two main coalitions (proponents and opponents) diverged in their support of the BFW bills as policy solutions to address barriers to breastfeeding. We conducted 29 interviews with mainly bill proponents, and 54 documents confirmed data about bill opponents. Proponents supported the bills given increasingly strong evidence of breastfeeding's benefits and that public policy could address environmental challenges to breastfeeding. Opponents saw the bills as government overreach into the private matter of choosing to breastfeed. Opposition to the bills came late in the session, and proponents felt opponents' messaging misconstrued the intent of the legislation. Conclusions for Practice Key learnings for developing breastfeeding-friendly state policies include analyzing differences between proponents' and opponents' beliefs, framing advocacy messages beyond individuals and health, expanding the coalition outside of traditional health entities, and anticipating the opposition.

  18. Assessment of U.S. Government and Coalition Efforts to Develop the Logistics Sustainment Capability of the Afghan National Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-19

    No. DODIG‑2015‑047 D E C E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 4 Assessment of U.S. Government and Coalition Efforts to Develop the Logistics Sustainment... Government and Coalition Efforts to Develop the Logistics Sustainment Capability of the Afghan National Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...the Secretary of Defense and Congress; and informs the public. Vision Our vision is to be a model oversight organization in the Federal Government by

  19. Getting It Together: Promoting Drug-Free Communities. A Resource Guide for Developing Effective Youth Coalitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Circle, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This guide is designed to serve organizations and individuals working with youth on issues of alcohol and other drug (AOD) prevention. Chapter 1 examines why coalitions are needed, characteristics of prevention, misconceptions about alcohol and other drug use, community systems and alcohol and other drug use, definitions of coalitions and…

  20. Building Coalitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John; And Others

    Chapter 12 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter discusses ways for administrators to enlist community support through coalition-building. To counter insufficient tax revenues and citizen apathy, today's administrator must be a political strategist adept at identifying and recruiting potential school allies and helping divergent…

  1. Science Coalition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Coalition of Science and Technology (NCST) has elected S. Thomas Moser, of the international accounting firm Peat Marwick, to their board of advisors. Moser is the national director of Marwick's high-technology practice.NCST, based in Washington, D.C., is a broad-based science and technology advocacy organization that seeks to bridge the political interests of the scientific and academic research community with the business community.

  2. Measuring coalition functioning: refining constructs through factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Louis D; Feinberg, Mark E; Greenberg, Mark T

    2012-08-01

    Internal and external coalition functioning is an important predictor of coalition success that has been linked to perceived coalition effectiveness, coalition goal achievement, coalition ability to support evidence-based programs, and coalition sustainability. Understanding which aspects of coalition functioning best predict coalition success requires the development of valid measures of empirically unique coalition functioning constructs. The goal of the present study is to examine and refine the psychometric properties of coalition functioning constructs in the following six domains: leadership, interpersonal relationships, task focus, participation benefits/costs, sustainability planning, and community support. The authors used factor analysis to identify problematic items in our original measure and then piloted new items and scales to create a more robust, psychometrically sound, multidimensional measure of coalition functioning. Scales displayed good construct validity through correlations with other measures. Discussion considers the strengths and weaknesses of the refined instrument.

  3. Measuring Coalition Functioning: Refining Constructs through Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Louis D.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Internal and external coalition functioning is an important predictor of coalition success that has been linked to perceived coalition effectiveness, coalition goal achievement, coalition ability to support evidence-based programs, and coalition sustainability. Understanding which aspects of coalition functioning best predict coalition success requires the development of valid measures of empirically unique coalition functioning constructs. The goal of the present study is to examine and refine the psychometric properties of coalition functioning constructs in the following six domains: leadership, interpersonal relationships, task focus, participation benefits/costs, sustainability planning, and community support. We used factor analysis to identify problematic items in our original measure and then piloted new items and scales to create a more robust, psychometrically sound, multidimensional measure of coalition functioning. Scales displayed good construct validity through correlations with other measures. Discussion considers the strengths and weaknesses of the refined instrument. PMID:22193112

  4. International Clean Energy Coalition

    SciTech Connect

    Erin Skootsky; Matt Gardner; Bevan Flansburgh

    2010-09-28

    In 2003, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) collaboratively established the International Clean Energy Coalition (ICEC). The coalition consisting of energy policy-makers, technologists, and financial institutions was designed to assist developing countries in forming and supporting local approaches to greenhouse gas mitigation within the energy sector. ICEC's work focused on capacity building and clean energy deployment in countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation. Under ICEC, the coalition formed a steering committee consisting of NARUC members and held a series of meetings to develop and manage the workplan and define successful outcomes for the projects. ICEC identified India as a target country for their work and completed a country assessment that helped ICEC build a framework for discussion with Indian energy decisionmakers including two follow-on in-country workshops. As of the conclusion of the project in 2010, ICEC had also conducted outreach activities conducted during United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Ninth Conference of Parties (COP 9) and COP 10. The broad goal of this project was to develop a coalition of decision-makers, technologists, and financial institutions to assist developing countries in implementing affordable, effective and resource appropriate technology and policy strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Project goals were met through international forums, a country assessment, and in-country workshops. This project focused on countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation.

  5. Assessing Rural Coalitions That Address Safety and Health Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgus, Shari; Schwab, Charles; Shelley, Mack

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions can help national organizations meet their objectives. Farm Safety 4 Just Kids depends on coalitions of local people to deliver farm safety and health educational programs to children and their families. These coalitions are called chapters. An evaluation was developed to identify individual coalition's strengths and…

  6. Assessing Rural Coalitions That Address Safety and Health Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgus, Shari; Schwab, Charles; Shelley, Mack

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions can help national organizations meet their objectives. Farm Safety 4 Just Kids depends on coalitions of local people to deliver farm safety and health educational programs to children and their families. These coalitions are called chapters. An evaluation was developed to identify individual coalition's strengths and…

  7. The coalition technical assistance and training framework: helping community coalitions help themselves.

    PubMed

    Butterfoss, Frances D

    2004-04-01

    Coalition staff, leaders, and members need training to promote coalition building and maintenance as well as ongoing technical assistance. The Coalition Technical Assistance and Training Framework uses a 6-step process to diagnose coalition strengths and challenges and provide a prescription for action. Re-evaluation after a specified time period helps determine whether a coalition adopted recommended changes in coalition participants, structures, and/or processes and progressed through stages of development. This empowerment approach helps coalition staff and members help themselves to be more effective and efficient. The framework was piloted with the Virginia Healthy Start Initiative from November 1997 to June 2001. Seven perinatal councils that focused on preventing low-weight births and infant mortality adopted 75% of the recommended actions within 1 year. Results from a pre and post-assessment tool after 3 years showed significant progress in the coalitions' ability to develop effective participants, processes, and structures

  8. Extension Professionals and Community Coalitions: Professional Development Opportunities Related to Leadership and Policy, System, and Environment Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smathers, Carol A.; Lobb, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Community coalitions play an important role in community-wide strategies to promote health and wellbeing, and Extension professionals may provide leadership, technical assistance, and other support to coalitions. Extension professionals across a Midwestern state were invited to participate in an online survey about their coalition involvement and…

  9. Extension Professionals and Community Coalitions: Professional Development Opportunities Related to Leadership and Policy, System, and Environment Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smathers, Carol A.; Lobb, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Community coalitions play an important role in community-wide strategies to promote health and wellbeing, and Extension professionals may provide leadership, technical assistance, and other support to coalitions. Extension professionals across a Midwestern state were invited to participate in an online survey about their coalition involvement and…

  10. Mobilizing communities for teen pregnancy prevention: associations between coalition characteristics and perceived accomplishments.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Michelle C; Williams, Clayton W; Cassell, Carol M; Santelli, John; Kegler, Scott R; Montgomery, Susanne B; Bell, Mary Lou; Martinez, Yolanda G; Klein, Jonathan D; Mulhall, Peter; Will, Jeffry A; Wyatt, Vicki Harris; Felice, Toni L; Hunt, Sharon C

    2005-09-01

    To describe coalition membership, examine associations between coalition processes and short-term coalition outcomes, and assess the relative contribution of key coalition processes to perceived accomplishments in teen pregnancy prevention coalitions. A self-administered survey was distributed to active members of 21 teen pregnancy prevention coalitions in 13 communities. The overall response rate was 67%, with 471 surveys returned. Process measures included staff competence, member influence in decision making, and coalition functioning. Short-term outcome measures included perceived accomplishments, member satisfaction, member participation, and coalition viability. About 50% of coalition members represented health or teen pregnancy prevention or youth development service organizations, with 13% participating primarily as residents or youth. None of the process measures were associated with coalition viability (defined as active 2 years post-survey). Many bivariate associations between coalition processes and other short-term outcomes were significant at the individual and coalition levels of analysis. In a multivariate random coefficients model, coalition functioning (p <.001) and member influence in decision making (p = .019) were significantly associated with perceived coalition accomplishments. Consistent with research on coalitions that have addressed other health issues, good coalition processes were associated with short-term indicators of effectiveness in these teen pregnancy prevention coalitions. Coalition processes were not associated with coalition viability 2 years post-survey, however, suggesting that other factors influence coalition survival.

  11. How does community context influence coalitions in the formation stage? a multiple case study based on the Community Coalition Action Theory

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Community coalitions are rooted in complex and dynamic community systems. Despite recognition that environmental factors affect coalition behavior, few studies have examined how community context impacts coalition formation. Using the Community Coalition Action theory as an organizing framework, the current study employs multiple case study methodology to examine how five domains of community context affect coalitions in the formation stage of coalition development. Domains are history of collaboration, geography, community demographics and economic conditions, community politics and history, and community norms and values. Methods Data were from 8 sites that participated in an evaluation of a healthy cities and communities initiative in California. Twenty-three focus groups were conducted with coalition members, and 76 semi-structured interviews were conducted with local coordinators and coalition leaders. Cross-site analyses were conducted to identify the ways contextual domains influenced selection of the lead agency, coalition membership, staffing and leadership, and coalition processes and structures. Results History of collaboration influenced all four coalition factors examined, from lead agency selection to coalition structure. Geography influenced coalition formation largely through membership and staffing, whereas the demographic and economic makeup of the community had an impact on coalition membership, staffing, and infrastructure for coalition processes. The influence of community politics, history, norms and values was most noticeable on coalition membership. Conclusions Findings contribute to an ecologic and theory-based understanding of the range of ways community context influences coalitions in their formative stage. PMID:20178633

  12. Building Effective Coalitions: Some Planning Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croan, Gerald M.; Lees, Joan F.

    Coalitions of service providers are playing increasingly large roles in developing policies and programs affecting youth. Community coalitions are cost-effective, efficient ways to expand services and to increase the capacity of the community to plan and program for young people. This manual provides a basis for examination of the coalition…

  13. The Influence of Community Context on How Coalitions Achieve HIV-Preventive Structural Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Sarah J.; Miller, Robin Lin; Francisco, Vincent T.

    2014-01-01

    Community coalition action theory (CCAT) depicts the processes and factors that affect coalition formation, maintenance, institutionalization, actions, and outcomes. CCAT proposes that community context affects coalitions at every phase of development and operation. We analyzed data from 12 "Connect to Protect" coalitions using inductive…

  14. The Influence of Community Context on How Coalitions Achieve HIV-Preventive Structural Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Sarah J.; Miller, Robin Lin; Francisco, Vincent T.

    2014-01-01

    Community coalition action theory (CCAT) depicts the processes and factors that affect coalition formation, maintenance, institutionalization, actions, and outcomes. CCAT proposes that community context affects coalitions at every phase of development and operation. We analyzed data from 12 "Connect to Protect" coalitions using inductive…

  15. Assessing Community Coalitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drug Strategies, Washington, DC.

    This document presents a report on a 2-year study of community anti-drug coalitions in 11 cities that have community initiatives programs. Through an extensive review of the literature, conversations with prevention experts, and interviews with members of the programs, an examination was made of the lessons learned by the coalitions. Since formal…

  16. Appalachian regional model for organizing and sustaining county-level diabetes coalitions.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Richard; Shrewsberry, Molly; Cornelius-Averhart, Darrlyn; King, Henry B

    2011-07-01

    This article describes a model for developing diabetes coalitions in rural Appalachian counties and presents evidence of their sustainability. The rural Appalachian coalition model was developed through a partnership between two federal agencies and a regional university. Coalitions go through a competitive application process to apply for one-time $10,000 grants. The project has funded 7 to 9 coalitions annually since 2001, reaching 66 total coalitions in 2008. Sustainability of the coalitions is defined by the number of coalitions that voluntarily report on their programs and services. In 2008, 58 of 66 (87%) coalitions in the Appalachian region continue to function and voluntarily submit reports even after their grant funds have been depleted. The factors that may contribute to sustainability are discussed in the article. This model for organizing coalitions has demonstrated that it is possible for coalitions to be maintained over time in rural underserved areas in Appalachia.

  17. Growth and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tots Understanding Puberty Your Child's Changing Voice Your Child's Development: 1.5 Years (18 Months) Your Child's Growth ... 8 Months Your Baby's Growth: 9 Months Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Your Child's Development: 15 ...

  18. Immunization Action Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Handouts for Patients & Staff A-Z ... Index Supplies Checklist Administering Vaccines Temperature Logs Adult Vaccination Topics of Interest Documenting Vaccination Translations Parent Handouts ...

  19. Miami thrives: weaving a poverty reduction coalition.

    PubMed

    Evans, Scotney D; Rosen, Adam D; Kesten, Stacey M; Moore, Wendy

    2014-06-01

    In an environment where community based organizations are asked to do increasingly more to alleviate the effects of complex social problems, networks and coalitions are becoming the answer for increasing scale, efficiency, coordination, and most importantly, social impact. This paper highlights the formation of a poverty reduction coalition in south Florida. Our case study approach chronicles a developing coalition in Miami-Dade County and the role of one organization acting as lead to the initiative. Drawing on interviews with lead organization staff, participant observation field notes, network mapping and analysis of documents and artifacts from the initiative, we analyze the local organizational context and illuminate important processes associated with supporting a developing coalition. Findings offer a picture of the interorganizational relationships in the community using social network analysis and identify the organizational capacity factors that contribute to and inhibit the formation of a cohesive and effective coalition in this context. This study also highlights the utility of an action research approach to organizational learning about coalition-building in such a way that informs decision making.

  20. Lessons Learned from the Afghan Mission Network: Developing a Coalition Contingency Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    mission networks should be developed. See Associated Press (2012); Cutohin (2012), p. 9; and Baldor and Jelinek (2012). 12 technical and...10, 2012. As of January 15, 2013: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/oct/10/us-troops-jordan-syria-crisis Baldor , Lolita C., and Pauline Jelinek

  1. Implementing a Standards Development Framework for the Coalition Battle Management Language

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Voice-to-Message (e.g. 9-Liners) Natural Language Translation Interfaces Current Command & Staff Training Also, NATO COPD Sustaining...on the US Joint Intelligence Community/DoD Content Discovery and Retrieval ( IC /DoD CDR) Model Overview C-BML Standard Development Framework

  2. Business-Led Coalitions: Aligning Supply and Demand in Workforce Development. Workforce Brief #9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Stephen M.; Jimenez, Manuel

    The test for today's economy is to create a workforce development system that capitalizes on current opportunities across states, regions, and local communities. The economic environment is positive, with tight, dynamic, and global labor markets. The business need for job-ready, entry-level workers; high-skilled workers; and workers who can…

  3. Sustainability in a state comprehensive cancer control coalition: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Renee A; Chapman, Kathryn; Graf, Gavin; Stanfield, Bret; Waterbor, John W

    2014-03-01

    The Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition (ACCCC) has developed an integrated and coordinated approach to reducing cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, and to improving the quality of life for cancer survivors, their families, and their caregivers. The ACCCC is currently in a maintenance phase and a formal plan for sustainability of the coalition was needed to keep the members engaged and productive. A training session in coalition sustainability conducted in 2013 identified the following elements as essential to success: (1) increased marketing of the coalition by simplifying its mission; (2) improved networking including flexibility in coalition meeting location and attendance; (3) increased membership satisfaction through transformational leadership; (4) revision of the working structure of committees and improved accountability; and (5) enhancement of partner satisfaction with coalition activities designed to recruit and retain new partners. A self-administered membership satisfaction survey was given to assess coalition mission, meeting logistics, organization, capacity building, and coalition goals. Results indicated that the subcategories of communication, mission, and meeting logistics were rated satisfied to very satisfied on a five-point scale. Although the ACCCC had clearly written goals, improvement could be made in leadership participation and new member orientation could be improved. Most members rated their parent organization as highly involved with the ACCCC and many offered suggestions on capacity building. Results of the sustainability training have clarified the ACCCC's plans to ensure coalition viability and improve strategies to inform stakeholders of the benefits of participation in the coalition.

  4. Coalition Warfare Program Tactile Situation Awareness System for Aviation Applications: System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    electronics into a garment and provide the avionics interface(s) compatible with the wide variety of sensors in military and civilian aviation...also delivers peak displacement of the user’s skin at a lower frequency than the C-2 or C-3 do, thus allowing qualitatively different type of... wearable tactile array components, EAI developed the Distributed Tactor System. The Distributed Tactor System consists of a bus master

  5. Lessons Learned and Challenges in Building a Filipino Health Coalition

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, David E.; Abesamis-Mendoza, Noilyn; Ursua, Rhodora; Divino, Lily Ann M.; Cadag, Kara; Gavin, Nicholas P.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, community-based coalitions have become an effective channel to addressing various health problems within specific ethnic communities. The purpose of this article is twofold: (a) to describe the process involved in building the Kalusugan Coalition (KC), a Filipino American health coalition based in New York City, and (b) to highlight the lessons learned and the challenges from this collaborative venture. The challenges described also offer insights on how the coalition development process can be greatly affected by the partnership with an academic institution on a community-based research project. Because each cultural group has unique issues and concerns, the theoretical framework used by KC offers creative alternatives to address some of the challenges regarding coalition infrastructures, leadership development, unexpected change of coalition dynamics, and cultural nuances. PMID:19098260

  6. Developing Coalition Interoperability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    increasing MRO and manpower costs, consequently reducing the amount available to industry . 3.4 CAPABILITY REQUIREMENTS EVER CHANGING With this in mind...independent and maintain a level of secrecy in doctrine and tactics. NITEworks is a UK government and industry collaboration addressing the very...11 4.0 UK GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRY RESPONSE .......................................... 13 4.1 A BRIEF BIOGRAPHY

  7. Measuring community coalition effectiveness using the ICE instrument.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Atwood, Jan R; Stoner, Julie A

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the development and psychometric testing of the Internal Coalition Effectiveness (ICE) instrument, which was based on the conceptual model Internal Coalition Outcome Hierarchy. Sixty-one items were derived from literature about successful coalitions, and the ICE instrument was tested for reliability and validity. A national panel of eight experts conducted content validity. Remaining tests involved a sample of 61 members and leaders of a large midwestern coalition (77% response rate, n=47). Content validity involved a two-stage process for rigorous item development and quantification (0.88, p<0.05). Internal consistency was based on bivariate Pearson's correlation of 0.30-0.70 for two-item scales and Cronbach's alpha(alpha=0.70). Construct validity was assessed by correlation analysis, independent Student's t tests, and informal coalition feedback. The final 30-item version of ICE is psychometrically sound. Findings were shared with the local coalition, and, in support of the instrument's validity, members and leaders found this information useful for promoting coalition sustainability by identifying internal strengths and areas for improvement. The ICE instrument adds to the body of literature by measuring critical constructs of coalition effectiveness and has significant application for public health nurses working as evaluators for coalitions engaged in community health programming.

  8. Tarsal Coalition in Children.

    PubMed

    Denning, Jaime Rice

    2016-04-01

    Tarsal coalition (a congenital fibrous, cartilaginous, or bony connection between two bones) classically presents with recurrent ankle sprains or with insidious onset of a painful, stiff flatfoot. Flatfoot is a benign finding most of the time, but it is important to distinguish the rigid flatfoot from the flexible flatfoot. A patient with recurrent sprains of the ankle or a stiff flatfoot should be evaluated for a tarsal coalition. The key to making the diagnosis is careful examination for stiffness in the subtalar joint and appropriate imaging studies. Both nonoperative and operative measures can be used to treat this condition.

  9. Subtalar coalition in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Vincent S

    2015-06-01

    Subtalar tarsal coalition is an autosomal dominant developmental maldeformation that affects between 2% and 13% of the population. The most common locations are between the calcaneus and navicular and between the talus and calcaneus. If prolonged attempts at nonoperative management do not relieve the pain, surgery is indicated. The exact surgical technique(s) should be based on the location of the pain, the size and histology of the coalition, the health of the other joints and facets, the degree of foot deformity, and the excursion of the heel cord.

  10. Growing Pains: An Evaluation of the SUCCEED Coalition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brawner, Catherine E.; Serow, Robert C.

    The SUCCEED coalition, one of the NSF Engineering Education Coalitions, was founded on a vision in which all engineering graduates will possess not only highly developed technical skills, but also the attitudes and awareness needed to prosper in the contemporary workplace. This vision manifested itself within SUCCEED by the development of…

  11. Calcaneonavicular Coalition Resection With Pes Planovalgus Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Emily A; Peterson, Kyle S; Hyer, Christopher F

    2016-01-01

    Calcaneonavicular coalitions can lead to a painful, rigid pes planovalgus deformity. Historical treatment of coalitions recommends resection. A newer concept in coalition treatment includes concomitant flatfoot reconstruction. In the present study, we hoped to demonstrate the ability to reconstruct a flatfoot deformity with concomitant calcaneonavicular coalition resection. We performed a retrospective comparative study of patients undergoing isolated calcaneonavicular bar excision (group A) with those undergoing calcaneonavicular bar excision and concomitant pes planovalgus reconstruction (group B). The radiographic parameters of pes planovalgus correction were measured on the pre- and postoperative radiographs, including talar head uncoverage, calcaneal inclination, and anteroposterior and lateral talo-first metatarsal angle. Calcaneonavicular coalition resection was performed using a standard technique with or without biologic spacers. Associated flatfoot reconstruction included posterior muscle group lengthening, calcaneal osteotomy, and/or midfoot osteotomy. Of the 27 patients, 20 were included in group A and 7 in group B. Their mean age was 18.1 years. Improvement was seen in the radiographic parameters for patients undergoing calcaneonavicular bar excision with concomitant flatfoot procedures, with statistical significance found in the calcaneal inclination (p = .013). Talar head uncoverage improved in both groups (p = .011). No change was found in the radiographic angles in patients undergoing isolated calcaneonavicular bar excision. No patients in either group developed recurrence of the coalition. The results of the present study demonstrated radiographic improvement in patients undergoing calcaneonavicular bar excision with concomitant pes planovalgus reconstruction. Hindfoot reconstruction with joint sparing osteotomies during coalition excision is a reasonable option to improve alignment and avoid arthrodesis. Copyright © 2016 American College of

  12. GLOBAL WATER RESEARCH COALITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Global Water Research Coalition (GWRC) is a collaboration of 14 member drinking and wastewater research organizations. The USEPA is currently a partner to the GWRC membership. Through the GWRC, the members are able to leverage research funds on mutually desired efforts to m...

  13. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants. Each...

  14. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants. Each...

  15. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants. Each...

  16. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants. Each...

  17. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants. Each...

  18. ECOSYSTEM GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermodynamically, ecosystem growth and development is the process by which energy throughflow and stored biomass increase. Several proposed hypotheses describe the natural tendencies that occur as an ecosystem matures, and here, we consider five: minimum entropy production, maxi...

  19. ECOSYSTEM GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermodynamically, ecosystem growth and development is the process by which energy throughflow and stored biomass increase. Several proposed hypotheses describe the natural tendencies that occur as an ecosystem matures, and here, we consider five: minimum entropy production, maxi...

  20. An initial attempt at operationalizing and testing the Community Coalition Action Theory.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Michelle C; Swan, Deanne W

    2011-06-01

    The Community Coalition Action Theory (CCAT) blends practice wisdom with empirical data to explain how community coalitions achieve community change and community capacity outcomes. The current study uses data from an evaluation of 20 California Healthy Cities and Communities coalitions to test relationships between coalition factors and outcomes as predicted by CCAT in two stages of coalition development. Data are from two rounds of coalition member surveys, interviews with local coalition coordinators, and semiannual progress reports. Consistent with CCAT predictions and prior research, shared decision making and leadership were correlated with participation; staff competence, task focus, and cohesion were correlated with member satisfaction. Coalition size was associated with participation and dollars leveraged. Also, consistent with CCAT, diversity of funding sources was associated with new leadership opportunities and program expansion; dollars leveraged was correlated with new leadership opportunities and new partners. Findings provide preliminary support for many, but not all, of the relationships predicted by CCAT.

  1. Building community capacity to prevent violence through coalitions and partnerships.

    PubMed

    Chavis, D M

    1995-01-01

    This paper will explore the most effective strategic roles that coalitions can play in the prevention of complex, entrenched social and health problems such as violence, alcoholism, and other substance abuse problems. There is a growing body of "wisdom" and research literature that suggests that the most effective role for community coalitions and partnerships in terms of prevention is to build the capacity of community leaders and their institutions to better serve their constituencies. This can be accomplished through the use of the coalition to strengthen the enabling or support system for community initiatives. An enabling system provides a variety of services, including training and consultation, information and referral, networking and local coalition development, communication, incentive grants and recognition, information and social marketing, resource development, and research and evaluation services. This paper also outlines the key internal capacities a coalition will need in order to establish this system.

  2. Report of the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition and FDA clinical trials clinical outcome assessment endpoints workshop (October 15, 2014, Bethesda MD)

    PubMed Central

    Helfer, Jennifer L.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Blakeley, Jaishri; Gilbert, Mark R.; Armstrong, Terri S.

    2016-01-01

    On October 15, 2014, a workshop was held on the use of clinical outcome assessments in clinical trials for high-grade glioma of the brain. This workshop was sponsored by the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition, consisting of the National Brain Tumor Society, the Society for Neuro-Oncology, the Musella Foundation for Brain Tumor Research and Information, and Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure. It was planned and carried out with participation from the US Food and Drug Administration. The workshop also included stakeholders from all aspects of the brain tumor community, including clinicians, researchers, industry, clinical research organizations, patients and patient advocates, and the National Cancer Institute. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions of that workshop and the proposals that emerged to move the field forward and toward greater inclusion of these endpoints in future clinical trials for high-grade gliomas. PMID:26989130

  3. Report of the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition and FDA clinical trials neuroimaging endpoint workshop (January 30, 2014, Bethesda MD)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Patrick Y.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Reardon, David A.; Fine, Howard A.; Abrey, Lauren; Ballman, Karla; Bendszuz, Martin; Buckner, Jan; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Pope, Whitney B.; Gregory Sorensen, Alma; van den Bent, Martin; Yung, Wai-Kwan Alfred

    2014-01-01

    On January 30, 2014, a workshop was held on neuroimaging endpoints in high-grade glioma. This workshop was sponsored by the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition, consisting of the National Brain Tumor Society, the Society for Neuro-Oncology, Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure, and the Musella Foundation for Research and Information, and conducted in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration. The workshop included neuro-oncologists, neuroradiologists, radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons, biostatisticians, patient advocates, and representatives from industry, clinical research organizations, and the National Cancer Institute. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions of that workshop and the proposals that emerged to improve the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria and standardize neuroimaging parameters. PMID:25313237

  4. Report of the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition and FDA clinical trials clinical outcome assessment endpoints workshop (October 15, 2014, Bethesda MD).

    PubMed

    Helfer, Jennifer L; Wen, Patrick Y; Blakeley, Jaishri; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2016-03-01

    On October 15, 2014, a workshop was held on the use of clinical outcome assessments in clinical trials for high-grade glioma of the brain. This workshop was sponsored by the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition, consisting of the National Brain Tumor Society, the Society for Neuro-Oncology, the Musella Foundation for Brain Tumor Research and Information, and Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure. It was planned and carried out with participation from the US Food and Drug Administration. The workshop also included stakeholders from all aspects of the brain tumor community, including clinicians, researchers, industry, clinical research organizations, patients and patient advocates, and the National Cancer Institute. This report summarizes the presentations and discussions of that workshop and the proposals that emerged to move the field forward and toward greater inclusion of these endpoints in future clinical trials for high-grade gliomas.

  5. Moving from community coalitions to regional collaboration.

    PubMed

    Day, A

    1994-01-01

    The author discusses a coalition between two East Texas cities which are forging a lasting relationship grounded in a common goal of community development, stimulated by funding from the Pew Foundation. The strategies--open-space technology, community navigators, leadership training and issues forums--used to build regional networks are discussed.

  6. Measuring Coalition Functioning: Refining Constructs through Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Louis D.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Internal and external coalition functioning is an important predictor of coalition success that has been linked to perceived coalition effectiveness, coalition goal achievement, coalition ability to support evidence-based programs, and coalition sustainability. Understanding which aspects of coalition functioning best predict coalition success…

  7. Measuring Coalition Functioning: Refining Constructs through Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Louis D.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Internal and external coalition functioning is an important predictor of coalition success that has been linked to perceived coalition effectiveness, coalition goal achievement, coalition ability to support evidence-based programs, and coalition sustainability. Understanding which aspects of coalition functioning best predict coalition success…

  8. Coalition Building for Health: A Community Garden Pilot Project with Apartment Dwelling Refugees.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Lynne K; Blood-Siegfried, Jane; Champagne, Mary; Al-Jumaily, Maha; Biederman, Donna J

    2015-01-01

    Refugees often experience compromised health from both pre- and post-migration stressors. Coalition theory has helped guide the development of targeted programs to address the health care needs of vulnerable populations. Using the Community Coalition Action Theory as a framework, a coalition was formed to implement a community garden with apartment-dwelling refugees. Outcomes included successful coalition formation, a community garden, reported satisfaction from all gardeners with increased vegetable intake, access to culturally meaningful foods, and evidence of increased community engagement. The opportunity for community health nurses to convene a coalition to affect positive health for refugees is demonstrated.

  9. Ecosystem growth and development.

    PubMed

    Fath, Brian D; Jørgensen, Sven E; Patten, Bernard C; Straskraba, Milan

    2004-11-01

    One of the most important features of biosystems is how they are able to maintain local order (low entropy) within their system boundaries. At the ecosystem scale, this organization can be observed in the thermodynamic parameters that describe it, such that these parameters can be used to track ecosystem growth and development during succession. Thermodynamically, ecosystem growth is the increase of energy throughflow and stored biomass, and ecosystem development is the internal reorganization of these energy mass stores, which affect transfers, transformations, and time lags within the system. Several proposed hypotheses describe thermodynamically the orientation or natural tendency that ecosystems follow during succession, and here, we consider five: minimize specific entropy production, maximize dissipation, maximize exergy storage (includes biomass and information), maximize energy throughflow, and maximize retention time. These thermodynamic orientors were previously all shown to occur to some degree during succession, and here we present a refinement by observing them during different stages of succession. We view ecosystem succession as a series of four growth and development stages: boundary, structural, network, and informational. We demonstrate how each of these ecological thermodynamic orientors behaves during the different growth and development stages, and show that while all apply during some stages only maximizing energy throughflow and maximizing exergy storage are applicable during all four stages. Therefore, we conclude that the movement away from thermodynamic equilibrium, and the subsequent increase in organization during ecosystem growth and development, is a result of system components and configurations that maximize the flux of useful energy and the amount of stored exergy. Empirical data and theoretical models support these conclusions.

  10. The influence of community context on how coalitions achieve HIV-preventive structural change.

    PubMed

    Reed, Sarah J; Miller, Robin Lin; Francisco, Vincent T

    2014-02-01

    Community coalition action theory (CCAT) depicts the processes and factors that affect coalition formation, maintenance, institutionalization, actions, and outcomes. CCAT proposes that community context affects coalitions at every phase of development and operation. We analyzed data from 12 Connect to Protect coalitions using inductive content analysis to examine how contextual factors (e.g., economics, collaboration, history, norms, and politics) enhance or impede coalitions' success in achieving outcomes. Consistent with CCAT, context affected the objectives that coalitions developed and those they completed. Results suggest that local prevention history and political support have particular impact on coalitions' success in creating structural changes. These data underscore the heuristic value of CCAT, yet also imply that the contextual constructs that affect outcomes are issue specific.

  11. Family Resource Coalition: 10 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family Resource Coalition Report, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter issue focuses on the 10 years of leadership provided by the Family Resource Coalition in the support of families. The centerpiece of this anniversary issue is an interview with Coalition founder and President Bernice Weissbourd, exploring how the original ideas of the family resource movement have been implemented over the past 10…

  12. Instinctive analytics for coalition operations (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mel, Geeth R.; La Porta, Thomas; Pham, Tien; Pearson, Gavin

    2017-05-01

    The success of future military coalition operations—be they combat or humanitarian—will increasingly depend on a system's ability to share data and processing services (e.g. aggregation, summarization, fusion), and automatically compose services in support of complex tasks at the network edge. We call such an infrastructure instinctive—i.e., an infrastructure that reacts instinctively to address the analytics task at hand. However, developing such an infrastructure is made complex for the coalition environment due to its dynamism both in terms of user requirements and service availability. In order to address the above challenge, in this paper, we highlight our research vision and sketch some initial solutions into the problem domain. Specifically, we propose means to (1) automatically infer formal task requirements from mission specifications; (2) discover data, services, and their features automatically to satisfy the identified requirements; (3) create and augment shared domain models automatically; (4) efficiently offload services to the network edge and across coalition boundaries adhering to their computational properties and costs; and (5) optimally allocate and adjust services while respecting the constraints of operating environment and service fit. We envision that the research will result in a framework which enables self-description, discover, and assemble capabilities to both data and services in support of coalition mission goals.

  13. Calcaneo-Scaphoid Coalition.

    PubMed

    Seddon, H J

    1933-02-01

    Calcaneo-scaphoid coalition occurs in a number of forms, having one feature in common, namely, a skeletal abnormality of the calcaneo-scaphoid gap. The condition is congenital, but nothing is known of its causation. Ranking at first as merely an anatomical curiosity, it was later recognized to be frequently associated with spasmodic flat-foot. Probably 25% of all cases of spasmodic flat-foot show this skeletal anomaly in some form or other.Clinically, this variety of spasmodic flat-foot is indistinguishable from the better-known condition in which the bones are apparently normal. Diagnosis made radiographically; essential that an oblique lateral view of the foot should be taken.Causal relation of the condition to peroneal spasm.All the usual forms of treatment employed for the relief of spasmodic flat-foot fail when a calcaneo-scaphoid coalition is present. Resection of the offending bar is of no proven value, but may be worth further trial. If symptoms persist, subastragaloid arthrodesis is necessary.

  14. Reciprocal relations between coalition functioning and the provision of implementation support.

    PubMed

    Brown, Louis D; Feinberg, Mark E; Shapiro, Valerie B; Greenberg, Mark T

    2015-01-01

    Community coalitions have been promoted as a strategy to help overcome challenges to the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based prevention programs. This paper explores the characteristics of coalitions that enable the provision of implementation support for prevention programs in general and for the implementation of evidence-based prevention programs with fidelity. Longitudinal cross-lagged panel models were used to study 74 Communities That Care (CTC) coalitions in Pennsylvania. These analyses provide evidence of a unidirectional influence of coalition functioning on the provision of implementation support. Coalition member knowledge of the CTC model best predicted the coalition's provision of support for evidence-based program implementation with fidelity. Implications for developing and testing innovative methods for delivering training and technical assistance to enhance coalition member knowledge are discussed.

  15. Pathways to policy: Lessons learned in multisectoral collaboration for physical activity and built environment policy development from the Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention (CLASP) initiative.

    PubMed

    Politis, Christopher E; Mowat, David L; Keen, Deb

    2017-06-16

    The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer funded 12 large-scale knowledge to action cancer and chronic disease prevention projects between 2009 and 2016 through the Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention (CLASP) initiative. Two projects, Healthy Canada by Design (HCBD) and Children's Mobility, Health and Happiness (CMHH), developed policies to address physical activity and the built environment through a multisectoral approach. A qualitative analysis involving a review of 183 knowledge products and 8 key informant interviews was conducted to understand what policy changes occurred, and the underlying critical success factors, through these projects. Both projects worked at the local level to change physical activity and built environment policy in 203 sites, including municipalities and schools. Both projects brought multisectoral expertise (e.g., public health, land use planning, transportation engineering, education, etc.) together to inform the development of local healthy public policy in the areas of land use, transportation and school travel planning. Through the qualitative analysis of the knowledge products and key informant interviews, 163 policies were attributed to HCBD and CMHH work. Fourteen "pathways to policy" were identified as critical success factors facilitating and accelerating the development and implementation of physical activity and built environment policy. Of the 14 pathways to policy, 8 had a focus on multisectoral collaboration. The lessons learned from the CLASP experience could support enhanced multisectoral collaborations to accelerate the development and implementation of physical activity and built environment policy in new jurisdictions across Canada and internationally.

  16. Emergency preparedness and community coalitions: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Emily; Yee, Tracy; Cross, Dori; Samuel, Divya

    2012-11-01

    Being prepared for a natural disaster, infectious disease outbreak or other emergency where many injured or ill people need medical care while maintaining ongoing operations is a significant challenge for local health systems. Emergency preparedness requires coordination of diverse entities at the local, regional and national levels. Given the diversity of stakeholders, fragmentation of local health care systems and limited resources, developing and sustaining broad community coalitions focused on emergency preparedness is difficult. While some stakeholders, such as hospitals and local emergency medical services, consistently work together, other important groups--for example, primary care clinicians and nursing homes--typically do not participate in emergency-preparedness coalitions, according to a new qualitative study of 10 U.S. communities by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Challenges to developing and sustaining community coalitions may reflect the structure of preparedness activities, which are typically administered by designated staff in hospitals or large medical practices. There are two general approaches policy makers could consider to broaden participation in emergency-preparedness coalitions: providing incentives for more stakeholders to join existing coalitions or building preparedness into activities providers already are pursuing. Moreover, rather than defining and measuring processes associated with collaboration--such as coalition membership or development of certain planning documents--policy makers might consider defining the outcomes expected of a successful collaboration in the event of a disaster, without regard to the specific form that collaboration takes.

  17. CUBOID-NAVICULAR TARSAL COALITION

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Marcelo Pires; Mendes, Alberto Abussamara Moreira; Olivi, Rogério; Amodio, Daniel Tassetto

    2015-01-01

    The authors present the case of a nine-year-old female patient who presented with pain in her right foot associated with physical activities. After this case was diagnosed as cuboid-navicular tarsal coalition, the patient was treated surgically with resection of the coalition, thereby resolving the symptoms. The literature was reviewed and the importance of adequate physical examination and imaging assessment for investigating foot pain in children and adolescents was discussed. PMID:27047815

  18. CUBOID-NAVICULAR TARSAL COALITION.

    PubMed

    Prado, Marcelo Pires; Mendes, Alberto Abussamara Moreira; Olivi, Rogério; Amodio, Daniel Tassetto

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the case of a nine-year-old female patient who presented with pain in her right foot associated with physical activities. After this case was diagnosed as cuboid-navicular tarsal coalition, the patient was treated surgically with resection of the coalition, thereby resolving the symptoms. The literature was reviewed and the importance of adequate physical examination and imaging assessment for investigating foot pain in children and adolescents was discussed.

  19. Knowledge Based Approach to OOTW Coalition Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    the OOTW planning. A multi - agent system consists of a number of agents that group themselves in various, temporary coalitions (each solving a specific...it in order to plan an optimal mission. 159 The developed approach has been tested on the CPlanT multi - agent system implementation. 2 CPlanT System...Architecture CPlanT is a multi - agent system for planning humanitarian relief operations where any agent can initiate the planning process. Classical

  20. Building community participatory research coalitions from the ground up: the Philadelphia area research community coalition.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jerry C; Hayden, U Tara; Thomas, Nicole; Groce-Martin, Jennine; Henry, Thomas; Guerra, Terry; Walker, Alia; West, William; Barnett, Marina; Kumanyika, Shiriki

    2009-01-01

    A coalition of formal, large organizations and informal, grassroots organizations, recruited through an open process, contrasts with the usual practice of developing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) coalition with a small number of well-developed organizations. This paper describes the process, developmental challenges, and accomplishments of the Philadelphia Area Research Community Coalition (PARCC). The University of Pennsylvania-Cheyney University of Pennsylvania EXPORT Center established the PARCC, an academic-community research partnership of twenty-two diverse organizations of variable size and with variable experience in health research. The EXPORT Center provided the infrastructure and staff support needed to engage in sustained, face-to-face community outreach and to nurture, coordinate, and facilitate the 2.5-year developmental process. The start-up process, governing principles, activities, challenges, and lessons learned are described. Since its inception, PARCC established core work groups, a governance structure, operating principles, research training activities, community health education projects, and several PARCC-affiliated research projects. Organizations across the spectrum of developmental capacity were major contributors to PARCC. The success of PARCC was based on committed and trusted leadership, preexisting relationships, trust among members from the community and academia, research training, extensive time commitment of members to the coalition's work, and rapid development of work group activities. Building a CBPR coalition from the ground up involving organizations of diverse size and at various stages of development presents unique challenges that can be overcome with committed leadership, clear governance principles, and appropriate infrastructure. Engagement in community-based research during the early stages, while still developing trust, structure, and governance procedures can be accomplished as long as training of

  1. Histopathological study of nonosseous tarsal coalition.

    PubMed

    Kumai, T; Takakura, Y; Akiyama, K; Higashiyama, I; Tamai, S

    1998-08-01

    Histopathological analysis was performed on 55 feet in 48 patients with nonosseous tarsal coalitions. Histological findings were similar to those observed at the tendinous attachment site of Osgood-Schlatter disease, accessory navicular, and bipartite patellae. No nerve elements were observed in the fibrocartilaginous tissue at the coalition. Nerve elements were present only in periosteum and articular capsule surrounding the coalition. Pain in the tarsal coalition is not mediated by nerve elements at the coalition site itself. It is assumed that the pain is caused by mechanical abnormality that results from incomplete coalition. Incomplete coalition produces microfractures and remodelings on the boundaries between bone and the coalition, which then lead to degenerative changes. This mechanical abnormality seems to induce pain via free nerve endings in the periosteum and in the articular capsule surrounding the coalition.

  2. Examining the Support of Modern Athletic Reform Proposals Developed by the Coalition on Intercollegiate Athletics in Response to Higher Education Athletic Reform: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Wade W.; Wickersham, Leah E.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the success for the diffusion of the Coalition on Intercollegiate Athletics (COIA) white paper Framing the Future: Reforming Intercollegiate Athletics. The Stages of Concern Questionnaire (SoCQ) and personal interviews were utilized to collect data and purposeful sampling was used to identify one NCAA Division…

  3. Advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop the technology of the silicon dendritic web ribbon growth process is examined. The effort is being concentrated on the area rate and quality requirements necessary to meet the JPL/DOE goals for terrestrial PV applications. Closed loop web growth system development and stress reduction for high area rate growth is considered.

  4. Research and comprehensive cancer control coalitions.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Cynthia; La Porta, Madeline; Todd, William; Palafox, Neal A; Wilson, Katherine M; Fairley, Temeika

    2010-12-01

    The goal of cancer control research is "to generate basic knowledge about how to monitor and change individual and collective behavior and to ensure that knowledge is translated into practice and policy rapidly, effectively, and efficiently" (Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences in Cancer control framework and synthese rationale, 2010). Research activities span the cancer control continuum from prevention to early detection and diagnosis through treatment and survivorship (Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences in Cancer control framework and synthese rationale, 2010). While significant advancements have been made in understanding, preventing and treating cancer in the past few decades, these benefits have yielded disproportionate results in cancer morbidity and mortality across various socioeconomic and racial/ethnic subgroups (Ozols et al in J Clin Oncol, 25(1):146-1622, 2007). It has been a high priority since the beginning of the Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) movement to utilize research in the development and implementation of cancer plans in the states, tribes and tribal organizations, territories and US Pacific Island Jurisdictions. Nevertheless, dissemination and implementation of research in coalition activities has been challenging for many programs. Lessons learned from programs and coalitions in the implementation and evaluation of CCC activities, as well as resources provided by national partners, can assist coalitions with the translation of research into practice.

  5. The coalition process at work: Building care coordination models to control chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Michael P; Butterfoss, Frances D; Doctor, Linda Jo; Gilmore, Lisa A; Krieger, James W; Meurer, John R; Vega, Ivonne

    2006-04-01

    Asthma is a highly prevalent and frequently misunderstood chronic disease with significant morbidity. Integrating client services at the patient-centered level and using coalitions to build coordinated, linked systems to affect care may improve outcomes. All seven Allies Against Asthma coalitions identified inefficient, inconsistent, and/or fragmented care as issues for their communities. In response, the coalitions employed a collaborative process to identify and address problems related to system fragmentation and to improve coordination of care. Each coalition developed a variety of interventions related to its specific needs and assets, stakeholders, stage of coalition formation, and the dynamic structure of its community. Despite common barriers in forming alliances with busy providers and their staff, organizing administrative structures among interinstitutional cultures, enhancing patient and/or family involvement, interacting with multiple insurers, and contending with health system inertia, the coalitions demonstrated the ability to produce coordinated improvements to existing systems of care.

  6. A Tailored Approach to Launch Community Coalitions Focused on Achieving Structural Changes: Lessons Learned From a HIV Prevention Mobilization Study.

    PubMed

    Chutuape, Kate S; Willard, Nancy; Walker, Bendu C; Boyer, Cherrie B; Ellen, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Public health HIV prevention efforts have begun to focus on addressing social and structural factors contributing to HIV risk, such as unstable housing, unemployment, and access to health care. With a limited body of evidence-based structural interventions for HIV, communities tasked with developing structural changes need a defined process to clarify their purpose and goals. This article describes the adaptations made to a coalition development model with the purpose of improving the start-up phase for a second group of coalitions. Modifications focused on preparing coalitions to more efficiently apply structural change concepts to their strategic planning activities, create more objectives that met study goals, and enhance coalition procedures such as building distributed coalition leadership to better support the mobilization process. We report on primary modifications to the process, findings for the coalitions, and recommendations for public health practitioners who are seeking to start a similar coalition.

  7. A Tailored Approach to Launch Community Coalitions Focused on Achieving Structural Changes: Lessons Learned from a HIV Prevention Mobilization Study

    PubMed Central

    Chutuape, Kate S.; Willard, Nancy; Walker, Bendu C.; Boyer, Cherrie B.; Ellen, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Public health HIV prevention efforts have begun to focus on addressing social and structural factors contributing to HIV risk, such as unstable housing, unemployment and access to healthcare. With a limited body of evidence-based structural interventions for HIV, communities tasked with developing structural changes need a defined process to clarify their purpose and goals. This paper describes the adaptations made to a coalition development model with the purpose of improving the start-up phase for a second group of coalitions. Modifications focused on preparing coalitions to more efficiently apply structural change concepts to their strategic planning activities, create more objectives that met study goals, and enhance coalition procedures, such as building distributed coalition leadership, to better support the mobilization process. We report on primary modifications to the process, findings for the coalitions and recommendations for public health practitioners that are seeking to start a similar coalition. PMID:26785397

  8. Building Bridges: The Journey of Alabama's Health Action Coalition.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, Carol J; Cheshire, Michelle H; Buckner, Ellen B; Dawson, Martha A; Berry, Shaina R; McDaniel, Gretchen S; Ladner, Kathleen A

    2017-08-04

    The Alabama Health Action Coalition is a state coalition whose purpose is to enable access to high-quality, safe, and patient-centered health care for all Alabamians by leading change in nursing and health care. The Alabama Health Action Coalition has four focus areas: advancing nursing education, improving nursing workforce data, promoting diversity among nursing and health care professionals, and fostering a culture of health. From 2012 to 2014, the Advancing Education Taskforce and Health Workforce Committee initiated processes to maximize resources, track changes in workforce data, and provide support for goal achievement. Outcomes included an increase in the number of nurses with a BSN and higher degrees from 35 percent to 50 percent, nearing national averages. Tracking of trends continues with 2016 data. This growth is particularly important in a state with a large, underserved population and high percentage of rural areas.

  9. Building Bridges: The Journey of Alabama's Health Action Coalition.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, Carol J; Cheshire, Michelle H; Buckner, Ellen B; Dawson, Martha A; Berry, Shaina R; McDaniel, Gretchen S; Ladner, Kathleen A

    The Alabama Health Action Coalition is a state coalition whose purpose is to enable access to high-quality, safe, and patient-centered health care for all Alabamians by leading change in nursing and health care. The Alabama Health Action Coalition has four focus areas: advancing nursing education, improving nursing workforce data, promoting diversity among nursing and health care professionals, and fostering a culture of health. From 2012 to 2014, the Advancing Education Taskforce and Health Workforce Committee initiated processes to maximize resources, track changes in workforce data, and provide support for goal achievement. Outcomes included an increase in the number of nurses with a BSN and higher degrees from 35 percent to 50 percent, nearing national averages. Tracking of trends continues with 2016 data. This growth is particularly important in a state with a large, underserved population and high percentage of rural areas.

  10. Guide to Building a Broad-Based Coalition: Supporting the Development and Sustainability of a System of Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As communities across California commit to developing systems of high school pathways that will engage students in school and prepare them to succeed in postsecondary opportunities and contribute to a vital regional economy, many are realizing the importance of providing "broad-based support" for this work. Students need a choice of…

  11. Assessment of U.S. Government and Coalition Efforts to Develop the Logistics Sustainment Capability of the Afghan National Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-09

    Cooperation, • Tactical Logistics Operations, and • Literacy . 1 A kandak is the Afghan equivalent to...logistic resupply convoy operation. Literacy Developing a sustainable ANA logistics capability requires soldiers with effective literacy skills...Arguably, literacy is some of the most important ANSF training conducted today. In the past year, literacy training provided by NTM-A/CSTC-A

  12. Smart Growth and Equitable Development

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page discusses how smart growth, environmental justice, and equitable development can improve communities and provide economic, environmental, health, and social benefits to underserved communities.

  13. Sustainability: Building Program and Coalition Support. A Prevention 101 Series Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glider, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Given the prevalence of alcohol and other drug abuse and violence on campuses and in communities, programs and coalitions developed to prevent or intervene in these problems are faced with a challenging and long-term task. While the development of coalitions or campus-based prevention programs is a healthy start, these efforts must be sustained…

  14. Growth and bone development.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas; Javaid, Kassim; Hanson, Mark; Dennison, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality through its association with age-related fractures. Although most effort in fracture prevention has been directed at retarding the rate of age-related bone loss, and reducing the frequency and severity of trauma among elderly people, evidence is growing that peak bone mass is an important contributor to bone strength during later life. The normal patterns of skeletal growth have been well characterized in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. It has been confirmed that boys have higher bone mineral content, but not volumetric bone density, than girls. Furthermore, there is a dissociation between the peak velocities for height gain and bone mineral accrual, in both genders. Puberty is the period during which volumetric density appears to increase in both axial and appendicular sites. Many factors influence the accumulation of bone mineral during childhood and adolescence, including heredity, gender, diet, physical activity, endocrine status, and sporadic risk factors such as cigarette smoking. In addition to these modifiable factors during childhood, evidence has also accrued that fracture risk might be programmed during intrauterine life. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a relationship between birthweight, weight in infancy, and adult bone mass. This appears to be mediated through modulation of the set-point for basal activity of pituitary-dependent endocrine systems such as the hypothalamicpituitary-adrenal and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axes. Maternal smoking, diet (particularly vitamin D deficiency), and physical activity also appear to modulate bone mineral acquisition during intrauterine life; furthermore, both low birth size and poor childhood growth are directly linked to the later risk of hip fracture. The optimization of maternal nutrition and intrauterine growth should also be included within preventive strategies against osteoporotic fracture, albeit for future

  15. Normal growth and development

    MedlinePlus

    ... nutrition can cause problems with a child's intellectual development. A child with a poor diet may be tired and ... 4 years Developmental milestones record - 5 years Preschooler development School-age children development Puberty and adolescence

  16. Healthy Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ken K

    2017-01-01

    Observational and experimental studies indicate a remarkably consistent association between rapid growth and weight gain during infancy and higher risks for obesity in later childhood and adult life. This association appears to be equally relevant to breastfed and formula milk-fed infants, and infants small for gestational age and with normal birth weight. The type of infant milk feeding, energy intake, and milk nutrient composition are important determinants of infant growth and weight gain. There is also accumulating evidence that genetic factors related to adult obesity susceptibility act in the central nervous system to regulate intrinsic levels of infant appetite and satiety, and they impact on infant dietary behaviors to influence growth and weight gain. These genetic factors indicate an early life trajectory to later obesity that starts with rapid infancy gains in weight, length, and fat and lean mass, before the subsequent emergence of high BMI and adiposity. Better understanding of the anthropometric, metabolic and behavioral correlates of this trajectory will help to enable early-life prediction and preventive strategies against obesity and related metabolic disorders. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Coalitions: partnerships to promote agricultural health and safety.

    PubMed

    Palermo, T; Ehlers, J

    2002-05-01

    Throughout the 1990s, a variety of partnerships and community-based organizations have been formed with the primary mission to promote agricultural safety and health. These groups are altruistic, creative, energetic, and provide critical perspectives for improving the safety and health of the agricultural workforce at the local, regional, and national levels. These coalitions have been created as a result of philanthropic support, public funding, grassroots interest, and personal experiences with agricultural injuries andfatalities. They are playing important roles in collaborating with researchers and in reaching the individual agricultural communities. They have been instrumental in conducting needs assessments and are critical to the development and implementation of successful surveillance programs and interventions. Outreach and dissemination of research findings and other safety and health information to target audiences are strengths of these diverse coalitions. This article will focus on primarily community-based coalitions, providing an overview of the development, foci, membership activities, and contributions or impact of these groups during the 1990s and the challenges in maintaining and sustaining the coalitions. This information should be useful to those seeking to understand the activities of existing coalitions and identify potential partnerships for future activities.

  18. National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship

    MedlinePlus

    ... said, “The ACA is the law of the land for the foreseeable future.” But this week lawmakers ... Care Act (ACA) is the “law of the land for the foreseeable future.” The National Coalition for ...

  19. Toddler Growth and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Raise Concerns about a Child’s Speech and Language Development: Do’s and Don’ts How to Share Books ... Old Language Delays in Toddlers: Information for Parents Language Development: 1 Year Olds Language Development: 2 Year Olds ...

  20. CINCH: an urban coalition for empowerment and action. Consortium for the Immunization of Norfolk's Children.

    PubMed

    Butterfoss, F D; Morrow, A L; Rosenthal, J; Dini, E; Crews, R C; Webster, J D; Louis, P

    1998-04-01

    CINCH (Consortium for the Immunization of Norfolk's Children) is an urban coalition that was developed in 1993 to improve childhood immunization rates in Norfolk, Virginia. CINCH involves diverse citizens and institutions in effective community-based assessment, planning, and action. A needs assessment from 1993 found that only 49% of Norfolk 2-year-olds were adequately immunized. Using this data, CINCH developed a plan focused on education and communication, support for at-risk families, increased access to immunizations, and improved immunization delivery. After federal funding ended in 1995, members voted to expand the scope of the coalition to address additional child health needs and to broaden the membership. CINCH is a model for a sustainable city-citizen learning environment that intervenes to "help families help themselves to better health." The coalition is presented as an organization that focuses on community empowerment and development. The stages of coalition development and implications for coalition implementation in other sites are discussed.

  1. Examining the role of a community coalition in facilitating policy and environmental changes to promote physical activity: the case of Get Fit Kaua'i.

    PubMed

    Choy, Lehua B; Maddock, Jay E; Brody, Beverley; Richards, Katherine L; Braun, Kathryn L

    2016-12-01

    Community coalitions help to generate policy and environmental changes that address community health problems. This qualitative study examined how one community coalition, Get Fit Kaua'i, catalyzed built environment (BE) policy and infrastructure changes in a rural county in Hawai'i. The purpose was to develop a theory that explained the process by which the community coalition facilitated BE changes to support physical activity. Using a grounded theory approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 25 stakeholders engaged in the coalition's BE activities. The model to emerge from the coalition interviews consisted of five phases: (1) coalition formation, (2) capacity building, (3) policy development, (4) policy passage, and (5) policy implementation. Community context influenced all of these phases. Although community context limits generalizability, other community coalitions pursuing BE changes can learn from the process of the coalition under study.

  2. Seven Principles of Success: A Primer for Business-Led Coalitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theis, Audrey; Creticos, Peter; McMahon, Amanda

    Intended to help business-led coalitions master the seven principles of success in education and workforce development, this primer begins with a discussion of the problems stemming from the structural transition underway in the U.S. economy, an overview of the 21st century workforce system, and the potential role of business-led coalitions in…

  3. [Economic Growth and Development].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausen, A. W.

    Recent efforts of the World Bank to improve global economic problems are described, issues which will influence the role of the World Bank in the decade to come are discussed, and the Bank's future role is examined. Recent World Bank efforts to help developing nations include a lending program, project investments, analytical and advisory work,…

  4. Marching toward reproductive justice: coalitional (re) framing of the March for Women's Lives.

    PubMed

    Luna, Zakiya T

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how coalition frames develop and what happens to that frame after the formal coalition ends. To that end, I analyze the frame shift around the 2004 March for Women's Lives (March). The March initially focused on established ideas of reproductive rights around which the four national mainstream co-sponsors previously organized. However, after a newer reproductive justice organization joined the coalition, material and organizing reflected a shift in framing to reproductive justice. How did this change happen? What are the impacts of this event for the women's movement? Through document analysis and interviews, I trace the negotiations that facilitated this framing shift. I argue that this new coalition frame translated into positive lasting changes in organizing for women's reproductive health even as the coalition dissolved and some of the tensions within the larger women's movement remain.

  5. On the nature of voters’ coalition preferences

    PubMed Central

    Plescia, Carolina; Aichholzer, Julian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An expanding literature indicates that in multiparty systems with coalition governments, citizens consider the post-electoral bargaining process among parties when casting their vote. Yet, we know surprisingly little about the nature of voters’ coalition preferences. This paper uses data from the Austrian National Election Study to examine the determinants as well as the independence of preferences for coalitions as political object. We find that coalition preferences are strongly informed by spatial considerations; but additional non-ideological factors, such as party and leader preferences, also play a fundamental role. We also find that coalitions enjoy a certain degree of independence from other objects of vote choice and they do not always represent a simple average score on the feeling thermometer of the constituent parties. There are, however, substantial differences among voters, with party identifiers and those with extreme ideology being less likely to consider coalitions as separate entities from their component parties. PMID:28824702

  6. [Public health in a new coalition agreement].

    PubMed

    Gunning-Schepers, L J

    1998-06-20

    In drawing up a new coalition agreement in the Netherlands, public health and health care will be important issues. The government now has the opportunity, by planning well, to correct the negative image of public health care (expensive and inefficient) and to cope with major problems, such as long waiting lists and unequal access to care. Requirement are agreement on a realistic percentage of volume growth, based on demographic trends, good agreement on conditions of employment efficient use of funds which citizens can understand, limiting drug prices and outlining a health care system for the future that is transparent and universally accessible, with collective responsibilities clearly delineated. Furthermore research on public health and health care should be stimulated.

  7. Nutrition, Development, and Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Alan

    1973-01-01

    Focuses on the problem of malnutrition in developing countries through a description of its interrelationships with human development, national economies, economic growth and income, agricultural advances, the crisis in infant feeding practices, new foods, and the population dilemma. Outlines possible future policy directions to significantly…

  8. Nutrition, Development, and Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Alan

    1973-01-01

    Focuses on the problem of malnutrition in developing countries through a description of its interrelationships with human development, national economies, economic growth and income, agricultural advances, the crisis in infant feeding practices, new foods, and the population dilemma. Outlines possible future policy directions to significantly…

  9. Hospital-Based Coalition to Improve Regional Surge Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Terndrup, Thomas E.; Leaming, James M.; Adams, R. Jerry; Adoff, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Surge capacity for optimization of access to hospital beds is a limiting factor in response to catastrophic events. Medical facilities, communication tools, manpower, and resource reserves exist to respond to these events. However, these factors may not be optimally functioning to generate an effective and efficient surge response. The objective was to improve the function of these factors. Methods Regional healthcare facilities and supporting local emergency response agencies developed a coalition (the Healthcare Facilities Partnership of South Central Pennsylvania; HCFP-SCPA) to increase regional surge capacity and emergency preparedness for healthcare facilities. The coalition focused on 6 objectives: (1) increase awareness of capabilities and assets, (2) develop and pilot test advanced planning and exercising of plans in the region, (3) augment written medical mutual aid agreements, (4) develop and strengthen partnership relationships, (5) ensure National Incident Management System compliance, and (6) develop and test a plan for effective utilization of volunteer healthcare professionals. Results In comparison to baseline measurements, the coalition improved existing areas covered under all 6 objectives documented during a 24-month evaluation period. Enhanced communications between the hospital coalition, and real-time exercises, were used to provide evidence of improved preparedness for putative mass casualty incidents. Conclusion The HCFP-SCPA successfully increased preparedness and surge capacity through a partnership of regional healthcare facilities and emergency response agencies. PMID:23316266

  10. Strengthening Ecological Mindfulness through Hybrid Learning in Vital Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sol, Jifke; Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution a key policy "tool" used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described while an example of its use in practice,…

  11. Building a Healthier Tomorrow: A Manual for Rural Coalition Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, Suzanne; Plaut, Thomas; Trevor, June; Futch, Judy

    This manual is a how-to-do-it guide to building coalitions of health and human service agencies, organizations, businesses, churches, and other community-based groups for collaborative research, planning, and action to improve resident health and quality of life. Most of the information provided was discovered and developed during the 4-year life…

  12. The paradoxes and promise of community coalitions.

    PubMed

    Chavis, D M

    2001-04-01

    Community coalitions, as they are currently applied, are unique organizations whose ability to promote community change is different from other types of community organizations. This article explores those differences and elaborates how community coalitions can use those differences to transform conflict into greater capacity, equity, and justice. Concerns are also raised in this article about how community coalitions can intentionally and unintentionally protect the status quo and contain the empowerment of grassroots leadership and those of marginalized groups. There is a need for more theory, research, and discourse on how community coalitions can transform conflict into social change and how they can increase the power of grassroots and other citizen-lead organizations.

  13. State Fall Prevention Coalitions as Systems Change Agents: An Emphasis on Policy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ellen C; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G; Altpeter, Mary; Beattie, Bonita Lynn; Scheirer, Mary Ann; Shubert, Tiffany E

    2016-03-01

    Falls among older adults are an escalating public health issue, which requires a multidisciplinary and multilevel approach to affect systems change to effectively address this problem. The National Council on Aging established the Falls Free® Initiative, enfolding and facilitating statewide Fall Prevention Coalitions. Fall Free® activities included developing the State Policy Toolkit for Advancing Falls Prevention to promote sustainable change by supporting the dissemination and adoption of evidence-based strategies. To (1) determine if the policies being implemented were recommended and supported by the Toolkit, (2) identify the perceived barriers and facilitators to implementing policies, and (3) identify Coalitions' current and future fall prevention policy activities. A 63-item online survey was distributed to State Coalition Leads. Descriptive statistics (frequencies and counts) were used to describe Coalition characteristics and activities. Coalitions had several similarities, and varied greatly in their number of member organizations and members as well as meeting frequencies. Key activities included building partnerships, disseminating programs, and pursuing at least one of the eight National Council on Aging-recommended policy goals. The most commonly reported facilitator was active support from the Coalition Leads, whereas the lack of funding was the most cited barrier. This study serves as the first national census of empirical evidence regarding Falls Coalitions' composition, goals, and activities. Results indicate that Coalitions are actively pursuing evidence-based policies but could benefit from additional technical assistance and resources. Findings support the value of Toolkit recommendations by documenting what is feasible and being implemented. Knowledge about facilitators and barriers will inform future efforts to foster sustainable systems change in states with active Coalitions and encourage Coalitions in other states. © 2015 Society for

  14. Growth and development symposium: Intestinal development and growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a critical organ system mediating nutrient uptake and use by the animal. Understanding factors that influence GI development, growth, and function is critical to improving management and therapeutic approaches to maximize health and production efficiency of livesto...

  15. Future Coalitions at Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF OPERATIONAL STUDIES LIEUTENANT COLONEL TORE A...THE VIEWS OF EITHER THE MARINE CORPS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED WARFIGHTING OR ANY OTHER UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AGENCY. REFERENCES TO THIS STUDY SHOULD...United States as well as on the general internal security situation in these countries. Such a development is not promising for future political

  16. Coalition Network Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    architecture will allow for new mechanisms for resource management and development has begun on Service Augmented Resource Managers ( SARM ). The goal is to...provide minimally intrusive resource management, using as few windows as possible. SARM will allow a focus on the tasks specific to each individual...operator using one-glance awareness of task availability using caution panel style indicators. SARM will enable remote execution for simple resource

  17. Making Coalitions Work: Creating a Viable Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killacky, Jim; Hulse-Killacky, Diana

    1997-01-01

    Describes community-based programming (CBP), a cooperative process that allows community and technical colleges to address critical issues through coalitions. Provides strategies for creating effective coalitions, focusing on information that new members should know, essential leadership qualities, group rules and activities, and ways to close…

  18. Campus and Community Coalitions. Issues in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on campus and community coalitions. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Campus and Community Coalitions: Implementing Environmental Prevention Strategies (John D. Clapp); (2) Campus Brief: University of Rhode Island; (3) International Town & Gown Association; (4) Q&A With…

  19. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-08-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  20. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects. PMID:26303622

  1. Assembly tolerance allocation using a coalitional game method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Cheng; Jin, Sun; Lai, Xinmin; Yu, Kuigang

    2011-07-01

    Assembly tolerance allocation in modern manufacturing industries is important because it directly affects product quality and manufacturing cost. Loose tolerances may cause quality deficiency while tight tolerances can increase the cost. It is significant to develop a reasonable tolerance allocation strategy for every assembly component combining the cost and quality demands. Traditionally, designers often adopt the single objective optimization with some kind of constraint or establish a comprehensive evaluation function combining several optimization objectives with different weights to solve the tolerance allocation problem. These approaches may not be desirable as it is difficult to adequately consider the interaction and conflict between the cost and quality demands. In this article, an assembly tolerance allocation method using coalitional game theory is proposed in an attempt to find a trade-off between the assembly cost and the assembly quality. First, the assembly tolerance allocation problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem and the concept of the Pareto-optimal solution is introduced. Then, how the assembly tolerance allocation model is transformed into a coalitional game model is discussed, and a key technique of transforming the tolerance design variables into the game strategies is presented. Further, the Shapley value method of coalitional game based on each player's contribution evaluation to the profit of the whole coalition is given. Finally, the feasibility of the procedure is demonstrated through an example of vehicle front structure assembly.

  2. Continued benefits of a technical assistance web site to local tobacco control coalitions during a state budget shortfall.

    PubMed

    Buller, David B; Young, Walter F; Bettinghaus, Erwin P; Borland, Ron; Walther, Joseph B; Helme, Donald; Andersen, Peter A; Cutter, Gary R; Maloy, Julie A

    2011-01-01

    A state budget shortfall defunded 10 local tobacco coalitions during a randomized trial but defunded coalitions continued to have access to 2 technical assistance Web sites. To test the ability of Web-based technology to provide technical assistance to local tobacco control coalitions. Randomized 2-group trial with local tobacco control coalitions as the unit of randomization. Local communities (ie, counties) within the State of Colorado. Leaders and members in 34 local tobacco control coalitions funded by the state health department in Colorado. Two technical assistance Web sites: A Basic Web site with text-based information and a multimedia Enhanced Web site containing learning modules, resources, and communication features. Use of the Web sites in minutes, pages, and session and evaluations of coalition functioning on coalition development, conflict resolution, leadership satisfaction, decision-making satisfaction, shared mission, personal involvement, and organization involvement in survey of leaders and members. Coalitions that were defunded but had access to the multimedia Enhanced Web site during the Fully Funded period and after defunding continued to use it (treatment group × funding status × period, F(3,714) = 3.18, P = .0234). Coalitions with access to the Basic Web site had low Web site use throughout and use by defunded coalitions was nearly zero when funding ceased. Members in defunded Basic Web site coalitions reported that their coalitions functioned worse than defunded Enhanced Web site coalitions (coalition development: group × status, F(1,360) = 4.81, P = .029; conflict resolution: group × status, F(1,306) = 5.69, P = .018; leadership satisfaction: group × status, F(1,342) = 5.69, P = .023). The Enhanced Web site may have had a protective effect on defunded coalitions. Defunded coalitions may have increased their capacity by using the Enhanced Web site when fully funded or by continuing to use the available online resources after defunding

  3. Building Local Infrastructure for Community Adoption of Science-Based Prevention: The Role of Coalition Functioning.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Valerie B; Hawkins, J David; Oesterle, Sabrina

    2015-11-01

    The widespread adoption of science-based prevention requires local infrastructures for prevention service delivery. Communities That Care (CTC) is a tested prevention service delivery system that enables a local coalition of community stakeholders to use a science-based approach to prevention and improve the behavioral health of young people. This paper uses data from the Community Youth Development Study (CYDS), a community-randomized trial of CTC, to examine the extent to which better internal team functioning of CTC coalitions increases the community-wide adoption of science-based prevention within 12 communities, relative to 12 matched comparison communities. Specifically, this paper examines the potential of both a direct relationship between coalition functioning and the community-wide adoption of science-based prevention and a direct relationship between functioning and the coalition capacities that ultimately enable the adoption of science-based prevention. Findings indicate no evidence of a direct relationship between four dimensions of coalition functioning and the community-wide adoption of a science-based approach to prevention, but suggest a relationship between coalition functioning and coalition capacities (building new member skills and establishing external linkages with existing community organizations) that enable science-based prevention.

  4. Building Local Infrastructure for Community Adoption of Science-Based Prevention: The Role of Coalition Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, J. David; Oesterle, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    The widespread adoption of science-based prevention requires local infrastructures for prevention service delivery. Communities That Care (CTC) is a tested prevention service delivery system that enables a local coalition of community stakeholders to use a science-based approach to prevention and improve the behavioral health of young people. This paper uses data from the Community Youth Development Study (CYDS), a community-randomized trial of CTC, to examine the extent to which better internal team functioning of CTC coalitions increases the community-wide adoption of science-based prevention within 12 communities, relative to 12 matched comparison communities. Specifically, this paper examines the potential of both a direct relationship between coalition functioning and the community-wide adoption of science-based prevention and a direct relationship between functioning and the coalition capacities that ultimately enable the adoption of science-based prevention. Findings indicate no evidence of a direct relationship between four dimensions of coalition functioning and the community-wide adoption of a science-based approach to prevention, but suggest a relationship between coalition functioning and coalition capacities (building new member skills and establishing external linkages with existing community organizations) that enable science-based prevention. PMID:26017632

  5. Implementing Education for All--Whose Agenda, Whose Change? The Case Study of the Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strutt, Courtney; Kepe, Thembela

    2010-01-01

    With the onset of the Education for All (EFA) agenda in 1990, the international development community has seen new forms of international cooperation forming around the pledge for EFA. This paper analyzes a case study of activities and challenges of a civil society coalition, the Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition (GNECC), in pursuing the…

  6. Creation of the Quebrada Arriba Community and Academic Partnership: An Effective Coalition for Addressing Health Disparities in Older Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Orellano-Colón, Elsa M; González-Laboy, Yolanda; De Jesús-Rosario, Amarelis

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a community-academic coalition partnership to conduct community-based participatory research (CBPR) to address health disparities in older adults with chronic conditions living in the Quebrada Arriba community. We used the 'Developing and Sustaining CPPR Partnerships: A Skill-Building Curriculum', to create the Quebrada Arriba Community-Academic Partnership (QACAP). We assessed the meetings effectiveness and the CBPR experiences of the coalition members in the community-academic partnership. The stepwise process resulted in: the development of The Coalition for the Health and Wellbeing of Older People of Quebrada Arriba; the partnership's mission and vision; the operating procedures; the formulation of the research question, and; the action plan for obtaining funding resources. The mean levels of satisfaction for each of the items of the Meeting Effectiveness Evaluation tool were 100%. The mean agreement rating scores on variables related to having a positive experience with the coalition, members' representativeness of community interest, respectful contacts between members, the coalition's vision and mission, the participation of the members in establishing the prioritized community problem, and sharing of resources between the members was 100%. The steps used to build the QACAP provided an effective structure to create the coalition and captured the results of coalition activities. Partners' time to build trust and developing a sufficient understanding of local issues, high interest of the community members, flexibility of the partners, capitalization on the partners' strengths, and the shared decision building process were key contributors of this coalition's success.

  7. Implementing Education for All--Whose Agenda, Whose Change? The Case Study of the Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strutt, Courtney; Kepe, Thembela

    2010-01-01

    With the onset of the Education for All (EFA) agenda in 1990, the international development community has seen new forms of international cooperation forming around the pledge for EFA. This paper analyzes a case study of activities and challenges of a civil society coalition, the Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition (GNECC), in pursuing the…

  8. A framework for cohesive healthcare coalition formation.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Yu-N; Chong, Yong Han; Neoh, Siew Lan

    2006-01-01

    The mobilisation of cohesive and effective groups of healthcare human resource is important in ensuring the success of healthcare organisations. However, forming the right team or coalition in healthcare organisations is not always straightforward due to various human factors. Traditional coalition formation approaches have been perceived as 'materialistic' or focusing too much on competency or pay-off. Therefore, to put prominence on the human aspects of working together, we present a cohesiveness-focused healthcare coalition formation methodology and framework that explores the possibilities of social networks, i.e. the relationship between various healthcare human resources, and adaptive resonance theory.

  9. Developmental Stages and Work Capacities of Community Coalitions: How Extension Educators Address and Evaluate Changing Coalition Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Allison; Riffe, Jane; Peck, Terrill; Kaczor, Cheryl; Nix, Kelly; Faulkner-Van Deysen, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Extension educators provide resources to community coalitions. The study reported here adds to what is known about community coalitions and applies an assessment framework to a state-level coalition-based Extension program on healthy relationships and marriages. The study combines the Internal Coalition Outcome Hierarchy (ICOH) framework with four…

  10. Gregg O. Lehman on healthcare business coalitions, purchasing, and health policy. Interview by Joann Genovich-Richards.

    PubMed

    Lehman, G O

    2000-01-01

    As President and CEO of the National Business Coalition on Health (NBCH), Gregg Lehman leads a movement of 90 business coalitions nationwide seeking cost-effective, better quality healthcare for employees and their families. Member coalitions represent more than 8,000 employers with more than 32 million employees and dependents. Dr. Lehman has 25 years of leadership experience in higher education, private business, and a national association. In his current position, Dr. Lehman is actively working with coalitions to promote their role in relation to value-based healthcare purchasing and health policy issues. In addition, he is actively developing NBCH into an enterprise that assists local coalitions in developing national contracts and strategic partnerships for healthcare products and services. Dr. Lehman earned a PhD in higher education administration, with a minor in finance and economics, from Purdue University.

  11. Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator Awards 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-06-01

    This fact sheet recognizes the 2003 Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator awards winners and their outstanding efforts to promote alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The recipients will receive their awards at the Clean Cities Conference in Palm Springs, CA.

  12. The excluded player in coalition formation.

    PubMed

    van Beest, Ilja; Wilke, Henk; van Dijk, Eric

    2003-02-01

    Coalition research generally assumes that people strive to maximize their share of the coalition payoff and that they exclude others from joining a coalition if these others are not needed to obtain the coalition payoff. In two experiments, the authors show that this view is too narrow and that willingness to include such others is dependent on the extent to which people feel that exclusion affects the payoff of the excluded player. This finding was moderated by social value orientations. Proselfs were not affected by the consequences for the excluded players. Prosocials were less willing to exclude others the more harmful were the consequences of exclusion. Results are related to research on social exclusion, the do-no-harm principle, and social value orientations.

  13. [Early childhood growth and development].

    PubMed

    Arce, Melitón

    2015-01-01

    This article describes and discusses issues related to the process of childhood growth and development, with emphasis on the early years, a period in which this process reaches critical speed on major structures and functions of the human economy. We reaffirm that this can contribute to the social availability of a generation of increasingly better adults, which in turn will be able to contribute to building a better world and within it a society that enjoys greater prosperity. In the first chapter, we discuss the general considerations on the favorable evolution of human society based on quality of future adults, meaning the accomplishments that today’s children will gain. A second chapter mentions the basics of growth and development in the different fields and the various phenomena that occur in it. In the third we refer to lost opportunities and negative factors that can affect delaying the process and thereby result in not obtaining the expected accomplishments. In the fourth, conclusions and recommendations are presented confirming the initial conception that good early child care serves to build a better society and some recommendations are formulated to make it a good practice.

  14. Growth charts of human development.

    PubMed

    van Buuren, Stef

    2014-08-01

    This article reviews and compares two types of growth charts for tracking human development over age. Both charts assume the existence of a continuous latent variable, but relate to the observed data in different ways. The D-score diagram summarizes developmental indicators into a single aggregate score measuring global development. The relations between the indicators should be consistent with the Rasch model. If true, the D-score is a measure with interval scale properties, and allows for the calculation of meaningful differences both within and across age. The stage line diagram describes the natural development of ordinal indicators. The method models the transition probabilities between successive stages of the indicator as smoothly varying functions of age. The location of each stage is quantified by the mid-P-value. Both types of diagrams assist in identifying early and delayed development, as well as finding differences in tempo. The relevant techniques are illustrated to track global development during infancy and early childhood (0-2 years) and Tanner pubertal stages (8-21 years). New reference values for both applications are provided. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Distal metatarsal coalition: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Vun, Shen Hwa; Drampalos, Efstathios; Shareef, Sajan; Sinha, Satyajit; Bramley, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Metatarsal coalition is an extremely rare condition. We report the second documented case of 4th and 5th distal metatarsal coalition in the literature. Presentation of case An eight-year-old girl was referred to an orthopaedic clinic with a four-month history of forefoot pain and swelling on the plantar aspect of the right little toe. Radiograph and clinical examination confirmed distal metatarsal coalition between the 4th and 5th metatarsals. Following a period of conservative treatment, excision was eventually performed due to worsening symptoms. Patient re-attended two years later with a recurrence of the coalition confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scan. The case was discussed at a tertiary paediatric orthopaedic insititution. Decision was made to manage patient conservatively with insole and physiotherapy until skeletal maturity. A year later, patient’s symptoms did not worsen, and her foot displayed no evidence of change in the arch and shape. Discussion The timing of ossification of coalition varies from one anatomical site to another. Surgery when performed before ossification is complete runs the risk of recurrence. Conclusion Our case report illustrates the importance of restoring normal weight bearing dynamics and pain relief when managing metatarsal coalition, or synostosis in skeletally immature patients. We recommend persevering with conservative treatment, with operative treatment reserved only as a later option, and ideally, until skeletal maturity is achieved. PMID:25670408

  16. Intercell scheduling: A negotiation approach using multi-agent coalitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yunna; Li, Dongni; Zheng, Dan; Jia, Yunde

    2016-10-01

    Intercell scheduling problems arise as a result of intercell transfers in cellular manufacturing systems. Flexible intercell routes are considered in this article, and a coalition-based scheduling (CBS) approach using distributed multi-agent negotiation is developed. Taking advantage of the extended vision of the coalition agents, the global optimization is improved and the communication cost is reduced. The objective of the addressed problem is to minimize mean tardiness. Computational results show that, compared with the widely used combinatorial rules, CBS provides better performance not only in minimizing the objective, i.e. mean tardiness, but also in minimizing auxiliary measures such as maximum completion time, mean flow time and the ratio of tardy parts. Moreover, CBS is better than the existing intercell scheduling approach for the same problem with respect to the solution quality and computational costs.

  17. Growth velocity in constitutional delay of growth and development.

    PubMed

    Butenandt, Otfrid; Kunze, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Growth velocity was determined in 121 boys and 58 girls with constitutional delay of growth and development (CDGD) of familial origin. No data were included from patients suffering from growth hormone insufficiency (i.e. neurosecretory dysfunction for growth hormone) or any disease. From 479 values obtained in boys and 230 values obtained in girls the 25th, 50th and 75th percentiles were calculated. The mean growth velocity in children and adolescents with CDGD before the beginning of puberty was lower than the mean growth velocity of other European (British, German or Swiss) standards. Specific data of growth velocity should be used in patients with CDGD since population-based data may underestimate the normal growth velocity of these patients.

  18. The development of growth references and growth charts

    PubMed Central

    Cole, T J

    2014-01-01

    Context De Montbeillard produced the first growth chart in the late 18th century. Since then, growth assessment has developed to become an essential component of child health practice. Objective To provide a brief history of i) anthropometry, i.e. growth measurements; ii) growth references, the statistical summary of anthropometry, and iii) growth charts, the visual representation of growth references for clinical use. Methods The major contributors in the three categories over the past 200 years were identified, and their historical contributions put in context with more recent developments. Results Anthropometry was originally collected for administrative or public health purposes, its medical role emerging at the end of the 19th century. Growth reference data were collected in earnest from the 19th century, during which time the familiar summary statistics – mean, SD, centiles – were developed. More advanced statistical methods emerged much later. Growth charts first appeared in the late 19th century, and Tanner and Whitehouse later popularised the concepts of velocity and conditional references for growth in puberty. The recent WHO growth standard has been adopted by many countries including the UK, where the UK-WHO charts have pioneered many design features to improve usability and accuracy. Conclusion Growth charts have come a long way in 200 years, and they represent an impressive synthesis of anthropometry, statistical summary and chart design. PMID:22780429

  19. Strengthening ecological mindfulness through hybrid learning in vital coalitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sol, Jifke; Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2015-03-01

    In this contribution a key policy `tool' used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described while an example of its use in practice, is analysed using a form of reflexive monitoring and evaluation. The example focuses on a multi-stakeholder learning process around the transformation of a somewhat sterile pre-school playground into an intergenerational green place suitable for play, discovery and engagement. Our analysis of the policy-framework and the case leads us to pointing out the importance of critical interventions at so-called tipping points within the transformation process and a discussion of the potential of hybrid learning in vital coalitions in strengthening ecological mindfulness. This paper does not focus on establishing an evidence base for the causality between this type of learning and a change in behavior or mindfulness among participants as a result contributing to a vital coalition but rather focusses on the conditions, processes and interventions that allow for such learning to take place in the first place.

  20. Micronutrients in fetal growth and development.

    PubMed

    McArdle, H J; Ashworth, C J

    1999-01-01

    The roles that the different vitamins and minerals play in fetal growth and development are reviewed, primarily with respect to growth and differentiation in humans; but, as appropriate, data provided from animal and cellular studies are also considered.

  1. A model for evaluating the activities of a coalition-based policy action group: the case of Hermosa Vida.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Lisa Jane; Wertheim, Peter; Bohan, Kyle; Quezada, Julio Cesar; Henley, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Scholars and clinicians are increasingly recognizing the complexity of social contexts of health and the need for multifunctioning approaches to health care problems including community- and policy-level strategies. Barriers to change in health care policy can sometimes be attributed to the actions of advocacy coalitions who operate from a limited view of "policy change." Advocates have a tendency to pressure stakeholders to mandate laws as a final resolution of a movement, often leading to failure or, worse, stigmatizing of issues. A more inclusive focus on health policy change as an ongoing process increases the efficacy of advocacy and outcomes measurement. This article presents a tool for policy action that coalition members developed through the implementation of a 3-year grant to improve the safety net for preventing childhood obesity. Scholars and policy makers developed the Policy Coalition Evaluation Tool with the intent to create a model to guide and measure efforts and outcomes of a local community-based policy coalition. The authors suggest using community-based participatory research approaches for developing a coalition-specific Policy Coalition Evaluation Tool to increase the effectiveness of advocacy groups and the documentation of coalition activities over time.

  2. Differential Challenges in Coalition Building among HIV Prevention Coalitions Targeting Specific Youth Populations

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Schrader, Grisel M.; Harper, Gary W.; Purnell, Marjorie; Monarrez, Veronica; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Coalitions provide the potential for merging the power, influence, and resources of fragmented individuals and institutions into one collective group that can more effectively focus its efforts on a specific community health issue. Connect to Protect® coalitions devote resources to address the HIV epidemic at a structural level. This research examines differential challenges in coalition processes that may facilitate/hinder coalition building to achieve HIV prevention through structural change. Qualitative interviews conducted with community partners participating across 10 coalitions were analyzed to compare responses of those individuals working on HIV prevention coalitions targeting adolescent and young adult gay and bisexual men versus those targeting adolescent and young adult heterosexual women. Community partner responses revealed differences across several key areas including: a) acceptability and goals in discussing sexual issues with adolescents, b) goals of sexual health promotion activities, and c) competition among collaborating agencies. Themes highlighted in this research can complement existing community intervention literature by helping community mobilizers, interventionists, and researchers understand how cultural norms affect youth-specific coalition work. PMID:24188354

  3. Differential challenges in coalition building among HIV prevention coalitions targeting specific youth populations.

    PubMed

    Robles-Schrader, Grisel M; Harper, Gary W; Purnell, Marjorie; Monarrez, Veronica; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    Coalitions provide the potential for merging the power, influence, and resources of fragmented individuals and institutions into one collective group that can more effectively focus its efforts on a specific community health issue. Connect to Protect® coalitions devote resources to address the HIV epidemic at a structural level. This study examines differential challenges in coalition processes that may hinder coalition building to achieve HIV prevention through structural change. Qualitative interviews conducted with community partners participating across 10 coalitions were analyzed to compare responses of those individuals working on HIV prevention coalitions targeting adolescent and young adult gay and bisexual men versus those targeting adolescent and young adult heterosexual women. Community partner responses revealed differences across several key areas including: (a) acceptability and goals in discussing sexual issues with adolescents, (b) goals of sexual health promotion activities, and (c) competition among collaborating agencies. Themes highlighted in this study can complement existing community intervention literature by helping community mobilizers, interventionists, and researchers understand how cultural norms affect youth-specific coalition work.

  4. Advancing coalition theory: the effect of coalition factors on community capacity mediated by member engagement.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Michelle C; Swan, Deanne W

    2012-08-01

    Community coalitions have the potential to enhance a community's capacity to engage in effective problem solving for a range of community concerns. Although numerous studies have documented correlations between member engagement and coalition processes and structural characteristics, fewer have examined associations between coalition factors and community capacity outcomes. The current study uses data from an evaluation of the California Healthy Cities and Communities program to examine pathways between coalition factors (i.e. membership, processes), member engagement (i.e. participation, satisfaction) and community capacity as hypothesized by the Community Coalition Action Theory (CCAT). Surveys were completed by 231 members of 19 healthy cities and communities coalitions. Multilevel mediation analyses were used to examine possible mediating effects of member engagement on three community capacity indicators: new skills, sense of community and social capital. Results generally supported CCAT. Member engagement mediated the effects of leadership and staffing on community capacity outcomes. Results also showed that member engagement mediated several relationships between process variables (i.e. task focus, cohesion) and community capacity, but several unmediated direct effects were also observed. This suggests that although member engagement does explain some relationships, it alone is not sufficient to explain how coalition processes influence indicators of community capacity.

  5. Advancing coalition theory: the effect of coalition factors on community capacity mediated by member engagement

    PubMed Central

    Kegler, Michelle C.; Swan, Deanne W.

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions have the potential to enhance a community’s capacity to engage in effective problem solving for a range of community concerns. Although numerous studies have documented correlations between member engagement and coalition processes and structural characteristics, fewer have examined associations between coalition factors and community capacity outcomes. The current study uses data from an evaluation of the California Healthy Cities and Communities program to examine pathways between coalition factors (i.e. membership, processes), member engagement (i.e. participation, satisfaction) and community capacity as hypothesized by the Community Coalition Action Theory (CCAT). Surveys were completed by 231 members of 19 healthy cities and communities coalitions. Multilevel mediation analyses were used to examine possible mediating effects of member engagement on three community capacity indicators: new skills, sense of community and social capital. Results generally supported CCAT. Member engagement mediated the effects of leadership and staffing on community capacity outcomes. Results also showed that member engagement mediated several relationships between process variables (i.e. task focus, cohesion) and community capacity, but several unmediated direct effects were also observed. This suggests that although member engagement does explain some relationships, it alone is not sufficient to explain how coalition processes influence indicators of community capacity. PMID:21911845

  6. Impact of coalition interoperability on PKI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, Edward J.

    2003-07-01

    This paper examines methods for providing PKI interoperability among units of a coalition of armed forces drawn from different nations. The area in question is tactical identity management, for the purposes of confidentiality, integrity and non-repudiation in such a dynamic coalition. The interoperating applications under consideration range from email and other forms of store-and-forward messaging to TLS and IPSEC-protected real-time communications. Six interoperability architectures are examined with advantages and disadvantages of each described in the paper.

  7. Codes That Support Smart Growth Development

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Provides examples of local zoning codes that support smart growth development, categorized by: unified development code, form-based code, transit-oriented development, design guidelines, street design standards, and zoning overlay.

  8. Community Coalitions To Restructure Schools. ERIC Digest, Number 88.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson-del Mar, David

    Coalition building and school restructuring unfortunately do not always occur together. But the two forces can complement each other and combine their resources and strengths. Coalitions are organizations or groups of individuals who share a commitment to a particular issue. Although coalitions involved in school restructuring may in the long run…

  9. Pressures on TV Programs: Coalition for Better Television's Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, John M., Jr.

    In 1981, the conservative Coalition for Better Television (CBTV) threatened an economic boycott against advertisers who marketed their wares on programs that the coalition felt had excessive sex and violence. Because television networks are dependent on advertising, the coalition believed economic pressure on advertisers would force a…

  10. Statewide Coalitions and State Systems. Issues in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This "Issues in Prevention" focuses on statewide coalitions and state systems. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Statewide Coalitions for Prevention; (2) Louisiana Higher Education Coalition; (3) Statewide Initiative Grantees; (4) The Ohio College Initiative; and (5) Higher Education Center Resources.

  11. Rethinking the Factors of Success: Social Support and Community Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haithcox-Dennis, Melissa; DeWeese, Amanda; Goodman, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coalitions are often the strategy of choice when needs are great, resources are few, and individual efforts have proven unsuccessful in addressing serious health issues. Despite the widespread use of coalitions and extensive research, no definitive list of factors predicting coalition success has been identified. One factor, social…

  12. Coalition Cooperation Defines Roadmap for E85 and Biodiesel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-06-01

    This Clean Cities success story relates how Colorado's Colorado Biofuels Coalition was formed and provides guidance on forming other such coalitions. This Colorado's coalition sucessfully increase the number of fueling stations providing biofuels and has goals to the number even more. Plans also include assisting with financing infrastructure, making alternative fuels available to more fleets, and educating about E85 and biodiesel use.

  13. Pressures on TV Programs: Coalition for Better Television's Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, John M., Jr.

    In 1981, the conservative Coalition for Better Television (CBTV) threatened an economic boycott against advertisers who marketed their wares on programs that the coalition felt had excessive sex and violence. Because television networks are dependent on advertising, the coalition believed economic pressure on advertisers would force a…

  14. Advocacy coalitions involved in California's menu labeling policy debate: Exploring coalition structure, policy beliefs, resources, and strategies.

    PubMed

    Payán, Denise D; Lewis, LaVonna B; Cousineau, Michael R; Nichol, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    Advocacy coalitions often play an important role in the state health policymaking process, yet little is known about their structure, composition, and behavior. In 2008, California became the first state to enact a menu labeling law. Using the advocacy coalition framework, we examine different facets of the coalitions involved in California's menu labeling policy debate. We use a qualitative research approach to identify coalition members and explore their expressed beliefs and policy arguments, resources, and strategies by analyzing legislative documents (n = 87) and newspaper articles (n = 78) produced between 1999 and 2009. Between 2003 and 2008, six menu labeling bills were introduced in the state's legislature. We found the issue received increasing media attention during this period. We identified two advocacy coalitions involved in the debate-a public health (PH) coalition and an industry coalition. State organizations acted as coalition leaders and participated for a longer duration than elected officials. The structure and composition of each coalition varied. PH coalition leadership and membership notably increased compared to the industry coalition. The PH coalition, led by nonprofit PH and health organizations, promoted a clear and consistent message around informed decision making. The industry coalition, led by a state restaurant association, responded with cost and implementation arguments. Each coalition used various resources and strategies to advance desired outcomes. PH coalition leaders were particularly effective at using resources and employing advocacy strategies, which included engaging state legislators as coalition members, using public opinion polls and information, and leveraging media resources to garner support. Policy precedence and a local policy push emerged as important policymaking strategies. Areas for future research on the state health policymaking process are discussed.

  15. An empirical case study of the effects of training and technical assistance on community coalition functioning and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Keene Woods, Nikki; Watson-Thompson, Jomella; Schober, Daniel J; Markt, Becky; Fawcett, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    The case study analyzes the effects of training and technical assistance on the amount of community changes facilitated by members of a community coalition to prevent adolescent substance use. The study examines the sustainability of these changes in the community over time. The coalition implemented a Community Change Intervention that focused on building coalition capacity to support implementation of community changes-program, policy, and practice changes. Over the 2-year intervention period, there were 36 community changes facilitated by the coalition to reduce risk for adolescent substance use. Results showed that the coalition facilitated an average of at least 3 times as many community changes (i.e., program, policy and practice changes) per month following the intervention. Action planning was found to have accelerated the rate of community changes implemented by the coalition. After the intervention there was increased implementation of three key prioritized coalition processes: Documenting Progress/Using Feedback, Making Outcomes Matter, and Sustaining the Work. A 1-year probe following the study showed that the majority of the community changes were sustained. Factors associated with the sustainability of changes included the continued development of collaborative partnerships and securing multiyear funding. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  16. A Summary of Orientation Meetings and Planning Exercises Conducted Within the OCE Coalition, Appendix J. Vol. II, A Plan for Managing the Development, Implementation and Operation of a Model Elementary Teacher Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Coll. of Education, Monmouth.

    This report summarizes the orientation meetings and the planning review sessions held with members of all the Oregon College of Education coalition constituencies. Three separate orientation meetings were held, one with staff and administrators from the public schools, one with staff and administrators from the college as a whole, and one with…

  17. Faculty Growth through Community Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohfeld, Rae

    1984-01-01

    Enumerates ways institutions can benefit from faculty involvement in community development. Sees community involvement as one way to meet faculty members' need for job enrichment. Identifies possible community development activities, requisite skills, and ways instructors can develop these skills. (DMM)

  18. The Coalition's Higher Education Reforms in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The Coalition Government of Conservatives and Liberal Democrats in office from 2010 until 2015 sharply increased the maximum tuition fees for UK and EU undergraduates at English universities to £9,000. Although this is often portrayed as a radical change, it is argued that the reform was an evolution rather than a revolution. Common pessimistic…

  19. Implication of FORCEnet on Coalition Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Washington, DC 20350-2000 Implication of FORCEnet on Coalition Forces by Eric Romero Joel Timm Jeffrey Gorsch Clara Barron Arkapol...Nantasenamat Vincent Jung Mario Sanchez Michael Nguyen Michelle Nguyen David Tan Tewodros Metaferia September 2006 THIS PAGE...Clara Barron _____________________ ______________________ ______________________ Mario Sanchez Jeffrey Gorsch Vincent Jung

  20. [C-sign and talocalcaneal coalition].

    PubMed

    Tomčovčík, L

    2011-01-01

    Talocalcaneal coalition is an abnormal bridge between talus and calcaneus, causing pain and restriction of subtalar movement; its incidence is less than 1 %. The signs and symptoms usually become manifest in the second decade of life with ossification of the lesion. They involve flat foot, peroneal muscle spasm, tarsal tunnel syndrome, or valgus tilt of the heel. The sings need not be noticeable and may appear only as tiredness and vague pain in the hind foot after exercise or an easily twisted ankle. The authors describe the case of talocalcaneal coalition in a 20-year-old man, incidentally diagnosed at ankle fracture. The presence of C-sign led to CT examination and the exact diagnosis. Radiological demonstration of this abnormality may be difficult because plain X-ray images in both projections may show normal findings. Literature data report, in addition to C-sign, further secondary signs of talocalcaneal coalition present on lateral radiographs of the ankle joint. Although these signs do not directly point to talocalcaneal coalition, they reveal abnormal anatomy or movement of the joint and may initiate more thorough examination by CT or MRI and the establishment of an exact diagnosis. Therefore, to know the secondary signs and pay attention to them is very useful.

  1. Improving Military Integration in Coalitions in Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Congo MNF -I Multi-National Forces – Iraq MNLA National Movement for the Liberations of Azawad MTWG Military Technical Working Group MUJWA Movement...Coalition in Operation Desert Storm, the Multi-National Force–Iraq ( MNF -I), the International Security Assistance Forces (ISAF) in Afghanistan, or

  2. Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Basin Coalition

    Treesearch

    Sarah Kotchian

    1999-01-01

    In June 1994, one hundred people gathered for the first Uniting the Basin Conference in El Paso to discuss the state of their basin and to explore ways to improve its sustainability for future generations. One of the recommendations of that conference was the formation of an international non-governmental coalition of groups throughout the Basin to share information...

  3. Beth Reis and the Safe Schools Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaught, Sabina E.

    2007-01-01

    This article chronicles the formation and organization of the Safe Schools Coalition (SCC) through the experiences of Beth Reis, co-founder and co-Chair. The article suggests ways in which the SCC can serve as a model for both collective and individual work in promoting safe schools.

  4. The Coalition's Higher Education Reforms in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The Coalition Government of Conservatives and Liberal Democrats in office from 2010 until 2015 sharply increased the maximum tuition fees for UK and EU undergraduates at English universities to £9,000. Although this is often portrayed as a radical change, it is argued that the reform was an evolution rather than a revolution. Common pessimistic…

  5. Tamarisk coalition - native riparian plant materials program

    Treesearch

    Stacy Kolegas

    2012-01-01

    The Tamarisk Coalition (TC), a nonprofit organization dedicated to riparian restoration in the western United States, has created a Native Plant Materials Program to address the identified need for native riparian plant species for use in revegetation efforts on the Colorado Plateau. The specific components of the Native Plant Materials Program include: 1) provide seed...

  6. Growth and nutrition effects on gilt development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The growth and development of gilts are a component of their lifetime potential for productivity. Growth and development affects not only their ability to reach puberty, they also likely affect their reproductive performance through later parities and their physical soundness as they age. Because of...

  7. Population Growth and Economic and Social Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausen, A. W.

    Because evidence is clear that in many developing countries development will be postponed indefinitely unless slower population growth can be achieved soon, the international community must work together in a renewed effort to slow population growth. Assistance can be accomplished in three ways: (1) encouraging dialog aimed at forging…

  8. Population and growth causality in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kapuria-foreman, V

    1995-07-01

    This study empirically tests the null hypotheses of no causality between population growth and economic growth and of no causality between economic growth and population growth in 15 developing countries. The model follows the Cheng Hsiao form with lag lengths to minimize Akaike's Final Prediction Error (FPE). Equations are run separately for each country. Lag lengths and Granger causality test were chosen according to three steps. 1) Each of the variables was regressed on its own lagged values with a maximum lag of five years. A lag length was chosen that minimized FPE, which was calculated for each regression. 2) Bivariate regressions were run with a fixed lag length for population growth and mixed lag lengths for the other variable, until the lag length which minimized FPE was determined. 3) The last step involved checking the lag length of population growth by keeping the lag fixed for economic growth. The economic growth measure was gross domestic product per capita. Findings indicate that in seven countries the null hypothesis of no causality between population growth and economic growth, either positive or negative, cannot be rejected (Ghana, Sri Lanka, Bolivia, Philippines, Syria, Thailand, and Argentina). In Nepal, India, China, Guatemala, Peru, Turkey, Chile, and Mexico lagged values of population growth improve predictions of economic growth. Higher economic growth has no significant effect on population growth rates in Nepal, Bolivia, Philippines, Guatemala, Peru, Thailand, Argentina, and Mexico. Interaction between economic growth and population growth was found in India, China, Turkey, and Chile. The direction of causation tests indicate that population growth has a significant positive impact on income growth in China, Guatemala, Turkey, Chile, and Mexico. India shows a negative impact of population growth on income. A significant negative impact of economic growth on population growth is evident only in Sri Lanka. There is weak evidence of a

  9. Interest representation in soviet policymaking: A case study of a West Siberian energy coalition

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.

    1986-01-01

    Dr. Chung examines a little-known facet of Soviet decision making - pressure group politics and policy formation. He focuses on the ''pro-Siberian'' forces involved with the development of energy resources in West Siberia, an area rich in oil and natural gas. Because West Siberia is a remote and relatively unexplored region, controversy arose over the location of the highest-yielding fields and the allocation of funds and materials. Dr. Chung shows that the decision to accelerate the development of the West Siberian energy complex was influenced strongly by a ''policy coalition'' composed primarily of local officials, enterprise managers, professionals, and academics. Demonstrating that this coalition is a stable and highly active pressure group, he illustrates how it gradually established ascendancy and eventually outflanked opposing elements in the government and planning agencies. He identifies key elements of the coalition's strategy, tracing the steps by which it swung the leadership over to its views on resource allocation.

  10. The Alabama Coalition for a Healthier Black belt: a proof of concept project.

    PubMed

    Savage, Robert M; Dillon, Jacqueline M; Hammel, Jacinda C; Lewis, Tonia C; Johnson, Natasha C; Barlow, Lafon M; Brooms, Molly M; Moore, Patricia M; Parker, Henry E; Rodney, Kanini Z

    2013-02-01

    The Alabama Coalition for a Healthier Black was a demonstration of concept project. This paper is a descriptive and qualitative overview of this 2.5 year project. Limited key project results are reported here. Located in the rural Black Belt region of Alabama this coalition had several key aims: to develop a collaboration between primary care and mental health care through co-location of services; use of video-conferencing capability to provide mental health services more efficiently; enhanced training in rural healthcare; and development of stigma reduction campaigns along with other coalition partner specific initiatives. Co-location and telepsychiatry implementation produced the major challenges and resulting adaptations to original aims. Despite many challenges these new service patterns were put into place and appear to be sustainable.

  11. Enhancing the capacity of substance abuse prevention coalitions through training and technical assistance.

    PubMed

    Watson-Thompson, Jomella; Woods, Nikki Keene; Schober, Daniel J; Schultz, Jerry A

    2013-01-01

    Community capacity may be enhanced through intermediary supports that provide training and technical assistance (TA). This study used a randomized pre/posttest design to assess the impact of training and TA on coalition capacity. Seven community coalitions from the Midwest participated in the 2-year study, which included 36 hours of training, followed by monthly TA calls to support action planning implementation for prioritized processes. Collaborative processes most commonly identified as high-need areas for TA were Developing Organizational Structure, Documenting Progress, Making Outcomes Matter, and Sustaining the Work. Based on a coalition survey, the average change for processes prioritized through TA across all seven coalitions was .27 (SD = .29), while the average change for non-prioritized processes was .09 (SD = .20) (t(6) = 4.86, p = .003, d = 1.84). The findings from this study suggest that TA can increase coalition capacity for implementing collaborative processes using a participatory approach.

  12. Coalition formation in animals and the nature of winner and loser effects.

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, R A; Dugatkin, L A

    2000-01-01

    Coalition formation has been documented in a diverse array of taxa, yet there has been little formal analysis of polyadic interactions such as coalitions. Here, we develop an optimality model which examines the role of winner and loser effects in shaping coalition formation. We demonstrate that the predicted patterns of alliances are strongly dependent on the way in which winner and loser effects change with contestant strength. When winner and loser effects decrease with the resource-holding power (RHP) of the combatants, coalitions will be favoured between the strongest members of a group, but not between the weakest. If, in contrast, winner and loser effects increase with RHP, exactly the opposite predictions emerge. All other things being equal, intervention is more likely to prove worthwhile when the beneficiary of the aid is weaker (and its opponent is stronger), because the beneficiary is then less likely to win without help. Consequently, intervention is more probable when the impact of victory on the subsequent performance of a combatant increases with that individual's strength because this selects for intervention in favour of weaker combatants. The published literature on hierarchy formation does not reveal how winner and loser effects actually change with contestant strength and we therefore hope that our model will spur others to collect such data; in this light we suggest an experiment which will help to elucidate the nature of winner and loser effects and their impact on coalition formation in animals. PMID:10670947

  13. Growth and development of the corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, L P; Redmer, D A

    1999-01-01

    The mammalian corpus luteum, which plays a central role in the reproductive process because of its production of hormones such as progesterone, is an exceptionally dynamic organ. Growth and development of the corpus luteum are extremely rapid, and even when the corpus luteum is functionally mature cellular turnover remains high. Associated with this high rate of cell turnover, the mature corpus luteum receives the greatest blood supply per unit tissue of any organ, and also exhibits a relatively high metabolic rate. Central to the growth and development of the corpus luteum, therefore, is luteal vascular growth, which appears to be regulated primarily by the angiogenic growth factors, basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. In addition, the corpus luteum is a complex tissue composed of parenchymal (small and large steroidogenic) and nonparenchymal (for example fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle, pericytes and endothelial) cells. Recent studies evaluating the expression, location and regulation of gap junctions in the corpus luteum indicate an important role of gap junctional intercellular communication in the coordination of function among these diverse cell types during luteal growth and development. These studies will lead to an improved understanding not only of luteal function but also of tissue growth and development in general.

  14. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document outlines the strategic plan developed in 1999 by the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). The organizational structure, overall goals and milestones, and core strategies of the SUCCEED Project are described. This plan overviews faculty development, outcomes assessment, student…

  15. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document outlines the strategic plan developed in 1998 by the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). The organizational structure, overall goals and milestones, and core strategies of the SUCCEED Project are described. Focus Team strategic plans for faculty development, outcomes assessment, student…

  16. Intermediary Organizations in Charter School Policy Coalitions: Evidence from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBray, Elizabeth; Scott, Janelle; Lubienski, Christopher; Jabbar, Huriya

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a framework for investigating research use, using an "advocacy coalition framework" and the concepts of a "supply side" (mainly organizations) and "demand side" (policymakers). Drawing on interview data and documents from New Orleans about the charter school reforms that have developed there…

  17. Intermediary Organizations in Charter School Policy Coalitions: Evidence from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBray, Elizabeth; Scott, Janelle; Lubienski, Christopher; Jabbar, Huriya

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a framework for investigating research use, using an "advocacy coalition framework" and the concepts of a "supply side" (mainly organizations) and "demand side" (policymakers). Drawing on interview data and documents from New Orleans about the charter school reforms that have developed there…

  18. Freshman engineering physics in the foundation coalition at the University of Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, J. W.; Izatt, Jerald R.

    1997-03-01

    For the past two years, the University of Alabama has taught pilot sections of freshman engineering physics as part of the Foundation Coalition (FC) program. The FC is one of several NSF-supported coalitions of colleges and universities which are using innovative methods to improve undergraduate engineering education. In addition to physics, the freshman-year curriculum at UA consists of calculus, chemistry and general engineering studies. Most students also take English composition although it is not a part of the FC curriculum. The emphasis within the FC is on curriculum integration, technology-enabled learning, and human interface development.

  19. Modeling plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    2004-02-01

    Computational plant models or 'virtual plants' are increasingly seen as a useful tool for comprehending complex relationships between gene function, plant physiology, plant development, and the resulting plant form. The theory of L-systems, which was introduced by Lindemayer in 1968, has led to a well-established methodology for simulating the branching architecture of plants. Many current architectural models provide insights into the mechanisms of plant development by incorporating physiological processes, such as the transport and allocation of carbon. Other models aim at elucidating the geometry of plant organs, including flower petals and apical meristems, and are beginning to address the relationship between patterns of gene expression and the resulting plant form.

  20. Resources, environment and population. The Global Tomorrow Coalition Conference.

    PubMed

    Olson, R K

    1983-01-01

    The challenge for environmental action has been direct and powerful for the Global Tomorrow Coalition. In June 1983 a major international conference was held by the Coalition in Washington, D.C., the Conference examined the issues of acid rain, biological diversity, foresight capability, hazardous exports, water resources, the oceans, sustainable development, population, and nuclear issues. The Conference presented a unique portrait of the US environmental movement, its problems and the possibilities for US leadership at the international level. The Coalition issued an indictment of the Reagan Administration, charging that it had reversed American domestic and international policies and was threatening the foundation on international cooperation which the US had worked hard to establish. Specifically, the Administration did the following: prevented cooperative international action on acid rain; destroyed the effectiveness of the Council on Environmental Quality by cutting its budget by 2/3 and replacing the entire professional staff with new personnel lacking environmental expertise; withdrew US participation from the Law of the Sea Conference; discouraged initiatives and programs on environment and resource trends by OECD; obstructed OECD's efforts to harmonize testing for new chemicals; sought more than a 25% reduction in US fiscal 1984 support for the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA); opposed UN efforts to control hazardous exports and removed US governmental restraints on this trade; withdrew support for the Internatioanl Man and the Biopshere program; proposed cutting the US voluntary contribution to the UN Environment Program by 2/3; proposed weakening the rules under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species and withdrew support for the World Heritage Convention and the Convention for the Protection of Nature and Preservation of Wildlife in the Western hemisphere; and withdrew funding for participation in US and international

  1. Jasmonate action in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huang; Liu, Bei; Liu, Liangyu; Song, Susheng

    2017-03-01

    Phytohormones, including jasmonates (JAs), gibberellin, ethylene, abscisic acid, and auxin, integrate endogenous developmental cues with environmental signals to regulate plant growth, development, and defense. JAs are well- recognized lipid-derived stress hormones that regulate plant adaptations to biotic stresses, including herbivore attack and pathogen infection, as well as abiotic stresses, including wounding, ozone, and ultraviolet radiation. An increasing number of studies have shown that JAs also have functions in a remarkable number of plant developmental events, including primary root growth, reproductive development, and leaf senescence. Since the 1980s, details of the JA biosynthesis pathway, signaling pathway, and crosstalk during plant growth and development have been elucidated. Here, we summarize recent advances and give an updated overview of JA action and crosstalk in plant growth and development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Sustaining tobacco control coalitions amid declining resources.

    PubMed

    Carver, Vivien; Reinert, Bonita; Range, Lillian M

    2007-07-01

    Mississippi is unique among the 50 states in settling a lawsuit against tobacco companies earlier than the Master Settlement Agreement, devoting a relatively high amount of per capita funding on tobacco control, and avoiding tobacco-control budget cuts. Using a social-ecological approach combining insider and outsider strategies, tobacco-prevention coalitions in Mississippi succeeded in sustaining funding despite serious obstacles. Lessons learned included taking specific actions to embed themselves in the local community, wisely aligning with legislators, choosing courageous and effective champions, and ensuring that people are keenly aware of their existence and efforts. In using these strategies, tobacco-prevention coalitions in Mississippi have become an institution of the community and in so doing helped sustain their funding.

  3. Growth and development of the child's hip.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mark C; Eberson, Craig P

    2006-04-01

    The child's hip begins in intrauterine development as a condensation of mesoderm in the lower limb bud that rapidly differentiates to resemble the adult hip by eight weeks of life. The developmental instructions are transmitted through complicated cell signaling pathways. From eight weeks of development to adolescence, further growth of the hip is focused on differentiation and the establishment of the adult arterial supply. The postnatal growth of the child's hip is a product of concurrent acetabular and proximal femoral growth from their corresponding growth plates. Absence of appropriate contact between acetabulum and proximal femur yields an incongruent joint. Multiple disease processes may be understood in light of this growth process, including Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease and developmental dysplasia of the hip.

  4. Commanding Coalitions: The Diplomat-at-Arms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-20

    Commanding Coalitions: The Diplomat-at-Arms Submitted by Travis L. McIntosh Student ID: @02567790 For Partial Fulfillment for...are known for their professionalism and passion to see students excel and reach unforeseen potential. Without these two, the thesis would never...Modern Wars, Wesley Clark states that “every serious student of war recognizes that war is about attaining political objectives—that the military is

  5. Expanding the PhysTEC Coalition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Fredrick

    2003-04-01

    The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) is a community of physics departments representing scientists and educators at institutions dedicated to improving the science preparation of future K-12 teachers. Now in its second year, PhysTEC requires physics and education faculty to work together to provide an education for future teachers that emphasizes interactive engagement and a student-centered approach to learning science. The first six Coalition members are the physics departments at Ball State University, Oregon State University, University of Arizona, University of Arkansas, Western Michigan University, and Xavier University of Louisiana. PhysTEC is creating a broad, active Coalition of physics departments that have implemented or are interested in implementing one or more of the PhysTEC Program Components. · A long-term, active collaboration among the physics department, the department of education, and the local schools. · A Teacher-in-Residence (TIR) program that provides for a full-time participant in assisting faculty in course revisions. · The redesign of physics courses based on results from physics education research. · The redesign of elementary and secondary science methods courses with an emphasis on inquiry-based teaching and learning. · The establishment of a mentoring program to provide a valuable induction experience for novice science teachers. · The participation of physics faculty in the improvement and expansion of school experiences. www.phystec.org

  6. Speak Up Speak Out Coalition Survey Results | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Comprehensive planning is a visionary planning process that integrates community values and land use policy. The Mayor of Duluth, Minnesota, directed the inclusion of two new values into the City’s comprehensive planning process to direct the community’s future, process: health and fairness. In order to understand the meanings of health and fairness that residents of the city hold, the Community Planning Department included questions in a city-wide survey of planning priorities. As a community organization reviewed the survey results that would inform the new directives, they realized that overburdened communities were underrepresented in the survey responses. To address this deficiency, the community organization asked the City of Duluth if they could conduct a survey of the underrepresented voices to ensure their input was included in the process. The Health in All Policies Coalition contacted the USEPA Office of Research and Development in Duluth, MN at the advice of the Planning Department. The support USEPA provided ensured that the Coalition could make recommendations to the City of Duluth based on systematically collected and analyzed data. This presentation will share the results of the survey. This presentation of the Speak Up Speak Out survey data represents support for local decision-making, technical assistance and data analysis. The data were collected and analyzed through advice and consultation with USEPA Office of Research and Development, an

  7. Neurotrophins: Role in Placental Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Sahay, A S; Sundrani, D P; Joshi, S R

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrophins, a family of closely related proteins, were originally identified as growth factors for survival, development, and function of neurons in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Subsequently, neurotrophins have been shown to have functions in immune and reproductive systems. Neurotrophins like nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are known to play an important role during pregnancy in the process of placental angiogenesis and maturation. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of neurotrophins in the human placenta. The current chapter reviews studies demonstrating the role of neurotrophins during pregnancy particularly in placental development. This chapter also focuses on the regional changes in neurotrophins in the human placenta and its interactions with other growth factors. Future research is needed to understand the mechanisms through which neurotrophins influence the growth and development of the placenta and pregnancy outcome.

  8. Three years of evaluating community tobacco prevention coalitions: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Reinert, Bonita; Carver, Vivien; Range, Lillian M; Pike, Chris

    Though challenging, evaluation is essential for successful coalitions. In three years of annual evaluations of 30 tobacco prevention coalitions, lessons learned involve contracts, people (leaders, board members, oversight staff), and entire coalitions. Contracts should adjust within limits, include all work requirements, promote networking, and link directly to evaluation. Leaders need quarterly meetings and no numbers assigned to their performance. Board members, even youth, must be involved. Program monitors need practical or public health experience to provide encouragement with firmness. Fiscal monitors need financial acuity, fair-mindedness, communication skills, and a firm contract foundation. Program evaluators need people skills, program evaluation experience, and a coalition history. Coalitions improve nonlinearly, with awareness activities diminishing and programmatic activities increasing, so evaluation should evolve also. Oversight agencies are influential, so should restrain from introducing many new requirements and avoid blindsiding leaders. Best evaluations are cooperative, collegial dialogs between evaluator(s) and the entire coalition.

  9. The Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply project: An introduction

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J. C.; Mench, J. A.; Karcher, D.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, empirical information on the sustainability of commercial-scale egg production is lacking. The passage of state regulations specific to hen housing created urgency to better understand the effects of different housing systems on the sustainability of the egg supply, and stimulated the formation of a coalition, the Coalition for a Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES), to conduct research on this topic. The CSES is a multi-stakeholder group with 27 members, including food manufacturers, research institutions, scientists, restaurants, food service, retail food companies, egg suppliers, and nongovernmental organizations. A commercial-scale study was developed to better understand the effect of 3 housing systems (conventional cage, enriched colony, and cage-free aviary) on 5 areas related to a sustainable egg supply. These 5 sustainability areas represent effects on people, animals, and the environment: animal health and well-being, environment, food safety, worker health and safety, and food affordability. Five teams of scientists, each associated with a sustainability area, conducted an integrated field study at a commercial site in the upper Midwest through 2 flock cycles in 3 housing systems. This paper provides a brief overview of the CSES project to serve as an introduction for the papers that follow in this volume of Poultry Science. PMID:25737565

  10. The Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply project: An introduction.

    PubMed

    Swanson, J C; Mench, J A; Karcher, D

    2015-03-01

    In the United States, empirical information on the sustainability of commercial-scale egg production is lacking. The passage of state regulations specific to hen housing created urgency to better understand the effects of different housing systems on the sustainability of the egg supply, and stimulated the formation of a coalition, the Coalition for a Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES), to conduct research on this topic. The CSES is a multi-stakeholder group with 27 members, including food manufacturers, research institutions, scientists, restaurants, food service, retail food companies, egg suppliers, and nongovernmental organizations. A commercial-scale study was developed to better understand the effect of 3 housing systems (conventional cage, enriched colony, and cage-free aviary) on 5 areas related to a sustainable egg supply. These 5 sustainability areas represent effects on people, animals, and the environment: animal health and well-being, environment, food safety, worker health and safety, and food affordability. Five teams of scientists, each associated with a sustainability area, conducted an integrated field study at a commercial site in the upper Midwest through 2 flock cycles in 3 housing systems. This paper provides a brief overview of the CSES project to serve as an introduction for the papers that follow in this volume of Poultry Science. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  11. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan Revision, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Strategic Plan Revision of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). SUCCEED aims to institute a sustainable version of its curriculum model on each of the selected campuses. The areas of expertise in the program include faculty development, outcomes assessment,…

  12. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan Revision, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Strategic Plan Revision of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). SUCCEED aims to institute a sustainable version of its curriculum model on each of the selected campuses. The areas of expertise in the program include faculty development, outcomes assessment,…

  13. The Military Child Education Coalition[TM]: Supporting Military Families during Deployment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surles, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    The Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC[TM]) has recently released a new support for military families facing deployment, with the addition of another kit to its "Growing, Learning, and Understanding: Making Meaning through Early Literacy"[TM] (GLU[TM]) initiative. The GLU initiative focuses on developing early literacy skills in children…

  14. The Transformative Power of Youth Action Coalition's Multimodal Arts-for-Change Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, K. C. Nat; Way, Kate; Gray, Robin R. R.

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the potential of a series of Youth Action Coalition's (YAC) Arts-for-Change (AfC) youth programs for literacy and identity development, as well as for engaging youth in addressing issues of social justice. Drawing primarily on transcripts of interviews, surveys, and participant-observation fieldnotes inventorying changes in…

  15. Federal Information in the Networked Environment: A Perspective from the Coalition for Networked Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheverie, Joan F.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the development of strategies for providing access to and services for U.S. federal government information in higher education using the global information infrastructure, from the perspective of the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI). Discusses the preservation of electronic information and networked information discovery and…

  16. Some Observations--Early Years of Committee/Coalition of Adult Education Organizations (CAEO). MSS 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Alexander N.

    The first meeting of the Coalition of Adult Education Organizations (CAEO) was held in Syracuse in 1964 as a Conference of Adult Education Organizations. Its purpose was to obtain input to help determine the development of the Library of Continuing Education (LCE). Presidents, other officers or leaders of 17 organizations in Canada and the United…

  17. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Annual Report, Year 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Year 9 Annual Report of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). Contents include: (1) Executive Summary; (2) Response to Recommendations of Prior Review Teams; (3) Major Accomplishments; (4) Faculty Development; (5) Outcomes Assessment; (6) Student Transitions; (7)…

  18. Growth and development considerations for craniomaxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Costello, Bernard J; Rivera, Reynaldo D; Shand, Jocelyn; Mooney, Mark

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of craniomaxillofacial surgery is to improve function, occlusion, craniofacial balance, and aesthetics. Accurate diagnosis, assessment, and careful treatment planning are essential in achieving a successful outcome, and an understanding of the pattern of facial growth is integral in this process. Patients with craniofacial congenital dysmorphologies, posttraumatic asymmetries, or disturbances of facial balance from radiation may have functional and/or aesthetic issues that require treatment. Understanding the complexities of growth in the skull and face is a key component to appropriate treatment planning for these disorders. This article reviews growth and development in the craniofacial skeleton.

  19. Minnesota Tribal Coalition - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Triplett

    2006-12-19

    The project helped tribal leaders, staff and community members on the Grand Portage, Leech Lake, and White Earth Reservations better understand their community's energy usage, assess local resources that might be utilized to reduce energy consumption and begin to formulate appropriate development strategies. The principal guiding interest was to assess energy usage and the potential for wind resource development on each of the three reservations. Key tribal staff became familiar with wind energy technology and assessment methodologies that will be of continued use as each tribe moves forward with development projects. The findings were that wind resources are available at each reservation with varying degrees of potential for development. At White Earth moderate to excellent resources are present at White Earth village and along the U.S. 59 corridor sufficient to be tapped to serve several scattered tribal complexes. At Grand Portage a former community television repeater tower site provides a viable elevated location for a wind turbine to serve the tribal community settlement. At Leech Lake, while most constrained by tree cover, a site adjacent to a casino holds promise for the newer taller wind turbines now coming to market at ever-increasing taller rotor heights. The project developed considerable data of importance regarding the potential for wind development on and near each reservation.

  20. Voting behavior, coalitions and government strength through a complex network analysis.

    PubMed

    Dal Maso, Carlo; Pompa, Gabriele; Puliga, Michelangelo; Riotta, Gianni; Chessa, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the network of relations between parliament members according to their voting behavior. In particular, we examine the emergent community structure with respect to political coalitions and government alliances. We rely on tools developed in the Complex Network literature to explore the core of these communities and use their topological features to develop new metrics for party polarization, internal coalition cohesiveness and government strength. As a case study, we focus on the Chamber of Deputies of the Italian Parliament, for which we are able to characterize the heterogeneity of the ruling coalition as well as parties specific contributions to the stability of the government over time. We find sharp contrast in the political debate which surprisingly does not imply a relevant structure based on established parties. We take a closer look to changes in the community structure after parties split up and their effect on the position of single deputies within communities. Finally, we introduce a way to track the stability of the government coalition over time that is able to discern the contribution of each member along with the impact of its possible defection. While our case study relies on the Italian parliament, whose relevance has come into the international spotlight in the present economic downturn, the methods developed here are entirely general and can therefore be applied to a multitude of other scenarios.

  1. Voting Behavior, Coalitions and Government Strength through a Complex Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dal Maso, Carlo; Pompa, Gabriele; Puliga, Michelangelo; Riotta, Gianni; Chessa, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the network of relations between parliament members according to their voting behavior. In particular, we examine the emergent community structure with respect to political coalitions and government alliances. We rely on tools developed in the Complex Network literature to explore the core of these communities and use their topological features to develop new metrics for party polarization, internal coalition cohesiveness and government strength. As a case study, we focus on the Chamber of Deputies of the Italian Parliament, for which we are able to characterize the heterogeneity of the ruling coalition as well as parties specific contributions to the stability of the government over time. We find sharp contrast in the political debate which surprisingly does not imply a relevant structure based on established parties. We take a closer look to changes in the community structure after parties split up and their effect on the position of single deputies within communities. Finally, we introduce a way to track the stability of the government coalition over time that is able to discern the contribution of each member along with the impact of its possible defection. While our case study relies on the Italian parliament, whose relevance has come into the international spotlight in the present economic downturn, the methods developed here are entirely general and can therefore be applied to a multitude of other scenarios. PMID:25549351

  2. Coalition Building to Build Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosby, Anne Page

    1994-01-01

    Describes a collection development project to assess the African American materials in the Georgia State University library from an interdisciplinary point of view that grew into a continuing strategy of collaboration. Highlights include bibliography checking; individual and group initiatives; local library cooperation; and budgetary support.…

  3. Evaluation and community prevention coalitions: validation of an integrated Web-based/technical assistance consultant model.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Mark E; Gomez, Brendan J; Puddy, Richard W; Greenberg, Mark T

    2008-02-01

    Community coalitions (CCs) have labored with some difficulty to demonstrate empirical evidence of effectiveness in preventing a wide range of adolescent problem behaviors. Training and technical assistance (TA) have been identified as important elements in promoting improved functioning of CCs. A reliable, valid, and inexpensive method to assess functioning of CCs has been developed and is tested in this article in the context of Pennsylvania's Communities That Care (CTC) model. A CC Web-based questionnaire was developed and administered to more than 79 communities (867 participants) and the validity and reliability were assessed through multiple means, including the use of a companion TA implementation feedback questionnaire completed by TAs assigned to each of the sites. Results indicated adequate to good psychometric properties on internal reliability of the Web-based questionnaire, moderate construct validity across different reports of functioning, and relative stability throughout the course of 1 year. Implications for a variety of community prevention coalitions interested in a relatively low-cost, user friendly, and suitable methodology for evaluating coalition functioning are discussed. In addition, areas of application for future research including linking coalition functioning with the quality and nature of technical assistance, levels of risk and protective factors, and large data sets of youth risk factor and problem behavior data are highlighted.

  4. Emergency contraception for sexual assault victims: an advocacy coalition framework.

    PubMed

    Schorn, Mavis N

    2005-11-01

    A bill was introduced into the Tennessee legislature in the 2005 session that would require emergency departments to offer and dispense emergency contraception to sexual assault survivors who are at risk of pregnancy. Several advocacy groups collaborated to form the Women's Health Safety Network for the purpose of communicating as one voice. The advocacy coalition framework of policy development is applied to the political system and is used as a model to discuss issues impacting policy development for this particular bill. Key actors, proponents, and opponents to this bill are presented along with constraints to policy acceptance. The challenge for emergency contraception advocates on a state and national level is to keep the focus on public health science, the health and well-being of women, and out of the abortion debate.

  5. Parenting Coalitions after Remarriage: Dynamics and Therapeutic Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visher, Emily B.; Visher, John S.

    1989-01-01

    Defines and discusses advantages of parenting coalitions when children have contact with both of their parents after divorce and remarriage. Outlines developmental sequence leading to such coalitions and describes common obstacles encountered by the adults. Major focus is on therapeutic interventions which can help adults form parenting…

  6. The National Home Visiting Coalition: A History of Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Jane; Gavaghan, Bridget; Howard, Karen; Kelley, Melissa L.; Schwartz, Marvin; Walzer, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The Home Visiting Coalition represents more than 75 organizations working together to articulate the effectiveness of home visiting to a range of policymakers and stakeholders in the early childhood field. Despite varying program goals and service delivery strategies, the Coalition participants share a commitment to expanding access to…

  7. Quantum Coalition of " n Equipartition" Compound Mode in Minority Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiao-fei; Guo, Fen-zhuo; Zhang, Ke-jia

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the quantum coalition in an N-player quantum minority game proposed by Benjamin. N players share an initial entangled state and the measure of entanglement of the initial state is p. The coalition size is n ( n < N). When N is odd and when N is even with the restricted condition , we find a best quantum strategy which can make the expected payoff of each coalition player reach the maximal value in this paper. We compare the expected payoffs of the coalition players before and after the best coalition, and get that whether the players coalition or not is related to p when N is even; when N is odd, the expected payoff can always be improved by coalition which is independent of p. This result provides a theory basis for the choice of the initial state in a minority game. Moreover we propose a quantum minority game with clique-wise entanglement state which can make the expected payoff reach the upper limit and reduce the possibility of coalition.

  8. Community How To Guide On Underage Drinking Prevention: Coalition Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Governors' Highway Safety Representatives.

    Coalitions have been used successfully in the United States to tackle a number of seemingly intractable problems. For communities that want to reduce their underage drinking problem, putting together a broad-based coalition can bring substantial dividends. In this guide, readers will learn the steps that bring together a diverse group of people in…

  9. Social Norms Tactics to Promote a Campus Alcohol Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinci, Debra M.; Philen, Robert C.; Walch, Susan E.; Kennedy, Rebecca; Harrell, Mica; Rime, Carla; Matthews, Jaclyn

    2010-01-01

    Background: Social norms posters usually contain a normative message, branding, campaign tagline and sponsoring coalition/contact information. There are limited data on which campaign components promote recognition of Campus Alcohol Coalitions (CAC). Purpose: To determine the most effective media channels/incentives to promote recognition of CAC…

  10. Coalition releases declaration for healthy and productive oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-06-01

    Coalition releases declaration for healthy and productive oceans A coalition of 13 countries or federal agencies participating in a new Global Partnership for Oceans (GPO) indicated its support for a “Declaration for Healthy and Productive Oceans to Help Reduce Poverty” on 16 June, just prior to the Rio+20 conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  11. The National Home Visiting Coalition: A History of Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Jane; Gavaghan, Bridget; Howard, Karen; Kelley, Melissa L.; Schwartz, Marvin; Walzer, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The Home Visiting Coalition represents more than 75 organizations working together to articulate the effectiveness of home visiting to a range of policymakers and stakeholders in the early childhood field. Despite varying program goals and service delivery strategies, the Coalition participants share a commitment to expanding access to…

  12. Coalition Building for Adult Literacy: Historical and Organizational Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Anabel P.; Lehman, Bernadette

    Selected successful literacy coalitions were examined to identify key issues and trends in coalition building. The six key issues identified (focus and functions, funding, governance, membership, key figures, and evaluation) were used as a framework to review the early efforts, current activities, and future visions of literacy coalitions…

  13. The National Coalition for Literacy: Options for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisman, Forrest P.

    The National Coalition for Literacy's (NCL's) stated goal is to serve as the national leadership organization of the adult literacy field. However, NCL's organizational structure severely limits its ability to muster the personnel resources or raise the money required to fully perform the leadership functions required of a national coalition. The…

  14. Coalition Building: Cultivating New Partners for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curva, Fely; Mosteller, James

    2010-01-01

    A coalition is about building power to accomplish change that no one group can reasonably accomplish on its own. A well-defined coalition not only builds power and influence, it broadens support, maximizes resources (e.g., time, money, people and connections), enhances legitimacy, creates synergy, and offers diverse perspectives on issues.…

  15. Coalition Building: Cultivating New Partners for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curva, Fely; Mosteller, James

    2010-01-01

    A coalition is about building power to accomplish change that no one group can reasonably accomplish on its own. A well-defined coalition not only builds power and influence, it broadens support, maximizes resources (e.g., time, money, people and connections), enhances legitimacy, creates synergy, and offers diverse perspectives on issues.…

  16. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  17. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  18. Disturbances of bone growth and development

    SciTech Connect

    Ledesma-Medina, J.; Newman, B.; Oh, K.S.

    1988-03-01

    ''What is growth anyway. Can one talk about positive growth in childhood, neutral growth in maturity, and negative growth in old age. Our goal is to help promote normal positive growth in infants and children. To achieve this, we must be cognizant of the morphologic changes of both normal and abnormal bone formation as they are reflected in the radiographic image of the skeleton. The knowledge of the various causes and the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disturbances of bone growth and development allows us to recognize the early radiographic manifestations. Endocrine and metabolic disorders affect the whole skeleton, but the early changes are best seen in the distal ends of the femurs, where growth rate is most rapid. In skeletal infections and in some vascular injuries two-or three-phase bone scintigraphy supercedes radiography early in the course of the disease. MRI has proved to be very helpful in the early detection of avascular bone necrosis, osteomyelitis, and tumor. Some benign bone tumors and many bone dysplasias have distinct and diagnostic radiographic findings that may preclude further studies. In constitutional diseases of bone, including chromosomal aberrations, skeletal surveys of the patient and all family members together with biochemical and cytogenetic studies are essential for both diagnosis and genetic counseling. Our role is to perform the least invasive and most informative diagnostic imaging modalities that corroborate the biochemical and histologic findings to establish the definitive diagnosis. Unrecognized, misdiagnosed, or improperly treated disturbance of bone growth can result in permanent deformity usually associated with disability. 116 references.

  19. Gulf Coast Resilience Coalition: An Evolved Collaborative Built on Shared Disaster Experiences, Response, and Future Preparedness.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Tonya Cross; Osofsky, Howard J; Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Speier, Anthony; Rehner, Tim; Osofsky, Joy D; Rohrer, Glenn

    2015-12-01

    For close to a decade, the Gulf Coast of the United States has been in almost constant disaster recovery mode, and a number of lessons have been learned concerning disaster recovery and behavioral health. The purpose of this report was to describe the natural development of a Gulf Coast Resilience Coalition (GCRC). The GCRC methods began with state-specific recovery goals following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and transitioned to a shared multistate and multidiscipline coalition. The coalition's effectiveness is demonstrated through continuation, procurement of funding to provide response services, and increased membership to ensure sustainability. The coalition has enhanced response, recovery, and resilience by providing strategic plans for dissemination of knowledge; post-disaster surveillance and services; effective relationships and communication with local, state, and regional partners; disaster response informed by past experience; a network of professionals and community residents; and the ability to improve access to and efficiency of future behavioral health coordination through an organized response. The GCRC can not only improve readiness and response, but work toward a shared vision of improved overall mental and behavioral health and thus resilience, with beneficial implications for the Gulf South and other communities as well.

  20. Building health care system capacity: training health care professionals in disaster preparedness health care coalitions.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lauren; Craddock, Hillary; Gulley, Kelly; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth W

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to learn from the experiences of well-established, disaster preparedness-focused health care coalition (HCC) leaders for the purpose of identifying opportunities for improved delivery of disaster-health principles to health professionals involved in HCCs. This report describes current HCC education and training needs, challenges, and promising practices. A semi-structured interview was conducted with a sample of leaders of nine preparedness-focused HCCs identified through a 3-stage purposive strategy. Transcripts were analyzed qualitatively. Training needs included: stakeholder engagement; economic sustainability; communication; coroner and mortuary services; chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE); mass-casualty incidents; and exercise design. Of these identified training needs, stakeholder engagement, economic sustainability, and exercise design were relevant to leaders within HCCs, as opposed to general HCC membership. Challenges to education and training included a lack of time, little-to-no staff devoted to training, and difficulty getting coalition members to prioritize training. Promising practices to these challenges are also presented. The success of mature coalitions in improving situational awareness, promoting planning, and enabling staff- and resource-sharing suggest the strengths and opportunities that are inherent within these organizations. However, offering effective education and training opportunities is a challenge in the absence of ubiquitous support, incentives, or requirements among health care professions. Notably, an online resource repository would help reduce the burden on individual coalitions by eliminating the need to continually develop learning opportunities.

  1. Brassinosteroids Regulate Root Growth, Development, and Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhuoyun; Li, Jia

    2016-01-04

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are natural plant hormones critical for growth and development. BR deficient or signaling mutants show significantly shortened root phenotypes. However, for a long time, it was thought that these phenotypes were solely caused by reduced cell elongation in the mutant roots. Functions of BRs in regulating root development have been largely neglected. Nonetheless, recent detailed analyses, revealed that BRs are not only involved in root cell elongation but are also involved in many aspects of root development, such as maintenance of meristem size, root hair formation, lateral root initiation, gravitropic response, mycorrhiza formation, and nodulation in legume species. In this review, current findings on the functions of BRs in mediating root growth, development, and symbiosis are discussed.

  2. Recent growth trends in developing countries.

    PubMed

    1978-03-01

    The unprecedented economic conditions of the mid-1970s have created problems with economic development for all countries of the world. Recent economic growth trends in the following main groups of developing countries are reviewed: 1) low-income countries; 2) lower middle-income countries; 3) intermediate middle-income countries; 4) upper middle-come countries; and 5) balance of payments deficit oil exporting countries. Economic indicators for each group of countries are tabulated. The tables show that the developing countries have continued domestic economic growth at only moderately slower rates during the years since 1973. They have been helped by foreign aid or private-source borrowing. As a group, they have, in fact, helped to keep the world economy from plunging deeper into recession and to prevent world trade from contracting more than it actually did already in 1974 and 1975. The performance of these developing economies during these difficult years contributes to continued optimism regarding their future prospects.

  3. Analysis of Mouse Growth Plate Development.

    PubMed

    Mangiavini, Laura; Merceron, Christophe; Schipani, Ernestina

    2016-03-01

    To investigate skeletal development, pathophysiological mechanisms of cartilage and bone disease, and eventually assess innovative treatments, the mouse is a very important resource. During embryonic development, mesenchymal condensations are formed, and cells within these mesenchymal condensations either directly differentiate into osteoblasts and give origin to intramembranous bone, or differentiate into chondrocytes and form a cartilaginous anlage. The cartilaginous anlage or fetal growth plate is then replaced with bone. This process is also called endochondral bone development, and it is responsible for the generation of most of our skeleton. Here we discuss in detail the most common in vivo and in vitro techniques our laboratory is currently using for the analysis of the mouse fetal growth plate during development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Analysis of Mouse Growth Plate Development

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavini, Laura; Merceron, Christophe; Schipani, Ernestina

    2016-01-01

    To investigate skeletal development, pathophysiological mechanisms of cartilage and bone disease, and eventually assess innovative treatments, the mouse is a very important resource. During embryonic development, mesenchymal condensations are formed, and cells within these mesenchymal condensations either directly differentiate into osteoblasts and give origin to intramembranous bone, or differentiate into chondrocytes and form a cartilaginous anlage. The cartilaginous anlage or fetal growth plate is then replaced with bone. This process is also called endochondral bone development, and it is responsible for the generation of most of our skeleton. In this Review, we will discuss in detail the most common in vivo and in vitro techniques our laboratory is currently using for the analysis of the mouse fetal growth plate during development. PMID:26928664

  5. Population growth and development planning in Africa.

    PubMed

    1980-12-01

    Some of the consequences of rapid population growth and their implications for the economic development of the Africa region in the 1980s are outlined. The total population of Africa was estimated to be 412 million in 1976, or 10.2% of the total world population of 4044 million. Population density of the region is comparatively low, but the crude density measure of 14 persons per square kilometer in 1977 obscures the very high percentage of Africa's land which is desert or otherwise not arable. Continued high fertility rates in the region coupled with substantial decline in mortality rates especially for infants and children has resulted in Africa having a youthful population. The growth of cities due primarily to rural-urban migration is 1 of the most pressing problems of the region. Some countries in the region maintain pronatalist policies because they have a small population and regard population growth as a stimulus to the socioeconomic development effort. Few countries such as Kenya, Mauritius, Egypt, and Morocco consider rapid population growth a constraint on their development efforts and are now implementing national policies which aim at reducing the rate of growth of their populations. Population problems in Africa arise mainly from the fact that additions to the population needing education, housing, employment and to be fed adequately are increasing at a rate far more than most African countries can cope with. To illustrate the potential impact of population factors on development, the potential relationships between population and health, education, food supply, labor force supply and employment are analyzed.

  6. Community Health Coalitions in Context: Associations between Geographic Context, Member Type and Length of Membership with Coalition Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, V.; Sanders, M.; Andrews, M. L.; Hale, R.; Carrillo, C.

    2014-01-01

    The coalition literature recognizes context (geography, demographics and history) as a variable of interest, yet few coalition evaluation studies have focused on it. This study explores the association between geographic context and structures (e.g. member type) with functional characteristics (e.g. decision making or levels of conflict) in a…

  7. Community Health Coalitions in Context: Associations between Geographic Context, Member Type and Length of Membership with Coalition Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, V.; Sanders, M.; Andrews, M. L.; Hale, R.; Carrillo, C.

    2014-01-01

    The coalition literature recognizes context (geography, demographics and history) as a variable of interest, yet few coalition evaluation studies have focused on it. This study explores the association between geographic context and structures (e.g. member type) with functional characteristics (e.g. decision making or levels of conflict) in a…

  8. Vitamin D and skeletal growth and development.

    PubMed

    Koo, Winston; Walyat, Nitin

    2013-09-01

    Vitamin D is critical to bone mineral metabolism and to the growth and development of the skeleton. Optimizing vitamin D status could be one of the cornerstones to optimize skeletal growth and achieving the maximum peak bone mass soon after the completion of adolescence. Maximizing peak bone mass is considered to be the key to primary prevention of osteoporosis. There is controversy, however, about what constitutes a healthy vitamin D status based on the most abundant circulating metabolite of vitamin D, namely 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25 OHD) in plasma or serum; and even the value of 25 OHD that should be used to define vitamin D deficiency. We reviewed the recent data on circulating 25 OHD concentrations and its relationship with skeletal growth in apparently healthy children and in those with nutritional vitamin D deficiency.

  9. Nurse-police coalition: improves safety in acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Allen, Diane E; Harris, Frank N; de Nesnera, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession.

  10. Global change information support: A north-south coalition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blados, Walter R.; Cotter, Gladys A.

    1993-01-01

    On a daily basis we become more aware that our planet, earth, exists in a delicate balance; we, its inhabitants, must be informed caretakers. Global change communities have emerged around the globe to address this multidisciplinary subject. Information systems that integrate text, bibliographic, numeric and visual data are needed to support these global change communities. No one information center can hope to collect all the relevant data. Rather, we must form a coalition, North and South, to collect and provide access to disparate, multidisciplinary sources of information, and to develop standardized tools for documenting and manipulating this data and information. International resources need to be mobilized in a coordinated manner to move us towards this goal. This paper looks at emerging information technologies that can be utilized to build such a system, and outlines some cooperative North/South strategies.

  11. Global change information support - A north/south coalition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blados, Walter R.; Cotter, Gladys A.

    1993-01-01

    On a daily basis we become more aware that our planet, earth, exists in a delicate balance; we, its inhabitants, must be informed caretakers. Global change communities have emerged around the globe to address this multidisciplinary subject. Information systems that integrate text, bibliographic, numeric and visual data are needed to support these global change communities. No one information center can hope to collect all the relevant data. Rather, we must form a coalition, North and South, to collect and provide access to disparate, multidisciplinary sources of information, and to develop standardized tools for documenting and manipulating this data and information. International resources need to be mobilized in a coordinated manner to move us towards this goal. This paper looks at emerging information technologies that can be utilized to build such a system, and outlines some cooperative North/South strategies.

  12. [Contribution of the Peruvian Multisectorial Coalition against Cancer].

    PubMed

    Pinillos-Ashton, Luis; Limache-García, Abel

    2013-03-01

    Cancer is a public health problem due to its high incidence and mortality, its high social and economic cost, and the lack of intra and intersectorial strategies resulting in failure to access information and screening tests. For this reason, it is necessary to address this problem with a comprehensive and sustainable approach. After performing a diagnosis of the human and material resources at the national level, and after having observed the attitude of healthcare decisors, the Multisector Coalition against Cancer was created with the participation of the public and nonpublic sector. A strategic plan was developed, followed by a national plan for strengthening cancer prevention and control. As a result, intersectorial work and health promotion oriented to cancer prevention through information, education and communication were strengthened. Service supply was improved and optimized through decentralization of oncological care.

  13. Integrating physical stress, growth, and development.

    PubMed

    Uyttewaal, Magalie; Traas, Jan; Hamant, Olivier

    2010-02-01

    Linking the gene regulatory network to morphogenesis is a central question in developmental biology. Shape relies on the combined actions of biochemistry and biophysics, two parameters that are under local genetic control. The blooming of molecular biology since the 1970s has promoted a biochemical view of development, leaving behind the contribution of physical forces. Recently, the development of new techniques, such as live imaging, micromechanical approaches, and computer modeling, has revitalized the biomechanics field. In this review, we use shoot apical meristem development to illustrate how biochemistry and biomechanics cooperate to integrate the local cellular gene input into global growth patterns. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM: Understanding and mitigating the impacts of inflammation on animal growth and development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Growth and Development Symposium titled “Understanding and mitigating the impacts of inflammation on animal growth and development” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, LA, July 10 to 14, 2011. T...

  15. Population growth and development: the Kenyan experience.

    PubMed

    Nyamwange, M

    1995-01-01

    Rapid population growth in Kenya and high fertility impacts negatively on economic development. The growth and high fertility results in declines in gross national product, per capita food consumption, and land quality; a high dependency ratio; urban crowding; and inadequate health systems. East Africa has the highest crude birth rates in Africa, and Kenya has the highest birth rate of 54/1000 population in East Africa. The African crude death rate is 50% higher than the world average, but Kenya's death rate is the lowest in East Africa and comparable to North American and European death rates. Kenya has the highest rate of natural increase of about 4%. Population growth rates rose over the decades. Kenya's average population density is well above the sub-Saharan African average and much lower than very high density countries. Population is unequally distributed. Regional densities are widely divergent, and the highest densities in Western province are well above densities in Rwanda and Burundi. Urban growth has increased, as has migration to urban areas. Nairobi has 57% of urban population. Improved health and nutrition have contributed to increased life expectancy. The desired family size is large. The impact of demographic factors on economic conditions is evident in the decline in gross national product per capita growth to under 1% during 1972-88. A slight upswing occurred during 1988-93, but other crises are emerging. Food production has not kept pace with population growth. Production has been low due to serious land degradation, short fallow periods, and traditional farming practices. Population pressure has forced families to shift agriculture onto marginal lands, and desertification has increased. A growing proportion of the population is unemployed or underemployed. Population programs should address the underlying conditions for fertility decline.

  16. A Study of Myometrial Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Stewart F; Oshri, Assaf; Heller, Debra S

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate myometrial growth and development. Thirty-five autopsy uteri, ranging from 10 weeks' gestation to age 18 years, acquired over 3 decades from 2 hospitals, were studied based on specimen availability, photographed for documentation, and reviewed at the end of the study. Most were embedded in toto, with 1 block and 1 slide per case. Some were immunostained for actin, CD10, MIB-1, and/or trichrome stain for collagen and muscle. Myometrial thickness was measured by ocular micrometry when sections were nontangential and analyzed by paired-sample t tests and bivariate linear regression. Two university-affiliated hospitals. From 20 to 34 weeks, lateral wall corpus thickness increased 6-fold, with a 4- to 6-fold perinatal burst of growth (P < .01) and a drop in thickness after the neonatal period (P = .013). The corpus was thicker than the dome (P < .01) but less thick than the lower uterine segment (P = .087). The lower uterine segment was fully muscular in the second trimester, becoming more fibrous near term. Intramural, subserosal, and inframucosal myometaplasia were observed, as primitive stromal cells turned into muscle cells. Myometrial proliferation was brisk in the second trimester but greatly diminished in the perinatal period. Pressure effects from myometrial tone were observed during development. There was a pubertal burst of inframucosal myometaplasia. Myometaplasia accounted for most myometrial growth, especially in the perinatal and pubertal bursts of growth. Pressure effects, related to myometrial tone, appeared to affect myometrial development. True endocervix, with a fibrous wall and mucinous epithelium, appeared late in development. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Redox control of plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Kocsy, Gábor; Tari, Irma; Vanková, Radomíra; Zechmann, Bernd; Gulyás, Zsolt; Poór, Péter; Galiba, Gábor

    2013-10-01

    Redox changes determined by genetic and environmental factors display well-organized interactions in the control of plant growth and development. Diurnal and seasonal changes in the environmental conditions are important for the normal course of these physiological processes and, similarly to their mild irregular alterations, for stress adaptation. However, fast or large-scale environmental changes may lead to damage or death of sensitive plants. The spatial and temporal redox changes influence growth and development due to the reprogramming of metabolism. In this process reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidants are involved as components of signalling networks. The control of growth, development and flowering by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidants in interaction with hormones at organ, tissue, cellular and subcellular level will be discussed in the present review. Unsolved problems of the field, among others the need for identification of new components and interactions in the redox regulatory network at various organization levels using systems biology approaches will be also indicated.

  18. Adaptability in Coalition Teamwork (Facultes d’adaptation au travail d’equipe en coalition)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    to provide advice to NATO and national decision makers. The RTO performs its mission with the support of an extensive network of national experts. It...Summary Multinational coalitions are a complicated assembly of individuals, networks and organizations required to perform as teams, often ad-hoc or...of their own and others’ thoughts and their manifested predisposition to behaviour. Diversity can either enhance or hinder team performance along

  19. Promoting community coalition functioning: effects of Project STEP.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Nathaniel R; Nakawatase, Morgan; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2008-06-01

    There has been relatively little research on effects of interventions aimed directly at improving internal community coalition functioning, particularly in the area of planning for adoption of evidence-based prevention programs. The current study investigated the effect of Project STEP, a prevention diffusion trial, on three factors hypothesized to improve coalition prevention planning (quality of coalition plans, extent of plan implementation, and committee internal functioning in meetings). Cities were randomly assigned to one of three conditions (televised training with limited technical assistance, televised training alone, or control; n = 24). Results demonstrated that at 1.5 year follow-up, coalitions in the two intervention groups showed more effective prevention plans, plan implementation, and functioning in meetings than control coalitions. Group differences were maintained at 3-year follow-up, albeit at decreased levels, for quality of planning and implementation. The findings suggest that building coalition capacity to diffuse evidence-based prevention programs works at least partially by increasing the effectiveness of coalition functioning, and that booster training may be warranted within 3 years after initial training.

  20. Coalitional capacities and environmental strategies to prevent underage drinking.

    PubMed

    Nargiso, Jessica E; Friend, Karen B; Egan, Crystelle; Florin, Paul; Stevenson, John; Amodei, Brenda; Barovier, Linda

    2013-03-01

    Coalitions are the most common platform for implementing community-level environmental strategies (ES), such as media, policy, or enforcement for substance use prevention. The current study examines the associations between two types of coalition capacity (general and innovation-specific) and ES implementation efforts and outputs within 14 intervention communities over a three-year period. Efforts refer to the amount of energy exerted to implement an ES while outputs refer to the materials produced through these efforts. Quantitative measures of capacity were provided by coalition key informants and expert-raters. Additionally, Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) provided proactively to improve the implementation of ES was also examined. Greater general capacity, as rated by a coalition informant, was associated with more ES policy effort. Both expert-rated general and innovation-specific capacity, however, were associated with greater ES outputs. Study results also found that community coalitions that endorsed weaker mobilization, structure and task leadership, (measures of general capacity), utilized more TTA compared to those who perceived their coalition as having greater capacity. Moreover, communities that utilized more TTA resources reported a greater number of successful policy changes. The study supports the need to consider both general and innovation-specific capacity for ES implementation and offers promising preliminary findings regarding the role of TTA for improving coalitions' capacity to facilitate policy change.

  1. Functional mapping of growth and development.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Wu, Rongling

    2010-05-01

    Understanding how an organism develops into a fully functioning adult from a mass of undifferentiated cells may reveal different strategies that allow the organism to survive under limiting conditions. Here, we review an analytical model for characterizing quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that underlie variation in growth trajectories and developmental timing. This model, called functional mapping, incorporates fundamental principles behind biological processes or networks that are bridged with mathematical functions into a statistical mapping framework. Functional mapping estimates parameters that determine the shape and function of a particular biological process, thus providing a flexible platform to test biologically meaningful hypotheses regarding the complex relationships between gene action and development.

  2. Population growth and sustainable development in China.

    PubMed

    Gui, S

    1998-12-01

    This article identifies the adverse impacts of population growth in China and offers suggestions for attaining sustainable development. Although China has below replacement level fertility, population will continue to increase. Chinese demographers project that the total fertility rate will average 2.1 each year until 2010, 2.1 until 2050, or 1.88 until 2010 and 1.6 during 2010-2050 under high, medium, and low variants, respectively. Total population would number 1.69 billion, 1.50 billion, or 1.46 billion under various projections, respectively, by 2050. Continued growth is expected to seriously slow economic development, to hinder improvements in the quality of and full use of human resources, to depress increases in per-capita economic development levels, and to impact on reasonable use of resources and environmental protection. The averting of 5 million births would save 35.5 billion yuan. Population growth has reduced the per-capita share of cultivated land from 0.19 to 0.08 hectares during 1952-95. There are about 150-190 million surplus rural laborers. Registered unemployment in cities was 3.1% in 1997. 11.5 million were laid-off workers. The working-age population will exceed 900 million during 2007-26. China's gross national product (GNP) was the 8th highest in the world in 1990, but its per-capita GNP was in 100th place. China's abundant natural resources are seriously reduced when population is considered. Environmental damage is already evident. Population growth needs to be controlled through family planning, an old-age social security program, and long-term population policies. Society needs healthier births and childbearing and better educated children.

  3. Development of the larval amphibian growth and development ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Larval Amphibian Growth and Development Assay (LAGDA) is a Tier II test guideline being developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. The LAGDA was designed to evaluate effects of chronic chemical exposure on growth, thyroid-mediated amphibian metamorphosis and reproductive development. To evaluate the assay’s performance, two model chemicals targeting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis were tested; a weak estrogen receptor agonist, 4-tert-octylphenol (tOP), and an androgen receptor agonist, 17β-trenbolone (TB). Xenopus laevis embryos were constantly exposed in flow-through conditions to various test concentrations of tOP (nominal: 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 μg/L) or TB (nominal: 12.5, 25, 50, 100 ng/L) and clean water controls until 8 weeks post-metamorphosis, at which time growth measurements were taken and histopathology assessments were made on gonads, reproductive ducts, liver and kidneys. There were no effects on growth in either study and no signs of overt toxicity, sex reversal or gonad dysgenesis at the concentrations tested. Exposure to tOP caused a treatment-related decrease in circulating thyroxine and an increase in thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia (25, 50 μg/L). Müllerian duct development was clearly affected following exposure to both chemicals; tOP exposure caused dose-dependent maturation of oviducts in both male and female frogs, whereas TB exposure ca

  4. Nutrition and bone growth and development.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Ann; Schoenmakers, Inez; Laskey, M Ann; de Bono, Stephanie; Ginty, Fiona; Goldberg, Gail R

    2006-11-01

    The growth and development of the human skeleton requires an adequate supply of many different nutritional factors. Classical nutrient deficiencies are associated with stunting (e.g. energy, protein, Zn), rickets (e.g. vitamin D) and other bone abnormalities (e.g. Cu, Zn, vitamin C). In recent years there has been interest in the role nutrition may play in bone growth at intakes above those required to prevent classical deficiencies, particularly in relation to optimising peak bone mass and minimising osteoporosis risk. There is evidence to suggest that peak bone mass and later fracture risk are influenced by the pattern of growth in childhood and by nutritional exposures in utero, in infancy and during childhood and adolescence. Of the individual nutrients, particular attention has been paid to Ca, vitamin D, protein and P. There has also been interest in several food groups, particularly dairy products, fruit and vegetables and foods contributing to acid-base balance. However, it is not possible at the present time to define dietary reference values using bone health as a criterion, and the question of what type of diet constitutes the best support for optimal bone growth and development remains open. Prudent recommendations (Department of Health, 1998; World Health Organization/Food and Agriculture Organization, 2003) are the same as those for adults, i.e. to consume a Ca intake close to the reference nutrient intake, optimise vitamin D status through adequate summer sunshine exposure (and diet supplementation where appropriate), be physically active, have a body weight in the healthy range, restrict salt intake and consume plenty of fruit and vegetables.

  5. Axon kinematics change during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hailing; Shreiber, David I

    2007-08-01

    The microkinematic response of axons to mechanical stretch was examined in the developing chick embryo spinal cord during a period of rapid growth and myelination. Spinal cords were isolated at different days of embryonic (E) development post-fertilization (E12, E14, E16, and E18) and stretched 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%, respectively. During this period, the spinal cord grew approximately 55% in length, and white matter tracts were myelinated significantly. The spinal cords were fixed with paraformaldehyde at the stretched length, sectioned, stained immunohistochemically for neurofilament proteins, and imaged with epifluorescence microscopy. Axons in unstretched spinal cords were undulated, or tortuous, to varying degrees, and appeared to straighten with stretch. The degree of tortuosity (ratio of the segment's pathlength to its end-to-end length) was quantified in each spinal cord by tracing several hundred randomly selected axons. The change in tortuosity distributions with stretch indicated that axons switched from non-affine, uncoupled behavior at low stretch levels to affine, coupled behavior at high stretch levels, which was consistent with previous reports of axon behavior in the adult guinea pig optic nerve (Bain, Shreiber, and Meaney, J. Biomech. Eng., 125(6), pp. 798-804). A mathematical model previously proposed by Bain et al. was applied to quantify the transition in kinematic behavior. The results indicated that significant percentages of axons demonstrated purely non-affine behavior at each stage, but that this percentage decreased from 64% at E12 to 30% at E18. The decrease correlated negatively to increases in both length and myelination with development, but the change in axon kinematics could not be explained by stretch applied during physical growth of the spinal cord. The relationship between tissue-level and axonal-level deformation changes with development, which can have important implications in the response to physiological forces

  6. Operational development of small plant growth systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheld, H. W.; Magnuson, J. W.; Sauer, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a study undertaken on the first phase of an empricial effort in the development of small plant growth chambers for production of salad type vegetables on space shuttle or space station are discussed. The overall effort is visualized as providing the underpinning of practical experience in handling of plant systems in space which will provide major support for future efforts in planning, design, and construction of plant-based (phytomechanical) systems for support of human habitation in space. The assumptions underlying the effort hold that large scale phytomechanical habitability support systems for future space stations must evolve from the simple to the complex. The highly complex final systems will be developed from the accumulated experience and data gathered from repetitive tests and trials of fragments or subsystems of the whole in an operational mode. These developing system components will, meanwhile, serve a useful operational function in providing psychological support and diversion for the crews.

  7. Physiologic changes during growth and development.

    PubMed Central

    O'Flaherty, E J

    1994-01-01

    To express growth-related changes in physiologic or other functions in forms usable for kinetic modeling, we are interested in identifying regular relationships that take the form of simple mathematical expressions. Many anatomic and physiologic functions scale within or across species in accordance with the allometric relationship, y = axb. These include many organ weights, the glomerular filtration rate, respiration rate, oxygen consumption, or basal metabolic rate. The allometric lines may display discontinuities in slope associated with critical growth periods such as transitions from one growth phase to another. On the other hand, many other kinetically important processes depend on the physiocochemical characteristics of the agent and of the sites in the body with which it interacts. Their rates of development are determined by the age-dependence of these physiocochemical characteristics and of their interactions. Examples of different types of age-dependence are given, and their combined impact on the age-dependence of lead-kinetic behavior is examined. PMID:7737033

  8. The role of growth in heart development.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, Kent L; Louey, Samantha; Giraud, George D

    2008-01-01

    While it is established that the quality of the perinatal environment is critical in sculpting the developing individual, the mechanisms by which this occurs remain poorly defined. The growing fetus is dependent on the nutrients (including oxygen) it receives from the mother via the placenta. When this supply line is compromised, heart growth patterns are altered. In addition, hormones, other circulating factors, and the hemodynamic environment in which the fetus develops are important in determining outcomes for organ structure and function. Numerous studies in sheep have demonstrated that heart development can be modified in a number of ways, and the nature of the change differs between types and gestational timings of insults. Embolization of the placenta leads to the cessation of proliferation and maturation of cardiomyocytes; this may be due in part to changes in circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. Such insults may be the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease in adults. Insults that modify the maturational timeline, final myocyte number, vascularity and endothelial responsiveness in the heart can have effects that persist long after the insult has been ameliorated.

  9. Gove v. the Blob: The Coalition and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The author provides a year-by-year account of events during the period of the Conservative-led coalition government from 2010 to 2015 and concludes with some observations on the damage done to England's state education system.

  10. Gove v. the Blob: The Coalition and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The author provides a year-by-year account of events during the period of the Conservative-led coalition government from 2010 to 2015 and concludes with some observations on the damage done to England's state education system.

  11. Endangered Species Case - Washington Toxics Coalition v. EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Web page provides information on the Washington Toxics Coalition v. EPA case, related to protection of Pacific salmon and steelhead, and links to the biological opinions issued by the NMFS and EPA’s responses.

  12. Preparing for Coalition Warfare in the Age of Austerity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-05

    coalition information sharing tools to come out of the last decade is the Afghan Mission Network (AMN). The AMN successfully fuses a plethora of...national systems to allow for sharing 9 of data, commander‘s intent, and situational awareness across the battlefield and indeed back to home...senior coalition commanders describe it as an operational ‗game changer ,‘ a declaration echoed by former ISAF Commander General David Petraeus: "The

  13. The agencies method for coalition formation in experimental games

    PubMed Central

    Nash, John F.; Nagel, Rosemarie; Ockenfels, Axel; Selten, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    In society, power is often transferred to another person or group. A previous work studied the evolution of cooperation among robot players through a coalition formation game with a non-cooperative procedure of acceptance of an agency of another player. Motivated by this previous work, we conduct a laboratory experiment on finitely repeated three-person coalition formation games. Human players with different strength according to the coalition payoffs can accept a transfer of power to another player, the agent, who then distributes the coalition payoffs. We find that the agencies method for coalition formation is quite successful in promoting efficiency. However, the agent faces a tension between short-term incentives of not equally distributing the coalition payoff and the long-term concern to keep cooperation going. In a given round, the strong player in our experiment often resolves this tension approximately in line with the Shapley value and the nucleolus. Yet aggregated over all rounds, the payoff differences between players are rather small, and the equal division of payoffs predicts about 80% of all groups best. One reason is that the voting procedure appears to induce a balance of power, independent of the individual player's strength: Selfish subjects tend to be voted out of their agency and are further disciplined by reciprocal behaviors. PMID:23175792

  14. Bilateral Complete Osseous Coalition of the Capitate and Trapezoid.

    PubMed

    Christ, Alexander B; Maertens, Andrew S; Weiland, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Isolated capitate-trapezoid coalition is a rare form of carpal coalition with few cases described in the literature and a little insight as to how it should be addressed clinically. We present a case of bilateral, a complete osseous carpal coalition between capitate and trapezoid discovered in the setting of atraumatic, symptomatic scapholunate dissociation in a 59-year-old, right-handed mechanic. Published reports of capitate-trapezoid coalition are rare, and there is no consensus as to whether this abnormality is a symptomatic pathology or incidental finding. Most reports describe the finding, but do not recommend a course of treatment; several recommend surgery, but the patient declined or it was not mentioned whether it was performed. Capitate-trapezoid coalition is a rare condition that may present symptomatically or may be found incidentally. Reports are scant, and there are no guidelines for how to address these clinically. We present the first bilateral case report of capitate-trapezoid coalition confirmed with cross-sectional imaging and present a treatment algorithm.

  15. Bilateral Complete Osseous Coalition of the Capitate and Trapezoid

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Alexander B.; Maertens, Andrew S.; Weiland, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Isolated capitate–trapezoid coalition is a rare form of carpal coalition with few cases described in the literature and a little insight as to how it should be addressed clinically. Case Description  We present a case of bilateral, a complete osseous carpal coalition between capitate and trapezoid discovered in the setting of atraumatic, symptomatic scapholunate dissociation in a 59-year-old, right-handed mechanic. Literature Review  Published reports of capitate–trapezoid coalition are rare, and there is no consensus as to whether this abnormality is a symptomatic pathology or incidental finding. Most reports describe the finding, but do not recommend a course of treatment; several recommend surgery, but the patient declined or it was not mentioned whether it was performed. Clinical Relevance  Capitate–trapezoid coalition is a rare condition that may present symptomatically or may be found incidentally. Reports are scant, and there are no guidelines for how to address these clinically. We present the first bilateral case report of capitate–trapezoid coalition confirmed with cross-sectional imaging and present a treatment algorithm. PMID:27468375

  16. Predictors and level of sustainability of community prevention coalitions.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Mark E; Bontempo, Daniel E; Greenberg, Mark T

    2008-06-01

    After many years in which evaluations had generally not found the coalition approach to be effective, the community-coalition approach has recently been shown to produce a public health impact if best practices are utilized. The next challenge is to foster sustainability among coalitions in order to achieve long-term public health outcomes. This study examined the level of and predictors of sustainability among Communities That Care (CTC) sites in Pennsylvania. Board functioning and the funding of 110 CTC sites were assessed through the reports of board members, staff, and technical-assistance providers from 2003 through 2006; data were analyzed in 2007. Ninety percent of CTC coalitions continued after the 3-year initial funding period, with 3%-8% of sites terminating each year thereafter. Approximately two thirds of CTC sites continued to operate 4 years after the termination of the original 3-year implementation grant. Many of the sites attracted funding at a level equivalent to or greater than the initial grant. Overall coalition functioning, as reported by either board members or technical-assistance providers, along with planning for sustainability, predicted both survival and post-launch funding. Evidence suggests that board functioning predicts survival, at least in part independently of its influence on funding; and that planning for sustainability predicts sustainability, at least in part independently of overall coalition functioning.

  17. The agencies method for coalition formation in experimental games.

    PubMed

    Nash, John F; Nagel, Rosemarie; Ockenfels, Axel; Selten, Reinhard

    2012-12-11

    In society, power is often transferred to another person or group. A previous work studied the evolution of cooperation among robot players through a coalition formation game with a non-cooperative procedure of acceptance of an agency of another player. Motivated by this previous work, we conduct a laboratory experiment on finitely repeated three-person coalition formation games. Human players with different strength according to the coalition payoffs can accept a transfer of power to another player, the agent, who then distributes the coalition payoffs. We find that the agencies method for coalition formation is quite successful in promoting efficiency. However, the agent faces a tension between short-term incentives of not equally distributing the coalition payoff and the long-term concern to keep cooperation going. In a given round, the strong player in our experiment often resolves this tension approximately in line with the Shapley value and the nucleolus. Yet aggregated over all rounds, the payoff differences between players are rather small, and the equal division of payoffs predicts about 80% of all groups best. One reason is that the voting procedure appears to induce a balance of power, independent of the individual player's strength: Selfish subjects tend to be voted out of their agency and are further disciplined by reciprocal behaviors.

  18. Optimizing Health Care Coalitions: Conceptual Frameworks and a Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Hupert, Nathaniel; Biala, Karen; Holland, Tara; Baehr, Avi; Hasan, Aisha; Harvey, Melissa

    2015-12-01

    The US health care system has maintained an objective of preparedness for natural or manmade catastrophic events as part of its larger charge to deliver health services for the American population. In 2002, support for hospital-based preparedness activities was bolstered by the creation of the National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program, now called the Hospital Preparedness Program, in the US Department of Health and Human Services. Since 2012, this program has promoted linking health care facilities into health care coalitions that build key preparedness and emergency response capabilities. Recognizing that well-functioning health care coalitions can have a positive impact on the health outcomes of the populations they serve, this article informs efforts to optimize health care coalition activity. We first review the landscape of health care coalitions in the United States. Then, using principles from supply chain management and high-reliability organization theory, we present 2 frameworks extending beyond the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response's current guidance in a way that may help health care coalition leaders gain conceptual insight into how different enterprises achieve similar ends relevant to emergency response. We conclude with a proposed research agenda to advance understanding of how coalitions can contribute to the day-to-day functioning of health care systems and disaster preparedness.

  19. Childhood cognitive development after fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Llurba, E; Baschat, A A; Turan, O M; Harding, J; McCowan, L M

    2013-04-01

    To examine the relationship between prenatal umbilical artery (UA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) Doppler findings and cognitive development at 3 and 6 years in low-birth-weight children. This was a study of 209 low-birth-weight (< 10(th) centile) children born after 28 gestational weeks with UA resistance index (RI) measured within 2 weeks before delivery. Children with normal UA- and ICA-RI were defined as small-for-gestational age (SGA) and those with abnormal UA or ICA Doppler findings as having fetal growth restriction (FGR). Cognitive ability at 3 and 6 years' corrected age was assessed using the fourth edition of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (SBIS) and compared between SGA and FGR groups. An SBIS score < 85 was considered to indicate delayed development. The median gestational age at diagnosis of abnormal fetal growth was 36.6 (range, 28-41) weeks. There were 87 (41.6%) children classified as having FGR and 122 (58.4%) as SGA. The mean global SBIS score at 3 years was 109.4 (SD, 22.8) and at 6 years it was 110.5 (SD, 13.9). Overall, 22 (10.5%) children had delayed development at 3 years. Total SBIS scores and individual domain scores did not differ between FGR and SGA groups at 3 or 6 years and similar proportions in each group had delayed development. Abnormal prenatal UA and ICA Doppler findings are not associated with lower developmental scores in low-birth-weight children delivered in the third trimester of pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A university, community coalition, and town partnership to promote walking.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Sarah F; Williams, Joel E; Hickman, Powell; Kirchner, Amber; Spitler, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Less than half of all US adults report meeting physical activity recommendations of 30 minutes or more of moderate to vigorous physical activity on at least 5 days per week. Thus, community-wide ecological initiatives are needed to create environments that support incorporating physical activity into residents' daily lives. In this article we describe an ongoing collaborative service-learning partnership between Clemson University, a community coalition, and a neighboring small rural town to address local social and physical environment supports for walking. Years 1 to 3 of this collaborative initiative were evaluated using a mixed-method approach to assess physical environment changes, social environment changes, community perceptions of support for walking, community perceptions of collaborating with university students, and students' skill development. Results revealed several key environmental changes such as mapping and marking 3 walking trails in the community, development of broad marketing efforts linked to the trails that promote community health and heritage, and annual community events to promote walking and the newly developed walking trails. Interview data with community leaders identified several key themes critical to facilitating and enhancing our university and community collaboration. Lastly, students developed skills in developing partnerships, mapping, advocacy, event planning, critical reflection, and qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis. Through this process community members and students learn evidence-based public health skills for using data and planning frameworks to guide local initiatives, engage community members in decision making, and conducting evaluations.

  1. Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition: Extending the PhysTEC Model to Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Mary

    2012-02-01

    The American Association of Employment in Education reports that chemistry, like physics, faces ``some shortage'' of educators. Inspired by the success of the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), the American Chemical Society (ACS) is developing the Chemistry Teacher Education Coalition (CTEC) to actively engage chemistry departments in the preparation of future chemistry teachers. Engaging chemistry departments in teacher preparation would increase the number and diversity of well-prepared high school chemistry teachers while catalyzing cultural change within chemistry departments. Many features of PhysTEC, such as a grant competition to create model teacher preparation programs and regular conferences, are directly applicable to chemistry. This presentation will provide an overview of ACS efforts to launch a successful CTEC initiative.

  2. Albert Sabin and the Coalition to Eliminate Polio from the Americas.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Albert B. Sabin, MD, developer of the oral polio vaccine, was also a major proponent of its use in annual vaccination campaigns aimed at the elimination of polio. Sabin argued that administering his vaccine simultaneously to every child in a country would break polio's chains of transmission. Although he was already promoting mass vaccination by the 1960s, Sabin's efforts expanded considerably when he became an adviser to groups fighting polio in the Americas in the 1980s. Sabin's experiences provide a window into both the formation of the coalition that eliminated poliomyelitis from the Western Hemisphere and what can happen when biomedical researchers become public health policy advisers. Although the polio elimination coalition succeeded in part because member groups often accommodated each other's priorities, Sabin was often limited by his indifference to the interests of those he was advising and to the shortcomings of his vaccine.

  3. Complete bony coalition of the talus and navicular: decades of discomfort

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, David; Uzoigwe, Chika Edward; Bhagat, Shaishav B; Menon, Dipen K

    2011-01-01

    Tarsal coalition is a congenital disturbance of hindfoot development. Talonavicular coalition is among the rarest forms of aberrant bony union of the tarsus. It frequently occurs bilaterally and in association with a number of skeletal deformities. Some patients are asymptomatic and the anomaly is discovered incidentally on plain radiographs. For others, a troublesome bony prominence will be the principle complaint and in a small proportion of patients marked foot and ankle pain with activity will prove debilitating. The authors describe the case of a 54-year-old male with bilateral foot pain spanning for nearly two decades. Symptom onset was insidious and at the time of presentation, he was limited to 10–15 min of mobilisation on flat ground. PMID:22691945

  4. Albert Sabin and the Coalition to Eliminate Polio From the Americas

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Albert B. Sabin, MD, developer of the oral polio vaccine, was also a major proponent of its use in annual vaccination campaigns aimed at the elimination of polio. Sabin argued that administering his vaccine simultaneously to every child in a country would break polio's chains of transmission. Although he was already promoting mass vaccination by the 1960s, Sabin's efforts expanded considerably when he became an adviser to groups fighting polio in the Americas in the 1980s. Sabin's experiences provide a window into both the formation of the coalition that eliminated poliomyelitis from the Western Hemisphere and what can happen when biomedical researchers become public health policy advisers. Although the polio elimination coalition succeeded in part because member groups often accommodated each other's priorities, Sabin was often limited by his indifference to the interests of those he was advising and to the shortcomings of his vaccine. PMID:19008524

  5. Population growth and education development in China.

    PubMed

    Wei, J

    1988-09-01

    Using data from the 1982 national census and the 1982 national 1 per 1000 fertility sampling survey, this paper examines population growth and educational development in China. From 1949-1979, an average of 22 million people were born each year. In 1985, the birth rate was 20.9 and the natural increase rate was 14.9 per 1000. In 1949, the average numbers of students per 10,000 in university, middle school, and primary school were 2.2, 23, and 450, respectively. In 1982, the numbers were 1.4, 465, and 1324, respectively. Rapid population growth impedes educational development either by reducing educational quality to maintain enrollment or by reducing the quantity to maintain educational quality. Among those over age 12, roughly 1/3 were illiterate. Nonetheless, China has made significant progress in education. The illiteracy rate among 12-14 year olds is below 10%, and more than 1/4 of women have a primary school education. Among women ages 25-34, about 3/5 had a primary school education. The illiteracy rate among rural women age 20-44 is 6 times that of their urban counterparts. Women with a primary school education have about 2 times the fertility level of women with a college education, while the general fertility rate for women with a middle school education is about 1/4 lower than those with a primary school education. The higher the educational level, the lower the number of children ever born. Contraceptive use rates among women with a primary school education are significantly higher than those of illiterate women. Without education and development, the family planning program and birth control cannot be successful in China.

  6. Determinants of Community Coalition Ability to Support Evidence-Based Programs

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how aspects of coalition functioning predict a coalition's ability to promote high-quality implementation of evidence-based programs (EBPs). The study involved 62 Communities That Care (CTC) coalitions in Pennsylvania measured annually from 2003 to 2007. Findings indicate that the communities with higher levels of poverty and longer existing coalitions are related to lower support for high-quality EBP implementation. Several aspects of coalition functioning—including higher levels of funding; leadership strength; board efficiency; strong internal and external relationships; and fidelity to the CTC model—significantly predicted support for high-quality EBP implementation. Earlier measurements of coalition functioning (2003–2004 and 2005–2006) predicted EBP implementation (2007) more strongly than concurrent coalition assessments (2007). The discussion focuses on how coalitions and technical assistance providers can improve coalition support for the implementation of EBPs. PMID:20352332

  7. Triennial Growth Symposium: Dietary regulation of growth development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 2010 Triennial Growth Symposium was held immediately before the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, Poultry Science Association, Asociación Mexicana de Producción Animal, Canadian Society of Animal Science, Western Section American Society of Animal Science, and Ameri...

  8. Early intestinal growth and development in poultry.

    PubMed

    Lilburn, M S; Loeffler, S

    2015-07-01

    While there are many accepted "facts" within the field of poultry science that are in truth still open for discussion, there is little debate with respect to the tremendous genetic progress that has been made with commercial broilers and turkeys (Havenstein et al., 2003, 2007). When one considers the changes in carcass development in poultry meat strains, these genetic "improvements" have not always been accompanied by correlated changes in other physiological systems and this can predispose some birds to developmental anomalies (i.e. ascites; Pavlidis et al., 2007; Wideman et al., 2013). Over the last decade, there has been increased interest in intestinal growth/health as poultry nutritionists have attempted to adopt new approaches to deal with the broader changes in the overall nutrition landscape. This landscape includes not only the aforementioned genetic changes but also a raft of governmental policies that have focused attention on the environment (phosphorus and nitrogen excretion), consumer pressure on the use of antibiotics, and renewable biofuels with its consequent effects on ingredient costs. Intestinal morphology has become a common research tool for assessing nutritional effects on the intestine but it is only one metric among many that can be used and histological results can often be interpreted in a variety of ways. This study will address the broader body of research on intestinal growth and development in commercial poultry and will attempt to integrate the topics of the intestinal: microbial interface and the role of the intestine as an immune tissue under the broad umbrella of intestinal physiology. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  9. Growth and development of the ovine conceptus.

    PubMed

    Bazer, F W; Spencer, T E; Thatcher, W W

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to characterize development of the ovine conceptus throughout gestation to establish the temporal relationships in metabolites, electrolytes, fluid volumes within the placenta, and hormonal changes with fetal growth. Length and weight of placentae, weight of cotyledons, and uterine weight increased between d 25 and 80 of gestation in advance of increases in fetal growth between d 80 and 140 of gestation. Allantoic fluid volumes changed (P < 0.01) between d 25 (21 mL) and 40 (91 mL), decreased to d 70 (32 mL), and then increased to d 140 (438 mL). Concentrations and total amounts of proteins in allantoic fluid were reduced between d 25 and 50, but total protein increased (P < 0.01) from d 40 (63 mg) to d 140 (2,991 mg). Concentrations of fructose in allantoic fluid varied between 2 and 6 mg/mL throughout gestation, but total fructose increased (P < 0.01) between d 25 (46 mg) and d 120 (679 mg). Concentrations of glucose ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 mg/mL, and total glucose increased (P < 0.05) from d 25 (3 mg) to d 140 (63 mg) of gestation. Amniotic fluid volume increased (P < 0.01) between d 30 and 140. Concentrations of estrogens in allantoic fluid, maternal uterine artery, and uterine vein increased (P < 0.01) with advancing pregnancy, and concentrations of progesterone in allantoic fluid (P < 0.07) and plasma (P < 0.05) were affected by day of gestation. Concentrations of glucose were greater (P < 0.05) in uterine artery than uterine vein, but concentrations of electrolytes and osmolarity of plasma were not affected by day of gestation. Increases in weights of fetal organs were proportional to increases in fetal weight during gestation. Results of the present study of conceptus growth and development highlight areas of needed research and provide benchmarks for comparisons when evaluating effects of various treatments, environmental conditions, and epigenetics on successful outcomes of pregnancy in sheep.

  10. Hormone symphony during root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; De La Paz Sánchez, María; García-Ponce, Berenice; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2012-12-01

    Hormones regulate plant growth and development in response to external environmental stimuli via complex signal transduction pathways, which in turn form complex networks of interaction. Several classes of hormones have been reported, and their activity depends on their biosynthesis, transport, conjugation, accumulation in the vacuole, and degradation. However, the activity of a given hormone is also dependent on its interaction with other hormones. Indeed, there is a complex crosstalk between hormones that regulates their biosynthesis, transport, and/or signaling functionality, although some hormones have overlapping or opposite functions. The plant root is a particularly useful system in which to study the complex role of plant hormones in the plastic control of plant development. Physiological, cellular, and molecular genetic approaches have been used to study the role of plant hormones in root meristem homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the synthesis, signaling, transport of hormones and role during root development and examine the role of hormone crosstalk in maintaining homeostasis in the apical root meristem. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Animal studies on growth and development.

    PubMed

    Lerchl, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Despite the fact that no plausible biological mechanism has yet been identified how electromagnetic fields below recommended exposure limits could negatively affect health of animals or humans, many experiments have been performed in various animal species, mainly mice and rats, to investigate the possible effects on growth and development. While older studies often suffered from sub-optimal exposure conditions, recent investigations, using sophisticated exposure devices and thus preventing thermal effects, have been performed without these limitations. In principle, two types of studies can be addressed: those which have investigated the carcinogenic or co-carcinogenic effects of exposure in developing animals, and those which have been done in developing animals without the focus on carcinogenic or co-carcinogenic effects. In both areas, the vast majority of publications did not show adverse effects. The largest study so far has been done in normal mice which have been chronically exposed to UMTS signals up to 1.3 W/kg SAR, thus 16 times higher than the whole-body exposure limit for humans. Even after four generations, no systematic or dose-dependent alterations in development or fertility could be found, supporting the view that negative effects on humans are very unlikely. Ongoing experiments in our laboratory investigate the effects of head-only exposure in rats (up to 10 W/kg local SAR) which are exposed from 14 days of age daily for 2 h. A battery of behavioral tests is performed in young, adult, and pre-senile animals. The results will help to clarify possible effects of exposure on brain development.

  12. Compound equation developed for postnatal growth of birds and mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Compound growth equation was developed in which the rate of this linear growth process is regarded as proportional to the mass already attained at any instant by an underlying Gompertz process. This compound growth model was fitted to the growth data of a variety of birds and mammals of both sexes.

  13. Coalition contract management as a systems change strategy for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Darrow, William W; Montanea, Julie E; Sánchez-Braña, Elizabeth

    2010-11-01

    Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 provided a unique opportunity for minority community-based organizations (CBOs) to work together to eliminate disparities in HIV disease. A coalition was formed in Broward County to respond to the REACH 2010 program announcement, a university was chosen to coordinate efforts, and contracts were negotiated with CBO partners to develop, implement, and evaluate a community action plan. Contract management provided stability, focus, and a mechanism for coalition partners to measure progress toward achieving project objectives. By emphasizing documentation as well as the delivery of services, however, contract conditions also placed a heavy burden on educational outreach workers, restricted the reimbursable activities of member organizations, and created friction between minority agencies and university staff. Although the coalition met many of its objectives, the introduction and enforcement of a mutually agreed on set of rules and obligations as a way of promoting systems change in Broward County failed to make a lasting impact among community partners. CBOs continued to compete with one another for HIV prevention project funding and stopped collaborating as closely with another when federal support for our REACH 2010 community demonstration project ran out.

  14. [Growth factors in human tooth development].

    PubMed

    Bellone, C; Barni, T; Pagni, L; Balboni, G C; Vannelli, G B

    1990-03-01

    Our research concerns the immunohistochemical localization of EGF and IGF-I receptors in the tooth germ, using monoclonal antibodies. The results show that in the early phases of human tooth development EGF and IGF-I receptors are present. At bud stage both receptors are localized at dental laminae level, in some epithelial cells of the tooth bud and in some mesenchymal cells. At cap stage the receptors are present in the outer and inner enamel epithelium, and in some cells of stellate reticulum. As far as concerns the mesenchymal cells, some cells of dental papilla in contact with enamel organ, are intensely positive. The immunopositivity is present also in some mesenchymal cells at follicular level. At late cap stage and at early bell stage receptors are not present at inner enamel epithelium level but they can be detectable in the mesenchyma of dental papilla and in some cells of the follicle. On the basis of these results it may be hypothesized that EGF and IGF-I can act as growth factors in the modulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation during the human tooth morphogenesis. Moreover, it is possible that these substances can play a role in the mesenchymal-epithelial interaction in the developing human tooth.

  15. Mechanical forces in plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. D.; Cyr, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Plant cells perceive forces that arise from the environment and from the biophysics of plant growth. These forces provide meaningful cues that can affect the development of the plant. Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana were used to examine the cytoplasmic tensile character of cells that have been implicated in the gravitropic response. Laser-trapping technology revealed that the starch-containing statoliths of the central columella cells in root caps are held loosely within the cytoplasm. In contrast, the peripheral cells have starch granules that are relatively resistant to movement. The role of the actin cytoskeleton in affecting the tensile character of these cells is discussed. To explore the role that biophysical forces might play in generating developmental cues, we have developed an experimental model system in which protoplasts, embedded in a synthetic agarose matrix, are subjected to stretching or compression. We have found that protoplasts subjected to these forces from five minutes to two hours will subsequently elongate either at right angles or parallel to the tensive or compressive force vector. Moreover, the cortical microtubules are found to be organized either at right angles or parallel to the tensive or compressive force vector. We discuss these results in terms of an interplay of information between the extracellular matrix and the underlying cytoskeleton.

  16. Mechanical forces in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D D; Cyr, R J

    2000-06-01

    Plant cells perceive forces that arise from the environment and from the biophysics of plant growth. These forces provide meaningful cues that can affect the development of the plant. Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana were used to examine the cytoplasmic tensile character of cells that have been implicated in the gravitropic response. Laser-trapping technology revealed that the starch-containing statoliths of the central columella cells in root caps are held loosely within the cytoplasm. In contrast, the peripheral cells have starch granules that are relatively resistant to movement. The role of the actin cytoskeleton in affecting the tensile character of these cells is discussed. To explore the role that biophysical forces might play in generating developmental cues, we have developed an experimental model system in which protoplasts, embedded in a synthetic agarose matrix, are subjected to stretching or compression. We have found that protoplasts subjected to these forces from five minutes to two hours will subsequently elongate either at right angles or parallel to the tensive or compressive force vector. Moreover, the cortical microtubules are found to be organized either at right angles or parallel to the tensive or compressive force vector. We discuss these results in terms of an interplay of information between the extracellular matrix and the underlying cytoskeleton.

  17. Mechanical forces in plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. D.; Cyr, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Plant cells perceive forces that arise from the environment and from the biophysics of plant growth. These forces provide meaningful cues that can affect the development of the plant. Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana were used to examine the cytoplasmic tensile character of cells that have been implicated in the gravitropic response. Laser-trapping technology revealed that the starch-containing statoliths of the central columella cells in root caps are held loosely within the cytoplasm. In contrast, the peripheral cells have starch granules that are relatively resistant to movement. The role of the actin cytoskeleton in affecting the tensile character of these cells is discussed. To explore the role that biophysical forces might play in generating developmental cues, we have developed an experimental model system in which protoplasts, embedded in a synthetic agarose matrix, are subjected to stretching or compression. We have found that protoplasts subjected to these forces from five minutes to two hours will subsequently elongate either at right angles or parallel to the tensive or compressive force vector. Moreover, the cortical microtubules are found to be organized either at right angles or parallel to the tensive or compressive force vector. We discuss these results in terms of an interplay of information between the extracellular matrix and the underlying cytoskeleton.

  18. Testicular growth and development in puberty.

    PubMed

    Koskenniemi, Jaakko J; Virtanen, Helena E; Toppari, Jorma

    2017-06-01

    To describe pubertal testicular growth in humans, changes in testicular cell populations that result in testicular growth, and the role of testosterone and gonadotrophins follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in testicular growth. When human data were not available, studies in nonhuman primates and/or rodents were used as surrogates. Testicular growth in puberty follows a sigmoidal growth curve, with a large variation in timing of testicular growth and adult testicular volume. Testicular growth early in puberty is due to increase in Sertoli cell number and length of seminiferous tubules, whereas the largest and fastest growth results from the increase in the diameter of the seminiferous tubules first due to spermatogonial proliferation and then due to the expansion of meiotic and haploid germ cells. FSH stimulates Sertoli cell and spermatogonial proliferation, whereas LH/testosterone is mandatory to complete spermatogenesis. However, FSH and LH/testosterone work in synergy and are both needed for normal spermatogenesis. Testicular growth during puberty is rapid, and mostly due to germ cell expansion and growth in seminiferous tubule diameter triggered by androgens. Pre-treatment with FSH before the induction of puberty may improve the treatment of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, but remains to be proven.

  19. An assessment of the Pacific Regional Cancer Coalition: outcomes and implications of a regional coalition internal and external assessment.

    PubMed

    Sy, Angela U; Heckert, Karen A; Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee; Hedson, Johnny; Tamang, Suresh; Palafox, Neal

    2011-11-01

    The Pacific Regional Cancer Coalition (PRCC) provides regional leadership in the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) to implement the Regional Comprehensive Control Plan: 2007-2012, and to evaluate its coalition and partnerships. The Pacific Center of Excellence in the Elimination of Disparities (CEED), aims to reduce cancer disparities and conducts evaluation activities relevant to cancer prevention and control in the USAPI. The PRCC Self (internal) and Partner (external) Assessments were conducted to assess coalition functioning, regional and national partnerships, sustainability, and the role of regionalism for integrating all chronic disease prevention and control in the Pacific. Self-administered questionnaires and key informant telephone interviews with PRCC members (N=20), and representatives from regional and national partner organizations were administered (N=26). Validated multi item measures using 5-point scales on coalition and partnership characteristics were used. Chronbach's alphas and averages for the measures were computed. Internal coalition measures: satisfaction (4.2, SD=0.48) communication (4.0, SD=0.56), respect (4.0, SD=0.60) were rated more highly than external partnership measures: resource sharing (3.5, SD=0.74), regionalism (3.9, SD=0.47), use of findings (3.9, SD=0.50). The PRCC specifically identified its level of "collaboration" with external partners including Pacific CEED. External partners identified its partnership with the PRCC in the "coalition" stage. PRCC members and external partners are satisfied with their partnerships. All groups should continue to focus on building collaboration with partners to reflect a truly regional approach to sustain the commitment, the coalitions and the programming to reduce cancer in the USAPI. PRCC and partners should also work together to integrate all chronic disease prevention and control efforts in the Pacific.

  20. Hox in hair growth and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awgulewitsch, Alexander

    2003-05-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Hox gene family of transcriptional regulators has originally been known for specifying positional identities along the longitudinal body axis of bilateral metazoans, including mouse and man. It is believed that subsequent to this archaic role, subsets of Hox genes have been co-opted for patterning functions in phylogenetically more recent structures, such as limbs and epithelial appendages. Among these, the hair follicle is of particular interest, as it is the only organ undergoing cyclical phases of regression and regeneration during the entire life span of an organism. Furthermore, the hair follicle is increasingly capturing the attention of developmental geneticists, as this abundantly available miniature organ mimics key aspects of embryonic patterning and, in addition, presents a model for studying organ renewal. The first Hox gene shown to play a universal role in hair follicle development is Hoxc13, as both Hoxc13-deficient and overexpressing mice exhibit severe hair growth and patterning defects. Differential gene expression analyses in the skin of these mutants, as well as in vitro DNA binding studies performed with potential targets for HOXC13 transcriptional regulation in human hair, identified genes encoding hair-specific keratins and keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) as major groups of presumptive Hoxc13 downstream effectors in the control of hair growth. The Hoxc13 mutant might thus serve as a paradigm for studying hair-specific roles of Hoxc13 and other members of this gene family, whose distinct spatio-temporally restricted expression patterns during hair development and cycling suggest discrete functions in follicular patterning and hair cycle control. The main conclusion from a discussion of these potential roles vis-à-vis current expression data in mouse and man, and from the perspective of the results obtained with the Hoxc13 transgenic models, is that members of the Hox family are likely to fulfill essential roles

  1. Forecasting Austrian national elections: The Grand Coalition model

    PubMed Central

    Aichholzer, Julian; Willmann, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting the outcomes of national elections has become established practice in several democracies. In the present paper, we develop an economic voting model for forecasting the future success of the Austrian ‘grand coalition’, i.e., the joint electoral success of the two mainstream parties SPOE and OEVP, at the 2013 Austrian Parliamentary Elections. Our main argument is that the success of both parties is strongly tied to the accomplishments of the Austrian system of corporatism, that is, the Social Partnership (Sozialpartnerschaft), in providing economic prosperity. Using data from Austrian national elections between 1953 and 2008 (n=18), we rely on the following predictors in our forecasting model: (1) unemployment rates, (2) previous incumbency of the two parties, and (3) dealignment over time. We conclude that, in general, the two mainstream parties benefit considerably from low unemployment rates, and are weakened whenever they have previously formed a coalition government. Further, we show that they have gradually been losing a good share of their voter basis over recent decades. PMID:26339109

  2. Mapping one strong 'Ohana: using network analysis and GIS to enhance the effectiveness of a statewide coalition to prevent child abuse and neglect.

    PubMed

    Cardazone, Gina; U Sy, Angela; Chik, Ivan; Corlew, Laura Kate

    2014-06-01

    Network analysis and GIS enable the presentation of meaningful data about organizational relationships and community characteristics, respectively. Together, these tools can provide a concrete representation of the ecological context in which coalitions operate, and may help coalitions identify opportunities for growth and enhanced effectiveness. This study uses network analysis and GIS mapping as part of an evaluation of the One Strong 'Ohana (OSO) campaign. The OSO campaign was launched in 2012 via a partnership between the Hawai'i Children's Trust Fund (HCTF) and the Joyful Heart Foundation. The OSO campaign uses a collaborative approach aimed at increasing public awareness of child maltreatment and protective factors that can prevent maltreatment, as well as enhancing the effectiveness of the HCTF Coalition. This study focuses on three elements of the OSO campaign evaluation: (1) Network analysis exploring the relationships between 24 active Coalition member organizations, (2) GIS mapping of responses to a randomized statewide phone survey (n = 1,450) assessing awareness of factors contributing to child maltreatment, and (3) Combined GIS maps and network data, illustrating opportunities for geographically-targeted coalition building and public awareness activities.

  3. Building School-Business Coalitions that Pay Long-Range Dividends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Dale

    1986-01-01

    Building coalitions of secondary schools and businesses in order to improve education is best conducted by principals. Based on a national analysis, nine points will assist in building coalitions. (CJH)

  4. Studying bio-inspired coalition formation of robots for detecting intrusions using game theory.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiannuan; Xiao, Yang

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, inspired by the society of animals, we study the coalition formation of robots for detecting intrusions using game theory. We consider coalition formation in a group of three robots that detect and capture intrusions in a closed curve loop. In our analytical model, individuals seek alliances if they think that their detect regions are too short to gain an intrusion capturing probability larger than their own. We assume that coalition seeking has an investment cost and that the formation of a coalition determines the outcomes of parities, with the detect length of a coalition simply being the sum of those of separate coalition members. We derive that, for any cost, always detecting alone is an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS), and that, if the cost is below a threshold, always trying to form a coalition is an ESS (thus a three-way coalition arises).

  5. Evaluation informs coalition programming for environmental tobacco smoke reduction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Mueller, Keith J; Harrop, Dianne

    2003-01-01

    The objective for this formative evaluation was to establish baseline data for informing a community coalition's strategic planning in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) risk reduction. The coalition had chosen 3 targeted settings for ETS risk reduction: restaurants, childcare facilities, and government buildings. The evaluation methodology involved telephone interviews (restaurants, n = 805; governmental buildings, n = 258) and mailed surveys (childcare facilities, n = 1,142). Data on county residents and businesses were used for comparison purposes and were analyzed from the Nebraska Social Climate Survey (2001; n = 558). Evaluation baseline findings showed that licensed childcare facilities were more ETS knowledgeable, less ETS tolerant, and more smoke-free than restaurants. Residents were more bothered by ETS than what restaurant proprietors perceived. The majority of governmental buildings were not smoke-free. Conclusions were that community health nurse evaluators can provide coalitions with formative evaluative data to inform strategic planning and increase the likelihood of effective program interventions for community impact on ETS.

  6. Genome-based microorganism classification using coalition formulation game.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byung Chang; Han, Gyu-Bum; Cho, Dong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Genome-based microorganism classification is the one of interesting issues in microorganism taxonomy. However, the advance in sequencing technology requires a low-complex algorithm to process a great amount of bio sequence data. In this paper, we suggest a coalition formation game for microorganism classification, which can be implemented in distributed manner. We extract word frequency feature from microorganism sequences and formulate the coalition game model that considers the distance among word frequency features. Then, we propose a coalition formation algorithm for clustering microorganisms with feature similarity. The performance of proposed algorithm is compared with that of conventional schemes by means of an experiment. According to the result, we showed that the correctness of proposed distributed algorithm is similar to that of conventional centralized schemes.

  7. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D. L.; Schruben, J.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal models were developed that accurately predict the thermally generated stresses in the web crystal which, if too high, cause the crystal to degenerate. The application of the modeling results to the design of low-stress experimental growth configurations will allow the growth of wider web crystals at higher growth velocities. A new experimental web growth machine was constructed. This facility includes all the features necessary for carrying out growth experiments under steady thermal conditions. Programmed growth initiation was developed to give reproducible crystal starts. Width control permits the growth of long ribbons at constant width. Melt level is controlled to 0.1 mm or better. Thus, the capability exists to grow long web crystals of constant width and thickness with little operator intervention, and web growth experiments can now be performed with growth variables controlled to a degree not previously possible.

  8. From Read Ahead to Literacy Coalition: The Leadership Role of the Central New York Community Foundation in the Creation of a Local Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridzi, Frank; Carmody, Virginia; Byrnes, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies the lens of recent literature on neoinstitutionalism and institutional entrepreneurship to understand the stages of growth in a new community Literacy Coalition. It explores the interactional, technical and cultural phases of institution building identified in other case studies as they emerge in this community study. Finally,…

  9. From Read Ahead to Literacy Coalition: The Leadership Role of the Central New York Community Foundation in the Creation of a Local Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridzi, Frank; Carmody, Virginia; Byrnes, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies the lens of recent literature on neoinstitutionalism and institutional entrepreneurship to understand the stages of growth in a new community Literacy Coalition. It explores the interactional, technical and cultural phases of institution building identified in other case studies as they emerge in this community study. Finally,…

  10. Coalitional Tracker for Deception Detection in Thermal Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdall, Jonathan; Pavlidis, Ioannis; Tsiamyrtzis, Panagiotis

    We propose a novel tracking method that uses a network of independent particle filter trackers whose interactions are modeled using coalitional game theory. Our tracking method is general; it maintains pixel-level accuracy, and can negotiate surface deformations and occlusions. We tested our method in a substantial video set featuring nontrivial motion from over 40 objects in both the infrared and vi sual spectra. The coalitional tracker demonstrated fault-tolerant behavior that far exceeds the performance of single-particle filter trackers. Our method represents a shift from the typical tracking paradigms and may find application in demanding imaging problems across the electromagnetic spectrum.

  11. Clean Cities Award Winning Coalition: Greater Long Island

    SciTech Connect

    ICF Kaiser.

    1999-05-20

    This coalition was the culmination a two-year joint effort by Long Island Lighting Company and the Long Island Regional Planning Board. The group's first alternative fuel project was a single fill compressed natural gas station and a converted Chevrolet Caprice. Since then, the coalition has made steady progress in the alternative fuel and alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) market. They have over 400 AFVs and 21 fueling stations in their operating area. Thanks to strong partnerships with local public and private organizations, they've also passed some of the most progressive state tax incentive legislation for AFVs in the country.

  12. An Initial Attempt at Operationalizing and Testing the Community Coalition Action Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegler, Michelle C.; Swan, Deanne W.

    2011-01-01

    The Community Coalition Action Theory (CCAT) blends practice wisdom with empirical data to explain how community coalitions achieve community change and community capacity outcomes. The current study uses data from an evaluation of 20 "California Healthy Cities" and "Communities" coalitions to test relationships between…

  13. Lessons from the Field: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions as Catalysts for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Theresa M.; Lenczner, Sarah J.

    This document describes a study of the organization, operation, sustainability, and impact of community anti-drug coalitions nationwide. The study involved case studies of eight highly effective community coalitions and a cross-case analysis of characteristics shared among the coalitions. A consistent set of distinguishing features was examined…

  14. Testing a Comprehensive Community Problem-Solving Framework for Community Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Evelyn; Foster-Fishman, Pennie; Collins, Charles; Ahn, Soyeon

    2012-01-01

    Community problem solving is believed to help coalitions achieve community changes and subsequent population-level reductions in targeted community health problems. This study empirically examined a community problem solving model used by CADCA, a national coalition training organization, to determine if the model explains how coalitions become…

  15. Why the Iraqi Resistance to the Coalition Invasion Was so Weak

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    113 Iraqi Forces Could Not Withstand the Weight and Accuracy of Coalition Firepower... deprived the Coalition of the indig- enous military forces and civilian officials that Coalition planners had counted on to help stabilize and secure... weighted to the east, paralleling the Iraqi-Iranian border. One division, the 51st Mech- anized, was positioned south of Basra for the defense of

  16. Testing a Comprehensive Community Problem-Solving Framework for Community Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Evelyn; Foster-Fishman, Pennie; Collins, Charles; Ahn, Soyeon

    2012-01-01

    Community problem solving is believed to help coalitions achieve community changes and subsequent population-level reductions in targeted community health problems. This study empirically examined a community problem solving model used by CADCA, a national coalition training organization, to determine if the model explains how coalitions become…

  17. Curriculum Reform and the NSF Engineering Education Coalitions: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serow, Robert C.; And Others

    This paper presents the findings from an evaluation of SUCCEED (Southwestern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education), a National Science Foundation (NSF) coalition. The presentation is made in several stages: (1) a review of the background and goals of the NSF coalitions, SUCCEED in particular; (2) a discussion of the methods…

  18. Liking and Power as Factors Affecting Coalition Choices in the Triad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nacci, Peter L.; Tedeschi, James T.

    1976-01-01

    Effects of resource capability and interpersonal attraction on coalition behavior were studied. Introductory psychology students role played across three experimental conditions. Subjects were asked to select a coalition partner, predict formation of coalition, estimate winnings distribution. Male and female choices and predictions differed.…

  19. Lessons from the Field: Community Anti-Drug Coalitions as Catalysts for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Theresa M.; Lenczner, Sarah J.

    This document describes a study of the organization, operation, sustainability, and impact of community anti-drug coalitions nationwide. The study involved case studies of eight highly effective community coalitions and a cross-case analysis of characteristics shared among the coalitions. A consistent set of distinguishing features was examined…

  20. An Assessment of the Pacific Regional Cancer Coalition: Outcomes and Implications of a Regional Coalition Internal and External Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Heckert, Karen A; Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee; Hedson, Johnny; Tamang, Suresh; Palafox, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Significance The Pacific Regional Cancer Coalition Signifi(PRCC) provides regional leadership in the US Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) to implement the Regional Comprehensive Control Plan: 2007–2012, and to evaluate its coalition and partnerships. The Pacific Center of Excellence in the Elimination of Disparities (CEED), aims to reduce cancer disparities and conducts evaluation activities relevant to cancer prevention and control in the USAPI. Purpose The PRCC Self (internal) and Partner (external) Assessments were conducted to assess coalition functioning, regional and national partnerships, sustainability, and the role of regionalism for integrating all chronic disease prevention and control in the Pacific. Methods Self-administered questionnaires and key informant telephone interviews with PRCC members (N=20), and representatives from regional and national partner organizations were administered (N=26). Validated multi item measures using 5-point scales on coalition and partnership characteristics were used. Chronbach's alphas and averages for the measures were computed. Results Internal coalition measures: satisfaction (4.2, SD=0.48) communication (4.0, SD=0.56), respect (4.0, SD=0.60) were rated more highly than external partnership measures: resource sharing (3.5, SD=0.74), regionalism (3.9, SD=0.47), use of findings (3.9, SD=0.50). The PRCC specifically identified its level of “collaboration” with external partners including Pacific CEED. External partners identified its partnership with the PRCC in the “coalition” stage. Principal Conclusions PRCC members and external partners are satisfied with their partnerships. All groups should continue to focus on building collaboration with partners to reflect a truly regional approach to sustain the commitment, the coalitions and the programming to reduce cancer in the USAPI. PRCC and partners should also work together to integrate all chronic disease prevention and control efforts in the Pacific. PMID

  1. Growth Contracting for Faculty Development. Idea Paper No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Ed; Oggel, Terry

    The concept of growth contracting in higher education and the applications and limitations of growth plans are examined. In addition, critical steps in the process of developing contracts with faculty are identified. A professional growth plan is a binding agreement, which helps faculty and institutional representatives clarify specific goals.…

  2. The evolution of development of vascular cambia and secondary growth

    Treesearch

    Andrew Groover; Rachel Spicer

    2010-01-01

    Secondary growth from vascular cambia results in radial, woody growth of stems. The innovation of secondary vascular development during plant evolution allowed the production of novel plant forms ranging from massive forest trees to flexible, woody lianas. We present examples of the extensive phylogenetic variation in secondary vascular growth and discuss current...

  3. Children's Intuitive Mathematics: The Development of Knowledge about Nonlinear Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebersbach, Mirjam; Wilkening, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    This study is concerned with the development of children's intuitive understanding of nonlinear processes. The ability to estimate linear and exponential growth was examined in 7-, 9-, 11-, and 13-year-old children and adults (N=160). Whereas linear growth was judged correctly at all ages, estimations of exponential growth were in line with…

  4. Population Growth and Poverty in the Developing World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdsall, Nancy

    1980-01-01

    The link between rapid population growth and the absolute poverty which currently afflicts 780 million people in developing countries (excluding China and other centrally planned economies) is examined. As a result of rapid population growth, many countries suffer slow per capita income growth, a lack of progress in reducing income inequality, and…

  5. Population Growth and Poverty in the Developing World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdsall, Nancy

    1980-01-01

    The link between rapid population growth and the absolute poverty which currently afflicts 780 million people in developing countries (excluding China and other centrally planned economies) is examined. As a result of rapid population growth, many countries suffer slow per capita income growth, a lack of progress in reducing income inequality, and…

  6. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Modeling in the development of low stress configurations for wide web growth is presented. Parametric sensitivity to identify design features which can be used for dynamic trimming of the furnace element was studied. Temperature measurements of experimental growth behavior led to modification in the growth system to improve lateral temperature distributions.

  7. Development of the larval amphibian growth and development ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Larval Amphibian Growth and Development Assay (LAGDA) is a globally harmonized chemical testing guideline developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in collaboration with Japan’s Ministry of Environment to support risk assessment. The assay is employed as a higher tiered approach to evaluate effects of chronic chemical exposure throughout multiple life stages in model amphibian species Xenopus laevis. To evaluate the utility of the initial LAGDA design, the assay was performed using a mixed mode of action endocrine disrupting chemical, benzophenone-2 (BP-2). X. laevis embryos were exposed in flow-through conditions to 0, 1.5, 3.0 or 6.0 mg/L BP-2 until two months post-metamorphosis. Overt toxicity was evident throughout the exposure period in the 6.0 mg/L treatment due to elevated mortality rates and observed liver and kidney pathologies. Concentration-dependent increases in severity of thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia occurred in larval tadpoles indicating BP-2-induced impacts on the thyroid axis. Additionally, gonads were impacted in all treatments with some genotypic males showing both testis and ovary tissues (1.5 mg/L) and 100% of the genotypic males in the higher treatments (3.0 and 6.0 mg/L) experiencing complete male-to-female sex reversal. Concentration-dependent vitellogenin (Vtg) induction occurred in both genders with associated accumulations of protein in the livers, kidneys and gonads, which was likely Vtg

  8. Growth

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; George A. Schier

    1985-01-01

    This chapter considers aspen growth as a process, and discusses some characteristics of the growth and development of trees and stands. For the most part, factors affecting growth are discussed elsewhere, particularly in the GENETICS AND VARIATION chapter and in chapters in PART 11. ECOLOGY. Aspen growth as it relates to wood production is examined in the WOOD RESOURCE...

  9. National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers Proposal to the Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers, Waco, TX.

    In 1988, nine institutions operating advanced technology centers (ATC's) to provide workers with up-to-date technical skills formed the National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers (NCATC). The center was established to increase awareness of ATC's, serve as a forum for the discussion and demonstration of new and underused technologies,…

  10. Omnishambles: Reactions to the Second Year of Coalition Education Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The UK's Coalition Government completed its second year in office in May 2012. Many of its policies and pronouncements have been divisive and are contributing to the dismantling of the state education system as we have known it. Here, reflecting George Orwell's observation that "Every joke against the established order is a tiny…

  11. Career advancement opportunities and the ACVP/STP Coalition.

    PubMed

    Cockerell, Gary

    2014-07-01

    A new service to facilitate career advancement opportunities has been implemented by the American College of Veterinary Pathologists (ACVP)/Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) Coalition for Veterinary Pathology Fellows. This service will allow rapid communication of these opportunities between veterinary pathologists in academia, industry, and government, and will be useful to trainees as well as established pathologists.

  12. [Tarsal-carpal coalition syndrome: a familial case].

    PubMed

    Caino, S; Dello Ruso, B; Fano, V; Obregón, M G

    2012-06-01

    Tarsal-carpal coalition syndrome (TCC, OMIM #186570) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by fusion of the carpals, tarsals, and phalanges, with the short first metacarpals causing brachydactyly and humeroradial fusion. Mutations in the NOG gene have been reported in many families. We describe a family with carpal tarsal fusion seen at a Skeletal Dysplasia Clinic and look at the differential diagnoses.

  13. West Virginia's Environmental Council: Birth of a Citizen Coalition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmer, Mary J.

    1995-01-01

    West Virginia's strong environmental legislation is due to the efforts of the West Virginia Environmental Council. The history of the statewide coalition is presented, as well as organizational aspects that make the council successful, such as loose structure based on consensus, and respect for all the different shades of green comprising the…

  14. EPA Tools and Resources Webinar Series: Challenging Nutrients Coalition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To help address nutrients pollution the US EPA has organized an innovative public-private coalition to address the issue of excess nitrogen and phosphorous levels in water, for which the impacts to the economy are estimated to be in the billions annually.

  15. Toward Community Research and Coalitional Literacy Practices for Educational Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campano, Gerald; Ghiso, María Paula; Yee, Mary; Pantoja, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Community-based research can provide an avenue for understanding the complexities of students' and families' lives and working together for educational justice through what we refer to as coalitional literacy practices. In this article, we share a critical incident about a student's absence from school as an illustrative case of the grass-roots…

  16. Faculty Practice as Partnership with a Community Coalition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Betty J.

    1998-01-01

    A coalition of community agencies and a nursing school involves nursing students in nontraditional delivery of health-care services to the elderly. Elders report satisfaction with the program but not as much ownership, despite the goal of involving them in program planning and evaluation. (SK)

  17. Guide to Performance Management for Community Literacy Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatry, Harry; Morley, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Coalitions have key roles in helping their communities accomplish the following: (1) Track the level of literacy in the community; (2) Use that information to help identify what, and how much, literacy assistance is needed; (3) Assess the extent to which community literacy programs are meeting the need, including how well existing literacy…

  18. Sustaining Physics Teacher Education Coalition Programs in Physics Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Plisch, Monica; Goertzen, Renee Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of increasing the number of physics teachers educated per year at institutions with thriving physics teacher preparation programs may inspire and support other institutions in building thriving programs of their own. The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), led by the American Physical Society (APS) and the…

  19. Toward Community Research and Coalitional Literacy Practices for Educational Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campano, Gerald; Ghiso, María Paula; Yee, Mary; Pantoja, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Community-based research can provide an avenue for understanding the complexities of students' and families' lives and working together for educational justice through what we refer to as coalitional literacy practices. In this article, we share a critical incident about a student's absence from school as an illustrative case of the grass-roots…

  20. Omnishambles: Reactions to the Second Year of Coalition Education Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The UK's Coalition Government completed its second year in office in May 2012. Many of its policies and pronouncements have been divisive and are contributing to the dismantling of the state education system as we have known it. Here, reflecting George Orwell's observation that "Every joke against the established order is a tiny…

  1. Coalitions and male-male behavior in Alouatta palliata.

    PubMed

    Dias, Pedro Américo D; Rangel-Negrin, Ariadna; Veà, Joaquim J; Canales-Espinosa, Domingo

    2010-01-01

    Coalitions influence the establishment and maintenance of social relationships among males in primate species. In this study, we compare the social behavior of males between two groups of Alouatta palliata: a group that was recently taken over by a coalition of two males (Mt), and a group that had a stable composition for at least 9 months (Rh). We predicted that coalition partners would be more cooperative and less competitive than dyads formed by immigrant and long-term resident males, and dyads formed by long-term resident males. Additionally, we predicted that these dyadic trends should be reflected in more competition and less cooperation in the group that was taken over. As predicted, the coalition partners of Mt showed the highest levels of cooperation among all dyads and the second lowest rate of agonism. Cooperation was higher in the group that had a stable composition. Results from this study suggest that the social relationships of male mantled howlers vary as a function of familiarity between males and that in the context of coalitionary takeovers, coalitionary males are highly cooperative. Cooperation is lower in groups recently taken over and competition is more intense, perhaps as a consequence of the process of establishment and reorganization of power relationships within some dyads. In the future, we must determine the frequency of coalitionary takeovers in this population and assess its ultimate consequences for male-male social relationships.

  2. Unusual coalition seeks tighter NOx standards in northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-08-25

    A coalition of environmentalists and major Northeast-based companies, including one utility, have called for stringent new regionwide controls on nitrogen oxides emissions from power plants and industrial facilities. A letter to the Northeastern Governors said the North east could not effectively address its urban smog problem with out significantly tighter limits.

  3. Pofessional Practice and Innovation: Geographical Information Systems: An Effective Planning and Decision-Making Platform for Community Health Coalitions in Australia.

    PubMed

    Baum, Scott; Kendall, Elizabeth; Muenchberger, Heidi; Gudes, Ori; Yigitcanlar, Tan

    2010-10-01

    The development of locally-based healthcare initiatives, such as community health coalitions that focus on capacity building programs and multi-faceted responses to long-term health problems, have become an increasingly important part of the public health landscape. As a result of their complexity and the level of investment, it has become necessary to develop innovative ways to help manage these new healthcare approaches. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) have been suggested as one of the innovative approaches that will allow community health coalitions to better manage and plan their activities. The focus of this paper is to provide a commentary on the use of GIS as a tool for community coalitions and discuss some of the potential benefits and issues surrounding the development of these tools.

  4. 2010 Coalition Battle Management Language Workshop (Atelier 2010 sur le langage de gestion du champ de bataille pour les operations en coalition)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Feb 2010 2010 Coalition Battle Management Language Workshop (Atelier 2010 sur le langage de gestion du champ de bataille pour les opérations en... bataille pour les opérations en coalition) Papers presented at the NATO Modeling and Simulation Group (NMSG) Workshop held in Farnborough, United Kingdom...RTO-MP-MSG-079 ES - 3 Atelier 2010 sur le langage de gestion du champ de bataille pour les opérations en coalition (RTO-MP-MSG-079

  5. Maternal growth factor regulation of human placental development and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Karen; Westwood, Melissa

    2010-10-01

    Normal development and function of the placenta is critical to achieving a successful pregnancy, as normal fetal growth depends directly on the transfer of nutrients from mother to fetus via this organ. Recently, it has become apparent from both animal and human studies that growth factors within the maternal circulation, for example the IGFs, are important regulators of placental development and function. Although these factors act via distinct receptors to exert their effects, the downstream molecules activated upon ligand/receptor interaction are common to many growth factors. The expression of numerous signaling molecules is altered in the placentas from pregnancies affected by the fetal growth complications, fetal growth restriction, and macrosomia. Thus, targeting these molecules may lead to more effective treatments for complications of pregnancy associated with altered placental development. Here, we review the maternal growth factors required for placental development and discuss their mechanism of action.

  6. Development of Technology Transfer Economic Growth Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastrangelo, Christina M.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of producing technology transfer metrics that answer the question: Do NASA/MSFC technical assistance activities impact economic growth? The data for this project resides in a 7800-record database maintained by Tec-Masters, Incorporated. The technology assistance data results from survey responses from companies and individuals who have interacted with NASA via a Technology Transfer Agreement, or TTA. The goal of this project was to determine if the existing data could provide indications of increased wealth. This work demonstrates that there is evidence that companies that used NASA technology transfer have a higher job growth rate than the rest of the economy. It also shows that the jobs being supported are jobs in higher wage SIC codes, and this indicates improvements in personal wealth. Finally, this work suggests that with correct data, the wealth issue may be addressed.

  7. Sacroiliac Coalition: First Description and Report of a Successful Resection.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Axel; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea; Berezowska, Sabina; D'Anastasi, Melvin; Birkenmaier, Christof

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective This report describes the first case of a sacroiliac coalition, its clinical features, the diagnostic difficulties, and the surgical treatment chosen in this case. Methods A 33-year-old man presented to our outpatient clinics complaining of severe left-sided low back pain with an intermitted nondermatomal radiation into the left thigh. The only abnormality on a pelvic radiograph was a coin-size, faint hyperdensity, which was almost overlooked. Subsequent computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed two bridging bone spurs on the anterior surface of the left joint with a fibrous interruption at the apex. After the conservative treatment failed, a surgical treatment was offered to the patient. The coalition was resected via an anterior retroperitoneal approach and through the tissue plane between the psoas and the iliacus muscles. A histopathologic examination was performed and confirmed the diagnosis of a coalition. Results The patient's pain resolved immediately after surgery. After 8 months, a follow-up CT scan showed complete removal of the coalition without any signs of recurrence, and at 12 months' follow-up, the patient remained pain-free. Conclusions This is the first published case of a sacroiliac coalition. The only sign of this rare condition on the plain radiographs was very easy to miss. As has been discussed in the literature, CT and MRI are important in the differential diagnostics of such lesions. The histopathologic findings included that of a fibrous bar, confirming the diagnosis, which is further corroborated by the complete resolution of the symptoms.

  8. Sacroiliac Coalition: First Description and Report of a Successful Resection

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Axel; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea; Berezowska, Sabina; D'Anastasi, Melvin; Birkenmaier, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective This report describes the first case of a sacroiliac coalition, its clinical features, the diagnostic difficulties, and the surgical treatment chosen in this case. Methods A 33-year-old man presented to our outpatient clinics complaining of severe left-sided low back pain with an intermitted nondermatomal radiation into the left thigh. The only abnormality on a pelvic radiograph was a coin-size, faint hyperdensity, which was almost overlooked. Subsequent computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed two bridging bone spurs on the anterior surface of the left joint with a fibrous interruption at the apex. After the conservative treatment failed, a surgical treatment was offered to the patient. The coalition was resected via an anterior retroperitoneal approach and through the tissue plane between the psoas and the iliacus muscles. A histopathologic examination was performed and confirmed the diagnosis of a coalition. Results The patient's pain resolved immediately after surgery. After 8 months, a follow-up CT scan showed complete removal of the coalition without any signs of recurrence, and at 12 months' follow-up, the patient remained pain-free. Conclusions This is the first published case of a sacroiliac coalition. The only sign of this rare condition on the plain radiographs was very easy to miss. As has been discussed in the literature, CT and MRI are important in the differential diagnostics of such lesions. The histopathologic findings included that of a fibrous bar, confirming the diagnosis, which is further corroborated by the complete resolution of the symptoms. PMID:26430601

  9. Mechanical regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Soybean and eggplant grown and shaken in a greenhouse exhibited decreased internode length, internode diameter, leaf area, and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots in much the same way as outdoor-exposed plants. Perhaps more important than decreased dimensions of plant parts resulting from periodic seismic treatment is the inhibition of photosynthetic productivity that accompanies this stress. Soybeam plants briefly shaken or rubbed twice daily experienced a decrease in relative as well as absolute growth rate compared to that of undisturbed controls. Growth dynamics analysis revealed that virtually all of the decline in relative growth rate (RGR) was due to a decline in net assimilation rate (NAR), but not in leaf area ratio (LAR). Lower NAR suggests that the stress-induced decrease in dry weight gain is due to a decline in photosynthetic efficiency. Possible effects on stomatal aperture was investigated by measuring rates of whole plant transpiration as a function of seismo-stress, and a transitory decrease followed by a gradual, partial recovery was detected.

  10. Mechanical regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Soybean and eggplant grown and shaken in a greenhouse exhibited decreased internode length, internode diameter, leaf area, and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots in much the same way as outdoor-exposed plants. Perhaps more important than decreased dimensions of plant parts resulting from periodic seismic treatment is the inhibition of photosynthetic productivity that accompanies this stress. Soybeam plants briefly shaken or rubbed twice daily experienced a decrease in relative as well as absolute growth rate compared to that of undisturbed controls. Growth dynamics analysis revealed that virtually all of the decline in relative growth rate (RGR) was due to a decline in net assimilation rate (NAR), but not in leaf area ratio (LAR). Lower NAR suggests that the stress-induced decrease in dry weight gain is due to a decline in photosynthetic efficiency. Possible effects on stomatal aperture was investigated by measuring rates of whole plant transpiration as a function of seismo-stress, and a transitory decrease followed by a gradual, partial recovery was detected.

  11. Analysing growth and development of plants jointly using developmental growth stages

    PubMed Central

    Dambreville, Anaëlle; Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Normand, Frédéric; Guédon, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant growth, the increase of organ dimensions over time, and development, the change in plant structure, are often studied as two separate processes. However, there is structural and functional evidence that these two processes are strongly related. The aim of this study was to investigate the co-ordination between growth and development using mango trees, which have well-defined developmental stages. Methods Developmental stages, determined in an expert way, and organ sizes, determined from objective measurements, were collected during the vegetative growth and flowering phases of two cultivars of mango, Mangifera indica. For a given cultivar and growth unit type (either vegetative or flowering), a multistage model based on absolute growth rate sequences deduced from the measurements was first built, and then growth stages deduced from the model were compared with developmental stages. Key Results Strong matches were obtained between growth stages and developmental stages, leading to a consistent definition of integrative developmental growth stages. The growth stages highlighted growth asynchronisms between two topologically connected organs, namely the vegetative axis and its leaves. Conclusions Integrative developmental growth stages emphasize that developmental stages are closely related to organ growth rates. The results are discussed in terms of the possible physiological processes underlying these stages, including plant hydraulics, biomechanics and carbohydrate partitioning. PMID:25452250

  12. Analysing growth and development of plants jointly using developmental growth stages.

    PubMed

    Dambreville, Anaëlle; Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Normand, Frédéric; Guédon, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth, the increase of organ dimensions over time, and development, the change in plant structure, are often studied as two separate processes. However, there is structural and functional evidence that these two processes are strongly related. The aim of this study was to investigate the co-ordination between growth and development using mango trees, which have well-defined developmental stages. Developmental stages, determined in an expert way, and organ sizes, determined from objective measurements, were collected during the vegetative growth and flowering phases of two cultivars of mango, Mangifera indica. For a given cultivar and growth unit type (either vegetative or flowering), a multistage model based on absolute growth rate sequences deduced from the measurements was first built, and then growth stages deduced from the model were compared with developmental stages. Strong matches were obtained between growth stages and developmental stages, leading to a consistent definition of integrative developmental growth stages. The growth stages highlighted growth asynchronisms between two topologically connected organs, namely the vegetative axis and its leaves. Integrative developmental growth stages emphasize that developmental stages are closely related to organ growth rates. The results are discussed in terms of the possible physiological processes underlying these stages, including plant hydraulics, biomechanics and carbohydrate partitioning. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A model-driven approach to qualitatively assessing the added value of community coalitions.

    PubMed

    Herman, Elizabeth Jane; Keller, Adrienne; Davis, Adam; Ehrensberger, Ryan; Telleen, Sharon; Kurz, Richard; Nesvold, Jill Heins; Findley, Sally; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Benson, Mindy; Fierro, Leslie

    2011-02-01

    Community-based coalitions are commonly formed to plan and to carry out public health interventions. The literature includes evaluations of coalition structure, composition, and functioning; evaluations of community-level changes achieved through coalition activities; and the association between coalition characteristics and various indicators of success. Little information is available on the comparative advantage or "added value" of conducting public health interventions through coalitions as opposed to less structured collaborative mechanisms. This paper describes a qualitative, iterative process carried out with site representatives of the Controlling Asthma in American Cities Project (CAACP) to identify outcomes directly attributable to coalitions. The process yielded 2 complementary sets of results. The first were criteria that articulated and limited the concept of "added value of coalitions". The criteria included consensus definitions, an organizing figure, a logic model, and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The second set of results identified site-specific activities that met the definitional criteria and were, by agreement, examples of CAACP coalitions' added value. Beyond the specific findings relevant to the added value of coalitions in this project, the use of a social ecological model to identify the components of added value and the placement of those components within a logic model specific to coalitions should provide useful tools for those planning and assessing coalition-based projects.

  14. IMPLICATIONS OF CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR SCHOOL PLANT DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHERRY, RALPH W.

    IT IS THE BELIEF OF SOME THAT SCHOOL PLANTS ARE FOR CHILDREN. TO SERVE AS A STUDY GUIDE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THIS BELIEF, THIS PAPER PRESENTS PRINCIPLES, NEEDS OF CHILDREN, AND A LIST OF SUGGESTED READING. BASIC PRINCIPLES DISCUSSED ARE--(1) DEVELOPMENT IS A PRODUCT OF TWO FACTORS--LEARNING AND GROWTH, (2) HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT FOLLOW AN…

  15. Western and Chinese Development Discourses: Education, Growth and Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordtveit, Bjorn Harald

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Western and Chinese discourses of education, sustainable growth and development. Education is increasingly considered as a means to fuel economic growth, especially since the 1980s, when conservative economic values became predominant in Western development thought. Despite a discourse on sustainability favouring ecologically…

  16. Western and Chinese Development Discourses: Education, Growth and Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordtveit, Bjorn Harald

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Western and Chinese discourses of education, sustainable growth and development. Education is increasingly considered as a means to fuel economic growth, especially since the 1980s, when conservative economic values became predominant in Western development thought. Despite a discourse on sustainability favouring ecologically…

  17. Comprehensive evaluation of a community coalition: a case study of environmental tobacco smoke reduction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Mueller, Keith J; Harrop, Dianne

    2003-01-01

    Community coalitions have become an increasingly popular means for addressing community health issues, yet evaluating their effectiveness and performance has presented formidable challenges. To meet the community's need for health program evaluation, public health nurses will need to become better prepared to deal with the complexities of evaluating coalitions and their multifaceted organizational structures. This article presents the methodology and conceptual framework, Targeting Outcomes of Programs (TOP), used to evaluate the performance and impact of a local community coalition. The case study offered here focuses on a tobacco-prevention coalition composed of 15 public and private agencies and their 121 activities. The TOP evaluation model provided the coalition with formative evaluation, needed to improve the coalition's on-going program delivery, and summative evaluation, needed for annual reviews of the coalition's effectiveness and impact in the community. The methodological approach and instrument presented here provide the public health nurse with a solid conceptual framework for approaching such a task.

  18. The Rare Cuboid-Navicular Coalition Presenting as Chronic Foot Pain

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Omer; Graham, James Allen

    2015-01-01

    Tarsal coalitions are relatively rare diagnoses affecting adolescent patients that typically present with progressive foot pain. Cuboid-navicular coalition, a type of tarsal coalition, is extremely rare with less than 10 reported cases to date. Most prevailing theories reported have described this specific type of coalition as asymptomatic except at specific moments of stress and exercise. The purpose in presenting this case is to demonstrate that cuboid-navicular coalition can be associated with chronic unremitting pain, as in our patient. We present a case of cuboid-navicular fibrocartilaginous coalition in an adolescent patient presenting with chronic foot pain. Furthermore, from an imaging standpoint, radiographic findings are often subtle and radiologists cannot rely on indirect signs such as talar beak in clinching the diagnosis of cuboid-navicular coalition. Instead, abnormal articulation between the cuboid and navicular must be sought. PMID:25688320

  19. The rare cuboid-navicular coalition presenting as chronic foot pain.

    PubMed

    Awan, Omer; Graham, James Allen

    2015-01-01

    Tarsal coalitions are relatively rare diagnoses affecting adolescent patients that typically present with progressive foot pain. Cuboid-navicular coalition, a type of tarsal coalition, is extremely rare with less than 10 reported cases to date. Most prevailing theories reported have described this specific type of coalition as asymptomatic except at specific moments of stress and exercise. The purpose in presenting this case is to demonstrate that cuboid-navicular coalition can be associated with chronic unremitting pain, as in our patient. We present a case of cuboid-navicular fibrocartilaginous coalition in an adolescent patient presenting with chronic foot pain. Furthermore, from an imaging standpoint, radiographic findings are often subtle and radiologists cannot rely on indirect signs such as talar beak in clinching the diagnosis of cuboid-navicular coalition. Instead, abnormal articulation between the cuboid and navicular must be sought.

  20. A Coalition on the Public Understanding of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, L.; Hehn, J.; Kass, J.; O'Grady, R.; Scotchmoor, J.; Stucky, R.

    2006-12-01

    For many of the problems facing contemporary societies, such as potential impacts of climate change, coastal degradation, reductions of fisheries stocks, volcanic and earthquake hazards in densely populated areas, quality and availability of water, and exploitation of hydrocarbon resources and development of alternative energy sources, formulation of wise public policy depends on evaluation of the state of geoscientific research in the relevant areas. In a democratic society, public discourse about and input to policy decisions on key issues affecting the public welfare requires a public that understands the scientific research process, values the contribution of science to society, and has a working knowledge of what science can and cannot yet say about specific issues. Arguably, that ideal falls short in contemporary American society. Disturbing trends in science education, low public scientific literacy, and increasing alarms about U.S. competitiveness have all been prominent national news topics in recent years. (1) A recent National Science Board report indicated that two-thirds of Americans do not understand what science is, how it is conducted, and what one can expect from it. (2) A recent Gallup poll reports widespread and increasingly prevalent belief in pseudoscience. (3) There is a growing public complacency about and disengagement from science at the very moment when the impact of science on public life is greater than ever. (4) The Business Roundtable of major U.S. companies notes that the scientific and technical building blocks of our economic leadership are eroding at a time when many other nations are gathering strength. In response, a Coalition on the Public Understanding of Science COPUS has been initiated. Essential to COPUS is the premise that public understanding of science and the scientific process and an awareness of the impacts of scientific advancements on our quality of life are necessary to increase student interest in science as a

  1. Best Development Practices: A Primer for Smart Growth

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Best Development Practices: A Primer for Smart Growth lists specific practices to achieve development principles that mix land uses, support transportation options, protect natural systems, and provide housing choices.

  2. Coalition Warfare Program (CWP): secure policy controlled information query and dissemination over a Bices network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Andrew; Pham, Tien; Karr, Todd; Bent, Graham; Harries, Dominic; Knox, Alan

    2013-05-01

    In 2006, the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) established a collaborative research alliance with academia and industry, called the International Technology Alliance (ITA) to address fundamental issues concerning Network and Information Sciences. Under the ITA research program, a US-UK transition project on "ITA Policy Controlled Information Query and Dissemination" was funded in 2011 by OSD's Coalition Warfare Program (CWP). The goal of this CWP project is to develop an extensible capability of performing distributed federated query and information dissemination across a coalition network of distributed disparate data/information sources with access­ controlled policies. The CWP project is lead by US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory (Dstl) with software development by IBM UK and IBM US. The CWP project exploits two key technology components developed within the ITA, namely the Gaian Database and integrated Access Policy Decision and Enforcement mechanisms. The Gaian Database (GaianDB) is a Dynamic Distributed Federated Database (DDFD) that addresses a need to share information among coalition members by providing a means for policy-controlled access to data across a network of heterogeneous data sources. GaianDB implements a SQL-compliant Store-Locally-Query-Anywhere (SLQA) approach providing software applications with global access to data from any node in the database network via standard SQL queries. Security policy is stored locally and enforced at the database node level, reducing potential for unauthorized data access and waste of network bandwidth. A key metric of success for a CWP project is the transition of coalition-related technology from TRL-3 or 4 to TRL-6 or higher. Thus, the end goal of this CWP project was to demonstrate the GaianDB and policy technology within an operational environment at the NATO Intelligence Fusion Centre (NIFC) at Molesworth RAF. An initial

  3. Talocalcaneal coalition: A focus on radiographic findings and sites of bridging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Hyuck; Park, Hyung Jun; Yeo, Eui Dong; Lee, Young Koo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Verifying the exact location of talocalcaneal (TC) coalition is important for surgery, but the complicated anatomy of the subtalar joint makes it difficult to visualize on radiographs. No study has used computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to verify the radiological characteristics of TC coalition or those of different facet coalitions. Therefore, this study verified the radiological findings used to identify TC coalitions and those of different facet coalitions using CT and MRI. Materials and Methods: Plain with/without weight bearing anteroposterior and lateral radiographs, CT, and MRI of 43 feet in 39 patients with TC coalitions were reviewed retrospectively. CT or MRI was used to verify the location of the TC coalition. Secondary signs for the presence of a coalition in the anteroposterior and lateral plain radiographs, including talar beak, humpback sign, duck-face sign, and typical or deformed C-sign, were evaluated. Three independent observers evaluated the radiographs twice at 6-week intervals to determine intraobserver reliability. They examined the radiographs for the secondary signs, listed above, and coalition involved facets. Results: The average rates from both assessments were as follows: Middle facet 5%, middle and posterior facets 27%, and posterior facet 68%. The deformed C-sign is more prevalent in posterior facet coalitions. The posterior facet has the highest prevalence of involvement in TC coalitions, and the deformed C-sign and duck-face sign have high correlations with TC coalitions in the posterior subtalar facet. Conclusion: A posterior facet is the most prevalent for TC coalition, and the C-sign is useful for determining all types of TC coalition. PMID:27904223

  4. A dissection and computer tomograph study of tarsal coalitions in 100 cadaver feet.

    PubMed

    Solomon, L B; Rühli, F J; Taylor, J; Ferris, L; Pope, R; Henneberg, M

    2003-03-01

    Most of the clinical studies report the incidence of tarsal coalitions (TC) as less than 1% but they disregard the asymptomatic coalitions. TC have been associated with degenerative arthritic changes. After X-rays, computer tomography (CT) is the most commonly used diagnostic test in the detection of TC. The aims of our study were to establish the incidence of TC; the association between TC and accessory tarsal bones and between TC and tarsal arthritis; and to assess the sensitivity of CT as a diagnostic tool in TC. We performed spiral CT scans of 100 cadaver feet (mean age at death 77.7+/-10.4), which were subsequently dissected. The dissections identified nine non-osseous TC: two talocalcaneal and seven calcaneonavicular. There was no osseous coalition. Tarsal arthritis was identified in 31 cases. Both talocalcaneal coalitions were associated with arthritis while none of the calcaneonavicular coalitions were associated with tarsal arthritis. The CT diagnosed an osseous talocalcaneal coalition and was suspicious of fibrocartilaginous coalitions in eight cases. There was correlation between dissection and CT in two talocalcaneal coalitions and three calcaneonavicular coalitions thus CT identifying 55.5% of the coalitions. CT did not diagnose four non-osseous coalitions and diagnosed errouresly four possible coalitions. In conclusion our study demonstrated that the incidence of non-osseous TC is higher than previously thought (12.72%). The calcaneonavicular coalitions are the most common single type (9.09%) and they do not seem to be associated with arthritic changes in the tarsal bones. Our CT results suggest that spiral CT has a low sensitivity in the detection of non-osseous coalitions and questions if multislice CT should be used routinely when TC are suspected.

  5. Power and Politics in the Global Health Landscape: Beliefs, Competition and Negotiation Among Global Advocacy Coalitions in the Policy-Making Process

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Advocacy coalitions play an increasingly prominent role within the global health landscape, linking actors and institutions to attract political attention and resources. This paper examines how coalitions negotiate among themselves and exercise hidden forms of power to produce policy on the basis of their beliefs and strategic interests. Methods: This paper examines the beliefs and behaviours of health advocacy coalitions using Sabatier’s Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) as an informal theoretical lens. Coalitions are further explored in relation to the concept of transnational advocacy networks (Keck and Sikkink) and of productive power (Shiffman). The ACF focuses on explaining how policy change takes place when there is conflict concerning goals and technical approaches among different actors. This study uses participant observation methods, self-reported survey results and semi-structured qualitative interviews to trace how a major policy project of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) era, the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, was constructed through negotiations among maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy coalitions. Results: The Global Strategy represented a new opportunity for high-level political attention. Despite differing policy beliefs, MNCH and SRHR actors collaborated to produce this strategy because of anticipated gains in political attention. While core beliefs did not shift fundamentally and collaboration was primarily a short-term tactical response to a time-bound opportunity, MNCH actors began to focus more on human rights perspectives and SRHR actors adopted greater use of quantifiable indicators and economic argumentation. This shift emphasises the inherent importance of SRHR to maternal and child health survival. Conclusion: As opportunities arise, coalitions respond based on principles and policy beliefs, as well as to perceptions of

  6. Power and Politics in the Global Health Landscape: Beliefs, Competition and Negotiation Among Global Advocacy Coalitions in the Policy-Making Process.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Lori

    2016-01-30

    Advocacy coalitions play an increasingly prominent role within the global health landscape, linking actors and institutions to attract political attention and resources. This paper examines how coalitions negotiate among themselves and exercise hidden forms of power to produce policy on the basis of their beliefs and strategic interests. This paper examines the beliefs and behaviours of health advocacy coalitions using Sabatier's Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) as an informal theoretical lens. Coalitions are further explored in relation to the concept of transnational advocacy networks (Keck and Sikkink) and of productive power (Shiffman). The ACF focuses on explaining how policy change takes place when there is conflict concerning goals and technical approaches among different actors. This study uses participant observation methods, self-reported survey results and semi-structured qualitative interviews to trace how a major policy project of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) era, the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health, was constructed through negotiations among maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy coalitions. The Global Strategy represented a new opportunity for high-level political attention. Despite differing policy beliefs, MNCH and SRHR actors collaborated to produce this strategy because of anticipated gains in political attention. While core beliefs did not shift fundamentally and collaboration was primarily a short-term tactical response to a time-bound opportunity, MNCH actors began to focus more on human rights perspectives and SRHR actors adopted greater use of quantifiable indicators and economic argumentation. This shift emphasises the inherent importance of SRHR to maternal and child health survival. As opportunities arise, coalitions respond based on principles and policy beliefs, as well as to perceptions of advantage. Global health policy-making is an arena of

  7. Seedling growth and development on space shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, J.; Lemay, R.; Jahns, G.

    1994-11-01

    Young pine seedlings, and mung bean and oat seeds were flown on shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, in March, 1982 and July/August, 1985, respectively. The plant growth units built to support the two experiments functioned mechanically as anticipated and provided the necessary support data. Pine seedlings exposed to the microgravity environment of the space shuttle for 8 days continued to grow at a rate similar to ground controls. Pine stems in flight seedlings, however, averaged 10 to 12% less lignin than controls. Flight mung beans grew slower than control beans and their stems contained about 25% less lignin than control seedlings. Reduced mung bean growth in microgravity was partly due to slower germination rate. Lignin also was reduced in flight oats as compared to controls. Oats and mung beans exhibited upward growing roots which were not observed in control seedlings. Chlorophll A/B ratios were lower in flight tissues than controls. The sealed PGCs exhibited large variations in atmospheric gas composition but the changes were similar between flight and ground controls. Ethylene was present in low concentrations in all chambers.

  8. Seedling growth and development on space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowles, J.; Lemay, R.; Jahns, G.

    1994-01-01

    Young pine seedlings, and mung bean and oat seeds were flown on shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, in March, 1982 and July/August, 1985, respectively. The plant growth units built to support the two experiments functioned mechanically as anticipated and provided the necessary support data. Pine seedlings exposed to the microgravity environment of the space shuttle for 8 days continued to grow at a rate similar to ground controls. Pine stems in flight seedlings, however, averaged 10 to 12% less lignin than controls. Flight mung beans grew slower than control beans and their stems contained about 25% less lignin than control seedlings. Reduced mung bean growth in microgravity was partly due to slower germination rate. Lignin also was reduced in flight oats as compared to controls. Oats and mung beans exhibited upward growing roots which were not observed in control seedlings. Chlorophyll A/B ratios were lower in flight tissues than controls. The sealed PGCs exhibited large variations in atmospheric gas composition but the changes were similar between flight and ground controls. Ethylene was present in low concentrations in all chambers.

  9. Seedling growth and development on space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Cowles, J; LeMay, R; Jahns, G

    1994-11-01

    Young pine seedlings, and mung bean and oat seeds were flown on shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, in March, 1982 and July/August, 1985, respectively. The plant growth units built to support the two experiments functioned mechanically as anticipated and provided the necessary support data. Pine seedlings exposed to the microgravity environment of the space shuttle for 8 days continued to grow at a rate similar to ground controls. Pine stems in flight seedlings, however, averaged 10 to 12% less lignin than controls. Flight mung beans grew slower than control beans and their stems contained about 25% less lignin than control seedlings. Reduced mung bean growth in microgravity was partly due to slower germination rate. Lignin also was reduced in flight oats as compared to controls. Oats and mung beans exhibited upward growing roots which were not observed in control seedlings. Chlorophyll A/B ratios were lower in flight tissues than controls. The sealed PGCs exhibited large variations in atmospheric gas composition but the changes were similar between flight and ground controls. Ethylene was present in low concentrations in all chambers.

  10. Seedling growth and development on space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowles, J.; Lemay, R.; Jahns, G.

    1994-01-01

    Young pine seedlings, and mung bean and oat seeds were flown on shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, in March, 1982 and July/August, 1985, respectively. The plant growth units built to support the two experiments functioned mechanically as anticipated and provided the necessary support data. Pine seedlings exposed to the microgravity environment of the space shuttle for 8 days continued to grow at a rate similar to ground controls. Pine stems in flight seedlings, however, averaged 10 to 12% less lignin than controls. Flight mung beans grew slower than control beans and their stems contained about 25% less lignin than control seedlings. Reduced mung bean growth in microgravity was partly due to slower germination rate. Lignin also was reduced in flight oats as compared to controls. Oats and mung beans exhibited upward growing roots which were not observed in control seedlings. Chlorophyll A/B ratios were lower in flight tissues than controls. The sealed PGCs exhibited large variations in atmospheric gas composition but the changes were similar between flight and ground controls. Ethylene was present in low concentrations in all chambers.

  11. Divergent selection for shape of growth curve in Japanese quail. 2. Embryonic development and growth.

    PubMed

    Hyánková, L; Novotná, B; Knízetová, H; Horácková, S

    2004-04-01

    1. Embryonic growth and development were analysed using meat type lines of Japanese quail, HG and LG, divergently selected for shape of the growth curve. A total of 1020 embryos of generations 9, 10 or 13 were used for analysis. 2. Considerable inter-line differences were observed in the rate of embryonic development. When compared to HG, LG embryos appeared to be developmentally accelerated during the first 42 h of incubation (larger blastoderm diameter, more somites and higher frequency of more advanced Hamburger-Hamilton stages) as well as at the end of the prenatal period (more embryos with the yolk sac inside the body cavity, shorter incubation period). This corresponded with the trend in postnatal development. 3. Embryonic growth of both lines exhibited an exponential trend. However, considerable inter-line differences were noted in the rate of embryonic growth. Initial growth retardation compensated subsequently by a higher growth rate of HG vs LG quail, characterised the lines after hatching. The same growth pattern repeated three times during the prenatal period (between d 0 and 3, 3 and 8, and 8 and 16). 4. The repeated occurrence of transient decreases in growth rate of the developmentally delayed HG line could be associated with a delayed onset of genetically determined physiological functions mediating utilisation of nutrient supply. 5. Hence, different shapes of growth curves in two genotypes with similar growth potential reveal inter-line differences in physiological age persisting during the whole ontogenesis.

  12. Genetic determinants of prepubertal and pubertal growth and development.

    PubMed

    Thomis, Martine A; Towne, Bradford

    2006-12-01

    This article surveys the current general understanding of genetic influences on within- and between-population variation in growth and development in the context of establishing an International Growth Standard for Preadolescent and Adolescent Children. Traditional genetic epidemiologic analysis methods are reviewed, and evidence from family studies for genetic effects on different measures of growth and development is then presented. Findings from linkage and association studies seeking to identify specific genomic locations and allelic variants of genes influencing variation in growth and maturation are then summarized. Special mention is made of the need to study the interactions between genes and environments. At present, specific genes and polymorphisms contributing to variation in growth and maturation are only beginning to be identified. Larger genetic epidemiologic studies are needed in different parts of the world to better explore population differences in gene frequencies and gene-environment interactions. As advances continue to be made in molecular and statistical genetic methods, the genetic architecture of complex processes, including those of growth and development, will become better elucidated. For now, it can only be concluded that although the fundamental genetic underpinnings of the growth and development of children worldwide are likely to be essentially the same, there are also likely to be differences between populations in the frequencies of allelic gene variants that influence growth and maturation and in the nature of gene-environment interactions. This does not necessarily preclude an international growth reference, but it does have important implications for the form that such a reference might ultimately take.

  13. Space Station Freedom Integrated Research and Development Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, Barry D.; Ahlf, P. R.; Saucillo, Rudy J.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station Freedom is designed to be an Earth-orbiting, multidiscipline research and development (R&D) facility capable of evolution to accomodate a variety of potential uses. One evolution scenario is growth to an enhanced R&D facility. In support of the Space Station Freedom Program Preliminary Design Review (PDR), the NASA Langley Research Center Space Station Office is analyzing growth requirements and evaluating configurations for this R&D utilization. This paper presents a summary of FY1989 study results including time-phased growth plans, R&D growth issues and configurations, and recommendations for the program baseline design which will facilitate evolutionary R&D growth. This study consisted of three major areas of concentration: mission requirements analysis; Space Station Freedom systems growth analysis; and growth accomodations and trades. Mission requirements analysis was performed to develop a realistic mission model of post-Phase 1 R&D missions. A systems-level analysis was performed to project incremental growth requirements of Space Station Freedom needed to support these R&D missions. Identification of growth requirements and specific growth elements led to the need for special accomodations analyses and trades. These studies included identification of hooks and scars on the baseline design, determination of an optimal module growth pattern, analysis of the dual keel length, and determination of an optimal locaton for the customer servicing facility. Results of this study show that Space Station Freedom must be capable of evolving to a dual keel, eight pressurized module configuration (two growth habs and two growth labs); providing 275 kW power (for experimenters and station housekeeping); accomodating a crew of 24; and supporting other growth structures and special facilities to meet projected R&D mission requirements.

  14. Growth and development after hematopoietic cell transplant in children.

    PubMed

    Sanders, J E

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following high-dose chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for children with malignant or nonmalignant hematologic disorders has resulted in an increasing number of long-term disease-free survivors. The preparative regimens include high doses of alkylating agents, such as CY with or without BU, and may include TBI. These agents impact the neuroendocrine system in growing children and their subsequent growth and development. Children receiving high-dose CY or BUCY have normal thyroid function, but those who receive TBI-containing regimens may develop thyroid function abnormalities. Growth is not impacted by chemotherapy-only preparative regimens, but TBI is likely to result in growth hormone deficiency and decreased growth rates that need to be treated with synthetic growth hormone therapy. Children who receive high-dose CY-only have normal development through puberty, whereas those who receive BUCY have a high incidence of delayed pubertal development. Following fractionated TBI preparative regimens, approximately half of the patients have normal pubertal development. These data demonstrate that the growth and development problems after HCT are dependent upon the preparative regimen received. All children should be followed for years after HCT for detection of growth and development abnormalities that are treatable with appropriate hormone therapy.

  15. Cooperation, competition, and coalitions in enzyme-producing microbes: social evolution and nutrient depolymerization rates.

    PubMed

    Folse, Henry J; Allison, Steven D

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular enzymes represent a public good for microbial communities, as they break down complex molecules into simple molecules that microbes can take up. These communities are vulnerable to cheating by microbes that do not produce enzymes, but benefit from those produced by others. However, extracellular enzymes are ubiquitous and play an important role in the depolymerization of nutrients. We developed a multi-genotype, multi-nutrient model of a community of exoenzyme-producing microbes, in order to investigate the relationship between diversity, social interactions, and nutrient depolymerization. We focused on coalitions between complementary types of microbes and their implications for spatial pattern formation and nutrient depolymerization. The model included polymers containing carbon, nitrogen, or phosphorus, and eight genotypes of bacteria, which produced different subsets of the three enzymes responsible for hydrolyzing these polymers. We allowed social dynamics to emerge from a mechanistic model of enzyme production, action, and diffusion. We found that diversity was maximized at high rates of either diffusion or enzyme production (but not both). Conditions favoring cheating also favored the emergence of coalitions. We characterized the spatial patterns formed by different interactions, showing that same-type cooperation leads to aggregation, but between-type cooperation leads to an interwoven, filamentous pattern. Contrary to expectations based on niche complementarity, we found that nutrient depolymerization declined with increasing diversity due to a negative competitive effect of coalitions on generalist producers, leading to less overall enzyme production. This decline in depolymerization was stronger for non-limiting nutrients in the system. This study shows that social interactions among microbes foraging for complementary resources can influence microbial diversity, microbial spatial distributions, and rates of nutrient depolymerization.

  16. Growth hormone treatment in young children with Down's syndrome: effects on growth and psychomotor development

    PubMed Central

    Anneren, G; Tuvemo, T; Carlsson-Skwirut, C; Lonnerholm, T; Bang, P; Sara, V; Gustafsson, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Learning disability and short stature are cardinal signs of Down's syndrome. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), regulated by growth hormone (GH) from about 6 months of age, may be involved in brain development.
AIMS—To study long term effects of GH on linear growth and psychomotor development in young children with Down's syndrome. 
Study design—Fifteen children with Down's syndrome were treated with GH for three years from the age of 6 to 9 months (mean, 7.4). Linear growth, psychomotor development, skeletal maturation, serum concentrations of IGF-I and its binding proteins (BPs), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of IGF-II were studied.
RESULTS—The mean height of the study group increased from −1.8 to −0.8 SDS (Swedish standard) during treatment, whereas that of a Down's syndrome control group fell from −1.7 to −2.2 SDS. Growth velocity declined after treatment stopped. Head growth did not accelerate during treatment. No significant difference in mental or gross motor development was found. The low concentrations of serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 became normal during GH treatment.
CONCLUSIONS—GH treatment results in normal growth velocity in Down's syndrome but does not affect head circumference or mental or gross motor development. Growth velocity declines after treatment stops.

 PMID:10086938

  17. Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0103 TITLE: Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clinton...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0103 Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The long-term goal for our project is to develop a

  18. Problems of urban development and growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerlach, A. C.; Wray, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The increase in the density of human population in urban areas and the effects on various aspects of the environment are discussed. The application of remote sensors to measure, analyze, and predict urban changes and their environmental impact is described. Examples of urban area mapping by aerial photography are included. The methods which have been developed to acquire, analyze, utilize, and preserve remotely sensed data on urban development are presented.

  19. Population growth and economic development revisited with reference to Asia.

    PubMed

    Jha, S C; Deolalikar, A B; Pernia, E M

    1993-01-01

    "This article takes another look at the old issue of population growth and economic development in the context of recent developments and with the benefit of the increasing stock of knowledge on the subject. It first presents a demographic perspective; then it analyzes the implications of population growth with respect to such integral aspects of economic development as human capital accumulation, income distribution and poverty, the environment, and sustainable economic growth. The approach in each case is to review the theoretical considerations, survey the empirical evidence, and then draw policy implications. An overall conclusion with implications for policy caps the paper." The geographical focus is on Asia.

  20. Community prevention coalition context and capacity assessment: Comparing the United States and Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Louis D.; Chilenski, Sarah Meyer; Ramos, Rebeca; Gallegos, Nora; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Effective planning for community health partnerships requires understanding how initial readiness—that is, contextual factors and capacity-- influence implementation of activities and programs. This study compares the context and capacity of drug and violence prevention coalitions in Mexico to those in the United States. Measures of coalition context include community problems, community leadership style, and sense of community. Measures of coalition capacity include the existence of collaborative partnerships and coalition champions. The assessment was completed by 195 members of 9 coalitions in Mexico and 139 members of 7 coalitions in the United States. Psychometric analyses indicate the measures have moderate to strong internal consistency, along with good convergent and discriminant validity in both settings. Results indicate that members of Mexican coalitions perceive substantially more serious community problems, especially with respect to education, law enforcement, and access to alcohol and drugs. Compared to respondents in the U.S., Mexican respondents perceive sense of community to be weaker and that prevention efforts are not as valued by the population where the coalitions are located. The Mexican coalitions appear to be operating in a substantially more challenging environment for the prevention of violence and substance use. Their ability to manage these challenges will likely play a large role in determining whether they are successful in their prevention efforts. The context and capacity assessment is a valuable tool coalitions can use to identify and address initial barriers to success. PMID:26205249

  1. Community Prevention Coalition Context and Capacity Assessment: Comparing the United States and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Brown, Louis D; Chilenski, Sarah M; Ramos, Rebeca; Gallegos, Nora; Feinberg, Mark E

    2016-04-01

    Effective planning for community health partnerships requires understanding how initial readiness-that is, contextual factors and capacity-influences implementation of activities and programs. This study compares the context and capacity of drug and violence prevention coalitions in Mexico to those in the United States. Measures of coalition context include community problems, community leadership style, and sense of community. Measures of coalition capacity include the existence of collaborative partnerships and coalition champions. The assessment was completed by 195 members of 9 coalitions in Mexico and 139 members of 7 coalitions in the United States. Psychometric analyses indicate the measures have moderate to strong internal consistency, along with good convergent and discriminant validity in both settings. Results indicate that members of Mexican coalitions perceive substantially more serious community problems, especially with respect to education, law enforcement, and access to alcohol and drugs. Compared to respondents in the United States, Mexican respondents perceive sense of community to be weaker and that prevention efforts are not as valued by the population where the coalitions are located. The Mexican coalitions appear to be operating in a substantially more challenging environment for the prevention of violence and substance use. Their ability to manage these challenges will likely play a large role in determining whether they are successful in their prevention efforts. The context and capacity assessment is a valuable tool that coalitions can use in order to identify and address initial barriers to success.

  2. Population growth and development: the case of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nakibullah, A

    1998-04-01

    In a poor, overly populated country such as Bangladesh, some believe that a high rate of population growth is a cause of poverty which impedes economic development. Population growth would therefore be exogenous to economic development. However, others believe that rapid population growth is a consequence rather than a cause of poverty. Population growth is therefore endogenous to economic development. Findings are presented from an investigation of whether population growth has been exogenous or endogenous with respect to Bangladesh's development process during the past 3 decades. The increase in per capita real gross domestic product (GDP) is used as a measure of development. Data on population, real GDP per capita, and real investment share of GDP are drawn from the Penn World Table prepared by Summers and Heston in 1991. The data are annual and cover the period 1959-90. Analysis of the data indicate that population growth is endogenous to Bangladesh's development process. These findings are reflected both in the Granger causality tests and the decompositions of variances of detrended real GDP per capita and population growth.

  3. Intellectual College Development Related to Alumni Perceptions of Personal Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, T. Dary

    2012-01-01

    Alumni self-ratings of their personal growth were linked to their intellectual development during college four to seven years earlier. Graduates that were satisfied with their personal growth in the arts, creative thinking, making logical inferences, learning independently, exercising initiative, and tolerating other points of view had higher…

  4. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    Treesearch

    Russell J. Rodriguez; D. Carl Freeman; E. Durant McArthur; Yong Ok Kim; Regina S. Redman

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at...

  5. The Use of Twitter for Professional Growth and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstein, Jackie

    2011-01-01

    Twitter, the micro blogging tool, has seen unprecedented growth in the past year and is expected to continue into the future. Twitter's power, engagement, and popularity lie in its endless networking opportunities. Its potential as a venue for professional growth and development needs to be explored, discussed, and ultimately used as such. A brief…

  6. The Use of Twitter for Professional Growth and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstein, Jackie

    2011-01-01

    Twitter, the micro blogging tool, has seen unprecedented growth in the past year and is expected to continue into the future. Twitter's power, engagement, and popularity lie in its endless networking opportunities. Its potential as a venue for professional growth and development needs to be explored, discussed, and ultimately used as such. A brief…

  7. Placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in human lung development.

    PubMed

    Janér, Joakim; Andersson, Sture; Haglund, Caj; Karikoski, Riitta; Lassus, Patrik

    2008-08-01

    We examined the pulmonary expression of 2 proangiogenic factors, namely, placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, during lung development and acute and chronic lung injury in newborn infants. Six groups were included in an immunohistochemical study of placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, that is, 9 fetuses, 4 preterm and 8 term infants without lung injury who died soon after birth, 5 preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome of <2 days and 7 with respiratory distress syndrome of >10 days, and 6 with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Placental growth factor concentrations in tracheal aspirate fluid were measured in 70 samples from 20 preterm infants during the first postnatal week. In immunohistochemical analyses, placental growth factor staining was seen in bronchial epithelium and macrophages in all groups. Distal airway epithelium positivity was observed mostly in fetuses and in preterm infants who died soon after birth. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining was seen in vascular endothelium in all groups and also in lymphatic endothelium in fetuses. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining in arterial endothelium was associated with higher and staining in venous endothelium with lower gestational age. In capillaries, less vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining was seen in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The mean placental growth factor protein concentration in tracheal aspirate fluid during the first postnatal week was 0.64 +/- 0.42 pg/mL per IgA-secretory component unit. Concentrations during the first postnatal week were stable. Lower placental growth factor concentrations correlated with chorioamnionitis and lactosyl ceramide positivity. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining pattern seems to reflect ongoing differentiation and activity of different endothelia. Lower vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression

  8. Growth & development of Indian children adopted in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Proos, Lemm A

    2009-11-01

    More than 6800 children from India have been adopted in Sweden over the last four decades. At arrival many were undernourished and suffered from infectious diseases. Catch-up growth was common. Unexpectedly, cases of early pubertal development were subsequently reported. In order to investigate the growth and development of adopted children more in detail we studied 114 children adopted from India prospectively during two years. The majority were stunted at arrival and caught up in height and weight after two years. Psychomotor retardation and common infections diminished fairly soon. Those that were stunted did not attain the higher catch-up levels of those not stunted at arrival. Low birthweight also limited the degree of catch-up growth. 107 girls were analysed retrospectively in another study. The median menarcheal age was 11.6 yr (range 7.3-14.6 yr) which is significantly earlier than the mean in Swedish and privileged Indian girls (13.0 and 12.4-12.9 yr, respectively). The pubertal linear growth component was normal in duration and magnitude but likewise started 1.5 yr earlier. The final height/age was 154 cm (-1.4 SDS) and the weight/age 46.9 kg (-1.1 SDS) 8 per cent were 145 cm or shorter. Stunting limited catch-up growth and final height. Those that were most stunted at arrival, and had the fastest catch-up growth, had the earliest menarche. Good maternal and child nutrition is necessary for full expression of a child's growth potential. What is lost in growth early in life can only partially be recovered by catch-up growth. Such growth is associated with risk for early pubertal development which abbreviates the childhood growth period and limits final height. The mechanism underlying the early pubertal development, and the optimal management of nutrition rehabilitation after chronic malnutrition, need to be clarified by further studies.

  9. Educational Leadership: Personal Growth for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Herry

    2004-01-01

    Henry Tomlinson discusses how important it is that leaders of educational organizations know themselves in order to be successful. How that process of self-knowing can be undertaken is carefully developed in the first six chapters through discussion of a variety of approaches for this. The focus is initially very much on personal development…

  10. The Human Health, Growth, and Development Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyles, Linda R.; And Others

    This health and human development curriculum for grades 1-6 contains tips for teachers and overviews of the philosophy behind teaching these topics to elementary school students. The section on health education is structured around ten content strands: (1) health knowledge, attitudes, decisions, and behavior; (2) emotional and social health; (3)…

  11. Individual Professional Development Plans: Cultivating Professional Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargens, Taryl M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last five years schools and districts have been under enormous pressure to improve student achievement scores on state accountability assessments. Educators agree that professional development plays a key role in providing the knowledge and skills needed to increase teacher effectiveness in the classroom. There is no reliable measure for…

  12. The Human Health, Growth, and Development Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyles, Linda R.; And Others

    This health and human development curriculum for grades 1-6 contains tips for teachers and overviews of the philosophy behind teaching these topics to elementary school students. The section on health education is structured around ten content strands: (1) health knowledge, attitudes, decisions, and behavior; (2) emotional and social health; (3)…

  13. Educational Leadership: Personal Growth for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Herry

    2004-01-01

    Henry Tomlinson discusses how important it is that leaders of educational organizations know themselves in order to be successful. How that process of self-knowing can be undertaken is carefully developed in the first six chapters through discussion of a variety of approaches for this. The focus is initially very much on personal development…

  14. Early childhood growth and development in rural Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Kuklina, Elena V; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Stein, Aryeh D; Barnhart, Huiman H; Martorell, Reynaldo

    2006-07-01

    Small size at birth and in early childhood has been associated with impaired neurodevelopment in studies from developing countries, but few have examined associations with growth. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between growth and neurodevelopment during early childhood (birth-36 months). Multivariate regression models were used to analyze the data collected in the course of a study of pregnancy outcomes and early childhood growth and development carried out in rural Guatemala in 1991-1999. Motor and mental development scores were based on the Psychomotor and Mental Development Indices, respectively, derived from the administration of an adapted version of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (Second Edition, 1993) at 6, 24 and 36 months. Z-scores for height-for-age (HAZ), weight-for-age (WAZ), and head circumference-for-age (HCZ) were used as indicators of attained size; changes in these Z-scores over time represent growth. Birth size was significantly associated with child development at 6 and 24 months. Gains in length and weight during the first 24 months were positively associated with child development, whereas growth from 24 to 36 months age was not associated with child development at 36 months. Motor development was more strongly and consistently related to child growth than was mental development. Head circumference gain after 6 months was not a significant predictor of child development at 24 and 36 months. Small size at birth and poor physical growth during the first 24 months are related to neurodevelopmental delays. More evidence from developing countries will help explain the underlying mechanisms and identify appropriate interventions to prevent neurodevelopmental delay in early childhood.

  15. The Impact of Coalition Movements on Airlift Projections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    planning models . As a source of historic airlift information, Time Phased Force Deployment Data is a key input to USTRANSCOM models . Comparing...accordance with existing doctrine. That approach should extend organizations, structures and systems (use to ensure accurate U.S. airlift tracking...in an adjustment to doctrine/doctrinal application and modeling methods to ensure that coalition airlift use is properly tracked and considered so

  16. Coalition Logistics: A Case Study in Operation Restore Hope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-03

    prerequisites forbid the intake of certain foods include Israel (no pork, Kosher prepared), Muslim nations (no pork, Halal prepared), and Hindu nations (no beef...communications. The critical life support supplies, such as food , water, and medicine, were pushed into the theater along with the transportation and...dictates a common sense burden-sharing philosophy.ś In a coalition operation, countries share common resources such as food , water, blood, transportation

  17. Growth and development of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Berger, Aaron J; Kahn, David

    2012-11-01

    Every surgeon operating on the face, and particularly around the eye, should possess a working knowledge of the critical details related to development of the human orbit and recognized changes that occur during the course of aging. The anatomy of the orbit and periorbital region is complex, and the diagnosis and treatment of patients with orbital/periorbital disease requires expertise in congenital differences and awareness of the changes that occur as individuals age. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Center for the development of commercial crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1989-01-01

    The second year of operation of the Center for Commercial Crystal Growth in Space is described. This center is a consortium of businesses, universities and national laboratories. The primary goal of the Center's research is the development of commercial crystal growth in space. A secondary goal is to develop scientific understanding and technology which will improve commercial crystal growth on earth. In order to achieve these goals the Center's research is organized into teams by growth technique; melt growth, solution growth, and vapor growth. The melt growth team is working on solidification and characterization of bulk crystals of gallium arsenide and cadmium telluride. They used high resolution X-ray topography performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Streak-like features were found in the diffraction images of semi-insulating undoped LEC GaAs. These were shown to be (110) antiphase boundaries, which have not been reported before but appear to be pervasive and responsible for features seen via less-sensitive characterization methods. The results on CdTe were not as definitive, but indicate that antiphase boundaries may also be responsible for the double peaks often seen in X-ray rocking curves of this material. A liquid encapsulated melt zone system for GaAs has been assembled and techniques for casting feed rods developed. It was found that scratching the inside of the quartz ampoules with silicon carbide abrasive minimized sticking of the GaAs to the quartz. Twelve floating zone experiments were done.

  19. Framework for Creating a Smart Growth Economic Development Strategy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This step-by-step guide can help small and mid-sized cities, particularly those that have limited population growth, areas of disinvestment, and/or a struggling economy, build a place-based economic development strategy.

  20. Experiments with Corn To Demonstrate Plant Growth and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haldeman, Janice H.; Gray, Margarit S.

    2000-01-01

    Explores using corn seeds to demonstrate plant growth and development. This experiment allows students to formulate hypotheses, observe and record information, and practice mathematics. Presents background information, materials, procedures, and observations. (SAH)

  1. Experiments with Corn To Demonstrate Plant Growth and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haldeman, Janice H.; Gray, Margarit S.

    2000-01-01

    Explores using corn seeds to demonstrate plant growth and development. This experiment allows students to formulate hypotheses, observe and record information, and practice mathematics. Presents background information, materials, procedures, and observations. (SAH)

  2. Can race be erased? Coalitional computation and social categorization

    PubMed Central

    Kurzban, Robert; Tooby, John; Cosmides, Leda

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have established that people encode the race of each individual they encounter, and do so via computational processes that appear to be both automatic and mandatory. If true, this conclusion would be important, because categorizing others by their race is a precondition for treating them differently according to race. Here we report experiments, using unobtrusive measures, showing that categorizing individuals by race is not inevitable, and supporting an alternative hypothesis: that encoding by race is instead a reversible byproduct of cognitive machinery that evolved to detect coalitional alliances. The results show that subjects encode coalitional affiliations as a normal part of person representation. More importantly, when cues of coalitional affiliation no longer track or correspond to race, subjects markedly reduce the extent to which they categorize others by race, and indeed may cease doing so entirely. Despite a lifetime's experience of race as a predictor of social alliance, less than 4 min of exposure to an alternate social world was enough to deflate the tendency to categorize by race. These results suggest that racism may be a volatile and eradicable construct that persists only so long as it is actively maintained through being linked to parallel systems of social alliance. PMID:11742078

  3. Tobacco Control and Health Advocacy in the European Union: Understanding Effective Coalition-Building

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Jeff; Amos, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Coalitions of supporters of comprehensive tobacco control policy have been crucial in achieving policy success nationally and internationally, but the dynamics of such alliances are not well understood. Methods: Qualitative semi-structured, narrative interviews with 35 stakeholders involved in developing the European Council Recommendation on smoke-free environments. These were thematically analyzed to examine the dynamics of coalition-building, collaboration and leadership in the alliance of organizations which successfully called for the development of comprehensive European Union (EU) smoke-free policy. Results: An alliance of tobacco control and public health advocacy organizations, scientific institutions, professional bodies, pharmaceutical companies, and other actors shared the goal of fighting the harms caused by second-hand smoke. Alliance members jointly called for comprehensive EU smoke-free policy and the protection of the political debates from tobacco industry interference. The alliance’s success was enabled by a core group of national and European actors with long-standing experience in tobacco control, who facilitated consensus-building, mobilized allies and synchronized the actions of policy supporters. Representatives of Brussels-based organizations emerged as crucial strategic leaders. Conclusions: The insights gained and identification of key enablers of successful tobacco control advocacy highlight the strategic importance of investing into tobacco control at European level. Those interested in effective health policy can apply lessons learned from EU smoke-free policy to build effective alliances in tobacco control and other areas of public health. PMID:25634938

  4. Eye growth and myopia development: Unifying theory and Matlab model.

    PubMed

    Hung, George K; Mahadas, Kausalendra; Mohammad, Faisal

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this article is to present an updated unifying theory of the mechanisms underlying eye growth and myopia development. A series of model simulation programs were developed to illustrate the mechanism of eye growth regulation and myopia development. Two fundamental processes are presumed to govern the relationship between physiological optics and eye growth: genetically pre-programmed signaling and blur feedback. Cornea/lens is considered to have only a genetically pre-programmed component, whereas eye growth is considered to have both a genetically pre-programmed and a blur feedback component. Moreover, based on the Incremental Retinal-Defocus Theory (IRDT), the rate of change of blur size provides the direction for blur-driven regulation. The various factors affecting eye growth are shown in 5 simulations: (1 - unregulated eye growth): blur feedback is rendered ineffective, as in the case of form deprivation, so there is only genetically pre-programmed eye growth, generally resulting in myopia; (2 - regulated eye growth): blur feedback regulation demonstrates the emmetropization process, with abnormally excessive or reduced eye growth leading to myopia and hyperopia, respectively; (3 - repeated near-far viewing): simulation of large-to-small change in blur size as seen in the accommodative stimulus/response function, and via IRDT as well as nearwork-induced transient myopia (NITM), leading to the development of myopia; (4 - neurochemical bulk flow and diffusion): release of dopamine from the inner plexiform layer of the retina, and the subsequent diffusion and relay of neurochemical cascade show that a decrease in dopamine results in a reduction of proteoglycan synthesis rate, which leads to myopia; (5 - Simulink model): model of genetically pre-programmed signaling and blur feedback components that allows for different input functions to simulate experimental manipulations that result in hyperopia, emmetropia, and myopia. These model simulation programs

  5. The shuttle development and its growth potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, William E.; Dean, Janet L.

    During the next two decades, we will establish the foundation for the 21st century's accomplishments in space. The Space Shuttle vehicle will become the cornerstone for that foundation by providing economical opportunities for space exploration and utilization. Reusability of the Shuttle vehicle is the key to its economy. The major developmental challenges encountered in the Shuttle program are typified by the complexities involved in designing the reusable propulsion and thermal protection subsystems. We successfully met such challenges and are nearing the launch of the first Shuttle orbital flight. Our immediate goal is to enter the Space Shuttle operational phase because only then will we fully understand the unique capabilities of the Shuttle. Concurrent with our effort to begin Shuttle operations are our initial efforts to expand Shuttle capabilities, extending them significantly beyond those of the current baseline system. Shuttle payload capacity and mission-duration capabilities are to increase considerably during the next decade. Just as present Shuttle performance specifications and development timetables were guided by the space program plans and forecasts of the 1960s, so will the development of long-range space programs be determined by our near-future achievements. We anticipate that the Space Shuttle will play a critical role in those achievements.

  6. Redefining Individual Growth and Development Indicators: Oral Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradfield, Tracy A.; Besner, Amanda C.; Wackerle-Hollman, Alisha K.; Albano, Anthony D.; Rodriguez, Michael C.; McConnell, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Language skills developed during preschool contribute strongly to later reading and academic achievement. Effective preschool assessment and intervention should focus on core components of language development, specifically oral language skills. The Early Language and Literacy Individual Growth and Development Indicators (IGDIs) are a set of…

  7. Redefining Individual Growth and Development Indicators: Oral Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradfield, Tracy A.; Besner, Amanda C.; Wackerle-Hollman, Alisha K.; Albano, Anthony D.; Rodriguez, Michael C.; McConnell, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Language skills developed during preschool contribute strongly to later reading and academic achievement. Effective preschool assessment and intervention should focus on core components of language development, specifically oral language skills. The Early Language and Literacy Individual Growth and Development Indicators (IGDIs) are a set of…

  8. A Social Network Analysis of a Coalition Initiative to Prevent Underage Drinking in Los Angeles County

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kar-Hai; Hoeppner, Elena; Valente, Thomas; Rohrbach, Luanne

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health began a prevention services initiative to address problems dealing with alcohol and other drugs across the County. A major component of the strategy included the formation of eight coalitions. Defined by geographic borders, each coalition consisted of multiple service provider organizations, and were mandated to implement customized plans that would focus on preventing underage drinking by addressing availability and accessibility of alcohol. In this study, we collect survey data and observe coalition meetings to study the interactions within and between coalitions. We are informed by network tie strength theories to supplement our view of how organizations communicate. We apply social network analysis to learn how the multi-coalition network is functioning, and identify important unrealized connections. Our findings suggest there are many potential connections between coalitions that are not being leveraged. PMID:27899879

  9. Measuring Dimensions of Coalition Functioning for Effective and Participatory Community Practice

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Valerie B.; Oesterle, Sabrina; Abbott, Robert D.; Arthur, Michael W.; Hawkins, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Social work has a long history of community practice, but community practice models have been understudied. An important first step in conducting such studies is the establishment of psychometrically sound measures that are relevant for evaluations of community practice. In this article, data are used from a community-randomized trial of Communities That Care, a coalition-based model of community practice shown to be effective at transforming communities and changing rates of problem behavior in youths. Coalition functioning is reported by coalition members in 12 communities across intervention implementation phases. A four-dimensional model of coalition functioning (goal-directedness, efficiency, opportunities for participation, and cohesion) was confirmed using factor analysis, and the dimensions were found to be invariant across time. One test of validity of these dimensions is conducted by correlating coalition members' ratings of coalition functioning with those of external observers. PMID:24778545

  10. Reducing disparities for African Americans with diabetes: progress made by the REACH 2010 Charleston and Georgetown Diabetes Coalition.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Carolyn; McNary, Sara; Carlson, Barbara A; King, Marilyn Givens; Hossler, Charles L; Magwood, Gayenell; Zheng, Deyi; Hendrix, Katharine; Beck, Lorna Shelton; Linnen, Florene; Thomas, Virginia; Powell, Sheila; Ma'at, Imani

    2004-01-01

    Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH 2010) is a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention demonstration program that responds to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' goal to eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health status by the year 2010. As part of REACH 2010, community projects were funded to develop, implement, and evaluate community action plans to improve health care and outcomes for racial and ethnic populations. This article describes the program and details the progress of the REACH 2010: Charleston and Georgetown Diabetes Coalition in reducing disparities in care. Approaches employed by the Coalition included community development, empowerment, and education related to diabetes; health systems change associated with access, care, and education; and coalition advocacy. Racial disparities were identified for 12,000 African Americans with diabetes in this urban/rural South Carolina community. After 24 months, significant differences that initially ranged from 11% to 28% in African Americans (when compared with whites/others) were not observed on 270 chart audits for A1C, lipid and kidney testing, eye examinations, and blood pressure control. Future efforts will focus on maintaining progress, eliminating other disparities, and identifying the contributions of each intervention in eliminating racial disparities.

  11. Mass growth in space vehicle and exploration architecture development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert W.; Wilhite, Alan W.; Reeves, David; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wagner, John

    2010-04-01

    Inert or dry mass in aerospace systems has historically grown during aerospace vehicle development because of a number of factors: changing requirements, uncertainty in the performance of the initial technology selection, addition of redundancy, errors in the original design, as well as uncertain masses and loads. In the case of exploration architectures for lunar missions, compounding effects of a multi-staged mission design makes mass-efficient vehicles a necessity for achieving the total delta-V performance required to reach the lunar surface and return to Earth. Current standards and guidelines for mass growth risk mitigation are compared, including the industry and NASA standard methods for risk management and mitigation through the application of mass margin. Historical mass growth trends are analyzed, and average levels of growth are compared to the standard margin allocation levels. Analysis of the available historical data shows that the mean inert mass growth is 28%, and 30% of historical programs experience inert mass growth in excess of the allowable growth and margin recommended level of 32.5%. As an illustrative example of the mass growth of lunar exploration architectures the mass growth sensitivity of the Apollo architecture is calculated. Results show that a kilogram of mass growth on the lunar ascent stage is compounded over 800 times in gross mass.

  12. KSCO 2002: Second International Conference on Knowledge Systems for Coalition Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    peace keeping, disaster relief or other humanitarian operations) Multi-agent systems and the concept of agency in coalitions Tools and techniques...approaches to OOTW – (peace keeping, disaster relief or other humanitarian operations) Multi-agent systems and the concept of agency in coalitions Tools and...the Coalition Commander in the 21st Century: A Report on the Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD)” Hsu, E. “A Group-Oriented Framework

  13. An incidental talonavicular coalition in a diabetic patient: a podiatric perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shtofmakher, Garry; Rozenstrauch, Adam; Cohen, Randy

    2014-01-01

    A tarsal coalition is a pathological union of two or more tarsal bones. The authors present an incidental finding of a unilateral talonavicular (TN) coalition that was overlooked in a 57-year-old diabetic female with signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. This case highlights the clinical implications and important teaching points in recognising a TN coalition. This is particularly relevant for new, upcoming clinicians who may have never been exposed to this diagnostic rarity during clinical training. PMID:24827664

  14. Thyroid hormone mediates otolith growth and development during flatfish metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, A M; Wang, X; Tan, Y; Sievers, Q; Sievers, B; Lee, M; Burrall, K

    2010-11-01

    Flatfish begin life as bilaterally symmetrical larvae that swim up-right, then abruptly metamorphose into asymmetrically shaped juveniles with lateralized swimming postures. Flatfish metamorphosis is mediated entirely by thyroid hormone (TH). Changes in flatfish swim posture are thought to be regulated via vestibular remodeling, although the influence of TH on teleost inner ear development remains unclear. This study addresses the role of TH on the development of the three otolith end-organs (sacculus, utricle, and lagena) during southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) metamorphosis. Compared with pre-metamorphosis, growth rates of the sacculus and utricle otoliths increase dramatically during metamorphosis in a manner that is uncoupled from general somatic growth. Treatment of P. lethostigma larvae with methimazol (a pharmacological inhibitor of endogenous TH production) inhibits growth of the sacculus and utricle, whereas treatment with TH dramatically accelerates their growth. In contrast with the sacculus and utricle otoliths that begin to form and mineralize during embryogenesis, a non-mineralized lagena otolith is first visible 10-12 days after hatching. The lagena grows during pre- and pro-metamorphosis, then abruptly mineralizes during metamorphic climax. Mineralization of the lagena, but not growth, can be induced with TH treatment, whereas treatment with methimazol completely inhibits lagena mineralization without inhibiting its growth. These findings suggest that during southern flounder metamorphosis TH exerts differential effects on growth and development among the three types of otolith.

  15. The impact of social policy on changes in professional practice within learning disability services: different standards for children and adults? A two-part examination: part 2. Professional services under the coalition: the trends continue apace.

    PubMed

    Race, David G; Malin, Nigel A

    2011-12-01

    This is the second of two articles examining links between policy developments and changes in professional practice within learning disability services in England. The first article focused on policy foundations over the last 30 years, and concluded that there was a developing gap in professional inputs between children's and adult services. This article, written one year into the Coalition government, argues that its policies--especially the large-scale reduction in public expenditure, but also the decline in support for inclusion of children in mainstream education, the rapid growth of academies, and proposals for the reorganization of the NHS--have exacerbated the trends identified earlier. In addition, local authorities, though outwardly compliant, have variously interpreted their responsibilities under the personalization agenda, in particular in relation to individual budgets, and this has resulted in assessments of need being based on 'service hours' rather than service quality and staff qualifications.

  16. EDITORIAL: Five years of development and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2004-02-01

    The last issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics under my editorship has recently been published. During the last five years, since its change of title, the journal has significantly modified its targets. Starting from a balanced mix of quantum optics and semiclassical optics, new topics have been brought within the scope of the journal, such as atom optics, degenerate quantum gases, quantum computation and quantum information, representing the growing role played by lasers within our technologically oriented society. Furthermore, the journal has greatly expanded the number of Special Issues and has introduced PhD Tutorials. While many authors do not have time to invest in preparing review articles, we have found the review-style PhD Tutorials to be very popular. Looking back over the evolution of the journal, the most obvious criterion of its development, at least from the point of view of the prospective contributing author, has been the gratifying increase in the impact factor measured by ISI, reflecting the leading position of Journal of Optics B as a European journal devoted exclusively to optics research. It is most rewarding to report that the number of printed pages has increased by 77% since 1999 and by more than 20% in the last year, far above the target planned by the publisher. Furthermore, from an Editorial point of view, the high standing of the journal is demonstrated by the very high quality ratings given by referees to the top fraction of submitted manuscripts and by the large number of full text web downloads reported for those papers. Special Issues also attract high numbers of web downloads, demonstrating the special attention these issues attract within the scientific community. Such results have been achieved only through teamwork, and I wish to express my gratitude to all those who contributed to this result over the years: Françoise Chavel from the European Optical Society secretariat in Paris, John Haynes, Tom Spicer

  17. Coalition-based multimedia peer matching strategies for P2P networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunggon; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of matching users for multimedia transmission in peer-to-peer (P2P) networks and identify strategies for fair resource division among the matched multimedia peers. We propose a framework for coalition formation, which enables users to form a group of matched peers where they can interact cooperatively and negotiate resources based on their satisfaction with the coalition, determined by explicitly considering the peer's multimedia attributes. In addition, our proposed approach goes a step further by introducing the concept of marginal contribution, which is the value improvement of the coalition induced by an incoming peer. We show that the best way for a peer to select a coalition is to choose the coalition that provides the largest division of marginal contribution given a deployed value-division scheme. Moreover, we model the utility function by explicitly considering each peer's attributes as well as the cost for uploading content. To quantify the benefit that users derive from a coalition, we define the value of a coalition based on the total utility that all peers can achieve jointly in the coalition. Based on this definition of the coalition value, we use an axiomatic bargaining solution in order to fairly negotiate the value division of the upload bandwidth given each peer's attributes.

  18. Combating employee benefit cost and control issues: the case for coalition purchasing.

    PubMed

    Anastasio, Louis N

    2005-01-01

    Growing in popularity, employee benefit coalitions can impact an employer's bottom line and are becoming a market factor to be dealt with in every industry and business setting. This article examines how modern-day coalitions are bringing classic aggregation theory into the 21st century and the reasons behind the growing popularity of employee benefit coalitions. It also suggests several strategic initiatives that human resource (HR) and benefit managers can take within their own organization to unlock the power of the coalition movement toward a better, more efficient buying model.

  19. Development of a Benchmark Example for Delamination Fatigue Growth Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The development of a benchmark example for cyclic delamination growth prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The example is based on a finite element model of a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen, which is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the delamination growth prediction capabilities in commercial finite element codes. First, the benchmark result was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to grow under cyclic loading in a finite element model of a commercial code. The number of cycles to delamination onset and the number of cycles during stable delamination growth for each growth increment were obtained from the analysis. In general, good agreement between the results obtained from the growth analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Overall, the results are encouraging but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination is required

  20. Development of a Benchmark Example for Delamination Fatigue Growth Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The development of a benchmark example for cyclic delamination growth prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The example is based on a finite element model of a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen, which is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the delamination growth prediction capabilities in commercial finite element codes. First, the benchmark result was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to grow under cyclic loading in a finite element model of a commercial code. The number of cycles to delamination onset and the number of cycles during stable delamination growth for each growth increment were obtained from the analysis. In general, good agreement between the results obtained from the growth analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Overall, the results are encouraging but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination is required.

  1. Magnetic fields: how is plant growth and development impacted?

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Dobránszki, Judit

    2016-03-01

    This review provides detailed insight on the effects of magnetic fields on germination, growth, development, and yield of plants focusing on ex vitro growth and development and discussing the possible physiological and biochemical responses. The MFs considered in this review range from the nanoTesla (nT) to geomagnetic levels, up to very strong MFs greater than 15 Tesla (T) and also super-weak MFs (near 0 T). The theoretical bases of the action of MFs on plant growth, which are complex, are not discussed here and thus far, there is limited mathematical background about the action of MFs on plant growth. MFs can positively influence the morphogenesis of several plants which allows them to be used in practical situations. MFs have thus far been shown to modify seed germination and affect seedling growth and development in a wide range of plants, including field, fodder, and industrial crops; cereals and pseudo-cereals; grasses; herbs and medicinal plants; horticultural crops (vegetables, fruits, ornamentals); trees; and model crops. This is important since MFs may constitute a non-residual and non-toxic stimulus. In addition to presenting and summarizing the effects of MFs on plant growth and development, we also provide possible physiological and biochemical explanations for these responses including stress-related responses of plants, explanations based on dia-, para-, and ferromagnetism, oriented movements of substances, and cellular and molecular changes.

  2. Chin development as a result of differential jaw growth.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Steven D; Low, Laura E; Holton, Nathan E; Franciscus, Robert G; Frazier, Mike; Qian, Fang; Mann, Kyle; Schneider, Galen; Scott, Jill E; Southard, Thomas E

    2011-04-01

    During facial growth, the maxilla and mandible translate downward and forward. Although the forward displacement of the maxilla is less than that of the mandible, the interarch relationship of the teeth in the sagittal view during growth remains essentially unchanged. Interdigitation is thought to provide a compensatory (tooth movement) mechanism for maintaining the pattern of occlusion during growth: the maxillary teeth move anteriorly relative to the maxilla while the mandibular teeth move posteriorly relative to the basilar mandible. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the human chin develops as a result of this process. Twenty-five untreated subjects from the Iowa Facial Growth Study with Class I normal occlusion were randomly selected based on availability of cephalograms at T1 (mean = 8.32 yr) and T2 (mean = 19.90 yr). Measurements of growth (T2 minus T1) parallel to the Frankfort horizontal (FH) for the maxilla, maxillary dentition, mandible, mandibular dentition, and pogonion (Pg) were made. Relative to Pg (a stable bony landmark), B-point moved posteriorly, on average 2.34 mm during growth, and bony chin development (B-point to Pg) increased concomitantly. Similarly, the mandibular and maxillary incisors moved posteriorly relative to Pg 2.53 mm and 2.76 mm, respectively. A-point, relative to Pg, moved posteriorly 4.47 mm during growth. Bony chin development during facial growth occurs, in part, from differential jaw growth and compensatory dentoalveolar movements. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth and development and their environmental and biological determinants.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Neves, Kelly; de Souza Morais, Rosane Luzia; Teixeira, Romero Alves; Pinto, Priscilla Avelino Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    To investigate child growth, cognitive/language development, and their environmental and biological determinants. This was a cross-sectional, predictive correlation study with all 92 children aged 24-36 months who attended the municipal early childhood education network in a town in the Vale do Jequitinhonha region, in 2011. The socioeconomic profile was determined using the questionnaire of the Associação Brasileira de Empresas de Pesquisa. The socio-demographicand maternal and child health profiles were created through a self-prepared questionnaire. The height-for-age indicator was selected to represent growth. Cognitive/language development was assessed through the Bayley Scale of Infant and Toddler Development. The quality of educational environments was assessed by Infant/Toddler Environment Scale; the home environment was assessed by the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment. The neighborhood quality was determined by a self-prepared questionnaire. A multivariate linear regression analysis was performed. Families were predominantly from socioeconomic class D, with low parental education. The prevalence of stunted growth was 14.1%; cognitive and language development were below average at 28.6% and 28.3%, respectively. Educational institutions were classified as inadequate, and 69.6% of homes were classified as presenting a risk for development. Factors such as access to parks and pharmacies and perceived security received the worst score regarding neighborhood environment. Biological variables showed a greater association with growth and environmental variables with development. The results showed a high prevalence of stunting and below-average results for cognitive/language development among the participating children. Both environmental and biological factors were related to growth and development. However, biological variables showed a greater association with growth, whereas environmental variables were associated with development

  4. Does preterm period sleep development predict early childhood growth trajectories?

    PubMed

    Winkler, M R; Park, J; Pan, W; Brandon, D H; Scher, M; Holditch-Davis, D

    2017-09-01

    The current study examined the relationship between sleep state development across the preterm and early post-term periods and subsequent growth trajectories from 1 to 27 months corrected age. Retrospective analysis of data collected prospectively from 111 preterm infants (⩽34 weeks gestation) who participated in a multi-site longitudinal study. Separate longitudinal parallel process models were calculated for each sleep state (active and quiet sleep) and growth (weight, length and body mass index (BMI) Z-scores) variable to estimate the associations between their developmental trajectories. Significant associations were identified between the trajectories of quiet sleep and weight, active sleep and weight, quiet sleep and BMI, and active sleep and BMI. No statistically meaningful associations were identified between the trajectories of early childhood length and the preterm sleep states. Faster preterm period sleep development appears to predict more favorable early childhood growth trajectories, particularly for weight, indicating preterm sleep may be an important biomarker for subsequent growth outcomes.

  5. Hierarchical Size Scaling during Multicellular Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Uppaluri, Sravanti; Weber, Stephanie C; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2016-10-04

    Multicellular organisms must regulate their growth across the diverse length scales of biological organization, but how this growth is controlled from organelle to body, while coordinating interdependent functions at each scale, remains poorly understood. We utilized the C. elegans worm intestine as a model system to identify distinct allometric scaling laws, revealing that the growth of individual structures is differentially regulated during development. We show that the volume of the nucleolus, a subcellular organelle, is directly proportional (isometric) to cell size during larval development. In contrast to findings in a variety of other systems, the size of the nucleus grows more slowly and is hypoallometric to the cell. We further demonstrate that the relative size of the nucleolus, the site of ribosome biogenesis, is predictive of the growth rate of the entire worm. These results highlight the importance of subcellular size for organism-level function in multicellular organisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Subtalar Joint Distraction Arthrodesis to Correct Calcaneal Valgus in Pediatric Patients with Tarsal Coalition: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jaclyn M; Kihm, Carl A; Camasta, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Subtalar joint middle facet coalitions commonly present in children who have a painful, rigid, pes planovalgus foot type. The middle facet coalition allows rearfoot forces to be distributed medially through the coalition, and this can result in arthritis or lateral tarsal wedging. The senior author has used a wedged bone graft distraction subtalar joint arthrodesis to correct calcaneal valgus and restore the talar height in these patients. The tight, press-fit nature of the tricortical iliac crest allograft provides stability and can negate the need for internal fixation. We retrospectively reviewed 9 pediatric subtalar joint distraction arthrodesis procedures performed on 8 patients during a 6-year period. All patients began weightbearing at 6 weeks after surgery. All patients had osseous union, and no complications developed that required a second surgery. The clinical outcomes, assessed at a mean of 25.5 (range, 6.3 to 75.8) months postoperatively, were satisfactory. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 90.1 (range, 79 to 94), on a 94-point scale. The wedged distraction arthrodesis technique has not been previously described for correction of pediatric patients with lateral tarsal wedging, but it is an effective option and yields successful outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Southwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center and the Oklahoma inter tribal emergency management coalition: a unique partnership.

    PubMed

    Chief, Vicki Tall; Burton, Tracey P; Campbell, Janis; Boatright, Daniel T; Wendelboe, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Oklahoma is home to 39 Native American tribes, so the issue of tribal sovereignty had to be addressed before tribes, local, and state preparedness officials could work together successfully. We describe the unique partnership that was established when the Southwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (SWPERLC) began working with tribes which led to the development of a tribal emergency management coalition. The SWPERLC established a formal partnership with tribal emergency managers and a 501(c)3 coalition was formed. The SWPERLC sponsors annual summits and attends and/or hosts monthly meetings, offering education and training opportunities year-round. One example of a lesson learned resulted from a pandemic influenza survey administered to Oklahoma tribes. We learned that 40% of those Native Americans surveyed who chose not be vaccinated were concerned with side effects. Our evidence showed that improved public health conversations regarding the safety of vaccines must be had with the Native American community. Because of all the activities that were completed we now better understand how state and local preparedness officials can more successfully and beneficially work with tribes. Persistence, patience, and dedication were key factors highlighted during the formation of the coalition. Mutual respect and trust have allowed and will allow this partnership to continue.

  8. Naval Coalition Building with the GCC States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    East, “norms” of state development have also driven the GCC states to build navies. Martha Finnemore , discussing state development, points out that...The Absence of Middle Eastern Great Powers: Political ‘Backwardness’ in Historical Perspective,” 661-662. 130 Martha Finnemore , “Defining State... Martha Finnemore , “Defining State Interests,” National Interests in International Society. 17 132 Giacomo Luciani, “The Oil Rent, the Fiscal Crisis

  9. Transforming growth factor β signaling in uterine development and function.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinglei

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily is evolutionarily conserved and plays fundamental roles in cell growth and differentiation. Mounting evidence supports its important role in female reproduction and development. TGFBs1-3 are founding members of this growth factor family, however, the in vivo function of TGFβ signaling in the uterus remains poorly defined. By drawing on mouse and human studies as a main source, this review focuses on the recent progress on understanding TGFβ signaling in the uterus. The review also considers the involvement of dysregulated TGFβ signaling in pathological conditions that cause pregnancy loss and fertility problems in women.

  10. Conventional development versus managed growth: the costs of sprawl.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Robert W; Mukherji, Sahan

    2003-09-01

    We examined the effects of sprawl, or conventional development, versus managed (or "smart") growth on land and infrastructure consumption as well as on real estate development and public service costs in the United States. Mathematical impact models were used to produce US estimates of differences in resources consumed according to each growth scenario over the period 2000-2025. Sprawl produces a 21% increase in amount of undeveloped land converted to developed land (2.4 million acres) and approximately a 10% increase in local road lane-miles (188 300). Furthermore, sprawl causes about 10% more annual public service (fiscal) deficits ($4.2 billion US dollars) and 8% higher housing occupancy costs ($13 000 US dollars per dwelling unit). Managed growth can save significant amounts of human and natural resources with limited effects on traditional development procedures.

  11. Conventional Development Versus Managed Growth: The Costs of Sprawl

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, Robert W.; Mukherji, Sahan

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the effects of sprawl, or conventional development, versus managed (or “smart”) growth on land and infrastructure consumption as well as on real estate development and public service costs in the United States. Methods. Mathematical impact models were used to produce US estimates of differences in resources consumed according to each growth scenario over the period 2000–2025. Results. Sprawl produces a 21% increase in amount of undeveloped land converted to developed land (2.4 million acres) and approximately a 10% increase in local road lane-miles (188 300). Furthermore, sprawl causes about 10% more annual public service (fiscal) deficits ($4.2 billion) and 8% higher housing occupancy costs ($13 000 per dwelling unit). Conclusions. Managed growth can save significant amounts of human and natural resources with limited effects on traditional development procedures. PMID:12948976

  12. Functional genomics of root growth and development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali; Simpson, June; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Benfey, Philip N

    2009-04-01

    Roots are vital for the uptake of water and nutrients, and for anchorage in the soil. They are highly plastic, able to adapt developmentally and physiologically to changing environmental conditions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind this growth and development requires knowledge of root transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Genomics approaches, including the recent publication of a root expression map, root proteome, and environment-specific root expression studies, are uncovering complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional networks underlying root development. The challenge is in further capitalizing on the information in these datasets to understand the fundamental principles of root growth and development. In this review, we highlight progress researchers have made toward this goal.

  13. Phase transition in tumor growth: I avascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Rebelo, I.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular tumor growth based on a simple chemical network. This model presents a logistic behavior and shows a “second order” phase transition. We prove the fractal origin of the empirical logistics and Gompertz constant and its relation to mitosis and apoptosis rate. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates the entropy production rate as a Lyapunov function during avascular tumor growth.

  14. A growth factor phenotype map for ovine preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Watson, A J; Watson, P H; Arcellana-Panlilio, M; Warnes, D; Walker, S K; Schultz, G A; Armstrong, D T; Seamark, R F

    1994-04-01

    The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the patterns of expression for several growth factor ligand and receptor genes during ovine preimplantation development. Transcripts for insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II, and the receptors for insulin and IGF-I were detected throughout ovine preimplantation development from the 1-cell to the blastocyst stage. Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) transcripts were also detected throughout ovine preimplantation development. The mRNAs encoding basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were detected in all stages of the ovine preimplantation embryo, although the relative abundance of this transcript consistently decreased from the 1-cell to the blastocyst stage, suggesting that it may represent a maternal transcript in early sheep embryos. Transcripts encoding ovine trophoblast protein (oTP) were detected only within blastocyst-stage embryos. Primary ovine oviduct cell cultures express the transcripts for IGF-II, IGF-I, TGF alpha, bFGF, TGF beta 1, and the receptors for insulin and IGF-I, suggesting that paracrine growth factor circuits may exist between the oviduct epithelium and the early ovine embryo. Transcripts for insulin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) were not detected in any stage of the ovine preimplantation embryo or within the oviduct cell preparations. The expression of growth factor transcripts very early in mammalian development would predict that these molecules fulfil a necessary role(s) in supporting the progression of early embryos through the preimplantation interval. Our future efforts will be directed to understanding the nature of these putative regulatory pathways.

  15. An assessment of growth and development paths for southeast Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Pete Tsournos; Richard W. Haynes

    2004-01-01

    The intuitive explanation for why an economy grows or develops often involves the ways in which land (resources), labor, and capital interact. Here we review the literature for what is known about the different pathways for economic growth and development in resource-abundant regions. We discuss the effectiveness of the forest products industry as a determinant of...

  16. Population growth, human development, and deforestation in biodiversity hotspots.

    PubMed

    Jha, S; Bawa, K S

    2006-06-01

    Human population and development activities affect the rate of deforestation in biodiversity hotspots. We quantified the effect of human population growth and development on rates of deforestation and analyzed the relationship between these causal factors in the 1980s and 1990s. We compared the averages of population growth, human development index (HDI, which measures income, health, and education), and deforestation rate and computed correlations among these variables for countries that contain biodiversity hotspots. When population growth was high and HDI was low there was a high rate of deforestation, but when HDI was high, rate of deforestation was low, despite high population growth. The correlation among variables was significant for the 1990s but not for the 1980s. The relationship between population growth and HDI had a regional pattern that reflected the historical process of development. Based on the changes in HDI and deforestation rate over time, we identified two drivers of deforestation: policy choice and human-development constraints. Policy choices that disregard conservation may cause the loss of forests even in countries that are relatively developed. Lack of development in other countries, on the other hand, may increase the pressure on forests to meet the basic needs of the human population. Deforestation resulting from policy choices may be easier to fix than deforestation arising from human development constraints. To prevent deforestation in the countries that have such constraints, transfer of material and intellectual resources from developed countries may be needed. Popular interest in sustainable development in developed countries can facilitate the transfer of these resources.

  17. Gravitational Effects on Reproduction, Growth, and Development of Mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    The broad objective of this research program is to determine the role which gravity plays in the growth and development of mammalian animals. Current studies are focused on the effects of graded hypergravitatinal field intensities on mice, rats and other small sized laboratory animals using the chronic centrifugation technique. They include studies on reproduction and prenatal and postnatel growth and development. Among the important questions addressed are: (1) what stage or stages in animal development are affected by hypergravity and what are the effects? (2) is there a minimum or critical body size for hypergravity to produce a significant effect on growth and development? (3) are there field intensity thresholds for the preceding questions? From analysis of the body masses at birth of rats conceived and allowed to undergo gestation under 2.1G and under normal gravity (1G), it was found that there was no significant difference between the two groups. Futhermore, their growth rates postnatally were the same until they reached a body mass of approximately 50 grams when the 2.1G group showed a significantly slower rate. Results from these studies support the conclusion that prenatal as well as the early postnatal stages of growth and development of the rat are refractory to hyper-G.

  18. Growth and development rates have different thermal responses.

    PubMed

    Forster, Jack; Hirst, Andrew G; Woodward, Guy

    2011-11-01

    Growth and development rates are fundamental to all living organisms. In a warming world, it is important to determine how these rates will respond to increasing temperatures. It is often assumed that the thermal responses of physiological rates are coupled to metabolic rate and thus have the same temperature dependence. However, the existence of the temperature-size rule suggests that intraspecific growth and development are decoupled. Decoupling of these rates would have important consequences for individual species and ecosystems, yet this has not been tested systematically across a range of species. We conducted an analysis on growth and development rate data compiled from the literature for a well-studied group, marine pelagic copepods, and use an information-theoretic approach to test which equations best describe these rates. Growth and development rates were best characterized by models with significantly different parameters: development has stronger temperature dependence than does growth across all life stages. As such, it is incorrect to assume that these rates have the same temperature dependence. We used the best-fit models for these rates to predict changes in organism mass in response to temperature. These predictions follow a concave relationship, which complicates attempts to model the impacts of increasing global temperatures on species body size.

  19. Gravitational Effects on Reproduction, Growth, and Development of Mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    The broad objective of this research program is to determine the role which gravity plays in the growth and development of mammalian animals. Current studies are focused on the effects of graded hypergravitatinal field intensities on mice, rats and other small sized laboratory animals using the chronic centrifugation technique. They include studies on reproduction and prenatal and postnatel growth and development. Among the important questions addressed are: (1) what stage or stages in animal development are affected by hypergravity and what are the effects? (2) is there a minimum or critical body size for hypergravity to produce a significant effect on growth and development? (3) are there field intensity thresholds for the preceding questions? From analysis of the body masses at birth of rats conceived and allowed to undergo gestation under 2.1G and under normal gravity (1G), it was found that there was no significant difference between the two groups. Futhermore, their growth rates postnatally were the same until they reached a body mass of approximately 50 grams when the 2.1G group showed a significantly slower rate. Results from these studies support the conclusion that prenatal as well as the early postnatal stages of growth and development of the rat are refractory to hyper-G.

  20. Insulin-like growth factors in embryonic and fetal growth and skeletal development (Review)

    PubMed Central

    AGROGIANNIS, GEORGIOS D.; SIFAKIS, STAVROS; PATSOURIS, EFSTRATIOS S.; KONSTANTINIDOU, ANASTASIA E.

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II have a predominant role in fetal growth and development. IGFs are involved in the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of fetal cells in vitro and the IGF serum concentration has been shown to be closely correlated with fetal growth and length. IGF transcripts and peptides have been detected in almost every fetal tissue from as early in development as pre-implantation to the final maturation stage. Furthermore, IGFs have been demonstrated to be involved in limb morphogenesis. However, although ablation of Igf genes in mice resulted in growth retardation and delay in skeletal maturation, no impact on outgrowth and patterning of embryonic limbs was observed. Additionally, various molecular defects in the Igf1 and Igf1r genes in humans have been associated with severe intrauterine growth retardation and impaired skeletal maturation, but not with truncated limbs or severe skeletal dysplasia. The conflicting data between in vitro and in vivo observations with regard to bone morphogenesis suggests that IGFs may not be the sole trophic factors involved in fetal skeletal growth and that redundant mechanisms may exist in chondro- and osteogenesis. Further investigation is required in order to elucidate the functions of IGFs in skeletal development. PMID:24859417

  1. Effects of growth hormone (GH) transgene and nutrition on growth and bone development in common carp.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tingbing; Zhang, Tanglin; Wang, Yaping; Chen, Yushun; Hu, Wei; Zhu, Zuoyan

    2013-10-01

    Limited information is available on effects of growth hormone transgene and nutrition on growth and development of aquatic animals. Here, we present a study to test these effects with growth-enhanced transgenic common carp under two nutritional conditions or feeding rations (i.e., 5% and 10% of fish body weight per day). Compared with the nontransgenic fish, the growth rates of the transgenic fish increased significantly in both feeding rations. The shape of the pharyngeal bone was similar among treatments, but the transgenic fish had relatively smaller and lighter pharyngeal bone compared with the nontransgenic fish. Calcium content of the pharyngeal bone of the transgenic fish was significantly lower than that of the nontransgenic fish. Feeding ration also affected growth rate but less of an effect on bone development. By manipulating intrinsic growth and controlling for both environment (e.g., feeding ration) and genetic background or genotype (e.g., transgenic or not), this study provides empirical evidence that the genotype has a stronger effect than the environment on pharyngeal bone development. The pharyngeal bone strength could be reduced by decreased calcium content and calcification in the transgenic carp.

  2. Insulin-like growth factors in embryonic and fetal growth and skeletal development (Review).

    PubMed

    Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Sifakis, Stavros; Patsouris, Efstratios S; Konstantinidou, Anastasia E

    2014-08-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II have a predominant role in fetal growth and development. IGFs are involved in the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of fetal cells in vitro and the IGF serum concentration has been shown to be closely correlated with fetal growth and length. IGF transcripts and peptides have been detected in almost every fetal tissue from as early in development as pre‑implantation to the final maturation stage. Furthermore, IGFs have been demonstrated to be involved in limb morphogenesis. However, although ablation of Igf genes in mice resulted in growth retardation and delay in skeletal maturation, no impact on outgrowth and patterning of embryonic limbs was observed. Additionally, various molecular defects in the Igf1 and Igf1r genes in humans have been associated with severe intrauterine growth retardation and impaired skeletal maturation, but not with truncated limbs or severe skeletal dysplasia. The conflicting data between in vitro and in vivo observations with regard to bone morphogenesis suggests that IGFs may not be the sole trophic factors involved in fetal skeletal growth and that redundant mechanisms may exist in chondro- and osteogenesis. Further investigation is required in order to elucidate the functions of IGFs in skeletal development.

  3. Capital's Daisy Chain: Exposing Chicago's Corporate Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrastia, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    This article uses the global city of Chicago as an urban exemplar of a thirty-year worldwide economic shift toward public (state) private (corporate) partnerships. Advanced by racialized youth-development discourses in Chicago, private corporations, public education, and social housing are in alliance to transform "the problems of urban…

  4. Actor coalitions and implementation in strategic delta planning: Opening the Haringvliet sluices in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermoolen, Myrthe; Hermans, Leon

    2016-04-01

    The sustained development of urbanizing deltas is influenced by natural and societal processes. These processes are characterized by their long time span, in which conflicting interests of different stakeholders have to be reconciled. Reaching consent between actors is a challenge itself, but maintaining this consent throughout different stages of strategic planning - from advocacy and agenda setting to implementation - over these long periods of time is even more difficult. The implementation stage still includes many different actors involved, some of which are different than the ones who agreed before, due to both the long run of the strategic delta planning, and to a shift of tasks and responsibilities. Thus, implementation of strategic plans often features delays, deviations of agreed plans and unintended outcomes. A key question therefore is how coalition dynamics in (pre-)planning stages influence and are influenced by the coalition dynamics during implementation. The different stages in strategic planning are often studied from either a plan formulation or an implementation perspective, but the connection between the two proves an important bottleneck for strategic planning in deltas. For instance, many building with nature solutions are still in their pilot-phase, and their upscaling can profit from lessons concerning past implementation efforts. The proposed contribution will use the case of the management of the Dutch Haringvliet sluices and the decision ('Kierbesluit') in 2000 to put these sluices ajar, to study the link between the different strategic delta planning stages and the role of the formation and change of actor coalitions herein. With the completion of the Haringvliet dam with outlet sluices in 1970, the Haringvliet estuary of the rivers Rhine and Meuse was closed off from the sea, creating a fresh water lake. This was done to make the Dutch Southwest delta safe from flooding, and had positive effects for agricultural water supply and

  5. Report of recommendations: the Annapolis Coalition Conference on Behavioral Health Work Force Competencies.

    PubMed

    Hoge, Michael A; Morris, John A; Daniels, Allen S; Huey, Leighton Y; Stuart, Gail W; Adams, Neal; Paris, Manuel; Goplerud, Eric; Horgan, Constance M; Kaplan, Linda; Storti, Susan A; Dodge, Joan M

    2005-01-01

    In May 2004, the Annapolis Coalition on Behavioral Health Workforce Education convened a national meeting on the identification and assessment of competencies. The Conference on Behavioral Health Workforce Competencies brought leading consumer and family advocates together with other experts on competencies from diverse disciplines and specialties in the fields of both mental health care and substance use disorders treatment. Aided by experts on competency development in business and medicine, conference participants have generated 10 consensus recommendations to guide the future development of workforce competencies in behavioral health. This article outlines those recommendations. A collaborative effort to identify a set of core or common competencies is envisioned as a key strategy for advancing behavioral health education, training, and other workforce development initiatives.

  6. Building Partner Capabilities for Coalition Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Force Gaps CNA and experimentation, influences industry research and development, identifies requirements for science and technology research, and...interest to the U.S. Army and candi - date partners. Step 1: Determine Relative Importance of U.S. Army Capability Gaps The study team convened a...Lithuania Philippines Pakistan Italy Malaysia Russia Qatar Latvia Mongolia Singapore Saudi Arabia Luxembourg New Zealand Thailand Turkey Netherlands

  7. Growth hormone actions during development influence adult phenotype and longevity.

    PubMed

    Bartke, A; Sun, L; Fang, Y; Hill, C

    2016-12-15

    There is considerable evidence that exposure to undernutrition, overnutrition, stress or endocrine disruptors during fetal development can increase the probability of obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and other problems in adult life. In contrast to these findings, reducing early postnatal growth by altering maternal diet or number of pups in a litter can increase longevity. In hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice, which are remarkably long lived, a brief period of growth hormone therapy starting at 1 or 2weeks of age reduces longevity and normalizes ("rescues") multiple aging-related traits. Collectively, these findings indicate that nutritional and hormonal signals during development can have profound impact on the trajectory of aging. We suspect that altered "programming" of aging during development may represent one of the mechanisms of the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) and the detrimental effects of "catch-up" growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Early growth and development of later life metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Foo, Joo-Pin; Mantzoros, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Growth is effected via a complex interaction of genetic, nutritional, environmental and growth factors. Hormonal factors such as the growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling system, the human placental lactogen, and insulin play an integral role in early growth. Genetic factors affecting the GH-IGF system and insulin secretion and actions, and epigenetic mechanisms including DNA methylation have been further implicated as contributory factors. These hormonal systems, on a background of genetic susceptibility, together with other factors including maternal nutrition, placental and environmental factors, regulate not only early growth but also development. These interactions may impact on later health consequences in adult life. Accumulating data in the last few decades on developmental programming and later life metabolic disorders has provided a novel perspective on the possible pathogenesis of metabolic dysregulation. Despite postulations put forward to elucidate the mechanism underlying the association between early growth and later life metabolic disorders, it remains unclear what the dominant factor(s) would be, how any underlying mechanisms interact, or whether these mechanisms are truly causal.

  9. Posterior cranial base natural growth and development: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Currie, Kris; Sawchuk, Dena; Saltaji, Humam; Oh, Heesoo; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Lagravere, Manuel

    2017-07-24

    To provide a synthesis of the published studies evaluating the natural growth and development of the human posterior cranial base (S-Ba). The search was performed on MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, and all EBM Reviews electronic databases. In addition, reference lists of the included studies were hand-searched. Articles were included if they analyzed posterior cranial-base growth in humans specifically. Study selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were completed in duplicate. A meta-analysis was not justified. Finally, 23 published studies were selected: 5 cross-sectional and 18 cohort studies. Articles were published between 1955 and 2015, and all were published in English. The sample sizes varied between 20 and 397 individuals and consisted of craniofacial measurements from either living or deceased human skulls. Validity of the measurements was not determined in any of the studies, while six papers reported some form of reliability assessment. All the articles included multiple time points within the same population or data from multiple age groups. Growth of S-Ba was generally agreed to be from spheno-occipital synchondrosis growth. Basion displaced downward and backward and sella turcica moved downward and backward during craniofacial growth. Timing of cessation of S-Ba growth was not conclusive due to limited identified evidence. Current evidence suggests that S-Ba is not totally stable, as its dimensions change throughout craniofacial growth and a minor dimensional change is observed even in late adulthood.

  10. Professional Development and the Impact on Teacher Growth and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segura, Sherry K.

    2016-01-01

    This study involved examining the beliefs of teachers at one urban elementary school regarding how professional development has helped them meet the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. This study included a series of in-depth interviews with three teacher leaders. The goal was to obtain consent from them to participate in this…

  11. Coalitions: Organizational, Political, Command & Control Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Toppling the Tower of Babel , Military Review, September-October, 22–25. [36] Barnett, T.P.M. (1999), The Seven Deadly Sins of Network-Centric Warfare, In... Library 1 Head/C2 Decision Support Systems 1 M. Bélanger 1 P. Maupin 1 Dr P. Valin 1 Head/Intelligence and Information 1 Alain Auger 1 Anne-Claire...2008 - 304 External distribution 1 Library and Archives Canada 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0N4 1 Director Research and Development Knowledge

  12. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal models used for analyzing dendritic web growth and calculating the thermal stress were reexamined to establish the validity limits imposed by the assumptions of the models. Also, the effects of thermal conduction through the gas phase were evaluated and found to be small. New growth designs, both static and dynamic, were generated using the modeling results. Residual stress effects in dendritic web were examined. In the laboratory, new techniques for the control of temperature distributions in three dimensions were developed. A new maximum undeformed web width of 5.8 cm was achieved. A 58% increase in growth velocity of 150 micrometers thickness was achieved with dynamic hardware. The area throughput goals for transient growth of 30 and 35 sq cm/min were exceeded.

  13. Metropolitan migration and population growth in selected developing countries.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate the components of metropolitan population growth in selected developing countries during 1960-1970 period. The study examines population growth in 26 cities: 5 are in Africa, 8 in Asia, and 13 in Latin America, using data from national census publications. These cities in general are the political capitals of their countries, but some additional large cities were selected in Brazil, Mexico, and South Africa. All cities, at the beginning of the 1960-1970 decade had over 500,000 population; Accra, the only exception, reached this population level during the 1960s. Some cities had over 4 million residents in 1970. Net migration contributed about 37% to total metropolitan population growth; the remainder of the growth is attributable to natural increase. Migration has a much stronger impact on metropolitan growth than suggested by the above figure: 1) Several metropolitan areas, for various reasons, are unlikely to receive many migrants; without those cities, the share of metropolitan growth from net migration is 44%. 2) Estimates of the natural increase of migrants after their arrival in the metropolitan areas, when added to migration itself, changes the total contribution of migration to 49% in some metropolitan areas. 3) Even where net migration contributes a smaller proportion to metropolitan growth than natural increase, the rates of net migration are generally high and should be viewed in the context of rapid metropolitan population growth from natural increase alone. Finally, the paper also compares the components of metropolitan growth with the components of growth in the remaining urban areas. The results show that the metropolitan areas, in general, grow faster than the remaining urban areas, and that this more rapid growth is mostly due to a higher rate of net migration. Given the significance of migration for metropolitan growth, further investigations of the effects of these migration streams, particularly with

  14. Teaching child growth and development: the Christmas shoebox.

    PubMed

    Epp, Sheila M; McAulay, Judy E

    2008-01-01

    Teaching growth and development to nursing students can be dry, uninteresting, and labor-intensive. Engaging students in learning this material was the challenge of a short, 4-week pediatric experience. Students use growth and development knowledge to select toys and activities that fit in a shoebox and explain to their classmates the rationale for their selection. The Christmas shoebox activity increases their ability to transfer knowledge to both the examination questions and the clinical setting and provides a charitable service to the community.

  15. BRASSINOSTEROIDS: Essential Regulators of Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Clouse, Steven D.; Sasse, Jenneth M.

    1998-06-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are growth-promoting natural products found at low levels in pollen, seeds, and young vegetative tissues throughout the plant kingdom. Detailed studies of BR biosynthesis and metabolism, coupled with the recent identification of BR-insensitive and BR-deficient mutants, has greatly expanded our view of steroids as signals controlling plant growth and development. This review examines the microchemical and molecular genetic analyses that have provided convincing evidence for an essential role of BRs in diverse developmental programs, including cell expansion, vascular differentiation, etiolation, and reproductive development. Recent advances relevant to the molecular mechanisms of BR-regulated gene expression and BR signal transduction are also discussed.

  16. Dramatic growth of mice that develop from eggs microinjected with metallothionein–growth hormone fusion genes

    PubMed Central

    Palmiter, Richard D.; Brinster, Ralph L.; Hammer, Robert E.; Trumbauer, Myrna E.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.; Birnberg, Neal C.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    A DNA fragment containing the promoter of the mouse metallothionein-I gene fused to the structural gene of rat growth hormone was microinjected into the pronuclei of fertilized mouse eggs. Of 21 mice that developed from these eggs, seven carried the fusion gene and six of these grew significantly larger than their littermates. Several of these transgenic mice had extraordinarily high levels of the fusion mRNA in their liver and growth hormone in their serum. This approach has implications for studying the biological effects of growth hormone, as a way to accelerate animal growth, as a model for gigantism, as a means of correcting genetic disease, and as a method of farming valuable gene products. PMID:6958982

  17. Ethylene production throughout growth and development of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Peterson, Barbara V.; Stutte, Gary W.

    2004-01-01

    Ethylene production by 10 or 20 m2 stands of wheat, soybean, lettuce, potato, and tomato was monitored throughout growth and development in an atmospherically closed plant chamber. Chamber ethylene levels varied among species and rose during periods of canopy expansion and rapid growth for all species. Following this, ethylene levels either declined during seed fill and maturation for wheat and soybean, or remained relatively constant for potato and tomato (during flowering and early fruit development). Lettuce plants were harvested during rapid growth and peak ethylene production. Chamber ethylene levels increased rapidly during tomato ripening, reaching concentrations about 10 times that measured during vegetative growth. The highest ethylene production rates during vegetative growth ranged from 1.6 to 2.5 nmol m-2 d-1 during rapid growth of lettuce and wheat stands, or about 0.3 to 0.5 nmol g-1 fresh weight per hour. Estimates of stand ethylene production during tomato ripening showed that rates reached 43 nmol m-2 d-1 in one study and 93 nmol m-2 d-1 in a second study with higher lighting, or about 50x that of the rate during vegetative growth of tomato. In a related test with potato, the photoperiod was extended from 12 to 24 hours (continuous light) at 58 days after planting (to increase tuber yield), but this change in the environment caused a sharp increase in ethylene production from the basal rate of 0.4 to 6.2 nmol m-2 d-1. Following this, the photoperiod was changed back to 12 h at 61 days and ethylene levels decreased. The results suggest three separate categories of ethylene production were observed with whole stands of plants: 1) production during rapid vegetative growth, 2) production during climacteric fruit ripening, and 3) production from environmental stress.

  18. Ethylene production throughout growth and development of plants.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Raymond M; Peterson, Barbara V; Stutte, Gary W

    2004-12-01

    Ethylene production by 10 or 20 m2 stands of wheat, soybean, lettuce, potato, and tomato was monitored throughout growth and development in an atmospherically closed plant chamber. Chamber ethylene levels varied among species and rose during periods of canopy expansion and rapid growth for all species. Following this, ethylene levels either declined during seed fill and maturation for wheat and soybean, or remained relatively constant for potato and tomato (during flowering and early fruit development). Lettuce plants were harvested during rapid growth and peak ethylene production. Chamber ethylene levels increased rapidly during tomato ripening, reaching concentrations about 10 times that measured during vegetative growth. The highest ethylene production rates during vegetative growth ranged from 1.6 to 2.5 nmol m-2 d-1 during rapid growth of lettuce and wheat stands, or about 0.3 to 0.5 nmol g-1 fresh weight per hour. Estimates of stand ethylene production during tomato ripening showed that rates reached 43 nmol m-2 d-1 in one study and 93 nmol m-2 d-1 in a second study with higher lighting, or about 50x that of the rate during vegetative growth of tomato. In a related test with potato, the photoperiod was extended from 12 to 24 hours (continuous light) at 58 days after planting (to increase tuber yield), but this change in the environment caused a sharp increase in ethylene production from the basal rate of 0.4 to 6.2 nmol m-2 d-1. Following this, the photoperiod was changed back to 12 h at 61 days and ethylene levels decreased. The results suggest three separate categories of ethylene production were observed with whole stands of plants: 1) production during rapid vegetative growth, 2) production during climacteric fruit ripening, and 3) production from environmental stress.

  19. Ethylene production throughout growth and development of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Peterson, Barbara V.; Stutte, Gary W.

    2004-01-01

    Ethylene production by 10 or 20 m2 stands of wheat, soybean, lettuce, potato, and tomato was monitored throughout growth and development in an atmospherically closed plant chamber. Chamber ethylene levels varied among species and rose during periods of canopy expansion and rapid growth for all species. Following this, ethylene levels either declined during seed fill and maturation for wheat and soybean, or remained relatively constant for potato and tomato (during flowering and early fruit development). Lettuce plants were harvested during rapid growth and peak ethylene production. Chamber ethylene levels increased rapidly during tomato ripening, reaching concentrations about 10 times that measured during vegetative growth. The highest ethylene production rates during vegetative growth ranged from 1.6 to 2.5 nmol m-2 d-1 during rapid growth of lettuce and wheat stands, or about 0.3 to 0.5 nmol g-1 fresh weight per hour. Estimates of stand ethylene production during tomato ripening showed that rates reached 43 nmol m-2 d-1 in one study and 93 nmol m-2 d-1 in a second study with higher lighting, or about 50x that of the rate during vegetative growth of tomato. In a related test with potato, the photoperiod was extended from 12 to 24 hours (continuous light) at 58 days after planting (to increase tuber yield), but this change in the environment caused a sharp increase in ethylene production from the basal rate of 0.4 to 6.2 nmol m-2 d-1. Following this, the photoperiod was changed back to 12 h at 61 days and ethylene levels decreased. The results suggest three separate categories of ethylene production were observed with whole stands of plants: 1) production during rapid vegetative growth, 2) production during climacteric fruit ripening, and 3) production from environmental stress.

  20. The biomechanical basis of bone strength development during growth.

    PubMed

    Kontulainen, Saija A; Hughes, Julie M; Macdonald, Heather M; Johnston, James D

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the development of the material composition and structure of bone during growth, both key determinants of bone strength, and identifying factors that regulate the development of these properties are important for developing effective lifestyle interventions to optimize peak bone strength. New imaging technologies provide the ability to measure estimates of both the material composition and structure of bone, and thus, estimates of whole bone strength. During childhood and adolescence, bone structure is altered by growth in length and width, which is associated with increases in mass, and alterations in tissue density. These processes lead to a bone with an optimal size, shape, and architecture to withstand the normal physiological loads imposed on it. Longitudinal bone growth is the result of endochondral ossification, a process that continues throughout childhood and rapidly increases during the adolescent growth spurt. Along the shaft, long bones continually grow in width, thus improving the resistance to bending forces by depositing new bone on the periosteal surface with simultaneous resorption on the endocortical surface. Sexual dimorphism in periosteal bone formation and endosteal bone resorption result in sex-specific differences in adult bone conformation. Changes in linear and periosteal growth are closely tied to changes in bone mass, with approximately one quarter of adult total body bone mineral accrued during the 2 years around the adolescent growth spurt. These structural and material changes are under mechanical regulation and influenced by the hormonal environment. Overall, bones must continually adapt their geometry and mass to withstand loads from increases in bone length, muscle mass and external forces during growth. However, the tempo, timing, and extent of such adaptations are also closely regulated by several systemic hormones.

  1. Ihh signaling regulates mandibular symphysis development and growth.

    PubMed

    Sugito, H; Shibukawa, Y; Kinumatsu, T; Yasuda, T; Nagayama, M; Yamada, S; Minugh-Purvis, N; Pacifici, M; Koyama, E

    2011-05-01

    Symphyseal secondary cartilage is important for mandibular development, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its formation remain largely unknown. Here we asked whether Indian hedgehog (Ihh) regulates symphyseal cartilage development and growth. By embryonic days 16.5 to 18.5, Sox9-expressing chondrocytes formed within condensed Tgfβ-1/Runx2-expressing mesenchymal cells at the prospective symphyseal joint site, and established a growth-plate-like structure with distinct Ihh, collagen X, and osteopontin expression patterns. In post-natal life, mesenchymal cells expressing the Ihh receptor Patched1 were present anterior to the Ihh-expressing secondary cartilage, proliferated, differentiated into chondrocytes, and contributed to anterior growth of alveolar bone. In Ihh-null mice, however, symphyseal development was defective, mainly because of enhanced chondrocyte maturation and reduced proliferation of chondroprogenitor cells. Proliferation was partially restored in dual Ihh;Gli3 mutants, suggesting that Gli3 is normally a negative regulator of symphyseal development. Thus, Ihh signaling is essential for symphyseal cartilage development and anterior mandibular growth.

  2. Effect of young maternal age and skeletal growth on placental growth and development.

    PubMed

    Hayward, C E; Greenwood, S L; Sibley, C P; Baker, P N; Jones, R L

    2011-12-01

    Teenagers are susceptible to delivering small-for-gestational-age infants. Previous studies implicate continued skeletal growth as a contributory factor, and impaired placental development was the primary cause of fetal growth restriction in growing adolescent sheep. The aims of this study were to examine the impact of young maternal age and growth on placental development. Placentas were collected from 31 teenagers, of which 12 were growing and 17 non-growing based on knee height measurements. An adult control group (n = 12) was included. Placental weight and morphometric measurements of villous, syncytiotrophoblast, fibrin and vessel areas, as well as indices of proliferation and apoptosis, were analysed in relation to maternal growth and age. Growing teenagers had a higher birthweight:placental weight ratio than non-growing teenagers (p < 0.05). Villous area, syncytial area, fibrin content, vascularisation and cell turnover did not differ between growing and non-growing teenagers. There were no differences in placental weight or morphometry between adult and teenage pregnancies. Maternal smoking, a potential confounding factor, did not exert a major influence on the placental parameters examined, except for a stimulatory effect on placental proliferation (p < 0.05) and syncytial knot formation (p < 0.05). We were unable to detect any major differences in placental size or composition between growing and non-growing teenagers. Birthweight:placental weight ratio was higher in growing compared to non-growing teenagers. This suggests that maternal growth may affect placental function rather than development, and is consistent with our recent observations that maternal growth was not detrimental to fetal growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Population growth. Its magnitude and implications for development.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, N

    1984-09-01

    A summary of the 1984 World Development Report is provided. The 3 major points stressed in the report were: 1) rapid population growth adversely affects development, 2) governments must adopt policies to reduce fertility, and 3) policies adopted by many countries have effectively reduced fertility. World population growth began accelerating at 0.5%/year in the 18th century, and by 1950 the annual acceleration rate was 2%. Most of the increase in population size is occurring in less developed countries, and this increase is due in part to the recent decline in mortality experienced by these countries. Of the 80 million individuals who will be added to the world's population in 1984, 70 million will be in the developing countries. Since 1965 the population growth rate for developing countries as a group declined from 2.4% to 2%. However, because of the high proportion of younger aged individuals in developing countries, the decline in fertility is expected to level off. According to World Bank population projections, the world population will stabilize at around 11 billion in 2150. During the interium, the population of developing countries will increase from its present level of 3.6 billion to 8.4 billion, and the population of developed countries will increase from 1.2 billion to 1.4 billion. These projections are probably overly optimistic. The adverse impact on development of rapid population growth is due to several factors. 1st, resources which could be used for investment must instead be used to fulfill the consumption needs of an increased number of people. 2nd, increases in the labor force must be absorbed by the agricultural sector, and this reduces agricultural productivity. 3rd, rapid population growth increases management problems. The adaption of policies by governments to reduce fertility is a necessary step in halting population growth. For poor families, children provide economic security. Therefore, governments must act to improve the economic

  4. Game theoretical multi-agent modelling of coalition formation for multilateral trades

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.S.K.; Poon, A.S.Y.; Wu, F.F.

    1999-08-01

    In recent years, the electric utility industries world wide have been undergoing deregulation to introduce competitiveness in the generation, transmission , and distribution of electric power. The once centralized system planning and operation management must be remodelled to adapt to the new market structure. In particular, the trading mechanism needs to be totally revised as any party may get involved in this free-market, subject to the unavoidable constraints such as generation volumes, physical transmission means, and days-ahead scheduling. This paper presents a multi-agent model in conjunction with game theory to resolve the coalition formation for multilateral trades. The authors have implemented the model using the Java programming language and the JATLite/JAT0.3 agent development tools developed by Stanford University.

  5. Rural Oregon community perspectives: introducing community-based participatory research into a community health coalition.

    PubMed

    Young-Lorion, Julia; Davis, Melinda M; Kirks, Nancy; Hsu, Anna; Slater, Jana Kay; Rollins, Nancy; Aromaa, Susan; McGinnis, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Community Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP) model has supported community health development in more than 100 communities nationally. In 2011, four rural Oregon CHIPs collaborated with investigators from the Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN), a component of the Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute (OCTRI), to obtain training on research methods, develop and implement pilot research studies on childhood obesity, and explore matches with academic partners. This article summarizes the experiences of the Lincoln County CHIP, established in 2003, as it transitioned from CHIP to Community Health Improvement and Research Partnership (CHIRP). Our story and lessons learned may inform rural community-based health coalitions and academicians who are engaged in or considering Community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships. Utilizing existing infrastructure and relationships in community and academic settings provides an ideal starting point for rural, bidirectional research partnerships.

  6. The Cleveland–Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition: “We Have Evolved”

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, Morgan; Freedman, Darcy A.; Trapl, Erika S.; Borawski, Elaine A.

    2015-01-01

    Several pieces of legislation passed in Cleveland, Ohio, from 2007 to 2011, focused on improving the city’s food environment through urban agriculture initiatives. We used qualitative, case study methods, including interviews with 7 key informants, to examine the policy development process and investigate the role of the Cleveland–Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition in developing and implementing 4 pieces of legislation. In this article, we focus on 2 pieces of legislation: zoning designation of an urban garden and allowance of small farm animals and bees on residential property. Five key themes emerged: impetus for policy came from community needs; education and raising awareness helped mitigate barriers; a cultural shift took place among policy makers; social connections and individual champions were needed; and concerns over food access and health influenced policy decisions. Legislative actions are important tools to influence the nutrition environment, as long as they are based on local needs and context. PMID:26043301

  7. The Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition: "we have evolved".

    PubMed

    Walsh, Colleen C; Taggart, Morgan; Freedman, Darcy A; Trapl, Erika S; Borawski, Elaine A

    2015-06-04

    Several pieces of legislation passed in Cleveland, Ohio, from 2007 to 2011, focused on improving the city's food environment through urban agriculture initiatives. We used qualitative, case study methods, including interviews with 7 key informants, to examine the policy development process and investigate the role of the Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Food Policy Coalition in developing and implementing 4 pieces of legislation. In this article, we focus on 2 pieces of legislation: zoning designation of an urban garden and allowance of small farm animals and bees on residential property. Five key themes emerged: impetus for policy came from community needs; education and raising awareness helped mitigate barriers; a cultural shift took place among policy makers; social connections and individual champions were needed; and concerns over food access and health influenced policy decisions. Legislative actions are important tools to influence the nutrition environment, as long as they are based on local needs and context.

  8. Using Social Network Analysis to Predict Early Collaboration within Health Advocacy Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeycutt, Todd C.; Strong, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Within coalitions of consumer advocates formed to advance health insurance coverage expansions, engaging in united advocacy activities soon after formation might be an important precursor to attaining coalition effectiveness in shaping policy. In this article, the authors apply social network analysis (SNA) to examine how organizational…

  9. Changes in Capacity among Local Coordinated Community Response Coalitions (CCRs) Supported by the DELTA Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Pamela J.; Finkelstein, Daniel M.; Perez, Victoria E.; Rosenbach, Margo L.

    2010-01-01

    Coalitions are often the means through which communities plan and coordinate services for individuals and address larger environmental issues associated with social problems. Since 2003, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has supported local coordinated community response coalitions (CCRs) in 14 states to prevent intimate partner…

  10. The DELTA PREP Initiative" Accelerating Coalition Capacity for Intimate Partner Violence Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakocs, Ronda; Freire, Kimberley E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The DELTA PREP Project aimed to build the prevention capacity of 19 state domestic violence coalitions by offering eight supports designed to promote prevention integration over a 3-year period: modest grant awards, training events, technical assistance, action planning, coaching hubs, the Coalition Prevention Capacity Assessment, an…

  11. Project coalitions in healthcare construction projects and the application of real options: an exploratory survey.

    PubMed

    van Reedt Dortland, Maartje; Dewulf, Geert; Voordijk, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Exploring the impact of the type of project coalition on types of flexibility by analyzing considered and exercised flexibilities in separated and integrated project coalitions in the design and construction phase and the operations and maintenance phase of a healthcare construction project. Flexibility in healthcare construction projects is increasingly needed in order to deal with growing uncertainties. Until now, little research has been carried out on how and to what extent flexibility is incorporated in different types of project coalitions chosen by healthcare organizations. An exploratory survey was conducted among health organizations in both cure and care. Questions were asked on the position of the real estate department within the organization, the type of project coalitions chosen and the rationale behind this choice, and the extent to which flexibility in terms of a real option was considered and to what extent it had been exercised in a project coalition. Integrated project coalitions pay more attention to flexibility in advance in both the process and the product, but exercise them to a lesser extent than separated project coalitions. The economic feasibility of real options is higher in integrated project coalitions. The study shows that real options thinking is already incorporated in real estate management of healthcare organizations, although more flexibility is considered in advance of the project than is actually realized during and after construction. Built environment, construction, decision making, hospitals, planning.

  12. The Coalition that Supported the Smith-Hughes Act or a Case for Strange Bedfellows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillison, John

    1995-01-01

    A coalition led by the National Society for Promotion of Industrial Education gained passage of the Smith-Hughes Act in 1917, but natural antagonisms quickly dissolved it. The coalition included unions, manufacturers, professional educators, political parties, farmers' groups, and home economics groups. This diverse group's accomplishment is a…

  13. The DELTA PREP Initiative" Accelerating Coalition Capacity for Intimate Partner Violence Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakocs, Ronda; Freire, Kimberley E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The DELTA PREP Project aimed to build the prevention capacity of 19 state domestic violence coalitions by offering eight supports designed to promote prevention integration over a 3-year period: modest grant awards, training events, technical assistance, action planning, coaching hubs, the Coalition Prevention Capacity Assessment, an…

  14. Urban Educational Change: Building Trust and Alignment among Fragmented Coalitions of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Tricia J.; Finnigan, Kara S.

    2017-01-01

    This article is a historical case study of an attempt to build a citywide coalition in Rochester, NY. The coalition wanted to improve urban education by implementing community based wrap-around supports in a similar form as the well-respected Harlem Children's Zone. Our study found that groups had difficulty creating buy-in for this reform effort…

  15. ASAS centennial paper: animal growth and development research: historical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Etherton, T D

    2009-09-01

    From a historical perspective, it is difficult to identify a specific date that launched the field of endocrinology. One "biomarker" of the inception of endocrinology traces back to Ernest Henry Starling, who first introduced the word hormone in a talk given in 1905 at the Royal College of Physicians in London (Starling, 1905). A historical look at the field of endocrine regulation of animal growth since 1905 conveys that countless scientists worldwide worked to advance the scientific evidence base, which led to the commercial development of hormone-based products that enhanced growth and beneficially changed carcass composition of meat animals. This review will discuss some of seminal contributions that include the discovery of hormones (like ST and beta-adrenergic agonists) that have been shown to play key roles in regulating growth and nutrient partitioning of livestock, the mechanisms by which these hormones act, and the development of products for application in animal agriculture.

  16. Large area sheet task: Advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D.; Schruben, J.

    1981-01-01

    The growth of silicon dendritic web for photovoltaic applications was investigated. The application of a thermal model for calculating buckling stresses as a function of temperature profile in the web is discussed. Lid and shield concepts were evaluated to provide the data base for enhancing growth velocity. An experimental web growth machine which embodies in one unit the mechanical and electronic features developed in previous work was developed. In addition, evaluation of a melt level control system was begun, along with preliminary tests of an elongated crucible design. The economic analysis was also updated to incorporate some minor cost changes. The initial applications of the thermal model to a specific configuration gave results consistent with experimental observation in terms of the initiation of buckling vs. width for a given crystal thickness.

  17. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration

  18. Development of InAlAsSb growth by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocum, Michael; Forbes, David V.; Hillier, Glen C.; Smith, Brittany L.; Adams, Jessica G. J.; Hubbard, Seth M.

    2017-08-01

    The growth of InAlAsSb by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy has been demonstrated, with a controllable antimony fraction exceeding 6%. Calculations have shown that InAlAsSb with Sb contents greater than 5-7% in the quaternary are within the miscibility gap, however this work demonstrates specific growth conditions that allow compositions well within the miscibility gap. From a study of the growth of AlAsSb and an evaluation of two aluminum precursors (TMAl versus TTBAl), growth temperature, and V/III ratio, a foundation is developed to optimize the growth of InAlAsSb. By tailoring V/III ratio, growth conditions were found to achieve high crystalline content of both indium and antimony. InAlAsSb was grown on InP with antimony fractions from 32% to 48%, for which indium fraction varied from 10% to 19%, which provides an expected direct bandgap ranging from 1.75 to 1.98 eV.

  19. The dynamics of bone structure development during pubertal growth.

    PubMed

    Rauch, F

    2012-03-01

    The pubertal growth spurt is a time of rapid changes in bone length, mass and structure, followed by the cessation of longitudinal growth. The two best studied anatomical areas in this respect are the metaphyses and the diaphyses of peripheral long bones. A model is presented here in which the speed of longitudinal growth and the resulting age gradient in metaphyseal bone are key factors in explaining the high incidence of distal radius fractures during puberty. As growth in length accelerates, the age of the bone structural elements at a given distance to the growth plate decreases, leaving less time for cortical thickening through trabecular coalescence. This leads to a discrepancy between stagnant metaphyseal bone strength and increasing mechanical requirements in the case of accidents. In comparison to the metaphysis, diaphyseal bone develops more in line with the increasing mechanical requirements, presumably because the bone formation rates needed for diaphyseal growth in width are only a fraction of the apposition rates in the metaphysis. It remains largely unexplored how local and systemic signals are integrated to achieve site-specific changes in bone structure.

  20. When and why do territorial coalitions occur? Experimental evidence from a fiddler crab.

    PubMed

    Detto, Tanya; Jennions, Michael D; Backwell, Patricia R Y

    2010-05-01

    Neighboring territory owners are often less aggressive toward each other than to strangers ("dear enemy" effect). There is, however, little evidence for territorial defense coalitions whereby a neighbor will temporarily leave his/her own territory, enter that of a neighbor, and cooperate in repelling a conspecific intruder. This is surprising, as theoreticians have long posited the existence of such coalitions and the circumstances under which they should evolve. Here we document territorial defense coalitions in the African fiddler crab Uca annulipes, which lives in large colonies wherein each male defends a burrow and its surrounding area against neighbors and "floaters" (burrowless males). Fights between a resident and a floater sometimes involve another male who has left his territory to fight the floater challenging his neighbor. Using simple experiments, we provide the first evidence of the rules determining when territorial coalitions form. Our results support recent models that suggest that these coalitions arise from by-product mutualism.

  1. On the Perception of Newcomers: Toward an Evolved Psychology of Intergenerational Coalitions.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Aldo; Delton, Andrew W

    2010-06-01

    Human coalitions frequently persist through multiple, overlapping membership generations, requiring new members to cooperate and coordinate with veteran members. Does the mind contain psychological adaptations for interacting within these intergenerational coalitions? In this paper, we examine whether the mind spontaneously treats newcomers as a motivationally privileged category. Newcomers-though capable of benefiting coalitions-may also impose considerable costs (e.g., they may free ride on other members, they may be poor at completing group tasks). In three experiments we show (1) that the mind categorizes coalition members by tenure, including newcomers; (2) that tenure categorization persists in the presence of orthogonal and salient social dimensions; and (3) that newcomers elicit a pattern of impressions consistent with their probable ancestral costs. These results provide preliminary evidence for a specialized component of human coalitional psychology: an evolved concept of newcomer.

  2. Development and growth in synanthropic species: plasticity and constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj-Fišer, Simona; Čelik, Tatjana; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Šuen, Klavdija; Šiling, Rebeka; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2014-07-01

    Urbanization poses serious extinction risks, yet some species thrive in urban environments. This may be due to a pronounced developmental plasticity in these taxa, since phenotypically, plastic organisms may better adjust to unpredictable urban food resources. We studied phenotypic plasticity in Nuctenea umbratica, a common European forest and urban vegetation spider. We subjected spiderlings to low (LF), medium (MF) and high (HF) food treatments and documented their growth and developmental trajectories into adulthood. Spiders from the three treatments had comparable numbers of instars and growth ratios, but differed in developmental periods. Longest developing LF spiders (♀ = 390, ♂ = 320 days) had the smallest adults, but MF (♀ = 300, ♂ = 240 days) and HF (♀ = 240, ♂ = 210 days) spiders reached comparable adult sizes through shorter development. While males and females had comparable instar numbers, females had longer development, higher growth ratios, adult sizes and mass; and while males adjusted their moulting to food availability, female moulting depended on specific mass, not food treatment. We discussed the patterns of Nuctenea sex-specific development and compared our results with published data on two other Holarctic urban colonizers ( Larinioides sclopetarius, Zygiella x- notata) exhibiting high plasticity and fast generation turn-over. We conclude that despite relatively unconstrained developmental time in the laboratory enabling Nuctenea to achieve maximal mass and size—main female fitness proxies—their relatively fixed growth ratio and long generation turn-over may explain their lower success in urban environments.

  3. Economic Growth and Development in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acemoglu, Daron

    2013-01-01

    A central theme of this article is that economics instructors should spend more time teaching about economic growth and development at the undergraduate level because the topic is of interest to students, is less abstract than other macroeconomic topics, and is the focus of exciting research in economics. Facts and data can be presented to…

  4. Impact of Personal Growth Projects on Leadership Identity Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Summer F.; Boyd, Barry L.; Williams, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Within personal leadership education courses, leadership educators should include experiences which help students develop themselves as leaders. In this article, the authors discuss results from a qualitative research study involving the analysis of Personal Growth Project (PGP) assignments in a personal leadership education collegiate course. The…

  5. Economic Growth and Development in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acemoglu, Daron

    2013-01-01

    A central theme of this article is that economics instructors should spend more time teaching about economic growth and development at the undergraduate level because the topic is of interest to students, is less abstract than other macroeconomic topics, and is the focus of exciting research in economics. Facts and data can be presented to…

  6. Human Growth and Development: Educational and Professional Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Malachy; Boland, Elizabeth A.; Sheppard-Jones, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    The 2004 Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards were revised to include Human Growth and Development (HGD) as a knowledge domain. The HGD domain introduces a significant amount of new content to the curriculum, including several topics that have not traditionally appeared in the rehabilitation counselor educational curriculum. Thus,…

  7. Vocabulary Growth and Reading Development across the Elementary School Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, Ludo; van Leeuwe, Jan; Vermeer, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The associations between vocabulary growth and reading development were examined longitudinally for a representative sample of Dutch children throughout the elementary school period. Data on basic and advanced vocabulary, word decoding, and reading comprehension were collected across the different grades. The results showed significant progress on…

  8. Policy Analysis for Rural Development and Growth Management in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, John S.; Duff, Mary K.

    Providing a broad analysis of Colorado's rural problems, the body of this report enumerates rural development and growth management problems; describes remedies worth study; and suggests a policy making system. The Appendix presents supporting material, including comparative socioeconomic data on each Colorado county. Opportunities and threats…

  9. Human fetal growth and organ development: 50 years of discoveries.

    PubMed

    Pardi, Giorgio; Cetin, Irene

    2006-04-01

    Knowledge about human fetal growth and organ development has greatly developed in the last 50 years. Anatomists and physiologists had already described some crucial aspects, for example, the circulation of blood during intrauterine life through the fetal heart, the liver as well as the placenta. However, only in the last century physiologic studies were performed in animal models. In the human fetus, the introduction of ultrasound and Doppler velocimetry has provided data about the growth and development of the fetus and of the circulation through the different fetal districts. Moreover, in the last 2 decades we have learned about fetal oxygenation and fetal nutrient supply caused by the availability of fetal blood samples obtained under relatively steady state conditions. These studies, together with studies using stable isotope methodologies, have clarified some aspects of the supply of the major nutrients for the fetus such as glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids. At the same time, the relevance of placental function has been recognized as a major determinant of fetal diseases leading to intrauterine growth restriction. More recently, the availability of new tools such as 3-dimensional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, have made possible the evaluation of the growth and development of fetal organs. This knowledge in the healthy fetus will improve the ability of clinicians to recognize abnormal phenotypes of the different fetal organs, thus allowing to stage fetal diseases.

  10. Population Growth and Costs of Education in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chau, Ta Ngoc; And Others

    The study reported in this document attempted to determine the effect of population growth on education costs in developing countries, given various assumptions as to the future trend of fertility and mortality. The population factor was examined along with other factors influencing educational costs, such as the improvement of enrollment ratios,…

  11. Growth of a species, an association, a science: 80 years of growth and development research.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Richard J; Duren, Dana L

    2013-01-01

    Physical anthropological research was codified in the United States with the creation of the American Association of Physical Anthropology (AAPA) in 1929. That same year, a study began in yellow springs, Ohio, with a goal of identifying "what makes people different." The approach used to answer that question was to study the growth and development of Homo sapiens. The resulting study, the Fels Longitudinal Study, is currently the longest continuous study of human growth and development in the world. Although the AAPA and the Fels Longitudinal Study have existed as separate entities for more than 80 years now, it is not surprising, given the relationship between anatomical and developmental research, there has been considerable overlap between the two. As the field of physical anthropology has blossomed to include subdisciplines such as forensics, genetics, primatology, as well as sophisticated statistical methodologies, the importance of growth and development research has escalated. Although current Fels Longitudinal Study research is largely directed at biomedical questions, virtually all findings are relevant to physical anthropology, providing insights into basic biological processes and life history parameters. Some key milestones from the early years of the AAPA and the Fels Longitudinal Study are highlighted here that address growth and development research in physical anthropology. These are still held as fundamental concepts that underscore the importance of this line of inquiry, not only across the subdisciplines of physical anthropology, but also among anthropological, biological, and biomedical inquiries.

  12. Simulating unstressed crop development and growth using the Unified Plant Growth Model (UPGM)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since development of the EPIC model in 1989, many versions of the plant growth component have been incorporated into other erosion and crop management models and subsequently modified to meet model objectives (e.g., WEPS, WEPP, SWAT, ALMANAC, GPFARM). This has resulted in different versions of the ...

  13. Growth of a Species, an Association, a Science: 80 Years of Growth and Development Research

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Richard J.; Duren, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    Physical anthropological research was codified in the United States with the creation of the American Association of Physical Anthropology (AAPA) in 1929. That same year, a study began in yellow springs, Ohio, with a goal of identifying “what makes people different.” The approach used to answer that question was to study the growth and development of Homo sapiens. The resulting study, the Fels Longitudinal Study, is currently the longest continuous study of human growth and development in the world. Although the AAPA and the Fels Longitudinal Study have existed as separate entities for more than 80 years now, it is not surprising, given the relationship between anatomical and developmental research, there has been considerable overlap between the two. As the field of physical anthropology has blossomed to include subdisciplines such as forensics, genetics, primatology, as well as sophisticated statistical methodologies, the importance of growth and development research has escalated. Although current Fels Longitudinal Study research is largely directed at biomedical questions, virtually all findings are relevant to physical anthropology, providing insights into basic biological processes and life history parameters. Some key milestones from the early years of the AAPA and the Fels Longitudinal Study are highlighted here that address growth and development research in physical anthropology. These are still held as fundamental concepts that underscore the importance of this line of inquiry, not only across the subdisciplines of physical anthropology, but also among anthropological, biological, and biomedical inquiries. PMID:23283658

  14. [Evaluation of growth and development of institutionalized children].

    PubMed

    Chaves, Caroline Magna Pessoa; Lima, Francisca Elisângela Teixeira; Mendonça, Larissa Bento de Araújo; Custódio, Ires Lopes; Matias, Erica Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the growth and development of institutionalized children from 0-6 years old. It had a descriptive, transversal and quantitative approach, and was held in a shelter from the Bureau of Labor and Social Development of the Government of the State of Ceará, in the months of March and April 2011. The sample comprised 44 children. It the sample prevailed male children (59.1%), aged 24 to 72 months (56.8%) and with time of sheltering more than one year (72.7%). It was found that the children were in the normal range of nutrition; however, 65.9% of children did not achieve at least one of the development milestones proposed by the Ministry of Health. The study suggests a reflection on how children living in shelters are being assisted by the health team, making it necessary follow up their growth and development, in order to intervene on the alterations.

  15. Eider females form non-kin brood-rearing coalitions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ost, M.; Vitikainen, E.; Waldeck, P.; Sundstrom, L.; Lindstrom, K.; Hollmen, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Kilpi, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    Kin selection is a powerful tool for understanding cooperation among individuals, yet its role as the sole explanation of cooperative societies has recently been challenged on empirical grounds. These studies suggest that direct benefits of cooperation are often overlooked, and that partner choice may be a widespread mechanism of cooperation. Female eider ducks (Somateria mollissima) may rear broods alone, or they may pool their broods and share brood-rearing. Females are philopatric, and it has been suggested that colonies may largely consist of related females, which could promote interactions among relatives. Alternatively, shared brood care could be random with respect to relatedness, either because brood amalgamations are accidental and nonadaptive, or through group augmentation, assuming that the fitness of all group members increases with group size. We tested these alternatives by measuring the relatedness of co-tending eider females in enduring coalitions with microsatellite markers. Females formed enduring brood-rearing coalitions with each other at random with respect to relatedness. However, based on previous data, partner choice is nonrandom and dependent on female body condition. We discuss potential mechanisms underlying eider communal brood-rearing decisions, which may be driven by the specific ecological conditions under which sociality has evolved in this species.

  16. Dynamic and adaptive policy models for coalition operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Dinesh; Calo, Seraphin; Chakraborty, Supriyo; Bertino, Elisa; Williams, Chris; Tucker, Jeremy; Rivera, Brian; de Mel, Geeth R.

    2017-05-01

    It is envisioned that the success of future military operations depends on the better integration, organizationally and operationally, among allies, coalition members, inter-agency partners, and so forth. However, this leads to a challenging and complex environment where the heterogeneity and dynamism in the operating environment intertwines with the evolving situational factors that affect the decision-making life cycle of the war fighter. Therefore, the users in such environments need secure, accessible, and resilient information infrastructures where policy-based mechanisms adopt the behaviours of the systems to meet end user goals. By specifying and enforcing a policy based model and framework for operations and security which accommodates heterogeneous coalitions, high levels of agility can be enabled to allow rapid assembly and restructuring of system and information resources. However, current prevalent policy models (e.g., rule based event-condition-action model and its variants) are not sufficient to deal with the highly dynamic and plausibly non-deterministic nature of these environments. Therefore, to address the above challenges, in this paper, we present a new approach for policies which enables managed systems to take more autonomic decisions regarding their operations.

  17. Reframing coalitions as systems interventions: a network study exploring the contribution of a youth violence prevention coalition to broader system capacity.

    PubMed

    Bess, Kimberly D

    2015-06-01

    This longitudinal research conceptualizes community coalitions as events in local intervention systems (Hawe et al. in Am J Commun Psychol 43(3-4):267-276, 2009). It explores the potential contribution coalitions make, through the collaborative activities of their members, to the broader intervention systems in which they are embedded. Using social network analysis, it examines patterns of structural change in a network of 99 organizations focused on youth violence prevention (YVP) over a 5-year period in which 30 of the 99 organizations were involved in a local YVP Coalition. Both longitudinal modeling and cross sectional analyses are used to examine change in system capacity-strong interorganizational networks-related to patterns of network density, centralization, and hierarchy. Somewhat surprisingly, the study found that capacity in the broader YVP Intervention System actually diminished during the 5-year period of the coalition's operation, though part of the system-the sub-network that made up the YVP Coalition-was marginally strengthened. In this case, therefore, the evidence suggests that power and relational resources in the broader YVP Intervention System were redistributed. The article explores how the definition of capacity related to density and hierarchy may be contextually dependent. Implications for the role of coalitions in building system capacity are discussed.

  18. Growth, Characterization and Device Development in Monocrystalline Diamond Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    AD-A256 283 Quarterly Letter Report Growth, Characterization and Device Development in Monocrystalline Diamond Films DT C * F LEC EGOT 2 1992L... Characterization and Device Development in s400003srrO8 Monocrystalline Diamond Films 1114SS 6. AUTHOR(S) N00179N66005 Robert F. Davis 4B855 7. PERFORMING...deposited on single crystal Si(100) substrates via in-situ carburization followed by bias-enhanced nucleation. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy

  19. Promoting Infant Development: A Coalition Model for Community Service Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badger, Earladeen; Burns, Donna

    United Services for Effective Parenting (USEP), a program coordinating agency in Ohio, was begun in 1974 as an advocacy group for infants, their families, and the program providers who served them. Staff from health care, education, and social service agencies met informally because of common problems. A formal organization was established when it…

  20. Redefining Individual Growth and Development Indicators: Phonological Awareness.

    PubMed

    Wackerle-Hollman, Alisha K; Schmitt, Braden A; Bradfield, Tracy A; Rodriguez, Michael C; McConnell, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    Learning to read is one of the most important indicators of academic achievement. The development of early literacy skills during the preschool years is associated with improved reading outcomes in later grades. One of these skill areas, phonological awareness, shows particular importance because of its strong link to later reading success. Presented here are two studies that describe the development and revision of four measures of phonological awareness skills: Individual Growth and Development Indicators Sound Blending, Syllable Sameness, Rhyming, and Alliteration 2.0. The authors discuss the measure development process, revision, and utility within an early childhood Response to Intervention framework. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  1. Imprinted gene expression in fetal growth and development.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, L; Marsit, C J; Sharma, P; Maccani, M; Ma, Y; Hu, J; Chen, J

    2012-06-01

    Experimental studies showed that genomic imprinting is fundamental in fetoplacental development by timely regulating the expression of the imprinted genes to overlook a set of events determining placenta implantation, growth and embryogenesis. We examined the expression profile of 22 imprinted genes which have been linked to pregnancy abnormalities that may ultimately influence childhood development. The study was conducted in a subset of 106 placenta samples, overrepresented with small and large for gestational age cases, from the Rhode Island Child Health Study. We investigated associations between imprinted gene expression and three fetal development parameters: newborn head circumference, birth weight, and size for gestational age. Results from our investigation show that the maternally imprinted/paternally expressed gene ZNF331 inversely associates with each parameter to drive smaller fetal size, while paternally imprinted/maternally expressed gene SLC22A18 directly associates with the newborn head circumference promoting growth. Multidimensional Scaling analysis revealed two clusters within the 22 imprinted genes which are independently associated with fetoplacental development. Our data suggest that cluster 1 genes work by assuring cell growth and tissue development, while cluster 2 genes act by coordinating these processes. Results from this epidemiologic study offer solid support for the key role of imprinting in fetoplacental development.

  2. Mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.; Myers, P. N.

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce the chapter with a discussion of lessons from nature, agriculture, and landscapes; terms and definitions; and an historical perspective of mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development. Topics include developmental responses to mechanical stress; mechanical stress-environment interactions; metabolic, productivity, and compositional changes; hormonal involvement; mechanoperception and early transduction mechanisms; applications in agriculture; and research implications. The discussion of hormonal involvement in mechanical stress physiology includes ethylene, auxin, gibberellins, and other phytohormones. The discussion of applications in agriculture examines windbreaks, nursery practices, height control and conditioning, and enhancement of growth and productivity. Implications for research are related to handling plant materials, space biology, and future research needs.

  3. Mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.; Myers, P. N.

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce the chapter with a discussion of lessons from nature, agriculture, and landscapes; terms and definitions; and an historical perspective of mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development. Topics include developmental responses to mechanical stress; mechanical stress-environment interactions; metabolic, productivity, and compositional changes; hormonal involvement; mechanoperception and early transduction mechanisms; applications in agriculture; and research implications. The discussion of hormonal involvement in mechanical stress physiology includes ethylene, auxin, gibberellins, and other phytohormones. The discussion of applications in agriculture examines windbreaks, nursery practices, height control and conditioning, and enhancement of growth and productivity. Implications for research are related to handling plant materials, space biology, and future research needs.

  4. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M

    2007-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) are expressed in the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme of the developing kidney. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that exogenous fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) increase growth and maturation of the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. Deletion of fgf7, fgf10, and fgfr2IIIb (the receptor isoform that binds Fgf7 and Fgf10) in mice lead to smaller kidneys with fewer collecting ducts and nephrons. Overexpression of a dominant negative receptor isoform in transgenic mice has revealed more striking defects including renal aplasia or severe dysplasia. Moreover, deletion of many fgf ligands and receptors in mice results in early embryonic lethality, making it difficult to determine their roles in kidney development. Recently, conditional targeting approaches revealed that deletion of fgf8 from the metanephric mesenchyme interrupts nephron formation. Furthermore, deletion of fgfr2 from the ureteric bud resulted in both ureteric bud branching and stromal mesenchymal patterning defects. Deletion of both fgfr1 and fgfr2 in the metanephric mesenchyme resulted in renal aplasia, characterized by defects in metanephric mesenchyme formation and initial ureteric bud elongation and branching. Thus, Fgfr signaling is critical for growth and patterning of all renal lineages at early and later stages of kidney development.

  5. Coalitions of things: supporting ISR tasks via internet of things approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Taylor, Ian; Dawson, Andrew; Braines, Dave; O'Leary, Nick; Thomas, Anna; Tomsett, Richard; La Porta, Tom; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Zaroukian, Erin

    2017-05-01

    In the wake of rapid maturing of Internet of Things (IoT) approaches and technologies in the commercial sector, the IoT is increasingly seen as a key `disruptive' technology in military environments. Future operational environments are expected to be characterized by a lower proportion of human participants and a higher proportion of autonomous and semi-autonomous devices. This view is reflected in both US `third offset' and UK `information age' thinking and is likely to have a profound effect on how multinational coalition operations are conducted in the future. Much of the initial consideration of IoT adoption in the military domain has rightly focused on security concerns, reflecting similar cautions in the early era of electronic commerce. As IoT approaches mature, this initial technical focus is likely to shift to considerations of interactivity and policy. In this paper, rather than considering the broader range of IoT applications in the military context, we focus on roles for IoT concepts and devices in future intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) tasks, drawing on experience in sensor-mission resourcing and human-computer collaboration (HCC) for ISR. We highlight the importance of low training overheads in the adoption of IoT approaches, and the need to balance proactivity and interactivity (push vs pull modes). As with sensing systems over the last decade, we emphasize that, to be valuable in ISR tasks, IoT devices will need a degree of mission-awareness in addition to an ability to self-manage their limited resources (power, memory, bandwidth, computation, etc). In coalition operations, the management and potential sharing of IoT devices and systems among partners (e.g., in cross-coalition tactical-edge ISR teams) becomes a key issue due heterogeneous factors such as language, policy, procedure and doctrine. Finally, we briefly outline a platform that we have developed in order to experiment with human-IoT teaming on ISR tasks, in both

  6. Control of root growth and development by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relatively simple molecules that exist within cells growing in aerobic conditions. ROS were originally associated with oxidative stress and seen as highly reactive molecules that are injurious to many cell components. More recently, however, the function of ROS as signal molecules in many plant cellular processes has become more evident. One of the most important functions of ROS is their role as a plant growth regulator. For example, ROS are key molecules in regulating plant root development, and as such, are comparable to plant hormones. In this review, the molecular mechanisms of ROS that are mainly associated with plant root growth are discussed. The molecular links between root growth regulation by ROS and other signals will also be briefly discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional genomics of root growth and development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali; Simpson, June; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Benfey, Philip N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Roots are vital for the uptake of water and nutrients, and for anchorage in the soil. They are highly plastic, able to adapt developmentally and physiologically to changing environmental conditions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind this growth and development requires knowledge of root transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics. Genomics approaches, including the recent publication of a root expression map, root proteome, and environment-specific root expression studies, are uncovering complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional networks underlying root development. The challenge is in further capitalizing on the information in these datasets to understand the fundamental principles of root growth and development. In this review, we highlight progress researchers have made toward this goal. PMID:19117793

  8. [Growth and development of fruit and seed of Panax quinquefolium].

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaolei; Li, Xian'en; Guo, Qiaosheng

    2012-08-01

    To understand the embryo after-ripening phenomenon of Panax quinquefolium, the growth and development process of fruit and seed was investigated in this study. The growth and development characteristics of fruit and seed were obtained by field observation, the morphological changes were measured with a vernier caliper, paraffin section was used as well. The plant reached the most flowering numbers in 5-8 d after initial blooming time and the lag phase of embryo occurred in about 70 d. The size, fresh and dry weight of fruit and seed were all reached maximum in fruit maturation period. As the result showed, the development of seed was stopped at torpedo form of embryos, this conclusion can be applied to explore the morphological after-ripening mechanism of P. quinquefolium seed.

  9. Vapor crystal growth technology development: Application to cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, Michael; Duval, Walter M. B.

    1991-01-01

    Growth of bulk crystals by physical vapor transport was developed and applied to cadmium telluride. The technology makes use of effusive ampoules, in which part of the vapor contents escapes to a vacuum shroud through defined leaks during the growth process. This approach has the advantage over traditional sealed ampoule techniques that impurity vapors and excess vapor constituents are continuously removed from the vicinity of the growing crystal. Thus, growth rates are obtained routinely at magnitudes that are rather difficult to achieve in closed ampoules. Other advantages of this effusive ampoule physical vapor transport (EAPVT) technique include the predetermination of transport rates based on simple fluid dynamics and engineering considerations, and the growth of the crystal from close to congruent vapors, which largely alleviates the compositional nonuniformities resulting from buoyancy driven convective transport. After concisely reviewing earlier work on improving transport rates, nucleation control, and minimization of crystal wall interactions in vapor crystal growth, a detail account is given of the largely computer controlled EAPVT experimentation.

  10. Role of various cytokines and growth factors in pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Krista; Hanks, Lynae J; Alvarez, Jessica A

    2010-01-01

    Historical data suggest that body composition is intricately involved in pubertal development. Progression through puberty is dependent on the interaction between the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 (GH-IGF-1) axis, reproductive and metabolic hormones as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines which induce alterations in feedback mechanisms and therefore mediate body composition and growth. Simultaneous increases in GH and IGF-1, and the concomitant changes in the hormonal milieu (i.e. reproductive hormones, testosterone and estrogen, and insulin)are the major contributors to anabolic effects seen throughout the pubertal transition, and are affected by various factors including (but not limited to) energy status and body composition. Orexigenic agents (i.e. ghrelin and leptin) also play a role at the level of the hypothalamus affecting not only energy intake, but also pubertal onset and progression. Effects of cytokines, many of which may be considered catabolic, extend beyond their traditionally viewed role involving the immune system, accompanying reproductive maturity further regulating aspects of energy and bone metabolism. As such, the signal(s) initiating the hypothalamic response that triggers puberty is likely reliant on a number of neural, metabolic and endocrine networks, all of which are at least partially influenced by pubertal growth factors, and act independently, antagonistically and/or synergistically to regulate anabolic pathways, therefore modifying body composition trajectory and growth during adolescence.

  11. Tobacco Control and Health Advocacy in the European Union: Understanding Effective Coalition-Building.

    PubMed

    Weishaar, Heide; Collin, Jeff; Amos, Amanda

    2016-02-01

    Coalitions of supporters of comprehensive tobacco control policy have been crucial in achieving policy success nationally and internationally, but the dynamics of such alliances are not well understood. Qualitative semi-structured, narrative interviews with 35 stakeholders involved in developing the European Council Recommendation on smoke-free environments. These were thematically analyzed to examine the dynamics of coalition-building, collaboration and leadership in the alliance of organizations which successfully called for the development of comprehensive European Union (EU) smoke-free policy. An alliance of tobacco control and public health advocacy organizations, scientific institutions, professional bodies, pharmaceutical companies, and other actors shared the goal of fighting the harms caused by second-hand smoke. Alliance members jointly called for comprehensive EU smoke-free policy and the protection of the political debates from tobacco industry interference. The alliance's success was enabled by a core group of national and European actors with long-standing experience in tobacco control, who facilitated consensus-building, mobilized allies and synchronized the actions of policy supporters. Representatives of Brussels-based organizations emerged as crucial strategic leaders. The insights gained and identification of key enablers of successful tobacco control advocacy highlight the strategic importance of investing into tobacco control at European level. Those interested in effective health policy can apply lessons learned from EU smoke-free policy to build effective alliances in tobacco control and other areas of public health. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.

  12. The role of growth hormone in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Waters, M J; Kaye, P L

    2002-06-01

    Studies across several species, particularly the mouse, show that growth hormone (GH, somatotrophin) is an important determinant of litter size, and to a lesser extent, of birth length. GH acts at all stages of development, from ovulation through preimplantation development to the late fetus, with actions on both embryo/fetus and mother contributing to successful fetal development. The fact that these are not more obvious in vivo is likely a result of redundancy of cytokine hormone action, particularly in relation to prolactin, which shares common actions and receptor locations with GH.

  13. A critical evaluation of subtalar joint arthrosis associated with middle facet talocalcaneal coalition in 21 surgically managed patients: a retrospective computed tomography review. Investigations involving middle facet coalitions-part III.

    PubMed

    Kernbach, Klaus J; Barkan, Howard; Blitz, Neal M

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition is frequently associated with rearfoot arthrosis that is often managed surgically with rearfoot fusion. However, no objective method for classifying the extent of subtalar joint arthrosis exists. No study has clearly identified the extent of posterior facet arthrosis present in a large cohort treated surgically for talocalcaneal coalition through preoperative computerized axial tomography. The authors conducted a retrospective review of 21 patients (35 feet) with coalition who were surgically treated over a 12-year period for coalition on at least 1 foot. Using a predefined original staging system, the extent of the arthrosis was categorized into normal or mild (Stage I), moderate (Stage II), and severe (Stage III) arthrosis. The association of stage and age is statistically significant. All of the feet with Stage III arthrosis had fibrous coalitions. No foot with osseous coalition had Stage III arthrosis. The distribution of arthrosis staging differs between fibrous and osseous coalitions. Only fibrous coalitions had the most advanced arthrosis (Stage III), whereas osseous coalitions did not. This suggests that osseous coalitions may have a protective effect in the prevention of severe degeneration of the subtalar joint. Concomitant subtalar joint arthrosis severity progresses with age; surgeons may want to consider earlier surgical intervention to prevent arthrosis progression in patients with symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition.

  14. Effect of lighting conditions on zebrafish growth and development.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Natalia; Vera, Luisa María; Foulkes, Nicholas Simon; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2014-04-01

    In the underwater environment, the properties of light (intensity and spectrum) change rapidly with depth and water quality. In this article, we have described how and to what extent lighting conditions can influence the development, growth, and survival of zebrafish. Fertilized eggs and the corresponding larvae were exposed to different visible light wavelengths (violet, blue, green, yellow, red, and white) in a 12-h light-12-h dark (LD) cycle until 30 days posthatching (dph), when the expression of morphometric parameters and growth (igf1a, igf2a)- and stress-related (crh and pomca) genes were examined. Another group of larvae was raised under constant darkness (DD) until 5 or 10 dph, after which they were transferred to a LD of white light. A third group remained under DD to investigate the effects of light deprivation upon zebrafish development. The results revealed that the hatching rate was highest under blue and violet light, while total length at 30 dph was greatest under blue, white, and violet light. Red light led to reduced feeding activity and poor survival (100% mortality). Larvae raised under constant white light (LL) showed a higher proportion of malformations, as did larvae raised under LD violet light. The expression of growth and stress factors was upregulated in the violet (igf1a, igf2a, pomca, and chr) and blue (igf2a) groups, which is consistent with the higher growth recorded and the higher proportion of malformations detected under the violet light. All larvae kept under DD died before 18 dph, but the survival rates improved in larvae transferred to LD at 5 dph and at 10 dph. In summary, these findings revealed that lighting conditions are crucial factors influencing zebrafish larval development and growth.

  15. Does Development Make You Happy? Subjective Well-Being and Economic Growth in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The evidence for any relationship between GDP/capita growth and growth in subjective wellbeing (SWB) in wealthier countries is disputed, at best. However, there are a number of reasons commonly articulated for thinking the relationship should be stronger in less developed countries (LDCs). This paper looks at both reasons for expecting the…

  16. Does Development Make You Happy? Subjective Well-Being and Economic Growth in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The evidence for any relationship between GDP/capita growth and growth in subjective wellbeing (SWB) in wealthier countries is disputed, at best. However, there are a number of reasons commonly articulated for thinking the relationship should be stronger in less developed countries (LDCs). This paper looks at both reasons for expecting the…

  17. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M

    2011-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) are expressed throughout the developing kidney. Several early studies have shown that exogenous fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) affect growth and maturation of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) and ureteric bud (UB). Transgenic mice that over-express a dominant negative receptor isoform develop renal aplasia/severe dysplasia, confirming the importance of Fgfrs in renal development. Furthermore, global deletion of Fgf7, Fgf10, and Fgfr2IIIb (isoform that binds Fgf7 and Fgf10) in mice leads to small kidneys with fewer collecting ducts and nephrons. Deletion of Fgfrl1, a receptor lacking intracellular signaling domains, causes severe renal dysgenesis. Conditional targeting of Fgf8 from the MM interrupts nephron formation. Deletion of Fgfr2 from the UB results in severe ureteric branching and stromal mesenchymal defects, although loss of Frs2α (major signaling adapter for Fgfrs) in the UB causes only mild renal hypoplasia. Deletion of both Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 in the MM results in renal aplasia with defects in MM formation and initial UB elongation and branching. Loss of Fgfr2 in the MM leads to many renal and urinary tract anomalies as well as vesicoureteral reflux. Thus, Fgfr signaling is critical for patterning of virtually all renal lineages at early and later stages of development.

  18. Triennial Growth Symposium--A role for vitamin D in skeletal muscle development and growth.

    PubMed

    Starkey, J D

    2014-03-01

    Although well known for its role in bone development and mineral homeostasis, there is emerging evidence that vitamin D is capable of functioning as a regulator of skeletal muscle development and hypertrophic growth. This review will focus on the relatively limited body of evidence regarding the impact of vitamin D on prenatal development and postnatal growth of skeletal muscle in meat animal species. Recent evidence indicating that improvement of maternal vitamin D status through dietary 25-hydroxycholecalciferol supplementation can positively affect fetal skeletal muscle fiber number and myoblast activity in swine as well as work demonstrating that posthatch vitamin D status enhancement stimulates a satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle hypertrophy response in broiler chickens is discussed. The relative lack of information regarding how and when to best supply dietary vitamin D to promote optimal prenatal development and postnatal growth of skeletal muscle provides an exciting field of research. Expansion of knowledge in this area will ultimately improve our ability to efficiently and effectively produce the livestock required to meet the increasing worldwide demand for meat products.

  19. Participation in sports in relation to adolescent growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kelly A.; Darmawan, Daphne

    2017-01-01

    Puberty is defined by physical growth, development of secondary sexual characteristics, and maturation of psychosocial skills. The initiation and rate of progression of pubertal events varies among adolescents, but pubertal changes occur in a predictable stepwise manner. Factors including individual differences in physical and psychosocial development, stage of development based on age (early, middle, and late), and the rate of pubertal development, may all contribute to the way in which adolescents experience sports activities. During adolescence, gender differences also become more apparent and may significantly impact sports participation. As practitioners evaluate overall development and adolescent readiness for sports participation, they should consider the different areas of development including: somatic, neurologic, cognitive, psychosocial-function in an integrated and interdependent approach. PMID:28795005

  20. Evolution of fairness and coalition formation in three-person ultimatum games.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Okada, Akira; Shirata, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-07

    We consider the evolution of fairness and coalition formation in a three-person ultimatum game in which the coalition value depends on its size. Traditional game theory, which assumes selfish and rational players, predicts the largest and efficient coalition with a proposer exploiting most of the total value. In a stochastic evolutionary model (the frequency-dependent Moran process with mutations) where players make errors in estimating the payoffs and strategies of others, evolutionary selection favors the formation of a two-person subcoalition under weak selection and in the low mutation limit if and only if its coalition value exceeds a high proportion (0.7) of that of the largest coalition. Proposers offer 30-35% of the subcoalition value to a coalition member, excluding a non-member. Multilateral bargaining is critically different from the bilateral one. Coalition-forming behavior may cause economic inefficiency and social exclusion. Stochastic evolutionary game theory thus provides theoretical support to explain the behavior of human subjects in economic experiments of a three-person ultimatum game. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.